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Sample records for intact soil-core microcosms

  1. Intact soil-core microcosms for evaluating the fate and ecological impact of the release of genetically engineered microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Van Voris, P.; Li, S.W. ); Bentjen, S.A. )

    1989-01-01

    Intact soil-core microcosms were studied to determine their applicability for evaluating the transport, survival, and potential ecosystem effects of genetically engineered microorganisms before they are released into the environment. Soil-core microcosms were planted with wheat and maize seeds and inoculated with Azospirillum lipoferum SpBr17 and SpRG20a Tn5 mutants, respectively. Microcosm leachate, rhizosphere soil, plant endorhizosphere, insects, and xylem exudate were sampled for A. lipoferum Tn5 mutant populations. A. lipoferum TN5 populations, determined by most-probable-number technique-DNA hybridization, varied from bellow detection to 10{sup 6} g of dry root{sup {minus}1} in the rhizosphere, with smaller populations detected in the endorhizosphere. Intact soil-core microcosms were found to maintain some of the complexities of the natural ecosystem and should be particularly useful for initial evaluations of the fate of plant-associated genetically engineered bacteria.

  2. Hydrocarbon biodegradation kinetics in an intact unsaturated zone soil core

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.E.; Ostendorf, D.W.; Richards, R.J.; Goodwin, S.

    1995-12-31

    Aerobic biodegradation of vapor-phase petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated in an intact soil core from the site of an aviation gasoline release. A mid-depth unsaturated zone soil core was subjected to a flow of nitrogen gas, oxygen, water vapor, and vapor-phase hydrocarbons in a configuration analogous to a biofilter or an in situ bioventing or sparging situation. The vertical profiles of vapor-phase hydrocarbon concentration in the soil core were determined by gas chromatography of vapor samples. Steady-state concentrations were input to a simple analytical model balancing advection and first-order biodegradation of hydrocarbons. First-order rate constants for each major hydrocarbon compound were used to calibrate the model to the concentration profiles. Compounds with lower molecular weights, fewer methyl groups, and no quaternary carbons tended to have higher rate constants. The first-order rate constants were consistent with kinetic parameters determined from microcosm studies at the same field site, suggesting that both estimation methods were effective.

  3. Petroleum hydrocarbon bioventing kinetics determined in soil core, microcosm, and tubing cluster studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.E.; Ostendorf, D.W.; Richards, R.J.; Goodwin, S.

    1996-05-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of vapor-phase petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated in an intact soil core from the site of an aviation gasoline release. An unsaturated zone soil core was subjected to a flow of nitrogen gas, oxygen, water vapor, and vapor-phase hydrocarbons in a configuration analogous to a biofilter or an in situ bioventing or sparging situation. The vertical profiles of vapor-phase hydrocarbon concentration in the soil core were determined by gas chromatography of vapor samples. Biodegradation reduced low influent hydrocarbon concentrations by 45 to 92% over a 0.6-m interval of an intact soil core. The estimated total hydrocarbon concentration was reduced by 75% from 26 to 7 parts per million. Steady-state concentrations were input to a simple analytical model balancing advection and first-order biodegradation of hydrocarbons. First-order rate constants for the major hydrocarbon compounds were used to calibrate the model to the concentration profiles. Rate constants for the seven individual hydrocarbon compounds varied by a factor of 4. Compounds with lower molecular weights, fewer methyl groups, and no quaternary carbons tended to have higher rate constants. The first-order rate constants were consistent with kinetic parameters determined from both microcosm and tubing cluster studies at the field site.

  4. Field calibration of soil-core microcosms for evaluating fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H Jr; Fredrickson, J K; Bentjen, S A; Workman, D J; Li, S W; Thomas, J M

    1991-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory compared intact soil-core microcosms and the field for ecosystem structural and functional properties after the introduction of a model genetically engineered microorganism (GEM). This project used two distinct microbial types as model GEMs, Gram-negative Pseudomonas sp. RC1, which was an aggressive root colonizer, and Gram-positive Streptomyces lividans TK24. The model GEMs were added to surface soil in separate studies, with RC1 studied throughout the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), while TK24 was studied throughout a ten month period. Also, RC1 was used in studies conducted during two consecutive field seasons (1988 to 1990) to determine how year-to-year field variability influenced the calibration of microcosms with the field. The main conclusions of this research were that intact soil-core microcosms can be useful to simulate the field for studies of microbial fate and effects on ecosystem structural and functional properties. In general, microcosms in the growth chamber, which simulated average field variations, were similar to the field for most parameters or differences could be attributed to the great extremes in temperature that occurred in the field compared to the microcosms. Better controls of environmental variables including temperature and moisture will be necessary to more closely simulate the field for future use of microcosms for risk assessment. 126 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. An improved method for field extraction and laboratory analysis of large, intact soil cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, J.A.; Hemmen, K.; Dowd, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed for the extraction of large, undisturbed soil cores and for subsequent analysis of fluid movement within the cores. The major problems associated with these methods are expense, cumbersome field extraction, and inadequate simulation of unsaturated flow conditions. A field and laboratory procedure is presented that is economical, convenient, and simulates unsaturated and saturated flow without interface flow problems and can be used on a variety of soil types. In the field, a stainless steel core barrel is hydraulically pressed into the soil (30-cm diam. and 38 cm high), the barrel and core are extracted from the soil, and after the barrel is removed from the core, the core is then wrapped securely with flexible sheet metal and a stainless mesh screen is attached to the bottom of the core for support. In the laboratory the soil core is set atop a porous ceramic plate over which a soil-diatomaceous earth slurry has been poured to assure good contact between plate and core. A cardboard cylinder (mold) is fastened around the core and the empty space filled with paraffin wax. Soil cores were tested under saturated and unsaturated conditions using a hanging water column for potentials ???0. Breakthrough curves indicated that no interface flow occurred along the edge of the core. This procedure proved to be reliable for field extraction of large, intact soil cores and for laboratory analysis of solute transport.

  6. Improved Methods for Estimating Microbial Activity and Moisture Characteristic Curves in Intact Unsaturated Soil Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. N.; Baker, K. E.

    2001-12-01

    Estimation of microbial activity in soils is a complex and often difficult process. In this work, we describe several new and innovative methods we have developed to measure microbial respiration in intact cores of unsaturated soils. The ultimate goal of this work is to predict the effect of microbial activity on contaminant mobility via CO2 generation in variably saturated vadose zone soils. This goal requires estimation of the effect of available water (i.e. in pores accessible to the microbes) on the microbial activity, and thus a homogeneous distribution of substrate throughout the soil water. Prior studies have added substrate solution drop wise to the soil, and then distributed the substrate throughout the soil by mixing. While this method distributes the substrate well, it alters the in situ pore volume distribution and has been shown to result in an anomalously high degree of microbial activity shortly after mixing. Traditional methods for uniformly distributing substrate in intact unsaturated soils require days to weeks to reach equilibrium. Since the substrate would be completely consumed in this time frame, an innovative approach is being used in this study to drain intact soil cores to the desired moisture contents in a matter of hours. This approach involves the use of the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFAT). In the method, the samples are vacuum saturated under refrigeration to uniformly distribute a 14C-labeled substrate throughout the soil water, drained to various pressures in the UFA, and transferred to a sealed container and incubated. The labeled 14CO2 is then trapped and counted after incubation to determine microbial activity. Since the soil used in this study contains a high percentage of swelling clays, the cores tend to compact in the UFA, altering the macropore volume distribution. To address this alteration, we developed a correction function to correct the UFA-measured pore volume distribution at each rotational speed. Finally, the high

  7. Experimental terrestrial soil-core microcosm test protocol. A method for measuring the potential ecological effects, fate, and transport of chemicals in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Tolle, D.A.; Arthur, M.F.

    1985-06-01

    In order to protect the environment properly and have a realistic appraisal of how a chemical will act in the environment, tests of ecological effects and chemical fate must be performed on complex assemblages of biotic and abiotic components (i.e., microcosms) as well as single species. This protocol is one which could be added to a series of tests recently developed as guidelines for Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (P.L. 94-469; U.S.C., Section 2601-2629). The terrestrial soil-core microcosm is designed to supply site-specific and possibly regional information on the probable chemical fate and ecological effects resulting from release of a chemical substance to a terrestrial ecosystem. The EPA will use the data resulting from this test system to compare the potential hazards of a chemical with others that have been previously evaluated.

  8. Controlled Environment Soil-Core Microcosm Unit (CESMU) for Investigating Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Chemicals in Site-Specific Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    types. These four soil types included Wheeling sandy loam (Fine-loamy, mixed mesic Ultic Hapludalfs], Lexington silt loam [Fine-silty, mixed thermic ... thermic Typic Paleudults]. The intact soil cores were collected using a hydraulically controlled probe, delivering the soil with minimal disturbance...sunlight, sufficient for plant growth; however, they can instead be covered with an opaque insulated cover spanning all columns to eliminate photo

  9. Investigating phosphorus interactions with bed sediments in a fluvial environment using a recirculating flume and intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Kirsten; Nash, David; Grayson, Rodger

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus uptake by bed sediments in surface drains can reduce phosphorus exports from irrigated land. This paper reports on an investigation into the effects of velocity and water depth on phosphorus uptake by bed sediments, which consisted of eight sequential flow events conducted in a recirculating flume as well as a concurrent experiment using sediment cores. For the heavy clay bed sediment discussed in this paper, velocity and depth of water column had no significant effect on net phosphorus uptake and the rates of phosphorus uptake in either the cores or the recirculating flume. The most significant factor affecting phosphorus uptake was the experiment number which represented the sequential nature of experiments within the flume and increasing phosphorus saturation of the surface sediments. Of the kinetic equations used to describe phosphorus uptake (Elovich, boundary layer and diffusion) the Elovich equation provided the best representation of the results, both in terms of the adj-R2 values and the absence of systematic errors in the residuals. Results suggest that intact soil cores may be used to parameterise rate equations such as the Elovich equation for use in process-based mathematical models of phosphorus transport in fluvial systems.

  10. Comparative community responses to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} in microcosms and intact grassland

    SciTech Connect

    Chiariello, N.R.

    1995-06-01

    Ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} involve components that are difficult to resolve in spatially varying, intact systems. Depending on their functional similarity to the field, experimental microcosms may provide more uniform, accessible analogues. At Stanford University`s Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, research on grassland responses to elevated CO{sub 2} combines field studies and microcosm experiments on annual communities established from seed. Parallel measurements from year 3 of CO{sub 2} treatments in the field and year 2 in the microcosms (after self-seeding) provide a test of their functional similarity. In both, nutrient-poor serpentine soils supported high plant density (>10,000 m{sup -2}), diverse phenology, and low aboveground production (100-200 g m{sup -2}). Elevated CO{sub 2} (720 ppm) favored late-flowering, taprooted annuals in both and had little or no effect on early annuals. Exotic species that were rare in field plots were lost from microcosms by year 2. Annual grasses contributed more to production in microcosms than in the field.

  11. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Bacteriophage through Intact Soil Cores following Surface Application and Injection of Slurry▿

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B.; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions. PMID:21948848

  12. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage through intact soil cores following surface application and injection of slurry.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-11-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions.

  13. N2O, NO, N2, and CO2 emissions from tropical savanna and grassland of Northern Australia: an incubation experiment with intact soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Reiser, K.; Dannenmann, M.; Hutley, L. B.; Jacobeit, J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-06-01

    Strong seasonal variability of hygric and thermal soil conditions are a defining environmental feature in Northern Australia. However, how such changes affect the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO) and dinitrogen (N2) is still not well explored. By incubating intact soil cores from four sites (3 savanna, 1 pasture) under controlled soil temperatures (ST) and soil moisture (SM) we investigated the release of the trace gas fluxes of N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2). Furthermore, the release of N2 due to denitrification was measured using the helium gas flow soil core technique. Under dry pre-incubation conditions NO and N2O emission were very low (<7.0 ± 5.0 μg NO-N m-2 h-1; <0.0 ± 1.4 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1) or in case of N2O, even a net soil uptake was observed. Substantial NO (max: 306.5 μg N m-2 h-1) and relatively small N2O pulse emissions (max: 5.8 ± 5.0 μg N m-2 h-1) were recorded following soil wetting, but these pulses were short-lived, lasting only up to 3 days. The total atmospheric loss of nitrogen was dominated by N2 emissions (82.4-99.3% of total N lost), although NO emissions contributed almost 43.2% at 50% SM and 30 °C ST. N2O emissions were systematically higher for 3 of 12 sample locations, which indicates substantial spatial variability at site level, but on average soils acted as weak N2O sources or even sinks. Emissions were controlled by SM and ST for N2O and CO2, ST and pH for NO, and SM and pH for N2.

  14. Transport of Residual Nitrogen and Carbon through Intact Soil Cores Amended with Stockpiled Feedlot Manure with Wood-Chip or Straw Bedding.

    PubMed

    Miller, J J; Beasley, B W; Drury, C F; Hao, X; Larney, F J

    2013-11-01

    The environmental impact of using wood chips instead of straw bedding with feedlot manure on transport and leaching potential from feedlot manure is unknown. Our main objective was to determine if transport of total N, total organic N, NO-N, and nonpurgeable organic C (NPOC) to subsurface soil was lower for soils amended with feedlot manure if combined with wood chips compared with straw. A secondary objective was to compare transport of N and NPOC with organic amendments versus inorganic fertilizer. Stockpiled feedlot manure (SM) with wood chip (SM-WD) or barley straw (SM-ST) bedding at 39 Mg (dry wt.) ha, and inorganic fertilizer (IN) at 100 kg N ha, was applied annually for 13 yr to a clay loam soil in a replicated field experiment in southern Alberta, Canada. Intact soil cores were taken in fall 2011 (0-30 cm depth) from the three treatments, and the residual N and NPOC were eluted from the soil cores. Total N, total organic N, and NPOC were determined on filtered (1.0 μm) effluent samples that are primarily dissolved fraction but may contain some small particulate N and C. Peak concentrations, flow-weighted mean concentrations, and mass loss of total N, total organic N, NO-N, and NPOC were significantly ( ≤ 0.05) lower by 35 to 86% for SM-WD compared with SM-ST. Mean recoveries were also significantly lower for SM-WD than SM-ST by 0.07 to 8% (absolute difference). The transport behavior was similar for SM-WD and IN treatment, but solute transport was greater for SM-ST than for IN. Application of stockpiled feedlot manure with wood chips instead of straw bedding may be a beneficial management practice to reduce transport and leaching potential of N fractions and NPOC.

  15. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  16. Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

    1989-04-01

    This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for detection, fate, and survival analysis of genetically engineered microorganisms and their recombinant genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Seidler, R.J.

    1989-02-01

    The research included in this document represents the current scientific information available regarding the applicability of terrestrial microcosms and related methodologies for evaluating detection methods and the fate and survival of microorganisms in the environment. The three terrestrial microcosms described in this document were used to evaluate the survival and fate of recombinant bacteria in soils and in association with plant surfaces and insects and their transport through soil with percolating water and root systems, and to test new methods and procedures to improve detection and enumeration of bacteria in soil. Simple (potting soil composed of peat mix and perlite, lacking environmental control and monitoring) and complex microcosms (agricultural soil with partial control and monitoring of environmental conditions) were demonstrated to be useful tools for preliminary assessments of microbial viability in terrestrial ecosystems. These studies evaluated the survival patterns of Enterobacter cloacae (pBR322) in soil and on plant surfaces and the ingestion of this same microorganism by cutworms and survival in the foregut and frass. The Versacore microcosm design was used to monitor the fate and competitiveness of genetically engineered bacteria in soil. Both selective media and gene probes were used successfully to follow the fate of two recombinant Pseudomonas sp. introduced into Versacore microcosms. Intact soil-core microcosms were employed to evaluate the fate and transport of genetically altered Azospirillum sp. and Pseudomonas sp. in soil and the plant rhizosphere. The usefulness of these various microcosms as a tool for risk assessment is underscored by the ease in obtaining soil from a proposed field release site to evaluate subsequent GEM fate and survival.

  18. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  19. Temperature effects on propylene glycol-contaminated soil cores

    SciTech Connect

    Davis-Hoover, W.J.; Vesper, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are examining the effect of temperature on the biodegradation of propylene glycol (PPG) in subsurface soil cores. Subsurface soils were contaminated in situ with PPG and allowed to diffuse into the soil for 30 days. The treated soil was reexposed, and intact were incubated for 30 days at temperatures ranging from 9 to 39 C in a temperature gradient incubator. At 30 days, soil moisture, soil pH, microbial activity [fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test], R2A plate counts, and plate counts of PPG degraders were studied. Although the soil moisture and pH remained relatively unchanged, the parameters of microbial activity varied rather consistently with temperature. Multiple populations or subpopulations of bacteria appear to exist between temperatures of 9 and 39 C in these soils.

  20. The University as Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    This paper puts forward the model of "microcosm-macrocosm" isomorphism encapsulated in certain philosophical views on the form of university education. The human being as a "microcosm" should reflect internally the external "macrocosm". Higher Education is a socially instituted attempt to guide human beings into forming themselves as microcosms of…

  1. The University as Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    This paper puts forward the model of "microcosm-macrocosm" isomorphism encapsulated in certain philosophical views on the form of university education. The human being as a "microcosm" should reflect internally the external "macrocosm". Higher Education is a socially instituted attempt to guide human beings into forming themselves as microcosms of…

  2. Apollo rocks, fines and soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allton, J.; Bevill, T.

    Apollo rocks and soils not only established basic lunar properties and ground truth for global remote sensing, they also provided important lessons for planetary protection (Adv. Space Res ., 1998, v. 22, no. 3 pp. 373-382). The six Apollo missions returned 2196 samples weighing 381.7 kg, comprised of rocks, fines, soil cores and 2 gas samples. By examining which samples were allocated for scientific investigations, information was obtained on usefulness of sampling strategy, sampling devices and containers, sample types and diversity, and on size of sample needed by various disciplines. Diversity was increased by using rakes to gather small rocks on the Moon and by removing fragments >1 mm from soils by sieving in the laboratory. Breccias and soil cores are diverse internally. Per unit weight these samples were more often allocated for research. Apollo investigators became adept at wringing information from very small sample sizes. By pushing the analytical limits, the main concern was adequate size for representative sampling. Typical allocations for trace element analyses were 750 mg for rocks, 300 mg for fines and 70 mg for core subsamples. Age-dating and isotope systematics allocations were typically 1 g for rocks and fines, but only 10% of that amount for core depth subsamples. Historically, allocations for organics and microbiology were 4 g (10% for cores). Modern allocations for biomarker detection are 100mg. Other disciplines supported have been cosmogenic nuclides, rock and soil petrology, sedimentary volatiles, reflectance, magnetics, and biohazard studies . Highly applicable to future sample return missions was the Apollo experience with organic contamination, estimated to be from 1 to 5 ng/g sample for Apollo 11 (Simonheit &Flory, 1970; Apollo 11, 12 &13 Organic contamination Monitoring History, U.C. Berkeley; Burlingame et al., 1970, Apollo 11 LSC , pp. 1779-1792). Eleven sources of contaminants, of which 7 are applicable to robotic missions, were

  3. Nitrate reduction in a groundwater microcosm determined by sup 15 N gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, G.; Annadotter, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N liter{sup {minus}1}. Traces of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day{sup {minus}1}. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}O, {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and {sup 15}N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their (methyl-{sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N{sub 2}, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was reduced to NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month.

  4. Inorganic and suspended/dissolved-organic nitrogen in Sierra Nevada soil core leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.A.; Miller, W.W.; Blank, R.R.

    1998-07-01

    Watershed disturbance has been suggested as a possible mechanism for accelerated nutrient input into Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada. However, little is known regarding how nutrient discharge is coupled to physicochemical watershed processes. Recent investigations in the Lake Tahoe Basin have suggested that suspended/dissolved-organic nutrient transport may play an important role in lake and tributary water quality. The mobility of inorganic and suspended/dissolved-organic N in soils of a Lake Tahoe watershed was assessed using constant head permeameter leaching experiments with intact soil cores. The authors evaluated the interaction of plot condition on magnitude and form of N discharge. Incremental leachate discharge was analyzed for concentrations of inorganic (NH{sub 4}-N and NO{sub 3}-N) and suspended/dissolved-organic N. Leachate from the riparian soil cores had significantly higher concentrations and total discharge NO{sub 3}-N than that from the nonforested or forested areas. Loading of NH{sub 4}-N was more consistent among vegetative cover types, but the riparian leachate again contributed a significantly greater amount. Suspended/dissolved-organic N was mobile and the most dominant form of N for nonforested and forested soil cores with discharge loading ratios of 17:1 and 7:1, respectively. Although the loading ratio was approximately 1:1 for the riparian soil cores, the amount of suspended/dissolved-organic N discharged was greatest. The mobility and presence of significant amounts of suspended/dissolved-organic N indicate that this once unrecognized nutrient form is an important component in at least one Sierra Nevada watershed, and should be more fully investigated elsewhere.

  5. A Protocol for Collecting and Constructing Soil Core Lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Saporito, Louis S; Bryant, Ray B; Kleinman, Peter J A

    2016-06-06

    Leaching of nutrients from land applied fertilizers and manure used in agriculture can lead to accelerated eutrophication of surface water. Because the landscape has complex and varied soil morphology, an accompanying disparity in flow paths for leachate through the soil macropore and matrix structure is present. The rate of flow through these paths is further affected by antecedent soil moisture. Lysimeters are used to quantify flow rate, volume of water and concentration of nutrients leaching downward through soils. While many lysimeter designs exist, accurately determining the volume of water and mass balance of nutrients is best accomplished with bounded lysimeters that leave the natural soil structure intact. Here we present a detailed method for the extraction and construction of soil core lysimeters equipped with soil moisture sensors at 5 cm and 25 cm depths. Lysimeters from four different Coastal Plain soils (Bojac, Evesboro, Quindocqua and Sassafras) were collected on the Delmarva Peninsula and moved to an indoor climate controlled facility. Soils were irrigated once weekly with the equivalent of 2 cm of rainfall to draw down soil nitrate-N concentrations. At the end of the draw down period, poultry litter was applied (162 kg TN ha(-1)) and leaching was resumed for an additional five weeks. Total recovery of applied irrigation water varied from 71% to 85%. Nitrate-N concentration varied over the course of the study from an average of 27.1 mg L(-1) before litter application to 40.3 mg L(-1) following litter application. While greatest flux of nutrients was measured in soils dominated by coarse sand (Sassafras) the greatest immediate flux occurred from the finest textured soil with pronounced macropore development (Quindocqua).

  6. Extending the Marine Microcosm Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryswyk, Hal Van; Hall, Eric W.; Petesch, Steven J.; Wiedeman, Alice E.

    2007-01-01

    The traditional range of marine microcosm laboratory experiments is presented as an ideal environment to teach the entire analysis process. The microcosm lab provides student-centered approach with opportunities for collaborative learning and to develop critical communication skills.

  7. Extending the Marine Microcosm Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryswyk, Hal Van; Hall, Eric W.; Petesch, Steven J.; Wiedeman, Alice E.

    2007-01-01

    The traditional range of marine microcosm laboratory experiments is presented as an ideal environment to teach the entire analysis process. The microcosm lab provides student-centered approach with opportunities for collaborative learning and to develop critical communication skills.

  8. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Availability of 99Tc in undisturbed soil cores.

    PubMed

    Denys, Sébastien; Echevarria, Guillaume; Florentin, Louis; Leclerc-Cessac, Elisabeth; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Models for safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories need accurate values of the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides. In oxidizing environments, (99)Tc is expected to occur as pertechnetate ((99)TcO(4)(-)). Due to its high mobility, leaching of this element in the field might be important, potentially affecting the reliability of estimated transfer parameters of (99)Tc as measured in closed experimental systems such as hydroponics or pot experiments. The aim of this experiment was to measure the leaching of (99)Tc in undisturbed irrigated soil cores under cultivation as well as plant uptake and to study the possible competition between the two transfer pathways. Undisturbed soil cores (50 x 50 cm) were sampled from a Rendzic Leptosol (R), a colluvial Fluvic Cambisol (F) and a Dystric Cambisol (D) using PVC tubes (three cores sampled per soil type). Each core was equipped with a leachate collector at the bottom, allowing the monitoring of (99)Tc leaching through the cores. Cores were placed in a greenhouse and maize (Zea mays L., cv. DEA, Pioneer) was sown. After 135 d, maize was harvested and radioactivity determined in both plant and water samples. Results showed that during the growing period, leaching of (99)Tc was limited, due to the high evapotranspiration rate of maize. After harvest, leaching of (99)Tc went on because of the absence of evapotranspiration. Effective uptake (EU) of (99)Tc in leaves and grains was calculated. EU reached 70% of the input in the leaves and was not significantly different among soils. These results confirmed those obtained from pot experiments, even though leaching was allowed to occur in close-to-reality hydraulical conditions. As a consequence, it was concluded that pot experiments are an adequate surrogate for more complex "close-to-reality" experimental systems for measuring transfer factors.

  10. A Natal Microcosm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-05-11

    In the quest to better understand the birth of stars and the formation of new worlds, astronomers have used NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to examine the massive stars contained in a cloudy region called Sharpless 140. This cloud is a fascinating microcosm of a star-forming region since it exhibits, within a relatively small area, all of the classic manifestations of stellar birth. Sharpless 140 lies almost 3000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cepheus. At its heart is a cluster of three deeply embedded young stars, which are each several thousand times brighter than the Sun. Though they are strikingly visible in this image from Spitzer's infrared array camera, they are completely obscured in visible light, buried within the core of the surrounding dust cloud. The extreme youth of at least one of these stars is indicated by the presence of a stream of gas moving at high velocities. Such outflows are signatures of the processes surrounding a star that is still gobbling up material as part of its formation. The bright red bowl, or arc, seen in this image traces the outer surface of the dense dust cloud encasing the young stars. This arc is made up primarily of organic compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which glow on the surface of the cloud. Ultraviolet light from a nearby bright star outside of the image is "eating away" at these molecules. Eventually, this light will destroy the dust envelope and the masked young stars will emerge. This false-color image was taken on Oct. 11, 2003 and is composed of photographs obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05878

  11. A Natal Microcosm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the quest to better understand the birth of stars and the formation of new worlds, astronomers have used NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to examine the massive stars contained in a cloudy region called Sharpless 140. This cloud is a fascinating microcosm of a star-forming region since it exhibits, within a relatively small area, all of the classic manifestations of stellar birth.

    Sharpless 140 lies almost 3000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cepheus. At its heart is a cluster of three deeply embedded young stars, which are each several thousand times brighter than the Sun. Though they are strikingly visible in this image from Spitzer's infrared array camera, they are completely obscured in visible light, buried within the core of the surrounding dust cloud.

    The extreme youth of at least one of these stars is indicated by the presence of a stream of gas moving at high velocities. Such outflows are signatures of the processes surrounding a star that is still gobbling up material as part of its formation.

    The bright red bowl, or arc, seen in this image traces the outer surface of the dense dust cloud encasing the young stars. This arc is made up primarily of organic compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which glow on the surface of the cloud. Ultraviolet light from a nearby bright star outside of the image is 'eating away' at these molecules. Eventually, this light will destroy the dust envelope and the masked young stars will emerge.

    This false-color image was taken on Oct. 11, 2003 and is composed of photographs obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  12. Atrazine remediation in wetland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Runes, H B; Bottomley, P J; Lerch, R N; Jenkins, J J

    2001-05-01

    Laboratory wetland microcosms were used to study treatment of atrazine in irrigation runoff by a field-scale-constructed wetland under controlled conditions. Three experiments, in which 1 ppm atrazine was added to the water column of three wetland, one soil control, and one water control microcosm, were conducted. Atrazine dissipation from the water column and degradate formation (deethylatrazine [DEA]; deisopropylatrazine [DIA]; and hydroxyatrazine [HA]) were monitored. Atrazine dissipation from the water column of wetland microcosms was biphasic. Less than 12% of the atrazine applied to wetland microcosms remained in the water column on day 56. Atrazine degradates were observed in water and sediment, with HA the predominant degradate. Analysis of day 56 sediment samples indicated that a significant portion of the initial application was detected as the parent compound and HA. Most probable number (MPN) assays demonstrated that atrazine degrader populations were small in wetland sediment. Wetland microcosms were able to reduce atrazine concentration in the water column via sorption and degradation. Based on results from this study, it is hypothesized that plant uptake contributed to atrazine dissipation from the water column.

  13. Using Microcosms To Teach about the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Taylor, Lisa

    A microcosm is a small, completely sealed, self-sustaining ecosystem. Once a microcosm has been sealed in a transparent container, only light and some heat can enter and only excess heat can leave. This manual describes how to set up aquatic microcosms using glass jars and little or no collecting equipment. The activities can be tailored to suit…

  14. Using Microcosms To Teach about the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Taylor, Lisa

    A microcosm is a small, completely sealed, self-sustaining ecosystem. Once a microcosm has been sealed in a transparent container, only light and some heat can enter and only excess heat can leave. This manual describes how to set up aquatic microcosms using glass jars and little or no collecting equipment. The activities can be tailored to suit…

  15. Sorption and photo degradation processes govern distribution of sulfamethazine in freshwater-sediment microcosms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The antibiotic sulfamethazine can be transported from manured fields to surface water bodies. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in surface water using 14C-phenyl-sulfamethazine in small pond water microcosms containing intact sediment and pond water. We found a 2.7-d half-li...

  16. Uranium Transformations in Static Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Shelly D; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Criddle, Craig; Marsh, Terence; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Ravel, Bruce; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of complex biogeochemical processes and their effects on speciation of U in the subsurface is critical for developing remediation strategies with an understanding of stability. We have developed static microcosms that are similar to bioreduction process studies in situ under laminar flow conditions or in sediment pores. Uranium L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis with depth in the microcosms indicated that transformation of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} occurred by at least two distinct processes. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis indicated that initial U{sup VI} species associated with C- and P-containing ligands were transformed to U{sup IV} in the form of uraninite and U associated with Fe-bound ligands. Microbial community analysis identified putative Fe{sup III} and sulfate reducers at two different depths in the microcosms. The slow reduction of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} may contribute the stability of U{sup IV} within microcosms at 11 months after a decrease in bioreducing conditions due to limited electron donors.

  17. Uranium transformations in static microcosms.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Criddle, C.; Marsh, T. L.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Ravel, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P. M.; Kemner, K. M.; Stanford Univ.; Michigan State Univ.; ORNL; BNL; EXAFS Analysis

    2010-01-01

    Elucidation of complex biogeochemical processes and their effects on speciation of U in the subsurface is critical for developing remediation strategies with an understanding of stability. We have developed static microcosms that are similar to bioreduction process studies in situ under laminar flow conditions or in sediment pores. Uranium L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis with depth in the microcosms indicated that transformation of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} occurred by at least two distinct processes. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis indicated that initial U{sup VI} species associated with C- and P-containing ligands were transformed to U{sup IV} in the form of uraninite and U associated with Fe-bound ligands. Microbial community analysis identified putative Fe{sup III} and sulfate reducers at two different depths in the microcosms. The slow reduction of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} may contribute the stability of U{sup IV} within microcosms at 11 months after a decrease in bioreducing conditions due to limited electron donors.

  18. Know Thyself: Macrocosm and Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubbs, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    There was a time when, in the Liberal Arts, philosophy and education enjoyed the most intimate and productive relationship. Drawing together philosophy and nature they sought to understand the greatest of human mysteries. This meant thinking about both the macrocosm and the microcosm and especially the relation between them. In this relation lies…

  19. Know Thyself: Macrocosm and Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubbs, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    There was a time when, in the Liberal Arts, philosophy and education enjoyed the most intimate and productive relationship. Drawing together philosophy and nature they sought to understand the greatest of human mysteries. This meant thinking about both the macrocosm and the microcosm and especially the relation between them. In this relation lies…

  20. Infiltration characteristics of non-aqueous phase liquids in undisturbed loessal soil cores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunqiang; Shao, Ming'an

    2009-01-01

    The widespread contamination of soils and aquifers by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL), such as crude oil, poses serious environmental and health hazards globally. Understanding the infiltration characteristics of NAPL in soil is crucial in mitigating or remediating soil contamination. The infiltration characteristics of crude and diesel oils into undisturbed loessal soil cores, collected in polymethyl methacrylate cylindrical columns, were investigated under a constant fluid head (3 cm) of either crude oil or diesel oil. The infiltration rate of both crude and diesel oils decreased exponentially as wetting depth increased with time. Soil core size and bulk density both had significant effects on NAPL infiltration through the undisturbed soil cores; a smaller core size or a greater bulk density could reduce oil penetration to depth. Compacting soil in areas susceptible to oil spills may be an effective stratage to reduce contamination. The infiltration of NAPL into soil cores was spatially anisotropic and heterogeneous, thus recording the data at four points on the soil core is a good stratage to improve the accuracy of experimental results. Our results revealed that crude and diesel oils, rather than their components, have a practical value for remediation of contaminated loessal soils.

  1. Attenuation of TNT in seawater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, I; Vane, C H

    2010-01-01

    The ability of two differing marine sediments (one clayey, the other sandy) to attenuate the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), dissolved in intertidal seawater from the eastern English coast of the North Sea, was examined using aerobic microcosms. Analysis of the seawater from the microcosms revealed an initial sharp decline in TNT concentration with clayey sediment in both sterilized (to prevent microbial activity) and unsterilized microcosms. This effect did not occur to such a marked extent in similar sterile and non-sterile sandy sediment microcosms and was attributed mainly to sorption of TNT to the fine clay particles of the clayey sediment. As time progressed, the attenuation of TNT in microcosms containing either type of sediment was found to be less in those that had been sterilized compared with those where microbial action proceeded unhindered. Feeding the microcosms, (i.e. supplying extra carbon sources for the microbial communities), appeared to have a small, but perceptible, enhancing effect upon TNT dissipation. The attenuation of TNT was also measured in large microcosms containing 2.5 L of seawater and no sediment. Analysis of the seawater revealed a gradual decline in TNT concentration in non-sterile and fed microcosms compared to their sterile counterpart. Overall, this laboratory study showed that the attenuation of TNT is slow (half-life in seawater ca.1900 days; half-life sand sediment <700 days; half life in clay sediment 130 days) under conditions commonly encountered in coastal waters of the North Sea.

  2. A portable fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system for automated root phenotyping in soil cores in the field.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Anton; Bischof, Leanne; Zwart, Alec; Watt, Michelle

    2016-02-01

    Root architecture traits are a target for pre-breeders. Incorporation of root architecture traits into new cultivars requires phenotyping. It is attractive to rapidly and directly phenotype root architecture in the field, avoiding laboratory studies that may not translate to the field. A combination of soil coring with a hydraulic push press and manual core-break counting can directly phenotype root architecture traits of depth and distribution in the field through to grain development, but large teams of people are required and labour costs are high with this method. We developed a portable fluorescence imaging system (BlueBox) to automate root counting in soil cores with image analysis software directly in the field. The lighting system was optimized to produce high-contrast images of roots emerging from soil cores. The correlation of the measurements with the root length density of the soil cores exceeded the correlation achieved by human operator measurements (R (2)=0.68 versus 0.57, respectively). A BlueBox-equipped team processed 4.3 cores/hour/person, compared with 3.7 cores/hour/person for the manual method. The portable, automated in-field root architecture phenotyping system was 16% more labour efficient, 19% more accurate, and 12% cheaper than manual conventional coring, and presents an opportunity to directly phenotype root architecture in the field as part of pre-breeding programs. The platform has wide possibilities to capture more information about root health and other root traits in the field. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. A portable fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system for automated root phenotyping in soil cores in the field

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, Anton; Bischof, Leanne; Zwart, Alec; Watt, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Root architecture traits are a target for pre-breeders. Incorporation of root architecture traits into new cultivars requires phenotyping. It is attractive to rapidly and directly phenotype root architecture in the field, avoiding laboratory studies that may not translate to the field. A combination of soil coring with a hydraulic push press and manual core-break counting can directly phenotype root architecture traits of depth and distribution in the field through to grain development, but large teams of people are required and labour costs are high with this method. We developed a portable fluorescence imaging system (BlueBox) to automate root counting in soil cores with image analysis software directly in the field. The lighting system was optimized to produce high-contrast images of roots emerging from soil cores. The correlation of the measurements with the root length density of the soil cores exceeded the correlation achieved by human operator measurements (R 2=0.68 versus 0.57, respectively). A BlueBox-equipped team processed 4.3 cores/hour/person, compared with 3.7 cores/hour/person for the manual method. The portable, automated in-field root architecture phenotyping system was 16% more labour efficient, 19% more accurate, and 12% cheaper than manual conventional coring, and presents an opportunity to directly phenotype root architecture in the field as part of pre-breeding programs. The platform has wide possibilities to capture more information about root health and other root traits in the field. PMID:26826219

  4. Acetylene Reduction by Soil Cores of Maize and Sorghum in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tjepkema, John; Van Berkum, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Nitrogenase activity was measured by the C2H2 reduction method in large soil cores (29 cm in diameter by 20 cm in depth) of maize (Zea mays) and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare). The activity was compared to that obtained by a method in which the roots were removed from the soil and assayed for nitrogenase activity after an overnight preincubation in 1% O2. In a total of six experiments and 28 soil cores, the nitrogenase activity of the cores was an average of 14 times less than the activity of roots removed from the same cores and preincubated. Nitrogenase activity in the cores was very low and extrapolated to an average nitrogen fixation rate of 2.8 g of N/hectare per day. It was shown that inadequate gas exchange was not a reason for the lower activity in the soil cores, and the core method gave satisfactory results for nitrogenase activity of soybeans (Glycine max) and Paspalum notatum. PMID:16345217

  5. Mutational hot spots in the mitochondrial microcosm

    SciTech Connect

    Paeaebo, S.

    1996-09-01

    Human mitochondria can be seen as a genetic microcosm, located within the macrocosm of the entire cell. In each cell, this microcosm contains a few thousand copies of a circular DNA genome of 16,569 bp that is transmitted between generations, almost exclusively from mother to child. The study of this genetic microcosm holds particular fascination, since it may fore-shadow the coming genetics of the nuclear genome. In the mitochondrial microcosm, the {open_quotes}Human Genome Project{close_quotes} was completed years ago, with the publication of the DNA sequence of an entire mitochondrial genome. In the microcosm, one is thus well into the {open_quotes}postgenomic era.{close_quotes} It therefore may be instructive to ask what the first 15 years of postgenomics has brought within the microcosmic field of mitochondrial genetics. The availability of a complete genome sequence obviously brought great benefits to the study of physiological process in the mitochondria. However, in addition, many insights in the immediately postgenomic phase seem to come from the study of genomic variation. 26 refs.

  6. Effect of elevated temperature and enhanced drainage on carbon balance of tundra microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Shaver, G.R.; Giblin, A.E.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Rastetter, E.B.; Laundre, J.A.; Murray, G.L. )

    1994-06-01

    We tested effects of temperature and drainage on C balance of intact soil and tundra vegetation over a simulated season. We measured C budgets (CO[sub 2] and CH[sub 4] emissions and dissolved CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and DOC in soil water) of Eriophorum vaginatum tussock and moss-dominated interussock microcosms at two temperatures (7[degrees] and 15[degrees]C, season maxima) and two water regimes (saturated and field capacity). Net ecosystem productivity was strongly affected by water. Averaged over temperature and microhabitat, the rate of net C loss from microcosms at field capacity was [approximately]5[times] the saturated microcosms. Only saturated, 15[degrees]C tussock microcosms showed net C storage integrated over the whole season. Ecosystem respiration was strongly affected by water and less by temperature. Respiration rates at field capacity were [approximately]2[times] the rates under saturated conditions. Elevated temperature caused a 1.5[times] increase. Other C components were <20% of gaseous CO[sub 2] losses. Results indicate that C in tundra exists in a fragile balance between storage and release that is controlled mainly by water regime.

  7. Assessment of optimum aquatic microcosm design for pollution impact studies

    SciTech Connect

    Harte, J.; Levy, D.; Rees, J.; Saegebarth, E.

    1981-08-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to evaluate optimum design and operating conditions for pelagic lake microcosms and to explore a possible use of such systems for toxicological testing. Criteria selected for microcosm optimization were realism and replicability of identically initiated microcosms. In the assessment studies, a number of different pelagic microcosm configurations were studied, including the size of the microcosm containers, the method of algal surface-growth prevention, and the degree of water mixing and aeration. In addition, the microcosm-lake comparisons were carried out in various seasons of the years to determine the influence of natural seasonal factors on the chemical and biological differences between the lakes and microcosms. In all but the smallest microcosms, surface-growth prevention removed size dependence. Chemical nutrients tracked well except during periods when nutrient inputs to the lake from the surrounding watershed were high. Good tracking of phytoplankton succession patterns was observed only when the physical conditions of the lake matched well with those in the laboratory system. In the decomposition studies, additions of dead organic matter to the lake microcosms were made, and the subsequent response of mineralization activity was measured. Highly replicable and interesting short-term behavior was seen, implying that protocols can be developed for microcosm testing of effects of toxicants on mineralization rates. On the basis of the microcosm assessment and decomposition studies, it was concluded that appropriate applications of pelagic microcosms are limited, and those applications that are most appropriate are delineated.

  8. MODELING EUTROPHICATION KINETICS IN RESERVOIR MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study addresses the question of how a general seasonal eutrophication model, WASP5, can handle daily phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics in perturbed microcosms for 1-to 2-week periods of time. It is intended to explore both the interpretative and the predictive capabilities...

  9. Depth-resolved microbial community analyses in two contrasting soil cores contaminated by antimony and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Xiao, Tangfu; Dong, Yiran; Tang, Song; Ning, Zengping; Huang, Zhengyu; Sun, Weimin

    2017-02-01

    Investigation of microbial communities of soils contaminated by antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) is necessary to obtain knowledge for their bioremediation. However, little is known about the depth profiles of microbial community composition and structure in Sb and As contaminated soils. Our previous studies have suggested that historical factors (i.e., soil and sediment) play important roles in governing microbial community structure and composition. Here, we selected two different types of soil (flooded paddy soil versus dry corn field soil) with co-contamination of Sb and As to study interactions between these metalloids, geochemical parameters and the soil microbiota as well as microbial metabolism in response to Sb and As contamination. Comprehensive geochemical analyses and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing were used to shed light on the interactions of the microbial communities with their environments. A wide diversity of taxonomical groups was present in both soil cores, and many were significantly correlated with geochemical parameters. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and co-occurrence networks further elucidated the impact of geochemical parameters (including Sb and As contamination fractions and sulfate, TOC, Eh, and pH) on vertical distribution of soil microbial communities. Metagenomes predicted from the 16S data using PICRUSt included arsenic metabolism genes such as arsenate reductase (ArsC), arsenite oxidase small subunit (AoxA and AoxB), and arsenite transporter (ArsA and ACR3). In addition, predicted abundances of arsenate reductase (ArsC) and arsenite oxidase (AoxA and AoxB) genes were significantly correlated with Sb contamination fractions, These results suggest potential As biogeochemical cycling in both soil cores and potentially dynamic Sb biogeochemical cycling as well.

  10. Estimation of SX Farm Vadose Zone CS-137 Inventories from Geostatistical Analysis of Drywell and Soil Core Data

    SciTech Connect

    KNEPP, A.J.

    2000-06-02

    This report provides an estimation of the Cs-137 inventories in the soil under the SX Tank Farm based on measurements obtained from drywell and soil cores. The Cs-137 inventories are estimated separately for distinct volumes of soil associated etc.

  11. Impact of iron amendment on net methylmercury export from tidal wetland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Patrick D; Sedlak, David L

    2010-10-01

    Tidal wetlands can be important sources of methylmercury (MeHg) in aquatic ecosystems. As a result, wetland restoration could increase MeHg concentrations. Previous research has shown that addition of Fe[II] to wetland sediment can reduce MeHg production by decreasing concentrations of bioavailable Hg complexes with dissolved sulfur species. In this study, the potential for reducing MeHg production via an iron amendment was evaluated in laboratory microcosms that used intact sediments from a tidal marsh in San Francisco Bay. The microcosms were maintained under simulated tidal conditions and amended at four iron doses (0, 180, 360, and 720 g-Fe/m(2)). Two experiments were conducted: one with devegetated sediments and one with live wetland vegetation. Following iron addition to the devegetated sediments, porewater S[-II] concentrations decreased for each dose relative to the control with the average weekly export of MeHg in the surface water decreased by 82% and 89% for the two highest doses, respectively. Despite substantial variability within treatment groups, similar trends were observed for the vegetated microcosms. The results suggest that iron addition has the potential to provide a landscape-scale control on MeHg released by restored tidal wetlands; however, additional research is required to evaluate the efficacy of this approach under field conditions.

  12. Anaerobic biotransformation of trichlorofluoroethene in groundwater microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Vancheeswaran, S.; Semprini, L. . Dept. of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering); Hyman, M.R. . Dept. of Microbiology)

    1999-06-15

    The biological reduction of trichlorofluoroethene (TCFE) was investigated in anaerobic groundwater microcosms. TCFE was reductively dehalogenated by microorganisms to produce three dichlorofluoroethene isomers, with cis-1,2-dichlorofluoroethene (c-DCFE) being the main isomer formed. Further sequential biological transformation of these compounds to mono-chlorofluoroethene isomers was incomplete and occurred at much slower rates. The rates of TCFE reduction were compared to the rates of reduction of two common chlorinated solvents, perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), when present at similar concentrations. Aqueous concentrations ranged from 7.0 to 14.0 mg/L for TCFE and from 7.5 to 15.0 mg/L for PCE and TCE. Similar rates of PCE and TCE transformation relative to TCFE were observed in single-compound tests (PCE, TCE, and TCFE in separate microcosms) and when the contaminants were present together as mixtures in the microcosms. The close similarities between the time course and kinetics of TCFE degradation and the degradation of both PCE and TCE, when present at comparable initial concentrations, suggest that TCFE could potentially be used as a benign reactive tracer to measure in-situ rates of PCE and TCE transformation in contaminated environments.

  13. Microcosm investigations of phthalate behaviour in sewage treatment biofilms.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Roly; May, Eric; Williams, John

    2007-01-01

    Discharge from sewage works has been shown to be an important source of phthalates into the environment which is of major concern because some are toxic, suspected endocrine disruptors and recalcitrant. Laboratory trickle filter microcosms (continuous and re-circulating flow) were constructed and operated to investigate the biodegradation and adsorption of phthalates and also to isolate phthalate degrading microorganisms. It was found that adsorption was critical for the removal of both DEP (77.5%) and DEHP (55.7%) in continuous flow microcosms. The proportion of phthalates removed by biodegradation in the continuous flow microcosms was estimated. Re-circulating flow microcosms improved the removal of DEHP compared to continuous flow microcosms. Microcosm biofilm used for an enrichment culture on phthalate media isolated a varied group of microbes including Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria, yeasts and fungi. Bacteria species with all the necessary enzymes to degrade phthalic acid were isolated.

  14. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Smith, James A

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  15. Measurement of effective air diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Smith, James A.

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm 2/s over a range of air-filled porosity of 0.23-0.49. The experimental data were compared to several previously published relations that predict diffusion coefficients as a function of air-filled porosity and porosity. A multiple linear regression analysis was developed to determine if a modification of the exponents in Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation would better fit the experimental data. The literature relations appeared to generally underpredict the effective diffusion coefficient for the soil cores studied in this work. Inclusion of a particle-size distribution parameter, d10, did not significantly improve the fit of the linear regression equation. The effective diffusion coefficient and porosity data were used to recalculate estimates of diffusive flux through the subsurface made in a previous study performed at the field site. It was determined that the method of calculation used in the previous study resulted in an underprediction of diffusive flux from the subsurface. We conclude that although Millington's [Science 130 (1959) 100] relation works well to predict effective diffusion coefficients in homogeneous soils with relatively uniform particle-size distributions, it may be inaccurate for many natural soils with heterogeneous structure and/or non-uniform particle-size distributions.

  16. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  17. Cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Allen C.; Wilson, Timothy P.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory microcosms were used to determine the concentrations of oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that optimize trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation in sediment and ground-water samples from a TCE-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, Morris County, New Jersey. The mechanism for degradation is the cometabolic activity of methanotrophic bacteria. The laboratory data will be used to support a field study designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of combining air sparging with cometabolic degradation of TCE for the purpose of aquifer remediation. Microcosms were constructed in autoclaved 250-mL (milliliter) amber glass bottles with valves for repeated headspace sampling. Equal volumes (25 mL) of sediment and ground water, collected from a depth of 40 feet, were added. TCE was added to attain initial aqueous concentrations equal to the field level of 1,400 mu g/L (micrograms per liter). Nine microcosms were constructed with initial headspace O2 concentrations of 5%, 10%, or 14% and CH4 concentrations of 0.5%, 3%, or 5%, with nitrogen making up the balance. Sterile controls, controls without CH4, and controls without sediment were also constructed. A 4-mL gas sample was removed periodically and TCE, O2 , CH4 , and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured by using gas chromatography. As biodegradation proceeded, the decrease in O2, CH4 , and TCE concentrations and the production of CO2 were monitored. An initial acclimation period of at least 100 days was observed in those microcosms in which significant microbial activity occurred, as determined from decreases in O2 and CH4 concentrations and an increase in CO2 content. Degradation of TCE occurred with O2 concentrations of 2.7 to 8.7% and CH4 concentrations of 0.5 to 3.5%. Microcosms that initially contained 10% O2 and 3% CH4 showed the greatest microbial activity and the greatest amount of TCE degradation. The greatest rates of TCE degradation occurred when O2 and CH4 headspace concentrations reached

  18. Laboratory measurements of electrical resistivity versus water content on small soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robain, H.; Camerlynck, C.; Bellier, G.; Tabbagh, A.

    2003-04-01

    The assessment of soil water content variations more and more leans on geophysical methods that are non invasive and that allow a high spatial sampling. Among the different methods, DC electrical imaging is moving forward. DC Electrical resistivity shows indeed strong seasonal variations that principally depend on soil water content variations. Nevertheless, the widely used Archie's empirical law [1], that links resistivity with voids saturation and water conductivity is not well suited to soil materials with high clay content. Furthermore, the shrinking and swelling properties of soil materials have to be considered. Hence, it is relevant to develop new laboratory experiments in order to establish a relation between electrical resistivity and water content taking into account the rheological and granulometrical specificities of soil materials. The experimental device developed in IRD laboratory allows to monitor simultaneously (i) the water content, (ii) the electrical resistivity and (iii) the volume of a small cylindrical soil core (100cm3) put in a temperature controlled incubator (30°C). It provides both the shrinkage curve of the soil core (voids volume versus water content) and the electrical resistivity versus water content curve The modelisation of the shrinkage curve gives for each moisture state the water respectively contained in macro and micro voids [2], and then allows to propose a generalized Archie's like law as following : 1/Rs = 1/Fma.Rma + 1/Fmi.Rmi and Fi = Ai/(Vi^Mi.Si^Ni) with Rs : the soil resistivity. Fma and Fmi : the so called "formation factor" for macro and micro voids, respectively. Rma and Rmi : the resistivity of the water contained in macro and micro voids, respectively. Vi : the volume of macro and micro voids, respectively. Si : the saturation of macro and micro voids, respectively. Ai, Mi and Ni : adjustment coefficients. The variations of Rmi are calculated, assuming that Rma is a constant. Indeed, the rise of ionic

  19. Feasibility of large-scale aquatic microcosms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, T.; Wyman, R.L.; Logan, D.T.; Logan, C.M.; Lispi, D.R.

    1982-02-01

    Microcosms have been used to study a number of fundamental ecological principles and more recently to investigate the effects of man-made perturbations on ecosystems. In this report the feasibility of using large-scale microcosms to access aquatic impacts of power generating facilities is evaluated. Aquatic problems of concern to utilities are outlined, and various research approaches, including large and small microcosms, bioassays, and other laboratory experiments, are discussed. An extensive critical review and synthesis of the literature on recent microcosm research, which includes a comparison of the factors influencing physical, chemical, and biological processes in small vs large microcosms and in microcosms vs nature, led the authors to conclude that large-scale microcosms offer several advantages over other study techniques for particular types of problems. A hypothetical large-scale facility simulating a lake ecosystem is presented to illustrate the size, cost, and complexity of such facilities. The rationale for designing a lake-simulating large-scale microcosm is presented.

  20. Pyrene fate in surface soil microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, J.C.; Pfaender, F.K.

    1995-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous products of natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. They are also common contaminants at hazardous waste sites. This study assessed the fate of pyrene in pristine and previously exposed soils. Pyrene was incubated with surface soils in 1 liter microcosms. The study was performed using soil samples collected from the first 10 cm of a pristine forest soil profile and from soil at a former wood treatment site contaminated with creosote. Microcosms were constantly aerated and soil moisture was maintained at approximately 25%. Variations in the partitioning of pyrene incubated with soil into methanol and methylene chloride extractions were measured over time. Hydroxypyrene was found to be an abiotic transformation product in pristine soil. Products were separated from the extracts by HPLC and identified by GC/MS and compared to authentic standards. After an extended period of adaptation, mineralization began in the pristine soils while metabolism in the previously exposed soil was immediate. Fractionation of soils containing {sup 14}C-pyrene quantified a fraction of label which was neither degraded nor extractable using conventional methods. The amount of label in this fraction was related to the amount of microbial metabolism of the pyrene.

  1. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Janos, David P; Scott, John; Aristizábal, Catalina; Bowman, David M J S

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta) host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments) separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  2. Arbuscular-Mycorrhizal Networks Inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta Seedlings in Rain Forest Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Janos, David P.; Scott, John; Aristizábal, Catalina; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta) host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments) separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks–previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect–probably help to maintain the rain forest–savanna boundary. PMID:23460899

  3. A Reproducible Oral Microcosm Biofilm Model for Testing Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rudney, J.D.; Chen, R.; Lenton, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Jones, R.S.; Reilly, C.; Fok, A.S.; Aparicio, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Methods and Results Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite disks were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms were analyzed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose-pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veilonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. Conclusions This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. PMID:22925110

  4. Ecotoxicological assessment of biosolids by microcosms.

    PubMed

    Groth, Vitor Avelar; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana; da Silva, Eduardo Mendes; Niemeyer, Júlia Carina

    2016-10-01

    Biosolids have been applied as soil amendments to improve and maintain the soil fertility and faster plant growth. In spite of its beneficial use, the potential risks of land disposal should be analyzed, considering potential ecological receptors in soil and water. This work describes the use of an early warning laboratory microcosm system to evaluate the integrated ecotoxicological potential of two biosolids: BIO-1 and BIO-2 (18 and 28 months after landfarming, respectively), from an effluent treatment station in a petrochemical and industrial district. The endpoints related to habitat function were: a) germination, growth and biomass of Phaseolus vulgaris; b) survival, biomass and number of cocoons of Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta) and; c) reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola). The retention function was evaluated by testing the leachates using the tropical cladoceran Latonopsis australis (Cladocera) in a 48-h acute toxicity test, and growth of the aquatic plant Lemna minor in a 7-d chronic test. Tropical artificial soil (TAS) and a natural soil (NS) from the region were used as control soils. Results showed no chronic toxicity of BIO-1 and BIO-2 to the soil organisms tested, but acute toxicity of BIO-1 in the leachate for 50% of L. australis, and chronic toxicity of both biosolid leachates to L. minor (inhibition of growth rate), indicating potential risks to aquatic ecosystems. The results confirmed the ability of this microcosm system as a rapid tool to assess biosolid toxicity over time and its potential for hazardous waste characterization in environmental risk assessment, in a screening phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  6. Assessment of optimum aquatic microcosm design for pollution-impact studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harte, J.; Levy, D.; Rees, J.; Saegebarth, E.

    1980-09-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to determine and evaluate optimum design and operating conditions for pelagic lake microcosms (microcosm assessment studies) and to explore a possible use of such systems for toxicological testing (decomposition studies). Criteria selected for microcosm optimization were realism (tracking by the microcosms of the real lake used to stock the microcosms) and replicability of identically-initiated microcosms. In the assessment studies, a number of different pelagic microcosm configurations were studied, including the size of the microcosm containers (from 4 liters to 200 liters), the method of algal surface-growth prevention, and the degree of water mixing and aeration. In addition, the microcosm-lake comparisons were carried out at various seasons of the year, allowing us to determine the influence of natural seasonal factors on the chemical and biological differences between the lakes and the microcosms.

  7. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  8. Survival and function of a genetically engineered pseudomonad in aquatic sediment microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Pipke, R.; Wagner-Doebler, I.; Timmis, K.N.; Dwyer, D.F. )

    1992-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 FR1(pFRC20P) is a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) which is able to degrade chloro- and methylaromatics through a constructed ortho cleavage pathway. The fate of the GEM and its ability to degrade substituted aromatic compounds in two different aquatic sediments was investigated by using a microcosm system which consisted of intact layered sediment cores with an overlying water column. The GEM survived in Lake Plussee and in Rhine river sediments at densities of approximately 10{sup 5} bacteria per g (dry weight) (1 to 5% of the total CFU) throughout a 4-week period of investigation. According to several criteria, the microcosm system was stable and healthy throughout the experiment and the addition of GEM did not affect the total number of extractable CFU. When compared with uninoculated controls, the presence of the GEM enhanced the rate of degradation of a mixture of 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-methylbenzoate (25 {mu}m each) which had been added to the water column of the sediment cores.

  9. Determination of uranium isotopes in soil core samples collected on the JCO grounds after the criticality accident.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Muramatsu, Y; Tagami, K

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of the 1999 criticality accident in Tokai-mura on the U isotope composition in soils, U isotopes (235U and 238U) were determined with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for soil core samples collected on the JCO grounds after the accident. The 235U/238U ratios were higher than the natural ratio in most samples. The highest ratio observed was 0.0262. Although vertical profiles of the 235U/238U ratio differed among the soil cores, the ratios tended to be high at the surface and decreased with depth. The U concentration also changed with depth. The percentages of 235U in the excess U, estimated from the positive correlation between U concentration and the 235U/238U ratio in soil samples, were less than 4% by mass (mostly 1-3%) and were much lower than the enrichment of the U used in the uranium conversion building at the time of the criticality accident (18.8%). These findings indicate that enriched U had been released before the criticality accident during the U processing at JCO in connection with the reconversion of light water reactor fuel. Since the range of the U concentrations found was comparable to the range of uncontaminated Japanese surface soils, the amount of U added to the soil was judged negligible from a radiation protection viewpoint.

  10. Calibration of laboratory bioassays with results from microcosms and ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.; Franco, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of an organic contaminant (as synthetic coal-derived crude oil) were measured in outdoor ponds and indoor pond-derived microcosms and compared with results of laboratory bioassays. Ponds and microcosms were treated with the oil continuously for eight weeks. Concentrations of phenolic compounds spanned the range of acute and chronic toxicity concentrations determined in single-species bioassays. Effects were similar in microcosms and ponds, implying that microcosms are suitable models for field studies for some purposes. Significant changes in community metabolism and zooplankton populations occurred in microcosms and ponds exposed to less than 0.05 mg/L phenols, near the 28-day lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) for Daphnia magna. Ponds and microcosms were seriously damaged at concentrations near acute bioassay mean lethal concentration (LC/sub 50/) values. Indirect effects in the ecosystems occurred at all treatment levels, and included changes in water quality, replacement of sensitive taxa by more tolerant competitors, and changes in abundance of some species because of increases or decreases in their predators or grazers. The safe exposure level determined from the ecosystem experiments was accurately predicted by an application factor of 0.03 in conjunction with the most sensitive acute bioassay result (the D. magna 48-h LC/sub 50/). Less conservative extrapolation methods overestimated the safe concentration of this material in these ecosystems. 32 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Microbial degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) in soil slurry microcosms.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsi-Ling; Hwa, Mei-Yin; Lee, Yao-Chuan; Chang, Yu-Jie; Chang, Yi-Tang

    2016-03-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE), which has been identified as an endocrine disrupting compound, is used as brominated flame retardant, and this can result in serious bioaccumulation within ecological systems. The objective of this study was to explore DBDE bioremediation (25 mg/kg) using laboratory scale soil slurry microcosms. It was found that effective biodegradation of DBDE occurred in all microcosms. Various biometabolites were identified, namely polybrominated diphenyl ethers congeners and hydroxylated brominated diphenyl ether. Reductive debrominated products such as tri-BDE to hepta-BDE congeners were also detected, and their total concentrations ranged from 77.83 to 91.07 ng/g. The mechanism of DBDE biodegradation in soil slurry microcosms is proposed to consist of a series of biological reactions involving hydroxylation and debromination. Catechol 2,3-oxygenase genes, which are able to bring about meta-cleavage at specific unbrominated locations in carbon backbones, were identified as present during the DBDE biodegradation. No obvious effect on the ecological functional potential based on community-level physiological profiling was observed during DBDE biodegradation, and one major facultative Pseudomonas sp. (99 % similarity) was identified in the various soil slurry microcosms. These findings provide an important basis that should help environmental engineers to design future DBDE bioremediation systems that use a practical microcosm system. A bacterial-mixed culture can be selected as part of the bioaugmentation process for in situ DBDE bioremediation. A soil/water microcosm system can be successfully applied to carry out ex situ DBDE bioremediation.

  12. Reductive dehalogenation of dichlorobenzenes and monochlorobenzene to benzene in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fung, Jennifer M; Weisenstein, Brian P; Mack, E Erin; Vidumsky, John E; Ei, Tom A; Zinder, Stephen H

    2009-04-01

    Anaerobic microcosms were constructed using sediments from a historically chlorobenzene-contaminated site and were provided with yeast extract as an electron donor. In these methanogenic microcosms, all three isomers of dichlorobenzene (DCB) were reductively dehalogenated to monochlorobenzene (MCB) when added together or individually, with 1,2-DCB dehalogenation being the most rapid and 1,4-DCB the slowest. When nearly all of the DCBs were consumed, benzene was detected and its accumulation was concomitant with MCB disappearance. Small amounts of toluene were also detected along with benzene. Subsequent MCB doses were also converted to benzene, and benzene reached levels in excess of 5000 micromol/L in some microcosms. An initial DCB dose stimulated, and in some cases was necessary for, MCB dehalogenation. Subsequent doses of DCB or MCB were dehalogenated more rapidly than previous ones, consistent with a growth-related process. Addition of a ca. 4% inoculum from microcosms that had consumed DCBs or MCB stimulated DCB and MCB dehalogenation in fresh microcosms, also indicative of growth and suggests thatthe chlorobenzene-dehalogenating microorganisms in these microcosms are candidates for bioaugmentation at anaerobic DCB or MCB contaminated sites. These studies add to evidence that benzene production from chlorobenzenes needs to be considered when modeling processes at contaminated sites.

  13. Calibration of laboratory bioassays with results from microcosms and ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.; Franco, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Effects of an organic contaminant (a synthetic coal-derived crude oil) were measured in outdoor ponds and indoor pond-derived microcosms and compared with results of laboratory bioassays. Ponds and microcosms were treated with the oil continuously for 8 weeks. Concentrations of phenolic compounds (the major water-soluble constituents of the oil) spanned the range of acute and chronic toxicity concentrations determined in single-species bioassays. Effects were similar in microcosms and ponds, implying that microcosms are suitable models for field studies for some purposes. Significant changes in community metabolism and zooplankton populations occurred in microcosms and ponds exposed to less than 0.05 mg/litre phenols, near the 28-day Lowest Observed Effect Concentration for Daphnia magna. Ponds and microcosms were seriously damaged at concentrations near acute bioassay LC50 values. Indirect effects in the ecosystems occurred at all treatment levels, and included changes in water quality, replacement of sensitive taxa by more tolerant competitors, and changes in abundance of some species because of increases or decreases in their predators or grazers. The safe exposure level determined from the ecosystem experiments were accurately predicted by an application factor of 0.03 in conjunction with the most sensitive acute bioassay result (the D. magna 48-h LC50). Less conservative extrapolation methods overestimated the safe concentration of this material in these ecosystems. 28 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Effect of organic loading on nitrification and denitrification in a marine sediment microcosm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Sloth, N.P.; Kaspar, H.F.; Blackburn, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of organic additions on nitrification and denitrification were examined in sediment microcosms. The organic material, heat killed yeast, had a C/N ratio of 7.5 and was added to sieved, homogenized sediments. Four treatments were compared: no addition (control, 30 g dry weight (dw) m-2 mixed throughout the 10 cm sediment column (30 M), 100 g dw m-2 mixed throughout sediments (100M), and 100 g dw m-2 mixed into top 1 cm (100S). After the microcosms had been established for 7-11 days, depth of O2 penetration, sediment-water fluxes and nitrification rates were measured. Nitrification rates were measured using three different techniques: N-serve and acetylene inhibition in intact cores, and nitrification potentials in slurries. Increased organic additions decreased O2 penetration from 2.7 to 0.2 mm while increasing both O2 consumption, from 30 to 70 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, and NO3- flux into sediments. Nitrification rates in intact cores were similar for the two methods. Highest rates occurred in the 30 M treatment, while the lowest rate was measured in the 100S treatment. Total denitrification rates (estimated from nitrification and nitrate fluxes) increased with increased organic addition, because of the high concentrations of NO3- (40 ??M) in the overlying water. The ratio of nitrification: denitrification was used as an indication of the importance of nitrification as the NO3- supply for denitrification. This ratio decreased from 1.55 to 0.05 with increased organic addition.

  15. MRI of intact plants.

    PubMed

    Van As, Henk; Scheenen, Tom; Vergeldt, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transport in the stem, e.g., as a function of environmental (stress) conditions. Non-spatially resolved portable NMR is becoming available to study leaf water content and distribution of water in different (sub-cellular) compartments. These parameters directly relate to stomatal water conductance, CO(2) uptake, and photosynthesis. MRI applied on plants is not a straight forward extension of the methods discussed for (bio)medical MRI. This educational review explains the basic physical principles of plant MRI, with a focus on the spatial resolution, factors that determine the spatial resolution, and its unique information for applications in plant water relations that directly relate to plant photosynthetic activity. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

  16. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  17. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  18. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on saliva-derived microcosms.

    PubMed

    Pham, Lien Chi; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Exterkate, Rob A M; Terefework, Zewdu; de Soet, Johannes J; ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2011-02-01

    The probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is shown to hamper the presence of mutans streptococci in saliva and may have positive effects on oral health. We investigated the effects of LGG on the cariogenic potential and microbial composition of saliva-derived microcosms. Single and dual species biofilms of LGG and Streptococcus mutans, and saliva-derived microcosms with or without LGG were grown in an Active Attachment Biofilm model. The microcosms were grown on bovine dentin/enamel discs in the presence or absence of sucrose (suc+/suc-). The presence of LGG was determined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and real-time PCR. Mutans streptococci (MS) and total viable counts, pH of the spent medium, capacity of lactate formation and integrated mineral loss in dentin was assessed. MLPA was used for identification and relative quantification of 20 oral microorganisms in the microcosms. Principal Component Analysis was applied to MLPA data. LGG inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual species biofilms and did not affect the pH. LGG established in saliva-derived microcosms and reduced MS counts significantly, but did not affect pH or dentin demineralization. Simultaneous growth of the microcosms with LGG under heavy cariogenic conditions (suc+) introduced a compositional shift in the microbial community. The CFU, real-time PCR and MLPA data correlated significantly. We conclude that LGG established into and inhibited the growth of MS in complex saliva-derived biofilms, but this had no significant effect on cariogenic potential of the microcosms. This suggests that other microorganisms besides MS were responsible for increased cariogenicity of sucrose-exposed biofilms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long Term Thawing Experiments on Intact Cores of Arctic Mineral Cryosol: Implications for Greenhouse Gas Feedbacks from Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Whyte, L. G.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral cryosols comprise >87% of Arctic tundra. Much attention has focused on high-organic carbon cryosols and how they will respond to global warming. The biogeochemical processes related to the greenhouse gas release from mineral cryosols, however, have not been fully explored. To this end, seventeen intact cores of active layer and underlying permafrost of mineral cryosol from Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada, were subjected to 85 weeks of thawing at 4.5°C under various treatment regimes. The fluxes of CO2 and CH4 across the atmosphere-soil boundary and vertical profiles of the gas and water chemistry and the metagenomes were determined. The flux measurements were compared to those of microcosms and field measurements. The main conclusions were as follows: 1) CO2 emission rates from the intact cores do not behave in the typical fast to slow carbon pool fashion that typify microcosm experiments. The CO2 emission rates from the intact cores were much slower than those from the microcosm initially, but steadily increased with time, overtaking and then exceeding microcosm release rates after one year. 2) The increased CO2 flux from thawing permafrost could not be distinguished from that of control cores until after a full year of thawing. 3) Atmospheric CH4 oxidation was present in all intact cores regardless of whether they are water saturated or not, but after one year it had diminished to the point of being negligible. Over that same time the period the metagenomic data recorded a significant decline in the proportion of high-affinity methanotrophs. 4) Thaw slumps in the cores temporarily increased the CH4 oxidation and the CO2 emission rates. 5) The microbial community structures varied significantly by depth with methanotrophs being more abundant in above 35 cm depth than below 35 cm depth. 6) Other than the diminishment of Type II methanotrophs, the microbial community structure varied little after one week of thawing, nor even after 18 months of thaw.

  20. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  1. Effects of pharmaceutical mixtures in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Richards, Sean M; Wilson, Christian J; Johnson, David J; Castle, Dawn M; Lam, Monica; Mabury, Scott A; Sibley, Paul K; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals have a wide range of biological properties and are released into the environment in relatively large amounts, yet little information is available regarding their effects or potential ecological risks. We exposed outdoor aquatic microcosms to combinations of ibuprofen (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug), fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), and ciprofloxacin (a DNA gyrase-inhibiting antibiotic) at concentrations of 6, 10, and 10 microg/L, respectively (low treatment [LT]); 60, 100, and 100 microg/L, respectively (medium treatment [MT]); and 600, 1,000, and 1,000 microg/L, respectively (high treatment [HT]). We maintained these concentrations for 35 d. Few responses were observed in the LT; however, effects were observed in the MT and HT. Fish mortality occurred in the MT (<35 d) and in the HT (<4 d). Phytoplankton increased in abundance and decreased in diversity (number of taxa) in the HT, with consistent trends being observed in the MT and LT. Zooplankton also showed increased abundance and decreases in diversity in the HT, with consistent trends being observed in the MT. Multivariate analyses for zooplankton and phytoplankton suggested interactions between these communities. Lemna gibba and Myriophyllum spp. showed mortality in the HT; growth of L. gibba was also reduced in the MT. Bacterial abundance did not change in the HT. All responses were observed at concentrations well below the equivalent pharmacologically active concentrations in mammals. Although the present data do not suggest that ibuprofen, fluoxetine, and ciprofloxacin are individually causing adverse effects in surface-water environments, questions remain about additive responses from mixtures.

  2. Soil coring at multiple field environments can directly quantify variation in deep root traits to select wheat genotypes for breeding

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, A. P.; Rebetzke, G. J.; Kirkegaard, J. A.; Christopher, J.; Richards, R. A.; Watt, M.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to incorporate deep root traits into future wheat varieties to increase access to stored soil water during grain development, which is twice as valuable for yield as water captured at younger stages. Most root phenotyping efforts have been indirect studies in the laboratory, at young plant stages, or using indirect shoot measures. Here, soil coring to 2 m depth was used across three field environments to directly phenotype deep root traits on grain development (depth, descent rate, density, length, and distribution). Shoot phenotypes at coring included canopy temperature depression, chlorophyll reflectance, and green leaf scoring, with developmental stage, biomass, and yield. Current varieties, and genotypes with breeding histories and plant architectures expected to promote deep roots, were used to maximize identification of variation due to genetics. Variation was observed for deep root traits (e.g. 111.4–178.5cm (60%) for depth; 0.09–0.22cm/°C day (144%) for descent rate) using soil coring in the field environments. There was significant variation for root traits between sites, and variation in the relative performance of genotypes between sites. However, genotypes were identified that performed consistently well or poorly at both sites. Furthermore, high-performing genotypes were statistically superior in root traits than low-performing genotypes or commercial varieties. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between green leaf score (–0.5), CTD (0.45), and rooting depth and a positive correlation for chlorophyll reflectance (0.32). Shoot phenotypes did not predict other root traits. This study suggests that field coring can directly identify variation in deep root traits to speed up selection of genotypes for breeding programmes. PMID:24963000

  3. In-situ 1-D and 2-D mapping of soil core and rock samples using the LIBS long spark

    SciTech Connect

    Rodolfa, C. T.; Cremers, D. A.; Ebinger, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    LIBS is being developed for stand-off interrogation of samples up to 20 m from a lander or rover. Stand-off capability is important to access targets not conveniently located for in-situ analysis. On the other hand, in-situ techniques are still important and are being developed for future missions such as MSL. Retrieved samples may consist of loose soils, subsurface soil cores, drilled rock cores, and ice cores. For these sample types, it is possible to employ LIBS analysis and take advantage of LIBS capabilities. These include: (1) rapid analysis, (2) good detection sensitivity for many elements, (3) good spatial resolution (3-100 microns), and (4) ability to clean a surface prior to analysis. Using LIBS, it is possible to perform a 1-dimensional analysis, for example, determining element concentrations along a soil core, or a 2-dimensional mapping of the sample surface using a unique 'long' spark. Two-dimensional sampling has been developed previously by focusing the laser pulses as small spots on the sample and then moving the sample a short distance between sampling locations. Although demonstrated, this method is time consuming, requiring a large number of shots to span even a small region (for 3 micron resolution, an area 600 x 480 microns sampled in {approx} 30 min using a 20 Hz laser). For a spacecraft instrument, the ability to more rapidly prepare a 2D elemental spatial map will be desirable. Here they discuss the use of LIBS for sampling along a core in 1D (detection of carbon) and for 2D mapping of a rock face.

  4. Soil coring at multiple field environments can directly quantify variation in deep root traits to select wheat genotypes for breeding.

    PubMed

    Wasson, A P; Rebetzke, G J; Kirkegaard, J A; Christopher, J; Richards, R A; Watt, M

    2014-11-01

    We aim to incorporate deep root traits into future wheat varieties to increase access to stored soil water during grain development, which is twice as valuable for yield as water captured at younger stages. Most root phenotyping efforts have been indirect studies in the laboratory, at young plant stages, or using indirect shoot measures. Here, soil coring to 2 m depth was used across three field environments to directly phenotype deep root traits on grain development (depth, descent rate, density, length, and distribution). Shoot phenotypes at coring included canopy temperature depression, chlorophyll reflectance, and green leaf scoring, with developmental stage, biomass, and yield. Current varieties, and genotypes with breeding histories and plant architectures expected to promote deep roots, were used to maximize identification of variation due to genetics. Variation was observed for deep root traits (e.g. 111.4-178.5cm (60%) for depth; 0.09-0.22cm/°C day (144%) for descent rate) using soil coring in the field environments. There was significant variation for root traits between sites, and variation in the relative performance of genotypes between sites. However, genotypes were identified that performed consistently well or poorly at both sites. Furthermore, high-performing genotypes were statistically superior in root traits than low-performing genotypes or commercial varieties. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between green leaf score (-0.5), CTD (0.45), and rooting depth and a positive correlation for chlorophyll reflectance (0.32). Shoot phenotypes did not predict other root traits. This study suggests that field coring can directly identify variation in deep root traits to speed up selection of genotypes for breeding programmes.

  5. Metal binding in soil cores and sediments in the vicinity of a dammed agricultural and industrial watershed.

    PubMed

    Kanbar, Hussein Jaafar; Hanna, Nour; El Samrani, Antoine G; Kazpard, Véronique; Kobaissi, Ahmad; Harb, Nafez; Amacha, Nabil

    2014-12-01

    The environment is witnessing a downgrade caused by the amelioration of the industrial and agricultural sectors, namely, soil and sediment compartments. For those reasons, a comparative study was done between soil cores and sediments taken from two locations in the Qaraaoun reservoir, Lebanon. The soil cores were partitioned into several layers. Each layer was analyzed for several physicochemical parameters, such as functional groups, particle size distribution, ζ-potential, texture, pH, electric conductivity, total dissolved solids, organic matter, cation exchange capacity, active and total calcareous, available sodium and potassium, and metal content (cadmium, copper, and lead). The metal content of each site was linked to soil composition and characteristics. The two sites showed distinguishable characteristics for features such as organic matter, pH, mineral fraction, calcareous, and metal content. The samples taken toward the south site (Q1), though contain lower organic matter than the other but are more calcareous, showed higher metal content in comparison to the other site (Q2) (average metal content of Q1 > Q2; for Cd 3.8 > 1.8 mg/kg, Cu 28.6 > 21.9 mg/kg, Pb 26.7 > 19 mg/kg). However, the metal content in this study did not correlate as much to the organic matter; rather, it was influenced by the location of the samples with respect to the dam, the reservoir's hydrodynamics, the calcareous nature of the soil, and the variation of the industrial and agricultural influence on each site.

  6. Reduction of nitrate in aquifer microcosms by carbon additions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obenhuber, Donald C.; Lowrance , Richard

    1991-01-01

    Aquifer microcosms were used to examine the effects of NO−3 and C amendments on groundwater from the Claiborne aquifer. Nitrate concentrations of 12.17 mg L−1 in aquifer microcosms were reduced 0.92%/d to 5.84 mg L−1 by the addition of 10 mg C L−1 for 35 d. Nitrate disappearance correlated with increases in number of denitrifiers and dissolved N2O concentration and decreases in dissolved oxygen, suggesting biological denitrification. Nitrate/chloride ratios decreased in microcosms with 10 mg C L−1 added and then increased when the C addition was removed. Carbon additions of 0.4 mg C L−1 had no effect on the microbial or chemical properties of the microcosms. Nitrous oxide levels in wells sampling the Claiborne aquifer showed an increase with depth, indicating N2O production within the aquifer. Microcosms are useful tools to examine biological transformations of chemical contaminants in unconsolidated aquifer material. The remediation of NO−3 contaminated aquifers by organic infusion is possible and appears to be a function of microbial denitrification.

  7. Effectiveness of intact capture media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, P.; Aubert, J.; Brownlee, D.; Hrubesh, L.; Williams, J.; Albee, A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of capturing cosmic dust at hypervelocity has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the unintended Solar Max spacecraft. This technology will enable a comet coma sample return mission and be important for the earth orbital cosmic dust collection mission, i.e., the Space Station Cosmic Dust Collection Facility. Since the only controllable factor in an intact capture of cosmic dust is the capturing medium, characterizing the effectiveness and properties of available capture media would be very important in the development of the technique for capturing hypervelocity cosmic dust intact. We have evaluated various capture underdense media for the relative effectiveness for intact capture. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  8. PCB dechlorination enhancement in Anacostia River sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Valdis; Park, Joong-Wook; Son, Eun-Kyeu; Rodenburg, Lisa A; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M; Fennell, Donna E

    2009-10-01

    In situ treatment of PCB contaminated sediments via microbial dechlorination is a promising alternative to dredging, which may be reserved for only the most contaminated areas. Reductive dechlorination of low levels of weathered PCB mixtures typical of urban environments may occur at slow rates. Here, we report that biostimulation and bioaugmentation enhanced dechlorination of low concentration (2.1 mg PCBs/kg dry weight) historical PCBs in microcosms prepared with Anacostia River, Washington, DC, sediment. Treatments included electron donors butyrate, lactate, propionate and acetate (1 mM each); alternate halogenated electron acceptors (haloprimers) tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB, 25 microM), pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB, 25 microM), or 2,3,4,5,6-PCB (PCB116, 2.0 microM); and/or bioaugmentation with a culture containing Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (3 x 10(6)cells/mL). Dechlorination rates were enhanced in microcosms receiving bioaugmentation, PCNB and PCNB plus bioaugmentation, compared to other treatments. Microcosm subcultures generated after 415 days and spiked with PCB116 showed sustained capacity for dechlorination of PCB116 in PCNB, PCNB plus bioaugmentation, and TeCB treatments, relative to other treatments. Analysis of Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes showed that TeCB and PCNB increased native Dehalococcoides spp. from the Pinellas subgroup; however this increase was correlated to enhanced dechlorination of low concentration weathered PCBs only in PCNB-amended microcosms. D. ethenogenes strain 195 was detected only in bioaugmented microcosms and decreased over 281 days. Bioaugmentation with D. ethenogenes strain 195 increased PCB dechlorination rates initially, but enhanced capacity for dechlorination of a model congener, PCB116, after 415 days occurred only in microcosms with enhanced native Dehalococcoides spp.

  9. Coalgebraic Components in a Many-Sorted Microcosm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasuo, Ichiro; Heunen, Chris; Jacobs, Bart; Sokolova, Ana

    The microcosm principle, advocated by Baez and Dolan and formalized for Lawvere theories lately by three of the authors, has been applied to coalgebras in order to describe compositional behavior systematically. Here we further illustrate the usefulness of the approach by extending it to a many-sorted setting. Then we can show that the coalgebraic component calculi of Barbosa are examples, with compositionality of behavior following from microcosm structure. The algebraic structure on these coalgebraic components corresponds to variants of Hughes’ notion of arrow, introduced to organize computations in functional programming.

  10. Soil architecture relationships with dynamic soil physical processes: a conceptual study using natural, artificial, and 3D-printed soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per; Dal Ferro, Nicola; Morari, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Pore system architecture is a key feature for understanding physical, biological and chemical processes in soils. Development of visualisation technics, especially x-ray CT, during recent years has been useful in describing the complex relationships between soil architecture and soil functions. We believe that combining visualization with physical models is a step further towards a better understanding of these relationships. We conducted a concept study using natural, artificial and 3D-printed soil cores. Eight natural soil cores (100 cm3) were sampled in a cultivated stagnic Luvisol at two depths (topsoil and subsoil), representing contrasting soil pore systems. Cylinders (100 cm3) were produced from plastic or from autoclaved aerated concrete. Holes of diameters 1.5 and 3 mm were drilled in the cylinder direction for the plastic cylinder and for one of the AAC cylinders. All natural and artificial cores were scanned in a micro x-ray CT scanner at a resolution of 35 µm. The reconstructed image of each soil core was printed with 3D multijet printing technology at a resolution of 29 µm. In some reconstructed digital volumes of the natural soil cores, pores of different sizes (equivalent diameter of 35, 70, 100, and 200 µm) were removed before additional 3D printing. Effective air-filled porosity, Darcian air permeability, and oxygen diffusion were measured on all natural, artificial and printed cores. The comparison of the natural and the artificial cores emphasized the difference in pore architecture between topsoil (sponge like) and subsoil (dominated by large vertical macropores). This study showed the high potential of using printed soil cores for understanding soil pore functions. The results confirm the suitability of the Ball model partitioning the pore system into arterial, marginal and remote pores to describe effects of soil structure on gas transport.

  11. Metagenome and metatranscriptome data for Rifle CMT-03 laboratory microcosm experiment completed in April 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jewell, Talia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Karaoz, Ulas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bill, Markus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chakraborty, Romy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brodie, Eoin L [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Kenneth Hurst [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beller, Harry R [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Sediment samples were collected during installation of monitoring borehole CMT-03. Microcosms were constructed and inoculated under anerobic conditions with these sediments and anaerobic Rifle artificial groundwater. Microcosm metagenomes and metatranscriptomes were sampled every 5 days for a period of 20 days. The dataset gives gene-level annotations, binning, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic coverages for these microcosms.

  12. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, D.W.; Pullmann, E.R.; Peterson, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hydrological changes, particularly alterations in water table level, may largely overshadow the more direct effects of global temperature increase upon carbon cycling in arctic and subarctic wetlands. Frozen cores (n=40) of intact soils and vegetation were collected from a bog near Fairbanks, Alaska, and fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and Co in response to water table variation were studied under controlled conditions in the Duke University phytotron. Core microcosms thawed to a 20-cm depth over 30 days under a 20 hour photoperiod with a day/night temperature regime of 20/10{degrees}C. After 30 days the water table in 20 microcosms was decreased from the soil surface to -15 cm and maintained at the soil surface in 20 control cores. Outward fluxes of CO{sub 2} (9-16 g m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) and CO (3-4 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) were greatest during early thaw and decreased to near zero for both gases before the water table treatment started. Lower water table tripled CO{sub 2} flux to the atmosphere when compared with control cores. Carbon monoxide was emitted at low rates from high water table cores and consumed by low water table cores. Methane fluxes were low (<1 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) in all cores during thaw. High water table cores increased CH{sub 4} flux to 8-9 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1} over 70 days and remained high relative to the low water table cores (<0.74 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}). Although drying of wetland taiga soils may decrease CH{sub 4} emissions to the atmosphere, the associated increase in CO{sub 2} due to aerobic respiration will likely increase the global warming potential of gas emissions from these soils. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Modeling of penconazole and metalaxyl mobility in undisturbed vineyard soil cores, unamended and amended with spent mushroom substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Benito, Jesus Maria; Mamy, Laure; Rodriguez-Cruz, Maria Sonia; Sanchez-Martin, Maria Jesus

    2013-04-01

    In Spain, one of the main producers of mushrooms in the world, a huge amount of the substrates used for the growth of mushrooms have to be eliminated after harvest. However, this substrate represents a promising amendment because of its high organic matter content and, in particular, it could be used in vineyard soils because they generally are poor in organic matter. But the effect of this amendment on the fate in soils of fungicides that are massively used in vineyards is unknown. Therefore, the objectives of this work were to model the mobility of two fungicides, penconazole and metalaxyl, in undisturbed vineyard soil columns using the PRZM3 (Pesticide Root Zone Model) parameterized with laboratory data, and to compare the simulations with the experimental results obtained in mobility studies. Soil cores (40 cm x 9 cm d.i.) were collected from experimental plots in three different vineyard soils of La Rioja (Spain). Three different treatments were tested in each soil: natural (control) soil, soil amended with fresh spent mushroom substrate, and soil amended with composted spent mushroom substrate. The leaching of fungicides was studied in non-incubated and incubated (outdoors for 77 days) soil cores under unsaturated flow conditions. In general, the addition of mushroom substrates decreased the leaching of fungicides compared to control soils. For the most hydrophobic fungicide, penconazole, the predictions obtained by the model were highly correlated (r > 0.88) with the experimental results. Penconazole was never observed in the leachates, its vertical distribution was similar within all soil profiles, and retention of almost all the fungicide was into the topsoil (0-8cm). For the less hydrophobic fungicide, metalaxyl, and the CGA 62826 metabolite generated from its degradation during the experimental period, PRZM3 was not able to reproduce the observations and it was necessary to calibrate the model. After calibration, the correlation between model predictions

  14. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF ALKYLBENZENES IN LABORATORY MICROCOSMS REPRESENTING AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microcosm study was performed to document the anaerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m- xylene, and/or o-xylene in petroleum-contaminated aquifer sediment from sites in Michigan (MI) and North Carolina (NC) and relate the results to previous field investiga...

  15. CHARACTERIZING THE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN SABRE MICROCOSM STUDIES (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, laboratory microcosm and column studies were conducte...

  16. METRICS OF PERFORMANCE FOR THE SABRE MICROCOSM STUDY (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, a laboratory microcosm study was conducted to provide...

  17. Effects of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin in indoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Harry; Reichman, Erik P; van den Brink, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the parasiticide ivermectin were assessed in plankton-dominated indoor microcosms. Ivermectin was applied once at concentrations of 30, 100, 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 ng/l. The half-life (dissipation time 50%; DT₅₀) of ivermectin in the water phase ranged from 1.1 to 8.3 days. The lowest NOEC(community) that could be derived on an isolated sampling from the microcosm study by means of multivariate techniques was 100 ng/l. The most sensitive species in the microcosm study were the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia sp. (no observed effect concentration, NOEC = 30 ng/l) and Chydorus sphaericus (NOEC = 100 ng/l). The amphipod Gammarus pulex was less sensitive to ivermectin, showing consistent statistically significant reductions at the 1000-ng/l treatment level. Copepoda taxa decreased directly after application of ivermectin in the highest treatment but had already recovered at day 20 posttreatment. Indirect effects (e.g., increase of rotifers, increased primary production) were observed at the highest treatment level starting only on day 13 of the exposure phase. Cladocera showed the highest sensitivity to ivermectin in both standard laboratory toxicity tests as well as in the microcosm study. This study demonstrates that simple plankton-dominated test systems for assessing the effects of ivermectin can produce results similar to those obtained with large complex outdoor systems.

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN SABRE MICROCOSM STUDIES (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, laboratory microcosm and column studies were conducte...

  19. METRICS OF PERFORMANCE FOR THE SABRE MICROCOSM STUDY (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, a laboratory microcosm study was conducted to provide...

  20. Effects of the Veterinary Pharmaceutical Ivermectin in Indoor Aquatic Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Harry; Reichman, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the parasiticide ivermectin were assessed in plankton-dominated indoor microcosms. Ivermectin was applied once at concentrations of 30, 100, 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 ng/l. The half-life (dissipation time 50%; DT50) of ivermectin in the water phase ranged from 1.1 to 8.3 days. The lowest NOECcommunity that could be derived on an isolated sampling from the microcosm study by means of multivariate techniques was 100 ng/l. The most sensitive species in the microcosm study were the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia sp. (no observed effect concentration, NOEC = 30 ng/l) and Chydorus sphaericus (NOEC = 100 ng/l). The amphipod Gammarus pulex was less sensitive to ivermectin, showing consistent statistically significant reductions at the 1000-ng/l treatment level. Copepoda taxa decreased directly after application of ivermectin in the highest treatment but had already recovered at day 20 posttreatment. Indirect effects (e.g., increase of rotifers, increased primary production) were observed at the highest treatment level starting only on day 13 of the exposure phase. Cladocera showed the highest sensitivity to ivermectin in both standard laboratory toxicity tests as well as in the microcosm study. This study demonstrates that simple plankton-dominated test systems for assessing the effects of ivermectin can produce results similar to those obtained with large complex outdoor systems. PMID:20422169

  1. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF ALKYLBENZENES IN LABORATORY MICROCOSMS REPRESENTING AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microcosm study was performed to document the anaerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m- xylene, and/or o-xylene in petroleum-contaminated aquifer sediment from sites in Michigan (MI) and North Carolina (NC) and relate the results to previous field investiga...

  2. Comparison of laboratory batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays.

    PubMed

    Clément, Bernard J P; Delhaye, Hélène L; Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle G

    2014-10-01

    Since 1997, we have been developing a protocol for ecotoxicological bioassays in 2-L laboratory microcosms and have applied it to the study of various pollutants and ecotoxicological risk assessment scenarios in the area of urban facilities and transport infrastructures. The effects on five different organisms (micro-algae, duckweeds, daphnids, amphipods, chironomids) are assessed using biological responses such as growth, emergence (chironomids), reproduction (daphnids) and survival, with a duration of exposure of 3 weeks. This bioassay has mainly been used as a batch bioassay, i.e., the water was not renewed during the test. A flow-through microcosm bioassay has been developed recently, with the assumption that conditions for the biota should be improved, variability reduced, and the range of exposure patterns enlarged (e.g., the possibility of maintaining constant exposure in the water column). This paper compares the results obtained in batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays, using cadmium as a model toxicant. As expected, the stabilization of physico-chemical parameters, increased organism fitness and reduced variability were observed in the flow-through microcosm bioassay.

  3. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  4. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  5. Ecological studies of cadmium and nutrient enrichment in laboratory microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, P.F.

    1981-01-01

    Phase I was a 4 x 4 factorial experiment with static microcosoms designed to test the subsidy-stress hypothesis and focused on the interactive effects of cadmium and nutrient enrichment. Phase II was a 2 x 4 factorial experiment with flowthrough microcosms designed to test the biomass-increment hypothesis and focused on temporal aspects of system behavior in response to phosphorus enrichment and chronic versus acute cadmium perturbations. Phase I results supported the subsidy-stress hypothesis with respect to cadmium inputs. There was a significant interaction effect of cadmium and nutrients, with high nutrient levels reducing the stress effect of cadmium. Phase II results generally supported the biomass-increment hypothesis with the exception that the element most limiting in system inputs (phosphorus) showed little or no output response to cadmium perturbations. The general community level response to cadmium pertubations was a shift from a grazing to a detritus food chain. Conclusions relevant to toxicity screening in microcosms are: (1) of the variables measured, community metabolism, community composition by trophic groups, and output/input rations for NO/sub 3/-N, Mn and Fe, provided the most consistent indicators of system response to cadmium. (2) Nutrient enrichment and phosphorus limitation significantly influenced cadmium effects on most of the variables studied. (3) Pulsed cadmium inputs early in succession significantly affected system response to cadmium pulses later in succession. A hierarchical procedure for screening a suspected toxic substance is discussed, which includes: (1) static microcosms, (2) flowthrough microcosms, and (3) microcosm subsamples from specific natural ecosystems. Each step results in increased information about effects of a toxicant and each step more closely approximates natural ecosystems.

  6. Creosote toxicity to photosynthesis and plant growth in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Marwood, Christopher A; Bestari, K T Jim; Gensemer, Robert W; Solomon, Keith R; Greenberg, Bruce M

    2003-05-01

    To assess photosynthesis as a bioindicator of toxicity from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the response of chlorophyll-a fluorescence to creosote exposure was compared with effects on population-level plant growth. Large, outdoor, freshwater microcosms containing Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) received either a single application or multiple applications of liquid creosote at nominal concentrations from 0.109 to 32.7 mg L(-1). For several weeks following treatment, photosynthetic electron transport was measured using pulse amplitude-modulated chlorophyll-a fluorescence. The maximum efficiency of photosystem II electron transport (Fv/Fm) and the quantum yield of photochemistry (deltaF/F'm) were diminished in plants shortly after the addition of creosote. In microcosms that received a single treatment of creosote only, the 50% effective concentrations (EC50s), expressed as the aqueous concentration of 15 of the most abundant PAHs, were 0.28 mg L(-1) for Fv/Fm and 0.30 mg L(-1) for deltaF/F'm. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence was diminished to a greater extent in microcosms that received multiple treatments of creosote, with EC50s of 0.13 mg L(-1) for Fv/Fm and 0.10 mg L(-1) for deltaF/F'm. Plant biomass accumulation was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner in all microcosms treated with creosote, but this inhibition occurred to a greater degree in microcosms treated with multiple creosote applications. The response of chlorophyll-a fluorescence, measured only 8 d after creosote treatment, was similar to plant growth over the entire growing season, indicating that this technique can be used to estimate potential effects of contaminants before detrimental impacts on populations.

  7. Vertical distributions of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in an agricultural soil core from the Guanzhong Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongxuan; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations and distributions of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an agricultural soil core in the Guanzhong Basin, China were determined. Overall, p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE were dominant contaminants and accounted for approximately 48.4 and 23.3% of the total detected DDTs. Low chlorinated PCBs (PCB 28 and PCB 52) were generally detected at higher concentrations and more frequently than high chlorinated PCBs. The peak values of ∑DDT (12.92 ng/g), ∑HCH (2.25 ng/g), and ∑PCB (3.44 ng/g) occurred in the 10-15, 15-20, and 5-10 cm sections, respectively. The negative correlation between the organochlorine pesticide (OCP) concentrations and the soil depths and the relatively high p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE ratios in the surface soils indicated that these chemicals were recently used illegally, despite their official ban in 1983. The increase in the ratio of α-/γ-HCH with increasing soil depth indicated that the use of lindane decreased relative to the use of technical HCHs in recent years.

  8. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  9. Recent advances in the use of estuarine meiobenthos to assess contaminated sediment effects in multi-species whole sediment microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Schizas, N.V.; Donelan, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Many marine meiobenthic taxa (i.e. invertebrates passing a 1-mm sieve but retaining on a 0.063 mm sieve) are ideal for ``whole-sediment`` and porewater bioassay of sedimented pollutants. Annual production of meiobenthos is 5--10 times that of the more commonly studied macrobenthos, and > 95% of all meiobenthos live in the oxic zone of muddy sediments at densities of 4--12 million per M{sup 2}. Most spend their entire lifecycles, burrowing freely and feeding on/within the sediment:porewater matrix, many taxa undergo 10--14 generations per year, most larval/juvenile stages are benthic, and many have easily quantifiable reproductive output. Furthermore, many meiobenthic taxa can be cultured indefinitely over multiple life-cycles within simple sediment microcosms consisting of sealed whole-sediment cores collected intact from intertidal mudflats. The authors describe several recent technical developments exploiting meiofaunal sediment culture for rapid contaminated sediment bioassays of toxicant effects on survival, reproduction and population growth of meiobenthic taxa in whole-sediment microcosms. Currently meiobenthic copepods, nematodes, foraminifers and polychaetes are being continuously cultured to study these parameters under exposure to model sediment-associated toxicants (e.g. cadmium). Bioassays are run for 21-d under flowing seawater. With this approach, fertile benthic copepods (e.g. Amphiascus tenuiremis) can be added to core microcosms to assess survival and growth of a fixed population cohort. All other meiobenthic taxa are enumerated relative to controls and evaluated for toxicant effects on higher order community-level endpoints. This approach exploits meiobenthos` high abundance and rapid reproductive rates to yield on a micro scale better endpoints than much larger sediment mesocosms targeted at macrofaunal endpoints.

  10. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of copper in outdoor freshwater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-05-01

    This study characterizes the effects of copper (Cu) on Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) and mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) using a replicated outdoor microcosm design. Soils used in this study were collected from two Cu-enriched citrus agricultural sites in South Florida (Agler property (AGLR) in St. Lucie County and Sunrise Boys property (SRB) in Palm Beach County) and a reference site (Equus property) in St. Lucie County. The study included a 5-week aging phase, an 11 month exposure phase, and a 3 month post-treatment (exposure) phase. The aging phase was initiated by flooding agricultural soils with rainwater in 4 m(3) fiberglass microcosm tanks. Introducing juvenile apple snails (≤7 d old) and mosquito fish (2-3 cm) into the microcosm tanks initiated the exposure phase. Survival, growth, and reproduction of apple snails and fish, and Cu uptake in apple snails, fish, and periphyton were determined in this study. Water chemistry (e.g., dissolved Cu concentration, dissolved organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations, pH, hardness, alkalinity, etc.) was measured daily or weekly during the study. Initial soil Cu concentrations in Equus, SRB, and AGLR microcosms were 7, 55, and 99 mg/kg dw, respectively. Dissolved Cu concentrations in Equus, SRB and AGLR microcosms at the beginning of the study were 3, 82, and 43 μg/L, respectively and decreased to low saturation levels of about ≤9 μg/L Cu after the first 3 months of the study. The decrease of dissolved Cu concentrations was likely due to the dilution of rainwater. Snail and fish mortality appeared to be higher in SRB microcosms than in Equus and AGLR microcosms. There was no significant difference in growth of the snails between treatments. Snail growth data followed the von Bertalanffy Model. The maximum shell length, shell height, and shell width of the snails calculated by the von Bertalanffy Model (L(∞)) were 2.76, 2.05, and 2.18 cm, respectively. The maximum wet weight was 9.38 g

  11. Effect of spent mushroom substrate amendment of vineyard soils on the behavior of fungicides: 2. Mobility of penconazole and metalaxyl in undisturbed soil cores.

    PubMed

    Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Cruz, M Sonia; Andrades, M Soledad; Sánchez-Martín, María J

    2009-10-28

    Mobility of fungicides penconazole and metalaxyl in unamended and amended vineyard soils with fresh and composted spent mushroom substrates (F-SMS and C-SMS) was studied. Experiments were performed in non-incubated and incubated (outdoors for 77 days) undisturbed soil cores under non-saturated flow conditions. Breakthrough curves (BTC) of metalaxyl leaching were delayed with regard to the tracer ion, and they showed an incomplete leaching in all soil cores after the addition of 2.5-4.5 pore volumes. A decrease of the maximum peak concentration in C-SMS soils with regard to unamended soils (up to 24-fold in Viana soil) and an increase in the fungicide retention by soils (up to 8-fold in the first segment of Viana soil core) was observed. However, a decrease (up to 2.6-fold in Sajazarra soil) or an increase (up to 1.4-fold in Aldeanueva soil) of the maximum peak concentration in F-SMS soils was observed. No leaching of penconazole was observed in all cases. After fungicide incubation in soil cores, the amounts of metalaxyl retained and leached decreased significantly by 1.24-37.8-fold and 1.17-302-fold, respectively, whereas no changes were observed for penconazole. Degradation of metalaxyl occurred in non-incubated soil and increased after incubation (two metalaxyl metabolites were detected in the leachates and the soil extracts), but it was not seen for penconazole in any case. In consequence, the addition of SMS as amendment to soil (especially C-SMS) enhanced adsorption of both fungicides, although metalaxyl could be available for degradation. This effect contributes to prevent groundwater contamination by metalaxyl, but it could contribute to increase the surface water contamination by penconazole, because adsorption protects this fungicide from degradation, increasing its persistence in soils.

  12. Isomer-specific investigation of PCDD/F mobility and other fate processes in deep soil cores.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sharon; Stevenson, Gavin; Malcolm, Don; Zennegg, Markus; Gaus, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are highly hydrophobic compounds with low migration potential in soil-water. Nevertheless, they have been occasionally reported in subsurface soils hypothesised as the result of facilitated transport processes with colloids or surfactants, or yet unidentified in-situ formation processes. To date, however, the prevalence of deep soil contamination, involved processes and their kinetics remain poorly understood. This study investigated PCDD/F concentrations and isomer profiles through deep soil cores (to 20 m) from agricultural, industrial and urban sites in Queensland, Australia. Based on isomer profiles, a unique source common to all core soils (regardless of depth) was identified, dominated by octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD). The source was consistent with contamination resulting from pesticide impurities. Elevated PCDD concentrations (μg/kg range) to depths up to ∼4-17 m and a continuous increase of peri-chlorinated (1,4,6,9-substituted) isomers through the cores suggested that vertical transport and lateral dechlorination were key post-depositional processes at these sites. The mobility of PCDDs in the present study is far greater than previously reported in soils in general. High estimated mass transport rates for OCDD in four agricultural cores (3.0-6.2% year(-1)) likely reflect significant levels of facilitating species, including surfactants, and intensive rainfall at these sites. The implications of such extensive subsurface transport of PCDD/Fs for groundwater contamination and load estimates may be significant. If the cores of the present study are assumed representative of the region, a total PCDD/F load in the order of 800 tonnes (1.6 tonnes TEQ) could be present in subsurface Queensland coastal soils.

  13. Nitrogen Transformations in Wetland Soil Cores Measured by (sup15)N Isotope Pairing and Dilution at Four Infiltration Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stepanauskas, R.; Davidsson, E. T.; Leonardson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water infiltration rate (IR) on nitrogen cycling in a saturated wetland soil was investigated by applying a (sup15)N isotope dilution and pairing method. Water containing [(sup15)N]nitrate was infiltrated through 10-cm-long cores of sieved and homogenized soil at rates of 72, 168, 267, and 638 mm day(sup-1). Then the frequencies of (sup30)N(inf2), (sup29)N(inf2), (sup15)NO(inf3)(sup-), and (sup15)NH(inf4)(sup+) in the outflow water were measured. This method allowed simultaneous determination of nitrification, coupled and uncoupled denitrification, and nitrate assimilation rates. From 3% (at the highest IR) to 95% (at the lowest IR) of nitrate was removed from the water, mainly by denitrification. The nitrate removal was compensated for by the net release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen. Lower oxygen concentrations in the soil at lower IRs led to a sharper decrease in the nitrification rate than in the ammonification rate, and, consequently, more ammonium leaked from the soil. The decreasing organic-carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (from 12.8 to 5.1) and the increasing light A(inf250)/A(inf365) ratio (from 4.5 to 5.2) indicated an increasing bioavailability of the outflowing dissolved organic matter with increasing IR. The efflux of nitrous oxide was also very sensitive to IR and increased severalfold when a zone of low oxygen concentration was close to the outlet of the soil cores. N(inf2)O then constituted 8% of the total gaseous N lost from the soil. PMID:16535352

  14. A microcosm study of lindane and naphthalene for model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, C.A.; Dickson, K.L.; Rodgers, J.H.; Saleh, F.Y.

    1981-10-01

    Lindane and naphthalene were used in a series of flow-through microcosms to validate predictions of two environmental fate models--the exposure analysis modeling system (EXAMS) and simplified lake and stream analysis (SLSA). The microcosms' physical transport characteristics were carefully measured and used as input parameters to the models, along with laboratory data on lindane and naphthalene rate constants and coefficients. The results show that both models accurately predict the chemicals' concentrations in the water compartment. Observed concentrations in the sediments were two to three orders of magnitude lower than the models' predictions, even though the overall mass balance accounted for about 90% of the chemicals' input. Lack of agreement between observed and predicted sediment concentrations may be attributed to the variability of the sediment partition coefficient values, the slow rate of sediment loading, vertical stratification of the chemicals in the sediment, and microbial degradation of the chemicals in the sediment.

  15. Modelling of Genetically Engineered Microorganisms Introduction in Closed Artificial Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.; Brilkov, A. V.; Ganusov, V. V.; Kargatova, T. V.; Maksimova, E. E.; Popova, L. Yu.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of introducing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEM) into simple biotic cycles of laboratory water microcosms was investigated. The survival of the recombinant strain Escherichia coli Z905 (Apr, Lux+) in microcosms depends on the type of model ecosystems. During the absence of algae blooming in the model ecosystem, the part of plasmid-containing cells E. coli decreased fast, and the structure of the plasmid was also modified. In conditions of algae blooming (Ankistrodesmus sp.) an almost total maintenance of plasmid-containing cells was observed in E.coli population. A mathematics model of GEM's behavior in water ecosystems with different level of complexity has been formulated. Mechanisms causing the difference in luminescent exhibition of different species are discussed, and attempts are made to forecast the GEM's behavior in water ecosystems.

  16. Modelling of genetically engineered microorganisms introduction in closed artificial microcosms.

    PubMed

    Pechurkin, N S; Brilkov, A V; Ganusov, V V; Kargatova, T V; Maksimova, E E; Popova LYu

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of introducing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEM) into simple biotic cycles of laboratory water microcosms was investigated. The survival of the recombinant strain Escherichia coli Z905 (Apr, Lux+) in microcosms depends on the type of model ecosystems. During the absence of algae blooming in the model ecosystem, the part of plasmid-containing cells E. coli decreased fast, and the structure of the plasmid was also modified. In conditions of algae blooming (Ankistrodesmus sp.) an almost total maintenance of plasmid-containing cells was observed in E. coli population. A mathematics model of GEM's behavior in water ecosystems with different level of complexity has been formulated. Mechanisms causing the difference in luminescent exhibition of different species are discussed, and attempts are made to forecast the GEM's behavior in water ecosystems.

  17. Bioaugmentation with distinct Dehalobacter strains achieves chloroform detoxification in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Justicia-Leon, Shandra D; Higgins, Steven; Mack, E Erin; Griffiths, Daniel R; Tang, Shuiquan; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Löffler, Frank E

    2014-01-01

    Chloroform (CF) is a widespread groundwater contaminant not susceptible to aerobic degradation. Under anoxic conditions, CF can undergo abiotic and cometabolic transformation but detoxification is generally not achieved. The recent discovery of distinct Dehalobacter strains that respire CF to dichloromethane (DCM) and ferment DCM to nonchlorinated products promises that bioremediation of CF plumes is feasible. To track both strains, 16S rRNA gene-based qPCR assays specific for either Dehalobacter strain were designed and validated. A laboratory treatability study explored the value of bioaugmentation and biostimulation to achieve CF detoxification using anoxic microcosms established with aquifer material from a CF-contaminated site. Microcosms that received 6% (v/v) of the CF-to-DCM-dechlorinating culture Dhb-CF to achieve an initial Dehalobacter cell titer of 1.6 ± 0.9 × 10(4) mL(-1) dechlorinated CF to stoichiometric amounts of DCM. Subsequent augmentation with 3% (v/v) of the DCM-degrading consortium RM to an initial Dehalobacter cell abundance of 1.2 ± 0.2 × 10(2) mL(-1) achieved complete DCM degradation in microcosms amended with 10 mM bicarbonate. Growth of the CF-respiring and the DCM-degrading Dehalobacter populations and detoxification were also observed in microcosms that received both inocula simultaneously. These findings suggest that anaerobic bioremediation (e.g., bioaugmentation) is a possible remedy at CF- and DCM-contaminated sites without CT, which strongly inhibited CF organohalide respiration and DCM organohalide fermentation.

  18. Petroleum Oxidation in Marine Microcosms by Natural Microbial Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardlaw, G. D.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Ehrhardt, C. J.; Valentine, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Millions of gallons of petroleum are emitted into marine environments each year and the oxidation of this oil by microbes is an important mechanism for mediating toxicity. In terms of quantity, petroleum is the most abundant organic pollutant impacting marine environments today. Recent advances in chromatography have led to the development of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC &GC). The acronym, GC GC, is used because orthogonal gas chromatographic separations are achieved in both analytical dimensions by using stationary phases with varying partitioning abilities and selectivity. This novel method has greatly expanded the analytical window of petroleum hydrocarbons and was used to track the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons in aerobic marine microcosm experiments. Sediment microcosms were composed of seawater and sediment collected from the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. Oil collected directly from the reservoir underlying the seep field was added to each microcosm, and samples were incubated for one year. Net metabolism was tracked by quantifying oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. The loss of petroleum components was tracked with GC GC, whereas the bacterial and archaeal community structures were tracked using T-RFLP. Results of these incubation studies will be presented.

  19. Inhibition of Bacterial Ammonia Oxidation by Organohydrazines in Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yucheng; Guo, Yun; Lin, Xiangui; Zhong, Wenhui; Jia, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxylamine oxidation by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) is a key step for energy-yielding in support of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Organohydrazines have been shown to inactivate HAO from Nitrosomonas europaea, and may serve as selective inhibitors to differentiate bacterial from archaeal ammonia oxidation due to the absence of bacterial HAO gene homolog in known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). In this study, the effects of three organohydrazines on activity, abundance, and composition of AOB and AOA were evaluated in soil microcosms. The results indicate that phenylhydrazine and methylhydrazine at the concentration of 100 μmol g−1 dry weight soil completely suppressed the activity of soil nitrification. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and sequencing analysis of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA) clearly demonstrated that nitrification activity change is well paralleled with the growth of Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB in soil microcosms. No significant correlation between AOA community structure and nitrification activity was observed among all treatments during the incubation period, although incomplete inhibition of nitrification activity occurred in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine-amended soil microcosms. These findings show that the HAO-targeted organohydrazines can effectively inhibit bacterial nitrification in soil, and the mechanism of organohydrazine affecting AOA remains unclear. PMID:22319517

  20. Plant bioindicators for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon toxicity in aquatic microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Gensemer, R.W.; Solomon, K.R.; Day, K.E.; Hodson, P.V.; Servos, M.R.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1994-12-31

    Plant bioindicators are being developed to assess the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in experimental aquatic ecosystems. The approach is to develop and test biomarker assays that are specifically predictive of ecological events at the population and/or community levels of organization in artificial aquatic microcosms. PAH mixtures were introduced into a series of aquatic microcosms using the wood preservative creosote as a PAH source. The authors applied creosote at five dosage levels designed to simulate conductions observed at highly contaminated sites. The growth and biomass of phytoplankton, periphyton, and macrophytes were then measured throughout the growing season, and compared to one or more biomarker assays used to detect PAH contamination. Preliminary results using fluorescence induction on aquatic macrophytes suggest that PAHs can significantly inhibit photosynthesis at even modest concentrations 1--4 hours after exposure. This assay thus is not only a sensitive indicator of PAH exposure, but may also describe mechanisms of PAH toxicity that ultimately reduce biomass or population growth for aquatic plants in these microcosms.

  1. Morphological Alteration and Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Kamjumphol, Watcharaporn; Chareonsudjai, Pisit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Chareonsudjai, Sorujsiri

    2015-11-01

    The resilience of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was evaluated in control soil microcosms and in soil microcosms containing NaCl or FeSO4 at 30°C. Iron (Fe(II)) promoted the growth of B. pseudomallei during the 30-day observation, contrary to the presence of 1.5% and 3% NaCl. Scanning electron micrographs of B. pseudomallei in soil revealed their morphological alteration from rod to coccoid and the formation of microcolonies. The smallest B. pseudomallei cells were found in soil with 100 μM FeSO4 compared with in the control soil or soil with 0.6% NaCl (P < 0.05). The colony count on Ashdown's agar and bacterial viability assay using the LIVE/DEAD(®) BacLight(™) stain combined with flow cytometry showed that B. pseudomallei remained culturable and viable in the control soil microcosms for at least 120 days. In contrast, soil with 1.5% NaCl affected their culturability at day 90 and their viability at day 120. Our results suggested that a low salinity and iron may influence the survival of B. pseudomallei and its ability to change from a rod-like to coccoid form. The morphological changes of B. pseudomallei cells may be advantageous for their persistence in the environment and may increase the risk of their transmission to humans. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Fate and bioaccumulation of isoproturon in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Gerard; Vuillod, Maryline; Lissolo, Thierry; Clement, Bernard

    2002-06-01

    To gain information concerning the ecotoxicity of isoproturon (IPU) on aquatic ecosystems, six experimental ponds of 5 m3 each were studied. All the experiments were conducted during the summer over two years. Three different types of ecosystems were tested in 1994 and one type of ecosystem was selected and repeated in 1995 with three replicates. In each case, the initial concentration of IPU contamination was set at 10 microg/L. The IPU concentration was determined in the water column and in different species (mainly plants) of the microcosms. A first-order kinetic decrease in IPU concentration was observed in 1994, with half-life ranging from 15 to 35 d, depending on the microcosms. This relatively fast decrease was also confirmed in 1995, but it reached a constant value after two months. A high variability of the IPU concentration was observed in exposed plants, with bioconcentration factors ranging from 100 to 1,200 with large coefficients of variation. The observed plant bioconcentration factors are higher than those predicted by usual numerical models, probably due to the specific binding of IPU on one protein of the photosynthetic apparatus. Our data show that bioconcentration does not occur in mollusks but is important in photosynthetic organisms. Plant bioconcentration and microbial biodegradation are the main processes involved in the IPU decay in our outdoor aquatic microcosms.

  3. Morphological Alteration and Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Kamjumphol, Watcharaporn; Chareonsudjai, Pisit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Chareonsudjai, Sorujsiri

    2015-01-01

    The resilience of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was evaluated in control soil microcosms and in soil microcosms containing NaCl or FeSO4 at 30°C. Iron (Fe(II)) promoted the growth of B. pseudomallei during the 30-day observation, contrary to the presence of 1.5% and 3% NaCl. Scanning electron micrographs of B. pseudomallei in soil revealed their morphological alteration from rod to coccoid and the formation of microcolonies. The smallest B. pseudomallei cells were found in soil with 100 μM FeSO4 compared with in the control soil or soil with 0.6% NaCl (P < 0.05). The colony count on Ashdown's agar and bacterial viability assay using the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ stain combined with flow cytometry showed that B. pseudomallei remained culturable and viable in the control soil microcosms for at least 120 days. In contrast, soil with 1.5% NaCl affected their culturability at day 90 and their viability at day 120. Our results suggested that a low salinity and iron may influence the survival of B. pseudomallei and its ability to change from a rod-like to coccoid form. The morphological changes of B. pseudomallei cells may be advantageous for their persistence in the environment and may increase the risk of their transmission to humans. PMID:26324731

  4. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2016-08-04

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review.

  5. Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review. PMID:27527230

  6. Influence of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on the structure of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria communities in a soil microcosm.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Peinado, M del Mar; González-López, Jesús; Martínez-Toledo, M Victoria; Pozo, Clementina; Rodelas, Belén

    2010-03-01

    lower in the microcosms receiving 50 mg l(-1) LAS and in the lower portion of soil cores. The clear differentiation of the samples of the upper portion of the soil columns amended with LAS was specifically related to the presence and intensity of a distinctive major band (named band class 7). There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the concentrations of LAS detected in soil portions taken from LAS 10 mg l(-1) and LAS 50 mg l(-1) microcosms and the relative intensity of band class 7 in the corresponding TGGE profiles. Prevalent Alphaproteobacteria populations in the soil microcosms had close similarity (>99%) to cultivated species affiliated to genera of the Rhizobiaceae, Methylocystaceae, Hyphomicrobiaceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Brucellaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae, and Caulobacteraceae families. The population represented by band class 7 was found closely related to the genus Phenylobacterium (Caulobacteraceae). According to cluster analysis of TGGE profiles, the structure of both Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria communities in the soil microcosms was remarkably stable in the presence of LAS at the two concentrations tested, as most bands were universally present in all samples and displayed fairly similar relative intensities. Previous studies by others authors, based on biological and chemical tests, concluded that LAS toxicity was not an important microbial selection factor in sludge amended soil, while work based on the use of molecular fingerprinting to evaluate the impact of LAS in aqueous media and marine sediments showed that concentrations as low as 1 mg l(-1) significantly influence the development of the bacterial community structure. Although TGGE is not a strictly quantitative method due to the bias introduced by the PCR reaction, changes of band intensity through experiments are a consequence of a change in the relative abundance of the corresponding populations in the community and can be used as a semiquantitative measure of bacterial

  7. Microcosms as potential screening tools for evaluating transport and effects of toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Ausmus, B.S.; Eddlemon, G.K.; Draggan, S.J.; Giddhings, J.M.; Jackson, D.R.; Luxmoore, R.J.; O'Neill, E.G.; O'Neill, R.V.; Ross-Todd, M.; Van Voris, P.

    1980-06-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic microcosms were evaluated for use in research on environmental contaminants. Research completed in this project attempted to: (1) evaluate relationships among size, complexity, stability, and replicability; (2) assess the simularity between microcosm results and actual environmental transport and effects; (3) identify and quantify system-level parameters that might be sensitive indicators of effects of chemical contaminants; (4) determine the relationship between system-level parameters measured in microcosms and in natural ecosystems; and (5) suggest protocols for establishing, maintaining, and interpreting results from microcosms. A number of experimental approaches using several microcosm designs and contaminants are reported. The use of terrestrial microcosm results was evaluated in conjunction with mathematical simulation models as a means of extending short-term exprimental results to interpret conditions as they might occur in the natural ecosystem. Although microcosms offer an excellent experimental system, their application to toxic substance testing is not a straightforward matter. They are characterized by complex dynamics and counterintuitive responses just as is the ecosystem to which they are an analog. These factors notwithstanding, microcosms do offer an excellent means of studying specific aspects of contaminant behavior and ecosystem processes. With appropriate attention to the design of specific questions, answers to which are relevant to interpreting ecological transport and effects of contaminants, microcosms can be useful tools.

  8. Anaerobic degradation of vinyl chloride in aquifer microcosms.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Assal, Antoine; Hunkeler, Daniel; Holliger, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation potential at a chloroethene-contaminated site was investigated by operating two anoxic column aquifer microcosms enriched in iron(III). One column was fed with vinyl chloride (VC) only (column A) and one with VC and acetate (column B). In column A, after about 600 pore volume exchanges (PVEs), VC started to disappear and reached almost zero VC recovery in the effluent after 1000 PVEs. No formation of ethene was observed. In column B, effluent VC was almost always only a fraction of influent VC. Formation of ethene was observed after 800 PVEs and started to become an important degradation product after 1550 PVEs. However, ethene was never observed in stoichiometric amounts compared with disappeared VC. The average stable isotope enrichment factor for VC disappearance in column A was determined to be -4.3‰. In column B, the isotope enrichment factor shifted from -10.7 to -18.5‰ concurrent with an increase in ethene production. Batch microcosms inoculated with column material showed similar isotope enrichment factors as the column microcosms. These results indicated that two degradation processes occurred, one in column A and two in parallel in column B with increasing importance of reductive dechlorination with time. This study suggests that in addition to reductive dechlorination, other degradation processes such as anaerobic oxidation should be taken into account when evaluating natural attenuation of VC and that isotope analysis can help to differentiate between different pathways of VC removal. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  9. Naphthenic acids and surrogate naphthenic acids in methanogenic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Holowenko, F M; Mackinnon, M D; Fedorak, P M

    2001-08-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex mixture of naturally occurring acyclic and cyclic aliphatic carboxylic acids in petroleum. In the Athabasca oil sands. NAs have been identified as the largest component of dissolved organic matter in the tailings waters from oils sands extraction processes. They are the major contributor to the acute toxicity of the fine tailings wastewaters at the oil sands extraction plants in northeastern Alberta, Canada. In this study, three sources of NAs were studied, including commercially available NAs, those extracted from oil sands process-affected waters, and individual naphthenic-like surrogate compounds. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated differences between the commercial and extracted NAs. The NAs derived from the process-affected waters showed a short-term inhibition of methanogenesis from H2 or acetate, but with time the populations resumed methane production. It has been postulated that microbial metabolism of the carboxylated side chains of NAs would lead to methane production. The two NA mixtures failed to stimulate methanogenesis in microcosms that contained either oil sands fine tailings or domestic sewage sludge. However, in microcosms with sewage sludge, methanogenesis was stimulated by some surrogate NAs including 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid at 400-800 mg/L, 5-cyclohexylpentanoic acid at 200 mg/L or 6-phenylhexanoic acid at 200 and 400 mg/L. When added at 200 mg/L to methanogenic microcosms containing fine tailings, 3-cyclohexylpropanoic and 4-cyclohexylbutanoic acids produced methane yields that suggested mineralization of the side chain and the ring.

  10. Biotransformations of Aroclor 1242 in Hudson River test tube microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, K.M.; Principe, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are relatively unreactive and hydrophobic, are widely used commercially, and have accumulated in soils, sediments, and biota. The researchers partially simulated environmental conditions in the laboratory to examine the fate of Aroclor 1242 in the Upper Hudson River. The test tube microcosms developed both aerobic and anaerobic compartments. This paper reports on the patterns and rates of anaerobic and aerobic PCB transformations for a single set of conditions in static, unamended microosms to model the environmental fate of Aroclor 1242 in river sediments. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  11. EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT TYPE ON BENTHIC MACROINFAUNAL COLONIZATION OF LABORATORY MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the effects of four different sediment types on macroinfaunal colonization and community development in our laboratory flow-thru microcosm system (all microcosms were 20 cm side-1 and sediment depth was 5 cm) over a period of 41 days. Sediments included Santa Rosa Islan...

  12. EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT TYPE ON BENTHIC MACROINFAUNAL COLONIZATION OF LABORATORY MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the effects of four different sediment types on macroinfaunal colonization and community development in our laboratory flow-thru microcosm system (all microcosms were 20 cm side-1 and sediment depth was 5 cm) over a period of 41 days. Sediments included Santa Rosa Islan...

  13. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  15. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  16. Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.

    1998-12-21

    Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but Np(V) in aerobic environments. However, currently it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. In order to evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosminoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated fresh water lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10{sup {minus}5} M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np volubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbian y produced Mn(II/HI) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction.

  17. Effects of monensin on zooplankton communities in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Derek G; Lissemore, Linda; Sibley, Paul K; Solomon, Keith R

    2007-09-15

    The effects of monensin, an antibiotic widely used in the poultry and beef industry, were evaluated on zooplankton community structure and population dynamics. Monensin was added to 12 000 L aquatic microcosms as a single treatment at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 500 microg/L, and they were evaluated over a 50 day period. Changes in the zooplankton assemblage were evaluated by principal response curves (PRC), while changes in abundance and species richness were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Monensin did not significantly affect community structure. However, significant changes within specific taxonomic groups were observed with decreases in the abundance of Rotifera and Copepoda nauplii and in the richness of Rotifera and Cladocera. Concentration-dependent increases in Ostracoda abundance were also observed. Changes in chlorophyll-a concentrations within the microcosms over the course of the study indicated that the changes in zooplankton populations were the indirect result of the effects of monensin on the algal community. Monensin concentrations measured in surface waters were 40 times lower than the determined no-observable effect concentration (NOEC) of 50 microg/L and do not likely present a risk to zooplankton.

  18. Community conditioning confirmed in a multiple stressor microcosm

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S.A.; Markiewicz, A.J.; Landis, W.G.; Matthews, R.A.; Matthews, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The authors tested the community conditioning hypothesis by evaluating the effects of multiple stress events on aquatic community dynamics in a Standard Aquatic Microcosm (SAM). Community conditioning suggests that changes in community dynamics are the result of the history of the community, specifically, the conditioning of the treated community by stress events. Consequently, systems exposed to different stressors would be expected to exhibit different dynamics. In an extended 91-day SAM, two of four treatments were dosed with the turbine fuel, JP-8, one week into the experiment. Two treatments were later exposed to the heat stress, one that had received jet fuel and one that had not. Biological, physical and chemical data were subjected to conventional univariate statistical analyses including ANOVA. Data were also analyzed with multivariate techniques including nonmetric clustering and association analysis, an artificial intelligence approach that enabled the detection of community dynamics not detected with conventional methods. The results clearly support the community conditioning hypothesis as the four treatments were distinguishable at the end of the experiment. This design is particularly important since little information is available regarding the impacts of sequential stresses on communities. The results also demonstrate the importance of indirect effects on community dynamics. Furthermore, the experiment demonstrates that microcosms, like natural communities, are complex systems and clearly historical. The community conditioning hypothesis supports the growing argument against the attainment of recovery in ecosystems following a disturbance. Such research is applicable to the refinement of ecological risk assessment.

  19. Distribution and bioaccumulation of selenium in aquatic microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Huckins, James N.; Little, Edward E.; La Point, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Closed-system microcosms were used to study factors affecting the fate of selenium (Se) in aquatic systems. Distribution and bioaccumulation of Se varied among sediment types and Se species. A mixture of dissolved 75Se species (selenate, selenite and selenomethionine) was sorbed more rapidly to fine-textured, highly organic pond sediments than to sandy riverine sediments. Sulfate did not affect the distribution and bioaccumulation of 75Se over the range 80–180 mg SO4 liter−1. When each Se species was labeled separately, selenomethionine was lost from the water column more rapidly than selenate or selenite. Selenium lost from the water column accumulated primarily in sediments, but volatilization was also an important pathway for loss of Se added as selenomethionine. Loss rates of dissolved Se residues were more rapid than rates reported from mesocosm and field studies, suggesting that sediment: water interactions are more important in microcosms than in larger test systems. Daphnids accumulated highest concentrations of Se, followed by periphyton and macrophytes. Selenium added as selenomethionine was bioaccumulated preferentially compared to that added as selenite or selenate. Organoselenium compounds such as selenomethione may thus contribute disproportionately to Se bioaccumulation and toxicity in aquatic organisms.

  20. Alteration of Rock Fragments from Columbia River Basalt Microcosms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; McKay, David S.; Stevens, Todd O.

    1999-01-01

    During an earlier study, microorganisms were grown microcosms consisting of sterilized chips of Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and natural CRB ground water with its natural microflora; environmental conditions simulated a deep subsurface, anaerobic, dark environment. Subsequent scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM) studies revealed the presence of several types of bacteria and biofilm, some of which were mineralized. Some of these biological features are very similar to possible biogenic features found in two meteorites from Mars, ALH84001 (found in Antarctica) and Nakhla (observed to fall in Egypt). Both ALH84001 and Nakhla contain traces of low-temperature aqueous alteration of silicates, oxides, and sulfides. The goals of this study are to use high-resolution field-emission SEM (FE-SEM) to examine the CRB samples for evidence of alteration features similar to those in the martian meteorites, to determine the extent of alteration during the CRB microcosm experiments, and to determine whether effects of biological activity can be distinguished from inorganic effects.

  1. Ecological changes in oral microcosm biofilm during maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Kang, Si-Mook; Lee, Eun-Song; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Bo-Ra; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ecological changes in the biofilm at different stages of maturation using 16S rDNA gene amplicon sequencing and to identify correlations between red/green (R/G) fluorescence ratio and ecological changes. An oral microcosm biofilm was initiated from the saliva of a single donor and grown anaerobically for up to 10 days in basal medium mucin. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence analysis was shown that the R/G ratio of the biofilm increased consistently, but the slope rapidly decreased after six days. The bacterial compositions of 10 species also consistently changed over time. However, there was no significant correlation between each bacteria and red fluorescence. The monitoring of the maturation process of oral microcosm biofilm over 10 days revealed that the R/G ratio and the bacterial composition within biofilm consistently changed. Therefore, the R/G fluorescence ratio of biofilm may be related with its ecological change rather than specific bacteria.

  2. Azolla-anabaena-bacteria system as a natural microcosm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrapico, Francisco J.

    2002-02-01

    Azolla is an aquatic fern that contains a permanent endosymbiotic prokaryotic community (cyanobacteria and bacteria) inside of the cavity in the leaf dorsal lobe of the pteridophyte. This is a unique situation and can be seen as a microcosm inside of an organism and also can be considered a good example of a living model for biological and environmental studies. These symbionts are specific of this symbiosis and lives immobilized in a mucilaginous fibrillar network, which fills part of the cavity. The symbionts works as immobilized organisms in a natural system that can be used as a model for biotechnological research and in biologically based life support systems. The nature and the complexity of this system is simultaneously a reference and a challenge for the research in the communication between the two levels of nature organization (microcosm and mesocosm), and can also be used as a reference for the design of new environmental engineered symbiotic systems that include man as a prelude to life in space.

  3. Microcosm experiments of oil degradation by microbial mats.

    PubMed

    de Oteyza, Tirso García; Grimalt, Joan O; Llirós, Marc; Esteve, Isabel

    2006-03-15

    Several microcosm experiments were run in parallel to evaluate the efficiency of microbial mats for crude oil degradation as compared with physico-chemical weathering. The oils used in the experiments constituted representative examples of those currently used for commercial purposes. One was aliphatic and of low viscosity (33.4 American Petroleum Institute degrees, degrees API) and the other was predominantly aromatic, with high sulphur content (ca. 2.7%) and viscosity (16.6 degrees API). After crude oil introduction, the microcosms were kept under cyclic changes in water level to mimic coastal tidal movements. The transformations observed showed that water weathering leads to more effective and rapid elimination of low molecular weight hydrocarbons than microbial mat metabolism, e.g. n-alkanes with chain length shorter than n-pentadecane or n-heptadecane, regular isoprenoid hydrocarbons with chain length lower than C16 or C18 or lower molecular weight naphthalenes. Microbial mats preserved these hydrocarbons from volatilization and water washing. However, hydrocarbons of lower volatility such as the C24-C30 n-alkanes or containing nitrogen atoms, e.g. carbazoles, were eliminated in higher proportion by microbial mats than by water weathering. The strong differences in composition between the two oils used for the experiments were also reflected in significant differences between water weathering and microbial mat biodegradation. Higher oil viscosity seemed to hinder the former but not the later.

  4. Alteration of Rock Fragments from Columbia River Basalt Microcosms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; McKay, David S.; Stevens, Todd O.

    1999-01-01

    During an earlier study, microorganisms were grown microcosms consisting of sterilized chips of Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and natural CRB ground water with its natural microflora; environmental conditions simulated a deep subsurface, anaerobic, dark environment. Subsequent scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM) studies revealed the presence of several types of bacteria and biofilm, some of which were mineralized. Some of these biological features are very similar to possible biogenic features found in two meteorites from Mars, ALH84001 (found in Antarctica) and Nakhla (observed to fall in Egypt). Both ALH84001 and Nakhla contain traces of low-temperature aqueous alteration of silicates, oxides, and sulfides. The goals of this study are to use high-resolution field-emission SEM (FE-SEM) to examine the CRB samples for evidence of alteration features similar to those in the martian meteorites, to determine the extent of alteration during the CRB microcosm experiments, and to determine whether effects of biological activity can be distinguished from inorganic effects.

  5. Use of in situ microcosms for evaluating reservoir water management options

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H. ); Cooper, J.J. ); Vigg, S. )

    1988-10-01

    The use of in situ microcosms for performing reservoir trophic studies and aiding in the design of reservoir restoration programs are discussed. The site of this study was Lahontan Reservoir, Nevada, which has experienced water quality problems associated with monospecific blooms of blue-green algae and hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen depletions. In situ microcosms were used to investigate the response of phytoplankton species composition to additions of the nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus, and the phosphorus precipitant aluminum sulfate. At the end of the 16-day experimental period, the microcosms receiving the phosphate treatments yielded the highest standing crops of algae and the greatest percentage composition of blue-green algae. The microcosms receiving the nitrate treatment exhibited greater initial algal concentrations followed by a decline in phytoplankton, which coincided with an increase in the zoo-plankton population. The results presented here suggest that microcosms can be a cost-effective method for assessing reservoir water quality and planning restoration programs.

  6. Sorption and photodegradation processes govern distribution and fate of sulfamethazine in freshwater-sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Keri L; Gross, Aaron D; Moorman, Thomas B; Coats, Joel R

    2013-10-01

    The antibiotic sulfamethazine can be transported from manured fields to surface water bodies. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in pond water using (14)C-phenyl-sulfamethazine in small pond water microcosms containing intact sediment and pond water. We found a 2.7-day half-life in pond water and 4.2-day half-life when sulfamethazine was added to the water (5 mg L(-1) initial concentration) with swine manure diluted to simulate runoff. Sulfamethazine dissipated exponentially from the water column, with the majority of loss occurring via movement into the sediment phase. Extractable sulfamethazine in sediment accounted for 1.9-6.1% of the applied antibiotic within 14 days and then declined thereafter. Sulfamethazine was transformed mainly into nonextractable sediment-bound residue (40-60% of applied radioactivity) and smaller amounts of photoproducts. Biodegradation, as indicated by metabolite formation and (14)CO2 evolution, was less significant than photodegradation. Two photoproducts accounted for 15-30% of radioactivity in the water column at the end of the 63-day study; the photoproducts were the major degradates in the aqueous and sediment phases. Other unidentified metabolites individually accounted for <7% of radioactivity in the water or sediment. Less than 3% of applied radioactivity was mineralized to (14)CO2. Manure input significantly increased sorption and binding of sulfamethazine residues to the sediment. These results show concurrent processes of photodegradation and sorption to sediment control aqueous concentrations and establish that sediment is a sink for sulfamethazine and sulfamethazine-related residues. Accumulation of the photoproducts and sulfamethazine in sediment may have important implications for benthic organisms.

  7. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  8. Intact Transition Epitope Mapping (ITEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Danquah, Bright D.; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2017-08-01

    Intact transition epitope mapping (ITEM) enables rapid and accurate determination of protein antigen-derived epitopes by either epitope extraction or epitope excision. Upon formation of the antigen peptide-containing immune complex in solution, the entire mixture is electrosprayed to translate all constituents as protonated ions into the gas phase. There, ions from antibody-peptide complexes are separated from unbound peptide ions according to their masses, charges, and shapes either by ion mobility drift or by quadrupole ion filtering. Subsequently, immune complexes are dissociated by collision induced fragmentation and the ion signals of the "complex-released peptides," which in effect are the epitope peptides, are recorded in the time-of-flight analyzer of the mass spectrometer. Mixing of an antibody solution with a solution in which antigens or antigen-derived peptides are dissolved is, together with antigen proteolysis, the only required in-solution handling step. Simplicity of sample handling and speed of analysis together with very low sample consumption makes ITEM faster and easier to perform than other experimental epitope mapping methods.

  9. Cadmium in aquatic microcosms: implications for screening the ecological effects of toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, P.F.; Langner, C.L.; Odum, E.P.

    1982-11-01

    A two-phase set of experiments was conducted to address some of the problems inherent in ecological screening of toxic substances in aquatic microcosms. Phase I was a 4 x 4 factorial experiment dealing with the interactive effects of cadmium and nutrients in static microcosms. Phase II was a 2 x 4 factorial experiment using flowthrough microcosms to study temporal aspects of system behavior in response to nutrient loading and chronic versus acute cadmium perturbations. Nutrient enrichment resulted in increased biomass and metabolic activity in both static and flowthrough microcosms. Cadmium treatments generally resulted in a decrease in abundance of grazing crustaceans and a subsequent increase in community respiration, suggesting a change in community structure from a grazing to a detritus food chain. Of the variables measured, community metabolism, community composition, and output/input ratios of nitrate-nitrogen were the most useful indicators of system response to cadmium. Nutrient enrichment reduced the effects of cadmium. For screening the ecological effects of toxic chemicals, a series of experiments is proposed, including 1) relatively simple static microcosms, 2) flow through microcosms, and 3) more detailed but selective studies in microcosms derived from specific ecosystems. Each step yields increasingly more information and serves as a guide for subsequent experiments; in addition, each step more closely approximates natural ecosystems.

  10. Biodegradation of veterinary ionophore antibiotics in broiler litter and soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peizhe; Cabrera, Miguel L; Huang, Ching-Hua; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2014-01-01

    Ionophore antibiotics (IPAs) are polyether compounds used in broiler feed to promote growth and control coccidiosis. Most of the ingested IPAs are excreted into broiler litter (BL), a mixture of excreta and bedding material. BL is considered a major source of IPAs released into the environment as BL is commonly used to fertilize agricultural fields. This study investigated IPA biodegradation in BL and soil microcosms, as a process affecting the fate of IPAs in the environment. The study focused on the most widely used IPAs, monensin (MON), salinomycin (SAL), and narasin (NAR). MON was stable in BL microcosms at 24-72% water content (water/wet litter, w/w) and 35-60 °C, whereas SAL and NAR degraded under certain conditions. Factor analysis was conducted to delineate the interaction of water and temperature on SAL and NAR degradation in the BL. A major transformation product of SAL and NAR was identified. Abiotic reaction(s) were primarily responsible for the degradation of MON and SAL in nonfertilized soil microcosms, whereas biodegradation contributed significantly in BL-fertilized soil microcosms. SAL biotransformation in soil microcosms yielded the same product as in the BL microcosms. A new primary biotransformation product of MON was identified in soil microcosms. A field study showed that MON and SAL were stable during BL stacking, whereas MON degraded after BL was applied to grassland. The biotransformation product of MON was also detected in the top soil layer where BL was applied.

  11. Aromatic hydrocarbon degradation in hydrogen peroxide- and nitrate-amended microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, B.J.; Pugh, L.B.; Clarke, B.H.

    1995-12-31

    Fifty microcosms were constructed using aquifer materials from a former coal gasification site and divided into four groups: poisoned control, nutrient-free control, hydrogen peroxide-amended, and nitrate-amended microcosms. Each microcosm contained site soil and groundwater in a 1.2-L glass media bottle. When depleted, hydrogen peroxide and sodium nitrate were injected into the microcosms. Microcosms were periodically sacrificed for analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes [BTEX]); total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH); and heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). BTEX and two- and three-ringed PAHs were degraded in microcosms receiving electron-acceptor additions compared to poisoned controls. Four-, five-, and six-ringed PAHs were not significantly degraded during this study. Except in poisoned controls, significant amounts of dissolved oxygen (DO) or nitrate were utilized, and microbial populations increased by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to site soils used to assemble the microcosms (i.e., baseline samples).

  12. Temporal variation of magnetotactic bacterial communities in two freshwater sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), which can mineralize nanosized magnetite or greigite crystals within cells, play important roles in biogeochemical processes, for example iron and sulfur cycling, and depositional remanent magnetization acquisitions. Despite decades of research, the knowledge of MTB distribution and ecology is still limited. In the present study, we investigated the temporal variation of MTB communities in freshwater sediment microcosms based on 16S rRNA genes and unifrac analyses. Two microcosms (MY8 and MY11) collected from two separate sites in Lake Miyun (Beijing, China) were analyzed. The majority of retrieved sequences belonged to alphaproteobacterial magnetotactic cocci in both microcosms (representing 64.29% of clones from MY8 and 100% of clones from MY11), whereas so-called 'Magnetobacterium bavaricum'-like MTB affiliated within Nitrospira phylum were exclusively found in microcosm MY8. Over a 3-month period, the temporal variation of MTB communities was evident in both microcosms. In addition, the phylogenetic discrepancy of MTB communities between two microcosms is more prominent than that of the same microcosm at different times, implying adaptation of MTB phylogenetic lineages to specific microenvironments. Among the physical-chemical parameters measured, a strong correlation was shown between nitrate and the main genetic variability of MTB communities, indicating that nitrate may influence the occurrence of MTB phylogenetic lineages in natural environments.

  13. Use of microcosms to determine the survival of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum maritimum in seawater.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben; Irgang, Rute; Magariños, Beatriz; Romalde, Jesús L; Toranzo, Alicia E

    2006-05-01

    The survival of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum maritimum in different seawater microcosms was investigated during 160 days. The persistence of culturable cells was greater in sterile than in natural seawater. Standard plate counts showed that T. maritimum survived in sterile seawater for more than 5 months at concentration around 10(3) cfu ml(-1). However, T. maritimum proved to be very labile in non-sterile seawater, rendering culturable cells no longer than 5 days. These results were confirmed when DNA-based methods were applied. Regardless of the microcosms used, epifluorescence microscopy counts remained at about 10(6) cells ml(-1) throughout the experiment, even though we can not distinguish T. maritimum in the case of non-sterile microcosms. Resuscitation assays with addition of fresh medium to non-sterile microcosms did not favour the recovery of T. maritimum on solid media. Although morphological changes from filamentous to spheres were observed after 3 days in the non-sterile microcosms, in the case of the sterile microcosms this change was observed at the sixth day. The biochemical, physiological, serological and genetic characteristics were unaffected in the sterile microcosms. The overall results contribute to a better understanding of the behaviour of T. maritimum in natural seawater and suggest that the aquatic bacterial population play an important role in the survival of this fish pathogen.

  14. Cadmium in aquatic microcosms: Implications for screening the ecological effects of toxic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Paul F.; Langner, Christine L.; Odum, Eugene P.

    1982-11-01

    A two-phase set of experiments was conducted to address some of the problems inherent in ecological screening of toxic substances in aquatic microcosms. Phase I was a 4×4 factorial experiment dealing with the interactive effects of cadmium and nutrients in static microcosms. Phase II was a 2×4 factorial experiment using flowthrough microcosms to study temporal aspects of system behavior in response to nutrient loading and chronic versus acute cadmium perturbations. Nutrient enrichment resulted in increased biomass and metabolic activity in both static and flowthrough microcosms. Cadmium treatments generally resulted in a decrease in abundance of grazing crustaceans and a subsequent increase in community respiration, suggesting a change in community structure from a grazing to a detritus food chain. Of the variables measured, community metabolism, community composition, and output/input ratios of nitrate-nitrogen were the most useful indicators of system response to cadmium. Nutrient enrichment significantly influenced cadmium effects with respect to most of the variables measured; high levels of enrichment reduced the effects of cadmium. For screening the ecological effects of toxic chemicals, a series of experiments is proposed, including 1) relatively simple static microcosms, 2) flow through microcosms, and 3) more detailed but selective studies in microcosms derived from specific ecosystems. Each step yields increasingly more information and serves as a guide for subsequent experiments; in addition, each step more closely approximates natural ecosystems.

  15. Introduction of anaerobic dechlorinating bacteria into soil slurry microcosms and nested-PCR monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    el Fantroussi, S; Mahillon, J; Naveau, H; Agathos, S N

    1997-01-01

    Desulfomonile tiedjei and Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans were chosen as model bacteria to demonstrate the introduction of an anaerobic microbia reductive dechlorination activity into nonsterile soil slurry microcosms by inoculation. De novo 3-chlorobenzoate dechlorination activity was established with the bacterium D. tiedjei in microcosms normally devoid of this dechlorination capacity. The addition of D. tiedjei to microcosms supplemented with 20 mM pyruvate as the cosubstrate resulted in total biotransformation of 1.5 mM 3-chlorobenzoate within 7 days. The introduction of the bacterium Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans into nonsterile microcosms resulted in a shortening of the period required for dechlorination activity to be established. In microcosms inoculated with Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans, total degradation of 6 mM 3-chloro-4-hydroxy phenoxyacetic acid (3-Cl-4-OHPA) was observed after 4 days in contrast to the result in noninoculated microcosms, where the total degradation of 3-Cl-4-OHPA by indigenous microorganisms was observed after 11 days. Both externally introduced bacterial strains were detected in soil slurry microcosms by a nested-PCR methodology. PMID:9023963

  16. Microbial community analysis of switchgrass planted and unplanted soil microcosms displaying PCB dechlorination.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Meggo, Richard; Hu, Dingfei; Schnoor, Jerald L; Mattes, Timothy E

    2015-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) pose potential risks to human and environmental health because they are carcinogenic, persistent, and bioaccumulative. In this study, we investigated bacterial communities in soil microcosms spiked with PCB 52, 77, and 153. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) was employed to improve overall PCB removal, and redox cycling (i.e., sequential periods of flooding followed by periods of no flooding) was performed in an effort to promote PCB dechlorination. Lesser chlorinated PCB transformation products were detected in all microcosms, indicating the occurrence of PCB dechlorination. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis showed that PCB spiking, switchgrass planting, and redox cycling affected the microbial community structure. Putative organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi populations, which were not found in unflooded microcosms, were enriched after 2 weeks of flooding in the redox-cycled microcosms. Sequences classified as Geobacter sp. were detected in all microcosms and were most abundant in the switchgrass-planted microcosm spiked with PCB congeners. The presence of possible organohalide-respiring bacteria in these soil microcosms suggests that they play a role in PCB dechlorination therein.

  17. Microbial community analysis of switchgrass planted and unplanted soil microcosms displaying PCB dechlorination

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yi; Meggo, Richard; Hu, Dingfei; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Mattes, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) pose potential risks to human and environmental health because they are carcinogenic, persistent and bioaccumulative. In this study we investigated bacterial communities in soil microcosms spiked with PCB 52, 77 and 153. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) was employed to improve overall PCB removal and redox cycling (i.e. sequential periods of flooding followed by periods of no flooding) was performed in an effort to promote PCB dechlorination. Lesser chlorinated PCB transformation products were detected in all microcosms, indicating the occurrence of PCB dechlorination. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis showed that PCB spiking, switchgrass planting and redox cycling affected the microbial community structure. Putative organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi populations, which were not found in unflooded microcosms, were enriched after two weeks of flooding in the redox-cycled microcosms. Sequences classified as Geobacter sp. were detected in all microcosms, and were most abundant in the switchgrass-planted microcosm spiked with PCB congeners. The presence of possible organohalide-respiring bacteria in these soil microcosms suggests they play a role in PCB dechlorination therein. PMID:25820643

  18. Microcosms as models for generating and testing community theory

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.A.; Huxel, G.R.; Hewitt, C.L.

    1996-04-01

    Microcosms as biological models have played a central role in the development of contemporary ecological though. From Gause`s (1934) pioneering analysis of competitive exclusion to Huffaker`s (1958) explicit examination of a spatial resource and Tilman`s (1977,1982) elegant exploration of competitive mechanisms, laboratory analyses have provided essential insight into real-world ecology. Conversely, phenomena encountered in the field have been systematically examined in the laboratory, extending and refining our understanding of the dynamical range of both mechanism and process. Extension of these model-driven insights to the field has been integral in the development of important themes within the collective gestalt of academic ecology. This interchange between laboratory and field studies is typified by recent laboratory models of competition, predation, community, assembly, and landscape assembly. 74 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Starvation survival of Candida albicans in various water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Kamel; Kouidhi, Bochra; Zmantar, Tarek; Mahdouani, Kacem; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2011-08-01

    Candida is a major Human pathogen causing a variety of infections and can survive for extended period of time in aquatic environment including marine and fresh water. In this study we compared a colorimetric XTT assay to colony forming units (CFU) count to evaluate the survival potential of Candida albicans incubated in water microcosms. Our results showed that cells maintain cultivability within a long period followed by a decline in cultivability and a drop of plate counts to less than 20 cell ml(-1) after 150 days in tap water, 190 days in rain water and 200 days in seawater. In addition we noted that 10% of cells viability was reached after 150 days in seawater, 180 days in rain water and 210 days in tap water. Molecular method confirms the persistence of C. albicans cells in water during long time starvation period. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of nonylphenol on zooplankton in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Severin, Gabriele E; Welzl, Gerhard; Jüttner, Ingrid; Pfister, Gerd; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the endocrine disruptor nonylphenol (NP) on the zooplankton assemblages of 230 L aquatic microcosms during a four-week preapplication period, a six-week NP treatment via controlled release, and a six-week postapplication period. Zooplankton assemblage change, investigated by ordination principal response curves (PRC), was due to lower abundances of copepoda, rotifera, and cladocera. The most sensitive groups/taxa were copepoda larvae, followed by the rotifers Synchaeta spp., Polyarthra spp., and the cladocerans Daphnia longispina and Chydorus sphaericus. The mean no-observed-effect concentrations for the community (NOEC(community)) was 30 microg/L. Cladocera densities recovered during the postapplication period at all but the highest NP concentrations (maximum 120 microg/L); copepod densities did not recover at the three highest concentrations (maximum 96-120 microg/L).

  1. Direct microscopy of bacillus endospore germination in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Thrane, C; Olsson, S; Wolstrup, J; Sørensen, J

    2000-10-01

    Antagonistic endospore-forming Bacillus spp. offer a large potential as seed inoculants for control of soil-borne pathogens. In the soil, however, inoculated Bacillus endospores may remain dormant without germination, and plant protection can therefore be inefficient and unpredictable. A method based on direct fluorescence microscopy in soil microcosms was used to determine whether low-cost organic additives incorporated into seed coating material could stimulate endospore germination. Complex organic additives supported a high level of endospore germination of the fungal antagonist Paenibacillus polymyxa CM5-5. Skim milk is a low-cost additive that may be incorporated into seed coating material for efficient induction of Bacillus endospore germination in soil.

  2. Population dynamics of Vibrio spp. associated with marine sponge microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Maria; Fischer, Markus; Ottesen, Andrea; McCarthy, Peter J; Lopez, Jose V; Brown, Eric W; Monday, Steven R

    2010-12-01

    Vibrio is a diverse genus of marine-associated bacteria with at least 74 species and more expected as additional marine ecospheres are interrogated. This report describes a phylogenetic reconstruction of Vibrio isolates derived from one such unique ecosystem, marine sponges (Phylum Porifera) collected from depths of 150 to 1242 feet. 16S rRNA gene sequencing along with molecular typing of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions clustered many sponge-associated Vibrio (spp) with current known species. That is, several benthic Vibrio species commensal with Porifera sponges seemed genetically linked to vibrios associated with coastal or shallow-water communities, signalling a panmictic population structure among seemingly ecologically disparate strains. Conversely, phylogenetic analysis provided evidence for at least two novel Vibrio speciation events within this specific sponge microcosm. Collectively, these findings earmark this still relatively unknown environment as a bastion of taxonomic and phylogenetic variability for the genus and probably other bacterial taxa.

  3. Habitat Complexity in Aquatic Microcosms Affects Processes Driven by Detritivores

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Lorea; Bailey, R. A.; Elosegi, Arturo; Larrañaga, Aitor; Reiss, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Habitat complexity can influence predation rates (e.g. by providing refuge) but other ecosystem processes and species interactions might also be modulated by the properties of habitat structure. Here, we focussed on how complexity of artificial habitat (plastic plants), in microcosms, influenced short-term processes driven by three aquatic detritivores. The effects of habitat complexity on leaf decomposition, production of fine organic matter and pH levels were explored by measuring complexity in three ways: 1. as the presence vs. absence of habitat structure; 2. as the amount of structure (3 or 4.5 g of plastic plants); and 3. as the spatial configuration of structures (measured as fractal dimension). The experiment also addressed potential interactions among the consumers by running all possible species combinations. In the experimental microcosms, habitat complexity influenced how species performed, especially when comparing structure present vs. structure absent. Treatments with structure showed higher fine particulate matter production and lower pH compared to treatments without structures and this was probably due to higher digestion and respiration when structures were present. When we explored the effects of the different complexity levels, we found that the amount of structure added explained more than the fractal dimension of the structures. We give a detailed overview of the experimental design, statistical models and R codes, because our statistical analysis can be applied to other study systems (and disciplines such as restoration ecology). We further make suggestions of how to optimise statistical power when artificially assembling, and analysing, ‘habitat complexity’ by not confounding complexity with the amount of structure added. In summary, this study highlights the importance of habitat complexity for energy flow and the maintenance of ecosystem processes in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27802267

  4. Fate of pathogenic bacteria in microcosms mimicking human body sites.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Francesco; Ghidini, Valentina; Tafi, Maria Carla; Boaretti, Marzia; Lleo, Maria M

    2013-07-01

    During the infectious process, pathogens may reach anatomical sites where they are exposed to substances interfering with their growth. These substances can include molecules produced by the host, and his resident microbial population, as well as exogenous antibacterial drugs. Suboptimal concentrations of inhibitory molecules and stress conditions found in vivo (high or low temperatures, lack of oxygen, extreme pH) might induce in bacteria the activation of survival mechanisms blocking their division capability but allowing them to stay alive. These "dormant" bacteria can be reactivated in particular circumstances and would be able to express their virulence traits. In this study, it was evaluated the effect of some environmental conditions, such as optimal and suboptimal temperatures, direct light and antibiotic sub-inhibitory concentrations doses of antibiotic, on the human pathogens Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis when incubated in fluids accumulated in the body of patients with different pathologies. It is shown that inoculation in a number of accumulated body fluids and the presence of gentamicin, reliable conditions encountered during pathological states, induce stress-responding strategies enabling bacteria to persist in microcosms mimicking the human body. Significant differences were detected in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species with E. faecalis surviving, as starved or viable but non-culturable forms, in any microcosm and condition tested and E. coli activating a viable but non-culturable state only in some clinical samples. The persistence of bacteria under these conditions, being non-culturable, might explain some recurrent infections without isolation of the causative agent after application of the standard microbiological methods.

  5. [Exploration of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by western medicine].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-jing

    2015-02-01

    "Microcosmic syndrome", "treatment based on syndrome differentiation", and "combination of disease identification and syndrome differentiation" generally refer to a mode: following the syndrome if with no disease identified, following the disease if with no syndrome type differentiated. For example, Chinese medical treatment of hypertension, high blood lipids, increased transaminase, and so on candirectly use Chinese recipes, but no longer with syndrome differentiation. Clinical application of Chinese patent medicine can also obtain favorable clinical. Western doctors need not follow syndrome differentiation. The invention of artemisinin was screened from more than 40 000 kinds of compounds and herbs, but with no reference of any traditional Chinese medical theory. A lot of folk remedy and empirical recipes have obtained effective efficacy but unnecessarily with profound Chinese medical theories. Various evidences showed that disease can also be cured without syndrome differentiation. I held that it might be associated with the same mechanism of Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Any disease can be cured or alleviated by Chinese medicine is a result from its modern pharmacological effect, which is achieved by improving etiologies, and pathogeneses. I was inspired by whether we can directly use traditional Chinese medicine with modern pharmacological effects to treat symptomatic disease. So I raised an idea of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by Western medicine, i.e., we find and use Chinese herbs with relatively effective modern pharmacological effect to treat diseases targeting at patients' clinical symptoms and signs, as well as various positive laboratory results (collectively called as microscopic dialectical indicators). More Western doctors would use it to treat disease due to omission of complicated and mysterious syndrome differentiation. This will promote extensive application and expansion of Chi- nese medicine and pharmacy, enlarge the team of

  6. Habitat Complexity in Aquatic Microcosms Affects Processes Driven by Detritivores.

    PubMed

    Flores, Lorea; Bailey, R A; Elosegi, Arturo; Larrañaga, Aitor; Reiss, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Habitat complexity can influence predation rates (e.g. by providing refuge) but other ecosystem processes and species interactions might also be modulated by the properties of habitat structure. Here, we focussed on how complexity of artificial habitat (plastic plants), in microcosms, influenced short-term processes driven by three aquatic detritivores. The effects of habitat complexity on leaf decomposition, production of fine organic matter and pH levels were explored by measuring complexity in three ways: 1. as the presence vs. absence of habitat structure; 2. as the amount of structure (3 or 4.5 g of plastic plants); and 3. as the spatial configuration of structures (measured as fractal dimension). The experiment also addressed potential interactions among the consumers by running all possible species combinations. In the experimental microcosms, habitat complexity influenced how species performed, especially when comparing structure present vs. structure absent. Treatments with structure showed higher fine particulate matter production and lower pH compared to treatments without structures and this was probably due to higher digestion and respiration when structures were present. When we explored the effects of the different complexity levels, we found that the amount of structure added explained more than the fractal dimension of the structures. We give a detailed overview of the experimental design, statistical models and R codes, because our statistical analysis can be applied to other study systems (and disciplines such as restoration ecology). We further make suggestions of how to optimise statistical power when artificially assembling, and analysing, 'habitat complexity' by not confounding complexity with the amount of structure added. In summary, this study highlights the importance of habitat complexity for energy flow and the maintenance of ecosystem processes in aquatic ecosystems.

  7. ANAEROBIC SOIL DISINFESTATION IN MICROCOSMS OF TWO SANDY SOILS.

    PubMed

    Stremińska, M A; Runia, W T; Termorshuizen, A J; Feil, H; Van Der Wurff, A W G

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has been proposed as an alternative control method of soil-borne plant pathogens. It involves adding a labile carbon source, irrigating the soil to stimulate decomposition of organic material and then covering the soil with air-tight plastic to limit gas exchange. During the ASD process, soil microorganisms switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. As a result, by-products of anaerobic metabolism are released into the soil environment such as various organic acids and gases. These by-products are reported to have a negative effect on survival of soil-borne plant pathogens. However, the efficacy of ASD to reduce soil-borne pathogens in practice may vary significantly. Therefore, we studied the efficacy of the ASD process in two different soils. In addition, it was investigated whether a pre-treatment with an anaerobic bacterial inoculum prior to ASD affected the efficacy of the process. Two sandy soils (dune sand and glacial sand) were inoculated in 2 L soil microcosms. We tested the efficacy of ASD treatment against the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. For each soil, three treatments were used: control treatment (no Herbie addition, aerobic incubation), ASD 1 (organic substrate addition, anaerobic incubation) and ASD 2 (organic substrate and anaerobic bacterial inoculum addition, anaerobic incubation). Soil microcosms were incubated in the dark at 20°C for two weeks. We observed that anaerobic soil disinfestation treatments were highly effective against Potato Cyst Nematode (PCN), with pathogen being eradicated totally in all but one ASD treatment (glacial sand ASD2) within two weeks. The relative abundance of Firmicutes (spore-forming bacteria, often fermentative) in total bacteria increased significantly in ASD treated soils. Numbers of these bacteria correlated positively with increased concentrations of acetic and butyric acids in soil water phase in ASD treatments.

  8. Incorporating detrital conditioning in outdoor microcosms dosed with JP-8 jet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.A.; Markiewicz, A.; Harter, V.; Landis, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have developed an outdoor microcosm system that incorporates detrital conditioning to test the hypothesis that microbiota play a critical role in altering the community response to hydrocarbon toxicants. The microcosms were constructed using 568 L tanks, arranged in 6 units of 4 tanks, with each unit equidistant from a central conditions tank (CT). During pre-treatment, the microcosms and CT were filled with nutrient-amended well water, artificial sediment, leaf packs containing dried maple leaves, elodea fragment, and unglazed tiles for periphyton growth. Water circulation was maintained at the rate of 24 exchanges per day. After four weeks, invertebrates from local ponds were added to the CT. Leafpacks were added to the CT and microcosms every two weeks; eight week old packs were discarded after returning invertebrates to the CT. On a weekly basis, 25% of the sediments, leaf packs, tiles, and elodea from each microcosms were transferred to another microcosm; the CT walls and tiles were scraped; an the water quality was monitored. Circulation was discontinued one week prior to dosing. On 4/12/96, the microcosms were dosed to contain 0--0.25 {micro}g/L of JP-8 jet fuel. Within two weeks the GC/MS hydrocarbon concentrations were very low in the water column of the highest treatment group. There has been little acute toxicity, despite selecting doses that caused severe, acute toxicity in laboratory microcosm studies. The presence of a complex, detritus-based microbial community appears to mitigate the influences of the toxicant on the microcosms.

  9. 46 CFR 174.185 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact stability. 174.185 Section 174.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Offshore Supply Vessels § 174.185 Intact stability. (a...

  10. 46 CFR 172.070 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact stability. 172.070 Section 172.070 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... § 172.070 Intact stability. All tank vessels of 5,000 DWT and above contracted after the effective date...

  11. 46 CFR 172.070 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability. 172.070 Section 172.070 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... § 172.070 Intact stability. All tank vessels of 5,000 deadweight tons (DWT) and above, contracted after...

  12. 46 CFR 174.015 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability. 174.015 Section 174.015 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Deck Cargo Barges § 174.015 Intact stability. (a) Except...

  13. 46 CFR 174.015 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact stability. 174.015 Section 174.015 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Deck Cargo Barges § 174.015 Intact stability. (a) Except...

  14. 46 CFR 172.070 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact stability. 172.070 Section 172.070 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... § 172.070 Intact stability. All tank vessels of 5,000 deadweight tons (DWT) and above, contracted after...

  15. 46 CFR 172.070 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact stability. 172.070 Section 172.070 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... § 172.070 Intact stability. All tank vessels of 5,000 deadweight tons (DWT) and above, contracted after...

  16. 46 CFR 174.185 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability. 174.185 Section 174.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Offshore Supply Vessels § 174.185 Intact stability. (a...

  17. 46 CFR 172.070 - Intact stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability. 172.070 Section 172.070 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... § 172.070 Intact stability. All tank vessels of 5,000 deadweight tons (DWT) and above, contracted after...

  18. Properties of Subsurface Soil Cores from Four Geologic Provinces Surrounding Mars Desert Research Station, Utah: Characterizing Analog Martian Soil in a Human Exploration Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Clarke, J. D. A.; Direito, S.; Foing, B.

    2011-01-01

    The DOMEX program is a NASA-MMAMA funded project featuring simulations of human crews on Mars focused on science activities that involve collecting samples from the subsurface using both manual and robotic equipment methods and analyzing them in the field and post mission. A crew simulating a human mission to Mars performed activities focused on subsurface science for 2 weeks in November 2009 at Mars Desert Research Station near Hanksville, Utah --an important chemical and morphological Mars analog site. Activities performed included 1) survey of the area to identify geologic provinces, 2) obtaining soil and rock samples from each province and characterizing their mineralogy, chemistry, and biology; 3) site selection and reconnaissance for a future drilling mission; 4) deployment and testing of Mars Underground Mole, a percussive robotic soil sampling device; and 5) recording and analyzing how crew time was used to accomplish these tasks. This paper summarizes results from analysis of soil cores

  19. Non-destructive Analysis of Oil-Contaminated Soil Core Samples by X-ray Computed Tomography and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Nishiwaki, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Utsuzawa, Shin; Jinguuji, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Non-destructive measurements of contaminated soil core samples are desirable prior to destructive measurements because they allow obtaining gross information from the core samples without touching harmful chemical species. Medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) and time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry were applied to non-destructive measurements of sandy soil core samples from a real site contaminated with heavy oil. The medical CT visualized the spatial distribution of the bulk density averaged over the voxel of 0.31 × 0.31 × 2 mm3. The obtained CT images clearly showed an increase in the bulk density with increasing depth. Coupled analysis with in situ time-domain reflectometry logging suggests that this increase is derived from an increase in the water volume fraction of soils with depth (i.e., unsaturated to saturated transition). This was confirmed by supplementary analysis using high-resolution micro-focus X-ray CT at a resolution of ∼10 μm, which directly imaged the increase in pore water with depth. NMR transverse relaxation waveforms of protons were acquired non-destructively at 2.7 MHz by the Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The nature of viscous petroleum molecules having short transverse relaxation times (T2) compared to water molecules enabled us to distinguish the water-saturated portion from the oil-contaminated portion in the core sample using an M0–T2 plot, where M0 is the initial amplitude of the CPMG signal. The present study demonstrates that non-destructive core measurements by medical X-ray CT and low-field NMR provide information on the groundwater saturation level and oil-contaminated intervals, which is useful for constructing an adequate plan for subsequent destructive laboratory measurements of cores. PMID:21258437

  20. Automated online measurement of N2, N2O, NO, CO2, and CH4 emissions based on a gas-flow-soil-core technique.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tingting; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Xunhua; Sun, Yang; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Chen, Nuo

    2013-11-01

    The gas-flow-soil-core (GFSC) technique allows to directly measure emission rates of denitrification gases of incubated soil cores. However, the technique was still suffering some drawbacks such as inadequate accuracy due to asynchronous detection of dinitrogen (N2) and other gases and low measurement frequency. Furthermore, its application was limited due to intensive manual operation. To overcome these drawbacks, we updated the GFSC system as described by Wang et al. (2011) by (a) using both a chemiluminescent detector and a gas chromatograph detector to measure nitric oxide (NO), (b) synchronizing the measurements of N2, NO, nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), and (c) fully automating the sampling/analysis of all the gases. These technical modifications significantly reduced labor demands by at least a factor of two, increased the measurement frequency from 3 to 6 times per day and resulted in remarkable improvements in measurement accuracy (with detection limits of 0.5, 0.01, 0.05, 2.3 and 0.2μgN or Ch(-1)kg(-1)ds, or 17, 0.3, 1.8, 82, and 6μgN or Cm(-2)h(-1), for N2, N2O, NO, CO2, and CH4, respectively). In some circumstances, the modified system measured significantly more N2 and CO2 and less N2O and NO because of the enhanced measurement frequency. The modified system distinguished the differences in emissions of the denitrification gases and CO2 due to a 20% change in initial carbon supplies. It also remarkably recovered approximately 90% of consumed nitrate during incubation. These performances validate the technical improvement, and indicate that the improved GFSC system may provide a powerful research tool for obtaining deeper insights into the processes of soil carbon and nitrogen transformation during denitrification. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Non-destructive Analysis of Oil-Contaminated Soil Core Samples by X-ray Computed Tomography and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry: a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Mitsuhata, Yuji; Nishiwaki, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Utsuzawa, Shin; Jinguuji, Motoharu

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive measurements of contaminated soil core samples are desirable prior to destructive measurements because they allow obtaining gross information from the core samples without touching harmful chemical species. Medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) and time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry were applied to non-destructive measurements of sandy soil core samples from a real site contaminated with heavy oil. The medical CT visualized the spatial distribution of the bulk density averaged over the voxel of 0.31 × 0.31 × 2 mm(3). The obtained CT images clearly showed an increase in the bulk density with increasing depth. Coupled analysis with in situ time-domain reflectometry logging suggests that this increase is derived from an increase in the water volume fraction of soils with depth (i.e., unsaturated to saturated transition). This was confirmed by supplementary analysis using high-resolution micro-focus X-ray CT at a resolution of ∼10 μm, which directly imaged the increase in pore water with depth. NMR transverse relaxation waveforms of protons were acquired non-destructively at 2.7 MHz by the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The nature of viscous petroleum molecules having short transverse relaxation times (T2) compared to water molecules enabled us to distinguish the water-saturated portion from the oil-contaminated portion in the core sample using an M(0)-T2 plot, where M(0) is the initial amplitude of the CPMG signal. The present study demonstrates that non-destructive core measurements by medical X-ray CT and low-field NMR provide information on the groundwater saturation level and oil-contaminated intervals, which is useful for constructing an adequate plan for subsequent destructive laboratory measurements of cores.

  2. BIODEGRADATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) FROM CRUDE OIL IN SANDY-BEACH MICROCOSMS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Though the lower n-alkanes are considered the most degradable components of crude oil, our experiments with microcosms simulating oiled beaches showed substantial depletion of fluorene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and other PAH in control treatments consisting of raw seawater...

  3. Design and interpretation of microcosm studies for chlorinated compounds. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Luce, D.

    1996-12-31

    There are three lines of evidence used to support natural attenuation as a remedy for chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. They are (1) documented loss of contaminant at field scale, (2) geochemical analytical data, and (3) direct microbiological evidence. Microcosm studies are often used to provide a third line of evidence. The potential for biodegradation of the contaminants of interest can be confirmed by the use of microcosms, through comparison of removals in the living treatments with removals in the controls. Microcosm studies also permit an absolute mass balance determination based on biodegradation of the contaminants of interest. Further, the appearance of daughter products in the microcosms can be used to conform biodegradation of the parent compound.

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) FROM CRUDE OIL IN SANDY-BEACH MICROCOSMS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Though the lower n-alkanes are considered the most degradable components of crude oil, our experiments with microcosms simulating oiled beaches showed substantial depletion of fluorene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and other PAH in control treatments consisting of raw seawater...

  5. Stability and resilience of oral microcosms toward acidification and Candida outgrowth by arginine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jessica E; Röling, Wilfred F M; Buijs, Mark J; Sissons, Christopher H; ten Cate, Jacob M; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2015-02-01

    Dysbiosis induced by low pH in the oral ecosystem can lead to caries, a prevalent bacterial disease in humans. The amino acid arginine is one of the pH-elevating agents in the oral cavity. To obtain insights into the effect of arginine on oral microbial ecology, a multi-plaque "artificial mouth" (MAM) biofilm model was inoculated with saliva from a healthy volunteer and microcosms were grown for 4 weeks with 1.6 % (w/v) arginine supplement (Arginine) or without (Control), samples were taken at several time-points. A cariogenic environment was mimicked by sucrose pulsing. The bacterial composition was determined by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, the presence and amount of Candida and arginine deiminase system genes arcA and sagP by qPCR. Additionally, ammonium and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were determined. The Arginine microcosms were dominated by Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Neisseria and remained stable in time, while the composition of the Control microcosms diverged significantly in time, partially due to the presence of Megasphaera. The percentage of Candida increased 100-fold in the Control microcosms compared to the Arginine microcosms. The pH-raising effect of arginine was confirmed by the pH and ammonium results. The abundances of sagP and arcA were highest in the Arginine microcosms, while the concentration of butyrate was higher in the Control microcosms. We demonstrate that supplementation with arginine serves a health-promoting function; it enhances microcosm resilience toward acidification and suppresses outgrowth of the opportunistic pathogen Candida. Arginine facilitates stability of oral microbial communities and prevents them from becoming cariogenic.

  6. Sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli in waste stabilization microcosms in a sahelian region (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso).

    PubMed

    Maïga, Ynoussa; Denyigba, Kokou; Wethe, Joseph; Ouattara, Aboubakar Sidiki

    2009-02-09

    Experiments on sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli were conducted from November 2006 to June 2007 in eight outdoors microcosms with different depths filled with maturation pond wastewater in order to determine pond depth influence on sunlight inactivation of E. coli. The long-term aim was to maximize sunlight inactivation of waterborne pathogens in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) in sahelian regions where number of sunny days enable longer exposure of wastewater to sunlight. The inactivation was followed during daylight from 8.00 h to 17.00 h and during the night. Sunlight inactivation rates (K(S)), as a function of cumulative global solar radiation (insolation), were 16 and 24 times higher than the corresponding dark inactivation (K(D)) rates, respectively in cold and warm season. In warm season, E. coli was inactivated far more rapidly. Inactivation of E. coli follows the evolution of radiation during the day. In shallow depth microcosms, E. coli was inactivated far more rapidly than in high depth microcosms. The physical chemical parameters [pH, dissolved oxygen (DO)] of microcosms water were higher in shallow depth microcosms than in high depth microcosms suggesting a synergistic effect of sunlight and these parameters to damage E. coli. To increase the efficiency of the elimination of waterborne bacteria, the use of maturation ponds with intermediate depths (0.4m) would be advisable in view of the high temperatures and thus evaporation recorded in sahelian regions.

  7. Phenotypic stress response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa following culture in water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Maatallah, Makaoui; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the potential behavioural changes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa following growth in different aquatic environmental conditions. To achieve this, P. aeruginosa was cultured in various water microcosms for 12 months under fixed (pH, nutrients and temperature) factors. P. aeruginosa responses to these conditions were investigated using colony morphotype, biochemical and enzymatic characterisation, pyocin typing, serotyping, sensitivity to different classes of antibiotics and molecular identification. Results show that starvation in water microcosms lead to unusual phenotypes. Of interest is that the pyocin changed from 24/n in the wild type to 83/a following culture in the water microcosms, and the serotype changed from O6 in the wild type to O1 in microcosm-cultured P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the starvation period in various aquatic microcosms enhanced the resistance of P. aeruginosa against beta-lactam antibiotics. Compared to the other aquatic environments, the seawater microcosm produced the greatest amount of variations in P. aeruginosa. Overall, data demonstrated a high adaptability of P. aeruginosa to environmental changes. This may explain the unusual antibiotic-resistant phenotypes belonging to P. aeruginosa species, and their capacity for spreading that leads to human infections.

  8. Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Antiseptics and microcosm biofilm formation on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Verardi, Georgia; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Maske, Tamires Timm; Webber, Bruna; Santos, Luciana Ruschel dos

    2016-01-01

    Oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants is a way to restore esthetics and masticatory function in edentulous patients, but bacterial colonization around the implants may lead to mucositis or peri-implantitis and consequent implant loss. Peri-implantitis is the main complication of oral rehabilitation with dental implants and, therefore, it is necessary to take into account the potential effects of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine (CHX), chloramine T (CHT), triclosan (TRI), and essential oils (EO) on bacterial adhesion and on biofilm formation. To assess the action of these substances, we used the microcosm technique, in which the oral environment and periodontal conditions are simulated in vitro on titanium discs with different surface treatments (smooth surface - SS, acid-etched smooth surface - AESS, sand-blasted surface - SBS, and sand-blasted and acid-etched surface - SBAES). Roughness measurements yielded the following results: SS: 0.47 µm, AESS: 0.43 µm, SB: 0.79 µm, and SBAES: 0.72 µm. There was statistical difference only between SBS and AESS. There was no statistical difference among antiseptic treatments. However, EO and CHT showed lower bacterial counts compared with the saline solution treatment (control group). Thus, the current gold standard (CHX) did not outperform CHT and EO, which were efficient in reducing the biofilm biomass compared with saline solution.

  10. The simulated emergence of distributed environmental control in evolving microcosms.

    PubMed

    Downing, Keith L

    2002-01-01

    This work continues investigation into Gaia theory [Lovelock, (1995) The ages of Gaia, Oxford University Press] from an artificial life perspective [Downing, (2000) in Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Artificial Life, (pp. 90-99) MIT Press], with the aim of assessing the general compatibility of emergent distributed environmental control with conventional natural selection. Our earlier system, GUILD [Downing and Zvirinsky, (1999) Artificial Life, 5, 291-318], displayed emergent regulation of the chemical environment by a population of metabolizing agents, but the chemical model underlying those results was trivial, essentially admitting all possible reactions at a single energy cost. The new model, METAMIC, utilizes abstract chemistries that are both (a) constrained to a small set of legal reactions, and (b) grounded in basic fundamental relationships between energy, entropy, and biomass synthesis/breakdown. To explore the general phenomena of emergent homeostasis, we generate 100 different chemistries and use each as the basis for several METAMIC runs, as part of a Gaia hunt. This search discovers 20 chemistries that support microbial populations capable of regulating a physical environmental factor within their growth-optimal range, despite the extra metabolic cost. Case studies from the Gaia hunt illustrate a few simple mechanisms by which real biota might exploit the underlying chemistry to achieve some control over their physical environment. Although these results shed little light on the question of Gaia on Earth, they support the possibility of emergent environmental control at the microcosmic level.

  11. Dissipation of double-stranded RNA in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Albright, Vurtice C; Wong, Colin R; Hellmich, Richard L; Coats, Joel R

    2017-05-01

    Silencing genes of a pest with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a promising new pest management technology. As part of the environmental risk assessment for dsRNA-based products, the environmental fate and the potential for adverse effects to on-target organisms should be characterized. In the present study, a nonbioactive dsRNA was spiked into the water column of a water and sediment microcosm to mimic drift from a spray application run off of unbound dsRNA or transport of plant tissues. Dissipation of dsRNA in the water column and partitioning into sediment was determined. The dsRNA rapidly dissipated in the water column and was below the limit of detection after 96 h. The levels detected in the sediment were not significant and may indicate rapid degradation in the water column prior to partitioning to sediment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1249-1253. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. No evidence of aquatic priming effects in hyporheic zone microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Mia M.; Wagner, Karoline; Burns, Nancy R.; Herberg, Erik R.; Wanek, Wolfgang; Kaplan, Louis A.; Battin, Tom J.

    2014-06-01

    The priming effect refers to quantitative changes in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant organic matter upon addition of labile organic matter and is a phenomenon that mainly has been reported and debated in soil science. Recently, priming effects have been indicated in aquatic ecosystems and have received attention due to the potential significance for ecosystem carbon budgets. Headwater stream biofilms, which are important degraders of both allochthonous, presumably recalcitrant, organic matter and labile autochthonous organic matter, may be sites where priming effects are important in aquatic environments. We have experimentally tested for priming effects in stream biofilms within microcosms mimicking the stream hyporheic zone. A 13C labeled model allochthonous carbon source was used in combination with different carbon sources simulating autochthonous inputs. We did not detect changes in respiration, removal or incorporation of allochthonous organic matter in response to autochthonous treatments, thus not supporting the occurrence of priming effects under the experimental conditions. This study is the first to address priming effects in the hyporheic zone, and one of very few studies quantitatively assessing aquatic priming effects. The results contrast with existing studies, which highlights the need for quantitative approaches to determine the importance of priming effects in aquatic environments.

  13. No evidence of aquatic priming effects in hyporheic zone microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Mia M; Wagner, Karoline; Burns, Nancy R; Herberg, Erik R; Wanek, Wolfgang; Kaplan, Louis A; Battin, Tom J

    2014-06-05

    The priming effect refers to quantitative changes in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant organic matter upon addition of labile organic matter and is a phenomenon that mainly has been reported and debated in soil science. Recently, priming effects have been indicated in aquatic ecosystems and have received attention due to the potential significance for ecosystem carbon budgets. Headwater stream biofilms, which are important degraders of both allochthonous, presumably recalcitrant, organic matter and labile autochthonous organic matter, may be sites where priming effects are important in aquatic environments. We have experimentally tested for priming effects in stream biofilms within microcosms mimicking the stream hyporheic zone. A (13)C labeled model allochthonous carbon source was used in combination with different carbon sources simulating autochthonous inputs. We did not detect changes in respiration, removal or incorporation of allochthonous organic matter in response to autochthonous treatments, thus not supporting the occurrence of priming effects under the experimental conditions. This study is the first to address priming effects in the hyporheic zone, and one of very few studies quantitatively assessing aquatic priming effects. The results contrast with existing studies, which highlights the need for quantitative approaches to determine the importance of priming effects in aquatic environments.

  14. No evidence of aquatic priming effects in hyporheic zone microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Mia M.; Wagner, Karoline; Burns, Nancy R.; Herberg, Erik R.; Wanek, Wolfgang; Kaplan, Louis A.; Battin, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    The priming effect refers to quantitative changes in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant organic matter upon addition of labile organic matter and is a phenomenon that mainly has been reported and debated in soil science. Recently, priming effects have been indicated in aquatic ecosystems and have received attention due to the potential significance for ecosystem carbon budgets. Headwater stream biofilms, which are important degraders of both allochthonous, presumably recalcitrant, organic matter and labile autochthonous organic matter, may be sites where priming effects are important in aquatic environments. We have experimentally tested for priming effects in stream biofilms within microcosms mimicking the stream hyporheic zone. A 13C labeled model allochthonous carbon source was used in combination with different carbon sources simulating autochthonous inputs. We did not detect changes in respiration, removal or incorporation of allochthonous organic matter in response to autochthonous treatments, thus not supporting the occurrence of priming effects under the experimental conditions. This study is the first to address priming effects in the hyporheic zone, and one of very few studies quantitatively assessing aquatic priming effects. The results contrast with existing studies, which highlights the need for quantitative approaches to determine the importance of priming effects in aquatic environments. PMID:24898319

  15. Community assembly in the presence of disturbance: a microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Patel, Shivani N

    2008-07-01

    Ecologists know relatively little about the manner in which disturbance affects the likelihood of alternative community stable states and how the history of community assembly affects the relationship between disturbance and species diversity. Using microbial communities comprising bacterivorous ciliated protists assembled in laboratory microcosms, we experimentally investigated these questions by independently manipulating the intensity of disturbance (in the form of density-independent mortality) and community assembly history (including a control treatment with simultaneous species introduction and five sequential assembly treatments). Species diversity patterns consistent with the intermediate disturbance hypothesis emerged in the controls, as several species showed responses indicative of a tradeoff between competitive ability and ability to recover from disturbance. Species diversity in communities with sequential assembly, however, generally declined with disturbance, owing to the increased extinction risk of later colonizers at the intermediate level of disturbance. Similarities among communities subjected to different assembly histories increased with disturbance, a result due possibly to increasing disturbance reducing the importance of competition and hence priority effects. This finding is most consistent with the idea that increasing disturbance tends to reduce the likelihood of alternative stable states. Collectively, these results indicate the strong interactive effects of disturbance and assembly history on the structure of ecological communities.

  16. ARSENIC MOBILIZATION FROM SEDIMENTS IN MICROCOSMS UNDER SULFATE REDUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Quicksall, Andrew N.; Chillrud, Steven N.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Bostick, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is often assumed to be immobile in sulfidic environments. Here, laboratory-scale microcosms were conducted to investigate whether microbial sulfate reduction could control dissolved arsenic concentrations sufficiently for use in groundwater remediation. Sediments from the Vineland Superfund site and the Coeur d'Alene mining district were amended with different combination of lactate and sulfate and incubated for 30 to 40 days. In general, sulfate reduction in Vineland sediments resulted in transient and incomplete arsenic removal, or arsenic release from sediments. Sulfate reduction in the Coeur d'Alene sediments was more effective at removing arsenic from solution than the Vineland sediments, probably by arsenic substitution and adsorption within iron sulfides. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the Vineland sediments initially contained abundant reactive ferrihydrite, and underwent extensive sulfur cycling during incubation. As a result, arsenic in the Vineland sediments could not be effectively converted to immobile arsenic-bearing sulfides, but instead a part of the arsenic was probably converted to soluble thioarsenates. These results suggest that coupling between the iron and sulfur redox cycles must be fully understood for in situ arsenic immobilization by sulfate reduction to be successful. PMID:27037658

  17. Stereoselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, John; Malia, Louis; Lubben, Anneke; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Here presented for the first time is the enantioselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosm bioreactors. The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that mechanisms governing the fate of amphetamine and methamphetamine in the environment are mostly stereoselective and biological in nature. Several bioreactors were studied over the duration of 15 days (i) in both biotic and abiotic conditions, (ii) in the dark or exposed to light and (iii) in the presence or absence of suspended particulate matter. Bioreactor samples were analysed using SPE-chiral-LC-(QTOF)MS methodology. This investigation has elucidated the fundamental mechanism for degradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine as being predominantly biological in origin. Furthermore, stereoselectivity and changes in enantiomeric fraction (EF) were only observed under biotic conditions. Neither amphetamine nor methamphetamine appeared to demonstrate adsorption to suspended particulate matter. Our experiments also demonstrated that amphetamine and methamphetamine were photo-stable. Illicit drugs are present in the environment at low concentrations but due to their pseudo-persistence and non-racemic behaviour, with two enantiomers revealing significantly different potency (and potentially different toxicity towards aquatic organisms) the risk posed by illicit drugs in the environment should not be under- or over-estimated. The above results demonstrate the need for re-evaluation of the procedures utilised in environmental risk assessment, which currently do not recognise the importance of the phenomenon of chirality in pharmacologically active compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Arsenic mobilization from sediments in microcosms under sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Quicksall, Andrew N; Chillrud, Steven N; Mailloux, Brian J; Bostick, Benjamin C

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic is often assumed to be immobile in sulfidic environments. Here, laboratory-scale microcosms were conducted to investigate whether microbial sulfate reduction could control dissolved arsenic concentrations sufficiently for use in groundwater remediation. Sediments from the Vineland Superfund site and the Coeur d'Alene mining district were amended with different combination of lactate and sulfate and incubated for 30-40 days. In general, sulfate reduction in Vineland sediments resulted in transient and incomplete arsenic removal, or arsenic release from sediments. Sulfate reduction in the Coeur d'Alene sediments was more effective at removing arsenic from solution than the Vineland sediments, probably by arsenic substitution and adsorption within iron sulfides. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the Vineland sediments initially contained abundant reactive ferrihydrite, and underwent extensive sulfur cycling during incubation. As a result, arsenic in the Vineland sediments could not be effectively converted to immobile arsenic-bearing sulfides, but instead a part of the arsenic was probably converted to soluble thioarsenates. These results suggest that coupling between the iron and sulfur redox cycles must be fully understood for in situ arsenic immobilization by sulfate reduction to be successful.

  19. Gradients in intact polar diacylglycerolipids across the Mediterranean Sea are related to phosphate availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popendorf, K. J.; Tanaka, T.; Pujo-Pay, M.; Lagaria, A.; Courties, C.; Conan, P.; Oriol, L.; Sofen, L. E.; Moutin, T.; van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Intact polar membrane lipids compose a significant fraction of cellular material in plankton and their synthesis imposes a substantial constraint on planktonic nutrient requirements. As a part of the Biogeochemistry from the Oligotrophic to the Ultraoligotrophic Mediterranean (BOUM) cruise we examined the distribution of several classes of intact polar diacylglycerolipids (IP-DAGs) across the Mediterranean, and found that phospholipid concentration as a percent of total lipids correlated with phosphate concentration. In addition, the ratios of non-phosphorus lipids to phospholipids - sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) to phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and betaine lipids to phosphatidylcholine (PC) - were also found to increase from west to east across the Mediterranean. Additionally, microcosm incubations from across the Mediterranean were amended with phosphate and ammonium, and in the course of several days nutrient amendments elicited a shift in the ratios of IP-DAGs. These experiments were used to assess the relative contribution of community shifts and physiological response to the observed change in IP-DAGs across the Mediterranean. The ratio of SQDG to chlorophyll-a was also explored as an indicator of phytoplankton response to nitrogen availability. This study is the first to demonstrate the dynamic response of membrane lipid composition to changes in nutrients in a natural, mixed planktonic community.

  20. Gradients in intact polar diacylglycerolipids across the Mediterranean Sea are related to phosphate availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popendorf, K. J.; Tanaka, T.; Pujo-Pay, M.; Lagaria, A.; Courties, C.; Conan, P.; Oriol, L.; Sofen, L. E.; Moutin, T.; van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2011-08-01

    Intact polar membrane lipids compose a significant fraction of cellular material in plankton and their synthesis imposes a substantial constraint on planktonic nutrient requirements. As a part of the Biogeochemistry from the Oligotrophic to the Ultraoligtrophic Mediterranean (BOUM) cruise we examined the distribution of several classes of intact polar diacylglycerolipids (IP-DAGs) across the Mediterranean, and found that phospholipid concentration as a percent of total lipids correlated with phosphate concentration. In addition, the ratios of non-phosphorus lipids to phospholipids - sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) to phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and betaine lipids to phosphatidylcholine (PC) - were also found to increase from west to east across the Mediterranean. Additionally, microcosm incubations from across the Mediterranean were amended with phosphate and ammonium, and in the course of several days nutrient amendments elicited a shift in the ratios of IP-DAGs. These experiments were used to assess the relative contribution of community shifts and physiological response to the observed change in IP-DAGs across the Mediterranean. The ratio of SQDG to chlorophyll a was also explored as an indicator of phytoplankton response to nitrogen availability. This study is the first to demonstrate the dynamic response of membrane lipid composition to changes in nutrients in a natural, mixed planktonic community.

  1. Bacterial Community Response to Petroleum Hydrocarbon Amendments in Freshwater, Marine, and Hypersaline Water-Containing Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:23872573

  2. Influence of native microbiota on survival of Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II in river water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Belén; López, María M; Biosca, Elena G

    2007-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype II biovar 2 causes bacterial wilt in solanaceous hosts, producing severe economic losses worldwide. Waterways can be major dissemination routes of this pathogen, which is able to survive for long periods in sterilized water. However, little is known about its survival in natural water when other microorganisms, such as bacteriophages, other bacteria, and protozoa, are present. This study looks into the fate of a Spanish strain of R. solanacearum inoculated in water microcosms from a Spanish river, containing different microbiota fractions, at 24 degrees C and 14 degrees C, for a month. At both temperatures, R. solanacearum densities remained constant at the initial levels in control microcosms of sterile river water while, by contrast, declines in the populations of the introduced strain were observed in the nonsterile microcosms. These decreases were less marked at 14 degrees C. Lytic bacteriophages present in this river water were involved in the declines of the pathogen populations, but indigenous protozoa and bacteria also contributed to the reduced persistence in water. R. solanacearum variants displaying resistance to phage infection were observed, but only in microcosms without protozoa and native bacteria. In water microcosms, the temperature of 14 degrees C was more favorable for the survival of this pathogen than 24 degrees C, since biotic interactions were slower at the lower temperature. Similar trends were observed in microcosms inoculated with a Dutch strain. This is the first study demonstrating the influence of different fractions of water microorganisms on the survival of R. solanacearum phylotype II released into river water microcosms.

  3. Bacterial community response to petroleum hydrocarbon amendments in freshwater, marine, and hypersaline water-containing microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

  4. Responses of meiofauna and nematode communities to crude oil contamination in a laboratory microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Teawook; Oh, Je Hyeok; Hong, Jae-Sang; Kim, Dongsung

    2016-09-01

    We examined the effects of crude oil contamination on community assemblages of meiofauna and nematodes after exposure to total petroleum hydrocarbons in the laboratory. We administered a seawater solution that had been contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons to seven treatment groups at different concentrations, while the control group received uncontaminated filtered seawater. The average density of total meiofauna in the experimental microcosms diluted with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4% contaminated seawater was higher than the density in the control. The average density of total meiofauna in the 8%, 15%, and 20% microcosms was lower than the density in the control. The density of nematodes was similar to that of the total meiofauna. Cluster analysis divided the microcosms into group 1 (control, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4% microcosms) and group 2 (8%, 15%, and 20% microcosms). However, SIMPROF analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups ( p > 0.05). Bolbolaimus spp. (37.1%) were dominant among the nematodes. Cluster analysis showed similar results for nematode and meiofaunal communities. The total meiofaunal density, nematode density, and number of Bolbolaimus spp. individuals were significantly negatively associated with the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (Spearman correlation coefficients, p < 0.05). Within the nematodes, epistrate feeders (group 2A: 46%) were the most abundant trophic group. Among the treatment groups, the abundance of group 2A increased in low-concentration microcosms and decreased in high-concentration microcosms. Thus, our findings provide information on the effects of oil pollution on meiofauna in the intertidal zones of sandy beaches.

  5. Effects of sorption, sulphate reduction, and Phragmites australis on the removal of heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lesage, E; Rousseau, D P L; Van de Moortel, A; Tack, F M G; De Pauw, N; Verloo, M G

    2007-01-01

    The removal of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn from synthetic industrial wastewater was studied in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms filled with gravel or a gravel/straw mixture. Half of the microcosms were planted with Phragmites australis and half were left unplanted. All microcosms received low-strength wastewater (1 mg L(-1) of Co, Ni, and Zn, 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu, 2,000mg L(-1) SO4) during seven 14-day incubation batches. The pore water was regularly monitored at two depths for heavy metals, sulphate, organic carbon and redox potential. Sorption properties of gravel and straw were assessed in a separate experiment. A second series of seven incubation batches with high-strength wastewater (10 mg L(-1) of each metal, 2,000 mg L(-1) SO4) was then applied to saturate the substrate. Glucose was added to the gravel microcosms together with the high-strength wastewater. Sorption processes were responsible for metal removal during start-up, with the highest removal efficiencies in the gravel microcosms. The lower initial efficiencies in the gravel/straw microcosms were presumably caused by the decomposition of straw. However, after establishment of anaerobic conditions (Eh approximately -200 mV), precipitation as metal sulphides provided an additional removal pathway in the gravel/straw microcosms. The addition of glucose to gravel microcosms enhanced sulphate reduction and metal removal, although Phragmites australis negatively affected these processes in the top-layer of all microcosms.

  6. Microcosms metacommunities in river network: niche effects and biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giometto, A.; Carrara, F.; Altermatt, F.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Many highly diverse landscapes exhibit hierarchical spatial structures that are shaped by geomorphological processes. Riverine ecosystems, among the most diverse habitats on Earth, represent an outstanding example of such mechanisms. In these landscapes, in which connectivity directly influences metacommunity processes, habitat capacity contributes to control biodiversity at several levels. A previous study has already highlighted the effect of connectivity on species distribution at local and regional scales, but habitat capacity was kept uniform. We studied the interaction of connectivity and habitat capacity in an aquatic microcosm experiment, in which microbial communities were grown in 36-well culture plates connected by dispersal. Dispersal occurred by periodic transfer of culture medium among connected local communities, following river network topology. The effect of habitat capacity in these landscapes was investigated by comparing three different spatial configurations of local community volumes: 1. Power law distributed volumes, according to drainage area. 2. Spatial random permutation of the volumes in the above configuration. 3. Equal distribution of volumes (preserving the total volume with respect to the above configurations). The net effect of habitat capacity on community composition was isolated in a control treatment in which communities were kept isolated for the whole duration of the experiment. In all treatments we observed that varying volumes induced niche effects: some protozoan species preferentially occupied larger nodes (systematically in isolation). Nevertheless, there is evidence that position along the network played a significant role in shaping biodiversity patterns. Size distribution measurements for each community were taken with a CASY cell counter, and species abundances data on log scale precision were collected by direct microscope observation.

  7. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Lateef B.; Ilori, Matthew O.; Amund, Olukayode O.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonas sp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g) after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized) soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg−1 h−1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg−1 h−1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg−1 h−1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days) and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments. PMID:26691461

  8. Controlled release experiments with nonylphenol in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Gerd; Jüttner, Ingrid; Severin, Gabriele F; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Kettrup, Antonius

    2003-01-01

    A method of controlled release of technical nonylphenol (tNP) was developed to simulate realistic exposure in ecotoxicological studies on aquatic organisms. The direct addition of tNP from an aqueous stock solution into 50 ml of water led to a concentration decrease of 80 to 90% weight/volume (w/v) from nominal values within 48 h. The inclusion of tNP in semipermeable low-density polyethylene (LDPE) lay-flat tubing (controlled-release devices [CRDs]) of different length allowed a continuous release into pure water at a rate of about 30 microg/cm2/d. Using CRDs in aquaria containing 15 L of 63-microm-filtered lake water, eight different concentrations with maxima between 38.1 and 326.7 microg/L were maintained for 11 d. During a second experiment in 15-L aquaria, five replicates of three concentrations were maintained using CRDs of the same length. Concentrations after 38 d varied between 0.1 and 6.7, 26.1 and 41.9, and 49.9 and 76.0 microg/L. In aquatic microcosms containing 230 L of lake water, a natural plankton community, 50 L of sediment, and macrophytes, seven different tNP concentrations (maxima 11-120.1 microg/L) were maintained over 45 d using CRDs of different length. They were replaced after 14 and 25 d because release of tNP was slower than predicted from laboratory experiments. Concentrations in the top 1-cm sediment layer were on average 19 times higher during the dosing period than concentrations in the water at the same time. In the sediments, different levels of applications led to concentrations that differed less distinctly than in the water. This method is suitable for exposing aquatic organisms continuously to constant, ecologically relevant concentrations of NP and represents an improvement over previous dosing methods in which exposure varied.

  9. Aquatic toxicity of ivermectin in cattle dung assessed using microcosms.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Leticia M; Lindt, I; Negro, L; Gutierrez, M F; Mayora, G; Montalto, L; Ballent, M; Lifschitz, A

    2017-10-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is a parasiticide widely used for livestock. It is a semisynthetic derivative of avermectin, a macrocyclic lactone produced by Streptomyces avermitilis. This drug is only partly metabolized by livestock; considerable amounts of parent drug are excreted mostly via feces. To simulate exposure of aquatic invertebrates and macrophytes to direct excretion of cattle dung into surface waters, a microcosm experiment with IVM spiked in cattle dung was conducted. The objectives of this study were to characterize accumulation of IVM in water, sediment+dung, roots of the floating fern Salvinia and the zooplankton Ceriodaphnia dubia, the amphipod Hyalella and the apple snail Pomacea; to determine the effect of this drug spiked in cattle dung on life-history traits of these invertebrates; and to evaluate the influence of IVM on aquatic nutrient cycling. Dung was spiked with IVM to attain concentrations of 1150, 458, 50 and 22µgkg(-1)dung fresh weight, approximating those found in cattle dung at days 3, 7, 16 and 29 following subcutaneous injection. Concentrations found in dung during the first week of excretion were lethally toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella, whereas no mortality was observed in Pomacea. Concentrations of IVM in roots, sediment + dung and Pomacea increased significantly from the lowest to the highest treatment level. The effect of this drug on decomposition and release of nutrients from dung would have negative consequences for nutrient cycling in water. Increasing concentrations in sediment + dung with days of the experiment suggested that toxic concentrations would persist for an extended period in the water-sediment system. IVM represents an ecological risk for aquatic ecosystems, underscoring the need for livestock management strategies to limit its entry into water bodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Polar organic solvent removal in microcosm constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Grove, Janet Kowles; Stein, Otto R

    2005-10-01

    Three polar organic solvents, acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and 1-butanol, were added at 100 mg/l each to post-primary municipal wastewater in order to simulate a mixed waste stream. This mixture was applied to an experimental microcosm subsurface constructed wetland system consisting of replicates of Juncus effusus, Carex lurida, Iris pseudacorus, Pondeteria cordata and unplanted controls in a series of 14-day batch incubations over a yearlong period simulating a summer and winter season. 90% removal of 1-butanol typically took less than 3 days. 90% removal of acetone required from 5 to 10 days in summer and 10 to 14 days in winter. 90% removal of THF required at least 10 days and was frequently not achieved during the 14-day incubations. Initial experiments confirmed that the majority of solvent removal was via microbial bioremediation. Solvent removal was typically better in planted replicates, especially Juncus, regardless of season. The removal rate of all solvents was slower in winter, but the seasonal effect was most pronounced in the unplanted control replicates and least in the Carex and Juncus replicates. Plant and seasonal effects are believed to be due, in part, to variation in metabolic pathways induced by plant and seasonal variation in available root-zone oxygen. Variation in transpiration also influenced species and seasonal effects on THF removal, but not the other more biodegradable solvents. A model based on a prediction of plant uptake of nonionic dissolved chemicals suggests that as much as 39% of the THF in solution could have been removed through plant transpiration.

  11. Plant growth and the performance of mangrove wetland microcosms for mariculture effluent depuration.

    PubMed

    Su, Yung-Ming; Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Hou, Ping-Chun Lucy

    2011-07-01

    This study established wetland microcosms that were either unplanted or planted in monoculture with native mangrove species in Taiwan (Avicennia marina, Rhizophora stylosa, and Lumnitzera racemosa) for the purpose of receiving high-salinity mariculture effluents; additionally, the microcosms operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Plant growth and the performance of the microcosms with respect to pollutant removal were investigated. The results showed that seedlings of all three mangrove species survived and grew sufficiently well under continuous flooding. The presence of mangroves consistently improved SS, BOD(5), and TP removal, particularly under short HRT conditions. The mangrove microcosms removed pollutants from the mariculture effluents with efficiencies of 5.7-27.1% (SS), 4.9-36.3% (BOD(5)), 18.7-29.9% (TP), 21.2-49.8% (NH(4)-N), and 5.4-37.7% (NO(x)-N). A. marina and L. racemosa were more tolerant of continuous flooding than R. stylosa. However, no species displayed consistently superior performance in decreasing all pollutant-related parameters investigated. For all pollutants, microcosms operating at a 2-d HRT exhibited a higher removal efficiency than those operating at a 0.5-d HRT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microcosm study of biotic vs abiotic sources of buffering in Mercer Marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, J.W.; Logue, B.E.; Williams, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    Microcosms were utilized to determine whether the major source of buffering in Mercer Marsh, a naturally occurring urban riparian wetland, is due to biotic or abiotic variables. Three types of systems, each consisting of six microcosms, were constructed. One system consisted of sterilized substrate and sterilized marsh water. The second type of system consisted of sterilized substrate and unsterilized marsh water. The third consisted of unsterilized substrate and unsterilized marsh water. Three microcosms of each type were spiked with sulfuric acid. The spiking of the microcosms lowered the original pH an average of .5 pH units. A subsequent average rise of .7 pH units resulted in all the acid spiked systems over the study period. The system without acid also increased in pH, although at a much slower rate, with an average rise of .2 pH units. The sterilized systems responded in the same manner to the acid spiking as those with unsterilized components, indicating that biota are not needed for buffering. Buffering also occurred in a second group of microcosms without substrate indicating that abiotic materials suspended in the water column are important in this process.

  13. An automated image analysis system to measure and count organisms in laboratory microcosms.

    PubMed

    Mallard, François; Le Bourlot, Vincent; Tully, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    1. Because of recent technological improvements in the way computer and digital camera perform, the potential use of imaging for contributing to the study of communities, populations or individuals in laboratory microcosms has risen enormously. However its limited use is due to difficulties in the automation of image analysis. 2. We present an accurate and flexible method of image analysis for detecting, counting and measuring moving particles on a fixed but heterogeneous substrate. This method has been specifically designed to follow individuals, or entire populations, in experimental laboratory microcosms. It can be used in other applications. 3. The method consists in comparing multiple pictures of the same experimental microcosm in order to generate an image of the fixed background. This background is then used to extract, measure and count the moving organisms, leaving out the fixed background and the motionless or dead individuals. 4. We provide different examples (springtails, ants, nematodes, daphnia) to show that this non intrusive method is efficient at detecting organisms under a wide variety of conditions even on faintly contrasted and heterogeneous substrates. 5. The repeatability and reliability of this method has been assessed using experimental populations of the Collembola Folsomia candida. 6. We present an ImageJ plugin to automate the analysis of digital pictures of laboratory microcosms. The plugin automates the successive steps of the analysis and recursively analyses multiple sets of images, rapidly producing measurements from a large number of replicated microcosms.

  14. Dissipation of [(14)C]acetochlor herbicide under anaerobic aquatic conditions in flooded soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Loor-Vela, Sandra X; Crawford Simmons, Jennifer J; Simmons, F William; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2003-11-05

    Acetochlor degradation was studied under anaerobic conditions representative of conditions in flooded soils. Soil-water microcosms were prepared with a saturated Drummer clay loam and made anaerobic by either glucose pretreatment or N(2) sparging. Sparged microcosms consisted of sulfate-amended, unamended, and gamma-irradiated microcosms. The microcosms were sampled in triplicate at predetermined time intervals during a 371 day incubation period. Volatile, aqueous, extractable, and bound (unextractable) (14)C residues were quantified with liquid scintillation counting and characterized using high-performance liquid radiochromatography (HPLRC) and soil combustion. SO(4)(2)(-), Fe(II), CH(4), and pH were monitored. Complete anaerobic degradation of [(14)C]acetochlor was observed in all viable treatments. The time observed for 50% acetochlor disappearance (DT(50)) was 10 days for iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing conditions (sulfate-amended), 15 days for iron-reducing conditions (unamended), and 16 days for methanogenic conditions (glucose-pretreated). Acetochlor remained after 371 days in the gamma-irradiated microcosms, and metabolites were observed. [(14)C]Metabolites were detected throughout the study. Formation of one of the metabolites correlated with Fe(II) formation (r(2)(), 0.83). A significant portion of the (14)C activity was eventually incorporated into soil-bound residue (30-50% of applied acetochlor) in all treatments.

  15. Calorie restriction and susceptibility to intact pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Long-term calorie restriction (CR) causes numerous physiological changes that ultimately increase mean and maximum lifespan of most species examined to date. One physiological change that occurs with CR is enhanced immune function, as tested using antigens and mitogens to stimulate an immune response. Fewer studies have used intact pathogen exposure to test whether the enhanced capacity of the immune response during CR actually decreases susceptibility of hosts to their pathogens. So far, studies using intact bacteria, virus, and helminth worm exposure indicate that, despite similar or enhanced immune system function, CR hosts are more susceptible to infection by intact pathogens than their fully fed counterparts. Long-term CR studies that examine susceptibility to a variety of parasite taxa will help determine if direct CR or CR mimetics will be beneficial to people living in pathogen-rich environments. PMID:19424864

  16. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD.

  17. Synergistic relationships in algal-bacterial microcosms for the treatment of aromatic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Borde, Xavier; Guieysse, Benoît; Delgado, Osvaldo; Muñoz, Raúl; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Nugier-Chauvin, Caroline; Patin, Henri; Mattiasson, Bo

    2003-02-01

    The potential of algal-bacterial microcosms was studied for the biodegradation of salicylate, phenol and phenanthrene. The isolation and characterization of aerobic bacterial strains capable of mineralizing each pollutant were first conducted. Ralstonia basilensis was isolated for salicylate degradation, Acinetobacter haemolyticus for phenol and Pseudomonas migulae and Sphingomonas yanoikuyae for phenanthrene. The green alga Chlorella sorokiniana was then cultivated in the presence of the pollutants at different concentrations, showing increasing inhibitory effects in the following order: salicylate < phenol < phenanthrene. The synergistic relationships in the algal-bacterial microcosms were clearly demonstrated, since for the three contaminants tested, a substantial removal (>85%) was recorded only in the systems inoculated with both algae and bacteria and incubated under continuous lighting. This study presents, to our knowledge, the first reported case of photosynthesis-enhanced biodegradation of toxic aromatic pollutants by algal-bacterial microcosms in a one-stage treatment.

  18. Fungal diversity and ecosystem function data from wine fermentation vats and microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Primrose J; Greig, Duncan

    2016-09-01

    Grape must is the precursor to wine, and consists of grape juice and its resident microbial community. We used Illumina MiSeq® to track changes in must fungal community composition over time in winery vats and laboratory microcosms. We also measured glucose consumption and biomass in microcosms derived directly from must, and glucose consumption in artificially assembled microcosms. Functional impacts of individual must yeasts in artificially assembled communities were calculated using a "keystone index," developed for "Species richness influences wine ecosystem function through a dominant species" [1]. Community composition data and functional measurements are included in this article. DNA sequences were deposited in GenBank (GenBank: SRP073276). Discussion of must succession and ecosystem functioning in must are provided in [1].

  19. Microbial abundance and community in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms: role of plant presence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xie, Huijun; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Yang, Zhongchen; Zhao, Congcong

    2016-03-01

    In this research, the role of plants in improving microorganism growth conditions in subsurface flow constructed wetland (CW) microcosms was determined. In particular, microbial abundance and community were investigated during summer and winter in Phragmites australis-planted CW microcosms (PA) and unplanted CW microcosms (control, CT). Results revealed that the removal efficiencies of pollutants and microbial community structure varied in winter with variable microbial abundance. During summer, PA comprised more dominant phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), whereas CT contained more Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria. During winter, the abundance of Proteobacteria was >40 % in PA but dramatically decreased in CT. Moreover, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacterial dominance in CT decreased. In both seasons, bacteria were more abundant in root surfaces than in sand. Plant presence positively affected microbial abundance and community. The potential removal ability of CT, in which Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria were abundant during summer, was more significantly affected by temperature reduction than that of PA with plant presence.

  20. Effects of three concentrations of mixed fatty acids on dechlorination of tetrachloroethene in aquifer microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.A.; Roberson, D.S.; Russell, H.H.; Sewell, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    Chloroethenes are among the most common organic contaminants of ground water. The biotransformation of these compounds by reductive dechlorination is a promising technology for in situ treatment. The effects of three concentrations of a fatty acids mixture on the reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) were studied in methanogenic microcosms. These microcosms were constructed with slurries of aquifer solids collected from an area impacted both by aviation gasoline and chlorinated ethenes at Traverse City, Michigan. PCE was not dechlorinated in microcosms without a fatty acid supplement. Although there were observed differences in the length of the lag time, the amount of ultimately dechlorinated PCE was similar. Of the fatty acids tested in the mixture, butyrate oxidation appeared to be the most probable link to PCE dechlorination. (Copyright (c) Pergamon Press 1994.)

  1. The influence of iron on the biodegradation of benzene in soil microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Poor, N.D.; Wheeler, E.; Novak, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    Iron was positively-correlated with benzene biodegradation rate in a statistically-significant multiple linear regression model of rates measured in aerobic soil microcosm experiments regressed with corresponding soil nitrate, phosphorus, iron, organic matter and sand content for 10 different previously uncontaminated Virginia subsurface soils. The addition of ferric chloride or ferric hydroxide to soil microcosms prepared with Alaga series sand and spiked with 10 mg/L initial benzene significantly increased the biodegradation rate in unamended experiments, but had no observable influence on biodegradation rates in experiments amended with ammonium phosphate and potassium phosphate. Unamended soil microcosms degraded 10 mg/L initial benzene in 10 days, iron-amended in 5 days, and nutrient-amended in 2 days.

  2. Effects of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil on freshwater ecosystems. I. Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.J.; Giddings, J.M.; Herbes, S.E.; Hook, L.A.; Newbold, J.D.; Roy, W.K.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen 67-liter freshwater microcosms were treated for 8 weeks with an unrefined coal-oil in amounts ranging from 0.03 to 7 ml per week. Phenols make up 95% of the water-soluble compounds in this oil, and dissolved phenol concentrations averaged < 0.01 mg L/sup -1/ in the lowest dose and 10 mg L/sup -1/ in the highest. The microcosms were severely damaged at the highest treatment level; macrophytes, zooplankton and insects were eliminated, and the ecosystems became anaerobic. Microcosms did not recover to pretreatment conditions within 5 months. At lower dosages there were temporary effects on ecosystem metabolism, water chemistry and community structure. The most sensitive indices, community respiration, production/respiration ratio, pH and cladoceran zooplankton numbers, were affected at phenol concentrations below the lowest observable effect concentration of a chronic Daphnia magna bioassay.

  3. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Zooplankton Assemblages in Aquatic Microcosms Simulating Rice Paddy Fields.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Pengfei; Liu, Fuguang; Liu, Yihua; Yao, Sumei; Zhu, Guonian

    2017-07-01

    The individual and combined effects of pesticides (chlorpyrifos, triadimefon and butachlor) on the zooplankton assemblages of microcosms were investigated. Laboratory microcosms were constructed with water and sediment to simulate aquatic conditions in China's rice paddy fields. Results from principal response curves analysis showed that butachlor and triadimefon had no significant impact individually on the population level in zooplankton assemblages. The deleterious effects of pesticide mixtures on the zooplankton were mainly caused by chlorpyrifos. In fact, assemblage succession only occurred in the treatments containing chlorpyrifos. There was no synergy effect on the microcosm from combinations of pesticides on the assemblages. The zooplankton assemblages affected by chlorpyrifos did not recover at the termination of the experiment, i.e., after 56 days.

  4. Quick stimulation of Alcanivorax sp. by bioemulsificant EPS2003 on microcosm oil spill simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Simone; Genovese, Maria; Denaro, Renata; Santisi, Santina; Volta, Anna; Bonsignore, Martina; Mancini, Giuseppe; Giuliano, Laura; Genovese, Lucrezia; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill microcosms experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of bioemulsificant exopolysaccharide (EPS2003) on quick stimulation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Early hours of oil spill, were stimulated using an experimental seawater microcosm, supplemented with crude oil and EPS2003 (SW+OIL+EPS2003); this system was monitored for 2 days and compared to control microcosm (only oil-polluted seawater, SW+OIL). Determination of bacterial abundance, heterotrophic cultivable and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were carried out. Community composition of marine bacterioplankton was determined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Data obtained indicated that bioemulsificant addition stimulated an increase of total bacterial abundance and, in particular, selection of bacteria related to Alcanivorax genus; confirming that EPS2003 could be used for the dispersion of oil slicks and could stimulate the selection of marine hydrocarbon degraders thus increasing bioremediation process. PMID:25763036

  5. Toxicity to freshwater organisms from oils and oil spill chemical treatments in laboratory microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S; Klerks, P L; Nyman, J A

    2003-01-01

    Toxicity and temporal changes in toxicity of freshwater-marsh-microcosms containing South Louisiana Crude (SLC) or diesel fuel and treated with a cleaner or dispersant, were investigated using Chironomus tentans, Daphnia pulex, and Oryzias latipes. Bioassays used microcosm water (for D. pulex and O. latipes) or soil slurry (for C. tentans) taken 1,7, 31, and 186 days after treatment. SLC was less toxic than diesel, chemical additives enhanced oil toxicity, the dispersant was more toxic than the cleaner, and toxicities were greatly reduced by day 186. Toxicities were higher in the bioassay with the benthic species than in those with the two water-column species. A separate experiment showed that C. tentans' sensitivity was intermediate to that of Tubifex tubifex and Hyallela azteca. Freshwater organisms, especially benthic invertebrates, thus appear seriously effected by oil under the worst-case-scenario of our microcosms. Moreover, the cleaner and dispersant tested were poor response options under those conditions.

  6. Effects of bioaugmentation on indigenous PCB dechlorinating activity in sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fagervold, Sonja K; Watts, Joy E M; May, Harold D; Sowers, Kevin R

    2011-07-01

    Bioaugmentation is an attractive mechanism for reducing recalcitrant pollutants in sediments, especially if this technology could be applied in situ. To examine the potential effectiveness of a bioaugmentation strategy for PCB contamination, PCB dehalorespiring populations were inoculated into Baltimore Harbor sediment microcosms. A culture containing the two most predominant indigenous PCB dehalorespiring microorganisms and a culture containing a strain with a rare ortho dechlorination activity and a non-indigenous strain that attacks double-flanked chlorines, were inoculated into sediment microcosms amended with 2,2',3,5,5',6-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 151) and Aroclor 1260. Although we observed a similar reduction in the concentration of PCB 151 in all microcosms at day 300, a reduced lag time for dechlorination activity was observed only in the bioaugmented microcosms and the pattern of dechlorination was altered depending on the initial combination of microorganisms added. Dechlorination of Aroclor 1260 was most extensive when dehalorespiring microorganisms were added to sediment. Overall numbers of dehalorespiring microorganisms in both bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented microcosms increased 100- and 1000-fold with PCB 151 and Aroclor 1260, respectively, and they were sustained for the full 300 days of the experiments. The ability of bioaugmentation to redirect dechlorination reactions in the sediment microcosms indicates that the inoculated PCB dehalorespiring microorganisms effectively competed with the indigenous microbial populations and cooperatively enhanced or altered the specific pathways of PCB dechlorination. These observations indicate that bioaugmentation with PCB dehalorespiring microorganisms is a potentially tractable approach for in situ treatment of PCB impacted sites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of three concentrations of mixed fatty acids on dechlorination of tetrachloroethene in aquifer microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.A.; Roberson, D.S. ); Russell, H.H. . Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    Chloroethenes are among the most common organic contaminants of ground water. The biotransformation of these compounds by reductive dechlorination is a promising technology for in situ treatment. The effects of three concentrations of a fatty acids mixture on the reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethane (PCE) were studied in methanogenic microcosms. These microcosms were constructed with slurries of aquifer solids collected from an area impacted both by aviation gasoline and chlorinated ethanes at Traverse City, Michigan. The microcosms were amended with approximately 30 [mu]M PCE and one of three concentrations of a mixture of low-molecular-weight organic axis, or were part of a control set that received no amendment. The observed lag or adaptation times before the onset of PCE dehalogenation were 51 d, 65 d, 86 d, and > 233 d (no acids). After 233 d of incubation, no PCE was detectable in any of the fatty-acid-supplemented microcosms, but 23 to 27 [mu]M of combined tri- and dichloroethenes (TCEs, DCEs) was detected. PCE was not dechlorinated in microcosms without a fatty acid supplement. Although there were observed differences in the length of the lag time, the amount of ultimately dechlorinated PCE was similar. A zero-order rate constant of 0.3 [mu]M d[sup [minus]1] was calculated for PCE dechlorination and for TCE dechlorination for the two series of microcosms receiving 0.1 and 1.0 mM fatty acid supplements. Of the fatty acids tested in the mixture, butyrate oxidation appeared to be the most probable link to PCE dechlorination.

  8. [Effects of sodium hypochlorite on structure and function of pond microcosms].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Lu, Yi; Wang, Yazhou

    2007-03-01

    To study the influence of sodium hypochlorite on destruction and restoration of simulated pond ecosystems. Six pond microcosms were established to simulate aquatic ecosystems. 0, 1, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 mg/L of sodium hypochlorite were put in these simulated pond microcosms every 24 h for 13 days and followed by observation for 10 days. The values of chlorine residual, total bacteria count, chlorophyll-a and total productivity were detected regularly. Chlorine residual increased continuously with the increase of doses and time course. Content of chlorophyll-a, total productivity negatively correlated with dose of sodium hypochlorite. 1.0 mg/L and 2.5 mg/L of sodium hypochlorite promoted the growth of bacteria, but 5.0 mg/L, 10.0 mg/L and 20.00 mg/L of sodium hypochlorite could kill bacteria effectively. Under low doses of sodium hypochlorite (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/L), there were no influence on microcosms' restoration, but the high doses (10.0 mg/L and 20.0 mg/L) could severely damage the microcosms. According to the tendency of chlorophyll-a and total productivity, structure and function of every pond microcosm could be changed by sodium hypochlorite in this test condition, the influence was reversible under the doses of 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/L, but microcosms could not be restored under the doses of 10.0 mg/L and 20.0 mg/L.

  9. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  10. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  11. Characterization of trace element geochemistry in continuous flow-through microcosms: a preliminary step to environmentally meaningful ecotoxicological experiments.

    PubMed

    Kottelat, Régis; Vignati, Davide A L; Garcia-Bravo, Andrea; Dominik, Janusz; Ferrari, Benoît J D

    2010-12-01

    The increasing use of freshwater/sediment microcosms in geochemical and ecotoxicological studies requires additional efforts to characterize and understand their functioning and the main parameters that can influence the pollutants' behavior and bioavailability inside the microcosms themselves. In this study, we investigated the geochemical behavior of four elements (Cr(III), Cu, Cd, and Pb) in microcosms containing one type of natural water and sediment. The microcosms were operated under flow-through conditions with continuous metal spiking (2.5-40 μgL(-1) for Cr(III) and Pb; 1.25-20 μgL(-1) for Cu and Cd) over a period of 1 month. During this period, metal concentrations and partitioning between colloidal and truly dissolved phases in the microcosm water columns showed very little variability indicating that the system rapidly reached and maintained a steady state. Metal concentrations in pore waters also showed little variability, while Cd, Cr, and Pb levels in the top layer of sediments increased linearly from day 0 to day 28 (no significant variations in sedimentary Cu levels were observed). These features make this type of microcosms particularly suitable for ecotoxicological studies with zooplanktonic or epibenthic organisms. Characterizing the geochemical properties of microcosms provides critical information for properly interpreting microcosms-based ecotoxicity data and for reducing uncertainty in laboratory-to-field extrapolation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MICROCOSM AND IN-SITU FIELD STUDIES OF ENHANCED BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE BY PHENOL-UTILIZING MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of different aerobic groundwater microorganisms to cometabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), and 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (t-DCE) was evaluated both in groundwater-fed microcosms and in situ in a shallow aquifer. Microcosms a...

  13. Effects of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems: experiments with microcosms and outdoor ponds. A synthesis report

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.; Franco, P.J.; Bartell, S.M.; Cushman, R.M.; Herbes, S.E.; Hook, L.A.; Newbold, J.D.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1985-06-01

    Ecosystem experiments were undertaken to investigate the long-term fate and effects of coal liquefaction products under more natural conditions. Two experiments were additions of a whole synthetic oil to microcosms and ponds, respectively, as a single contaminant release. Two other experiments involved continuous releases of a whole coal liquid to microcosms and ponds. This report describes the latter experiments, presents and analyzes the results, and draws conclusions regarding the nature of aquatic ecosystems and their responses to this form of chemical stress. 23 figs., 9 tabs. (ACR)

  14. Chromium valency response and environmental fate in three-phase aquatic microcosms. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Factors affecting the valency, solubility, transport, and biogeochemical fate of chromium in an aquatic environment were investigated and assessed utilizing a physical model. Three-phase, atmosphere-water-sediment, microcosms were utilized in a semi-continuous flow-through mode to model a river impoundment. Effects of varying chromium inputs on algal growth, sediment uptake rates, dissolved oxygen concentrations, chromium valency response, and ultimate fate of chromium were monitored. A concurrent study, conducted in an impoundment of the Naugatuck River in Thomaston, Connecticut, allowed field evaluation of responses observed in the microcosm models.

  15. Stimulation of Mercury Methylation by Coal Ash in Anaerobic Sediment Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, G.; Hsu-Kim, H.; Redfern, L.; Gunsch, C.; Vengosh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coal combustion products (coal ash) represent one of the largest industrial waste streams in the United States. Coal ash contains elevated levels of toxic, bioaccumulative elements such as mercury (Hg), yet the majority of coal ash waste is stored in unlined impoundments and landfills. These impoundments have a long history of environmental degradation, including: groundwater contamination, surface water contamination through impoundment effluent discharge, and impoundment failures resulting in catastrophic ash release events. The fate of toxic elements associated with coal ash is greatly influenced by environmental parameters, such as redox potential and microbial activity, which induce transformations and leaching of contaminants. Here we used anaerobic sediment-ash microcosms to determine how coal ash impacts methyl mercury (MeHg) production in a simulated benthic aquatic environment. We used two coal ash types in the microcosms: a weathered ash with low sulfate/Hg content and a fresh fly ash that was relatively enriched in sulfate/Hg compared to the weathered ash. Two different sediments were used in the microcosms: one was a pristine sediment (containing 0.03 mg/kg Hg) and the other was a relatively Hg-contaminated sediment (containing 0.29 mg/kg Hg). Results showed that microcosms amended with the low sulfate/low Hg ash had no net MeHg production. In contrast, microcosms amended with high sulfate/high Hg ash showed increases in MeHg concentrations that were 2 to 3 times greater than control microcosms without ash, indicating that coal ash can stimulate MeHg production by providing spikes of Hg and labile sulfate to the aquatic system. MeHg production in ash-amended microcosms containing contaminated sediment was no greater than in the ash-amended pristine sediment microcosms. This may indicate that Hg associated with coal ash is more bioavailable than the Hg present in historically contaminated sediments. Illumina sequencing is underway to investigate the

  16. The Use of Microcosms as an Experimental Approach to Understanding Terrestrial Ecosystem Functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, L. H.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1986, a series of microcosm experiments has been conducted at the Unit of Comparative Plant Ecology (UCPE) in an attempt to test our understanding of the principles controlling the structure and dynamics of plant communities and ecosystems. In each experiment microcosms have been seeded with a common pool of organisms, and systems have been allowed to assemble under replicated controlled conditions. Experiment variables have included mineral nutrient supply, temperature, moisture supply, soil depth, carbon dioxide concentration, mycorrhizas, rhizobia, herbivores and carnivores. Results from these experiments are presented to illustrate the value of synthesised ecosystems in ecological research.

  17. The recovery of heat-stressed Escherichia coli in lake water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lim, C H; Flint, K P

    1995-12-01

    Escherichia coli was heat stressed at 55 degrees, 60 degrees or 65 degrees C in sterile flasks of lake water. After 6 h at these temperatures the viable count on nutrient agar had dropped below the limits of detection (1 colony in 100 ml). The flasks were transferred to a 15 degrees C incubator and left for 7 d. Recovery of the stressed E. coli was shown to occur within 48 h at this temperature. Recovery also occurred in microcosms amended with 5% (v/v) synthetic sewage. The stressed E. coli multiplied in the amended but not in the unamended microcosms.

  18. Anaerobic Degradation of Pristane in Nitrate-Reducing Microcosms and Enrichment Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bregnard, T. P.; Haner, A.; Hohener, P.; Zeyer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm studies were conducted under nitrate-reducing conditions with diesel fuel-contaminated aquifer material from a site treated by in situ bioremediation. In the microcosms, the consumption of nitrate and the production of inorganic carbon were strongly stimulated by the addition of the isoprenoid alkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane). Within 102 days enrichment cultures degraded more than 90% of the pristane supplied as coatings on reticulated sinter glass rings. The study demonstrates that pristane can no longer be regarded as recalcitrant under anaerobic conditions. PMID:16535616

  19. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  20. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  1. Mineralogical, chemical, organic and microbial properties of subsurface soil cores from Mars Desert Research Station (Utah, USA): Phyllosilicate and sulfate analogues to Mars mission landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Clarke, Jonathan; Direito, Susana O. L.; Blake, David; Martin, Kevin R.; Zavaleta, Jhony; Foing, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    We collected and analysed soil cores from four geologic units surrounding Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Utah, USA, including Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison formation (Brushy Basin member) and Summerville formation. The area is an important geochemical and morphological analogue to terrains on Mars. Soils were analysed for mineralogy by a Terra X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a field version of the CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission (2012 landing). Soluble ion chemistry, total organic content and identity and distribution of microbial populations were also determined. The Terra data reveal that Mancos and Morrison soils are rich in phyllosilicates similar to those observed on Mars from orbital measurements (montmorillonite, nontronite and illite). Evaporite minerals observed include gypsum, thenardite, polyhalite and calcite. Soil chemical analysis shows sulfate the dominant anion in all soils and SO4>>CO3, as on Mars. The cation pattern Na>Ca>Mg is seen in all soils except for the Summerville where Ca>Na. In all soils, SO4 correlates with Na, suggesting sodium sulfates are the dominant phase. Oxidizable organics are low in all soils and range from a high of 0.7% in the Mancos samples to undetectable at a detection limit of 0.1% in the Morrison soils. Minerals rich in chromium and vanadium were identified in Morrison soils that result from diagenetic replacement of organic compounds. Depositional environment, geologic history and mineralogy all affect the ability to preserve and detect organic compounds. Subsurface biosphere populations were revealed to contain organisms from all three domains (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya) with cell density between 3.0×106 and 1.8×107 cells ml-1 at the deepest depth. These measurements are analogous to data that could be obtained on future robotic or human Mars missions and results are relevant to the MSL mission that will investigate phyllosilicates on Mars.

  2. Fate of antimicrobial resistance genes in response to application of poultry and swine manure in simulated manure-soil microcosms and manure-pond microcosms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mianzhi; Sun, Yongxue; Liu, Peng; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Qin; Xiong, Wenguang; Zeng, Zhenling

    2017-07-18

    This study aimed to determine the occurrence, abundance, and fate of nine important antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) (sul1, sul2, tetB, tetM, ermB, ermF, fexA, cfr, and Intl1) in the simulated soil and pond microcosms following poultry and swine manure application. Absolute quantitative PCR method was used to determine the gene copies. The results were modeled as a logarithmic regression (N = mlnt + b) to explore the fate of target genes. Genes sul1, Intl1, sul2, and tetM had the highest abundance following the application of the two manure types. The logarithmic regression model fitted the results well (R (2) values up to 0.99). The reduction rate of all genes (except for the genes fexA and cfr) in manure-pond microcosms was faster than those in manure-soil microcosms. Importantly, sul1, intl1, sul2, and tetM had the lowest reduction rates in all the samples and the low reduction rates of tetM was the first time to be reported. These results indicated that ARG management should focus on using technologies for the ARG elimination before the manure applications rather than waiting for subsequent attenuation in soil or water, particularly the ARGs (such as sul1, intl1, sul2, and tetM investigated in this study) that had high abundance and low reduction rate in the soil and water after application of manure.

  3. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  4. Effect of isobutanol on toluene biodegradation in nitrate amended, sulfate amended and methanogenic enrichment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jayamani, Indumathy; Cupples, Alison M

    2013-09-01

    Isobutanol is an alternate fuel additive that is being considered because of economic and lower emission benefits. However, future gasoline spills could result in co-contamination of isobutanol with gasoline components such as benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylene. Hence, isobutanol could affect the degradability of gasoline components thereby having an effect on contaminant plume length and half-life. In this study, the effect of isobutanol on the biodegradation of a model gasoline component (toluene) was examined in laboratory microcosms. For this, toluene and isobutanol were added to six different toluene degrading laboratory microcosms under sulfate amended, nitrate amended or methanogenic conditions. While toluene biodegradation was not greatly affected in the presence of isobutanol in five out of the six different experimental sets, toluene degradation was completely inhibited in one set of microcosms. This inhibition occurred in sulfate amended microcosms constructed with inocula from wastewater treatment plant activated sludge. Our data suggest that toluene degrading consortia are affected differently by isobutanol addition. These results indicate that, if co-contamination occurs, in some cases the in situ half-life of toluene could be significantly extended.

  5. The MBA in Singapore: A Microcosm of Communication Training for Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Priscilla S.; Wong, Irene F. H.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses communication training provided in MBA and executive MBA programs in Singapore. The authors found that Singapore is a microcosm in terms of (a) requirements for English competency, (b) the variety of communication offerings, and (c) the lack of uniformity in the delivery of communication training. Whereas Singaporean MBA/EMBA…

  6. STIMULATION OF THE REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE IN ANAEROBIC AQUIFER MICROCOSMS BY THE ADDITION OF TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the biologically mediated interactions of toluene and PCE under anaerobic conditions were investigated by using microcosms constructed with aquifer solids from an area that was exposed to both alkylbenzenes and chlorinated ethenes at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Statio...

  7. Fate of Sulfamethazine in Surface Water Microcosms and Bioaccumulation in Sediment-dwelling Invertebrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The antibiotic sulfamethazine can be transported from manured fields to surface water bodies. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in small pond water microcosms using 14C-phenyl-sulfamethazine, and found a 2.7-d half-life in pond water and 4.2-d half-life when added to the wat...

  8. ENANTIOSELECTIVE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF CHIRAL POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN LAKE SEDIMENT MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transformation rates and enantiomeric ratios of two chiral poylchlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexachlorobiphenyl (2,2',3,4',5',6-HCB) and 2,2',3,3',4,4',5,6-octachlorobiphenyl (2,2',3,3',4,4',5,6-OCB), were determined in anaerobic lake sediment microcosms (25oC)...

  9. Both species sorting and neutral processes drive assembly of bacterial communities in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jack E; Buckley, Hannah L; Etienne, Rampal S; Lear, Gavin

    2013-11-01

    A focus of ecology is to determine drivers of community assembly. Here, we investigate effects of immigration and species sorting (environmental selection) on structuring aquatic bacterial communities in both colonised and previously uncolonised environments. We used nonsterilised and presterilised water from three chemically distinct ponds to establish microcosms, which were opened for 12, 24, 48, 96 or 167 h and then closed again to allow airborne bacterial immigration and subsequent succession. Community similarity, richness, evenness and the parameters of a neutral model were investigated after 167 h. Immigration appeared to govern the assembly of communities in the presterilised water as there were no significant differences in evenness among microcosm communities containing water from each pond. Statistical estimation of neutral model parameters confirmed these findings, because the estimated immigration rate changed significantly with time of exposure to immigration. Species sorting also occurred because significant differences in community similarity (for presterilised and nonsterilised communities) and evenness (only for nonsterilised communities) were detected among microcosms containing different pond water; the magnitude of these differences was greater for communities in nonsterilised microcosms. Our study provides evidence for both processes being important during the colonisation of aquatic environments and presents a novel way to apply the neutral model. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods for visualising active microbial benzene degraders in in situ microcosms.

    PubMed

    Schurig, Christian; Mueller, Carsten W; Höschen, Carmen; Prager, Andrea; Kothe, Erika; Beck, Henrike; Miltner, Anja; Kästner, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation maybe a cost-efficient option for bioremediation of contaminated sites but requires knowledge about the activity of degrading microbes under in situ conditions. In order to link microbial activity to the spatial distribution of contaminant degraders, we combined the recently improved in situ microcosm approach, so-called 'direct-push bacterial trap' (DP-BACTRAP), with nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis on samples from contaminated constructed wetlands. This approach is based on initially sterile microcosms amended with (13)C-labelled benzene as a source of carbon and energy for microorganisms. The microcosms were introduced directly in the constructed wetland, where they were colonised by indigenous microorganisms from the sediment. After incubation in the field, the samples were analysed by NanoSIMS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy in order to visualise (13)C-labelled microbial biomass on undisturbed samples from the microcosms. With the approach developed, we successfully visualised benzene-degrading microbes on solid materials with high surface area by means of NanoSIMS. Moreover, we could demonstrate the feasibility of NanoSIMS analysis of unembedded porous media with a highly complex topography, which was frequently reasoned to not lead to sufficient results.

  11. 4-methylphenol produced in freshwater sediment microcosms is not a bisphenol A metabolite.

    PubMed

    Im, Jeongdae; Prevatte, Carson W; Lee, Hong Geun; Campagna, Shawn R; Löffler, Frank E

    2014-12-01

    4-Methylphenol (4-MP), a putative bisphenol A (BPA) degradation intermediate, was detected at concentrations reaching 2.1 mg L(-1) in anoxic microcosms containing 10 mg L(-1) BPA and 5 g of freshwater sediment material collected from four geographically distinct locations and amended with nitrate, nitrite, ferric iron, or bicarbonate as electron acceptors. 4-MP accumulation was transient, and 4-MP degradation was observed under all redox conditions tested. 4-MP was not detected in microcosms not amended with BPA. Unexpectedly, incubations with (13)C-labeled BPA failed to produce (13)C-labeled 4-MP suggesting that 4-MP was not derived from BPA. The detection of 4-MP in live microcosms amended with lactate, but not containing BPA corroborated that BPA was not the source of 4-MP. These findings demonstrate that the transient formation of 4-MP as a possible BPA degradation intermediate must be interpreted cautiously, as microbial activity in streambed microcosms may generate 4-MP from sediment-associated organic material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural changes in a macrozoobenthos assemblage after imidacloprid pulses in aquatic field-based microcosms.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Valentina; Mohr, Silvia; Berghahn, Rüdiger; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2013-11-01

    A field-based microcosm experiment was performed to investigate the effects of repeated pulses of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid on a lentic benthos assemblage. This specific microcosm method was chosen because it allows for both testing of a wide range of organisms under natural conditions and as well as gaining insight into intraspecific and interspecific interactions. The macrozoobenthos that colonised the microcosms was exposed to three pulses each 1 week apart at nominal concentrations ranging from 0.6 to 40 μg/L. Imidacloprid underwent fast aqueous photolysis due to optimal sunlight conditions during the test phase (half-life = 28 ± 8 h [monitored for 21 days]). Nonetheless, decreased abundance and emergence of Ephemeroptera and decreased survival of chironomid species of the subfamilies Tanypodinae and Orthocladiinae were observed at time-weighted average concentrations of 2.3 μg/L. In contrast, the gastropod Radix sp. became dominant at high imidacloprid concentrations, probably due to decreased competition for food with sensitive species. The results of this study show that repeated short-term contamination of imidacloprid at low concentration levels may affect aquatic ecosystems even under optimal conditions for photodegradation. The microcosm approach, with its simple and field-relevant design, proved to be a useful tool for assessing the effects of imidacloprid contamination.

  13. STIMULATION OF THE REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE IN ANAEROBIC AQUIFER MICROCOSMS BY THE ADDITION OF TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the biologically mediated interactions of toluene and PCE under anaerobic conditions were investigated by using microcosms constructed with aquifer solids from an area that was exposed to both alkylbenzenes and chlorinated ethenes at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Statio...

  14. EFFECTS OF MICROCOSM PREPARATION ON RATES OF TOLUENE BIODEGRADATION UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosms were prepared with subsurface material from two aquifers to examine the effects of preparation methods on rates of toluene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. In both cases, the data fit a zero-order kinetics plot. However, rates of removal were generally pro...

  15. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in soil microcosms is inhibited by acetylene.

    PubMed

    Offre, Pierre; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2009-10-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were considered to be responsible for the majority of ammonia oxidation in soil until the recent discovery of the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea. To assess the relative contributions of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil ammonia oxidation, their growth was analysed during active nitrification in soil microcosms incubated for 30 days at 30 degrees C, and the effect of an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation (acetylene) on their growth and soil nitrification kinetics was determined. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA genes did not detect any change in their community composition during incubation, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of bacterial amoA genes indicated a small decrease in abundance in control and acetylene-containing microcosms. DGGE fingerprints of archaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes demonstrated changes in the relative abundance of specific crenarchaeal phylotypes during active nitrification. Growth was also indicated by increases in crenarchaeal amoA gene copy number, determined by qPCR. In microcosms containing acetylene, nitrification and growth of the crenarchaeal phylotypes were suppressed, suggesting that these crenarchaea are ammonia oxidizers. Growth of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizers occurred in microcosms with active nitrification, indicating that ammonia oxidation was mostly due to archaea in the conditions of the present study.

  16. Responses of microbial activity and decomposer organisms to contamination in microcosms containing coniferous forest soil.

    PubMed

    Salminen, J; Liiri, M; Haimi, J

    2002-09-01

    Soil respiration from microcosms contaminated with pentachlorophenol, 2-ethanolhexanoate, creosote, CuSO4, and benomyl was measured in order to evaluate usefulness of soil microcosms and microbial respiration rate monitoring as a toxicity test in soils with high organic matter content. Coniferous forest soil and its organisms were used as test objects. In addition, how a short-term low temperature period including frost affects respiration dynamics in stressed soils was studied, i.e., whether contaminants reduce resistance of the community to other (also natural) stresses. In addition, at the end of the experiment, effects of contaminants on faunal and microbial community structures were analyzed. Soil respiration measurements from the microcosms appeared to be a sensitive parameter for testing community-level effects of chemicals in the soil with high organic matter content. An 84-day exposure had acute effects, long-term effects, delaying effects, and total recovery of community respiration. Direct negative and indirect positive effects of chemical contamination on the community of soil organisms were found. Responses to contamination of soil respiration rate and structure of the soil community were parallel. Addition of pentachlorophenol, 2-ethanolhexane, and Cu into the soil reduced frost resistance of the decomposer community. It was concluded that soil respiration monitoring of artificially contaminated soil microcosms seems to be a useful tool for testing community-level toxic effects of chemicals.

  17. EFFECTS OF MICROCOSM PREPARATION ON RATES OF TOLUENE BIODEGRADATION UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosms were prepared with subsurface material from two aquifers to examine the effects of preparation methods on rates of toluene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. In both cases, the data fit a zero-order kinetics plot. However, rates of removal were generally pro...

  18. Effects Of Nutrient Source And Supply On Crude Oil Biodegradation In Continuous-Flow Beach Microcosms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonium and nitrate were used as nitrogen sources to support microbial biodegradation of crude oil in continuous-flow beach microcosms to determine whether either nutrient was more effective in open systems, such as intertidal shorelines. No differences in the rate or the exten...

  19. A DNA Origami Mechanical Device for the Regulation of Microcosmic Structural Rigidity.

    PubMed

    Wan, Neng; Hong, Zhouping; Wang, Huading; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ziyue; Li, Chao; Xia, Han; Fang, Yan; Li, Maoteng; Zhan, Yi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2017-09-13

    DNA origami makes it feasible to fabricate a tremendous number of DNA nanostructures with various geometries, dimensions, and functionalities. Moreover, an increasing amount of research on DNA nanostructures is focused on biological and biomedical applications. Here, the reversible regulation of microcosmic structural rigidity is accomplished using a DNA origami device in vitro. The designed DNA origami monomer is composed of an internal central axis and an external sliding tube. Due to the external tube sliding, the device transforms between flexible and rigid states. By transporting the device into the liposome, the conformational change of the origami device induces a structural change in the liposome. The results obtained demonstrate that the programmed DNA origami device can be applied to regulate the microcosmic structural rigidity of liposomes. Because microcosmic structural rigidity is important to cell proliferation and function, the results obtained potentially provide a foundation for the regulation of cell microcosmic structural rigidity using DNA nanostructures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. AEROBIC SOIL MICROCOSMS FOR LONG-TERM BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from th...

  1. The Institution of Carlisle School: A Microcosm of 500 Years of Indian Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Mike

    The history of the Carlisle Indian Boarding School is a microcosm of 500 years of Indian policy. Established through the efforts of career military man Richard Pratt in 1879, the school symbolized the emerging view of assimilation, an important change from earlier attempts at genocide and prior militant attitudes towards the Indians. Long…

  2. Dynamics of microbial community during bioremediation of phenanthrene and chromium(VI)-contaminated soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ibarrolaza, Agustín; Coppotelli, Bibiana M; Del Panno, María T; Donati, Edgardo R; Morelli, Irma S

    2009-02-01

    The combined effect of phenanthrene and Cr(VI) on soil microbial activity, community composition and on the efficiency of bioremediation processes has been studied. Biometer flask systems and soil microcosm systems contaminated with 2,000 mg of phenanthrene per kg of dry soil and different Cr(VI) concentrations were investigated. Temperature, soil moisture and oxygen availability were controlled to support bioremediation. Cr(VI) inhibited the phenanthrene mineralization (CO(2) production) and cultivable PAH degrading bacteria at levels of 500-2,600 mg kg(-1). In the bioremediation experiments in soil microcosms the degradation of phenanthrene, the dehydrogenase activity and the increase in PAH degrading bacteria counts were retarded by the presence of Cr(VI) at all studied concentrations (25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1)). These negative effects did not show a correlation with Cr(VI) concentration. Whereas the presence of Cr(VI) had a negative effect on the phenanthrene elimination rate, co-contamination with phenanthrene reduced the residual Cr(VI) concentration in the water exchangeable Cr(VI) fraction (WEF) in comparison with the soil microcosm contaminated only with Cr(VI). Clear differences were found between the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of each soil microcosm, showing that the presence of different Cr(VI) concentrations did modulate the community response to phenanthrene and caused perdurable changes in the structure of the microbial soil community.

  3. The influence of sediment resuspension on the degradation of phenanthrene in flow-through microcosms.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Lawrence A; Gulnick, Jeanne D; Brownawell, Bruce J; Taylor, Gordon T

    2006-03-01

    The effect of sediment resuspension on the mineralization of phenanthrene was examined in microcosms and sediment slurries. In computer-controlled, flow-through microcosms, 14C-phenanthrene-amended sediments were resuspended into overlying oxic water at frequencies of 12, 4, 1, 0.25 and 0 d(-1). In slurry bottle experiments 14C-phenanthrene-amended sediments were continuously resuspended under oxic (excess air headspace) and anoxic (N2 headspace) conditions and mineralization was measured at periods from 2 h to 7 days. Our main findings were: (1) mineralization rate constants from the microcosms ranged from 0.001 to 0.01 d(-1) and increased with frequency of resuspension, (2) these rates fell between those measured in oxic and anoxic slurries and were predicted within a factor of 2.5 by a model in which mineralization depended on the degree of oxygen exposure, and (3) the phenanthrene-degrading bacterial community was more active in resuspended sediments incubated in the microcosms than in sediments which were not resuspended, or which were stored under refrigeration. We conclude from these experiments that the effects of sediment resuspension on phenanthrene degradation are consistent with a primary role of average oxygen exposure, and also an alteration in the PAH-degrading activity of microbial populations.

  4. Methanogenic degradation kinetics of phenolic compounds in aquifer-derived microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E.M.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Grbic-Galic, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this segment of a larger multidisciplinary study of the movement and fate of creosote derived compounds in a sand-and-gravel aquifer, we present evidence that the methanogenic degradation of the major biodegradable phenolic compounds and concomitant microbial growth in batch microcosms derived from contaminated aquifer material can be described using Monod kinetics. Substrate depletion and bacterial growth curves were fitted to the Monod equations using nonlinear regression analysis. The method of Marquardt was used for the determination of parameter values that best fit the experimental data by minimizing the residual sum of squares. The Monod kinetic constants (??max, Ks, Y, and kd) that describe phenol, 2-, 3-, and 4-methylphenol degradation and concomitant microbial growth were determined under conditions that were substantially different from those previously reported for microcosms cultured from sewage sludge. The Ks values obtained in this study are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained for the anaerobic degradation of phenol in digesting sewage sludge, indicating that the aquifer microorganisms have developed enzyme systems that are adapted to low nutrient conditions. The values for kd are much less than ??max, and can be neglected in the microcosms. The extremely low Y values, approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower than for the sewage sludge derived cultures, and the very low numbers of microorganisms in the aquifer derived microcosms suggest that these organisms use some unique strategies to survive in the subsurface environment. ?? 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  5. Effects of Al(3+) ions and Cu(2+) ions on microcosms with three different biological complexities.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, K

    2001-02-01

    Cu(2+) ions or Al(3+) ions were added to microcosms containing three, four and eight species (S-3, S-4, S-8) at the beginning of the culture, or at the 15th day from the beginning of the culture to determine the production rates (P), the respiration rates (R), and P/R ratios. There was a balance between the oxygen production rates and the oxygen consumption rates in the microcosms (S-4) and (S-8), whereas there was no balance between two quantities in the microcosm (S-3). There were no significant differences in the Cu(2+) and Al(3+) ion concentrations influencing the material cycles and the metabolic balance between the case when the number of species was four and the case when the number of species was eight. It was assumed that the effects concentrations of the chemical substances are not significantly related to the degree of diversity of the constituent species in the microcosms having a balance between production and consumption.

  6. Effects Of Nutrient Source And Supply On Crude Oil Biodegradation In Continuous-Flow Beach Microcosms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonium and nitrate were used as nitrogen sources to support microbial biodegradation of crude oil in continuous-flow beach microcosms to determine whether either nutrient was more effective in open systems, such as intertidal shorelines. No differences in the rate or the exten...

  7. Enumeration and Biomass Estimation of Bacteria in Aquifer Microcosm Studies by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, P. C.; Baveye, P.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and characterize bacteria from a sand column microcosm simulating aquifer conditions. Pure cultures of a species of Bacillus isolated from subsurface sediments or Bacillus megaterium were first evaluated to identify these organisms' characteristic histograms. Counting was then carried out with samples from the aquifer microcosms. Enumeration by flow cytometry was compared with more-traditional acridine orange direct counting. These two techniques gave statistically similar results. However, counting by flow cytometry, in this case, surveyed a sample size 700 times greater than did acridine orange direct counting (25 (mu)l versus 0.034 (mu)l) and required 1/10 the time (2 h versus 20 h). Flow cytometry was able to distinguish the same species of bacteria grown under different nutrient conditions, and it could distinguish changes in cell growth patterns, specifically single cell growth versus chained cell growth in different regions of an aquifer microcosm. A biomass estimate was calculated by calibrating the total fluorescence of a sample from a pure culture with the dry weight of a freeze-dried volume from the original pure culture. Growth conditions significantly affected histograms and biomass estimates, so the calibration was carried out with cells grown under conditions similar to those in the aquifer microcosm. Costs associated with using flow cytometry were minimal compared with the amount of time saved in counting cells and estimating biomass. PMID:16535470

  8. AEROBIC SOIL MICROCOSMS FOR LONG-TERM BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from th...

  9. Direct and indirect effects of pollutants on algae and algivorous ciliates in an aquatic indoor microcosm.

    PubMed

    Liebig, Markus; Schmidt, Gunnar; Bontje, Daniel; Kooi, Bob W; Streck, Georg; Traunspurger, Walter; Knacker, Thomas

    2008-06-23

    An aquatic indoor microcosm was used to study effects of the pesticides parathion-methyl and prometryn on phototrophic flagellates (Cryptomonas sp.) and predatory ciliates (Urotricha furcata). Parathion-methyl caused effects to flagellates and ciliates at the range of low mg L(-1), regardless of whether the organisms were exposed separately or combined in the multi-species test system. Prometryn caused effects on the flagellates at low microg L(-1) concentrations, resulting in a NOEC of 6.9 microg L(-1) in the single-species test and a NOEC of 15.2 microg L(-1) in the multi-species microcosm. For ciliates the NOEC decreased by factor 145 in the multi-species test compared to the NOEC of 2.2 mg L(-1) in the single-species test when exposed to prometryn. The lower NOEC for ciliates exposed to prometryn in the microcosm was most likely caused by an indirect effect due to reduced availability of flagellates as food. The measurement of nutrient concentrations in the test media and organisms facilitated the modelling of effects. The presented aquatic indoor microcosm is considered as a tool which could be standardised and applied as an instrument to provide data for higher tier risk assessment.

  10. Persistence and renaturation efficiency of thermally treated waste recombinant DNA in defined aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao H; Wang, Lei; Le, Yi Q; Hu, Jia J

    2012-01-01

    To validate the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from thermally denatured recombinant DNA discharged into the eco-system, a constructed plasmid was used to investigate the persistence and renaturation efficiency of thermally denatured recombinant DNA in defined aquatic microcosms. The results revealed that there was undecayed recombinant plasmid pMDLKJ material being discharged into the aquatic microcosms even after thermal treatment at either 100°C (using boiling water) or at 120°C (using an autoclave). The plasmid had a relatively long persistence time. At least 10(2) copies μL(-1) of a specific 245 bp fragment of the plasmid could be detected after 12 h and a specific 628 bp fragment could be detected up to 2 h. The thermally denatured recombinant DNA could efficiently renature and recover its functional double stranded structure in aquatic microcosms and the highest concentration of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) occurred around 1 h after the thermally denatured DNA was added to the system. These results imply that when thermally treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into aquatic environments, they have enough time to renature and possibly transfer to other organisms. In addition, the recombinant DNA added to aquatic microcosms could be absorbed by the seston particles in water, such as mineral, organic and colloids particles with a maximum absorption value of about 5.18 ng L(-1). This absorbed DNA could persist longer in aquatic environments than free recombinant DNA, thus further favoring HGT.

  11. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  12. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  13. Soluble electron shuttles control microbial community development under iron-reducing conditions in wetland sediment microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, T. M.; Sladek, M. F.; Jensvold, Z. D.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Koval, J. C.; Kemner, K. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) inhabit sedimentary environments throughout the critical zone, gaining energy by coupling the oxidation of reduced organic compounds or H2 to the reduction of iron and other metal oxides. These oxides are poorly soluble at the temperature and pH ranges typical of most critical zone environments, and consequently many DMRB use soluble electron-shuttling compounds to aid the transfer of electrons to these extracellular electron acceptors. Pure culture studies suggest these electron shuttles enhance the overall rate of iron reduction, yet little is known about how the presence of these compounds affects complex native communities of microorganisms under iron-reducing conditions. We examined the effect quinone-based electron shuttles with different redox potentials have on the rate of iron reduction, the onset of methanogenesis, and the trajectory of microbial community development in wetland sediment microcosms amended with goethite (α-FeOOH) and either acetate or H2. Unlike pure culture experiments, microcosms given 9,10-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQC) or 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (lawsone, NQL) showed no increase in the rate of iron reduction relative to control experiments with no shuttle (NS) added. The rate and extent of iron reduction increased significantly however in those given 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Methanogenesis did not begin in AQDS, NQL, or NS microcosms until ferrous iron production ceased and was inhibited entirely in AQC-amended microcosms. These AQC-amended microcosms also showed a significant divergence from the others in microbial community development. 16S rRNA sequences classified as Geobacteraceae dominated NS control microcosms (61% average abundance) as well as those amended with AQDS (42-65%) and NQL (62%), though distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were abundant depending on the shuttle used. AQC microcosms were instead dominated by Pelobacteraceae (68% in

  14. Biostimulation of indigenous microorganisms for bioremediation of oily hypersaline microcosms from the Arabian Gulf Kuwaiti coasts.

    PubMed

    Al-Mailem, Dina M; Al-Deieg, Maha; Eliyas, Mohamed; Radwan, Samir S

    2017-05-15

    Hypersaline soil and water samples were collected in summer and winter from the "sabkha" area at the Kuwaiti shore of the Arabian Gulf. Physicochemical parameters were analyzed, and found suitable for microbial oil-removal. Summer- and winter-microcosms were treated with individual cation (K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+)) salts, and with animal blood and commercial yeast, as cost-effective vitamin sources. Those microcosms were exposed to the open environment for six winter and six summer months, and analyzed for their hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms at time zero and in two month intervals. The hydrocarbonoclastic microbial communities in the microcosms consisted of halophilic bacteria and haloarchaea. The constituent bacterial species varied according to the season. Three species, Dietzia kunjamensis, Marinobacter lacisalsi and Halomonas oxialensis consistently occurred both in summer- and winter-samples, but the remaining species were different. On the other hand, the haloarchaeal communities in summer and winter were quite similar, and consisted mainly of Haloferax spp and Halobacterium spp. Treating the microcosms with cations and with vitamin-containing natural products enhanced microbial numbers and oil-removal. The effectiveness of the cations in oil-removal was in the order; Fe(3+) (94%) > Ca(2+) (89%) > Mg(2+) (85%) > K(+) (82%). Thus, oily microcosms amended with trivalent and divalent cations lost most of the oil, and those amended with commercial yeast and with animal blood, as vitamin sources, lost 78% and 72% oil, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of the fungicide metiram in outdoor freshwater microcosms: responses of invertebrates, primary producers and microbes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ronghua; Buijse, Laura; Dimitrov, Mauricio R; Dohmen, Peter; Kosol, Sujitra; Maltby, Lorraine; Roessink, Ivo; Sinkeldam, Jos A; Smidt, Hauke; Van Wijngaarden, René P A; Brock, Theo C M

    2012-07-01

    The ecological impact of the dithiocarbamate fungicide metiram was studied in outdoor freshwater microcosms, consisting of 14 enclosures placed in an experimental ditch. The microcosms were treated three times (interval 7 days) with the formulated product BAS 222 28F (Polyram®). Intended metiram concentrations in the overlying water were 0, 4, 12, 36, 108 and 324 μg a.i./L. Responses of zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, phytoplankton, macrophytes, microbes and community metabolism endpoints were investigated. Dissipation half-life (DT₅₀) of metiram was approximately 1-6 h in the water column of the microcosm test system and the metabolites formed were not persistent. Multivariate analysis indicated treatment-related effects on the zooplankton (NOEC(community) = 36 μg a.i./L). Consistent treatment-related effects on the phytoplankton and macroinvertebrate communities and on the sediment microbial community could not be demonstrated or were minor. There was no evidence that metiram affected the biomass, abundance or functioning of aquatic hyphomycetes on decomposing alder leaves. The most sensitive populations in the microcosms comprised representatives of Rotifera with a NOEC of 12 μg a.i./L on isolated sampling days and a NOEC of 36 μg a.i./L on consecutive samplings. At the highest treatment-level populations of Copepoda (zooplankton) and the blue-green alga Anabaena (phytoplankton) also showed a short-term decline on consecutive sampling days (NOEC = 108 μg a.i./L). Indirect effects in the form of short-term increases in the abundance of a few macroinvertebrate and several phytoplankton taxa were also observed. The overall community and population level no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC(microcosm)) was 12-36 μg a.i./L. At higher treatment levels, including the test systems that received the highest dose, ecological recovery of affected measurement endpoints was fast (effect period < 8 weeks).

  16. Exposure of Sink Drain Microcosms to Triclosan: Population Dynamics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Price, Bradford B.; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Recent concern that the increased use of triclosan (TCS) in consumer products may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance has led us to examine the effects of TCS dosing on domestic-drain biofilm microcosms. TCS-containing domestic detergent (TCSD) markedly lowered biofouling at 50% (wt/vol) but was poorly effective at use levels. Long-term microcosms were established and stabilized for 6 months before one was subjected to successive 3-month exposures to TCSD at sublethal concentrations (0.2 and 0.4% [wt/vol]). Culturable bacteria were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, and their susceptibilities to four biocides and six antibiotics were determined. Microcosms harbored ca. 10 log10 CFU/g of biofilm, representing at least 27 species, mainly gamma proteobacteria, and maintained dynamic stability. Viable cell counts were largely unaffected by TCSD exposure, but species diversity was decreased, as corroborated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. TCS susceptibilities ranged widely within bacterial groups, and TCS-tolerant strains (including aeromonads, pseudomonads, stenotrophomonads, and Alcaligenes spp.) were isolated before and after TCSD exposure. Several TCS-tolerant bacteria related to Achromobacter xylosoxidans became clonally expanded during dosing. TCSD addition did not significantly affect the community profiles of susceptibility to the test biocides or antibiotics. Several microcosm isolates, as well as reference bacteria, caused clearing of particulate TCS in solid media. Incubations of consortia and isolates with particulate TCS in liquid led to putative TCS degradation by the consortia and TCS solubilization by the reference strains. Our results support the view that low-level exposure of environmental microcosms to TCS does not affect antimicrobial susceptibility and that TCS is degradable by common domestic biofilms. PMID:12957932

  17. Nitrate and the Origin of Saliva Influence Composition and Short Chain Fatty Acid Production of Oral Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jessica E; Buijs, Mark J; Brandt, Bernd W; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate is emerging as a possible health benefactor. Especially the microbial conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the oral cavity and the subsequent conversion to nitric oxide in the stomach are of interest in this regard. Yet, how nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of the oral ecosystem is not fully understood. To investigate the effect of nitrate on oral ecology, we performed a 4-week experiment using the multiplaque artificial mouth (MAM) biofilm model. This model was inoculated with stimulated saliva of two healthy donors. Half of the microcosms (n = 4) received a constant supply of nitrate, while the other half functioned as control (n = 4). Additionally, all microcosms received a nitrate and sucrose pulse, each week, on separate days to measure nitrate reduction and acid formation. The bacterial composition of the microcosms was determined by 16S rDNA sequencing. The origin of the saliva (i.e., donor) showed to be the strongest determinant for the development of the microcosms. The supplementation of nitrate was related to a relatively high abundance of Neisseria in the microcosms of both donors, while Veillonella was highly abundant in the nitrate-supplemented microcosms of only one of the donors. The lactate concentration after sucrose addition was similarly high in all microcosms, irrespective of treatment or donor, while the concentration of butyrate was lower after nitrate addition in the nitrate-receiving microcosms. In conclusion, nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of oral microcosms, although the result is strongly dependent on the inoculum.

  18. Microcosm study for revegetation of barren land with wild plants by some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Seok; Ka, Jong-Ok; Lee, Geon-Hyoung; Song, Hong-Gyu

    2007-01-01

    Growth promotion of wild plants by some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) was examined in the microcosms composed of soils collected separately from a grass-covered site and a nongrass-covered site in a lakeside barren area at Lake Paro, Korea. After sowing the seeds of eight kinds of wild plants and inoculation of several strains of PGPR, the total bacterial number and microbial activity were measured during 5 months of study period, and the plant biomasses grown were compared at the end of the study. Acridine orange direct counts in the inoculated microcosms, 1.3-9.8 x 10(9) cells x g soil(-1) in the soil from the grass-covered area and 0.9-7.2 x 10(9) cells x g soil(-1) in the soil from the nongrass-covered site, were almost twice higher than those in the uninoculated microcosms. The number of Pseudomonas sp., well-known bacteria as PGPR, and the soil dehydrogenase activity were also higher in the inoculated soils than the uninoculated soils. The first germination of sowed seeds in the inoculated microcosm was 5 days earlier than the uninoculated microcosm. Average lengths of all plants grown during the study period were 26% and 29% longer in the inoculated microcosms starting with the grass-covered soil and the nongrass-covered soil, respectively, compared with those in the uninoculated microcosms. Dry weights of whole plants grown were 67-82% higher in the inoculated microcosms than the uninoculated microcosms. Microbial population and activity and growth promoting effect by PGPR were all higher in the soils collected from the grass-covered area than in the nongrass-covered area. The growth enhancement of wild plants seemed to occur by the activities of inoculated microorganisms, and this capability of PGPR may be utilized for rapid revegetation of some barren lands.

  19. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  20. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  1. How can we conserve intact tropical peatlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Ian; Roucoux, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    The scientific community has, for more than three decades, been expressing increasing alarm about the fate of peatlands in parts of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive land-use conversion and drainage for rice and oil palm have greatly compromised peatland hydrology, ecology, biological richness, and carbon storage. The discourse in the literature on these peatlands is now moving on from attempts to preserve the last remaining fragments of peat-swamp forest, towards discussion of how best to restore damaged ecosystems, and whether it is possible to manage plantations more 'sustainably'. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that peatlands occur quite widely in other parts of the lowland tropics, including parts of Amazonia and the Congo Basin, and many of these peatlands can reasonably be described as 'intact': although few if any parts of the tropics are totally unaffected by human actions, the hydrology and functional ecology of these systems appear to be close to a 'natural' state. The question then arises as to what should be done with the knowledge of their existence. Here we analyse the arguments in favour of protecting intact peatlands, and the potential conflicts with other priorities such as economic development and social justice. We evaluate alternative mechanisms for protecting intact peatlands, focusing on the particular issues raised by peatlands as opposed to other kinds of tropical ecosystem. We identify ways in which natural science agendas can help to inform these arguments, using our own contributions in palaeoecology and carbon mapping as examples. Finally, we argue for a radical reconsideration of research agendas in tropical peatlands, highlighting the potential contribution of methodologies borrowed from the social sciences and humanities.

  2. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  3. Sodium Absorption by Intact Sugar Beet Plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Adel M; Ulrich, Albert

    1971-01-01

    Sodium absorption by intact sugar beet plants (Beta vulgaris) was found to be mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms when uptake was studied over a wide range of Na and K concentrations. The first mechanism operates at low Na concentrations (<1 milliequivalent per liter); presence of K completely blocks this mechanism for Na. The second mechanism operates at high Na concentrations (>1 milliequivalent per liter), transporting Na as well as K; but apparently this mechanism is not active for Na absorption in young sugar beet plants up to the 10-leaf stage. PMID:16657872

  4. Response of zooplankton and phytoplankton communities to creosote-impregnated Douglas fir pilings in freshwater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Sibley, P K; Harris, M L; Bestari, K T; Steele, T A; Robinson, R D; Gensemer, R W; Day, K E; Solomon, K R

    2004-07-01

    Creosote has been used extensively as an industrial wood preservative for the protection of marine pilings, railway ties, and utility poles and is a common source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into aquatic environments. At present, there is little information by which to judge the potential for creosote leached from impregnated pilings to cause toxicity to biota in aquatic environments. The objective of the current study was to assess the effects of creosote on zooplankton and phytoplankton populations in freshwater microcosms in relation to changes in the concentration and composition of PAHs leached from creosote-impregnated Douglas fir pilings during an 83-day exposure period. The study consisted of single microcosms containing one half, one, two, three, four, and six treated pilings. Two microcosms that received untreated pilings were used as controls. The total surface area of pilings in each microcosm was normalized by adding the appropriate number of untreated pilings. Samples were collected periodically between -14 and 83 days pre- and postexposure to determine aqueous concentrations of 15 priority PAHs and to assess the response of zooplankton and phytoplankton communities. Plankton community response to creosote was analyzed using principle responses curves. Peak aqueous concentrations of sigmaPAH occurred at day 7, ranging from 7.3 to 97.3 microg/L. Zooplankton abundance decreased in all microcosms after introduction of the impregnated pilings, with the magnitude of response varying as a function of aqueous creosote concentration. Using inverse regression, a no-observed-effect concentration for the zooplankton community of 11.1 microg/L was estimated. In contrast, algal abundance and diversity increased in all treatments between 7 and 21 days and attained levels up to twice that in control microcosms. This trend most likely reflected decreased grazing pressure because of the decrease in zooplankton populations, but it may also have reflected

  5. Fate and effects of the insecticide-miticide chlorfenapyr in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Rand, Gary M

    2004-05-01

    The concentrations of chlorfenapyr in water and sediment in a lentic pond following early and late applications in a Florida crop treatment program were predicted using PRZM and EXAMS modeling and incorporating 30 years of actual rainfall data. An outdoor microcosm study was also conducted to determine the fate of chlorfenapyr and its effects on zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, phytoplankton, and fish in a freshwater system under exposure conditions representing simulated surface runoff and/or spray drift. The microcosm design used a regression model with five treatments (i.e., 300 microg/L spray, 30 microg/L spray, 15 microg/L spray and 30 microg/L runoff, 1.2 microg/L spray and 2.5 microg/L runoff, 30 microg/L runoff) plus a control. Chlorfenapyr was applied as an aqueous suspension concentrate (36% a.i.) to six microcosm tanks (30.9 m3). The no-observed-effect-concentration (NOEC) for zooplankton was the water concentration produced from the combination 1.2 microg/L spray and 2.5 microg/L runoff treatment. The NOEC for bluegill sunfish was the water concentration produced from the 30 microg/L runoff, which was significantly higher than the exposure concentrations from the lowest combination treatment. Chlorfenapyr was more toxic via spray to the water than via an exposure simulating surface runoff. The 96-h time weighted average concentrations (TWAs) from the lowest joint treatment and the 30 microg/L runoff treatment in the microcosm study were similar to model-predicted water 96-h TWA concentrations from early and late applications. The toxicity data from laboratory and microcosm studies along with water exposure data indicate low hazard to zooplankton species in the water column. Although chlorfenapyr remained in sediment, TWAs concentrations from the microcosm study along with model-predicted concentrations indicate low hazard to benthic invertebrate species based on acute toxicity to amphipods in the laboratory. Results from this assessment indicate that

  6. Molecular Analysis of Microbial Community Structures in Pristine and Contaminated Aquifers: Field and Laboratory Microcosm Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Y.; Zwolinski, M. D.; Schreiber, M. E.; Bahr, J. M.; Sewell, G. W.; Hickey, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    This study used phylogenetic probes in hybridization analysis to (i) determine in situ microbial community structures in regions of a shallow sand aquifer that were oxygen depleted and fuel contaminated (FC) or aerobic and noncontaminated (NC) and (ii) examine alterations in microbial community structures resulting from exposure to toluene and/or electron acceptor supplementation (nitrate). The latter objective was addressed by using the NC and FC aquifer materials for anaerobic microcosm studies in which phylogenetic probe analysis was complemented by microbial activity assays. Domain probe analysis of the aquifer samples showed that the communities were predominantly Bacteria; Eucarya and Archaea were not detectable. At the phylum and subclass levels, the FC and NC aquifer material had similar relative abundance distributions of 43 to 65% β- and γ-Proteobacteria (B+G), 31 to 35% α-Proteobacteria (ALF), 15 to 18% sulfate-reducing bacteria, and 5 to 10% high G+C gram positive bacteria. Compared to that of the NC region, the community structure of the FC material differed mainly in an increased abundance of B+G relative to that of ALF. The microcosm communities were like those of the field samples in that they were predominantly Bacteria (83 to 101%) and lacked detectable Archaea but differed in that a small fraction (2 to 8%) of Eucarya was detected regardless of the treatment applied. The latter result was hypothesized to reflect enrichment of anaerobic protozoa. Addition of nitrate and/or toluene stimulated microbial activity in the microcosms, but only supplementation of toluene alone significantly altered community structures. For the NC material, the dominant subclass shifted from B+G to ALF, while in the FC microcosms 55 to 65% of the Bacteria community was no longer identifiable by the phylum or subclass probes used. The latter result suggested that toluene exposure fostered the proliferation of phylotype(s) that were otherwise minor constituents of the

  7. Potential impact of selected agricultural chemical contaminants on a northern prairie wetland: A microcosm evaluation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B Thomas

    1986-05-01

    An aquatic, multicomponent microcosm simulating a northern prairie wetland was used to assess the potential effects of six extensively used agricultural pesticides on this important wildlife habitat. Using a nested experimental design, 16 4-liter aquatic microcosms were treated with three concentrations of each of the pesticides carbofuran, fonofos, phorate, atrazine, treflan and trial-late. The microcosm units were incubated for 30 d in an environmental chamber, with a 16-h light:8-h dark cycle, maintained at 20°C. Specific limnological, biological and toxicological parameters were monitored over time by observing the interactions of water, animals, sediment and plants with the pesticides. The laboratory protocol was designed as an initial, rapid, economical screening test to determine the effect, but not the fate, of chemical contaminants in terms of toxicity, impaired productivity and community biochemical functions. Static acute toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and Chironomus riparius suggested that carbofuran, fonofos, phorate and triallate were very toxic to aquatic invertebrates. For D. magna the 48-h EC50 values were 48, 15, 19 and 57 μg/L, respectively. Invertebrate viability tests indicated rapid changes in the toxicological persistence of these pesticides after microcosm interaction. Populations of D. magna were established in the 10 μg/L test concentration of carbofuran, phorate, triallate and fonofos at 1, 1, 14 and 28 d, respectively. Preexposure of the wetland sediments to either triallate or fonofos did not appear to change the relative toxicological persistence of each compound in the water column. Changes in pH, alkalinity, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were also observed with different pesticide treatments. Atrazine significantly reduced gross primary productivity and inhibited algal and macrophytic growth. In general, there was no evidence of significant inhibition of microbial functions in the water or

  8. Short-term emissions of ammonia and carbon dioxide from cattle urine contaminated tropical grassland microcosm.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepanjan; Patel, Manoj; Drabar, Reena; Vyas, Manish

    2006-11-01

    The study was designed to understand the emissions of ammonia (NH(3)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from a single cattle urination event on a tropical grassland and underline the significance of the emissions in the context of huge animal population grazing on large pasture areas in some countries. Emissions of ammonia (NH(3)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) were monitored for three weeks from a tropical grassland (dominated by Cynodon dactylon Pers.) microcosm contaminated with cow and buffalo urine. The grassland microcosms were treated with urine (50 and 100 ml of each) only once and irrigated with water once every week. Ammonia was sampled by an automatic sampling system comprising of a vacuum pump, three-way stopcocks and rubber tubing and an impinger containing suitable absorbing solution (H(2)SO(4)), connected to the tubing suitably. The sampled gas, after sucked by the vacuum pump and absorbed in H(2)SO(4), was allowed to enter the closed microcosm again maintaining internal pressure of the microcosm. Carbon dioxide was sampled by absorption in an alkali (NaOH) trap inside the microcosm. Both NH(3) and CO(2) emissions were highly variable temporally and there was no continuous increasing or decreasing emission trend with time. Respectively, 45 and 46% of total NH(3)-N were emitted within first 48 h from 50 and 100 ml cow urine application while the corresponding values for buffalo urine were 34 and 32%. Total NH(3)-N emissions, integrated for sampling days (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 15, 18 and 21st) were 11 and 6% in cow and 8 and 5% in buffalo urine, of the total-N added through 50 and 100 ml urine samples. Carbon dioxide emissions were standardized at 25 degrees C by using a suitable formula which were lower than actual emissions at actual soil temperature (> 25 degrees C). Carbon dioxide emission rates were classified on the basis of soil repiratory classification and classes ranged from moderately low soil activity up to unusually high soil activity, the latter

  9. 33 CFR 157.22 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intact stability requirements... OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.22 Intact stability requirements. All tank ships of 5,000 DWT and above contracted after December 3, 2001 must comply with the intact stability...

  10. 33 CFR 157.22 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intact stability requirements... OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.22 Intact stability requirements. All tank ships of 5,000 DWT and above contracted after December 3, 2001 must comply with the intact stability...

  11. 33 CFR 157.22 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intact stability requirements... OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.22 Intact stability requirements. All tank ships of 5,000 DWT and above contracted after December 3, 2001 must comply with the intact stability...

  12. 33 CFR 157.22 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intact stability requirements... OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.22 Intact stability requirements. All tank ships of 5,000 DWT and above contracted after December 3, 2001 must comply with the intact stability...

  13. 33 CFR 157.22 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intact stability requirements... OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.22 Intact stability requirements. All tank ships of 5,000 DWT and above contracted after December 3, 2001 must comply with the intact stability...

  14. Rapid isolation of intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, a rapid method to isolate intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves is described. Intact chloroplasts are isolated using two short centrifugation steps and avoiding the use of percoll gradient. Intactness of chloroplast is evaluated by the inability of potassium ferricyanide to enter inside the chloroplasts and to act as an electron acceptor for photosystem II.

  15. RNA aptamer delivery through intact human skin.

    PubMed

    Lenn, Jon D; Neil, Jessica; Donahue, Christine; Demock, Kellie; Tibbetts, Caitlin Vestal; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Smith, Susan H; Rubenstein, David; Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Pendergrast, P Shannon; Killough, Jason; Brown, Marc B; Williams, Adrian C

    2017-09-20

    It is generally recognised that only relatively small molecular weight (typically < ∼500 Da) drugs can effectively permeate through intact stratum corneum. Here, we challenge this orthodoxy using a 62-nucleotide (MW=20,395) RNA-based aptamer, highly specific to the human IL-23 cytokine, with picomolar activity. Results demonstrate penetration of the aptamer into freshly excised human skin using two different fluorescent labels. A dual hybridisation assay quantified aptamer from the epidermis and dermis giving levels far exceeding the cellular IC50 values (> 100,000-fold) and aptamer integrity was confirmed using an oligonucleotide precipitation assay. A Th17 response was stimulated in freshly excised human skin resulting in significantly upregulated IL-17f, and 22; topical application of the IL-23 aptamer decreased both IL-17f and IL-22 by approximately 45% but did not result in significant changes to IL-23 mRNA levels, confirming that the aptamer did not globally suppress mRNA levels. This study demonstrates that very large molecular weight RNA aptamers can permeate across the intact human skin barrier to therapeutically relevant levels into both the epidermis and dermis and that the skin penetrating aptamer retains its biologically active conformational structure capable of binding to endogenous IL-23. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Instrumentation and Microcosms to Study Rio Tinto Microbial Communties Allow Fine Scale Resolution and Experimental Manipulation with Replicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettler, E. R.; Aguilera, A.; Nuzzio, D.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.

    2010-04-01

    Instrumentation makes it possible to measure environmental parameters and study the microbial communities at fine temporal and spatial scales. Laboratory microcosms allow experimental manipulations with replication of microbial communities from the field.

  17. A simple, inexpensive, and field-relevant microcosm tidal simulator for use in marsh macrophyte studies1

    PubMed Central

    MacTavish, Rachel M.; Cohen, Risa A.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A microcosm unit with tidal simulation was developed to address the challenge of maintaining ecologically relevant tidal regimes while performing controlled greenhouse experiments on smooth cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora. • Methods and Results: We designed a simple, inexpensive, easily replicated microcosm unit with tidal simulation and tested whether S. alterniflora growth in microcosms with tidal simulation was similar to that of tidally influenced plants in the field on Sapelo Island, Georgia. After three months of exposure to either natural or simulated tidal treatment, plants in microcosms receiving tidal simulation had similar stem density, height, and above- and belowground biomass to plants in field plots. • Conclusions: The tidal simulator developed may provide an inexpensive, effective method for conducting studies on S. alterniflora and other tidally influenced plants in controlled settings to be used not only to complement field studies, but also in locations without coastal access. PMID:25383265

  18. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  19. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  20. Aerobic soil microcosms for long-term biodegradation of hydrocarbon vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.J.; Ostendorf, D.W.; Switzenbaum, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    Characterization and understanding of hydrocarbon vapor behavior and persistence in the subsurface is essential for the complete evaluation of a petroleum hydrocarbon spill site. The aims of the research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from these microcosms. The results were applied to a mathematical model from which rigorously controlled estimates of Michaelis-Menten type maximum rate parameters were produced. The latter were compared to independently derived estimates of the same kinetics parameter, and were used to establish whether any depth-dependence on this parameter exists. The maximum rate parameter value for the mid-depth soil range was found to be a successful test of previously acquired field data.

  1. Effects of invertebrate predators and a pesticide on temporary pond microcosms used for aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Barry, Michael J; Davies, Warren

    2004-09-01

    The effects of increased trophic complexity, through the addition of predatory notonectids (Anisops deanei), on temporary pond microcosms used for aquatic toxicity testing were studied. Replicate microcosms were established using sediment from a dried temporary pond, and treated with one of four concentrations of the organochlorine pesticide endosulfan (0, 1, 10 or 50 microg/L), in the presence or absence of six A. deanei. The tanks were sampled regularly for nine weeks following the addition of the predators and the entire contents of each tank counted after 12 weeks. Analysis using non-metric multidimensional scaling (MDS) and non-parametric MANOVA showed that both Anisops and endosulfan at concentrations >10 microg/L significantly altered community structure. However, an interaction between the effects of Anisops and the effects of endosulfan was not detected. The addition of Anisops did not increase the variability of response and thus did not reduce the sensitivity of the test method.

  2. Survival study of enterotoxigenic Escherichia colistrain in seawater and wastewater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boukef Ben Omrane, I; El Bour, M; Mejri, S; Mraouna, R; Got, P; Troussellier, M; Boudabous, A

    2011-01-01

    In order to survey osmotic and oligotrophic stress consequence on pathogenic enterobacteria discharged in marine areas, we examined enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and a reference (Ecoli O126:B16) strains during their survival (47 days) in wastewater microcosms, submerged in natural seawater and maintained in laboratory conditions. The results revealed that the survival time for the two strains was prolonged when bacterial cells were previously incubated in wastewater, with less cellular membrane damage. In addition, the wild clinical E. coli strain showed a better survival capacity than the reference E. coli strain one. For both, we noted some modifications in biochemical profiles relatively to the initial state, notably when they were previously incubated in wastewater microcosm.

  3. Survival of cells and DNA of Aeromonas salmonicida released into aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Deere, D; Porter, J; Pickup, R W; Edwards, C

    1996-09-01

    The survival of the bacterial fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida, and persistence of its DNA, were monitored in aquatic microcosms using selective culture and most probable number PCR. Bacterial cells and naked DNA were released into natural non-sterile microcosms consisting of lake sediment overlayered with lake water. Two different types of surface sediment were used. One was sandy in character, taken from the shoreline whilst the other was a littoral loamy surface mud. Inoculated cells and naked DNA became undetectable from water overlayers within 4 weeks of release. Colony counts of Aer. salmonicida declined below detectable limits after 4 weeks in loamy sediment or 7 weeks in sandy sediment; however, naked DNA and DNA from released cells remained detectable for more than 13 weeks.

  4. Microbial community dynamics associated with veterinary antibiotics removal in constructed wetlands microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Joana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Pereira, Ana C; Ribeiro, Iolanda L; Reis, Izabela; Carvalho, Pedro; Basto, M Clara P; Mucha, Ana P

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the response of the microbial community from CWs microcosms tested for the removal of two veterinary antibiotics, enrofloxacin (ENR) and tetracycline (TET), from livestock industry wastewater. Three treatments were tested (control, ENR or TET (100 μg L(-1))) over 12 weeks in microcosms unplanted and planted with Phragmites australis. CWs removal efficiency was relatively stable along time, with removals higher than 98% for ENR and 94% for TET. In addition, CWs were able to reduce wastewater toxicity, independently of antibiotics presence. Despite no significant differences were observed in terms of microbial abundance, bacterial richness or diversity, analysis of similarities (two-way crossed ANOSIM) showed a significant effect of both time and treatments in bacterial community structure. This study points to CWs applicability for veterinary antibiotics removal from livestock wastewaters, showing that CWs microbial communities were able to adapt without significant changes in their diversity or depuration capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing the impacts of sediment-bound bifenthrin on aquatic macroinvertebrates in laboratory bioassays and field microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Rhianna L; Hoak, Molly N; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Long, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two laboratory bioassays and two field microcosm exposures with bifenthrin (a synthetic pyrethroid) in order to evaluate the capacity of single-species laboratory bioassays to predict lethal and sublethal impacts on aquatic invertebrates in microcosms. For the laboratory species, Chironomus tepperi, larval survival was reduced by 24% at 53.66µg/g OC, while adult emergence was reduced at concentrations of 33.33µg/g OC and higher, with a 61% decrease at 77.78µg/g OC and no emergence at 126.67µg/g OC. The abundance of several other microcosm taxa was reduced in the microcosms at a similar concentration range (33.33µg/g OC and above), however there was no impact on the abundance of the congeneric species, Chironomus oppositus. The differences in impacts between test systems were potentially due to both differing species sensitivity and the interaction of ambient temperature with bifenthrin toxicity. Bifenthrin also was associated with early emergence of Chironomus sp. in both test systems, at concentrations of 10µg/g OC and higher (laboratory) and 43.90µg/g OC (microcosm), and with a significant decrease in the proportion of C. oppositus males in a microcosm. These findings indicate that while laboratory bioassays accurately predict many impacts in the field, there are some limitations to the predictive capacity of these tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor--microcosm tests and model development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C; Schadt, Christopher W; Shi, Xiaoqing; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-04-02

    We conducted microcosm tests and biogeochemical modeling to study U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments amended with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO). Indigenous microorganisms in the sediments degraded EVO and stimulated Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. Acetate concentration peaked in 100-120 days in the EVO microcosms versus 10-20 days in the oleate microcosms, suggesting that triglyceride hydrolysis was a rate-limiting step in EVO degradation and subsequent reactions. Acetate persisted 50 days longer in oleate- and EVO- than in ethanol-amended microcosms, indicating that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the oleate and EVO than ethanol microcosms. We developed a comprehensive biogeochemical model to couple EVO hydrolysis, production, and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of multiple functional microbial groups. By estimating EVO, LCFA, and glycerol degradation rate coefficients, and introducing a 100 day lag time for acetoclastic methanogenesis for oleate and EVO microcosms, the model approximately matched observed sulfate, U(VI), and acetate concentrations. Our results confirmed that EVO could stimulate U(VI) bioreduction in sediments and the slow EVO hydrolysis and acetate-utilizing methanogens growth could contribute to longer term bioreduction than simple substrates (e.g., ethanol, acetate, etc.) in the subsurface.

  7. Response of the Predatory Bacterium, Halobacteriovorax, and Virus to an Influx of a Prey Bacterium in a Natural Water Microcosm and a Three Membered Artificial Sea Water Microcosm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H.; Chen, H.; Laws, E. A.; Gulig, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Halobacteriovorax (HBx) is a predatory bacterium that preys on Vibrio sp. and many other gram negative bacteria. There is strong evidence that suggest HBx has a role in bacterial mortality in marine and brackish systems. However, its role has not been appropriately explored. In this study the rate of HBx predation on Vibrio vulnificus in comparison to that of viruses has been investigated. Initial experiments compared the responses of HBx and viruses in estuarine water systems to an input of V. vulnificus. Environmental water samples were filtered to remove larger protists and other organisms and debris. The filtered samples were used to establish laboratory microcosms to which was added a suspension of V. vulnificus. To measure the responses of HBx and viruses to the influx of V. vulnificus, samples were removed at intervals over a 40 h incubation period to enumerate HBx and V. vulnificus by culture and viruses by direct microscopic counts. In a subsequent experiment we investigated the responses of a virus and HBx strain when cultured with a suspension of V. vulnificus in a laboratory controlled microcosm of artificial sea water. The results of both experiments revealed that HBx was the first and most rapid responder to the inoculum of V. vulnificus and reduced their numbers significantly. The viruses were relatively non-responsive and did not substantially reduce V. vulnifius numbers. These results show that HBx may be a major contributor to bacterial mortality in conjunction with protists and viruses

  8. Germination and persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bishop, A H

    2014-11-01

    Decontaminating large, outdoor spaces of Bacillus anthracis spores presents significant problems, particularly in soil. Proof was sought that the addition of germinant chemicals could cause spores of B. anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis, a commonly used simulant of the threat agent, to convert to the less resistant vegetative form in a microcosm. Nonsterile plant/soil microcosms were inoculated with spores of B. thuringiensis and two nonpathogenic strains of B. anthracis. A combination of L-alanine (100 mmol l(-1)) and inosine (10 mmol l(-1)) resulted in a 6 log decrease in spore numbers in both strains of B. anthracis over 2 weeks at 22°C; a 3 log decrease in B. anthracis Sterne spore numbers was observed after incubation for 2 weeks at 10°C. Negligible germination nor a decrease in viable count occurred in either strain when the concentration of L-alanine was decreased to 5 mmol l(-1). Germinated spores of B. thuringiensis were able to persist in vegetative form in the microcosms, whereas those of B. anthracis rapidly disappeared. The pleiotropic regulator PlcR, which B. anthracis lacks, does not contribute to the persistence of B. thuringiensis in vegetative form in soil. The principle of adding germinants to soil to trigger the conversion of spores to vegetative form has been demonstrated. Bacillus anthracis failed to persist in vegetative form or resporulate in the microcosms after it had been induced to germinate. The large scale, outdoor decontamination of B. anthracis spores may be facilitated by the application of simple, defined combinations of germinants. © 2014 Crown Copyright. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology This article is Published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  9. Autotrophic growth of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers in freshwater sediment microcosms incubated at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yucheng; Ke, Xiubin; Hernández, Marcela; Wang, Baozhan; Dumont, Marc G; Jia, Zhongjun; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to ammonia oxidation, but their roles in freshwater sediments are still poorly understood. Seasonal differences in the relative activities of these groups might exist, since cultivated archaeal ammonia oxidizers have higher temperature optima than their bacterial counterparts. In this study, sediment collected from eutrophic freshwater Lake Taihu (China) was incubated at different temperatures (4°C, 15°C, 25°C, and 37°C) for up to 8 weeks. We examined the active bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers in these sediment microcosms by using combined stable isotope probing (SIP) and molecular community analysis. The results showed that accumulation of nitrate in microcosms correlated negatively with temperature, although ammonium depletion was the same, which might have been related to enhanced activity of other nitrogen transformation processes. Incubation at different temperatures significantly changed the microbial community composition, as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes. After 8 weeks of incubation, [(13)C]bicarbonate labeling of bacterial amoA genes, which encode the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A, and an observed increase in copy numbers indicated the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in all microcosms. Nitrosomonas sp. strain Is79A3 and Nitrosomonas communis lineages dominated the heavy fraction of CsCl gradients at low and high temperatures, respectively, indicating a niche differentiation of active bacterial ammonia oxidizers along the temperature gradient. The (13)C labeling of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in microcosms incubated at 4 to 25°C was minor. In contrast, significant (13)C labeling of Nitrososphaera-like archaea and changes in the abundance and composition of archaeal amoA genes were observed at 37°C, implicating autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea under warmer conditions.

  10. Degradation of weathered diesel fuel by microorganisms from a contaminated aquifer in aerobic and anaerobic microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Bregnard, T.P.A.; Hoehener, P.; Haener, A.; Zeyer, J.

    1996-03-01

    A diesel fuel-contaminated aquifer in Menziken, Canton of Aargau, Switzerland, was in situ bioremediated from 1989 to 1994 by adding O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} through an infiltration well. After a remediation time of 3.5 years, aquifer material from the contaminated zone was excavated and found to contain > 10{sup 6} hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms/g and 1.15 {+-} 0.15 mg/g weathered diesel fuel comprising mainly isoprenoid alkanes and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of unknown components. Samples of this material were incubated for up to 470 days in aerobic and anaerobic microcosms. The microbial activity was determined by measuring the production of inorganic carbon and the consumption of O{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The degradation of the weathered diesel fuel was quantified by infrared spectroscopy and by capillary gas chromatography. In aerobic microcosms, all isoprenoid alkanes and most of the UCM were biodegraded as long as a nitrogen source was present. The O{sub 2} consumption could be stimulated by adding KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and by elevating the temperature to 22 C. In anaerobic microcosms with KNO{sub 3}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was consumed, inorganic carbon was produced, and the isoprenoid alkanes and the UCM were partially metabolized. In some selected microcosms, the NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} consumption rate was stimulated by adding external substrates such as toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, n-alkanes, or fatty acids. Mineralization of toluene, naphthalene, and hexadecane to CO{sub 2} under denitrifying conditions was confirmed by using [{sup 14}C]-labelled substrates.

  11. Relative inactivation of faecal indicator bacteria and sewage markers in freshwater and seawater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Gyawali, P; Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the relative inactivation of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) namely Escherichia coli, enterococci and sewage markers [Bacteroides HF183 and human adenoviruses (HAVs)] was assessed in sewage-spiked freshwater and seawater microcosms under ambient subtropical climatic conditions. The numbers of declining FIB were measured with culture-based methods, whereas the numbers of sewage markers were measured with qPCR assays. The T90 inactivation times of E. coli, enterococci and the HF183 markers in both freshwater and seawater microcosms were <3·5 days, suggesting the suitability of the HF183 marker to identify recent sewage pollution events. The T90 value of HAVs (9·4-13 days), however, was significantly higher than FIB and the HF183 marker in both freshwater (P < 0·001) and seawater (P < 0·05) microcosms. Therefore, we recommend that HAVs should be used as an additional marker to adequately assess the potential health risks associated with longer-term sewage-polluted environmental waters. In this study, we have shown that the persistence of the Bacteroides HF183 marker in freshwater and seawater microcosms was similar to faecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and enterococci), whereas human adenoviruses (HAVs) persisted relatively longer. These findings suggest the suitability of both the markers to identify sewage pollution in environmental waters. However, HF183 marker appeared to be more useful than HAVs in identifying recent sewage pollution. As, HAVs may remain infective for lengthy periods, it should be used in conjunction with the HF183 marker to obtain information on the potential human health risks associated with sewage-polluted freshwater and seawater. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Direct Link between Toluene Degradation in Contaminated-Site Microcosms and a Polaromonas Strain ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weimin; Xie, Shuguang; Luo, Chunling; Cupples, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify the aerobic toluene-degrading microorganism in soil microcosms. Several approaches (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and quantitative PCR) provided evidence that the microorganism responsible was a member of the genus Polaromonas and could grow on toluene. This microorganism also transformed benzene, but not m-xylene or cis-dichloroethene. PMID:20008173

  13. Naturally-Derived Microcosms for Estimating Stress Effects in Aquatic Ecosystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-31

    bacteria, algae , and protozoa are representative of complex communities found in streams, rivers, and lakes. A microcosm developed from bottom and...measurable as shifts in the allocation of biomass to photosynthetic and heterotrophic compartments, including bacteria, fungi, and other compartments. These...ciliates, and sarcodines), > 15 genera of algae (includes greens, blue-greens, and diatoms), and rotifers or other micrometazoa. Organisms need not be

  14. Methyl t-Butyl Ether Mineralization in Surface-Water Sediment Microcosms under Denitrifying Conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Mineralization of [U-14C] methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) to 14CO2 without accumulation of t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was observed in surface-water sediment microcosms under denitrifying conditions. Methanogenic activity and limited transformation of MTBE to TBA were observed in the absence of denitrification. Results indicate that bed sediment microorganisms can effectively degrade MTBE to nontoxic products under denitrifying conditions.

  15. Direct and indirect effects of the fungicide azoxystrobin in outdoor brackish water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Kerstin; Blidberg, Eva; Elfgren, Irene Karlsson; Hellström, Anna; Kylin, Henrik; Gorokhova, Elena

    2010-02-01

    The effects of the strobilurin fungicide azoxystrobin were studied in brackish water microcosms, with natural plankton communities and sediment. Two experiments were conducted: Experiment 1 (nominal conc. 0, 15 and 60 microg/L, 24-L outdoor microcosms for 21 days) and a second, follow-up, Experiment 2 (nominal conc. 0, 3, 7.5, 15 microg/L, 4-L indoor microcosms for 12 days). The microcosms represent a simplified brackish water community found in shallow semi-enclosed coastal areas in agricultural districts in the Baltic Sea region. Measured water concentrations of the fungicide (Experiment 1) were, on average, 83 and 62% of nominal concentrations directly after application, and 25 and 30% after 21 days, for the low and high dose treatments, respectively, corresponding to mean DT50-values of 15.1 and 25.8 days, for low and high dose treatments, respectively. In Experiment 1, direct toxic effects on calanoid copepods at both test concentrations were observed. Similarly, in Experiment 2, the copepod abundance was significantly reduced at all tested concentrations. There were also significant secondary effects on zooplankton and phytoplankton community structure, standing stocks and primary production. Very few ecotoxicological studies have investigated effects of plant protection products on Baltic organisms in general and effects on community structure and function specifically. Our results show that azoxystrobin is toxic to brackish water copepods at considerably lower concentrations than previously reported from single species tests on freshwater crustaceans, and that direct toxic effects on this ecologically important group may lead to cascade effects altering lower food webs and ecosystem functioning.

  16. Autotrophic Growth of Bacterial and Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizers in Freshwater Sediment Microcosms Incubated at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yucheng; Ke, Xiubin; Hernández, Marcela; Wang, Baozhan; Dumont, Marc G.; Jia, Zhongjun

    2013-01-01

    Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to ammonia oxidation, but their roles in freshwater sediments are still poorly understood. Seasonal differences in the relative activities of these groups might exist, since cultivated archaeal ammonia oxidizers have higher temperature optima than their bacterial counterparts. In this study, sediment collected from eutrophic freshwater Lake Taihu (China) was incubated at different temperatures (4°C, 15°C, 25°C, and 37°C) for up to 8 weeks. We examined the active bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers in these sediment microcosms by using combined stable isotope probing (SIP) and molecular community analysis. The results showed that accumulation of nitrate in microcosms correlated negatively with temperature, although ammonium depletion was the same, which might have been related to enhanced activity of other nitrogen transformation processes. Incubation at different temperatures significantly changed the microbial community composition, as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes. After 8 weeks of incubation, [13C]bicarbonate labeling of bacterial amoA genes, which encode the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A, and an observed increase in copy numbers indicated the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in all microcosms. Nitrosomonas sp. strain Is79A3 and Nitrosomonas communis lineages dominated the heavy fraction of CsCl gradients at low and high temperatures, respectively, indicating a niche differentiation of active bacterial ammonia oxidizers along the temperature gradient. The 13C labeling of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in microcosms incubated at 4 to 25°C was minor. In contrast, significant 13C labeling of Nitrososphaera-like archaea and changes in the abundance and composition of archaeal amoA genes were observed at 37°C, implicating autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea under warmer conditions. PMID:23455342

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) anaerobic degradation in marine sediments: microcosm study and role of autochthonous microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Grenni, Paola; Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) biodegradation was followed for 1 year in microcosms containing marine sediments collected from Mar Piccolo (Taranto, Italy) chronically contaminated by this class of hazardous compounds. The microcosms were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions with or without the addition of Dehalococcoides mccartyi, the main microorganism known to degrade PCBs through the anaerobic reductive dechlorination process. Thirty PCB congeners were monitored during the experiments revealing that the biodegradation occurred in all microcosms with a decrease in hepta-, hexa-, and penta-chlorobiphenyls (CBs) and a parallel increase in low chlorinated PCBs (tri-CBs and tetra-CBs). The concentrations of the most representative congeners detected in the original sediment, such as 245-245-CB and 2345-245-CB, and of the mixture 2356-34-CB+234-245-CB, decreased by 32.5, 23.8, and 46.7 %, respectively, after only 70 days of anaerobic incubation without any bioaugmentation treatment. Additionally, the structure and population dynamics of the microbial key players involved in the biodegradative process and of the entire mixed microbial community were accurately defined by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) in both the original sediment and during the operation of the microcosm. The reductive dehalogenase genes of D. mccartyi, specifically involved in PCB dechlorination, were also quantified using real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results demonstrated that the autochthonous microbial community living in the marine sediment, including D. mccartyi (6.32E+06 16S rRNA gene copy numbers g(-1) sediment), was able to efficiently sustain the biodegradation of PCBs when controlled anaerobic conditions were imposed.

  18. Mercury Distribution, Methylation and Volatilization in Microcosms with and without the Sea Anemone Bunodosoma caissarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, N. R.; Correia, R. R. S.; Fernandez, M. A. S.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Guimarães, J. R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) can be a dangerous contaminant and has a complex biogeochemical cycling in aquatic environments. The sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum is an endemic species in Brazil capable of bioaccumulating Hg from the ambient seawater. The radiotracer 203Hg was used in order to investigate mechanisms of Hg uptake and depuration of B. caissarum and the distribution of Hg in laboratory model systems, with and without B. caissarum. A single initial spike of 203Hg was added to each microcosm. Microcosms had continuous air renovation and trapping of Hg volatile forms. Total Hg in different compartments was measured by gamma spectrometry. In the uptake experiment 203Hg activity was determined periodically in seawater and specimens for 6 days. At the end, specimens had an average bioconcentration factor of 70. After the uptake experiment, methylmercury (MeHg) in seawater was extracted and measured by liquid scintillation. In microcosms with and without B. caissarum, respectively 0.05% and 0.32% of the initial spike was found as MeHg. Hg was probably less available for methylation in the first because of bioaccumulation and higher concentrations of suspended particulate matter that could form complexes with Hg. After that, specimens were transferred to unspiked microcosms. After a 48 day depuration specimens still retained 35 - 70% of the previously bioaccumulated Hg and 0.2 - 2.4% of the total Hg was MeHg. The presence of B. caissarum resulted in an unexpected higher volatilization of Hg (58%) compared to controls (17%). This increased volatilization is possibly a result of Hg2+ reduction mediated by microorganisms associated with its tissues and mucus secretions and/or an unknown defense mechanism of this species.

  19. Impact of imidacloprid on life-cycle development of Coccinella septempunctata in laboratory microcosms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Caihong; Lin, Ronghua; Fu, Maoran; Zhou, Yanming; Zong, Fulin; Jiang, Hui; Lv, Ning; Piao, Xiuying; Zhang, Jia; Liu, Yongquan; Brock, Theo C M

    2014-12-01

    Long-term effects of a single application of imidacloprid on ladybird beetle, Coccinella septempunctata L., were studied in indoor laboratory microcosms, starting with the 2nd instar larvae of C. septempunctata but covering the full life cycle. The microcosms comprised enclosures containing a pot with soil planted with broad bean plants and black bean aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch, as food. Exposure doses (0.85-13.66g a.i. ha(-1)) in the long-term microcosm experiment were based on a preliminary short-term (72h) toxicity test with 2nd instar larvae. The measurement endpoints used to calculate NOERs (No Observed Effect application Rates) included development time, hatching, pupation, adult emergence, survival and number of eggs produced. Furthermore, for these endpoints ER50 (application rate causing 50 percent effect) and LR50 (application rate causing 50 percent mortality) values were calculated when possible. The single imidacloprid application affected survival (lowest LR50 4.07g a.i. ha(-1); NOER 3.42g a.i. ha(-1)), egg production (ER50 26.63g a.i. ha(-1)) and egg hatching (NOER 6.83g a.i. ha(-1)). Statistically significant treatment-related effects on the whole development duration, pupation and adult emergence could not be demonstrated (NOER≥13.66g a.i. ha(-1)). The lowest L(E)R50 values and NOERs derived from the laboratory microcosm test with C. septempunctata are lower than the reported field application rates of imidacloprid (15-60g a.i. ha(-1)) in cotton cultivation in China, suggesting potential risks to beneficial arthropods.

  20. Selective enrichment yields robust ethene-producing dechlorinating cultures from microcosms stalled at cis-dichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Anca G; Kang, Dae-Wook; Nelson, Katherine G; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Miceli, Joseph F; Done, Hansa Y; Popat, Sudeep C; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are of particular importance for bioremediation due to their unique capability of transforming perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to non-toxic ethene, through the intermediates cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Despite the widespread environmental distribution of Dehalococcoides, biostimulation sometimes fails to promote dechlorination beyond cis-DCE. In our study, microcosms established with garden soil and mangrove sediment also stalled at cis-DCE, albeit Dehalococcoides mccartyi containing the reductive dehalogenase genes tceA, vcrA and bvcA were detected in the soil/sediment inocula. Reductive dechlorination was not promoted beyond cis-DCE, even after multiple biostimulation events with fermentable substrates and a lengthy incubation. However, transfers from microcosms stalled at cis-DCE yielded dechlorination to ethene with subsequent enrichment cultures containing up to 10(9) Dehalococcoides mccartyi cells mL(-1). Proteobacterial classes which dominated the soil/sediment communities became undetectable in the enrichments, and methanogenic activity drastically decreased after the transfers. We hypothesized that biostimulation of Dehalococcoides in the cis-DCE-stalled microcosms was impeded by other microbes present at higher abundances than Dehalococcoides and utilizing terminal electron acceptors from the soil/sediment, hence, outcompeting Dehalococcoides for H2. In support of this hypothesis, we show that garden soil and mangrove sediment microcosms bioaugmented with their respective cultures containing Dehalococcoides in high abundance were able to compete for H2 for reductive dechlorination from one biostimulation event and produced ethene with no obvious stall. Overall, our results provide an alternate explanation to consolidate conflicting observations on the ubiquity of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and occasional stalling of dechlorination at cis-DCE; thus, bringing a new perspective to

  1. Selective Enrichment Yields Robust Ethene-Producing Dechlorinating Cultures from Microcosms Stalled at cis-Dichloroethene

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Anca G.; Kang, Dae-Wook; Nelson, Katherine G.; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Miceli, Joseph F.; Done, Hansa Y.; Popat, Sudeep C.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are of particular importance for bioremediation due to their unique capability of transforming perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to non-toxic ethene, through the intermediates cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Despite the widespread environmental distribution of Dehalococcoides, biostimulation sometimes fails to promote dechlorination beyond cis-DCE. In our study, microcosms established with garden soil and mangrove sediment also stalled at cis-DCE, albeit Dehalococcoides mccartyi containing the reductive dehalogenase genes tceA, vcrA and bvcA were detected in the soil/sediment inocula. Reductive dechlorination was not promoted beyond cis-DCE, even after multiple biostimulation events with fermentable substrates and a lengthy incubation. However, transfers from microcosms stalled at cis-DCE yielded dechlorination to ethene with subsequent enrichment cultures containing up to 109 Dehalococcoides mccartyi cells mL−1. Proteobacterial classes which dominated the soil/sediment communities became undetectable in the enrichments, and methanogenic activity drastically decreased after the transfers. We hypothesized that biostimulation of Dehalococcoides in the cis-DCE-stalled microcosms was impeded by other microbes present at higher abundances than Dehalococcoides and utilizing terminal electron acceptors from the soil/sediment, hence, outcompeting Dehalococcoides for H2. In support of this hypothesis, we show that garden soil and mangrove sediment microcosms bioaugmented with their respective cultures containing Dehalococcoides in high abundance were able to compete for H2 for reductive dechlorination from one biostimulation event and produced ethene with no obvious stall. Overall, our results provide an alternate explanation to consolidate conflicting observations on the ubiquity of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and occasional stalling of dechlorination at cis-DCE; thus, bringing a new perspective to better

  2. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  3. The IntAct molecular interaction database in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kerrien, Samuel; Aranda, Bruno; Breuza, Lionel; Bridge, Alan; Broackes-Carter, Fiona; Chen, Carol; Duesbury, Margaret; Dumousseau, Marine; Feuermann, Marc; Hinz, Ursula; Jandrasits, Christine; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Khadake, Jyoti; Mahadevan, Usha; Masson, Patrick; Pedruzzi, Ivo; Pfeiffenberger, Eric; Porras, Pablo; Raghunath, Arathi; Roechert, Bernd; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning

    2012-01-01

    IntAct is an open-source, open data molecular interaction database populated by data either curated from the literature or from direct data depositions. Two levels of curation are now available within the database, with both IMEx-level annotation and less detailed MIMIx-compatible entries currently supported. As from September 2011, IntAct contains approximately 275 000 curated binary interaction evidences from over 5000 publications. The IntAct website has been improved to enhance the search process and in particular the graphical display of the results. New data download formats are also available, which will facilitate the inclusion of IntAct's data in the Semantic Web. IntAct is an active contributor to the IMEx consortium (http://www.imexconsortium.org). IntAct source code and data are freely available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/intact. PMID:22121220

  4. Enhancing tetrabromobisphenol A biodegradation in river sediment microcosms and understanding the corresponding microbial community.

    PubMed

    Li, Guiying; Xiong, Jukun; Wong, Po Keung; An, Taicheng

    2016-01-01

    In situ remediation of contaminated sediment using microbes is a promising environmental treatment method. This study used bioaugmentation to investigate the biodegradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in sediment microcosms collected from an electronic-waste recycling site. Treatments included adding possible biodegradation intermediates of TBBPA, including 2,4-dibromophenol (2,4-DBP), 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), and bisphenol A (BPA) as co-substrates. Bioaugmentation was done with Ochrobactrum sp. T (TBBPA-degrader) and a mixed culture of Ochrobactrum sp. T, Bacillus sp. GZT (TBP-degrader) and Bacillus sp. GZB (BPA-degrader). Results showed that bioaugmentation with Ochrobactrum sp. T significantly improved TBBPA degradation efficiencies in sediment microcosms (P < 0.01); aerobic conditions increased the microbes' degradation activities. Co-substrates 2,4-DBP, TBP and BPA inhibited biodegradation of TBBPA. A metagenomic analysis of total 16S rRNA genes from the treated sediment microcosms showed that the following dominant genera: Ochrobactrum, Parasegetibacter, Thermithiobacillus, Phenylobacterium and Sphingomonas. The genus level of Ochrobactrum increased with increased degradation time, within 10-week of incubation. Microbes from genus Ochrobactrum are mainly linked to enhance the TBBPA biodegradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced and stabilized arsenic retention in microcosms through the microbial oxidation of ferrous iron by nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Stute, Martin; Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Lepre, Christopher J.; Bostick, Benjamin C.

    2015-10-23

    Magnetite strongly retains As, and is relatively stable under Fe(III)-reducing conditions common in aquifers that release As. In this paper, laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Superfund site. The microcosms were amended with various combinations of nitrate, Fe(II) (aq) (as ferrous sulfate) and lactate, and were incubated for more than 5 weeks. In the microcosms enriched with 10 mM nitrate and 5 mM Fe(II) (aq), black magnetic particles were produced, and As removal from solution was observed even under sustained Fe(III) reduction stimulated by the addition of 10 mM lactate. The enhanced As retention was mainly attributed to co-precipitation within magnetite and adsorption on a mixture of magnetite and ferrihydrite. Sequential chemical extraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that these minerals formed at pH 6–7 following nitrate-Fe(II) addition, and As-bearing magnetite was stable under reducing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that nano-particulate magnetite was produced as coatings on fine sediments, and no aging effect was detected on morphology over the course of incubation. Finally, these results suggest that a magnetite based strategy may be a long-term remedial option for As-contaminated aquifers.

  6. Enhanced and stabilized arsenic retention in microcosms through the microbial oxidation of ferrous iron by nitrate

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.; Mailloux, Brian J.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Magnetite strongly retains As, and is relatively stable under Fe(III)-reducing conditions common in aquifers that release As. In this paper, laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Superfund site. The microcosms were amended with various combinations of nitrate, Fe(II) (aq) (as ferrous sulfate) and lactate, and were incubated for more than 5 weeks. In the microcosms enriched with 10 mM nitrate and 5 mM Fe(II) (aq), black magnetic particles were produced, and As removal from solution was observed even under sustained Fe(III) reduction stimulated bymore » the addition of 10 mM lactate. The enhanced As retention was mainly attributed to co-precipitation within magnetite and adsorption on a mixture of magnetite and ferrihydrite. Sequential chemical extraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that these minerals formed at pH 6–7 following nitrate-Fe(II) addition, and As-bearing magnetite was stable under reducing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that nano-particulate magnetite was produced as coatings on fine sediments, and no aging effect was detected on morphology over the course of incubation. Finally, these results suggest that a magnetite based strategy may be a long-term remedial option for As-contaminated aquifers.« less

  7. Microcosm enrichment of biphenyl-degrading microbial communities from soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner-Doebler, I.; Bennasar, A.; Stroempl, C.; Bruemmer, I.; Eichner, C.; Grammel, I.; Moore, E.R.B.; Vancanneyt, M.

    1998-08-01

    A microcosm enrichment approach was employed to isolate bacteria which are representative of long-term biphenyl-adapted microbial communities. Growth of microorganisms was stimulated by incubating soil and sediment samples from polluted and nonpolluted sites with biphenyl crystals. After 6 months, stable population densities between 8 {times} 10{sup 9} and 2 {times} 10{sup 11} CFU/ml were established in the microcosms, and a large percentage of the organisms were able to grow on biphenyl-containing minimal medium plates. A total of 177 biphenyl-degrading strains were subsequently isolated and characterized by their ability to grow on biphenyl in liquid culture and to accumulate a yellow meta cleavage product when they were sprayed with dihydroxy-biphenyl. Isolates were identified by using a polyphasic approach, including fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell proteins, and genomic fingerprinting based on sequence variability in the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer region. In all of the microcosms, isolates identified as Rhodococcus opacus dominated the cultivable microbial community, comprising a cluster of 137 isolates with very similar FAME profiles (Euclidean distances, <10) and identical 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  8. Emissions of NO and N2O in wetland microcosms for swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunan; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Yong; Zhou, Juan; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emitted from wetland systems contribute an important proportion to the global warming effect. In this study, four wetland microcosms vegetated with Myriophyllum elatinoides (WM), Alternanthera philoxeroides (WA), Eichhornia crassipes (WE), or without vegetation (NW) were compared to investigate the emissions of NO and N2O during nitrogen (N) removal process when treating swine wastewater. After 30-day incubation, TN removal rates of 96.4, 74.2, 97.2, and 47.3 % were observed for the WM, WA, WE, and NW microcosms, respectively. Yet, no significant difference was observed in WM and WE (p > 0.05). The average NO and N2O emissions in WE was significantly higher than those in WM, WA, and NW (p < 0.05). In addition, the emission of N2O in WE accounted for 2.10 % of initial TN load and 2.17 % of the total amount of TN removal, compared with less than 1 % in the other microcosms. These findings indicate that wetland vegetated with M. elatinoides may be an optimal system for swine wastewater treatment, based on its higher removal of N and lower emissions of NO and N2O.

  9. Abundance and Dynamics of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Integrons in Lake Sediment Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Björn; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Lindberg, Richard; Fick, Jerker; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8×104 copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances. PMID:25247418

  10. Enhanced and stabilized arsenic retention in microcosms through the microbial oxidation of ferrous iron by nitrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N; Mailloux, Brian J; Stute, Martin; Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Lepre, Christopher J; Bostick, Benjamin C

    2016-02-01

    Magnetite strongly retains As, and is relatively stable under Fe(III)-reducing conditions common in aquifers that release As. Here, laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Superfund site. The microcosms were amended with various combinations of nitrate, Fe(II) (aq) (as ferrous sulfate) and lactate, and were incubated for more than 5 weeks. In the microcosms enriched with 10 mM nitrate and 5 mM Fe(II) (aq), black magnetic particles were produced, and As removal from solution was observed even under sustained Fe(III) reduction stimulated by the addition of 10 mM lactate. The enhanced As retention was mainly attributed to co-precipitation within magnetite and adsorption on a mixture of magnetite and ferrihydrite. Sequential chemical extraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that these minerals formed at pH 6-7 following nitrate-Fe(II) addition, and As-bearing magnetite was stable under reducing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that nano-particulate magnetite was produced as coatings on fine sediments, and no aging effect was detected on morphology over the course of incubation. These results suggest that a magnetite based strategy may be a long-term remedial option for As-contaminated aquifers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological and abiotic dechlorination of highly chlorinated dioxins in biphasic microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovskii, A.; Adriaens, P.

    1995-12-31

    A novel experimental approach to help increase the rates and extent of reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) is presented. Biphasic microcosms emulsions containing eluted microorganisms derived from historically contaminated Passaic River (New Jersey) sediments, and 4% (v/v) of decane, were spiked with mg/L of octaCDD. The microcosms were amended separately with three polyphenolic compounds--catechol, resorcinol, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate--to help improve electron transfer during reductive dechlorination. Abiotic controls containing phenolic compounds only, and pasteurized cells were monitored along with the active microcosms. Lesser-chlorinated congeners were observed in all treatments, including killed cells, indicating the potential not only for biological and abiotic, but also biogenic dechlorination mechanisms. After 3 months of incubation, tetraCDD isomers were produced in biological incubations only, and up to 30% of the spiked octaCDD was removed. Polyphenolic compounds first appear to transiently complex with the dioxins prior to further dechlorination, and did not increase the dechlorination rates over unamended cells. Whereas the 2,3,7,8-/1,4,6,9-substitution ratio of heptachlorinated congeners increased in all treatments, 2,3,7,8-substituted hexaCDDs congeners were identified mainly in active cell incubations. Further isomer-specific analysis may thus enable distinction between abiotic and biotic dechlorination processes in anaerobic sediments.

  12. The use of outdoor freshwater pond microcosms. III. Responses of phytoplankton and periphyton to pyridaben

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Krise, W.F.; Redell, L.A.; Bennett, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    An outdoor freshwater microcosm study was conducted in which pyridaben, an insecticide-miticide, was directly applied to water to determine its biological effects on phytoplankton and periphyton. Twenty-four microcosms (24 m3 each) were monitored for 11 months, then four treatments of pyridaben were applied two times at three concentrations (0.34, 34.0 ??g/L), including an untreated control. The succession of algal groups observed and the major genera found in microcosms during the baseline phase of the study were typical of oligo-mesotrophic systems in Florida. Following application of pyridaben, the most remarkable effect was a positive correlation of phytoplankton abundance with pyridaben concentrations in water; indicating increased abundance as a result of exposure. Both Chlorophyta and Pyrrophyta exhibited a significant increase (p=0.05) in population abundance at 3.4 and 34.0 ??g/L pyridaben. Chrysophyta also elicited a trend of increased abundance at 34.0 ??g/L, although the effect was not significant. The effects on phytoplankton populations were associated with the decline of zooplankton populations as a result of a direct effect of pyridaben exposure. There were no effects of pyridaben on periphyton communities or on functional endpoints. ?? 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Aerobic Vinyl Chloride Metabolism in Groundwater Microcosms by Methanotrophic and Etheneotrophic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Margaret; Smoler, Donna F; Fogel, Samuel; Mattes, Timothy E

    2016-04-05

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a carcinogen generated in groundwater by reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. Under aerobic conditions, etheneotrophs oxidize ethene and VC, while VC-assimilators can use VC as their sole source of carbon and energy. Methanotrophs utilize only methane but can oxidize ethene to epoxyethane and VC to chlorooxirane. Microcosms were constructed with groundwater from the Carver site in MA containing these three native microbial types. Methane, ethene, and VC were added to the microcosms singly or as mixtures. In the absence of VC, ethene degraded faster when methane was also present. We hypothesized that methanotroph oxidation of ethene to epoxyethane competed with their use of methane, and that epoxyethane stimulated the activity of starved etheneotrophs by inducing the enzyme alkene monooxygenase. We then developed separate enrichment cultures of Carver methanotrophs and etheneotrophs, and demonstrated that Carver methanotrophs can oxidize ethene to epoxyethane, and that starved Carver etheneotrophs exhibit significantly reduced lag time for ethene utilization when epoxyethane is added. In our groundwater microcosm tests, when all three substrates were present, the rate of VC removal was faster than with either methane or ethene alone, consistent with the idea that methanotrophs stimulate etheneotroph destruction of VC.

  14. Magnetotactic bacteria in microcosms originating from the French Mediterranean Coast subjected to oil industry activities.

    PubMed

    Postec, Anne; Tapia, Nicolas; Bernadac, Alain; Joseph, Manon; Davidson, Sylvain; Wu, Long-Fei; Ollivier, Bernard; Pradel, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) mineralize nanosized magnetite or greigite crystals within cells and thus play an important role in the biogeochemical process. Despite decades of research, knowledge of MTB distribution and ecology, notably in areas subjected to oil industry activities, is still limited. In the present study, we investigated the presence of MTB in the Gulf of Fos, French Mediterranean coast, which is subjected to intensive oil industry activities. Microcosms containing sediments/water (1:2, v/v) from several sampling sites were monitored over several weeks. The presence of MTB was revealed in five of eight sites. Diverse and numerous MTB were revealed particularly from one site (named CAR), whilst temporal variations of a homogenous magnetotactic cocci population was shown within the LAV site microcosm over a 4-month period. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, and a novel genus from the LAV site was evidenced. Among the physicochemical parameters measured, a correlation was shown between the variation of MTB abundance in microcosms and the redox state of sulphur compounds.

  15. Microcosm for assessing survival of genetically engineered microorganisms in aquatic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Awong, J.; Bitton, G.; Chaudhry, G.R. )

    1990-04-01

    Laboratory-contained microcosms are important for studying the fate and survival of genetically engineered microorganisms. In this study, we describe a simple aquatic microcosm that utilizes survival chambers in a flow through or static renewal system. The model was used to study the survival of genetically engineered and wild-type strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida in the lake water environment. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that the genetically engineered microorganisms survived better or at least as well as their wild-type counterparts at 15, 25, and 30{degree}C. The genetic determinants of the genetically engineered microorganisms also remained fairly stable within the host cell under the tested conditions. In the presence of organisms indigenous to lake water, E. coli was eliminated after 20 days, whereas P. putida showed an initial decline but was able to stabilize its population after 5 days. A herbicide, Hydrothol-191, caused a significant decline in numbers of P. putida, but no significant difference was observed between the genetically engineered microorganisms and the wild-type strain. The microcosm described is simple, can be easily adapted to study a variety of environmental variables, and has the advantage that the organisms tested are constantly exposed to test waters that are continuously renewed.

  16. Naphthalene biodegradation in environmental microcosms: estimates of degradation rates and characterization of metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, M.A.; Freeman, J.P.; Cerniglia, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Naphthalene biodegradation was investigated in microcosms containing sediment and water collected from three ecosystems which varied in past exposure to anthropogenic and petrogenic chemicals. Mineralization half-lives for naphthalene in microcosms ranged from 2.4 weeks in sediment chronically exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons to 4.4 weeks in sediment from a pristine environment. Microbiological analysis of sediments indicated that hydrocarbon-utilizing microbial populations also varied among ecosystems and were 5 to 12 times greater in sediment after chronic petrogenic chemical exposure than in sediment from an uncontaminated ecosystem. Sediment from an ecosystem exposed to agricultural chemicals had a mineralization half-life of 3.2 weeks for naphthalene and showed about a 30-fold increase in heterotrophic bacterial populations in comparison to uncontaminated sediments, but only a 2- to 3-fold increase in hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Analysis of organic solvent-extractable residues from the microcosms by high-pressure liquid chromatography detected polar metabolites which accounted for 1 to 3% of the total radioactivity. Purification of these residues by thin-layer chromatography and further analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated that cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, 1-naphthol, salicylic acid, and catechol were metabolites of naphthalene.

  17. Genetically Engineered Erwinia carotovora in Aquatic Microcosms: Survival and Effects on Functional Groups of Indigenous Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Scanferlato, Vjera S.; Orvos, David R.; Cairns, John; Lacy, George H.

    1989-01-01

    The survival of genetically engineered Erwinia carotovora L-864, with a kanamycin resistance gene inserted in its chromosome, was monitored in the water and sediment of aquatic microcosms. The density of genetically engineered and wild-type E. carotovora strains declined at the same rate, falling in 32 days below the level of detection by viable counts. We examined the impact of the addition of genetically engineered and wild-type strains on indigenous bacteria belonging to specific functional groups important in nutrient cycling. For up to 16 days, the densities of total and proteolytic bacteria were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in microcosms inoculated with genetically engineered or wild-type E. carotovora, but by 32 days after inoculation, they had decreased to densities similar to those in control microcosms. Inoculation of genetically engineered or wild-type E. carotovora had no apparent effect on the density of amylolytic and pectolytic bacteria in water and sediment. Genetically engineered and wild-type E. carotovora did not have significantly different effects on the densities of specific functional groups of indigenous bacteria (P > 0.05). Images PMID:16347942

  18. Environmental effect and fate of selected phenols in aquatic ecosystems using microcosm approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Portier, R.J.; Chen, H.M.; Meyers, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Microbiological studies, together with physicochemical analyses of selected industrial source phenols of environmental significance, were conducted in continuous flow and carbon metabolism microcosms to determine the behavior of these priority pollutants in soil and sediment-water systems typical of coastal wetlands. Phenols used included 4- nitrophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2-chlorophenol, and phenol. The organophosphate, UC-UL-Methyl Parathion, was used as a benchmark toxicant control while UC-Ring-Phenol was employed for all phenolic compound additions. Microbial diversity, ATP, and specific enzyme systems (i.e., phosphatase, dehydrogenase) were continuously monitored along with UCO2 expiration and UC assimilation by the cellular component. Residual analysis of all microcosm tests employed procedures using combined gas chromatography/high-performance liquid chromatography. Statistical analyses were conducted of variations of testing criteria, along with a ranking profile of relative biotransformation and biodegradation potential. Data presented confirm the validity of microcosm approaches and related correlation analysis in toxic substance fate investigations. 17 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  19. Response of the zooplankton community and environmental fate of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Timothy M; Wilson, Christian J; Cheong, Woo Jay; Sibley, Paul K; Mabury, Scott A; Muir, Derek C G; Solomon, Keith R

    2003-11-01

    Little is known regarding perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) toxicity to freshwater organisms. This field evaluation aims to assess the toxicological risk associated with exposure to PFOS across levels of biological organization. The analysis of variance study was conducted in replicate (n = 3) 12,000 L outdoor microcosms. Multivariate techniques were used to assess the response of zooplankton community structure and dynamics, as well as a floating macrophyte, Lemna gibba. The zooplankton community was significantly affected (p < 0.05) by the treatment regime given by the Monte Carlo permutations for all sampling times. A community-level no-observable-effect concentration ([NOEC]community) of 3.0 mg/L was determined for the 35-day study, however, longer term studies are recommended. The most sensitive taxonomic groups, Cladocera and Copepoda, were virtually eliminated in 30 mg/L treatments after 7 d. The 42-d 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) for L. gibba frond number was 19.1 mg/L and the NOEC was 0.2 mg/L. Furthermore, we investigated the persistence of PFOS over 285 d in microcosms under natural conditions. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid concentration showed no drastic reduction in any treatment microcosm over the entire study period, confirming that this compound undergoes little degradation in aquatic systems. Presently, there appears to be little hazard to these freshwater organisms at reported environmental concentrations.

  20. Environmental assessment of a phthalate ester, Di(2-Ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), derived from a marine microcosm

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, K.T.; Davey, E.W.; Lackie, N.F.; Morrison, G.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Soper, A.E.; Winslow, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    This study tested the influence of system complexity on the environmental assessment of a chemical. Marine microcosms were perturbed with a phthalate ester, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 ..mu..g of DEHP per litre were added to the water-column subsystem of marine microcosms for 30 days during the summer (18/sup 0/C) and winter (1/sup 0/C) seasons. Significant portions of the DEHP losses from the water-column subsystem during the experiments were due to the complete breakdown of the parent compound to carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/). In the benthic subsystem, DEHP concentrations in the sediment were increased by more than 50 and 250 times the concentration in the water column during the winter and summer seasons, respectively. Statistically significant (..cap alpha.. = 0.05) reductions in the fluxes of ammonia (NH/sub 3/) from the benthic subsystem were observed in microcosms receiving 100 ..mu..g of DEHP per litre during the summer. Concentrations of DEHP in selected bivalves ranged from 174 to 229 000 ..mu..g of DEHP per wet kilogram, depending upon the water column exposure concentrations and the season of the year.

  1. Modelling algae-duckweed interaction under chemical pressure within a laboratory microcosm.

    PubMed

    Lamonica, Dominique; Clément, Bernard; Charles, Sandrine; Lopes, Christelle

    2016-06-01

    Contaminant effects on species are generally assessed with single-species bioassays. As a consequence, interactions between species that occur in ecosystems are not taken into account. To investigate the effects of contaminants on interacting species dynamics, our study describes the functioning of a 2-L laboratory microcosm with two species, the duckweed Lemna minor and the microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, exposed to cadmium contamination. We modelled the dynamics of both species and their interactions using a mechanistic model based on coupled ordinary differential equations. The main processes occurring in this two-species microcosm were thus formalised, including growth and settling of algae, growth of duckweeds, interspecific competition between the two species and cadmium effects. We estimated model parameters by Bayesian inference, using simultaneously all the data issued from multiple laboratory experiments specifically conducted for this study. Cadmium concentrations ranged between 0 and 50 μg·L(-1). For all parameters of our model, we obtained biologically realistic values and reasonable uncertainties. Only duckweed dynamics was affected by interspecific competition, while algal dynamics was not impaired. Growth rate of both species decreased with cadmium concentration, as well as competition intensity showing that the interspecific competition pressure on duckweed decreased with cadmium concentration. This innovative combination of mechanistic modelling and model-guided experiments was successful to understand the algae-duckweed microcosm functioning without and with contaminant. This approach appears promising to include interactions between species when studying contaminant effects on ecosystem functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Jarosite-related chemical processes and water ecotoxicity in simplified anaerobic microcosm wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Lin, C.; Wu, Y.; Lu, W.; Liu, Y.; Ma, Y.; Chen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Simulation experiments were conducted to examine whether jarosite is decomposed and toxic products are produced under anaerobic microcosm wetland conditions. The results show that jarosite was stable under water inundation in the microcosm wetland for a period of at least 56 days when no organic substance was added. However, jarosite became increasingly unstable with increasing amount of added organic matter. This resulted in entry of ferrous Fe into the soil solutions. Concentration of other heavy metals in the leachates was extremely low except for Mn. This is attributed to the maintenance of a high pH in the microcosm wetlands, which might cause re-precipitation of originally jarosite-borne heavy metals, if any. No acute toxicity was observed for leachate from the control (non organic matter-added treatment). However, leachates from various organic matter-added treatments show varying degrees of toxicity to the test organism and soluble Fe was likely to be the dominant metal of potential toxicity. Atmospheric exposure of leachate led to oxidation of ferrous Fe and precipitation of iron hydroxide, which caused a drop in leachate pH. This, in turn, inhibited further oxidation of ferrous Fe.

  3. Enhanced and Stabilized Arsenic Retention in Microcosms through the Microbial Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    SUN, JING; CHILLRUD, STEVEN N.; MAILLOUX, BRIAN J.; STUTE, MARTIN; SINGH, RAJESH; DONG, HAILIANG; LEPRE, CHRISTOPHER J.; BOSTICK, BENJAMIN C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite strongly retains As, and is relatively stable under Fe(III)-reducing conditions common in aquifers that release As. Here, laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Superfund site. The microcosms were amended with various combinations of nitrate, Fe(II)(aq)(as ferrous sulfate) and lactate, and were incubated for more than 5 weeks. In the microcosms enriched with 10 mM nitrate and 5 mM Fe(II)(aq), black magnetic particles were produced, and As removal from solution was observed even under sustained Fe(III) reduction stimulated by the addition of 10 mM lactate. The enhanced As retention was mainly attributed to co-precipitation within magnetite and adsorption on a mixture of magnetite and ferrihydrite. Sequential chemical extraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that these minerals formed at pH 6 – 7 following nitrate-Fe(II) addition, and As-bearing magnetite was stable under reducing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that nano-particulate magnetite was produced as coatings on fine sediments, and no aging effect was detected on morphology over the course of incubation. These results suggest that a magnetite based strategy may be a long-term remedial option for As-contaminated aquifers. PMID:26454120

  4. Structural and functional responses of plankton to a mixture of four tetracyclines in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christian J; Brain, Richard A; Sanderson, Hans; Johnson, David J; Bestari, Ketut T; Sibley, Paul K; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals are routinely detected at low concentrations in surface waters, but effects on non-target organisms are not well understood. Microcosms were used to assess ecological responses in freshwater ecosystems to a mixture offourtetracyclines commonly used in veterinary and human medicine. Triplicate microcosms were treated with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and chlortetracycline, resulting in measured time-weighted average total mixture concentrations of 0, 0.080, 0.218, 0.662, and 2.29 microM, respectively. Responses were assessed in terms of structure and function based on measurements of zooplankton and phytoplankton communities, ecosystem productivity, and water quality. Effects were observed for some endpoints > or = the 0.218 microM treatment. The largest responses were concentration-dependent reductions in total phytoplankton abundance and species richness. Phytoplankton abundance recovered to control levels in all microcosms after treatment was terminated, and resilience (time to return to normal operating range during stress) was observed with respectto phytoplankton species richness. Zooplankton were generally unaffected by the tetracyclines. Responses also included decreased water clarity, lower oxygen concentration, and water temperature. Functional endpoints showed varying sensitivity. On the basis of dissolved oxygen concentrations, community respiration (R) increased while primary productivity (P) was unchanged with increased treatment concentration. The effects observed occurred at considerably greater concentrations than are currently measured in the environment, indicating minimal risk to aquatic organisms.

  5. [The impact of macro- and microcosm on the perception of illness and patient].

    PubMed

    Kalemba, Z

    1998-01-01

    The orgins of the idea of macro- and microcosm date back to the Ancient Greek thought. And however often that idea recurred in historically different epochs always carrying the sign of time it invariably assumed there was a correspondence between the universe (macrocosm) and man (microcosm). This type of correlation of both worlds was viewed as a reflection of cosmic harmony and common material (6/5th century BC) or the unity of what is created with the emphasis put on the uniqueness of man (Middle Ages). The philosophical consequence of such approach was the belief that the knowledge of one reality allows one to explain another. Most often such reasoning led from understanding the macrocosm (allowing for stars) to reflections on man. Advocates of such an approach to the perception of man and nature were two great scientific doctors Hippocrates (5th century BC) and Paracelsus (16th century). They both claimed that man retained communication with the whole universe. Paracelsus perceived the world and man in a unity that permitted to recognize an equivalent of anatomy in astronomy. This exceptional link between both cosms was a guarantee for health. Illness occurred as a result of the disturbance of harmony between both worlds. In this context, the task of medical science was to consist in such understanding of the forces present in macro- and microcosm that could restore the line between the nature and man inflicted with illness.

  6. Gonadal development of larval male Xenopus laevis exposed to atrazine in outdoor microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jooste, A.M.; Du Preez, L.H.; Carr, J.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Gross, T.S.; Kendall, R.J.; Smith, E.E.; Van Der Kraak, G. L.; Solomon, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    The potential effects of atrazine on gonadal development in metamorphs and subadults of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) were studied under conditions of natural photoperiod and temperatures in outdoor microcosms from August 2002 to June 2003 in South Africa. Triplicate 1100 L microcosms for each nominal concentration of 0.0, 1, 10, and 25 ??g of atrazine/L were used. Measured atrazine concentrations varied <25% throughout the study, and no atrazine was detected in the control microcosms. Tadpoles developed well at all concentrations. On the basis of histological examination of testes of recently metamorphosed stage 66 frogs, 57% of the individuals in the reference group exhibited testicular oocytes as compared with 57, 59, and 39% of the 1, 10, and 25 ??g/L atrazine groups, respectively. The average prevalence of testicular oocytes for all of the treatments including the controls was 54% in a single testis, while, in 35% of individuals, testicular oocytes were observed in both testes. The number of testicular oocytes per individual ranged from 0 to 58 with means of 9.5, 9.8, 8.5, and 11.1 for the 0.0, 1, 10, and 25 ??g of atrazine/L groups, respectively. Ten months after metamorphosis, another subset of juveniles was examined, and the maximum number of testicular oocytes observed was five in one animal. The presence of testicular oocytes was not related to exposure to atrazine and may be a natural phenomenon during ontogeny. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  7. Interaction of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide and soil nitrogen on the carbon balance of tundra microcosms.

    PubMed

    Billings, W D; Peterson, K M; Luken, J O; Mortensen, D A

    1984-12-01

    Natural cores of vegetation and soils of arctic tundra were collected in frozen condition in winter near Barrow, Alaska (71°20'N). These cores were used as microcosms in a phytotron experiment to measure the interactions, if any, between increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and fertilization by ammonium nitrate on net ecosystem CO2 exchange and net yield of tundra vegetation. Increased soil N significantly enhanced net ecosystem CO2 uptake. The effect of increased CO2 concentration had little or no effect on mean net ecosystem carbon balance of the tundra microcosms. Added N significantly increased leaf area and phytomass of vascular plants in the microcosms while increased atmospheric CO2 had no effect on these parameters. We conclude that atmospheric CO2 is not now limiting net ecosystem production in the tundra and that its direct effects will be slight even at double the present concentration. the most probable effects of carbon dioxide in the coastal tundra will be through its indirect effects on temperature, water table, peat decomposition, and the availability of soil nutrients.

  8. Mercury distribution, methylation and volatilization in microcosms with and without the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum.

    PubMed

    Rizzini Ansari, Nafisa; Correia, Raquel Rose Silva; Fernandez, Marcos Antônio; Cordeiro, Renato Campello; Guimarães, Jean Remy Davée

    2015-03-15

    Mercury (Hg) has a complex biogeochemical cycle in aquatic environments. Its most toxic form, methylmercury (MeHg), is produced by microorganisms. This study investigated how the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum affects Hg distribution, methylation and volatilization in laboratory model systems. (203)Hg was added to microcosms and its distribution in seawater, specimens and air was periodically measured by gamma spectrometry. MeHg was measured by liquid scintillation. After the uptake period, specimens had a bioconcentration factor of 70 and in microcosms with and without B. caissarum, respectively 0.05% and 0.32% of the initial spike was found as MeHg. After depuration, MeHg in specimens ranged from 0.2% to 2.4% of total Hg. Microcosms with B. caissarum had higher Hg volatilization (58%) than controls (17%), possibly due to Hg(2+) reduction mediated by microorganisms associated with its tissues and mucus secretions. Marine organisms and their associated microbiota may play a role in Hg and MeHg cycling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Roundup on the marine microbial community, as shown by an in situ microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Stachowski-Haberkorn, Sabine; Becker, Beatriz; Marie, Dominique; Haberkorn, Hansy; Coroller, Louis; de la Broise, Denis

    2008-09-29

    The effects of the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate) on natural marine microbial communities were assessed in a 7-day field experiment using microcosms. Bottles were maintained underwater at 6m depth, and 10% of their water content was changed every other day. The comparison of control microcosms and surrounding surface water showed that the microcosm system tested here can be considered as representative of the natural surrounding environment. A temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) was run on 16S and 18S rDNA-amplified extracts from the whole microbial community. Cluster analysis of the 16S gel showed differences between control and treatment fingerprints for Roundup at 1 microg L(-1) (ANOSIM, p=0.055; R=0.53), and 10 microg L(-1) (ANOSIM, p=0.086; R=0.40). Flow cytometry analysis revealed a significant increase in the prasinophyte-like population when Roundup concentration was increased to 10 microg L(-1). This study demonstrates that a disturbance was caused to the marine microbial community exposed to 1 microg L(-1) Roundup concentration, a value typical of those reported in coastal waters during a run-off event.

  10. Biosorbent, a promising material for remediation of eutrophic environments: studies in microcosm.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Glaucia; Ferreira, Josilei S; Aquino, Francisco W B; Pereira-Filho, Edenir R; Mozeto, Antonio A; Fadini, Pedro S

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication is considered a global environmental problem that causes economic and biodiversity loss. Together with excess phosphorus in some aquatic environments, there is the depletion of phosphate rock deposits, which can directly affect fertilizer production and therefore global food security. Thus, the present work aimed to study a new remediation technique for eutrophic environments that enables the recovery of these environments through phosphorus adsorption in sawdust, creating the possibility to apply the phosphorus-enriched material as an agricultural fertilizer. The study was conducted in 36 microcosm flasks with water and sediment samples from a eutrophic reservoir in Ibirité/MG. The experiment was carried out using 18 control flasks and 18 others as treatment, consisting of water and eutrophic environment sediment and, additionally, two bags, containing 10 g of sawdust in each bag. The phosphorus adsorption on sawdust was more intense after 49 days of immersion in the microcosm, and reductions of 90% in the concentration of reactive soluble phosphorus were observed in the water column of the microcosm treatment at 159 days of the experiment. Based on the results, it can be concluded that, although the phosphorus concentration adsorbed on sawdust (16.2 μg g(-1)) is considered low, the use of the biosorbent is a particularly promising technique for remediation of eutrophic environments, as well as the possible reuse of the adsorbed phosphorus as a fertilizer in agriculture.

  11. Microbial characterization of biofilms in domestic drains and the establishment of stable biofilm microcosms.

    PubMed

    McBain, Andrew J; Bartolo, Robert G; Catrenich, Carl E; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G; Rickard, Alexander H; Symmons, Sharon A; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We have used heterotrophic plate counts, together with live-dead direct staining and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), to characterize the eubacterial communities that had formed as biofilms within domestic sink drain outlets. Laboratory microcosms of these environments were established using excised biofilms from two separate drain biofilm samples to inoculate constant-depth film fermentors (CDFFs). Drain biofilms harbored 9.8 to 11.3 log(10) cells of viable enteric species and pseudomonads/g, while CDFF-grown biofilms harbored 10.6 to 11.4 log(10) cells/g. Since live-dead direct staining revealed various efficiencies of recovery by culture, samples were analyzed by DGGE, utilizing primers specific for the V2-V3 region of eubacterial 16S rDNA. These analyses showed that the major PCR amplicons from in situ material were represented in the microcosms and maintained there over extended periods. Sequencing of amplicons resolved by DGGE revealed that the biofilms were dominated by a small number of genera, which were also isolated by culture. One drain sample harbored the protozoan Colpoda maupasi, together with rhabtidid nematodes and bdelloid rotifers. The microcosm enables the maintenance of stable drain-type bacterial communities and represents a useful tool for the modeling of this ecosystem.

  12. Assessment of contaminated sediments with an indoor freshwater/sediment microcosm assay.

    PubMed

    Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle; Clément, Bernard; Blake, Gérard

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using a 2-L, indoor microcosm assay to evaluate five contaminated sediments (A, B, C, D, and E). Toxic potential was deduced in the light of general contamination of sediments, pollutant partitioning in microcosms, and biological responses of species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Lemna minor, Daphnia magna, Hyalella azteca, Chironomus riparius): E > A > B > C > D. Sediments mainly were contaminated by metals (lead and zinc). Organic pollutant contents varied among the sediments. The major polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were pyrene, fluoranthene, and phenanthrene. Sediments A, B, and C highly stimulated duckweed growth (> 700%) and impaired daphnid (< 20%) and amphipod survival (< 30%). Sediment D had no significant effect on pelagic and benthic organisms. Finally, sediment E, the most toxic, limited duckweed growth (inhibition of 82%) and impaired daphnid survival (0% of survival). Amphipods were impaired dramatically by this sediment (0% of survival), in contrast with chironomids, for which no toxic effect was measured. The 2-L, indoor microcosm assay successfully was applied to the assessment of those five contaminated sediments. Sediments A, B, C, and E should not be deposited in gravel quarries, and new, more sensitive endpoint measurements should be developed.

  13. Inhibition of Biodegradation of Hydraulic Fracturing Compounds by Glutaraldehyde: Groundwater Column and Microcosm Experiments.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jessica D; Ferrer, Imma; Tummings, Shantal S; Bielefeldt, Angela R; Ryan, Joseph N

    2017-09-05

    The rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas development has raised concerns about the potential contamination of aquifers; however, the groundwater fate and transport of hydraulic fracturing fluid compounds and mixtures remains a significant data gap. Degradation kinetics of five hydraulic fracturing compounds (2-propanol, ethylene glycol, propargyl alcohol, 2-butoxyethanol, and 2-ethylhexanol) in the absence and presence of the biocide glutaraldehyde were investigated under a range of redox conditions using sediment-groundwater microcosms and flow-through columns. Microcosms were used to elucidate biodegradation inhibition at varying glutaraldehyde concentrations. In the absence of glutaraldehyde, half-lives ranged from 13 d to >93 d. Accurate mass spectrometry indicated that a trimer was the dominant aqueous-phase glutaraldehyde species. Microbial inhibition was observed at glutaraldehyde trimer concentrations as low as 5 mg L(-1), which demonstrated that the trimer retained some biocidal activity. For most of the compounds, biodegradation rates slowed with increasing glutaraldehyde concentrations. For many of the compounds, degradation was faster in the columns than the microcosms. Four compounds (2-propanol, ethylene glycol, propargyl alcohol, and 2-butoxyethanol) were found to be both mobile and persistent in groundwater under a range of redox conditions. The glutaraldehyde trimer and 2-ethylhexanol were more rapidly degraded, particularly under oxic conditions.

  14. Identification of active oxalotrophic bacteria by Bromodeoxyuridine DNA labeling in a microcosm soil experiments.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Daniel; Martin, Gaëtan; David, Maude M; Cailleau, Guillaume; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway (OCP) leads to a potential carbon sink in terrestrial environments. This process is linked to the activity of oxalotrophic bacteria. Although isolation and molecular characterizations are used to study oxalotrophic bacteria, these approaches do not give information on the active oxalotrophs present in soil undergoing the OCP. The aim of this study was to assess the diversity of active oxalotrophic bacteria in soil microcosms using the Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) DNA labeling technique. Soil was collected near an oxalogenic tree (Milicia excelsa). Different concentrations of calcium oxalate (0.5%, 1%, and 4% w/w) were added to the soil microcosms and compared with an untreated control. After 12 days of incubation, a maximal pH of 7.7 was measured for microcosms with oxalate (initial pH 6.4). At this time point, a DGGE profile of the frc gene was performed from BrdU-labeled soil DNA and unlabeled soil DNA. Actinobacteria (Streptomyces- and Kribbella-like sequences), Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were found as the main active oxalotrophic bacterial groups. This study highlights the relevance of Actinobacteria as members of the active bacterial community and the identification of novel uncultured oxalotrophic groups (i.e. Kribbella) active in soils.

  15. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  16. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  17. Drilling to gabbro in intact ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas S; Teagle, Damon A H; Alt, Jeffrey C; Banerjee, Neil R; Umino, Susumu; Miyashita, Sumio; Acton, Gary D; Anma, Ryo; Barr, Samantha R; Belghoul, Akram; Carlut, Julie; Christie, David M; Coggon, Rosalind M; Cooper, Kari M; Cordier, Carole; Crispini, Laura; Durand, Sedelia Rodriguez; Einaudi, Florence; Galli, Laura; Gao, Yongjun; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gilbert, Lisa A; Hayman, Nicholas W; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Hirano, Nobuo; Holter, Sara; Ingle, Stephanie; Jiang, Shijun; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Kerneklian, Marcie; Koepke, Jürgen; Laverne, Christine; Vasquez, Haroldo L Lledo; Maclennan, John; Morgan, Sally; Neo, Natsuki; Nichols, Holly J; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reichow, Marc K; Sakuyama, Tetsuya; Sano, Takashi; Sandwell, Rachel; Scheibner, Birgit; Smith-Duque, Chris E; Swift, Stephen A; Tartarotti, Paola; Tikku, Anahita A; Tominaga, Masako; Veloso, Eugenio A; Yamasaki, Toru; Yamazaki, Shusaku; Ziegler, Christa

    2006-05-19

    Sampling an intact sequence of oceanic crust through lavas, dikes, and gabbros is necessary to advance the understanding of the formation and evolution of crust formed at mid-ocean ridges, but it has been an elusive goal of scientific ocean drilling for decades. Recent drilling in the eastern Pacific Ocean in Hole 1256D reached gabbro within seismic layer 2, 1157 meters into crust formed at a superfast spreading rate. The gabbros are the crystallized melt lenses that formed beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The depth at which gabbro was reached confirms predictions extrapolated from seismic experiments at modern mid-ocean ridges: Melt lenses occur at shallower depths at faster spreading rates. The gabbros intrude metamorphosed sheeted dikes and have compositions similar to the overlying lavas, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D.

  18. Population dynamics of transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 in freshwater and saline lake water microcosms with differing microbial community structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popova, L. Yu; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    Populations of Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7, a transgenic microorganism, were heterogenic in the expression of plasmid genes when adapting to the conditions of water microcosms of various mineralization levels and structure of microbial community. This TM has formed two subpopulations (ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-sensitive) in every microcosm. Irrespective of mineralization level of a microcosm, when E. coli Z905/pPHL7 alone was introduced, the ampicillin-resistant subpopulation prevailed, while introduction of the TM together with indigenous bacteria led to the dominance of the ampicillin-sensitive subpopulation. A high level of lux gene expression maintained longer in the freshwater microcosms than in sterile saline lake water microcosms. A horizontal gene transfer has been revealed between the jointly introduced TM and Micrococcus sp. 9/pSH1 in microcosms with the Lake Shira sterile water. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Population dynamics of transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 in freshwater and saline lake water microcosms with differing microbial community structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, L. Yu.; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Populations of Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7, a transgenic microorganism, were heterogenic in the expression of plasmid genes when adapting to the conditions of water microcosms of various mineralization levels and structure of microbial community. This TM has formed two subpopulations (ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-sensitive) in every microcosm. Irrespective of mineralization level of a microcosm, when E. coli Z905/pPHL7 alone was introduced, the ampicillin-resistant subpopulation prevailed, while introduction of the TM together with indigenous bacteria led to the dominance of the ampicillin-sensitive subpopulation. A high level of lux gene expression maintained longer in the freshwater microcosms than in sterile saline lake water microcosms. A horizontal gene transfer has been revealed between the jointly introduced TM and Micrococcus sp. 9/pSH1 in microcosms with the Lake Shira sterile water.

  20. Biodegradation of ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane [EDB]) in microcosms simulating in situ and biostimulated conditions.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Robert; Sheppard, Diane; Nüsslein, Klaus; Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Rieber, Khalil; Ergas, Sarina J; Forbes, Rose; Hilyard, Mark; Park, Chul

    2012-03-30

    Although 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) is a common groundwater contaminant, there is the lack of knowledge surrounding EDB biodegradation, especially under aerobic conditions. We have performed an extensive microcosm study to investigate the biodegradation of EDB under simulated in situ and biostimulated conditions. The materials for soil microcosms were collected from an EDB-contaminated aquifer at the Massachusetts Military Reservation in Cape Cod, MA. This EDB plume has persisted for nearly 40 years in both aerobic and anaerobic EDB zones of the aquifer. Microcosms were constructed under environmentally relevant conditions (field EDB and DO concentrations; incubated at 12°C). The results showed that natural attenuation occurred under anaerobic conditions but not under aerobic conditions, explaining why aerobic EDB contamination is so persistent. EDB degradation rates were greater under biostimulated conditions for both the aerobic and anaerobic microcosms. Particularly for aerobic biostimulation, methane-amended microcosms degraded EDB, on average, at a first order rate eight times faster than unamended microcosms. The best performing replicate achieved an EDB degradation rate of 7.0 yr(-1) (half-life (t(1/2))=0.10 yr). Residual methane concentrations and the emergence of methanotrophic bacteria, measured by culture independent bacterial analysis, provided strong indications that EDB degradation in aerobic methane-amended microcosms occurred via cometabolic degradation. These results indicate the potential for enhanced natural attenuation of EDB and that methane could be considered co-substrate for EDB bioremediation for the EDB-contaminated groundwater in aerobic zone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of sediment on the fate and toxicity of a polyethoxylated tallowamine surfactant system (MON 0818) in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Besser, John M; Buckler, Denny R; Honegger, Joy L; Ingersoll, Chris G; Johnson, B T; Kurtzweil, Mitchell L; Macgregor, Jon; McKee, Michael J

    2005-04-01

    The fate and toxicity of a polyethoxylated tallowamine (POEA) surfactant system, MON 0818, was evaluated in water-sediment microcosms during a 4-d laboratory study. A surfactant solution of 8 mg l(-1) nominal concentration was added to each of nine 72-l aquaria with or without a 3-cm layer of one of two natural sediments (total organic carbon (TOC) 1.5% or 3.0%). Control well water was added to each of nine additional 72-l aquaria with or without sediment. Water samples were collected from the microcosms after 2, 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of aging to conduct 48-h toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and to determine surfactant concentrations. Elevated mortality of D. magna (43-83%) was observed in overlying water sampled from water-only microcosms throughout the 96-h aging period, whereas elevated mortality (23-97%) was only observed in overlying water sampled from water-sediment microcosms during the first 24h of aging. Measured concentrations of MON 0818 in water-only microcosms remained relatively constant (4-6 mg l(-1)) during the 96-h period, whereas the concentrations in overlying water from microcosms containing either of the two types of sediment dissipated rapidly, with half-lives of 13 h in the 3.0% TOC sediment and 18 h in the 1.5% TOC sediment. Both toxicity and the concentration of MON 0818 in overlying water decreased more rapidly in microcosms containing sediment with the higher percent TOC and clay and with a higher microbial biomass. Mortality of D. magna was significantly correlated with surfactant concentrations in the overlying water. These results indicate that the toxicity of the POEA surfactant in water rapidly declines in the presence of sediment due to a reduction in the surfactant concentration in the overlying water above the sediment.

  2. Biomineralization of 1,4-dioxane in Pure Culture, Microcosm, and Column Studies Using 13C Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, H. M.; Azizian, M.; Hyman, M. R.; Semprini, L.

    2016-12-01

    1,4-dioxane (1,4-D), a probable human carcinogen at low (< 1ppb) concentrations, is a widely occurring groundwater contaminant due to its use as a stabilizer for chlorinated solvents. Aerobic cometabolism, the use of a primary substrate to induce the production of microbial enzymes capable of transforming contaminants into innocuous products, is a promising in-situ treatment strategy for 1,4-D because it has the potential to mineralize trace 1,4-D concentrations to carbon dioxide (CO2). Previous work has confirmed the bacterium Rhodococcus rhodochrous (strain ATCC 21198) will transform 1,4-D when grown on isobutane. In this study, 13C uniformly labeled 1,4-D was used to determine the extent to which strain ATCC 21198 biomineralizes 1,4-D to CO2. Batch experiments have been conducted with pure culture 21198 and in microcosms constructed with aquifer sediments. The rate of resting cell transformation of 1,4-D by ATCC 21198 was over 100 times faster than the rate of CO2 accumulation, indicating the presence of intermediates that were slowly mineralized to CO2 . In microcosms, the use of isobutane as a primary substrate effectively stimulated the native microbial community to transform 1,4-D. Microcosms were also bioaugmented with ATCC 21198. After an initial lag and subsequent additions of isobutane, transformation rates in the native microcosms approached those of the bioaugmented microcosms. Cometabolically active microbes survived several periods of starvation in all microcosms, and nutrient amendment allowed for sustained transformation rates. 13C labeled 1,4-D is currently being used to determine the rates and extents of biomineralization in the microcosms. Column studies are also being conducted to evaluate cometabolism and biominerazation potential of isobutane as a biostimulant and 21198 for bioaugmentation under geochemical and flow conditions more representative of in-situ bioremediation.

  3. Influence of sediment on the fate and toxicity of a polyethoxylated tallowamine surfactant system (MON 0818) in aquatic microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Besser, J.M.; Buckler, D.R.; Honegger, J.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Johnson, B. Thomas; Kurtzweil, M.L.; MacGregor, J.; McKee, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fate and toxicity of a polyethoxylated tallowamine (POEA) surfactant system, MON 0818, was evaluated in water–sediment microcosms during a 4-d laboratory study. A surfactant solution of 8 mg l−1 nominal concentration was added to each of nine 72-l aquaria with or without a 3-cm layer of one of two natural sediments (total organic carbon (TOC) 1.5% or 3.0%). Control well water was added to each of nine additional 72-l aquaria with or without sediment. Water samples were collected from the microcosms after 2, 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of aging to conduct 48-h toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and to determine surfactant concentrations. Elevated mortality of D. magna (43–83%) was observed in overlying water sampled from water-only microcosms throughout the 96-h aging period, whereas elevated mortality (23–97%) was only observed in overlying water sampled from water–sediment microcosms during the first 24 h of aging. Measured concentrations of MON 0818 in water-only microcosms remained relatively constant (4–6 mg l−1) during the 96-h period, whereas the concentrations in overlying water from microcosms containing either of the two types of sediment dissipated rapidly, with half-lives of 13 h in the 3.0% TOC sediment and 18 h in the 1.5% TOC sediment. Both toxicity and the concentration of MON 0818 in overlying water decreased more rapidly in microcosms containing sediment with the higher percent TOC and clay and with a higher microbial biomass. Mortality of D. magna was significantly correlated with surfactant concentrations in the overlying water. These results indicate that the toxicity of the POEA surfactant in water rapidly declines in the presence of sediment due to a reduction in the surfactant concentration in the overlying water above the sediment.

  4. NASA Hubble Sees Comet ISON Intact

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-09

    This image from NASA Hubble Space Telescope of the sunward plunging comet ISON suggests that the comet is intact despite some predictions that the fragile icy nucleus might disintegrate as the sun warms it. In this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image taken on October 9, 2013 the comet's solid nucleus is unresolved because it is so small. If the nucleus broke apart then Hubble would have likely seen evidence for multiple fragments. Moreover, the coma or head surrounding the comet's nucleus is symmetric and smooth. This would probably not be the case if clusters of smaller fragments were flying along. What's more, a polar jet of dust first seen in Hubble images taken in April is no longer visible and may have turned off. This color composite image was assembled using two filters. The comet's coma appears cyan, a greenish-blue color due to gas, while the tail is reddish due to dust streaming off the nucleus. The tail forms as dust particles are pushed away from the nucleus by the pressure of sunlight. The comet was inside Mars' orbit and 177 million miles from Earth when photographed. Comet ISON is predicted to make its closest approach to Earth on 26 December, at a distance of 39.9 million miles. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18153

  5. Ureide degradation pathways in intact soybean leaves.

    PubMed

    Vadez, V; Sinclair, T R

    2000-08-01

    Ureides dramatically accumulate in shoots of N(2)-fixing soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) under water deficit and this accumulation is higher in cultivars that have N(2) fixation that is sensitive to water deficit. One possible explanation is that ureide accumulation is associated with a feedback inhibition of nitrogenase activity. A critical factor involved in ureide accumulation is likely to be the rate of ureide degradation in the leaves. There exists, however, a controversy concerning the pathway of allantoic acid degradation in soybean. Allantoate amidinohydrolase was reported to be the pathway of degradation in studies using the cultivar Maple Arrow and allantoate amidohydrolase was the pathway that existed in the cultivar Williams. This investigation was undertaken to resolve the existence of these two pathways. An in situ technique was developed to examine the response of ureide degradation in leaf tissue to various treatments. In addition, the response of ureide accumulation and N(2) fixation activity was measured for intact plants in response to treatments that differentially influenced the two degradation pathways. The results from these studies confirmed that Maple Arrow and Williams degraded allantoic acid by different pathways as originally reported. The existence of two degradation pathways within the soybean germplasm opens the possibility of modifying ureide degradation to minimize the influence of soil water deficits on N(2) fixation activity.

  6. [Pulmonary atresia with an intact interventricular septum].

    PubMed

    Godart, F; Fall, A L; Francart, C; Brevière, G M; Cajot, M A; Rey, C

    2005-05-01

    We report this centre's experience of the treatment and follow up of pulmonary atresia with an intact septum. 35 infants were seen during the neonatal period. Opening via catheterisation was attempted in 21 patients with initial success in 10, and 11 failures leading to urgent surgery (surgical opening, n=9) and isolated Blalock-Taussig anastomosis (n=2). Fourteen other patients underwent immediate surgery: surgical opening, n=3, and Blalock alone, n=11. Four patients died in the neonatal period: 1 after successful opening via catheterisation, 3 others after Blalock anastomosis. Five others with a Blalock anastomosis died suddenly later. By the end of follow up, 16 patients had undergone biventricular type repair, of which 7 required additional procedures. 10 others had undergone cavo-pulmonary type repair, including 4 infants in whom the initial strategy of biventricular repair had failed. The only predictive factors at birth for subsequent progression to biventricular type repair were: larger tricuspid diameter at echography (10.9 +/- 2.25 mm versus 6.34 +/- 1.74 mm, p = 0.0007) or at angiography (10.07 +/- 2.09 mm versus 8.04 +/- 2.42 mm, p = 0.039), and the right ventricular morphology (p = 0.0011) with more tripartite ventricles, and less bipartite or even unipartite ones in the biventricular group.

  7. Uranium migration through intact sandstone cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D.; Lawless, T. A.; Sims, R. J.; Butter, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    Uranium is often considered to be a mobile radioelement in the natural environment owing to its tendency to form stable complexes with a number of aqueous anions, particularly in oxidising milieu. A series of infiltration experiments were devised to investigate this migration behaviour under rigidly controlled laboratory conditions. Intact cores of Permo-Triassic Clashach Sandstone were pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater solutions and continuous flow-through of uranium monitored together with pH and concentrations of other ions. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. These calculations together with electron microscopy indicated the potential role played by iron oxyhydroxide grain coatings in retarding the uranium plume. Thus, a second series of experiments was initiated on pre-acidified cores from which all surface exposed iron had been removed, allowing an assessment of the retention capacity of non-ferric components. Taken together, the data clearly illustrate the strong affinity of aqueous uranium species for natural surfaces even under strongly oxidising conditions. The success of the model in predicting a priori the dominant trends in uranium migration behaviour is encouraging and may aid in prioritising analytical requirements for investigations in more complex geochemical situations than those studied here.

  8. Assessing microbial responses to iron enrichment in the Subarctic Northeast Pacific: Do microcosms reproduce the in situ condition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarratt, M. G.; Marchetti, A.; Hale, M. S.; Rivkin, R. B.; Michaud, S.; Matthews, P.; Levasseur, M.; Sherry, N.; Merzouk, A.; Li, W. K. W.; Kiyosawa, H.

    2006-10-01

    A microcosm experiment was conducted in the NE Pacific in July 2002 to compare the microbial response between microcosms and the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron-Enrichment Study (SERIES) in situ iron-enrichment experiment. Seawater microcosms (20 L) were incubated aboard ship under natural light using three treatments: (1) low-iron seawater amended with 4 nmol l -1 FeSO 4 (+Fe); (2) low-iron seawater amended with 4 nmol l -1 FeSO 4 and 86 nmol l -1 GeO 2 (+Fe+Ge); (3) seawater collected from the in situ Fe-enriched patch (PW). The +Fe+Ge treatment used germanium to control diatom growth to assess the role of diatoms in dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) production. The following variables were measured in the microcosms and in situ: chlorophyll a (chl a), nitrate ( NO3-), silicic acid (Si(OH) 4), phytoplankton abundance and species identification, bacterial abundance (including estimates of low- and high-DNA bacteria), bacterial production, bacterial specific growth rate, particulate and dissolved DMSP and dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations. There was little or no significant difference (ANCOVA) in the response of most variables between the +Fe and PW microcosms, but large differences were observed between both these treatments and the in situ data from the enriched patch. Chl a in all microcosms increased from ambient levels (approx. 0.5-1 μg l -1) to approx. 4.5-6.2 μg l -1 after 11 d incubation, when NO3- was fully depleted from all microcosms. During this same period, in situ chl a increased more slowly to a maximum of 2.9 μg l -1 on day 11. Nanophytoplankton and picophytoplankton were more abundant in the microcosms relative to the in situ community, which became dominated by large diatoms. Bacterial abundance was similar in the microcosms and in situ, but bacterial production was significantly higher in the microcosms. While neither DMSP d nor DMS accumulation showed significant differences between the microcosms and in situ , particulate DMSP

  9. Positive Youth Development, Life Satisfaction, and Problem Behaviors of Adolescents in Intact and Non-Intact Families in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Leung, Hildie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether Chinese adolescents living in intact and non-intact families differed in their positive development, life satisfaction, and risk behavior. A total of 3,328 Secondary 1 students responded to measures of positive youth development (such as resilience and psychosocial competencies), life satisfaction, and risk behavior (substance abuse, delinquency, Internet addiction, consumption of pornographic materials, self-harm, and behavioral intention to engage in problem behavior). Findings revealed that adolescents growing up in intact families reported higher levels of positive developmental outcomes and life satisfaction as compared with adolescents from non-intact families. Adolescents in non-intact families also reported higher levels of risk behaviors than those growing up in intact families. PMID:24400264

  10. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  11. Transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 survival in aquatic microcosms with different salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, L. Y.; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    The population dynamics and expression variability of transgenic microorganism (TM) Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 (AprLux+) bioluminescence genes cloned in recombinant plasmid have been studied in the artificial aquatic ecosystems with different salinity and bacterial species composition. It was shown that in competition with indigenous microflora the TM population was 2-4 times lower than in sterile fresh-water and brackish microcosms. Higher salt concentration in the medium led to the differencies in displaying plasmid genes expression as compared to fresh-water microcosms, independent of their complexity. Particularly, in brackish medium the bioluminescence expression reduced to a greater extent and was revealed only at plating into TM accumulative cultures with high content of selective factor (50-200 μ kg/ml ampicillin). TM clones isolated from fresh-water microcosms maintained higher bioluminescence level, at that for sterile microcosms it was higher than for non-sterile. Many clones could be seen during the plating of microcosm water samples on the selective media.

  12. Experimental serpentinization of intact dunite cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Kong, X. Z.; Bagley, B. C.; Schaen, A. T.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Lost City, produces relatively cool and alkaline fluids that support diverse ecosystems. To simulate serpentinization in such systems, we conducted single-pass, flow-through experiments on dunite cores cut out of a sample from Jackson County, North Carolina. Experimental seawater prepared using laboratory-grade reagents and standards was pumped through a core at 150ºC and 150 bar pore-fluid outlet pressure at a flow rate of 0.01 ml/min. An additional experiment will be conducted at 200ºC. At 150ºC, permeability decreased by 2.3 times with reaction progress over the course of the 36 day experiment. Fluid-rock reaction generally produced CO2, H2, CH4, and CO concentrations of 100 μmol/kg, up to 40 μmol/kg, 2 μmol/kg, and less than 1 μmol/kg, respectively. Outlet fluid chemistry was relatively stable, except for initial peaks in Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, and Si. pH of outlet fluids increased with reaction progress, but it was always lower (6.9-7.4) than the initial seawater (7.8). X-ray computed tomography scans were/will be collected for both pre- and post-experimental cores. The combination of flow-through experiments on solid, intact rock cores cut out of natural samples and X-ray tomography permits visualization and quantification of mineralogical changes and flow path evolution during serpentinization. This approach further permits physical and chemical processes to be documented on a fine scale to better understand feedbacks between chemical reactions and flow fields, with implications for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  13. Agar-block microcosms for controlled plant tissue decomposition by aerobic fungi.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jonathan S; Jacobson, K Brook

    2011-02-03

    The two principal methods for studying fungal biodegradation of lignocellulosic plant tissues were developed for wood preservative testing (soil-block; agar-block). It is well-accepted that soil-block microcosms yield higher decay rates, fewer moisture issues, lower variability among studies, and higher thresholds of preservative toxicity. Soil-block testing is thus the more utilized technique and has been standardized by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) (method D 1413-07). The soil-block design has drawbacks, however, using locally-variable soil sources and in limiting the control of nutrients external (exogenous) to the decaying tissues. These drawbacks have emerged as a problem in applying this method to other, increasingly popular research aims. These modern aims include degrading lignocellulosics for bioenergy research, testing bioremediation of co-metabolized toxics, evaluating oxidative mechanisms, and tracking translocated elements along hyphal networks. Soil-blocks do not lend enough control in these applications. A refined agar-block approach is necessary. Here, we use the brown rot wood-degrading fungus Serpula lacrymans to degrade wood in agar-block microcosms, using deep Petri dishes with low-calcium agar. We test the role of exogenous gypsum on decay in a time-series, to demonstrate the utility and expected variability. Blocks from a single board rip (longitudinal cut) are conditioned, weighed, autoclaved, and introduced aseptically atop plastic mesh. Fungal inoculations are at each block face, with exogenous gypsum added at interfaces. Harvests are aseptic until the final destructive harvest. These microcosms are designed to avoid block contact with agar or Petri dish walls. Condensation is minimized during plate pours and during incubation. Finally, inoculum/gypsum/wood spacing is minimized but without allowing contact. These less technical aspects of agar-block design are also the most common causes of failure and the key source of

  14. Utility of Microcosm Studies for Predicting Phylloplane Bacterium Population Sizes in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, L. L.; Wilson, M.; Lindow, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    Population sizes of two ice nucleation-active strains of Pseudomonas syringae were compared on leaves in controlled environments and in the field to determine the ability of microcosm studies to predict plant habitat preferences in the field. The P. syringae strains investigated were the parental strains of recombinant deletion mutant strains deficient in ice nucleation activity that had been field tested for their ability to control plant frost injury. The population size of the P. syringae strains was measured after inoculation at three field locations on up to 40 of the same plant species that were studied in the growth chamber. There was seldom a significant relationship between the mean population size of a given P. syringae strain incubated under either wet or dry conditions in microcosms and the mean population size which could be recovered from the same species when inoculated in the field. Specifically, on some plant species, the population size recovered from leaves in the field was substantially greater than from that species in a controlled environment, while for other plant species field populations were significantly smaller than those observed under controlled conditions. Population sizes of inoculated P. syringae strains, however, were frequently highly positively correlated with the indigenous bacterial population size on the same plant species in the field, suggesting that the ability of a particular plant species to support introduced bacterial strains is correlated with its ability to support large bacterial populations or that indigenous bacteria enhance the survival of introduced strains. Microcosm studies therefore seem most effective at assessing possible differences between parental and recombinant strains under a given environmental regime but are limited in their ability to predict the specific population sizes or plant habitat preferences of bacteria on leaves under field conditions. PMID:16535405

  15. Intertidal mesograzers in field microcosms: linking laboratory feeding rates to community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ruesink

    2000-05-31

    Mesograzers (herbivores <2.5 cm) are both diverse and abundant, but their relative effects on intertidal communities have rarely been quantified. Here I examine the effects of crustacean and polychaete mesograzers on two intertidal resources, the red alga Odonthalia floccosa Esp. (Falkenb.) and the epiphytic diatom Isthmia nervosa Kütz. The mesograzers were hermit crabs (Pagurus hirsutiusculus (Dana) and P. granosimanus (Benedict)), amphipods (Hyale frequens Stout and H. pugettensis (Dana)), isopod (Idotea wosnesenskii (Brandt)), juvenile kelp crab (Pugettia producta (Randall)), and polychaete worm (Platynereis bicanaliculata (Baird)). Feeding rates on Isthmia, measured in the laboratory for different consumer species and size classes, scaled allometrically with body mass. Consumption rates were 2-23% of body mass daily on a fresh weight basis. However, feeding rates on Odonthalia did not scale, suggesting that size will not always indicate per capita effect. Mesograzer densities were measured on Tatoosh Island, Washington, USA. The mesograzer predicted to have the largest total effect (P. hirsutiusculus), based on densityxfeeding rate, was neither the most abundant nor the most voracious. The validity of these sorts of predictions depends on how well feeding rates measured in the laboratory approximate per capita effects under field conditions. Predictions were compared to observed effects in field microcosms. Given known numbers of mesograzers, predictions were made about the amount of Isthmia biomass that should disappear over 2 weeks from microcosms (9x9x12 cm) anchored in tidepools. Average per capita effects in field microcosms were correlated with laboratory feeding rates, but, for three species with significant feeding on Isthmia, effects were lower than feeding rates predicted. Feeding trials may overestimate community impact because they fail to account for alternative food, search times, resource productivity and stimulation of growth, or interference

  16. Plasmid Introduction in Metal-Stressed, Subsurface-Derived Microcosms: Plasmid Fate and Community Response

    PubMed Central

    Smets, Barth F.; Morrow, Jayne B.; Arango Pinedo, Catalina

    2003-01-01

    The nonconjugal IncQ plasmids pMOL187 and pMOL222, which contain the metal resistance-encoding genes czc and ncc, were introduced by using Escherichia coli as a transitory delivery strain into microcosms containing subsurface-derived parent materials. The microcosms were semicontinuously dosed with an artificial groundwater to set a low-carbon flux and a target metal stress (0, 10, 100, and 1,000 μM CdCl2), permitting long-term community monitoring. The broad-host-range IncPα plasmid RP4 was also transitorily introduced into a subset of microcosms. No novel community phenotype was detected after plasmid delivery, due to the high background resistances to Cd and Ni. At fixed Cd doses, however, small but consistent increases in Cdr or Nir density were measured due to the introduction of a single pMOL plasmid, and this effect was enhanced by the joint introduction of RP4; the effects were most significant at the highest Cd doses. The pMOL plasmids introduced could, however, be monitored via czc- and ncc-targeted infinite-dilution PCR (ID-PCR) methods, because these genes were absent from the indigenous community: long-term presence of czc (after 14 or 27 weeks) was contingent on the joint introduction of RP4, although RP4 cointroduction was not yet required to ensure retention of ncc after 8 weeks. Plasmids isolated from Nir transconjugants further confirmed the presence and retention of a pMOL222-sized plasmid. ID-PCR targeting the RP4-specific trafA gene revealed retention of RP4 for at least 8 weeks. Our findings confirm plasmid transfer and long-term retention in low-carbon-flux, metal-stressed subsurface communities but indicate that the subsurface community examined has limited mobilization potential for the IncQ plasmids employed. PMID:12839785

  17. Dissimilatory Iron Reduction and Odor Indicator Abatement by Biofilm Communities in Swine Manure Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Gonzalez, Hugo A.; Bruns, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Animal waste odors arising from products of anaerobic microbial metabolism create community relations problems for livestock producers. We investigated a novel approach to swine waste odor reduction: the addition of FeCl3, a commonly used coagulant in municipal wastewater treatment, to stimulate degradation of odorous compounds by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB). Two hypotheses were tested: (i) FeCl3 is an effective source of redox-active ferric iron (Fe3+) for dissimilatory reduction by bacteria indigenous to swine manure, and (ii) dissimilatory iron reduction results in significant degradation of odorous compounds within 7 days. Our results demonstrated that Fe3+ from FeCl3 was reduced biologically as well as chemically in laboratory microcosms prepared with prefiltered swine manure slurry and limestone gravel, which provided pH buffering and a substrate for microbial biofilm development. Addition of a 1-g liter−1 equivalent concentration of Fe3+ from FeCl3, but not from presynthesized ferrihydrite, caused initial, rapid solids flocculation, chemical Fe3+ reduction, and Eh increase, followed by a 2-day lag period. Between 2 and 6 days of incubation, increases in Fe2+ concentrations were accompanied by significant reductions in concentrations of volatile fatty acids used as odor indicators. Increases in Fe2+ concentrations between 2 and 6 days did not occur in FeCl3-treated microcosms that were sterilized by gamma irradiation or amended with NaN3, a respiratory inhibitor. DNA sequences obtained from rRNA gene amplicons of bacterial communities in FeCl3-treated microcosms were closely related to Desulfitobacterium spp., which are known representatives of DIRB. Use of iron respiration to abate wastewater odors warrants further investigation. PMID:16151075

  18. Plasmid Transfer between Spatially Separated Donor and Recipient Bacteria in Earthworm-Containing Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Daane, L. L.; Molina, J.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Most gene transfer studies have been performed with relatively homogeneous soil systems in the absence of soil macrobiota, including invertebrates. In this study we examined the influence of earthworm activity (burrowing, casting, and feeding) on transfer of plasmid pJP4 between spatially separated donor (Alcaligenes eutrophus) and recipient (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria in nonsterile soil columns. A model system was designed such that the activity of earthworms would act to mediate cell contact and gene transfer. Three different earthworm species (Aporrectodea trapezoides, Lumbricus rubellus, and Lumbricus terrestris), representing each of the major ecological categories (endogeic, epigeic, and anecic), were evaluated. Inoculated soil microcosms, with and without added earthworms, were analyzed for donor, recipient, and transconjugant bacteria at 5-cm-depth intervals by using selective plating techniques. Transconjugants were confirmed by colony hybridization with a mer gene probe. The presence of earthworms significantly increased dispersal of the donor and recipient strains. In situ gene transfer of plasmid pJP4 from A. eutrophus to P. fluorescens was detected only in earthworm-containing microcosms, at a frequency of (symbl)10(sup2) transconjugants per g of soil. The depth of recovery was dependent on the burrowing behavior of each earthworm species; however, there was no significant difference in the total number of transconjugants among the earthworm species. Donor and recipient bacteria were recovered from earthworm feces (casts) of all three earthworm species, with numbers up to 10(sup6) and 10(sup4) bacteria per g of cast, respectively. A. trapezoides egg capsules (cocoons) formed in the inoculated soil microcosms contained up to 10(sup7) donor and 10(sup6) recipient bacteria per g of cocoon. No transconjugant bacteria, however, were recovered from these microhabitats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of gene transfer between physically

  19. Combining rapid bioassessment and field-based microcosms for identifying impacts in an urban river.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Matthew L; Pettigrove, Vincent; Carew, Melissa E; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2010-08-01

    Rapid bioassessment indices based on macroinvertebrates are the most commonly used tools for assessing stream condition. However, once stream degradation has been detected, it is often difficult to identify which environmental stressors are most important because of changes in multiple correlated factors. In this study, we examined eight sites in an urban river watershed using a field-based microcosm experiment and the rapid bioassessment-based biotic index, SIGNAL. The experiment assessed the effects of polluted river sediment by examining the macroinvertebrate taxa that colonized sediments at an unpolluted wetland. Results were compared with an assessment of field-collected macroinvertebrates using SIGNAL, a biotic index that assigns pollution sensitivity scores to macroinvertebrate families, and environmental data, to determine whether sediment pollution or other factors such as habitat deterioration were likely to be influencing riverine macroinvertebrate communities. The microcosm results indicated that common species (Tanytarsus fuscithorax, Procladius paludicola, and Ablabesmyia notabilis) and the overall macroinvertebrate assemblage did not significantly change among sediments from different sites, with the exception of local effects on a few uncommon taxa (Chironomus pseudoppositus, Kiefferulus martini, Cladotanytarsus australomancus, Chaoboridae, Polypedilum "S1," and Tanytarsus belairensis). In contrast, SIGNAL showed a gradual trend of deterioration from upstream to downstream, decreasing from a score of 6.5 in upstream areas (unimpacted) to a score of 4.4 in the downstream sites (moderately impacted). This result combined with a significant correlation of SIGNAL scores to habitat data suggested that habitat deterioration rather than polluted sediment was likely to be responsible for the declining stream condition detected with the rapid bioassessment approach. The addition of the microcosms to other monitoring approaches could be useful for determining

  20. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew S.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Ravel, Bruce; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brandt, Craig C.

    2009-03-16

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  1. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ravel, Bruce; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brandt, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  2. Microcosmic mechanisms for protein incomplete release and stability of various amphiphilic mPEG-PLA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu Xia; Wang, Wei; Ho, Sa V; Qi, Feng; Ma, Guang Hui; Su, Zhi Guo

    2012-10-02

    The microcosmic mechanisms of protein (recombinant human growth hormone, rhGH) incomplete release and stability from amphiphilic poly(monomethoxypolyethylene glycol-co-D,L-lactide) (mPEG-PLA, PELA) microspheres were investigated. PELA with different hydrophilicities (PELA-1, PELA-2, and PELA-3) based on various ratios of mPEG to PLA were employed to prepare microspheres exhibiting a narrow size distribution using a combined double emulsion and premix membrane emulsification method. The morphology, rhGH encapsulation efficiency, in vitro release profile, and rhGH stability of PELA microspheres during the release were characterized and compared in detail. It was found that increasing amounts of PLA enhanced the encapsulation efficiency of PELA microspheres but reduced both the release rate of rhGH and its stability. Contact angle, atomic force microscope (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) techniques were first combined to elucidate the microcosmic mechanism of incomplete release by measuring the hydrophilicity of the PELA film and its interaction with rhGH. In addition, the pH change within the microsphere microenvironment was monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) employing a pH-sensitive dye, which clarified the stability of rhGH during the release. These results suggested that PELA hydrophilicity played an important role in rhGH incomplete release and stability. Thus, the selection of suitable hydrophilic polymers with adequate PEG lengths is critical in the preparation of optimum protein drug sustained release systems. This present work is a first report elucidating the microcosmic mechanisms responsible for rhGH stability and its interaction with the microspheres. Importantly, this research demonstrated the application of promising new experimental methods in investigating the interaction between biomaterials and biomacromolecules, thus opening up a range of exciting potential applications in the biomedical field

  3. Zostera marina seed burial can be enhanced by Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum: A microcosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jun; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jianying; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhang, Peidong

    2017-06-01

    Seagrass seed bank plays a key role in the regeneration of new vegetation when seagrasses are removed by the natural or man-made disaster. Various factors may affect the development of sediment seed bank. We conducted a microcosm experiment to test the effects of burrowing and feeding activities of Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum on the burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediments. The effects of lasting time (3-hour, 1-day, 3-day, 7-day, 14-day and 28-day), clam density (0, 2, 4 and 8 clams with shell length of 3 cm in each microcosm) and clam size (shell length of 2, 3 and 4 cm at 4-clam density) on seed burial were examined in plastic microcosm cores (30 cm high × 10 in inner diameter) in a 28-day period. Results showed that the seed burial depth significantly increased with time, the density and the size of clams. No seeds were buried in the sediment in the cores without clams during the whole experiment period. For the 3-cm clams, about 91.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment at the end of the experiment in the high-density treatment (8 clams at each core); while in the medium and low-density treatments (4 and 2 clams in each core, respectively), about 76.93% and 60.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment, respectively. For the size treatments, large (4 cm) clams buried 89.56% of the seeds at the end of the experiment, much more than those of medium (3 cm, 76.93%) and small (2 cm, 61.50%) size clams. During the whole experiment period, nearly all of the buried seeds were at a depth of from 0 cm to 5 cm. These results suggested that Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum may play an important positive role in seagrass seed bank dynamics in the field.

  4. Tracking the Response of Burkholderia cepacia G4 5223-PR1 in Aquifer Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Winkler, J; Timmis, K N; Snyder, R A

    1995-02-01

    The introduction of bacteria into the environment for bioremediation purposes (bioaugmentation) requires analysis and monitoring of microbial population dynamics to define persistence and activity from both efficacy and risk assessment perspectives. Burkholderia cepacia G4 5223-PR1 is a Tn5 insertion mutant which constitutively expresses a toluene ortho-monooxygenase that degrades trichloroethylene (TCE). This ability of G4 5223-PR1 to degrade TCE without aromatic induction may be useful for bioremediation of TCE-containing aquifers and groundwater. Thus, a simulated aquifer sediment system and groundwater microcosms were used to monitor the survival of G4 5223-PR1. The fate of G4 5223-PR1 in sediment was monitored by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, a colony blot assay, and growth on selective medium. G4 5223-PR1 was detected immunologically by using a highly specific monoclonal antibody which reacted against the O-specific polysaccharide chain of the lipopolysaccharides of this organism. G4 5223-PR1 survived well in sterilized groundwater, although in nonsterile groundwater microcosms rapid decreases in the G4 5223-PR1 cell population were observed. Ten days after inoculation no G4 5223-PR1 cells could be detected by selective plating or immunofluorescence. G4 5223-PR1 survival was greater in a nonsterile aquifer sediment microcosm, although after 22 days of elution the number of G4 5223-PR1 cells was low. Our results demonstrate the utility of monoclonal antibody tracking methods and the importance of biotic interactions in determining the persistence of introduced microorganisms.

  5. Factors Influencing TCE Anaerobic Dechlorination Investigated via Simulations of Microcosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Harkness, M.; Lee, M. D.; Mack, E. E.; Dworatzek, S.; Acheson, C.; McCarty, P.; Barry, D. A.; Gerhard, J. I.

    2006-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a public-private consortium whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The focus of this 4-year, $5.7 million research project is a field site in the United Kingdom containing a TCE DNAPL source area. In preparation, a microcosm study was performed to determine the optimal combination of factors to support reductive dechlorination of TCE in site soil and groundwater. The study consisted of 168 bottles distributed between four laboratories (Dupont, GE, SiREM, and Terra Systems) and tested the impact of six carbon substrates (lactate, acetate, methanol, SRS (soybean oil), hexanol, butyl acetate), bioaugmentation with KB-1 bacterial culture, three TCE levels (100 mg/L, 400 mg/L, and 800 mg/L) and two sulphate levels (200 mg/L, >500 mg/L) on TCE dechlorination. This research presents a numerical model designed to simulate the main processes occurring in the microcosms, including substrate fermentation, sequential dechlorination, toxic inhibition, and the influence of sulphate concentration. In calibrating the model to over 60 of the microcosm experiments, lumped parameters were employed to quantify the effect of key factors on the conversion rate of each chlorinated ethene in the TCE degradation sequence. Results quantify the benefit (i.e., increased stepwise dechlorination rate) due to both bioaugmentation and the presence of higher sulphate concentrations. Competitive inhibition is found to increase in significance as TCE concentrations increase; however, inclusion of Haldane inhibition is not supported. Over a wide range of experimental conditions and dechlorination steps, SRS appears to induce relatively little hydrogen limitation, thereby facilitating relatively quick conversion of TCE to ethene. In general, hydrogen limitation is found to increase with increasing TCE concentration and with bioaugmentation, and

  6. Microcosm experiments approach to quantify nitrogen leaching from mineral and organic fertilized soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severus Sandor, Mignon; Sandor, Valentina; Mihai Onica, Bogdan; Brad, Traian

    2017-04-01

    The use of nitrogen inputs to improve agricultural soils fertility is a common practice in arable lands. Depending of nitrogen forms only a part of introduced nitrogen will be effectively used by the crops while another part can be leached from soil with negative impact on the environment. In temperate climate these losses are greater during spring time when rains are frequent and crop plants are in the early growth stage. In a microcosm experiments we simulated this kind of conditions in order to assess nitrogen losses from two different soils (Chernozem, Luvisol) fertilized with mineral (ammonium nitrate) and organic (mustard as green manure, slurry manure and cattle manure) fertilizers. From each microcosms we obtained 100 ml of leachate which was filtered and analyzed from N-NO3 and N-NH4. The leachate was obtained by adding distillate water at the microcosm surface two times during the experiment at a ten days interval. Preliminary results showed that only small quantity of ammonium was leached from fertilized soils, mainly after 20 days of incubation. These amounts were higher in Chernozem soil than in Luvisol and registered the highest amount in cattle manure fertilized soils. In general, the nitrate was leached from soils in high quantities. The highest value was measured in Chernozem soil when cattle manure was used as fertilizer (1200 mg/l) and represents a cumulative amount. For most of the treatments the cumulative loss of nitrate nitrogen was double in Chernozem soil than in Luvisol. The highest quantity of leaching nitrate was measured for both soils in manure fertilized soil.

  7. [Detection of the viable but nonculturable Escherichia coli O157:H7 in aquatic microcosm].

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong-Jie; Zhou, Zhuo-Sheng; Hao, Chun-Hui; Guo, Yin-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Yan; Zheng, Hua-Ying; Huang, Zheng

    2012-02-01

    This study is to monitor the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in the aquatic microcosm from Han River and explore the feasibility of fluorescence staining, heterotrophic plate count and ELISA in detection of viable but nonculturable E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 were added into aquatic microcosm from Han River and cultured with low temperature and oligo-nutrition. Then the survival of E. coli O157:H7 were real-time monitored by acridine orange direct count (AODC), direct viable count (DVC)-CTC staining, DVC-nalidixic acid (NA) staining, heterotrophic plate count (HPC) and ELISA. E. coli O157:H7 can be converted to a viable but nonculturable state in the aquatic microcosm from Han River 58 days after cultured at 4°C with oligo-nutrition. The amount of viable E. coli O157:H7 was measured as 1.2 × 10(5) CFU/ml by DVC-CTC and 9.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml by DVC-NA, whereas the amount of culturable bacterial determined by HPC is 0. The amounts of bacteria determined by ELISA are basically stable within 58 days around 10(6) CFU/ml. E. coli O157:H7 can be converted into a viable but nonculturable state in Han River water at 4°C with oligo-nutrition, and ELISA combined with fluorescence staining and heterotrophic plate count can be used in quantitative detection of the viable but nonculturable E. coli O157:H7.

  8. Zostera marina seed burial can be enhanced by Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum: A microcosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jun; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jianying; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhang, Peidong

    2017-03-01

    Seagrass seed bank plays a key role in the regeneration of new vegetation when seagrasses are removed by the natural or man-made disaster. Various factors may affect the development of sediment seed bank. We conducted a microcosm experiment to test the effects of burrowing and feeding activities of Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum on the burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediments. The effects of lasting time (3-hour, 1-day, 3-day, 7-day, 14-day and 28-day), clam density (0, 2, 4 and 8 clams with shell length of 3 cm in each microcosm) and clam size (shell length of 2, 3 and 4 cm at 4-clam density) on seed burial were examined in plastic microcosm cores (30 cm high × 10 in inner diameter) in a 28-day period. Results showed that the seed burial depth significantly increased with time, the density and the size of clams. No seeds were buried in the sediment in the cores without clams during the whole experiment period. For the 3-cm clams, about 91.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment at the end of the experiment in the high-density treatment (8 clams at each core); while in the medium and low-density treatments (4 and 2 clams in each core, respectively), about 76.93% and 60.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment, respectively. For the size treatments, large (4 cm) clams buried 89.56% of the seeds at the end of the experiment, much more than those of medium (3 cm, 76.93%) and small (2 cm, 61.50%) size clams. During the whole experiment period, nearly all of the buried seeds were at a depth of from 0 cm to 5 cm. These results suggested that Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum may play an important positive role in seagrass seed bank dynamics in the field.

  9. Donor-dependent extent of uranium reduction for bioremediation of contaminated sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Palumbo, Anthony V; Ravel, Bruce; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Phelps, Tommy J; Schadt, Christopher W; Brandt, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 micromol L(-1) d(-1)). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  10. Monitoring of soil bacterial community and some inoculated bacteria after prescribed fire in microcosm.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Yoo, Jae-Jun; Jeon, Sun-Ok; Hong, Sun-Hee; Lee, Dong-Hun; Ahn, Tae-Seok

    2004-12-01

    The soil bacterial community and some inoculated bacteria were monitored to assess the microbial responses to prescribed fire in their microcosm. An acridine orange direct count of the bacteria in the unburned control soil were maintained at a relatively stable level (2.0 approximately 2.7 x 10(9) cells/g(-1).soil) during the 180 day study period. The number of bacteria in the surface soil was decreased by fire, but was restored after 3 months. Inoculation of some bacteria increased the number of inoculated bacteria several times and these elevated levels lasted several months. The ratios of eubacteria detected by a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method to direct bacterial count were in the range of 60 approximately 80% during the study period, with the exception of some lower values at the beginning, but there were no definite differences between the burned and unburned soils or the inoculated and uninoculated soils. In the unburned control soil, the ratios of alpha-, beta- and gamma-subgroups of the proteobacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacterium and other eubacteria groups to that of the entire eubacteria were 13.7, 31.7, 17.1, 16.8 and 20.8%, respectively, at time 0. The overall change on the patterns of the ratios of the 5 subgroups of eubacteria in the uninoculated burned and inoculated soils were similar to those of the unburned control soil, with the exception of some minor variations during the initial period. The proportions of each group of eubacteria became similar in the different microcosms after 6 months, which may indicate the recovery of the original soil microbial community structure after fire or the inoculation of some bacteria. The populations of Azotobacter vinelandii, Bacillus megaterium and Pseudomonas fluorescens, which had been inoculated to enhance the microbial activities, and monitored by FISH method, showed similar changes in the microcosms, and maintained high levels for several months.

  11. Distribution and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons within experimental microcosms treated with liquid creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Bestari, K.T.J.; Solomon, K.R.; Steele, T.S.; Sibley, P.K.; Robinson, R.D.; Day, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    Temporal changes in the distribution and relative composition of 15 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water, sediment, and absorbed to polyvinylchloride (PVC) strips were assessed following direct application of liquid creosote to aquatic microcosms. Fourteen microcosms were treated with nominal creosote concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 109 mg/L and two microcosms served as controls. Quantitative analysis of PAHs was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with a fluorescence detector. Post-treatment concentration of PAHs in water decreased exponentially with time. At 2 d posttreatment, total PAHs ({Sigma} PAH) ranged from 7.3 {micro}g/L to 5,803.2 {micro}g/L; by 84 d, {Sigma} PAH in the same microcosms was reduced to between 0.8 {micro}g/L and 13.9 {micro}g/L, respectively. The relative composition of PAHs in the water also changed with time; at 2 d posttreatment, {Sigma} PAH in the lowest treatment reflected contribution from nine PAHs, whereas only two PAHs contributed to this concentration at 84 d. Low and high molecular weight PAHs were lost first from the water column, followed by PAHs of intermediate mol wt. In sediments, a dose-dependent increase in {Sigma} PAH was observed above 0.59 mg/L creosote up to 28 d, followed by a decline thereafter in all but the highest treatment. Total PAHs in sediment ranged from 0.91 {micro}g/g to 63.9 {micro}g/g at 28 d. A dose-dependent relationship was also observed in PVC strips, with {Sigma}PAH on PVC ranging from 0.05 to 88 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} at 31 d and 0.04 to 18.4 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} at 58 d posttreatment. A mass balance evaluation showed that 88.3% of PAHs was lost from the system after 1 month, indicating that liquid creosote is attenuated relatively quickly in aquatic environments.

  12. Microcosm experiments to study the interaction of solid and solute phases during initial soil development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, C.; Chabbi, S.; Schaaf, W.

    2009-04-01

    During the initial phase of soil formation mineral weathering, interactions between the solid and liquid phases as well as accumulation of organic matter play an important role for the development of soil properties and for the establishment of vegetation and the colonization of soil biota. Our study is part of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR 38) ‘Patterns and processes of initial ecosystem development in an artificial catchment' funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). The catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ close to Cottbus (Germany) has a size of 6 ha and is composed of a 3-4 m layer of Quaternary loamy to sandy sediments overlying a 1-2 m clay layer. To connect interactions between the soil solid phase and soil solution at the micro-scale with observed processes at the catchment scale we perform microcosm experiments with soil samples from the catchment under controlled laboratory conditions. The microcosm experiments are carried out in a climate chamber at constant 10 °C corresponding to the mean annual temperature of the region. In total 48 soil columns with a diameter of 14.4 cm and height of 30 cm were filled with substrates of two textural compositions reflecting the gradients observed at the catchment and a bulk density of 1.4-1.5 g*cm3. Within the microcosms it is possible to control the gaseous phase and the water fluxes by artificial irrigation. The irrigation runs automated and quasi-continuously four times a day with 6.6 ml each (in total 600 mm*yr-1). Irrigation amount and chemical composition of the artificial rainwater are based on the annual mean at the field site. Litter of two different plant species occurring at the catchment site (Lotus corniculatus, Calamagrostis epigejos) labelled with stable isotopes (δ13C; δ15N) is used for the experiments. All treatments including a control run with four replicates. The gaseous phase in the headspace of the microcosms is analysed continuously for CO2 and N2O contents

  13. Marine Microcosm Experiments on Effects of Copper and Tributylin-Based Antifouling Paint Leachates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    feed water to 12 fiberglass microcosm tanks (figure 1). Each tank is 528 L in volume and measures 117 by 117 by 40 cm deep. Detailed descriptions of...open sunlight, but were h-haded with a layer of fiberglass window screen to reduce light levels in the tanks by 36 percent and to contain active...obvious shifts in abundance in an apparent response to antifouling leachate treatments. By the 24th day of the treatment phase, algal mats on the walls

  14. Arginine Exposure Decreases Acidogenesis in Long-Term Oral Biofilm Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ledder, Ruth G; Mistry, Hitesh; Sreenivasan, Prem K; Humphreys, Gavin; McBain, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Arginine is an important pH-elevating agent in the oral cavity. It has been incorporated in oral hygiene formulations to mitigate sensitivity and to prevent caries. In this investigation, the effects of sustained arginine dosing of dental plaque microcosms on bacteriological composition and pH were evaluated under controlled conditions. Plaque microcosms were established in constant-depth film fermentors (CDFFs) using salivary inocula and fed continuously with artificial saliva. To simulate resting and cariogenic states, the CDFFs were supplemented with sterile water or 5% sucrose, respectively. Plaques were then dosed twice daily with a dentifrice with 1.5% arginine arginine added (DA) or without arginine (DN). This regimen continued for over 3 weeks, after which fermentors were maintained without dosing. Microcosms were analyzed by differential viable counting, with a pH microelectrode, and by eubacterial DNA profiling. Sucrose dosing was associated with significantly (P < 0.001) decreased pH, significantly (P < 0.05) increased counts of total aerobes, Gram-negative anaerobes, aciduric species, acidogenic species, arginine utilizing species, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli and streptococci, and significant (P < 0.05) changes in DNA profiles. Plaques dosed with DA had a significantly (P < 0.001) higher pH than those dosed with DN, with or without sucrose supplementation. Dosing with DA but not DN significantly (P < 0.05) decreased counts of all functional bacterial groups apart from the total anaerobes in cariogenic plaques, and in resting plaques, dosing with DA significantly (P < 0.05) decreased counts of streptococci, lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and acidogenic bacteria. In summary, sustained exposure of oral microcosms to arginine in formulation significantly increased plaque pH and significantly reduced the viability of cariogenic bacterial species. IMPORTANCE Arginine is used in dental health formulations to help prevent dental cavities. This study assessed

  15. Comparison of the effects of two herbicides and an insecticide on tropical freshwater plankton in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Leboulanger, C; Bouvy, M; Carré, C; Cecchi, P; Amalric, L; Bouchez, A; Pagano, M; Sarazin, G

    2011-11-01

    Natural plankton communities from a tropical freshwater reservoir (Combani Reservoir, Mayotte Island, Mozambique Channel) were exposed, in 20-l nutrient-enriched microcosms, to two nominal concentrations of three pesticides: the herbicides diuron (2.2 and 11 μg/l) and paraquat (10 and 40.5 μg/l) and the insecticide fenitrothion (10 and 100 μg/l), commonly used in the tropics for agriculture and disease vector control. Bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, and zooplankton communities were monitored for 5 days after exposure, and the concentrations of toxicant and major nutrients were measured. Bacterioplankton growth was noticeable in all systems and was slightly affected by pesticide at any concentration. A transitory increase in thymidine-based bacterial production was observed in diuron- and fenitrothion-treated microcosms, followed by a marked decrease in all microcosms after 5 days. The functional diversity of bacterioplankton, evaluated using BIOLOG ECO(®) microplates, was reduced by exposure to the highest pesticide concentrations. Phytoplankton was affected by pesticides in different ways. Chlorophyll biomass and biovolumes were increased by diuron addition and decreased by paraquat, whereas fenitrothion-treated microcosms remained unaffected relative to controls. Phytoplankton taxonomic diversity was decreased by paraquat and high doses of fenitrothion but was unaffected by addition of diuron. The decrease in diversity was due to a reduction in the number of species, whereas the density of small cells increased, especially after addition of paraquat. Heterotrophic flagellates were sensitive to paraquat and to the highest diuron concentration; a reduction in biomass of up to 90% was observed for 40.5 μg/l paraquat. Zooplankton, dominated by Thermocyclops decipiens and Diaphanosoma excisum, was slightly sensitive to diuron, and very sensitive to paraquat. High concentrations of the insecticide fenitrothion were effective only on young stages. The potential

  16. Alkaline phosphatase activity of Escherichia coli starved in sterile lake water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ozkanca, R; Flint, K P

    1996-03-01

    Escherichia coli grown in high or low phosphate medium was inoculated into a lake water starvation medium. The viable count decreased at 37 degrees C but not at the lower temperatures over 70 d. Alkaline phosphatase was monitored using a colorimetric assay with pNPP as the substrate. Derepression of the enzyme occurred in cultures starved for > 30 d in the lake water and within 5 d in lake water microcosms supplemented with carbon and nitrogen sources where there was rarely an increase in viable count. Chloramphenicol prevented the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase suggesting that, even under starvation conditions, de novo synthesis of the enzyme occurs.

  17. Intersubjectivity, social microcosm, and the here-and-now in a support group for nurses.

    PubMed

    Brandman, W

    1996-12-01

    Intersubjectivity, a concept from Watson's nursing model is interwoven with the group dynamics of social microcosm and the here-and-now. Examples from a graduate nursing student's clinical experience illustrate the application of a transpersonal dynamic, formerly associated with dyads, to interactions between a nurse and a support group. A psychiatric consultation liaison nurse specialist student facilitates a support group for registered nurses in a neurological intensive care unit, in response to a group-perceived need to improve communications between nurses, nurses and patients, and nurses and physicians. Discovery and processing of hidden anger and pain activates healing for these nurses.

  18. Biomarker response and biomass change of earthworms exposed to chlorpyrifos in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, S A; Reinecke, A J

    2007-01-01

    Background levels of chlorpyrifos and earthworm abundance were determined in an orchard and adjacent areas on a farm in the Western Cape, South Africa before these areas were again sprayed with this organophosphate. The background concentrations ranged from 0.2 microg/kg dm in the spray drift area adjacent to the orchard to 10.18 microg/kg dm on the slope in the run off area. In the target area the chlorpyrifos concentrations varied from a mean of 15.25 +/- 10.0 microg/kg directly after spraying to a mean of 7.0 +/- 0.9 microg/kg 6 months later and in the nontarget area they varied from a mean of 55.0 +/- 35 microg/kg to 12.0 +/- 5 microg/kg after 6 months. Chlorpyrifos was therefore still present in the field soils, but at lower concentrations, up to 6 months after the last spraying event. Earthworm abundance and population densities were very low. Only Aporrectodea caliginosa was found and the densities were much lower in the orchards (22 per m(2)) than in the nontarget areas (98.3 per m(2)). Microcosm studies were undertaken to relate biomarker responses to chlorpyrifos with biomass changes. Microcosms were filled with soil from the same areas and earthworms of the species A. caliginosa were introduced. The microcosms were treated with a series of concentrations of chlorpyrifos in the laboratory under controlled conditions. These concentrations were chosen to fall within the background ranges found in the soils. The biomass of the worms was determined regularly for a period of 5 weeks and worms in a state of estivation were noted. Earthworms were removed from the microcosms for biomarker tests: for cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition assays every week and for a neutral red retention determination 2 weeks after the exposures started. The most prominent biomass loss was noted in earthworms exposed to the highest pesticide concentration of 8.0 microg/kg. Estivation was higher among earthworms exposed to higher exposure concentrations. Inhibition of ChE increased with

  19. Evaluation of Graphite for Environmental Toxicity Using the Standard Aquatic Microcosm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    suspended as possible. The exposure concentrations were set so that a no effect and an effect level could be expected as estimated by Daphnia magna 48-hr...development. 2 ,3,4,5#6 During the last 3 years, we participated in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) supported round-robin evaluation of the method...F.B., and Read, P.L., Standardized Aauatic Microcosm Protocol, Contract No. 223-80-2352, Vol I1, Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC, 1983. 9

  20. 46 CFR 170.165 - International Code on Intact Stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false International Code on Intact Stability. 170.165 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Intact Stability Criteria § 170.165 International Code on...) through (4) of this section, must comply with the Introduction and Part A of the International Code on...

  1. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  2. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  3. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  4. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  5. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  6. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing golden crab intact. 622.247... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that golden crab on that vessel in...

  7. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing golden crab intact. 622.247... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that golden crab on that vessel in...

  8. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  9. 50 CFR 622.10 - Landing fish intact--general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH... landing fish intact that are broadly applicable to finfish in the Gulf EEZ and Caribbean EEZ, as specified... intact. (a) Finfish in or from the Gulf EEZ or Caribbean EEZ, except as specified in paragraphs (b)...

  10. 46 CFR 174.045 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact stability requirements. 174.045 Section 174.045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Intact stability requirements. (a) Each unit must be designed so that the wind heeling moments (Hm) and...

  11. 46 CFR 174.045 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact stability requirements. 174.045 Section 174.045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Intact stability requirements. (a) Each unit must be designed so that the wind heeling moments (Hm) and...

  12. 46 CFR 174.045 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability requirements. 174.045 Section 174.045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Intact stability requirements. (a) Each unit must be designed so that the wind heeling moments (Hm) and...

  13. 46 CFR 174.045 - Intact stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability requirements. 174.045 Section 174.045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Intact stability requirements. (a) Each unit must be designed so that the wind heeling moments (Hm) and...

  14. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  15. 50 CFR 622.455 - Landing spiny lobster intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing spiny lobster intact. 622.455... ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.455 Landing spiny lobster intact. (a) A Caribbean spiny lobster in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with head...

  16. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.186 Section 622...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper... specified in paragraph (b) of this section. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but must...

  17. 50 CFR 622.186 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.186 Section 622...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.186 Landing fish intact. (a) South Atlantic snapper... specified in paragraph (b) of this section. Such fish may be eviscerated, gilled, and scaled, but must...

  18. 46 CFR 172.095 - Intact longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact longitudinal stability. 172.095 Section 172.095 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.095 Intact longitudinal stability. Each tank barge must be...

  19. 46 CFR 170.165 - International Code on Intact Stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false International Code on Intact Stability. 170.165 Section 170.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Intact Stability Criteria § 170.165 International Code on...

  20. 46 CFR 174.020 - Alternate intact stability criterion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternate intact stability criterion. 174.020 Section 174.020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY... Alternate intact stability criterion. A barge need not comply with § 174.015 and subparts C and E of part...

  1. 46 CFR 170.165 - International Code on Intact Stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false International Code on Intact Stability. 170.165 Section 170.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Intact Stability Criteria § 170.165 International Code on...

  2. 46 CFR 172.095 - Intact longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact longitudinal stability. 172.095 Section 172.095 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.095 Intact longitudinal stability. Each tank barge must be...

  3. 46 CFR 170.165 - International Code on Intact Stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false International Code on Intact Stability. 170.165 Section 170.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Intact Stability Criteria § 170.165 International Code on...

  4. 46 CFR 172.095 - Intact longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact longitudinal stability. 172.095 Section 172.095 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.095 Intact longitudinal stability. Each tank barge must be...

  5. 46 CFR 172.165 - Intact stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intact stability calculations. 172.165 Section 172.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.165 Intact stability calculations. (a) Design calculations must...

  6. 46 CFR 174.020 - Alternate intact stability criterion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternate intact stability criterion. 174.020 Section 174.020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY... Alternate intact stability criterion. A barge need not comply with § 174.015 and subparts C and E of part...

  7. 46 CFR 172.095 - Intact longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact longitudinal stability. 172.095 Section 172.095 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.095 Intact longitudinal stability. Each tank barge must be...

  8. 46 CFR 172.165 - Intact stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intact stability calculations. 172.165 Section 172.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.165 Intact stability calculations. (a) Design calculations must...

  9. 46 CFR 172.165 - Intact stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intact stability calculations. 172.165 Section 172.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.165 Intact stability calculations. (a) Design calculations must...

  10. 46 CFR 172.165 - Intact stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact stability calculations. 172.165 Section 172.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.165 Intact stability calculations. (a) Design calculations must...

  11. 46 CFR 172.165 - Intact stability calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact stability calculations. 172.165 Section 172.165 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.165 Intact stability calculations. (a) Design calculations must...

  12. 46 CFR 172.095 - Intact longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intact longitudinal stability. 172.095 Section 172.095 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.095 Intact longitudinal stability. Each tank barge must be...

  13. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... maintained with head and fins intact: cobia, king mackerel, and Spanish mackerel in or from the Gulf, Mid-Atlantic, or South Atlantic EEZ, except as specified for king mackerel in paragraph (g) of this section... must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (g) Cut-off (damaged) king or Spanish mackerel...

  14. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and fins intact: cobia, king mackerel, and Spanish mackerel in or from the Gulf, Mid-Atlantic, or South Atlantic EEZ, except as specified for king mackerel in paragraph (g) of this section; dolphin and... shell intact. (g) Cut-off (damaged) king or Spanish mackerel that comply with the minimum size limits...

  15. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... maintained with head and fins intact: cobia, king mackerel, and Spanish mackerel in or from the Gulf, Mid-Atlantic, or South Atlantic EEZ, except as specified for king mackerel in paragraph (g) of this section... must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (g) Cut-off (damaged) king or Spanish mackerel...

  16. Quick stimulation of Alcanivorax sp. by bioemulsificant EPS₂₀₀₃ on microcosm oil spill simulation.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Simone; Genovese, Maria; Denaro, Renata; Santisi, Santina; Volta, Anna; Bonsignore, Martina; Mancini, Giuseppe; Giuliano, Laura; Genovese, Lucrezia; Yakimov, Michail M

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill microcosms experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of bioemulsificant exopolysaccharide (EPS₂₀₀₃) on quick stimulation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Early hours of oil spill, were stimulated using an experimental seawater microcosm, supplemented with crude oil and EPS₂₀₀₃ (SW+OIL+EPS₂₀₀₃); this system was monitored for 2 days and compared to control microcosm (only oil-polluted seawater, SW+OIL). Determination of bacterial abundance, heterotrophic cultivable and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were carried out. Community composition of marine bacterioplankton was determined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Data obtained indicated that bioemulsificant addition stimulated an increase of total bacterial abundance and, in particular, selection of bacteria related to Alcanivorax genus; confirming that EPS₂₀₀₃ could be used for the dispersion of oil slicks and could stimulate the selection of marine hydrocarbon degraders thus increasing bioremediation process.

  17. Development of spatial database on intact forest landscapes of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Reddy, C.; Singh, Jyoti; Jha, C. S.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in identifying the status of biodiversity in different spatial and temporal scales. The objective of the current research is to prepare a consistent spatial database of intact forest landscapes of India. The intact forest landscapes are located in the Himalayas, Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Western Ghats and Sunderbans. At national level 237 forest landscapes and 5.4% of the total natural forest remained as intact in India. Current intact forest landscapes of India consists of blocks larger than 10 km2 covering an area of 34,061 km2. Of the total area under intact forest landscapes, Eastern Himalayas represent 76.7% of the area, followed by Western Himalayas (8.8%), Andaman & Nicobar Islands (6.2%) and Western Ghats (5.7%). The largest intact forest landscape block occupies an area of 3342.9 km2 (9.8%) is found in western Arunachal Pradesh. Temperate forest zone represents the highest intactness (56.6%), followed by subtropical zone (19.2%), tropical zone (18.6%) and alpine zone (5.6%). Himalayan moist temperate forests represent the highest area (39.1%) of intact forest landscapes followed by subtropical broad-leaved hill forests, wet evergreen forests, and montane wet temperate forests. It is estimated that 4.4% of the area of intact forest landscapes fall inside the existing 47 protected areas. The results of the analysis best suited as input for the process of identification of new protected areas. The study recommends fine-scale mapping of biodiversity within the intact forest landscapes and to prepare efficient conservation plans.

  18. Vesta Is Not an Intact Protoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, Guy; Turrini, Diego; Golabeck, Gregor; Jutzi, Martin; Sirono, Sin-iti; Svetsov, Vladimir; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2014-11-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta has been identified as the likely source of howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) basaltic achondrite meteorites, whose parent body differentiated and started solidifying within 3 Ma after the condensation of the Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). The formation of Jupiter and the disk-driven migration of the giant planets also occurred during this period; thus it was expected that Vesta could provide an intact record of large-scale early episodes of planetary migration and bombardment as in the proposed Jovian Early Bombardment and the “Grand Tack” scenarios. However, the results of the Dawn mission detailing Vesta’s mass, volume, density, and surface characteristics provide challenges for modeling the structure and evolution of this asteroid. All proposed models for the generation of the HEDs require the presence of a substantial olivine-rich mantle. But recent work on the depth of excavation of the large basins at the south pole of Vesta suggests that because there is not abundant mantle olivine visible on Vesta or in the Vestoid family asteroids, the crust of Vesta must be at least 80 km thick. Such a thick crust is radically at odds with previous models; should it exist, it ought to manifest itself in other ways such as Vesta’s density structure and bulk chemical composition. However, we find that no Vesta model of iron core, olivine-rich mantle, and HED crust can match the joint constraints of (a) Vesta’s density as derived from the gravity field observed by Dawn; (b) the observed depletion of sodium and potassium and trace element enrichments of the HED meteorites; and (c) the absence of exposed olivine on Vesta’s surface, among Vestoid asteroids, or in our collection of basaltic meteorites. Either Vesta was subjected to a radical change in composition, presumably due to the intense collisional environment where and when it formed, or the asteroid we see today is in fact a reaccretion of material formed elsewhere from now

  19. Comparative effects of a genetically engineered insect virus and a growth-regulating insecticide on microbial communities in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Kreutzweiser, D; England, L; Shepherd, J; Conklin, J; Holmes, S

    2001-01-01

    The effects of a genetically engineered insect baculovirus on indigenous aquatic microbial communities were determined in closed, recirculating aquatic microcosms, and compared with the effects of a natural strain of the virus and of a growth-regulating insecticide, Dimilin. The recombinant virus was a nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana (Cf)) with a lacZ marker gene inserted into the egt region of the CfNPV. The natural virus was Ireland strain CfNPV. Microbial measurement endpoints included decomposition activity (mass loss of organic material), respiration on two different substrates (O2 consumption), heterotrophic bacterial abundance (plate counts), and microbial community metabolic profiles (carbon source utilization patterns in Biolog GN microplates). Viral DNA of both the natural strain and the recombinant viruses, detected by polymerase chain reaction techniques, settled out of the microcosm water and accumulated on bottom substrates within 3 days of the microcosm inoculations. The viral DNA persisted in bottom substrates for the duration of the 21-day experimental period, although there was some evidence that the recombinant virus was less stable than the natural strain in particulate organic matter. No significant changes in microbial decomposition or respiration activity, bacterial abundance, or average metabolic responses were detected by a time trend analysis in microcosms inoculated with either the lacZ recombinant virus or the natural Ireland strain CfNPV. Significant effects on microbial decomposition and respiration activity were detected in microcosms treated with the growth-regulating insecticide at, and above, the expected environmental concentrations. Despite significant effects on microbial community functional attributes in Dimilin-treated microcosms, there were no detectable changes in community structure in terms of metabolic profiles or bacterial abundance.

  20. Thermal characteristics of a marine microcosm designed to simulate the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idso, S. B.; Idso, K. E.

    1982-05-01

    The construction and stocking of a 15 000-liter marine microcosm is described. The microcosm is located outdoors in the arid desert environment of Tempe, Arizona and is an attempt to simulate the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California near Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Temperature modulation is achieved by an appropriate area/volume ratio, partial shading of the water surface, and auxiliary solar panel heating. Long-term measurements demonstrate that the system is capable of accurately duplicating the mean monthly temperatures of Puerto Penasco waters throughout the entire year.

  1. Ammonium removal in constructed wetland microcosms as influenced by season and organic carbon load.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kate A; Stein, Otto R; Hook, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated ammonium nitrogen removal and nitrogen transformations in three-year-old, batch-operated, subsurface wetland microcosms. Treatments included replicates of Typha latifolia, Carex rostrata, and unplanted controls when influent carbon was excluded, and C. rostrata with an influent containing organic carbon. A series of 10-day batch incubations were conducted over a simulated yearlong cycle of seasons. The presence of plants significantly enhanced ammonium removal during both summer (24 degrees C, active plant growth) and winter (4 degrees C, plant dormancy) conditions, but significant differences between plant species were evident only in summer when C. rostrata outperformed T. latifolia. The effect of organic carbon load was distinctly seasonal, enhancing C. rostrata ammonium removal in winter but having an inhibitory effect in summer. Season did not influence ammonium removal in T. latifolia or unplanted columns. Net production of organic carbon was evident year-round in units without an influent organic carbon source, but was enhanced in summer, especially for C. rostrata, which produced significantly more than T. latifolia and unplanted controls. No differences in production were evident between species in winter. COD values for C. rostrata microcosms with and without influent organic carbon converged within 24 hours in winter and 7 days in summer. Gravel sorption, microbial immobilization and sequential nitrification/denitrification appear to be the major nitrogen removal mechanisms. All evidence suggests differences between season and species are due to differences in seasonal variation of root-zone oxidation.

  2. Temporal dynamics of microbial communities in microcosms in response to pollutants.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shuo; Zhang, Zhengqing; Yang, Fan; Lin, Yanbing; Chen, Weimin; Wei, Gehong

    2017-02-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms underlying microbial succession is a major goal of microbial ecology research. Given the increasing human pressure on the environment and natural resources, responses to the repeated introduction of organic and inorganic pollutants are of particular interest. To investigate the temporal dynamics of microbial communities in response to pollutants, we analysed the microbial community structure in batch microcosms that were inoculated with soil bacteria following exposure to individual or combined pollutants (phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane and phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2 ). Subculturing was performed at 10-day intervals, followed by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The dynamics of microbial communities in response to different pollutants alone and in combination displayed similar patterns during enrichment. Specifically, the repression and induction of microbial taxa were dominant, and the fluctuation was not significant. The rate of appearance for new taxa and the temporal turnover within microbial communities were higher than the rates reported in other studies of microbial communities in air, water and soil samples. In addition, conditionally rare taxa that were specific to the treatments exhibited higher betweenness centrality values in the co-occurrence network, indicating a strong influence on other interactions in the community. These results suggest that the repeated introduction of pollutants could accelerate microbial succession in microcosms, resulting in the rapid re-equilibration of microbial communities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Survival behaviour and virulence of the fish pathogen Vibrio ordalii in seawater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pamela; Poblete-Morales, Matías; Irgang, Rute; Toranzo, Alicia E; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-06-15

    Vibrio ordalii, the causative agent of atypical vibriosis, is a Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium that severely affects the salmonid aquaculture industry. V. ordalii has been biochemically, antigenically and genetically characterized. However, studies on the survival behaviour of this bacterium in aquatic environments are scarce, and there is no information regarding its disease transmission and infectious abilities outside of the fish host or regarding water as a possible reservoir. The present study investigated the survival behaviour of V. ordalii Vo-LM-06 and Vo-LM-18 in sterile and non-sterile seawater microcosms. After a year in sterile seawater without nutrients, 1% of both V. ordalii strains survived (~10(3) colony-forming units ml(-1)), and long-term maintenance did not affect bacterial biochemical or genetic properties. Additionally, V. ordalii maintained for 60 d in sterile seawater remained infective in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. However, after 2 d of natural seawater exposure, this bacterium became non-culturable, indicating that autochthonous microbiota may play an important role in survival. Recuperation assays that added fresh medium to non-sterile microcosms did not favour V. ordalii recovery on solid media. Our results contribute towards a better understanding of V. ordalii survival behaviour in seawater ecosystems.

  4. Ammonia manipulates the ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the coastal sediment-water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Sun, Renhua; Wen, Donghui

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia was observed as a potential significant factor to manipulate the abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) in water environments. For the first time, this study confirmed this phenomenon by laboratory cultivation. In a series of estuarine sediment-coastal water microcosms, we investigated the AOM's phylogenetic composition and activity change in response to ammonia concentration. Increase of ammonia concentration promoted bacterial amoA gene abundance in a linear pattern. The ratio of transcribed ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene/ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA gene increased from 0.1 to 43 as NH4 (+)-N increased from less than 0.1 to 12 mg L(-1), and AOA amoA transcription was undetected under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). The incubation of stable isotope probing (SIP) microcosms revealed a faster (13)C-NaHCO3 incorporation rate of AOA amoA gene under 0.1 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1) and a sole (13)C-NaHCO3 utilization of the AOB amoA gene under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). Our results indicate that ammonia concentration manipulates the structure of AOM. AOA prefers to live and perform higher amoA transcription activity than AOB in ammonia-limited water environments, and AOB tends to take the first contributor place in ammonia-rich ones.

  5. Enhanced Horizontal Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Microcosms Induced by an Ionic Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Mao, Daqing; Mu, Quanhua; Luo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The spread and propagation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is a worldwide public health concern. Ionic liquids (ILs), considered as “environmentally friendly” replacements for industrial organic solvents, have been widely applied in modern industry. However, few data have been collected regarding the potential ecological and environmental risks of ILs, which are important for preparing for their potential discharge into the environment. In this paper, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6]) (0.001-5.0 g/L) was tested for its effects on facilitating ARGs horizontal transfer mediated by plasmid RP4 in freshwater microcosms. In the horizontal transfer microcosms, the transfer frequency of plasmid RP4 was significantly enhanced (60-fold higher than untreated groups) by the IL [BMIm][PF6] (1.0 g/L). Meanwhile, two strains of opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. were isolated among the transconjugants, illustrating plasmid RP4 mediated horizontal transfer of ARGs occurred in pathogen. This could increase the risk of ARGs dissemination to human pathogens and pose great threat to public health. The cause that [BMIm[PF6] enhanced the transfer frequency of plasmid RP4 was proposed by suppressed cell membrane barrier and enhanced cell membrane permeability, which was evidenced by flow cytometry (FCM). This is the first report that some ILs facilitate horizontal transfer of plasmid RP4 which is widely distributed in the environment and thus add the adverse effects of the environmental risk of ILs. PMID:25951456

  6. Biotransformation at 10 C of di-n-butyl phthalate in subsurface microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Chauret, C.; Inniss, W.E.; Mayfield, C.I.

    1996-09-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) was found to be transformed by microorganisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at 10 C in microcosms simulating the Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden subsurface environment. Biotransformation of DBP was observed under aerobic, nitrate-reducing, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing conditions. The biotransformation of DBP in the microcosms was significantly decrease3d as the redox potential was lowered, especially under sulfate-reducing conditions. However, other factors such as nutrient depletion and buildup of toxic intermediates could have affected the biotransformation rates. The highest DBP biotransformation rate (0.57 {micro}g DBP{center_dot}g sediment{sup {minus}1}{center_dot}day{sup {minus}1}) was under sulfate-reducing conditions. Biotransformation of DBP at 10 C was significantly enhanced by the addition of 10 mM NaNO{sub 3} suggesting that both the addition of nitrate and high redox conditions favor its biotransformation in subsurface environments.

  7. Depletion of pentachlorophenol in soil microcosms with Byssochlamys nivea and Scopulariopsis brumptii as detoxification agents.

    PubMed

    Hechmi, Nejla; Bosso, Luciano; El-Bassi, Leila; Scelza, Rosalia; Testa, Antonino; Jedidi, Naceur; Rao, Maria A

    2016-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic compound which is widely used as a wood preservative product and general biocide. It is persistent in the environment and has been classified as a persistent organic pollutant to be reclaimed in many countries. Fungal bioremediation is an emerging approach to rehabilitating areas fouled by recalcitrant xenobiotics. In the present study, we isolated two fungal strains from an artificially PCP-contaminated soil during a long-term bioremediation study and evaluated their potential as bioremediation agents in depletion and detoxification of PCP in soil microcosms. The two fungal strains were identified as: Byssochlamys nivea (Westling, 1909) and Scopulariopsis brumptii (Salvanet-Duval, 1935). PCP removal and toxicity were examined during 28 days of incubation. Bioaugmented microcosms revealed a 60% and 62% PCP removal by B. nivea and S. brumptii, respectively. Co-inoculation of B. nivea and S. brumptii showed a synergetic effect on PCP removal resulting in 95% and 80% PCP decrease when initial concentrations were 12.5 and 25 mg kg(-1), respectively. Detoxification in bioaugmented soil and the efficient role of fungi in the rehabilitation of PCP contaminated soil were experimentally proven by toxicity assays. A decrease in inhibition of bioluminescence of Escherichia coli HB101 pUCD607 and an increase of germination index of mustard (Brassica alba) seeds were observed in the decontaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by chromium (VI) in anaerobic soil microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtev, P. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-10-01

    Chromium (VI) is often found as a co-contaminant at sites polluted with organic compounds. We used microcosms amended with glucose or protein, nitrate and increasing concentrations of chromium to study nitrate reduction in Cr(VI) polluted soils. Organic carbon stimulated bacterial activity, but the addition of Cr(VI) caused a lag and then slower rates 5 of CO2 accumulation. Nitrate reduction only occurred after Cr(VI) had been reduced. Bacterial activity was again inhibited when Cr(VI) was added a second time; thus not all Cr-sensitive bacteria were removed in the first phase. Glucose and protein selected for relatively similar bacterial communities, as assayed by PCR-DGGE of the 16S rRNA gene; this selection was modified by the addition of 10 Cr(VI). Cr-resistant bacteria isolated from microcosms were closely related to members of Bacillus, Enterococcus and Propionibacterium sp. Our results indicate that carbon utilization and nitrate reduction in these soils in the presence of Cr(VI) are contingent upon the reduction of the added heavy metal by a limited subset of the bacterial community. The amount of Cr(VI) required to inhibit nitrate reduction was 10-fold less than for aerobic catabolism of the same 15 substrate. We hypothesize that the resistance level of a microbial process is directly related to the diversity of microbes capable of conducting it.

  9. Methods for establishing microcosms of aquatic littoral ecosystems for determining safe levels of toxicant exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.J.; Giddings, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    This protocol describes procedures for establishing freshwater littoral communities in a laboratory, using materials collected from natural ponds. The methods were developed to assess the effects of chemical toxicants on aquatic communities; however, the systems may be adaptable to testing the potential impacts of microbial pesticides on freshwater ecosystems. Littoral ecosystems are established in 72-L glass aquaria using sediments, water, and biota from natural ponds. The microcosms are easily replicated and require little maintenance. These microcosms are static systems (no inflow or outflow) and retain a functional similarity to natural ponds for more than 6 months under artificial lighting. In testing for the effects of toxicants, at least five chemical concentrations, a no-treatment control, and a solvent control (if a carrier solvent is used) are recommended, with replication. Chemical (pH hardness, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen) and biological (e.g., zooplankton and bacterial densities, and chlorophyll concentrations) measurements are made periodically throughout the experimental period. No-observable-effect concentrations (NOEC) are determined using Dunnett's procedure.

  10. Bayesian modelling of daphnid responses to time-varying cadmium exposure in laboratory aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Billoir, Elise; Delhaye, Hélène; Clément, Bernard; Delignette-Muller, Marie Laure; Charles, Sandrine

    2011-05-01

    Experiments were carried out to test the effects of cadmium on five aquatic species in 2-L indoor freshwater/sediment microcosms. Experimental data were collected over 21 days in static conditions, i.e. the microcosms evolved without water renewal. Because of speciation, the total cadmium concentration in water decreased with time. Here we present a focus on Daphnia magna responses. For the three life history traits we considered (survival, growth and reproduction), mathematical effect models were built based on threshold stress functions involving no effect concentrations (NECs). These models took the time-varying conditions of exposure into account through a time-recurrent formalism. Within a Bayesian framework, four kinds of data were fitted simultaneously (exposure, survival, growth and reproduction), using an appropriate error model for each endpoint. Hence, NECs were determined as well as their associated estimation uncertainty. Through this modelling approach, we demonstrate that thresholds for stress functions can be successfully inferred even in experimental setup more complex than standard bioassays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Persistence of naturally occurring and genetically modified Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedroviruses in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Stephen B; Fick, William E; Kreutzweiser, David P; Ebling, Peter M; England, Laura S; Trevors, Jack T

    2008-10-01

    To assess the persistence of genetically modified and naturally occurring baculoviruses in an aquatic environment, replicate (three) outdoor, aquatic microcosms were spiked with spruce budworm viruses [Ireland strain of Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) and the recombinant CfMNPVegt(-)/lacZ(+)] at a rate of 1.86 x 10(10) occlusion bodies (OBs) m(-2) of surface area. The presence of virus in water samples collected at various times after inoculation was determined by PCR amplification of baculoviral DNA extracted from OBs. Although UV radiation rapidly degrades baculoviruses under natural conditions, both viruses persisted above the level of detection (>100 OBs 450 microL(-1) of natural pond water) for at least 1 year post-inoculation, with little difference between the viruses in their patterns of persistence. The present microcosm study suggests that occlusion bodies of baculoviruses can persist in the flocculent layer of natural ponds. On disturbance, OBs could re-enter the main water column and thus be available for transport to new locations. Implications for environmental risk assessment are discussed.

  12. Effects of 4-nonylphenol on phytoplankton and periphyton in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hense, Burkhard A; Jüttner, Ingrid; Welzl, Gerhard; Severin, Gabriele F; Pfister, Gerd; Behechti, Akbar; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2003-11-01

    The effects of nonylphenol (NP) on phytoplankton and periphyton were studied in 230 L outdoor microcosms. Phytoplankton cell density and biomass, phytoplankton and periphyton diversity, and assemblage composition were analyzed during a four-week preapplication period, followed by six weeks of NP treatment via controlled release and a six weeks postapplication period. Changes in species richness and diversity were not correlated with NP concentrations. However, changes in phytoplankton cell densities during the first week of the postapplication period were related to previous exposure. In the controls and the lowest-dosed microcosm. Conjugatophyceae constituted most of the biomass during the dosing and the postapplication period. In contrast, Dinophyceae dominated the biomass during the dosing and the postapplication period at higher NP concentrations. Principal response curves revealed changes in phytoplankton assemblage composition during the dosing and the postapplication period. Dinophyceae and most Cyanophyceae were more abundant at intermediate and higher NP concentrations, whereas Conjugatophyceae were less abundant compared to controls. Assemblages only partly recovered during the postapplication period. Periphyton taxon richness, diversity, and assemblage change was not related to NP concentrations. At the lowest and intermediate concentration, assemblages were significantly different from the controls and the higher concentrations, which were similar during the treatment period.

  13. Environmental Fate of Chiral Herbicide Fenoxaprop-ethyl in Water-Sediment Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Liu, Donghui; Liu, Mingke; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-26

    The environmental fate of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) in water, sediment and water-sediment microcosm was studied and degradation products fenoxaprop (FA), ethyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoate (EHPP), 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (HPPA) and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzoxazol-2-one (CDHB) were monitored. FE, FA, EHPP and HPPA were chiral and the environmental behavior was investigated on an enantiomeric level. In water, sediment and water-sediment microcosms, fenoxaprop-ethyl degraded very fast with half-lives less than 1 day and it was found the herbicidally inactive S-enantiomer degraded faster. Fenoxaprop was the main primary degradation product which was quickly formed and the further degradation was relatively slow with half-lives of 6.4-12.4 days, and the S-enantiomer degraded faster too. EHPP, HPPA and CDHB could be found and S-EHPP and S-HPPA were degraded preferentially. The effects of microorganism and water content were investigated and it was found that the enantioselectivity was attributed to microorganisms. In sediment, the main degradation pathway of fenoxaprop-ethyl was hydrolysis and the degradation rate of fenoxaprop-ethyl increased with water content. The degradation products and enantioselectivity should be considered for the impact of fenoxaprop-ethyl on the aquatic system.

  14. Understanding the controllability of complex networks from the microcosmic to the macrocosmic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng Gang; Ma, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    From a microcosmic perspective, nodes as meta-structures (or ‘smallest units’) for the constitution of a graph are of great importance for understanding complex network-based systems. In this paper, we develop a new framework, which first of all defines the meta-structures of a graph in different levels and tries to depict a graph from a low to a high level of abstraction. Further, based on this framework we study the meta-structure-driven control model and try to understand the controllability of complex networks from a microcosmic to a macrocosmic perspective. Finally, we analyze the impact of the community strength of networks on meta-structure-driven control. The results for artificial networks and real-world networks indicate that for meta-structure-driven control, the number of driver nodes is dependent on the networks’ degree distribution, and the dependence weakens as the level of the meta-structures increases. In addition, the networks are easier to control as the community strength increases, while this monotonicity is not preserved as the level of the meta-structures increases. We also find that it is harder to control sparse and inhomogeneous networks as the level of the meta-structures increases.

  15. Differential Decay of Wastewater Bacteria and Change of Microbial Communities in Beach Sand and Seawater Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; He, Xia; Yan, Tao

    2015-07-21

    Laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to determine the decay kinetics of wastewater bacteria and the change of microbial communities in beach sand and seawater. Cultivation-based methods showed that common fecal indicator bacteria (FIBs; Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens) exhibited biphasic decay patterns in all microcosms. Enterococci and C. perfringens, but not E. coli, showed significantly smaller decay rates in beach sand than in seawater. Cultivation-independent qPCR quantification of 16S rRNA gene also showed significantly slower decrease of total bacterial densities in beach sand than in seawater. Microbial community analysis by next-generation sequencing (NGS) further illustrated that the decreasing relative abundance of wastewater bacteria was contrasted by the increase in indigenous beach sand and seawater microbiota, and the overall microbial community dynamics corresponded well with the decay of individual FIB populations. In summary, the differential decay of wastewater bacteria in beach sand and in seawater provides a kinetic explanation to the often-observed higher abundance of FIBs in beach sand, and the NGS-based microbial community analysis can provide valuable insights to understanding the fate of wastewater bacteria in the context of indigenous microbial communities in natural environments.

  16. Effects of a mixture of tetracyclines to Lemna gibba and Myriophyllum sibiricum evaluated in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Wilson, Christian J; Johnson, David J; Sanderson, Hans; Bestari, Ketut Jim; Hanson, Mark L; Sibley, Paul K; Solomon, Keith R

    2005-12-01

    The impact of a mixture of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline and doxycycline on Myriophyllum sibiricum and Lemna gibba was investigated using fifteen 12,000-L microcosms (k=5, n=3). Significant concentration-response relationships were only found for M. sibiricum, where dry mass was 69, 47, 30, and 7% of controls at respective treatment concentrations of 0.080, 0.218, 0.668, and 2.289 micromol/L. Somatic endpoints were strongly and negatively correlated with percent light transmission, except plant length, which was positively correlated. Treated microcosms experienced a reduction in the percent of surface irradiance penetrating the water column as high as 99.8% at a depth of 70 cm, relative to controls. Position relative to the water column was likely responsible for the differential effects observed between floating (L. gibba) and submerged (M. sibiricum) species of macrophytes. A hazard quotient assessment of the lowest EC10 value indicated significant risk, exceeding the critical HQ value, but not the lowest EC25 value.

  17. [Microcosm Simulation Study and Methylmercury Forming Mechanism at Landscape Water of City].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Si, You-bin; Guo, Zi-wei; Du, Cheng-zhu; Zhu, Cong-cong

    2016-04-15

    Mercury is harmful to the environment, which has gradually become one of the research hotspots. Sediments, as a main repository of pollutants, have an important impact on water quality and the internal organisms, which deserves our research. In this paper, we focused on Hefei landscape water sediment and tried to investigate the status of inorganic mercury and methylmercury pollutions in the sediment. To study the conversion process from inorganic mercury to methylmercury and their enrichment levels and mechanism, we established the ecological chain of "sediment-water-grass-fish" through analog microcosm examination. The results were as follows: from ten water and sediment samples in Hefei landscape water sediment, we found that the contents of inorganic mercury and methylmercury ranged 11.74-13.12 µg · kg⁻¹ and 0.37-2.23 µg · kg⁻¹, respectively. The microcosm examination showed that: with increasing culture time, inorganic mercury in sediments gradually decreased. There was a phenomenon that the content of methylmercury increased at first and then decreased to reach the balance later. Both the inorganic mercury and methylmercury in water change showed an increasing trend. The enrichment contents of inorganic mercury in Egeria densa Planch, and golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) were low while their enrichment of methylmercury could he great. In addition, we found that both the bioaccumulation ability and the enrichment coefficient of methylmercury in the body of golden mandarin fish were the maximum during the same period.

  18. A comparison of zooplankton sampling methods in evaluating copper sulfate toxicity in outdoor microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Hellenbrandt, S.; La Point, T.W.; Shaw, J.L.; Marshall, S.J.; Ratte, H.T.

    1994-12-31

    Six outdoor microcosms (2m{sup 3}) were used to determine copper sulfate effects on epibenthic and planktonic zooplankton community structure. Microcosms were treated three times with CuSO{sub 4} at 0, 50, 100, 200, 350, 550 {mu}g Cu/L, respectively. Zooplankton was sampled biweekly from July through October 1993. Epibenthic zooplankton was collected with an inverted funnel trap, whereas planktonic zooplankton was sampled with an integrated water column sampler. Samples were sieved through a 35 {mu}m mesh and organisms preserved with 1% Lugol`s solution and later identified to genus or species level. Both communities initially decreased in total abundance at high copper rates. However, recovery started shortly after the final Cu application. Species richness was lowest at high copper concentrations, particularly in the epi-benthic community. Epibenthic zooplankton diversity decreased at high copper rates, whereas planktonic zooplankton diversity did not. Epi-benthic zooplankton may be a sensitive indicator of chemical stress and therefore be used to assess the bioavailability of sediment-bound xenobiotics.

  19. High diversity and differential persistence of fecal Bacteroidales population spiked into freshwater microcosm.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhanbei; He, Zhenli; Zhou, Xuxia; Powell, Charles A; Yang, Yuangen; Roberts, Michael G; Stoffella, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Bacteroidales markers are promising indicators of fecal pollution and are now widely used in microbial source tracking (MST) studies. However, a thorough understanding of the persistence of Bacteroidales population after being released into environmental waters is lacking. We investigated the persistence of two host specific markers (HF183 and CF193) and temporal change of Bacteroidales population over 14 days in freshwater microcosms seeded with human or bovine feces. The concentrations of HF183/CF193 and Escherichia coli were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and standard cultivation method, respectively. Shifts in the Bacteroidales population structure were fingerprinted using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and subsequent sequencing analysis targeting both 16S rDNA and rRNA-transcribed cDNA. Both HF183 and CF193 decayed significantly faster than E. coli but the decay curves fit poorly with first-order model. High diversity of Bacteroidales population was observed for both microcosms, and persistence of different species in the population varied. Sequence analysis indicated that most of the bovine Bacteroidales populations in our study are unexplored. DGGE and decay curve indicated that RNA decayed faster than DNA, further supporting the use of rRNA as indicator of metabolically active Bacteroidales population. Evaluations with more realistic scenarios are warranted prior to extending the results of this study to real field settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of bacteria associated with harmful algal blooms from coastal and microcosm environments using electronic microarrays.

    PubMed

    Barlaan, Edward A; Furukawa, Seiji; Takeuchi, Kazuhisa

    2007-03-01

    With the global expansion of harmful algal blooms (HABs), several measures, including molecular approaches, have been undertaken to monitor its occurrence. Many reports have indicated the significant roles of bacteria in controlling algal bloom dynamics. Attempts have been made to utilize the bacteria/harmful algae relationship in HAB monitoring. In this study, bacterial assemblages monitored during coastal HABs and bacterial communities in induced microcosm blooms were investigated. Samples were analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene. DGGE bands with peculiar patterns before, during, and after algal blooms were isolated and identified. Probes for six ribotypes representing organisms associated with Chatonella spp., Heterocapsa circularisquama, or Heterosigma akashiwo were used for analysis on NanoChip electronic microarray. In addition, a new approach using cultured bacteria species was developed to detect longer (533 bp) polymerase chain reaction-amplified products on the electronic microarray. The use of fluorescently labelled primers allowed the detection of individual species in single or mixed DNA conditions. The developed approach enabled the detection of the presence or absence and relative abundance of the HAB-related ribotypes in coastal and microcosm blooms. This study indicates the ability of electronic microarray platform to detect or monitor bacteria in natural and induced environments.

  1. Effects of two lubricant oils on marine nematode assemblages in a laboratory microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Beyrem, H; Louati, H; Essid, N; Aïssa, P; Mahmoudi, E

    2010-05-01

    The effects of two lubricating oils on nematode assemblages of a Tunisian lagoon were investigated in a microcosm experiment. Sediment from a pristine site in Ghar El Melh lagoon (Western Mediterranean) was treated with either mineral oil (Mobil 20 W-50), a synthetic lubricant (Mobil 0 W-40), the same two lubricants after use in a vehicle, and effects were examined after 5 weeks. Univariate analysis showed significant differences between most univariate indices of the nematode assemblages in all the lubricant treatments as compared to the control. Total nematode abundance (I), species richness (d) and number of species (S) decreased significantly in all lubricant contaminated microcosms. However, evenness was not affected in all treated replicates except in used mineral lubricant treatment where it was significantly higher than in the control. Diversity (H') was only altered in synthetic lubricant treatments. Results from multivariate analyses of the species abundance data demonstrated that responses of nematode species to the two lubricants treatments were varied: Daptonema trabeculosum was eliminated in all lubricant treatments and seemed to be an intolerant species to oil contamination. Spirinia gerlachi increased in mineral lubricant treatments ("clean" and used) but was eliminated in all synthetic lubricant treatments. This species could be categorized as "resistant" to mineral oil contamination and intolerant to synthetic lubricant contamination. Terschellingia longicaudata increased only in synthetic lubricant treatments ("clean" and used) and appeared to be a "synthetic oil-resistant" species. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A microcosm system and an analytical protocol to assess PAH degradation and metabolite formation in soils.

    PubMed

    Arias, Lida; Bauzá, Jorge; Tobella, Joana; Vila, Joaquim; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2008-06-01

    During bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-polluted soils accumulation of polar metabolites resulting from the biological activity may occur. Since these polar metabolites are potentially more toxic than the parental products, a better understanding of the processes involved in the production and fate of these oxidation products in soil is needed. In the present work we describe the design and set-up of a static soil microcosm system and an analytical methodology for detection of PAHs and their oxidation products in soils. When applied to a soil contaminated with phenanthrene, as a model PAH, and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, diphenic acid, and phthalic acid as putative metabolites, the extraction and fractionation procedures resulted in recoveries of 93%, 89%, 100%, and 89%, respectively. The application of the standardized system to study the biodegradation of phenanthrene in an agricultural soil with and without inoculation of the high molecular weight PAH-degrading strain Mycobacterium sp. AP1, demonstrates its suitability for determining the environmental fate of PAHs in polluted soils and for evaluating the effect of bioremediative treatments. In inoculated microcosms 35% of the added phenanthrene was depleted, 19% being recovered as CO(2) and 3% as diphenic acid. The latter, together with other two unidentified metabolites, accumulated in soil.

  3. Investigation into ammonia stress on Cyperus alternifolius and its impact on nutrient removal in microcosm experiments.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wendong; Han, Jianqiu; Li, Hanyan

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia stress on plants has been investigated at discrete ammonia concentrations in constructed wetlands. This study introduced a Gaussian model to simulate the kinetics of ammonia stress and investigated reversible and irreversible ammonia stress on Cyperus alternifolius in wetland-like microcosms. Ammonia stress on plant weight increase and oxygen release potential started at weekly ammonia concentrations of 27 and 28 mg N/L, reached 50% inhibition at 178 and 158 mg N/L, and resulted in lethal effects at 311 and 303 mg N/L, respectively. The stress of one-time ammonia concentrations up to 400 mg N/L could be reversible. Ammonia concentrations constantly above 219 mg N/L exerted irreversible stress. In the microcosms with ammonia concentrations above the 50% inhibition levels, plants played a minor role in nitrogen removal. Nitrogen removal performance was not affected considerably by ammonia stress. Orthophosphate removal was suppressed by ammonia stress due to less plant uptake. Design and operation of constructed wetlands should consider wastewater ammonia concentration so that the integrity of constructed wetland ecosystems can be maintained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial culture dynamics and chromium (VI) removal in packed-column microcosm reactors.

    PubMed

    Molokwane, Pulane E; Nkhalambayausi-Chirwa, Evans M

    2009-01-01

    Microbial Cr(VI) reduction in groundwater aquifer media was investigated in microcosm reactors extracted from Cr(VI) contaminated sites in South Africa. The reactors were operated under an influent Cr(VI) concentration of 40 mg/L to simulate the current Cr(VI) level at the contaminated site. Near complete Cr(VI) removal was observed in microcosm reactors inoculated with Cr(VI) reducing bacteria from dried activated sludge collected from a treatment plant receiving periodic loadings of Cr(VI). The best performance was observed under low hydraulic loading (flow rate, Q=0.310 cm(3)/hr). Microbial culture characterisation results showed a change in culture composition after 17 days of reactor operation, indicating Bacillus and Lysinibacillus species as the most dominant organisms in reactors that reduced Cr(VI). The predominance of Bacillus and Lysinibacillus species was either due to resilience against toxicity or adaptation to the changing conditions in the reactor. This research was the initial step towards the development of an in situ bioremediation process to contain the spread of a Cr(VI) plume in a groundwater aquifer at contaminated site in Brits, South Africa. South Africa holds about 72% percent of the world's chromium resources, the majority of which is mined in the North Eastern region of the country formally known as Transvaal.

  5. Microbial composition in microcosms amended with natural and mineral fertilizers under different water regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brad, Traian; Chiriac, Cecilia; Szekeres, Edina; Coman, Cristian; Rudi, Knut; Sandor, Mignon

    2017-04-01

    Twenty microcosm enclosures containing two types of soil (i.e. a rich Chernozemic and a poorer soil) were fertilized with mineral (NPK-complex) and organic (Gülle, manure and a green fertilizer) materials and placed under dry and wet water regimes. After 10, 20 and 30 days of the experiment, soil samples were analyzed for the structure and composition of microbial communities using next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina) and statistical analysis. The differences between bacteria communities in different soil types, and in different fertilization and hydric treatments were analyzed using quantitative phylogenetic distances and the ANOSIM test. The two types of soil especially selected for the structure of microbial communities, while moisture and the type of fertilizer appeared to have a smaller influence on microbial diversity in microcosms. The alpha-diversity indices (species richness, evenness and phylogenetic diversity) had higher values for the poorer soil compared to the rich Chernozemic soil. For both soil types, the highest bacteria diversity values were obtained after fertilization with manure. The microbial communities in the analyzed soils were complex and dominated by sequences belonging to Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Firmicutes.

  6. Environmental Fate of Chiral Herbicide Fenoxaprop-ethyl in Water-Sediment Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Liu, Donghui; Liu, Mingke; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    The environmental fate of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) in water, sediment and water-sediment microcosm was studied and degradation products fenoxaprop (FA), ethyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoate (EHPP), 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (HPPA) and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzoxazol-2-one (CDHB) were monitored. FE, FA, EHPP and HPPA were chiral and the environmental behavior was investigated on an enantiomeric level. In water, sediment and water-sediment microcosms, fenoxaprop-ethyl degraded very fast with half-lives less than 1 day and it was found the herbicidally inactive S-enantiomer degraded faster. Fenoxaprop was the main primary degradation product which was quickly formed and the further degradation was relatively slow with half-lives of 6.4-12.4 days, and the S-enantiomer degraded faster too. EHPP, HPPA and CDHB could be found and S-EHPP and S-HPPA were degraded preferentially. The effects of microorganism and water content were investigated and it was found that the enantioselectivity was attributed to microorganisms. In sediment, the main degradation pathway of fenoxaprop-ethyl was hydrolysis and the degradation rate of fenoxaprop-ethyl increased with water content. The degradation products and enantioselectivity should be considered for the impact of fenoxaprop-ethyl on the aquatic system.

  7. Introduction of mercury resistant bacterial strains to Hg(II) amended soil microcosms increases the resilience of the natural microbial community to mercury stress

    SciTech Connect

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse D.; Serensen, Soren J.

    2004-03-17

    Heavy metals are among the most important groups of pollutant compounds, and they are highly persistent in the soil environment. Techniques that can be used for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated environments thus need to be evolved. In the present study we evaluated the effect of introducing a Hg resistance plasmid in subsurface soil communities. This was done in microcosms with DOE subsurface soils amended with 5-10 ppm of HgCl2. Two microcosms were set up. In microcosm A we studied the effect of adding strain S03539 containing either the Hg resistance conjugative plasmid, pJORD 70, or the Hg resistance mobilizable plasmid, pPB117. In microcosm B we studied the effect of adding strain KT2442 with and without pJORD70. For both microcosms, the effect on the resilience of the indigenous bacterial community as well as the effect on the soil concentration of Hg was evaluated.

  8. Mucilage microcosms.

    PubMed

    Del Negro, Paola; Crevatin, Erica; Larato, Chiara; Ferrari, Carla; Totti, Cecilia; Pompei, Marinella; Giani, Michele; Berto, Daniela; Fonda Umani, Serena

    2005-12-15

    In the summers of 2000, 2001 and 2002, large amounts of sticky mucilaginous material aggregated to form masses of impressive dimensions over large areas of the Adriatic Sea, particularly in its northern part. Aggregates differing in size were sampled by SCUBA divers and submitted to chemical (nutrient and organic matter concentrations) and biological analysis (virus, bacteria and phytoplankton abundances and bacterial metabolism). Suspended and sinking mucilaginous aggregates were biota-rich environments where the abundance of planktonic organisms and the concentration of nutrients were orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding seawater. The embedded phytoplankton was mostly composed of diatoms, but the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis, previously reported in association with the aggregates, was also present. A variety of processes occurred within the mucilaginous aggregates which resulted in the transformation of the organic matter composition and lability and contributed to a partial degradation of mucilage. For an efficient degradation of mucilage, several conditions are necessary: high bacterial abundance and activity and an efficient recycling of nutrients within the aggregates. Most of these conditions, appear to change depending on the type and age of the aggregate. During the first phase of aggregation (cobwebs and ribbons), bacterial activities addressed the degradation of organic matter, particularly that of the nitrogen fraction. The degradation products were rapidly taken up by bacteria, supporting an increase in their abundance and production. In aged mucilage (clouds), the degradation processes decreased and the bacterial metabolism suggested the presence of new organic labile compounds probably due to phytoplankton production. On the basis of our results, stringers, generally considered the first step of the aggregation process, seemed to be the result of a mechanical disruption of other types of aggregates.

  9. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  10. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key objective of NASA s Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the 0.6 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectra is flat and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar panels with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft are spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but with fewer

  11. Treatment for burn blisters: debride or leave intact?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Faye; Amblum, Jeshi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents findings from a systematic literature review of whether blisters arising from minor burns should be de-roofed or left intact. It discusses the risks of infection, healing outcomes, discomfort, choice of dressings and costs associated with each method, and reveals that debriding blisters larger than the patient's little fingernail while leaving smaller ones intact is generally agreed to be the best option. The article also explains external factors that influence the choice of whether to debride or leave blisters intact, reviews policy at the trust where one of the authors works in the context of the research and makes recommendations for practice.

  12. Survival of Host-Associated Bacteroidales Cells and Their Relationship with Enterococcus spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium, and Adenovirus in Freshwater Microcosms as Measured by Propidium Monoazide-Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sungwoo

    2012-01-01

    The ideal host-associated genetic fecal marker would be capable of predicting the presence of specific pathogens of concern. Flowthrough freshwater microcosms containing mixed feces and inocula of the pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and adenovirus were placed at ambient temperature in the presence and absence of diurnal sunlight. The total Enterococcus DNA increased during the early periods (23 h) under sunlight exposure, even though cultivable Enterococcus and DNA in intact cells, as measured by propidium monoazide (PMA), decreased with first-order kinetics during the entire period. We found a significant difference in the decay of host-associated Bacteroidales cells between sunlight exposure and dark conditions (P value < 0.05), whereas the persistence of host-associated Bacteroidales DNA was comparable. The 2-log reduction times of adenovirus were 72 h for sunlight exposure and 99 h for dark conditions with similar decay rate constants (P value = 0.13). The persistences of fecal Bacteroidales cells and Campylobacter cells exposed to sunlight were similar, and host-associated Bacteroidales DNA and waterborne pathogen DNA were degraded at comparable rates (P values > 0.05). Overall, the ratio of quantitative PCR (qPCR) cycle threshold (CT) values with and without PMA treatment was indicative of the time elapsed since inoculation of the microcosm with (i) fecal material from different animal sources based on host-associated Bacteroidales and (ii) pure cultures of bacterial pathogens. The use of both PMA-qPCR and qPCR may yield more realistic information about recent sources of fecal contamination and result in improved prediction of waterborne pathogens and assessment of health risk. PMID:22139002

  13. Acoustic emissions during deformation of intact and jointed welded tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, D. J.; Teufel, L. W.

    1982-07-01

    Monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) has been widely used as a means of detecting failure in intact rock. For intact rock the technique is simple, because an increasing rate of AE is usually a sign of impending failure. However, most large rock masses contain numerous joints and the behavior of the joints controls the properties of the rock mass In particular, the failure mode often becomes stable or unstable slip (stick-slip) on a joint at stresses well below those required for failure of the intact rock. As an aid to understanding and monitoring the behavior of jointed rock masses, we have done a series of experiments on intact and artificially jointed samples of Grouse Canyon tuff. The tuff was selected because it is under consideration as a disposal medium for nuclear wastes. The samples were instrumented to measure axial and transverse displacements and AE rates.

  14. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  15. 10. VIEW SHOWING FRAGMENTED AND INTACT ORIGINAL SIDEWALK ALONG SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW SHOWING FRAGMENTED AND INTACT ORIGINAL SIDEWALK ALONG SOUTH SIDE OF SHERMAN CANAL, BETWEEN DELL AVENUE VEHICULAR BRIDGE AND GRAND CANAL COURT PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST - Venice Canals, Community of Venice, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  17. 50 CFR 622.276 - Landing fish intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.276 Landing fish intact. (a) Dolphin and wahoo in or...

  18. Preparation of Cardiac Extracellular Matrix from an Intact Porcine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Patel, Urvi B.; Freytes, Donald O.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications. PMID:19702513

  19. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix from an intact porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Czajka, Caitlin A; Patel, Urvi B; Freytes, Donald O; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications.

  20. Use Of Statistical Tools To Evaluate The Reductive Dechlorination Of High Levels Of TCE In Microcosm Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large, multi-laboratory microcosm study was performed to select amendments for supporting reductive dechlorination of high levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) found at an industrial site in the United Kingdom (UK) containing dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE. The study ...

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by a Mycobacterium sp. in microcosms containing sediment and water from a pristine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, M.A.; Cerniglia, C.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Microcosm studies were conducted to evaluate the survival and performance of a recently discovered polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading Mycobacterium sp. when this organism was added to sediment and water from a pristine ecosystem. Microcosms inoculated with the Mycobacterium sp. showed enhanced mineralization, singly and as components in a mixture, of 2-methylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Studies utilizing pyrene as the sole added PAH showed that the Mycobacterium sp. survived in microcosms for 6 weeks both with and without preexposure to PAH and mineralized multiple doses of pyrene. Pyrene mineralization rates for sterilized microcosms inoculated with the Mycobacterium sp. showed that competition with indigenous microorganisms did not adversely affect survival of or pyrene degradation by the Mycobacterium sp. Pyrene mineralization by the Mycobacterium sp. was not enhanced by inorganic nutrient enrichment and was hindered by organic nutrient enrichment, which appeared to result from overgrowth of indigenous bacteria. This study demonstrates the versatility of the PAH-degrading Mycobacterium sp. and expands its potential applications to include the degradation of two-, three-, four-, and five-ringed PAHs in sediments.

  2. Monitoring populations of 4-chlorobiphenyl-degrading bacterial in soil and lake water microcosms using colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, J.; Breen, A.; Sayler, G.S. ); Palumbo, A.V. )

    1989-01-01

    Population dynamics and maintenance of a 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB)- degrading bacteria, Alcaligenes eutrophus, added to field lysimeters and lake water microcosms were monitored using colony hybridization. Six field lysimeters (55 gal steel drums) were set up and monitored for one year. Each lysimeter contained 60 kg of soil from a PCB-contaminated floodplain and all but one were watered and stirred during the experiment. At the start of the field lysimeter experiment, half of the lysimeters received an inoculation of Alcaligenes eutrophus. The lysimeters differed in the treatments administered over the year; some received inorganic nutrients and yeast extract and one also received biphenyl. Four 20 l microcosms were set up with water from Fort Loudon Reservoir. They were supplemented with mineral salts and glucose and stirred and monitored for two months. Alcaligenes eutrophus was inoculated into two of the microcosms, one of which was maintained with selective pressure by the addition of 4CB. One of the uninoculated microcosms also had selective pressure for 4CB-degrading organisms. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Evaluation of aquatic sediment microcosms and their use in assessing possible effects of introduced microorganisms on ecosystem parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner-Doebler, I.; Pipke, R.; Timmis, K.N.; Dwyer, D.F. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper the authors describe a sediment microcosm system consisting of 20 undisturbed, layered sediment cores with overlying site water which are incubated under identical conditions of temperature, light stirring rate of overlying water, and water exchange rate. Ecosystem parameters (nutrient level, photosynthetic potential, community structure of heterotrophic bacterium thymidine incorporation rate, and oxygen microgradients) of the laboratory microcosms and the source ecosystem were compared and shown to be indistinguishable for the first 2 weeks. The microcosm system described here would thus appear to be a valid model of aquatic sediments for up to 4 weeks; the actual period would depend on the sediment source and incubation temperature. The validated systems were used with Rhine river sediment to assess possible effects on ecosystem parameters of Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 FR1(pFRC20P), a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) survived in the surface sediment at densities of 5 {times} 10{sup 4} to 5 {times} 10{sup 5}/g (dry weight) for 4 weeks and degraded added chloro- and methylaromatics. The GEM did not measurably influence ecosystem parameters such as photosynthesis, densities of selected heterotrophic bacteria, thymidine incorporation rate, and oxygen microgradients. Thus, the microcosm system described here would seem to be useful for the study of the ecology of biodegradation and the fate and effect of microorganisms introduced into the environment.

  4. Litter quality indirectly influences community composition, reproductive mode and trophic structure of oribatid mite communities: a microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Gergócs, Veronika; Rétháti, Gabriella; Hufnagel, Levente

    2015-11-01

    Our knowledge of the assembly processes of species-rich oribatid mite communities is fairly limited. Also, very little information is available on the effects of habitat factors on these processes. In this paper, the role of litter quality in pattern formation was investigated in a microcosm experiment using the "home-field advantage" approach. Native (home) and foreign (away) types of microarthropod assemblages were extracted from three types of litter samples (Turkey oak, Scots pine and black locust tree), and transferred alive into 'home' and 'away' samples, which have been defaunated and reinoculated with microorganisms to form microcosms. Microarthropods were extracted from the microcosms after incubation for 3-12 months. In addition to species identification and abundance records, some chemical properties of the litter were measured. We hypothesized that oribatid mite communities deteriorate, the proportion of parthenogenetic individuals decreases and the proportion of omnivorous individuals increases in 'away' microcosms in contrast to 'home' systems. Pine and oak litter were favourable for all the three types of oribatid communities since their community traits in these types of litter were found to be similar to 'home' litter. Black locust litter was favourable only for its native oribatid community in the long run. The proportion of parthenogenetic individuals partly supported our hypothesis, mainly in black locust litter. The relative abundance of omnivorous individuals did not differ significantly between treatments. Litter quality is likely to influence oribatid mite assemblages only indirectly.

  5. Application of microcosmic system for assessment of insecticide effects on biomarker responses in ecologically different earthworm species.

    PubMed

    Velki, Mirna; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Lončarić, Zeljka; Hackenberger, Davorka K

    2014-06-01

    Earthworms from different ecological categories--epigeic Eisenia andrei and Lumbricus rubellus, endogeic Octolasion lacteum and anecic Lumbricus terrestris--were exposed in a microcosmic system to three commonly used insecticides. The effects of the insecticides were evaluated by measuring the following molecular biomarkers-the activities of AChE, CES, CAT, GST and the concentration of GSH. The results showed that environmentally relevant doses of organophosphates dimethoate and pirimiphos-methyl significantly affected the measured biomarkers, whereas pyrethroid deltamethrin did not affect the earthworms at the recommended agricultural dose. Considering the ecological category of earthworms, the results were inhomogeneous and species-specific differences in the biomarker responses were recorded. Since the biomarker responses of the investigated earthworm species were different after exposure to organophosphates in a microcosm compared to the exposure via standardized toxicity tests, two types of species sensitivity should be distinguished-physiological and environmental sensitivity. In addition, the hormetic effect of organophosphates on AChE and CES activities was recorded. The detection of hormesis in a microcosm is of great importance for future environmental research and soil biomonitoring, since in a realistic environment pollutants usually occur at low concentrations that could cause a hormetic effect. The results demonstrate the importance of the application of microcosmic systems in the assessment of the effects of environmental pollutants and the necessity of taking into account the possible differences between physiological and environmental species sensitivity.

  6. Use Of Statistical Tools To Evaluate The Reductive Dechlorination Of High Levels Of TCE In Microcosm Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large, multi-laboratory microcosm study was performed to select amendments for supporting reductive dechlorination of high levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) found at an industrial site in the United Kingdom (UK) containing dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE. The study ...

  7. Evaluation of graphite for environmental toxicity using the standard aquatic microcosm. Technical report, June 1986-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, W.G.; Chester, N.A.; Haley, M.V.; Johnson, D.W.; Tauber, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    The impact of a graphite dust on an aquatic ecosystem model, the Standard Aquatic microcosm (SAM), was investigated. Graphite dust produced effects that resembled eutrophication in that a diversity decreased, ammonia increased, and a photosynthesis/respiration ratio of less than one was observed in the highest concentration. Compared to brass dust, graphite has much less potential to adversely impact aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Influence of tadpole shrimp, Triops longicaudatus (Notostraca:Triopsidae), stocking rate on Culex tarsalis development in experimental field microcosms.

    PubMed

    Tietze, N S; Mulla, M S

    1990-06-01

    The effectiveness of 5 tadpole shrimp (TPS) stocking rates to reduce cohorts of Culex tarsalis was studied in field microcosms (0.81-m2). Larval/pupal abundance in microcosms containing greater than 5 TPS/m2 was significantly (P less than 0.05) lower than that of controls lacking tadpole shrimp due to predation. Adult mosquito abundances captured in emergence units above the microcosms stocked with tadpole shrimp were significantly (P less than 0.05) lower than that of controls at rates greater than or equal to 10 TPS/m2. Tadpole shrimp growth during 17 days of this study was inversely proportional to their stocking rate, and a linear relationship between size and stocking rate was plotted. Tadpole shrimp stocking rates also influenced rate of mosquito development, causing significantly (P less than 0.05) shorter periods for 50% emergence where shrimp were present when compared with that of controls. Adult male Cx. tarsalis emerged significantly earlier then females in microcosms stocked at 5 TPS/m2, while no significant (P greater than 0.05) differences were detected between the sexes at the remaining predator stocking rates.

  9. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm

    DOE PAGES

    Woo, Hannah L.; O’Dell, Kaela B.; Utturkar, Sagar; ...

    2016-11-23

    We isolated Thalassospirasp. strain KO164 from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the deep-ocean bacterium’s ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin near-complete genome sequence, will be presented here.

  10. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hannah L.; O’Dell, Kaela B.; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Thalassospira sp. strain KO164 was isolated from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. The near-complete genome sequence presented here will facilitate analyses into this deep-ocean bacterium’s ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin. PMID:27881538

  11. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hannah L; O'Dell, Kaela B; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-23

    Thalassospira sp. strain KO164 was isolated from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. The near-complete genome sequence presented here will facilitate analyses into this deep-ocean bacterium's ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin.

  12. The effect of co-substrate activation on indigenous and bioaugmented PCB dechlorinating bacterial communities in sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Park, Joong-Wook; Krumins, Valdis; Kjellerup, Birthe V; Fennell, Donna E; Rodenburg, Lisa A; Sowers, Kevin R; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2011-03-01

    Microbial reductive dechlorination by members of the phylum Chloroflexi, including the genus Dehalococcoides, may play an important role in natural detoxification of highly chlorinated environmental pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Previously, we showed the increase of an indigenous bacterial population belonging to the Pinellas subgroup of Dehalococcoides spp. in Anacostia River sediment (Washington DC, USA) microcosms treated with halogenated co-substrates ("haloprimers"), tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB), or pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB). The PCNB-amended microcosms exhibited enhanced dechlorination of weathered PCBs, while TeCB-amended microcosms did not. We therefore developed and used different phylogenetic approaches to discriminate the effect of the two different haloprimers. We also developed complementary approaches to monitor the effects of haloprimer treatments on 12 putative reductive dehalogenase (rdh) genes common to Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 and Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. Our results indicate that 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analyses have a limit in their ability to distinguish the effects of two haloprimer treatments and that two of rdh genes were present in high abundance when microcosms were amended with PCNB, but not TeCB. rdh gene-based phylogenetic analysis supports that these two rdh genes originated from the Pinellas subgroup of Dehalococcoides spp., which corresponds to the 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis.

  13. Hydrocarbon biodegradation by Arctic sea-ice and sub-ice microbial communities during microcosm experiments, Northwest Passage (Nunavut, Canada).

    PubMed

    Garneau, Marie-Ève; Michel, Christine; Meisterhans, Guillaume; Fortin, Nathalie; King, Thomas L; Greer, Charles W; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-10-01

    The increasing accessibility to navigation and offshore oil exploration brings risks of hydrocarbon releases in Arctic waters. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons is a promising mitigation strategy but challenges remain, particularly due to low microbial metabolic rates in cold, ice-covered seas. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of ice-associated microbes collected from the Northwest Passage was investigated. Microcosm incubations were run for 15 days at -1.7°C with and without oil to determine the effects of hydrocarbon exposure on microbial abundance, diversity and activity, and to estimate component-specific hydrocarbon loss. Diversity was assessed with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial activity was measured by (3)H-leucine uptake rates. After incubation, sub-ice and sea-ice communities degraded 94% and 48% of the initial hydrocarbons, respectively. Hydrocarbon exposure changed the composition of sea-ice and sub-ice communities; in sea-ice microcosms, Bacteroidetes (mainly Polaribacter) dominated whereas in sub-ice microcosms, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria increased, and that of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. Sequencing data revealed a decline in diversity and increases in Colwellia and Moritella in oil-treated microcosms. Low concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sub-ice seawater may explain higher hydrocarbon degradation when compared to sea ice, where DOM was abundant and composed of labile exopolysaccharides.

  14. Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on calcium phosphate nanocomposite with quaternary ammonium

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Zhang, Ke; Wu, Eric; Xu, Sarah M.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Half of dental restorations fail in 10 years, with secondary caries as the main reason. Calcium phosphate composites could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) Impart antibacterial activity to a composite with nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP); and (2) investigate the effect of quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM) on mechanical and dental plaque microcosm biofilm properties for the first time. Methods The NACP and glass particles were filled into a dental resin that contained bis(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) dimethyl-ammonium bromide, the QADM. NACP nanocomposites containing 0%, 7%, 14%, and 17.5% of QADM by mass, respectively, were photo-cured. A commercial composite with no antibacterial activity was used as control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. A human saliva microcosm model was used to grow biofilms on composites. Live/dead assay, metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production of biofilms on the composites were measured. Results Increasing QADM mass fraction monotonically reduced the biofilm viability, CFU and lactic acid. Biofilms on NACP nanocomposite with 17.5% QADM had metabolic activity that was 30% that on a commercial composite control (p<0.05). Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci CFU counts (mean±sd; n=6) on composite control was 6-fold those on NACP+17.5% QADM nanocomposite. Composite control had long strings of cells with normal short-rod shapes, while some cells on NACP-QADM nanocomposites disintegrated into pieces. Adding QADM to NACP did not decrease the strength and elastic modulus, which matched (p>0.1) those of a commercial composite without Ca-PO4 or antibacterial activity. Significance A dental plaque microcosm model was used to evaluate the novel NACP-QADM nanocomposite. The nanocomposite greatly reduced the biofilm viability, metabolic activity and lactic acid, while its mechanical

  15. Exposure and effects of sediment-spiked fludioxonil on macroinvertebrates and zooplankton in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao H; Brock, Theo C M; Barone, Lidia E; Belgers, J Dick M; Boerwinkel, Marie-Claire; Buijse, Laura; van Wijngaarden, René P A; Hamer, Mick; Roessink, Ivo

    2017-08-25

    Information from effects of pesticides in sediments at an ecosystem level, to validate current and proposed risk assessment procedures, is scarce. A sediment-spiked outdoor freshwater microcosm experiment was conducted with fludioxonil (lipophilic, non-systemic fungicide) to study exposure dynamics and treatment-related responses of benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates and zooplankton. Besides blank control and solvent control systems the experiment had six different treatment levels (1.7-614mga.s./kg dry sediment) based around the reported 28-d No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for Chironomus riparius (40mga.s./kg dry sediment). Twelve systems were available per treatment of which four were sacrificed on each of days 28, 56 and 84 after microcosm construction. Fludioxonil persisted in the sediment and mean measured concentrations were 53-82% of the initial concentration after 84days. The dissipation rate increased with the treatment level. Also exposure concentrations in overlying water were long-term, with highest concentrations 28days after initiation of the experiment. Sediment-dwelling Oligochaeta and pelagic Rotifera and Cladocera showed the most pronounced treatment-related declines. The most sensitive sediment-dwelling oligochaete was Dero digitata (population NOEC 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). The same NOEC was calculated for the sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrate community. The most sensitive zooplankton species was the cladoceran Diaphanosoma brachyurum (NOEC of 1.6μga.s./L in overlying water corresponding to 5.0mga.s./kg dry sediment). At the two highest treatments several rotifer taxa showed a pronounced decrease, while the zooplankton community-level NOEC was 5.6μga.s./L (corresponding to 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). Zooplankton taxa calanoid Copepoda and Daphnia gr. longispina showed a pronounced treatment-related increase (indirect effects). Consequently, an assessment factor of 10 to the chronic laboratory NOECs of Chironomus riparius

  16. Molecular analysis of microbial community structures in pristine and contaminated aquifers--Field and laboratory microcosm experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, Y.; Zwolinski, M.D.; Schreiber, M.E.; Bahr, J.M.; Sewell, G.W.; Hickey, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular Analysis of Microbial Community Structures in Pristine and Contaminated Aquifers: Field and Laboratory Microcosm Experimentsvar callbackToken='531E8ACDB6C8511'; var subCode='asmjournal_sub'; var OAS_sitepage = 'aem.asm.org'; This study used phylogenetic probes in hybridization analysis to (i) determine in situ microbial community structures in regions of a shallow sand aquifer that were oxygen depleted and fuel contaminated (FC) or aerobic and noncontaminated (NC) and (ii) examine alterations in microbial community structures resulting from exposure to toluene and/or electron acceptor supplementation (nitrate). The latter objective was addressed by using the NC and FC aquifer materials for anaerobic microcosm studies in which phylogenetic probe analysis was complemented by microbial activity assays. Domain probe analysis of the aquifer samples showed that the communities were predominantlyBacteria; Eucarya and Archaea were not detectable. At the phylum and subclass levels, the FC and NC aquifer material had similar relative abundance distributions of 43 to 65% β- and γ-Proteobacteria (B+G), 31 to 35% α-Proteobacteria (ALF), 15 to 18% sulfate-reducing bacteria, and 5 to 10% high G+C gram positive bacteria. Compared to that of the NC region, the community structure of the FC material differed mainly in an increased abundance of B+G relative to that of ALF. The microcosm communities were like those of the field samples in that they were predominantly Bacteria (83 to 101%) and lacked detectable Archaea but differed in that a small fraction (2 to 8%) of Eucarya was detected regardless of the treatment applied. The latter result was hypothesized to reflect enrichment of anaerobic protozoa. Addition of nitrate and/or toluene stimulated microbial activity in the microcosms, but only supplementation of toluene alone significantly altered community structures. For the NC material, the dominant subclass shifted from B+G to ALF, while in the FC microcosms 55 to 65

  17. Unusual isotopic composition of C-CO2 from sterilized soil microcosms: a new way to separate intracellular from extracellular respiratory metabolisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéraval, Benoit; Alvarez, Gaël; Lehours, Anne Catherine; Amblard, Christian; Fontaine, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    The mineralization of organic C requires two main steps. First, microorganisms secrete exoenzymes in soil in order to depolymerize plant and microbial cell walls and release soluble substrates for microbial assimilation. The second step of mineralization, during which C is released as CO2, implies the absorption and utilization of solubilized substrates by microbial cells with the aim to produce energy (ATP). In cells, soluble substrates are carried out by a cascade of respiratory enzymes, along which protons and electrons are transferred from a substrate to oxygen. Given the complexity of this oxidative metabolism and the typical fragility of respiratory enzymes, it is traditionally considered that respiration (second step of C mineralization process) is strictly an intracellular metabolism process. The recurrent observations of substantial CO2 emissions in soil microcosms where microbial cells have been reduced to extremely low levels challenges this paradigm. In a recent study where some respiratory enzymes have shown to function in an extracellular context in soils, Maire et al. (2013) suggested that an extracellular oxidative metabolism (EXOMET) substantially contributes to CO2 emission from soils. This idea is supported by the recent publication of Blankinship et al., 2014 who showed the presence of active enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle on soil particles. Many controversies subsist in the scientific community due to the presence of non-proliferating but morphologically intact cells after irradiation that could substantially contribute to those soil CO2 emissions. To test whether a purely extracellular oxidative metabolism contribute to soil CO2 emissions, we combined high doses of gamma irradiations to different time of soil autoclaving. The presence of active and non-active cells in soil was checked by DNA and RNA extraction and by electronic microscopy. None active cells (RNA-containing cells) were detectable after irradiation, but some morphological

  18. Biotic and abiotic interactions in aquatic microcosms determine fate and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles: part 2-toxicity and Ag speciation.

    PubMed

    Bone, Audrey J; Colman, Benjamin P; Gondikas, Andreas P; Newton, Kim M; Harrold, Katherine H; Cory, Rose M; Unrine, Jason M; Klaine, Stephen J; Matson, Cole W; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2012-07-03

    To study the effects of complex environmental media on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, AgNPs were added to microcosms with freshwater sediments and two species of aquatic plants (Potamogeton diversifolius and Egeria densa), followed by toxicity testing with microcosm surface water. Microcosms were designed with four environmental matrices in order to determine the contribution of each environmental compartment to changes in toxicity: water only (W), water + sediment (WS), water + plants (WP), and water + plants + sediment (WPS). Silver treatments included AgNPs with two different coatings, gum arabic (GA-AgNPs) or polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP-AgNPs), as well as AgNO(3). Water samples taken from the microcosms at 24 h postdosing were used in acute toxicity tests with two standard model organisms, early life stage zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Daphnia magna. Speciation of Ag in these samples was analyzed using Ag L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Silver speciation patterns for the nanoparticle treatments varied significantly by coating type. While PVP-AgNPs were quite stable and resisted transformation across all matrices (>92.4% Ag(0)), GA-AgNP speciation patterns suggest significantly higher transformation rates, especially in treatments with plants (<69.2% and <58.8% Ag(0) in WP and WPS, respectively) and moderately increased transformation with sediments (<85.6% Ag(0)). Additionally, the presence of plants in the microcosms (with and without sediments) reduced both the concentration of Ag in the water column and toxicity for all Ag treatments. Reductions in toxicity may have been related to decreased water column concentrations as well as changes in the surface chemistry of the particles induced by organic substances released from the plants.

  19. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Turnover Is Linked to the Composition and Dynamics of the Bacterioplankton Assemblage during a Microcosm Phytoplankton Bloom

    PubMed Central

    Pinhassi, Jarone; Simó, Rafel; González, José M.; Vila, Maria; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Kiene, Ronald P.; Moran, Mary Ann; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Processing of the phytoplankton-derived organic sulfur compound dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by bacteria was studied in seawater microcosms in the coastal Gulf of Mexico (Alabama). Modest phytoplankton blooms (peak chlorophyll a [Chl a] concentrations of ∼2.5 μg liter−1) were induced in nutrient-enriched microcosms, while phytoplankton biomass remained low in unamended controls (Chl a concentrations