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Sample records for intake alters gene

  1. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  2. Raising gestational choline intake alters gene expression in DMBA-evoked mammary tumors and prolongs survival

    PubMed Central

    Kovacheva, Vesela P.; Davison, Jessica M.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Rogers, Adrianne E.; Yang, Shi; O'Brien, Michael J.; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    . J., Blusztajn, J. K. Raising gestational choline intake alters gene expression in DMBA-evoked mammary tumors and prolongs survival. (2009) PMID:19047067

  3. Dietary intake alters behavioral recovery and gene expression profiles in the brain of juvenile rats that have experienced a concussion.

    PubMed

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; Ma, Irene; Esser, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) research has made minimal progress diagnosing who will suffer from lingering symptomology or generating effective treatment strategies. Research demonstrates that dietary intake affects many biological systems including brain and neurological health. This study determined if exposure to a high fat diet (HFD) or caloric restriction (CR) altered post-concussion susceptibility or resiliency using a rodent model of pediatric concussion. Rats were maintained on HFD, CR, or standard diet (STD) throughout life (including the prenatal period and weaning). At postnatal day 30, male and female rats experienced a concussion or a sham injury which was followed by 17 days of testing. Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus tissue was collected for molecular profiling. Gene expression changes in BDNF, CREB, DNMT1, FGF-2, IGF1, LEP, PGC-1α, SIRT1, Tau, and TERT were analyzed with respect to injury and diet. Analysis of telomere length (TL) using peripheral skin cells and brain tissue found that TL in skin significantly correlated with TL in brain tissue and TL was affected by dietary intake and injury status. With respect to mTBI outcomes, diet was correlated with recovery as animals on the HFD often displayed poorer performance than animals on the CR diet. Molecular analysis demonstrated that diet induced epigenetic changes that can be associated with differences in individual predisposition and resiliency to post-concussion syndrome.

  4. Dietary intake alters behavioral recovery and gene expression profiles in the brain of juvenile rats that have experienced a concussion

    PubMed Central

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; Ma, Irene; Esser, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) research has made minimal progress diagnosing who will suffer from lingering symptomology or generating effective treatment strategies. Research demonstrates that dietary intake affects many biological systems including brain and neurological health. This study determined if exposure to a high fat diet (HFD) or caloric restriction (CR) altered post-concussion susceptibility or resiliency using a rodent model of pediatric concussion. Rats were maintained on HFD, CR, or standard diet (STD) throughout life (including the prenatal period and weaning). At postnatal day 30, male and female rats experienced a concussion or a sham injury which was followed by 17 days of testing. Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus tissue was collected for molecular profiling. Gene expression changes in BDNF, CREB, DNMT1, FGF-2, IGF1, LEP, PGC-1α, SIRT1, Tau, and TERT were analyzed with respect to injury and diet. Analysis of telomere length (TL) using peripheral skin cells and brain tissue found that TL in skin significantly correlated with TL in brain tissue and TL was affected by dietary intake and injury status. With respect to mTBI outcomes, diet was correlated with recovery as animals on the HFD often displayed poorer performance than animals on the CR diet. Molecular analysis demonstrated that diet induced epigenetic changes that can be associated with differences in individual predisposition and resiliency to post-concussion syndrome. PMID:25698949

  5. Dietary intake alters gene expression in colon tissue: possible underlying mechanism for the influence of diet on disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Andrew J.; Mullany, Lila E.; Wolff, Roger K.; Pellatt, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the association between diet and disease is well documented, the biologic mechanisms involved have not been entirely elucidated. In this study, we evaluate how dietary intake influences gene expression to better understand the underlying mechanisms through which diet operates. Methods We used data from 144 individuals who had comprehensive dietary intake and gene expression data from RNAseq using normal colonic mucosa. Using the DESeq2 statistical package, we identified genes that showed statistically significant differences in expression between individuals in high-intake and low-intake categories for several dietary variables of interest adjusting for age and sex. We examined total calories, total fats, vegetable protein, animal protein, carbohydrates, trans-fatty acids, mutagen index, red meat, processed meat, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, fiber, folate, dairy products, calcium, and prudent and western dietary patterns. Results Using a false discovery rate of less than 0.1, meat-related foods were statistically associated with 68 dysregulated genes, calcium with three dysregulated genes, folate with four dysregulated genes, and nonmeat-related foods with 65 dysregulated genes. With a more stringent false discovery rate of less than 0.05, there were nine meat-related dysregulated genes and 23 nonmeat-related genes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified three major networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to meat-related dietary variables and three networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to nonmeat-related variables. The top networks (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis network score >30) associated with meat-related genes were (i) cancer, organismal injury, and abnormalities, tumor morphology, and (ii) cellular function and maintenance, cellular movement, cell death, and survival. Among genes related to nonmeat consumption variables, the top networks were (i) hematological system development and function

  6. Postpartal immunometabolic gene network expression and function in blood neutrophils are altered in response to prepartal energy intake and postpartal intramammary inflammatory challenge.

    PubMed

    Moyes, K M; Graugnard, D E; Khan, M J; Mukesh, M; Loor, J J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of over-feeding energy prepartum on blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) response remains unclear. Cows fed controlled (CON; 1.34Mcal/kg of dry matter) or excess energy (OVE; 1.62Mcal/kg dry matter) during the dry period (~45d before expected calving date) received an intramammary (IM) challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) during the postpartal period to determine the effects of IM LPS and prepartal diet on the expression of key genes associated with immunometabolic response in blood PMN. Feed intake and daily milk yield were recorded throughout the study period. At 7d in milk (DIM), all cows received LPS (200µg) into 1 rear mammary quarter. Blood PMN were isolated at 7, 14, and 30 DIM, as well as before (0h) and after (12h) IM LPS challenge for gene expression analysis using quantitative real time PCR. Phagocytosis capabilities in vitro were assessed at 7, 14, and 30 DIM. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS with repeated measures. No differences in feed intake and milk yield were observed between OVE- and CON-fed cows. As expected, IM LPS challenge altered the expression of genes associated with the immune response (e.g., 1.9- and 1.8-fold for SELL and TLR2, respectively), metabolism (e.g., 1.8- and -1.8-fold for LDHA and SLC2A1, respectively), and transcription (e.g., 1.1- and 1.7-fold for NCOR1 and PPARD, respectively). At 12h postchallenge, an upregulation of TLR2 (1.8-fold), HIF1A (1.9-fold), and NFKB1 (1.5-fold) was observed for OVE rather than CON. At 7 DIM, S100A9 tended (2.2-fold) to be upregulated for OVE rather than CON. At 14 DIM, OVE resulted in lower PMN phagocytosis and an upregulation of NCOR2 (1.6-fold) and RXRA (1.9-fold) compared with CON-fed cows. At 30 DIM, an upregulation of MPO (3.5-fold) and PLA2G4A (1.5-fold) and a tendency for RXRA (1.7-fold) was observed for OVE- rather than CON-fed cows. Our results suggest that IM LPS challenge altered gene expression associated with metabolism in PMN

  7. Elevated dairy fat intake in lactating women alters milk lipid and fatty acids without detectible changes in expression of genes related to lipid uptake or synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yahvah, Katherine M; Brooker, Sarah L; Williams, Janet E; Settles, Matthew; McGuire, Mark A; McGuire, Michelle K

    2015-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that elevated maternal lipid intake (particularly from dairy products) is associated with increased lipids and altered fatty acid profile in milk produced by healthy lactating women. To investigate our primary hypothesis that a maternal diet rich in full-fat dairy products would simultaneously increase milk lipid percent and expression of genes related to the uptake and/or de novo biosynthesis of milk lipids, we provided 15 lactating women with diets enriched in full-fat or nonfat dairy products for 14 days each in a randomized, crossover study with a 2-week washout period. Milk fat (%) was lower when women consumed the low-fat compared with the full-fat dairy diet (2.41% ± 0.31% vs 3.35% ± 0.28%, respectively; P < .05); concentrations of more than 20 fatty acids also differed. However, neither conservatively evaluated microarray data nor quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis uncovered any treatment effects on expression of genes related to lipid synthesis or uptake. These data suggest that alteration in gene expression in the lactating human mammary gland is likely not the primary mechanism by which consumption of a high-fat diet affects milk fat percent in healthy, lactating women.

  8. Dietary whey reduces energy intake and alters hypothalamic gene expression in obese phyto-oestrogen-deprived male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Canesini, Guillermina; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phyto-oestrogens in adult male rats causes obesity and diabetes. As whey proteins have been reported to reduce food intake and improve glucose homoeostasis, we investigated whether they could attenuate susceptibility to obesity and diabetes due to phyto-oestrogen deprivation. To this end, thirty male Wistar rats were fed a high-phyto-oestrogen (HP) or a phyto-oestrogen-free (PF) diet for 10 weeks; six rats from each group were killed. The remaining HP animals (six animals) continued receiving the HP diet for 6 weeks. The remaining PF rats (twelve rats) were divided in two groups: one was given the PF diet and the other a variation of the PF diet plus whey protein (PF-W). Body weight, food intake and adipose tissue weights were recorded. Hypothalamic mRNA expressions of orexigenic (neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein (AgRP)) and anorexigenic (pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine-amphetamine-related transcript (CART)) neuropeptides were quantified by real-time PCR. Serum glucose, insulin and total thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone and oestradiol were assessed. After 10 weeks of PF diet, increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake, with up-regulation of AgRP and down-regulation of POMC', were observed. Longer treatment exacerbated these results, increased total T4 levels, reduced oestradiol levels and impaired glucose homoeostasis. PF-W reduced energy intake and increased POMC expression; however, body weight and adiposity remained unchanged. PF-W could not prevent the hormonal changes or the high circulating glucose levels induced by phyto-oestrogen deprivation, but reduced fasting insulin. These data demonstrate that, although 6 weeks of whey administration could not prevent obesity in phyto-oestrogen-deprived rats, the reduction in energy intake and circulating insulin could be beneficial with longer treatments. PMID:27469930

  9. Dietary whey reduces energy intake and alters hypothalamic gene expression in obese phyto-oestrogen-deprived male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Canesini, Guillermina; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phyto-oestrogens in adult male rats causes obesity and diabetes. As whey proteins have been reported to reduce food intake and improve glucose homoeostasis, we investigated whether they could attenuate susceptibility to obesity and diabetes due to phyto-oestrogen deprivation. To this end, thirty male Wistar rats were fed a high-phyto-oestrogen (HP) or a phyto-oestrogen-free (PF) diet for 10 weeks; six rats from each group were killed. The remaining HP animals (six animals) continued receiving the HP diet for 6 weeks. The remaining PF rats (twelve rats) were divided in two groups: one was given the PF diet and the other a variation of the PF diet plus whey protein (PF-W). Body weight, food intake and adipose tissue weights were recorded. Hypothalamic mRNA expressions of orexigenic (neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein (AgRP)) and anorexigenic (pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine-amphetamine-related transcript (CART)) neuropeptides were quantified by real-time PCR. Serum glucose, insulin and total thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone and oestradiol were assessed. After 10 weeks of PF diet, increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake, with up-regulation of AgRP and down-regulation of POMC', were observed. Longer treatment exacerbated these results, increased total T4 levels, reduced oestradiol levels and impaired glucose homoeostasis. PF-W reduced energy intake and increased POMC expression; however, body weight and adiposity remained unchanged. PF-W could not prevent the hormonal changes or the high circulating glucose levels induced by phyto-oestrogen deprivation, but reduced fasting insulin. These data demonstrate that, although 6 weeks of whey administration could not prevent obesity in phyto-oestrogen-deprived rats, the reduction in energy intake and circulating insulin could be beneficial with longer treatments.

  10. Protein supplements: do they alter dietary intakes?

    PubMed

    Mallard, Alistair R; McLay-Cooke, Rebecca T; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2014-06-01

    Effects of protein versus mixed macronutrient supplementation on total energy intake (TEI) and protein intake during an ad libitum diet were examined. Trained males undertook two, 2-week dietary interventions which were randomized, double blinded, and separated by 2 weeks. These were high-protein supplementation (HP: 1034.5 kJ energy, 29.6 g protein, 8.7 g fat and 12.3 g CHO) and standard meal supplementation (SM: 1039 kJ energy, 9.9 g protein, 9.5 g fat, and 29.4 g CHO) consumed daily following a week of baseline measures. Eighteen participants finished both interventions and one only completed HP. TEI (mean ± SD) was not different between baseline (11148 ± 3347 kJ) and HP (10705 ± 3143 kJ) nor between baseline and SM (12381 ± 3877 kJ), however, TEI was greater with SM than HP (923 ± 4015 kJ p = .043). Protein intake (%TEI) was greater with HP (22.4 ± 6.2%) than baseline (19.4 ± 5.4%; p = .008) but not SM (20.0 ± 5.0%). No differences in absolute daily protein intake were found. Absolute CHO intake was greater with SM than HP (52.0 ± 89.5 g, p = .006). No differences in fat intake were found. Body mass did not change between baseline (82.7 ± 11.2 kg) and either HP (83.1 ± 11.7 kg) or SM (82.9 ± 11.0 kg). Protein supplementation increases the relative proportion of protein in the diet, but doesn't increase the absolute amount of total protein or energy consumed. Thus some compensation by a reduction in other foods occurs. This is in contrast to a mixed nutrient supplement, which does not alter the proportion of protein consumed but does increase TEI.

  11. Regular tart cherry intake alters abdominal adiposity, adipose gene transcription, and inflammation in obesity-prone rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E M; Lewis, Sarah K; Urcuyo-Llanes, Daniel E; Tanone, Ignasia I; Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter B; Bolling, Steven F

    2009-10-01

    Obesity, systemic inflammation, and hyperlipidemia are among the components of metabolic syndrome, a spectrum of phenotypes that can precede the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Animal studies show that intake of anthocyanin-rich extracts can affect these phenotypes. Anthocyanins can alter the activity of tissue peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which affect energy substrate metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unknown if physiologically relevant, anthocyanin-containing whole foods confer similar effects to concentrated, anthocyanin extracts. The effect of anthocyanin-rich tart cherries was tested in the Zucker fatty rat model of obesity and metabolic syndrome. For 90 days, rats were pair-fed a higher fat diet supplemented with either 1% (wt/wt) freeze-dried, whole tart cherry powder or with a calorie- and macronutrient-matched control diet. Tart cherry intake was associated with reduced hyperlipidemia, percentage fat mass, abdominal fat (retroperitoneal) weight, retroperitoneal interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression, and plasma IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Tart cherry diet also increased retroperitoneal fat PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma mRNA (P = .12), decreased IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNA, and decreased nuclear factor kappaB activity. In conclusion, in at-risk obese rats fed a high fat diet, physiologically relevant tart cherry consumption reduced several phenotypes of metabolic syndrome and reduced both systemic and local inflammation. Tart cherries may reduce the degree or trajectory of metabolic syndrome, thereby reducing risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. PMID:19857054

  12. Regular tart cherry intake alters abdominal adiposity, adipose gene transcription, and inflammation in obesity-prone rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E M; Lewis, Sarah K; Urcuyo-Llanes, Daniel E; Tanone, Ignasia I; Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter B; Bolling, Steven F

    2009-10-01

    Obesity, systemic inflammation, and hyperlipidemia are among the components of metabolic syndrome, a spectrum of phenotypes that can precede the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Animal studies show that intake of anthocyanin-rich extracts can affect these phenotypes. Anthocyanins can alter the activity of tissue peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which affect energy substrate metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unknown if physiologically relevant, anthocyanin-containing whole foods confer similar effects to concentrated, anthocyanin extracts. The effect of anthocyanin-rich tart cherries was tested in the Zucker fatty rat model of obesity and metabolic syndrome. For 90 days, rats were pair-fed a higher fat diet supplemented with either 1% (wt/wt) freeze-dried, whole tart cherry powder or with a calorie- and macronutrient-matched control diet. Tart cherry intake was associated with reduced hyperlipidemia, percentage fat mass, abdominal fat (retroperitoneal) weight, retroperitoneal interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression, and plasma IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Tart cherry diet also increased retroperitoneal fat PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma mRNA (P = .12), decreased IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNA, and decreased nuclear factor kappaB activity. In conclusion, in at-risk obese rats fed a high fat diet, physiologically relevant tart cherry consumption reduced several phenotypes of metabolic syndrome and reduced both systemic and local inflammation. Tart cherries may reduce the degree or trajectory of metabolic syndrome, thereby reducing risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

  13. Altered energy intake and the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm are associated with changes in phase, but not amplitude, of clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goh, Grace H; Mark, Peter J; Maloney, Shane K

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are driven by a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In vitro, temperature cycles within the physiological range can act as potent entraining cues for biological clocks. We altered the body temperature (Tc) rhythm in rats by manipulating energy intake (EI) to determine whether EI-induced changes in Tc oscillations are associated with changes in SCN clock gene rhythms in vivo. Male Wistar rats (n = 16 per diet) were maintained on either an ad libitum diet (CON), a high energy cafeteria diet (CAF), or a calorie restricted diet (CR), and Tc was recorded every 30 min for 6-7 weeks. SCN tissue was harvested from rats at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0, ZT6, ZT12, or ZT18. Expression of the clock genes Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα, the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1, and the heat shock protein Hsp90aa1, were determined using qPCR. The circadian profile of gene expression for each gene was characterized using cosinor analysis. Compared to the CON rats, the amplitude of Tc was decreased in CAF rats by 0.1 °C (p < 0.001), and increased in CR rats by 0.3 °C (p < 0.001). The amplitude of Hsp90aa1 expression was lowest in CAF rats and highest in CR rats (p = 0.045), but the amplitude of all of the clock genes and Hsf1 were unaffected by diet (p > 0.25). Compared to CON, phase advances of the Tc, Bmal1, and Per2 rhythms were observed with CR feeding (p < 0.05), but CAF feeding elicited no significant changes in phase. The present results indicate that in vivo, the SCN is largely resistant to entrainment by EI-induced changes in the Tc rhythm, although some phase entrainment may occur.

  14. A gestational diet high in fat-soluble vitamins alters expression of genes in brain pathways and reduces sucrose preference, but not food intake, in Wistar male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Diana; Poon, Abraham N; Kubant, Ruslan; Kim, Hwanki; Huot, Pedro S P; Cho, Clara E; Pannia, Emanuela; Pausova, Zdenka; Anderson, G Harvey

    2015-04-01

    High intakes of multivitamins (HV) during pregnancy by Wistar rats increase food intake, body weight, and characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in male offspring. In this study, high-fat soluble vitamins were fed in combination during gestation to test the hypothesis that they partially account for the effects of the HV diet. Pregnant Wistar rats (14-16/group) were fed a recommended multivitamin diet (1-fold all vitamins) or high-fat soluble vitamin diet (HFS; 10-fold vitamins A, D, E, and K) during pregnancy. Offspring body weight, food intake, and preference as well as expression of selected genes in the hypothalamus and hippocampus were evaluated at birth, weaning, and 14 weeks postweaning. Body weight and food intake were not affected but sucrose preference decreased by 4% in those born to dams fed the HFS gestational diet. Gene expressions of the hypothalamic anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) and orexogenic neuropeptide Y (Npy) (∼30% p = 0.008, ∼40% p = 0.007) were increased in weaning and adult rats, respectively. Hippocampal dopaminergic genes (35%-50% p < 0.05) were upregulated at birth and 14 weeks postweaning. DNA hypermethylation (2% p = 0.006) was observed in the dopamine receptor 1 (Drd1) promoter region. We conclude that a gestational diet high in vitamins A, D, E, and K does not show the effects of the HV diet on body weight or food intake but may affect the development of higher hedonic regulatory pathways associated with food preference.

  15. Long-term intake of a high prebiotic fiber diet but not high protein reduces metabolic risk after a high fat challenge and uniquely alters gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dolan C; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-09-01

    A mismatch between early developmental diet and adulthood may increase obesity risk. Our objective was to determine the effects of re-matching rats to their weaning diets high in protein or fiber after transient high-fat/high-sucrose challenge in adulthood. We hypothesize that a long-term high fiber diet will be associated with a gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression reflective of reduced adiposity. Wistar rat pups were fed a control (C), high prebiotic fiber (HF), or high protein (HP) diet from 3-15 weeks of age; a high-fat/high-sucrose diet from 15-21 weeks; their respective C, HF, or HP diets from 21-25 weeks. Gut microbiota of cecal contents and hepatic gene expression were measured when rats were terminated at 25 weeks of age. HF rats had higher total bacteria, bifidobacteria and Bacteroides/Prevotella spp than C and HP at 25 weeks (P < 0.05). Firmicutes, especially Clostridium leptum, decreased in HF compared to C and HP (P < .05). The ratio of Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in HF versus C and HP at 25 weeks (P < .05). HF decreased hepatic cholesterol content compared to HP and C at 25 weeks. HF and HP increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA and decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase mRNA compared to C (P < .05). In conclusion, re-matching rats to a HF but not HP diet attenuated the typical increase in Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio associated with consumption of a high fat diet. Lower hepatic cholesterol with long-term HF diet intake may be related to alterations in gut microbiota and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  16. Regulation of aldosterone secretion during altered sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1983-07-01

    The interactions of the renin-angiotensin system with other factors in the regulation of aldosterone secretion were analyzed during altered sodium in the rat. During sodium restriction, the rise in aldosterone one secretion was accompanied by trophic changes in the adrenal glomerulosa zone including increased angiotensin II receptors and enzymes of early and late steps in the aldosterone biosynthetic pathway. All these effects of sodium restriction were reproduced by infusion of angiotensin II, and could be prevented by administration of the converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 14,225. These findings indicate that the adrenal secretory and trophic responses to sodium restriction are mediated by angiotensin II. In hypophysectomized rats, the basal activities of the enzymes of the early aldosterone biosynthetic pathway were reduced, contributing to the blunted aldosterone responsiveness to sodium deficiency. However, sodium restriction for 6 days significantly increased adrenal glomerulosa angiotensin II receptors and enzymes of the early and late aldosterone biosynthetic pathway, indicating that the pituitary gland is not necessary for the adrenal effects of angiotensin II. In contrast to the prominent glomerulotropic actions of angiotensin II in rats on normal or low sodium intake, infusion of angiotensin II during high sodium intake did not increase blood aldosterone, angiotensin II receptors, or 18-hydroxylase activity, indicating that the trophic actions of the octapeptide are determined by the state of sodium balance. In recent studies, other factors including potassium, dopamine and somatostatin have been shown to potentiate or inhibit the actions of angiotensin II on the adrenal gland. The ability of such factors to influence the effects of angiotensin II could serve as a protective mechanism to modulate aldosterone responses to angiotensin II when elevations in the circulating level of the peptide occur in the absence of sodium deficiency.

  17. Common genes regulate food and ethanol intake in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Morgan L; Lamina, Omoteniola; Hogan, Kerry E; Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2016-06-01

    The abuse liability of alcohol (ethanol) is believed to result in part from its actions on neurobiological substrates that underlie the motivation toward food and other natural reinforcers, and a growing body of evidence indicates that these substrates are broadly conserved among animal phyla. Understanding the extent to which the substrates regulating ethanol and food intake overlap is an important step toward developing therapeutics that selectively reduce ethanol intake. In the current experiments, we measured food and ethanol intake in Recombinant Inbred (RI) lines of Drosophila melanogaster using several assays, and then calculated genetic correlations to estimate the degree to which common genes might underlie behavior in these assays. We found that food intake and ethanol intake as measured in the capillary assay are genetically correlated traits in D. melanogaster, as well as in a panel of 11 Drosophila species that we tested subsequently. RI line differences in food intake in a dyed food assay were genetically unrelated to ethanol intake in the capillary assay or to ethanol preference measured using an olfactory trap apparatus. Using publicly available gene expression data, we found that expression profiles across the RI lines of a number of genes (including the D2-like dopamine receptor, DOPA decarboxylase, and fruitless) correlated with the RI line differences in food and ethanol intake we measured, while the expression profiles of other genes, including NPF, and the NPF and 5-HT2 receptors, correlated only with ethanol intake or preference. Our results suggest that food and ethanol intake are regulated by some common genes in Drosophila, but that other genes regulate ethanol intake independently of food intake. These results have implications toward the development of therapeutics that preferentially reduce ethanol intake. PMID:27286934

  18. Nutritional status alters saccharin intake and sweet receptor mRNA expression in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Yan, Jianqun; Suo, Yi; Li, Jinrong; Wang, Qian; Lv, Bo

    2010-04-14

    Sweet taste usually signifies the presence of caloric food. It is commonly accepted that a close association exists among sweet taste perception, preference, and nutritional status. However, the mechanisms involved remain unknown. To investigate whether nutritional status affects the preference for palatable solutions and alters sweet taste receptor gene expression in rats, we measured saccharin intake and preference using a two-bottle preference test, and changes in body weight, plasma leptin levels, and gene expression for the sweet taste receptor in taste buds in high-fat diet-induced obese rats and chronically diet-restricted rats. We found that the consumption and preference ratios for 0.01 and 0.04 M saccharin were significantly lower in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats than in the normal diet rats, while the serum leptin levels were markedly increased in obese rats. Consistent with the changes in saccharin intake, the gene expression level of the sweet taste receptor T1R3 was significantly decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats compared with the control rats. By contrast, the chronically diet-restricted rats showed remarkably enhanced consumption and preference for 0.04 M saccharin. The serum leptin concentration was decreased, and the gene expression of the leptin receptor was markedly increased in the taste buds. In conclusion, our results suggest that nutritional status alters saccharin preference and the expression of T1R3 in taste buds. These processes may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the modulation of peripheral sweet taste sensitivity, in which leptin plays a role.

  19. Altered salience network connectivity predicts macronutrient intake after sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Senhua; Hu, Siyuan; Goel, Namni; Detre, John A.; Dinges, David F.; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Although insufficient sleep is a well-recognized risk factor for overeating and weight gain, the neural mechanisms underlying increased caloric (particularly fat) intake after sleep deprivation remain unclear. Here we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined brain connectivity changes associated with macronutrient intake after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Compared to the day following baseline sleep, healthy adults consumed a greater percentage of calories from fat and a lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates during the day following TSD. Subjects also exhibited increased brain connectivity in the salience network from the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) to bilateral putamen and bilateral anterior insula (aINS) after TSD. Moreover, dACC-putamen and dACC-aINS connectivity correlated with increased fat and decreased carbohydrate intake during the day following TSD, but not during the day following baseline sleep. These findings provide a potential neural mechanism by which sleep loss leads to increased fat intake. PMID:25645575

  20. Neuropeptide Y administration into the amygdala alters high fat food intake.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D; York, David A; Bray, George A

    2006-07-01

    The orexigenic effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) are mediated through the hypothalamus, while the anxiolytic effects of NPY appear to be mediated through the amygdala. We hypothesized that intra-amygdalar administration of NPY might alter food preference without changing total food intake. Neuropeptide Y was administered into the central nucleus of the amygdala in both satiated and overnight-fasted rats, and intake and preference for a high fat diet (56%)/low carbohydrate (20%) diet or a low fat (10%)/high carbohydrate (66%) diet were measured. Intra-amygdalar NPY administration in satiated rats did not change total caloric intake, but it did produce a dose-dependent decrease in intake of and preference for high fat diet relative to low fat diet over 24 h. In overnight-fasted rats, intra-amygdalar NPY also decreased the intake and preference for a high fat diet relative to low fat diet over 24 h, without altering total caloric intake. Intra-amygdalar NPY administration did not produce conditioned taste aversions to a novel saccharin solution. These results suggest that amygdalar NPY may have a role in macronutrient selection, without altering total caloric intake.

  1. Metabolic effects of altering the 24 h energy intake in man, using direct and indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dauncey, M J

    1980-03-01

    1. The metabolic effects of increasing or decreasing the usual energy intake for only 1 d were assessed in eight adult volunteers. Each subject lived for 28 h in a whole-body calorimeter at 26 degrees on three separate occasions of high, medium or low energy intake. Intakes (mean +/- SEM) of 13830 +/- 475 (high), 8400 +/- 510 (medium) and 3700 +/- 359 (low) kj/24 h were eaten in three meals of identical nutrient composition. 2. Energy expenditure was measured continuously by two methods: direct calorimetry, as total heat loss partitioned into its evaporative and sensible components: and indirect calorimetry, as heat production calculated from oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. For the twenty-four sessions there was a mean difference of only 1.2 +/- 0.14 (SEM) % between the two estimates of 24 h energy expenditure, with heat loss being less than heat production. Since experimental error was involved in both estimates it would be wrong to ascribe greater accuracy to either one of the measures of energy expenditure. 3. Despite the wide variation in the metabolic responses of the subjects to over-eating and under-eating, in comparison with the medium intake the 24 h heat production increased significantly by 10% on the high intake and decreased by 6% on the low intake. Mean (+/- SEM) values for 24 h heat production were 8770 +/- 288, 7896 +/- 297 and 7495 +/- 253 kJ on the high, medium and low intakes respectively. The effects of over-eating were greatest at night and the resting metabolic rate remained elevated by 12% 14 h after the last meal. By contrast, during under-eating the metabolic rate at night decreased by only 1%. 4. Evaporative heat loss accounted for an average of 25% of the total heat loss at each level of intake. Changes in evaporative heat loss were +14% on the high intake and -10% on the low intake. Sensible heat loss altered by +9 and -5% on the high and low intakes respectively. 5. It is concluded that (a) the effects on 24 h energy

  2. Alterations in Food Group Intakes and Subsequent Weight Changes in Adults: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Esfahani, Firozeh; Ejtahed, Hanieh Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Delshad, Hossein; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-01-01

    Background: The extent of weight change is varied for specific foods. This highlights the effect of dietary quality and food choices on weight control. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the association between alterations in food group intake and weight change over a 3 years follow-up period. Materials and Methods: This longitudinal study was conducted on 851 adults in the framework of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Intakes of various foods were measured at baseline and after 3 years using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Dietary data was grouped into 13 food groups. Alterations in food group intakes were categorized in tertiles; middle tertile of intake changes was considered as the reference category and the first and last tertiles of changes as increased and decreased intakes, respectively. Weight change per year of follow-up was the outcome of interest. Weight gain was defined as ≥ 0.5 kg/y, weight loss as ≤ -0.5 kg/y and stable weight as > -0.5 to < 0.5 kg/y. Multinomial logistic regression was used with stable weight as the reference group. Results: In men, weight loss was significantly predicted only by decreased intake of added sugars (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.06-4.63). In women, weight gain was significantly predicted by decreased intake of whole grains (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.11-3.31) and weight loss was predicted by decreased intake of vegetables (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.91). Conclusions: Alterations in consumption of whole grains, vegetables, and added sugars are associated with body weight change, suggesting that it could be helpful in weight control. PMID:25237324

  3. Altered nutrient intake by baculovirus-challenged insects: Self-medication or compensatory feeding?

    PubMed

    Shikano, Ikkei; Cory, Jenny S

    2016-09-01

    Infection by parasites can alter the feeding behaviour of hosts. Some animals seek out substances that can therapeutically clear infections (self-medication), some may seek out resources to recoup resources lost while fighting off infection (compensatory feeding) and others may be manipulated to ingest substances that benefit parasite fitness (parasite manipulation of host). Recent studies have indicated that pathogen-challenged insects can self-medicate by increasing their protein intake relative to carbohydrate, which is thought to act by boosting the insect's immune response. However, increased protein intake could also be due to compensatory feeding or pathogen manipulation of the host, and a rigorous examination of all four of the testable predictions, which is necessary for verifying self-medication behaviour, has not been conducted. The therapeutic behaviour must (1) only be employed by infected individuals and (2) alleviate the potential fitness loss of the infected individual. (3) If an uninfected individual engages in the behaviour, they suffer a decrease in fitness, and lastly, (4) the parasite cannot benefit from the behaviour. In response to baculovirus-challenge (AcMNPV) at 24°C, the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, increased proportional protein intake, by increasing protein intake rather than decreasing carbohydrate intake. Increased protein intake did not benefit virus fitness, but it also did not increase the probability of host survival. Increased proportional protein intake did not occur in response to TnSNPV-challenge at 24°C or in response to AcMNPV-challenge at a higher temperature (32°C), indicating that the virus-induced change in nutrient intake depends on virus identity and temperature. Since virus-challenged T. ni did not show the typical costs associated with infection, the altered nutrient intake is likely to be a compensatory response. Understanding the motivation behind pathogen-induced changes in feeding behaviour could have

  4. Chronic Ethanol Intake Alters Circadian Phase Shifting and Free-Running Period in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seggio, Joseph A.; Fixaris, Michael C.; Reed, Jeffrey D.; Logan, Ryan W.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker—including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli—in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  5. Chronic ethanol intake alters circadian phase shifting and free-running period in mice.

    PubMed

    Seggio, Joseph A; Fixaris, Michael C; Reed, Jeffrey D; Logan, Ryan W; Rosenwasser, Alan M

    2009-08-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic and acute ethanol treatments alter fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker--including free-running period and responsiveness to photic and nonphotic phase-shifting stimuli--in rats and hamsters. In the present work, the authors extend these observations to the C57BL/6J mouse, an inbred strain characterized by very high levels of voluntary ethanol intake and by reliable and stable free-running circadian activity rhythms. Mice were housed individually in running-wheel cages under conditions of either voluntary or forced ethanol intake, whereas controls were maintained on plain water. Forced ethanol intake significantly attenuated photic phase delays (but not phase advances) and shortened free-running period in constant darkness, but voluntary ethanol intake failed to affect either of these parameters. Thus, high levels of chronic ethanol intake, beyond those normally achieved under voluntary drinking conditions, are required to alter fundamental circadian pacemaker properties in C57BL/6J mice. These observations may be related to the relative ethanol insensitivity displayed by this strain in several other phenotypic domains, including ethanol-induced sedation, ataxia, and withdrawal. Additional experiments will investigate chronobiological sensitivity to ethanol in a range of inbred strains showing diverse ethanol-related phenotypes. PMID:19625732

  6. Excess dietary salt intake alters the excitability of central sympathetic networks.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Madden, Christopher J; Sved, Alan F

    2010-07-14

    The ingestion of excess dietary salt (defined as NaCl) is strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease, morbidity, mortality, and is regarded as a major contributing factor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. Although several mechanisms contribute to the adverse consequences of dietary salt intake, accumulating evidence suggests that dietary salt loading produces neurogenically-mediated increases in total peripheral resistance to raise arterial blood pressure (ABP). Evidence from clinical studies and experimental models clearly establishes a hypertensive effect of dietary salt loading in a subset of individuals who are deemed "salt-sensitive". However, we will discuss and present evidence to develop a novel hypothesis to suggest that while chronic increases in dietary salt intake do not elevate mean ABP in "non-salt-sensitive" animals, dietary salt intake does enhance several sympathetic reflexes thereby predisposing these animals and/or individuals to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Additional evidence raises an intriguing hypothesis that these enhanced sympathetic reflexes are largely attributed to the ability of excess dietary salt intake to selectively enhance the excitability of sympathetic-regulatory neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Insight into the cellular mechanisms by which dietary salt intake alters the responsiveness of RVLM circuits will likely provide a foundation for developing new therapeutic approaches to treat salt-sensitive hypertension. The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009. PMID:20434471

  7. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-06-01

    The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients.A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume.Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = -0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001).The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients.

  8. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients. A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume. Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = –0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001). The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  9. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-06-01

    The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients.A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume.Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = -0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001).The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  10. The fetal origins of obesity: early origins of altered food intake.

    PubMed

    Muhlhausler, B S; Ong, Z Y

    2011-09-01

    There is now clear evidence from population-based and experimental animal studies that maternal obesity and maternal overnutrition, particularly excessive intake of high-fat and high-sugar diets, is associated with an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the offspring. Whilst the physiological reasons for this association are still not fully understood, one of the key pathways appears to be the ability of exposure to an oversupply of energy, fat and sugar during critical windows of development to program an increased food intake in the offspring. This review will focus on our current understanding of the programming of food intake, with a focus on the importance of the maternal diet. Specifically, we will discuss how exposure to an increased energy supply before birth and in early infancy, and/or increased maternal intake of palatable foods alters the development of the systems regulating appetite and food preferences, and how these changes interact to promote excess consumption and thus predispose the offspring to weight gain and obesity.

  11. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a source to detect markers of homeostatic alterations caused by the intake of diets with an unbalanced macronutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Keijer, Jaap; Caimari, Antoni; van Schothorst, Evert M; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are accessible in humans, and their gene expression pattern was shown to reflect overall physiological response of the body to a specific stimulus, such as diet. We aimed to study the impact of sustained intake (4months) of diets with an unbalanced macronutrient proportion (rich in fat or protein) administered isocalorically to a balanced control diet, as physiological stressors on PBMC whole-genome gene expression in rats, to better understand the effects of these diets on metabolism and health and to identify biomarkers of nutritional imbalance. Dietary macronutrient composition (mainly increased protein content) altered PBMC gene expression, with genes involved in immune response being the most affected. Intake of a high-fat (HF) diet decreased the expression of genes related to antigen recognition/presentation, whereas the high-protein (HP) diet increased the expression of these genes and of genes involved in cytokine signaling and immune system maturation/activation. Key energy homeostasis genes (mainly related to lipid metabolism) were also affected, reflecting an adaptive response to the diets. Moreover, HF diet feeding impaired expression of genes involved in redox balance regulation. Finally, we identified a common gene expression signature of 7 genes whose expression changed in the same direction in response to the intake of both diets. These genes, individually or together, constitute a potential risk marker of diet macronutrient imbalance. In conclusion, we newly show that gene expression analysis in PBMCs allows for detection of diet-induced physiological deviations that distinguish from a diet with a proper and equilibrated macronutrient composition.

  13. Time of day and access to food alter water intake in rats after water deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ang, K K; McKitrick, D J; Phillips, P A; Arnolda, L F

    2001-09-01

    conclude that both the time of day and access to food independently alter water intake in rats subjected to a previous 24 h water deprivation. Our study also supports the validity of performing water intake measurements in thirst studies in rats during the day.

  14. Long term exendin-4 treatment reduces food intake and body weight and alters expression of brain homeostatic and reward markers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Moghadam, Alexander A; Cordner, Zachary A; Liang, Nu-Chu; Moran, Timothy H

    2014-09-01

    Repeated administration of the long-acting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (EX-4) has been shown to reduce food intake and body weight and do so without a rebound increase in food intake after treatment termination. The current study examines the neural mechanisms underlying these actions. After 6 weeks of maintenance on a standard chow or a high-fat (HF) diet, male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with EX-4 (3.2 μg/kg, i.p., twice a day) or vehicle for 9 consecutive days. Food intake and body weight (BW) were monitored daily. Expression of the genes for the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) peptides proopiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and agouti gene-related protein was determined. Expression of the dopamine precursor tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene in the ventral tegmental area and genes for dopamine receptors 1 (D1R) and dopamine receptor 2 in the nucleus accumbens were also determined. Pair-fed groups were included to control for the effects of reduced food intake and BW. Treatment with EX-4 significantly decreased food intake and BW over the 9-day period in both the standard chow and HF groups. HF feeding decreased POMC without changing NPY/agouti gene-related protein gene expression in the ARC. Treatment with EX-4 increased POMC and decreased NPY expression independent of the reduction of food intake and BW. Mesolimbic TH and D1R gene expression were decreased significantly in chronic HF diet-fed rats, and these changes were reversed in both EX-4 and pair-fed conditions. These results suggest a role for increased POMC and decreased NPY expression in the ARC in the effects of EX-4 on food intake and BW. Our findings also suggest that EX-4 induced the recovery of mesolimbic TH and D1R expression in HF diet-fed rats may be secondary to HF intake reduction and/or weight loss.

  15. Drospirenone intake alters plasmatic steroid levels and cyp17a1 expression in gonads of juvenile sea bass.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Maria; Fernandes, Denise; Medina, Paula; Blázquez, Mercedes; Porte, Cinta

    2016-06-01

    Drospirenone (DRO) is one of the most widely used progestins in contraceptive treatments and hormone replacement therapies. The pharmacokinetics and potential toxicological effects of DRO were investigated in juvenile sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) exposed through the diet (0.01-10 μg DRO/g) for up to 31 days. DRO was detected in the blood (4-27 ng/mL) of fish exposed to the highest concentration, with no significant bioaccumulation over time and no alteration of hepatic metabolizing enzymes, namely, CYP1A and CYP3A-catalysed activities and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT). Pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17P4), 17α-hydroxypregnenolone (17P5), androstenedione (AD) and testosterone (T) were determined in plasma and gene expression of cyp17a1, cyp19a1a and cyp11β analysed by qRT-PCR in gonads. The significant increase in plasmatic levels of 17P5, 17P4 and AD detected after 31 days exposure to 10 ng DRO/g together with the increased expression of cyp17a1 in females evidence the ability of DRO to alter steroid synthesis at low intake concentrations (7 ng DRO/day). However, the potential consequences of this steroid shift for female reproduction remain to be investigated. PMID:26995450

  16. Altering physically effective fiber intake through forage proportion and particle length: digestion and milk production.

    PubMed

    Yang, W Z; Beauchemin, K A

    2007-07-01

    Intake of physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) of dairy cows was altered by adjusting the proportion of forage in the diet and forage particle length, and effects on nutrient intake, site and extent of digestion, microbial N synthesis, and milk production were measured. The experiment was designed as a triplicated 4 x 4 Latin square using 12 lactating dairy cows, with 4 that were ruminally and duodenally cannulated, 4 that were ruminally cannulated, and 4 that were intact. Thus, the site and extent of digestion, and microbial N synthesis were measured in a single 4 x 4 Latin square. Treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 factorial design; 2 forage particle lengths (FPL) of alfalfa silage (short and long) were combined with low (35:65) and high (60:40) forage:concentrate (F:C) ratios (dry matter basis). Dietary peNDF content was determined from the sum of the proportion (dry matter basis) of dietary dry matter retained either on the 2 screens (8- and 19-mm) or on the 3 screens (1.18-, 8-, and 19-mm) of the Penn State Particle Separator multiplied by the neutral detergent fiber content of the diet. An increased F:C ratio reduced intakes of dry matter and starch by 9 and 46%, respectively, but increased intake of fiber from forage sources by 53%. Digestibility of dry matter in the total tract was not affected, whereas total digestion of fiber and N was improved by increasing the F:C ratio. Improved total fiber digestion resulted from higher ruminal digestion, which was partially due to a shift in starch digestion from the rumen to the intestine with the increased F:C ratio. Actual milk yield was decreased but production of 4% fat-corrected milk was similar between the low and high F:C diets because of increased milk fat content. Increased FPL increased intake of peNDF, especially when the high F:C diet was fed. However, nutrient intakes, N metabolism in the digestive tract, and milk production were not affected. Digestibility of neutral detergent fiber in

  17. Repeated Gastric Distension Alters Food Intake and Neuroendocrine Profiles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, Sara L.; Kinzig, Kimberly P.

    2011-01-01

    The consumption of a large food bolus leads to stomach distension. Gastric distension potently signals the termination of a meal by stimulating gastric mechanoreceptors and activating neuroendocrine circuitry. The ability to terminate a meal is altered in disorders such as bulimia nervosa (BN), binge-eating disorder (BED) and certain subtypes of obesity in which large quantities of food are frequently ingested. When a large meal is consumed, the stomach is rapidly stretched. We modeled this rapid distension of the stomach in order to determine if the neuroendocrine abnormalities present in these disorders, including increased gastric capacit3y, leptin dysregulation, and alterations in neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression, were influenced by the rapid stretch aspect of repeatedly consuming a large meal. To test the effects of repeated gastric distension (RGD) on neuroendocrine factors involved in energy homeostasis, a permanent intra-gastric balloon was implanted in rats, and briefly inflated daily for 4 weeks. Though body weights and daily food intakes remained equivalent in RGD and control rats, a significant delay in the onset of feeding was present during the first and second, but not the third and fourth weeks of inflations. Despite equivalent body weights and daily caloric consumption, RGD animals had significantly decreased leptin levels (p < 0.05), and tended to have increased fasting arcuate NPY levels (p = 0.08), which were suppressed more than control animals following food intake (control and RGD decreases from baseline were 184.95% and 257.42%, respectively). NPY expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract followed a similar pattern. These data demonstrate that the act of regularly distending the stomach can have effects on the regulation of energy balance that are independent from those related to caloric consumption, and may be related to disorders such as BN, BED, and certain types of obesity in which meal termination

  18. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  19. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake.

  20. Dairy and plant based food intakes are associated with altered faecal microbiota in 2 to 3 year old Australian children

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Brown, P.; Morrison, M.; Krause, L.; Davies, P. S. W.

    2016-01-01

    The first 1000 days (conception to 24 months) is when gut microbiota composition and eating patterns are established, and a critical period influencing lifelong health. The aim of this study is to examine the associations between food intakes and microbiota composition at the end of this period. Diet was quantified for 37 well-nourished Australian children aged between 2 to 3 years by using a food frequency questionnaire and 24 hr recalls. Both dairy and plant-based (fruit, vegetables, soy, pulses and nuts) food intakes were associated with distinct microbiota profiles. Dairy intake was positively associated with the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio, and in particular Erysipelatoclostridium spp., but negatively associated with species richness and diversity. Vegetable intake was positively associated with the relative abundance of the Lachnospira genus, while soy, pulse and nut intake was positively associated with the relative abundance of bacteria related to Bacteroides xylanisolvens. Fruit intake, especially apples and pears, were negatively associated with the relative abundance of bacteria related to Ruminococcus gnavus. In this cohort of young children dairy and plant based food intakes were found to be associated with altered microbiota composition. Further exploration is needed to elucidate the effect of these dietary and microbial differences on host phenotype. PMID:27694811

  1. Differential expression of genes in the liver associated with gain and intake in beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to identify genes associated with gain and intake in the liver in beef cattle. The liver uses 25% of the body’s energy, while constituting less than 2% of total body weight. It is likely that the liver plays a key role in gain and intake due to its high energy utilizati...

  2. Genetic alteration and gene expression modulation during cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Garnis, Cathie; Buys, Timon PH; Lam, Wan L

    2004-01-01

    Cancer progresses through a series of histopathological stages. Progression is thought to be driven by the accumulation of genetic alterations and consequently gene expression pattern changes. The identification of genes and pathways involved will not only enhance our understanding of the biology of this process, it will also provide new targets for early diagnosis and facilitate treatment design. Genomic approaches have proven to be effective in detecting chromosomal alterations and identifying genes disrupted in cancer. Gene expression profiling has led to the subclassification of tumors. In this article, we will describe the current technologies used in cancer gene discovery, the model systems used to validate the significance of the genes and pathways, and some of the genes and pathways implicated in the progression of preneoplastic and early stage cancer. PMID:15035667

  3. Efflux Pump Control Alters Synthetic Gene Circuit Function.

    PubMed

    Diao, Junchen; Charlebois, Daniel A; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Bódi, Zoltán; Pál, Csaba; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic biology aims to design new biological systems for predefined purposes, such as the controlled secretion of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or other chemicals. Synthetic gene circuits regulating an efflux pump from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family could achieve this. However, ABC efflux pumps can also drive out intracellular inducer molecules that control the gene circuits. This will introduce an implicit feedback that could alter gene circuit function in ways that are poorly understood. Here, we used two synthetic gene circuits inducible by tetracycline family molecules to regulate the expression of a yeast ABC pump (Pdr5p) that pumps out the inducer. Pdr5p altered the dose-responses of the original gene circuits substantially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While one aspect of the change could be attributed to the efflux pumping function of Pdr5p, another aspect remained unexplained. Quantitative modeling indicated that reduced regulator gene expression in addition to efflux pump function could fully explain the altered dose-responses. These predictions were validated experimentally. Overall, we highlight how efflux pumps can alter gene circuit dynamics and demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding synthetic gene circuit function in new circumstances.

  4. Fatty acid intake alters growth and immunity in milk-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Vandehaar, M J; Sordillo, L M; Catherman, D R; Bateman, H G; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of supplementing milk replacer (MR) with NeoTec4 (Provimi North America, Brookville, OH), a commercially available blend of butyric acid, coconut oil, and flax oil, on calf growth, efficiency, and indices of immune function. In trial 1a, 48 male Holstein calves were fed either a control MR that contained only animal fat or the same MR with NeoTec4 (treatment) along with free-choice starter. The MR (28.7% crude protein, 15.6% fat) was fed at an average of 1 kg of dry matter (DM)/d. In trial 1b, weaned calves from trial 1a were all fed dry starter for 28 d without NeoTec4 (phase 1), and then half the calves were fed NeoTec4 for 28 d (phase 2). In trial 2, 40 male Holstein calves were fed a control MR with lard, coconut oil, and soy lecithin or the same MR supplemented with NeoTec4 (treatment). The MR (22.8% crude protein, 18.9% fat) was fed at an average of 1 kg of DM/d; no starter was fed. In trial 1a, NeoTec4 improved average daily gain, feed intake, and feed efficiency, reduced the number of days that calves experienced scours, and reduced the medical treatments for clostridium sickness. In trials 1a and 2, NeoTec4 altered the inflammatory response to vaccination with Pasteurella at 5 wk of age and to challenge with Salmonella toxin at less than 2 wk of age (fed NeoTec4 for 6 d), as observed by reduced hyperthermia and hypophagia, and altered the tumor necrosis factor-α response. In addition, NeoTec4 enhanced the response in IL-4 and globular protein estimates postchallenge and enhanced titers for bovine viral diarrhea and respiratory parainfluenza-3. Postchallenge serum concentrations of albumin were lower and urea nitrogen concentrations were greater in control calves than in calves fed NeoTec4. In trial 1b, performance did not differ during the first 28 d when no calves received NeoTec4, but calves receiving NeoTec4 in the second 28 d had greater average daily gain and feed efficiency. We conclude that

  5. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20-60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3-65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

  6. Carbon Nanomaterials Alter Global Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Sara; Short, John C W; McDermott, Hyoeun; Linan, Alexander; Bartlett, Katelyn; Gadila, Shiva Kumar Goud; Schmelzle, Katie; Wanekaya, Adam; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), which include carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their derivatives, have diverse technological and biomedical applications. The potential toxicity of CNMs to cells and tissues has become an important emerging question in nanotechnology. To assess the toxicity of CNTs and fullerenol C60(OH)24, we in the present work used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the simplest eukaryotic organisms that share fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. We found that treatment with CNMs, regardless of their physical shape, negatively affected the growth rates, end-point cell densities and doubling times of CNM-exposed yeast cells when compared to unexposed cells. To investigate potential mechanisms behind the CNMs-induced growth defects, we performed RNA-Seq dependent transcriptional analysis and constructed global gene expression profiles of fullerenol C60(OH)24- and CNT-treated cells. When compared to non-treated control cells, CNM-treated cells displayed differential expression of genes whose functions are implicated in membrane transporters and stress response, although differentially expressed genes were not consistent between CNT- and fullerenol C60(OH)24-treated groups, leading to our conclusion that CNMs could serve as environmental toxic factors to eukaryotic cells. PMID:27483901

  7. Genetic selection for body weight in chickens has altered responses of the brain's AMPK system to food intake regulation effect of ghrelin, but not obestatin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingwen; Siegel, Paul B; Denbow, D Michael

    2011-08-01

    The effects of ghrelin and obestatin regulation of food intake are different in mammals and chickens. We investigated central effects of ghrelin and obestatin in lines of chickens selected 50 generations for high (HWS) or low (LWS) body weight. We hypothesized that the effect of ghrelin and obestatin on food intake in 5-day-old chicks is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) system and selection for body weight alters the brain's response to ghrelin and obestatin by changing the neuronal AMPK system. Although intracerebroventricular (ICV) ghrelin injection decreased food intake in both lines, the threshold for the anorexigenic effect of central ghrelin was lower in LWS than HWS chicks. Obestatin caused a linear dose-dependent increase in food intake in HWS but not LWS chicks. ICV injection of 0.4 nmol ghrelin inhibited hypothalamic AMPK related gene expression and phosphorylation of AMPK α and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) with the magnitude of inhibition different in the two lines. In contrast, ICV injection of 4 nmol obestatin did not affect mRNA expression of AMPK system or phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC in either line. These data support the premise of a lower threshold for anorexigenic effect of central ghrelin in LWS than HWS chicks, and this difference may be associated with differential hypothalamic AMPK signaling. Additionally, the hypothalamic mRNA level of ghrelin was significantly higher in LWS than HWS, which may have also contributed to the different threshold response to ghrelin in these two lines. The expression of the ghrelin receptor was also higher in the LWS line, but not until 56 days of age. In summary, selection for body weight has resulted in differences in the central ghrelin and obestatin system, and an altered brain AMPK system may contribute to the different neuronal response to ghrelin, but not obestatin.

  8. The intake of high-fat diets induces an obesogenic-like gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which is reverted by dieting.

    PubMed

    Reynés, Bàrbara; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are increasingly used for nutrigenomic studies. In this study, we aimed to identify whether these cells could reflect the development of an obesogenic profile associated with the intake of high-fat (HF) diets. We analysed, by real-time RT-PCR, the dietary response of key genes related to lipid metabolism, obesity and inflammation in PBMC of control rats, rats fed a cafeteria or a commercial HF diet and rats fed a control diet after the intake of a cafeteria diet (post-cafeteria model). Cafeteria diet intake, which resulted in important overweight and related complications, altered the expressions of most of the studied genes in PBMC, evidencing the development of an obesogenic profile. Commercial HF diet, which produced metabolic alterations but in the absence of noticeably increased body weight, also altered PBMC gene expression, inducing a similar regulatory pattern as that observed for the cafeteria diet. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (Cpt1a) mRNA expression was of special interest; its expression reflected metabolic alterations related to the intake of both obesogenic diets (independently of increased body weight) even at an early stage as well as metabolic recovery in post-cafeteria animals. Thus, PBMC constitute an important source of biomarkers that reflect the increased adiposity and metabolic deregulation associated with the intake of HF diets. In particular, we propose an analysis of Cpt1a expression as a good biomarker to detect the early metabolic alterations caused by the consumption of hyperlipidic diets, and also as a marker of metabolic recovery associated to weight loss. PMID:27080153

  9. The intake of high-fat diets induces an obesogenic-like gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which is reverted by dieting.

    PubMed

    Reynés, Bàrbara; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are increasingly used for nutrigenomic studies. In this study, we aimed to identify whether these cells could reflect the development of an obesogenic profile associated with the intake of high-fat (HF) diets. We analysed, by real-time RT-PCR, the dietary response of key genes related to lipid metabolism, obesity and inflammation in PBMC of control rats, rats fed a cafeteria or a commercial HF diet and rats fed a control diet after the intake of a cafeteria diet (post-cafeteria model). Cafeteria diet intake, which resulted in important overweight and related complications, altered the expressions of most of the studied genes in PBMC, evidencing the development of an obesogenic profile. Commercial HF diet, which produced metabolic alterations but in the absence of noticeably increased body weight, also altered PBMC gene expression, inducing a similar regulatory pattern as that observed for the cafeteria diet. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (Cpt1a) mRNA expression was of special interest; its expression reflected metabolic alterations related to the intake of both obesogenic diets (independently of increased body weight) even at an early stage as well as metabolic recovery in post-cafeteria animals. Thus, PBMC constitute an important source of biomarkers that reflect the increased adiposity and metabolic deregulation associated with the intake of HF diets. In particular, we propose an analysis of Cpt1a expression as a good biomarker to detect the early metabolic alterations caused by the consumption of hyperlipidic diets, and also as a marker of metabolic recovery associated to weight loss.

  10. Nutrition-induced ketosis alters metabolic and signaling gene networks in liver of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Loor, Juan J; Everts, Robin E; Bionaz, Massimo; Dann, Heather M; Morin, Dawn E; Oliveira, Rosane; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Drackley, James K; Lewin, Harris A

    2007-12-19

    Dairy cows are highly susceptible after parturition to developing liver lipidosis and ketosis, which are costly diseases to farmers. A bovine microarray platform consisting of 13,257-annotated oligonucleotides was used to study hepatic gene networks underlying nutrition-induced ketosis. On day 5 postpartum, 14 Holstein cows were randomly assigned to ketosis-induction (n = 7) or control (n = 7) groups. Cows in the ketosis-induction group were fed at 50% of day 4 intake until they developed signs of clinical ketosis, and cows in the control group were fed ad libitum throughout the treatment period. Liver was biopsied at 10-14 (ketosis) or 14 days postpartum (controls). Feed restriction increased blood concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate, but decreased glucose. Liver triacylglycerol concentration also increased. A total of 2,415 genes were altered by ketosis (false discovery rate = 0.05). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed downregulation of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation, protein ubiquitination, and ubiquinone biosynthesis with ketosis. Other molecular adaptations included upregulation of genes and nuclear receptors associated with cytokine signaling, fatty acid uptake/transport, and fatty acid oxidation. Genes downregulated during ketosis included several associated with cholesterol metabolism, growth hormone signaling, proton transport, and fatty acid desaturation. Feed restriction and ketosis resulted in previously unrecognized alterations in gene network expression underlying key cellular functions and discrete metabolic events. These responses might help explain well-documented physiological adaptations to reduced feed intake in early postpartum cows and, thus, provide molecular targets that might be useful in prevention and treatment of liver lipidosis and ketosis.

  11. Mitochondrial and Ion Channel Gene Alterations in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Moyra; Flodman, Pamela L.; Gargus, John J.; Simon, Mariella T; Verrell, Kimberley; Haas, Richard; Reiner, Gail E.; Naviaux, Robert; Osann, Katherine; Spence, M. Anne; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the potential importance in autistic subjects of copy number variants (CNVs) that alter genes of relevance to bioenergetics, ionic metabolism, and synaptic function, we conducted a detailed microarray analysis of 69 autism probands and 35 parents, compared to 89 CEU HapMap controls. This revealed that the frequency CNVs of ≥ 100 kb and CNVs of ≥ 10 Kb were markedly increased in probands over parents and in probands and parents over controls. Evaluation of CNVs ≥ 1 Mb by chromosomal FISH confirmed the molecular identity of a subset of the CNVs, some of which were associated with chromosomal rearrangements. In a number of the cases, CNVs were found to alter the copy number of genes that are important in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), ion and especially calcium transport, and synaptic structure. Hence, autism might result from alterations in multiple bioenergetic and metabolic genes required for mental function. PMID:22538295

  12. Expression of candidate genes for residual feed intake in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Al-Husseini, W; Gondro, C; Quinn, K; Herd, R M; Gibson, J P; Chen, Y

    2014-02-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) has been adopted in Australia for the purpose of genetic improvement in feed efficiency in beef cattle. RFI is the difference between the observed feed intake of an animal and the predicted feed intake based on its size and growth rate over a test period. Gene expression of eight candidate genes (AHSG, GHR, GSTM1, INHBA, PCDH19, S100A10, SERPINI2 and SOD3), previously identified as differentially expressed between divergent lines of high- and low-RFI animals, was measured in an unselected population of 60 steers from the Angus Society Elite Progeny Test Program using quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that the levels of gene expression were significantly correlated with RFI. The genes explain around 33.2% of the phenotypic variance in RFI, and prediction equations using the expression data are reasonably accurate estimators of RFI. The association of these genes with economically important traits, such as other feed efficiency-related traits and fat, growth and carcass traits, was investigated as well. The expression of these candidate genes was significantly correlated with feed conversion ratio and daily feed intake, which are highly associated with RFI, suggesting a functional role for these genes in modulating feed utilisation. The expression of these genes did not show any association with average daily gain, eye muscle area and carcass composition.

  13. Altered Preconception Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated with Improved Pregnancy Rates in Overweight and Obese Women Undertaking in Vitro Fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Moran, Lisa J; Tsagareli, Victoria; Noakes, Manny; Norman, Robert

    2016-01-04

    Maternal preconception diet is proposed to affect fertility. Prior research assessing the effect of altering the fatty acid profile on female fertility is conflicting. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preconception maternal diet, specifically fatty acid profile, on pregnancies and live births following in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Forty-six overweight and obese women undergoing IVF were randomised to a diet and physical activity intervention (intervention) or standard care (control). Outcome measures included pregnancy, live birth and pre-study dietary intake from food frequency questionnaire. Twenty pregnancies (n = 12/18 vs. n = 8/20, p = 0.12) and 12 live births (n = 7/18 vs. n = 5/20, p = 0.48) occurred following the intervention with no differences between the treatment groups. On analysis adjusted for BMI and smoking status, women who became pregnant had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake (p = 0.03), specifically omega-6 PUFA and linoleic acid (LA) (p = 0.045) with a trend for an elevated intake of omega-3 PUFA (p = 0.06). There were no dietary differences for women who did or did not have a live birth. Maternal preconception PUFA, and specifically omega-6 and LA intake, are associated with improved pregnancy rates in overweight and obese women undergoing IVF. This has implications for optimising fertility through preconception nutrition.

  14. Obesogenic diets may differentially alter dopamine control of sucrose and fructose intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Carolyn E; Hajnal, Andras

    2011-07-25

    Chronic overeating of obesogenic diets can lead to obesity, reduced dopamine signaling, and increased consumption of added sugars to compensate for blunted reward. However, the specific role of diet composition yet remains unknown. To study this, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed a high-energy diet with high fat and low carbohydrate content (HFHE), a fat-sugar combination high-energy diet (FCHE), or standard chow for 24 weeks. We found that both high-energy diets produced substantial body weight gain compared to chow-fed controls. To investigate dopamine control of short (2-h) intake of palatable sucrose or fructose solutions, rats were pretreated peripherally (IP) with equimolar doses (0-600 nmol/kg) of the dopamine D1 (SCH23390) and D2 (raclopride) subtype-specific receptor antagonists. The results showed an overall increase in the efficacy of D1 and D2 receptor antagonists on suppression of intake in obese rats compared to lean rats, with effects differing based on diets and test solutions. Specifically, SCH23390 potently reduced both sucrose and fructose intake in all groups; however, lower doses were more effective in HFHE rats. In contrast, raclopride was most effective at reducing fructose intake in the obese FCHE rats. Thus, it appears that obesity due to the consumption of combinations of dietary fat and sugar rather than extra calories from dietary fat alone may result in reduced D2 receptor signaling. Furthermore, such deficits seem to preferentially affect the control of fructose intake. These findings demonstrate for the first time a plausible interaction between diet composition and dopamine control of carbohydrate intake in diet-induced obese rats. It also provides additional evidence that sucrose and fructose intake is regulated differentially by the dopamine system.

  15. Alcohol Consumption Modulates Host Defense in Rhesus Macaques by Altering Gene Expression in Circulating Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Barr, Tasha; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that chronic alcohol use disorder leads to increased susceptibility to several viral and bacterial infections, whereas moderate alcohol consumption decreases the incidence of colds and improves immune responses to some pathogens. In line with these observations, we recently showed that heavy ethanol intake (average blood ethanol concentrations > 80 mg/dl) suppressed, whereas moderate alcohol consumption (blood ethanol concentrations < 50 mg/dl) enhanced, T and B cell responses to modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination in a nonhuman primate model of voluntary ethanol consumption. To uncover the molecular basis for impaired immunity with heavy alcohol consumption and enhanced immune response with moderate alcohol consumption, we performed a transcriptome analysis using PBMCs isolated on day 7 post-modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination, the earliest time point at which we detected differences in T cell and Ab responses. Overall, chronic heavy alcohol consumption reduced the expression of immune genes involved in response to infection and wound healing and increased the expression of genes associated with the development of lung inflammatory disease and cancer. In contrast, chronic moderate alcohol consumption upregulated the expression of genes involved in immune response and reduced the expression of genes involved in cancer. To uncover mechanisms underlying the alterations in PBMC transcriptomes, we profiled the expression of microRNAs within the same samples. Chronic heavy ethanol consumption altered the levels of several microRNAs involved in cancer and immunity and known to regulate the expression of mRNAs differentially expressed in our data set.

  16. Alcohol Consumption Modulates Host Defense in Rhesus Macaques by Altering Gene Expression in Circulating Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Barr, Tasha; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that chronic alcohol use disorder leads to increased susceptibility to several viral and bacterial infections, whereas moderate alcohol consumption decreases the incidence of colds and improves immune responses to some pathogens. In line with these observations, we recently showed that heavy ethanol intake (average blood ethanol concentrations > 80 mg/dl) suppressed, whereas moderate alcohol consumption (blood ethanol concentrations < 50 mg/dl) enhanced, T and B cell responses to modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination in a nonhuman primate model of voluntary ethanol consumption. To uncover the molecular basis for impaired immunity with heavy alcohol consumption and enhanced immune response with moderate alcohol consumption, we performed a transcriptome analysis using PBMCs isolated on day 7 post-modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination, the earliest time point at which we detected differences in T cell and Ab responses. Overall, chronic heavy alcohol consumption reduced the expression of immune genes involved in response to infection and wound healing and increased the expression of genes associated with the development of lung inflammatory disease and cancer. In contrast, chronic moderate alcohol consumption upregulated the expression of genes involved in immune response and reduced the expression of genes involved in cancer. To uncover mechanisms underlying the alterations in PBMC transcriptomes, we profiled the expression of microRNAs within the same samples. Chronic heavy ethanol consumption altered the levels of several microRNAs involved in cancer and immunity and known to regulate the expression of mRNAs differentially expressed in our data set. PMID:26621857

  17. Alterations of prefrontal cortical microRNAs in methamphetamine self-administering rats: From controlled drug intake to escalated drug intake.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao-Yue; Cao, Dan-Ni; Chen, Ying; Wang, Lv; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2016-01-12

    Drug addiction is a process that transits from recreative and regular drug use into compulsive drug use. The two patterns of drug use, controlled drug intake and escalated drug intake, represent different stages in the development of drug addiction; and escalation of drug use is a hallmark of addiction. Accumulating studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in drug addiction. However, the molecular adaptations in escalation of drug use, as well as the difference in the adaptations between escalated and controlled drug use, remain unclear. In the present study, 28 altered miRNAs in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were found in the groups of controlled methamphetamine self-administration (1h/session) and escalated self-administration (6h/session), and some of them were validated. Compared with saline control group, miR-186 was verified to be up-regulated while miR-195 and miR-329 were down-regulated in the rats with controlled methamphetamine use. In the rats with escalated drug use, miR-127, miR-186, miR-222 and miR-24 were verified to be up-regulated while miR-329 was down-regulated compared with controls. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis indicated that the predicted targets of these verified miRNAs involved in the processes of neuronal apoptosis and synaptic plasticity. However, the putative regulated molecules may be different between controlled and escalated drug use groups. Taken together, we detected the altered miRNAs in rat PFC under the conditions of controlled methamphetamine use and escalated use respectively, which may extend our understanding of the molecular adaptations underlying the transition from controlled drug use to addiction.

  18. Transient increase in obese gene expression after food intake or insulin administration.

    PubMed

    Saladin, R; De Vos, P; Guerre-Millo, M; Leturque, A; Girard, J; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1995-10-12

    Obesity is a disorder of energy balance, indicating a chronic disequilibrium between energy intake and expenditure. Recently, the mouse ob gene, and subsequently its human and rat homologues, have been cloned. The ob gene product, leptin, is expressed exclusively in adipose tissue, and appears to be a signalling factor regulating body-weight homeostasis and energy balance. Because the level of ob gene expression might indicate the size of the adipose depot, we suggest that it is regulated by factors modulating adipose tissue size. Here we show that ob gene exhibits diurnal variation, increasing during the night, after rats start eating. This variation was linked to changes in food intake, as fasting prevented the cyclic variation and decreased ob messenger RNA. Furthermore, refeeding fasted rats restored ob mRNA within 4 hours to levels of fed animals. A single insulin injection in fasted animals increased ob mRNA to levels of fed controls. Experiments to control glucose and insulin independently in animals, and studies in primary adipocytes, showed that insulin regulates ob gene expression directly in rats, regardless of its glucose-lowering effects. Whereas the ob gene product, leptin, has been shown to reduce food intake and increase energy expenditure, our data demonstrate that ob gene expression is increased after food ingestion in rats, perhaps through a direct action of insulin on the adipocyte.

  19. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity. PMID:25654098

  20. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  1. Restricted nutrient intake does not alter serum-mediated measures of implant response in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During nutritional stress, reduced intake may reduce the efficacy of anabolic implants. This study was conducted to evaluate basic cellular responses to a growth promotant implant at two intake levels. Methods Sixteen crossbred steers (293 ± 19.3 kg) were used to evaluate the impact of anabolic implants in either an adequate or a restricted nutritional state. Steers were trained to individual Calan gates, and then randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Treatments consisted of: presence or absence of an anabolic growth implant (Revalor-XS, 200 mg TBA and 40 mg estradiol; IMPLANT or CONTROL) and a moderate energy, pelleted, starting cattle diet fed at either 2.0 × or 1.0 × maintenance energy (NEM) requirements (HIGH or LOW). Serum (d 0, 14, and 28) was used for application to bovine muscle satellite cells. After treatment with the serum (20% of total media) from the trial cattle, the satellite cells were incubated for 72 h. Protein abundance of myosin heavy chain (MHC), phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinase (phospho-ERK), and phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (phospho-mTOR) were analyzed to determine the effects of implant, intake, and their interaction (applied via the serum). Results Intake had no effect on MHC (P = 0.85) but IMPLANT increased (P < 0.01) MHC abundance vs. CONTROL. Implant status, intake status, and the interaction had no effect on the abundance of phospho-ERK (P ≥ 0.23). Implanting increased phospho-mTOR (P < 0.01) but there was no effect (P ≥ 0.51) of intake or intake × implant. Conclusions The nearly complete lack of interaction between implant and nutritional status indicates that the signaling molecules measured herein respond to implants and nutritional status independently. Furthermore, results suggest that the muscle hypertrophic effects of anabolic implants may not be mediated by circulating IGF-1. PMID:24245980

  2. Identification of Reference Genes in Human Myelomonocytic Cells for Gene Expression Studies in Altered Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Cora S.; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes (“housekeeping genes”) are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity. PMID:25654098

  3. In vitro maturation alters gene expression in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Adona, Paulo R; Leal, Cláudia L V; Biase, Fernando H; De Bem, Tiago H; Mesquita, Lígia G; Meirelles, Flávio V; Ferraz, André L; Furlan, Luiz R; Monzani, Paulo S; Guemra, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Gene expression profiling of in vivo- and in vitro-matured bovine oocytes can identify transcripts related to the developmental potential of oocytes. Nonetheless, the effects of in vitro culturing oocytes are yet to be fully understood. We tested the effects of in vitro maturation on the transcript profile of oocytes collected from Bos taurus indicus cows. We quantified the expression of 1488 genes in in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes. Of these, 51 genes were up-regulated, whereas 56 were down-regulated (≥2-fold) in in vivo-matured oocytes in comparison with in vitro-matured oocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nine genes confirmed the microarray results of differential expression between in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes (EZR, EPN1, PSEN2, FST, IGFBP3, RBBP4, STAT3, FDPS and IRS1). We interrogated the results for enrichment of Gene Ontology categories and overlap with protein-protein interactions. The results revealed that the genes altered by in vitro maturation are mostly related to the regulation of oocyte metabolism. Additionally, analysis of protein-protein interactions uncovered two regulatory networks affected by the in vitro culture system. We propose that the differentially expressed genes are candidates for biomarkers of oocyte competence. In vitro oocyte maturation can affect the abundance of specific transcripts and are likely to deplete the developmental competence.

  4. Body mass, composition, and food intake in rabbits during altered acceleration fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katovich, M. J.; Smith, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Mature male Polish rabbits were subjected to varying gravitational fields in an animal centrifuge in order to evaluate the effects of acceleration and deacceleration on body mass, body composition, and food intake. The acceleration field intensity was increased by 0.25-G increments to a maximum of 2.5 G at intervals which permitted physiological adaptation at each field. Control animals of the same age were maintained at earth gravity under identical conditions of constant-light environment at a room temperature of 23 + or - 5 C. It is shown that increasing the acceleration-field intensity leads to a decrease in body mass. The regulated nature of this decreased body mass is tested by the response to an additional three-day fasting of animals adapted physiologically to 2.5 G. Ad libitum food intake per kg body mass per day tends to increase in chronically accelerated animals above 1.75 G. Increase in water content in centrifuged animals after physiological adaptation to 2.5 G is the result of decreasing body fat. Body mass and food intake returned to the precentrifuged levels of control animals within six weeks after cessation of centrifugation.

  5. Polymorphism of rs1836882 in NOX4 Gene Modifies Associations between Dietary Caloric Intake and ROS Levels in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Hong; Wang, Ningfu; Chen, Huaihong; Jin, Qihui; Zhang, Ruoyu; Wang, Jing; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Excessive caloric intake is a contributing risk factor for human metabolic disorders. Caloric restriction may prolong a person’s life by lowering the incidence of deadly diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have been associated with the biochemical basis of the relationship between caloric intake and pathophysiologic processes. Polymorphisms associated with ROS generation genes are being increasingly implicated in inter-individual responses to daily caloric intake alterations. In the current study, a single nucleotide polymorphism, rs1836882, in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene’s promoter region was found to modulate associations between dietary caloric intake and ROS levels in PBMC. Based on rs1836882, 656 Chinese Han participants were classified into CC, CT and TT genotypes. ROS levels in PBMC were significantly higher in the CC or CT genotypes compared with the TT genotype with the same increases in daily caloric intake. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, NOX4 promoter region with rs1836882 (T) was observed to have a higher affinity for hepatocyte nuclear factor gamma (HNF3γ) protein than rs1836882 (C). HNF3γ protein over-expression decreased NOX4 gene transcriptional activity in the TT genotype more than in the CC genotype (5.68% vs. 2.12%, P<0.05) in a dual luciferase reporter assay. By silencing the NOX4 gene using small interfering RNA or over-expressing HNF3γ using an expression plasmid, serum from high dietary caloric intake participants decreased ROS levels in PBMC of the TT genotype more than in the CC or CT genotype via HNF3γ down-regulating the NOX4 gene expression signaling pathway. This is the first study to report on the functions of phenotypes of rs1836882 in the NOX4 gene, and it suggests rs1836882 as a candidate gene for interpreting inter-individual ROS levels differences in PBMC induced by alterations in daily caloric intake. PMID:24392026

  6. Altered gene expression in conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mahale, Alka; Alkatan, Hind; Alwadani, Saeed; Othman, Maha; Suarez, Maria J; Price, Antoinette; Al-Hussain, Hailah; Jastaneiah, Sabah; Yu, Wayne; Maktabi, Azza; Deepak, Edward P; Eberhart, Charles G; Asnaghi, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma is a malignancy of the ocular surface. The molecular drivers responsible for the development and progression of this disease are not well understood. We therefore compared the transcriptional profiles of eight snap-frozen conjunctival squamous cell carcinomas and one in situ lesion with normal conjunctival specimens in order to identify diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. RNA was analyzed using oligonucleotide microarrays, and a wide range of transcripts with altered expression identified, including many dysregulated in carcinomas arising at other sites. Among the upregulated genes, we observed more than 30-fold induction of the matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-9 and MMP-11, as well as a prominent increase in the mRNA level of a calcium-binding protein important for the intracellular calcium signaling, S100A2, which was induced over 20-fold in the tumor cohort. Clusterin was the most downregulated gene, with an approximately 180-fold reduction in the mRNA expression. These alterations were all confirmed by qPCR in the samples used for initial microarray analysis. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the overexpression of MMP-11 and S100A2, as well as reductions in clusterin, in several independent in situ carcinomas of conjunctiva. These data identify a number of alterations, including upregulation of MMP-9, MMP-11, and S100A2, as well as downregulation of clusterin, associated with epithelial tumorigenesis in the ocular surface. PMID:26916071

  7. Association of dietary and supplemental folate intake and polymorphisms in three FOCM pathway genes with colorectal cancer in a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Joseph H; Lesko, Samuel M; Muscat, Joshua E; Gallagher, Carla J; Berg, Arthur S; Miller, Paige E; Hartman, Terryl J; Lazarus, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Previous research has shown that greater intakes of dietary folate are associated with reduced risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) and that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) also may be involved in altering CRC risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of folate intake (and intakes of related dietary components such as methionine), 35 SNPs in three FOCM pathway genes (MTHFD1, MTHFR, and TYMS), and their interactions on CRC risk in a population-based case-control study in Pennsylvania (686 cases, 740 controls). Diet and supplement use was assessed for the year before diagnosis or interview for cases and controls, respectively, with a modified Diet History Questionnaire from the National Cancer Institute. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Using a dominant model for the variant allele, several SNPs were significantly associated with CRC including MTHFD1 rs8003379 (OR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.00-2.73) and rs17824591 (OR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.14-3.41) and the TYMS rs2853533 SNP (OR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.05-1.80). Using a nondominant model, the AA genotype for MTHFR rs1476413 exhibited a marginally significant (OR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.00-2.44) association with CRC. Two TYMS SNPs (rs16948305 and rs495139) exhibited significant (P = 0.024 and P = 0.040, respectively) gene-diet interactions with folate intake. One MTHFD1 (P = 0.019) and one MTHFR (P = 0.042) SNP exhibited gene-diet interactions with methionine intake. These findings suggest that allelic variants in genes involved in FOCM interact with dietary factors including folate and methionine to modify risk for CRC.

  8. HIV-associated mucosal gene expression: region-specific alterations

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Losurdo, John; Swanson, Garth; Siewe, Basile; Forsyth, Christopher B.; French, Audrey L.; Demarais, Patricia; Engen, Phillip; Raeisi, Shohreh; Mutlu, Ece; Landay, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite the use of HAART to control HIV, systemic immune activation and inflammation persists with the consequence of developing serious non-AIDS events. The mechanisms that contribute to persistent systemic immune activation have not been well defined. The intestine is the major source of “sterile” inflammation and plays a critical role in immune function; thus, we sought to determine whether intestinal gene expression was altered in virally controlled HIV-infected individuals. Design and methods Gene expression was compared in biopsy samples collected from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected individuals from the ileum, right colon (ascending colon), and left colon (sigmoid). Affymetrix gene arrays were performed on tissues and pathway analyses were conducted. Gene expression was correlated with systemic markers of intestinal barrier dysfunction and inflammation and intestinal microbiota composition. Results Genes involved in cellular immune response, cytokine signaling, pathogen-influenced signaling, humoral immune response, apoptosis, intracellular and second messenger signaling, cancer, organismal growth and development, and proliferation and development were upregulated in the intestine of HIV-infected individuals with differences observed in the ileum, right, and left colon. Gene expression in the ileum primarily correlated with systemic markers of inflammation (e.g., IL7R, IL2, and TLR2 with serum TNF) whereas expression in the colon correlated with the microbiota community (e.g., IFNG, IL1B, and CD3G with Bacteroides). Conclusion These data demonstrate persistent, proinflammatory changes in the intestinal mucosa of virally suppressed HIV-infected individuals. These changes in intestinal gene expression may be the consequence of or contribute to barrier dysfunction and intestinal dysbiosis observed in HIV. PMID:25587909

  9. Altered Gene Expression in Mice Selected for High Maternal Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Auger, Anthony P.; Jessen, Heather M.; Vanzo, Rena J.; Awad, Tarif A.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    We previously applied selective breeding on outbred mice to increase maternal aggression (maternal defense). In this study, we compared gene expression within a continuous region of the CNS involved in maternal aggression (hypothalamus and preoptic regions) between lactating selected (S) and non-selected control (C) mice (n = 6 per group). Using microarrays representing over 40,000 genes or expressed sequence tags, two statistical algorithms were used to identify significant differences in gene expression: robust multi array and the probe logarithmic intensity error method. ∼ 200 genes were identified as significant using an intersection from both techniques. A subset of genes were examined for confirmation by real-time PCR. Significant decreases were found in S mice for neurotensin and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (both confirmed by PCR). Significant increases were found in S mice for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (confirmed by PCR), the K+ channel subunit, Kcna1 (confirmed by PCR), corticotrophin releasing factor binding protein (just above significance using PCR; p = 0.051), and GABA A receptor subunit 1A (not confirmed by PCR, but similar direction). S mice also exhibited significantly higher levels of the neurotransmitter receptor, adenosine A1 receptor, and the transcription factors, c-Fos, and Egr-1. Interestingly, for 24 genes related to metabolism, all were significantly elevated in S mice, suggesting altered metabolism in these mice. Together, this study provides a list of candidate genes (some previously implicated in maternal aggression and some novel) that may play an important role in the production of this behavior. PMID:16939635

  10. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a False Discovery Rate (FDR) ≤0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR=0.12). Sixty-three (~28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, p-value<0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study’s results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  11. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the environment and genetics in lung cancer etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR = 0.12). Sixty-three (∼ 28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, P-value < 0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, and WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, and UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, and MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study's results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  12. Effects of altered calcium intake on diurnal and calcium-stimulated plasma calcitonin in normal women.

    PubMed

    Tiegs, R D; Heath, H

    1989-06-01

    We sought to determine if any protective effect of dietary calcium (Ca) or Ca supplements on bone could be at least partially mediated by increased calcitonin (CT) secretion. First we studied 10 healthy premenopausal women (median age, 35.5 years) who were randomized to high or low dietary Ca intake (1752 versus 391 mg elemental Ca per day) for 2 weeks and then crossed over. At the end of each dietary period, blood was drawn on 1 day at 0800, 1200, 1700, and 2000 h to assess diurnal variation of plasma CT levels. CT secretory reserve was assessed on the next day by Ca infusion (2 mg Ca per kg body weight over 5 minutes). Next, we studied 10 healthy premenopausal women who took a low-Ca diet (approximately 400 mg Ca per day) for a 2 week control period. The women were then randomized to high- or low-Ca intake [400 mg dietary Ca +/- 1500 mg Ca per day (as supplemental CaCO3)] and then crossed over. At the end of each study period, the diurnal variation in CT was tested on day 1; the CT secretory reserve was assessed on day 3 by an oral Ca load (500 mg as CaCO3)] and on day 5 by Ca infusion. Plasma immunoreactive CT was measured in whole plasma (iCT) and after silica extraction (exCT), predominantly monomeric CT. Neither increased dietary Ca nor Ca supplements affected the diurnal levels of iCT or exCT or augmented plasma CT responses to an oral Ca load.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Long-term fructose intake: biochemical consequences and altered renal histology in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Kizhner, Tali; Werman, Moshe J

    2002-12-01

    The use of fructose as a pure sugar has considerably increased in the last 3 decades, especially as a sweetener in carbonated beverages. Our previous studies showed that long-term fructose intake adversely affected several age-related metabolic parameters. The purpose of the present study was to compare the consequences of long-term fructose intake with those of glucose or sucrose on renal morphology and on several biochemical parameters used to estimate renal function. Male rats were fed a commercial diet for 16 months, and had free access either to water (control) or to 250 g/L solutions of fructose, glucose, or sucrose. Fructose-drinking rats exhibited higher liver weights compare to the other dietary groups. Control rats excreted significantly less urinary output than all sugar groups, which did not differ from each other. No differences were observed in fasting plasma fructose, glucose, and creatinine levels, or in urinary glucose levels. Fructose consumption resulted in elevated urinary fructose levels, higher creatinine clearance, and marked proteinuria. The tested sugars had influence on the molecular weight distribution of urinary proteins in the ranges of 10 to 16, 25 to 35, and 75 to 85 kd. Histological examination revealed that fructose consumption led to the formation of foci of cortical tubular necrosis with chronic inflammatory infiltrate, accumulation of tubular hyaline casts, thickening of the Bowman's capsule, mesangial thickening due to collagen deposits, and the occurrence of hemosiderin in tubular cells. These data suggest that fructose has a negative impact on kidney function and morphology. Further research is required to elucidate the precise mechanisms by which long-term fructose consumption hampers renal metabolism.

  14. Differential gene expression in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum among crossbred beef steers with divergent gain and feed intake phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lindholm-Perry, A K; Butler, A R; Kern, R J; Hill, R; Kuehn, L A; Wells, J E; Oliver, W T; Hales, K E; Foote, A P; Freetly, H C

    2016-08-01

    Small intestine mass and cellularity were previously associated with cattle feed efficiency. The small intestine is responsible for the digestion of nutrients and absorption of fatty acids, amino acids and carbohydrates, and it contributes to the overall feed efficiency of cattle. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptome differences among the small intestine from cattle with divergent gain and feed intake. Animals most divergent from the bivariate mean in each of the four phenotypic Cartesian quadrants for gain × intake were selected, and the transcriptomes of duodenum, jejunum and ileum were evaluated. Gene expression analyses were performed comparing high gain vs. low gain animals, high intake vs. low intake animals and each of the phenotypic quadrants to all other groups. Genes differentially expressed within the high gain-low intake and low gain-high intake groups of animals included those involved in immune function and inflammation in all small intestine sections. The high gain-high intake group differed from the high gain-low intake group by immune response genes in all sections of the small intestine. In all sections of small intestine, animals with low gain-low intake displayed greater abundance of heat-shock genes compared to other groups. Several over-represented pathways were identified. These include the antigen-processing/presentation pathway in high gain animals and PPAR signaling, starch/sucrose metabolism, retinol metabolism and melatonin degradation pathways in the high intake animals. Genes with functions in immune response, inflammation, stress response, influenza pathogenesis and melatonin degradation pathways may have a relationship with gain and intake in beef steers. PMID:27226174

  15. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  16. Chronic marginal iron intakes during early development in mice alter brain iron concentrations and behavior despite postnatal iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kwik-Uribe, C L; Golub, M S; Keen, C L

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the behavioral and cognitive outcomes associated with chronic marginal iron (Fe) intakes during early development. Offspring (3 males and 3 females/litter) of Swiss-Webster female mice who had been fed a control Fe diet (75 microg Fe/g diet) or marginal Fe diet (14 microg Fe/g diet) for 9 wk before mating were weaned on postnatal (PND) 21. Offspring of marginal Fe dams were fed either the marginal Fe diet (marginal group) or a control diet (replete group) from PND 21 throughout the duration of the study, whereas offspring of control dams consumed the control diet ad libitum (control group). On PND 30, 45 and 60, one male and female per litter underwent grip strength and auditory startle testing. A Morris maze was used to assess cognitive function in males starting at PND 50. Marginal Fe mice consistently demonstrated significantly lower grip strength, which was independent of differences in body weight. In addition, marginal Fe males demonstrated attenuated startle responsiveness, as well as altered performance in the Morris water maze. These differences in performance were found in association with lower brain Fe concentrations. Postnatal Fe supplementation did not reverse all of these disturbances because differences in brain Fe concentrations and maze learning persisted. This study demonstrates that chronic marginal Fe intakes during early development can result in persistent biochemical and behavioral changes in mice.

  17. Loss of SFRP4 Alters Body Size, Food Intake, and Energy Expenditure in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Mastaitis, Jason; Eckersdorff, Mark; Min, Soo; Xin, Yurong; Cavino, Katie; Aglione, Johnpaul; Okamoto, Haruka; Na, Erqian; Stitt, Trevor; Dominguez, Melissa G; Schmahl, Jennifer P; Lin, Calvin; Gale, Nicholas W; Valenzuela, David M; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) is an extracellular regulator of the wingless-type mouse mammary tumor virus integration site family (WNT) pathway. SFRP4 has been implicated in adipocyte dysfunction, obesity, insulin resistance, and impaired insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the exact role of SFRP4 in regulating whole-body metabolism and glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show here that male Sfrp4(-/-) mice have increased spine length and gain more weight when fed a high-fat diet. The body composition and body mass per spine length of diet-induced obese Sfrp4(-/-) mice is similar to wild-type littermates, suggesting that the increase in body weight can be accounted for by their longer body size. The diet-induced obese Sfrp4(-/-) mice have reduced energy expenditure, food intake, and bone mineral density. Sfrp4(-/-) mice have normal glucose and insulin tolerance and β-cell mass. Diet-induced obese Sfrp4(-/-) and control mice show similar impairments of glucose tolerance and a 5-fold compensatory expansion of their β-cell mass. In summary, our data suggest that loss of SFRP4 alters body length and bone mineral density as well as energy expenditure and food intake. However, SFRP4 does not control glucose homeostasis and β-cell mass in mice.

  18. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  19. Altered choroid plexus gene expression in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cortney A.; Thompson, Robert C.; Bunney, William E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Barchas, Jack D.; Myers, Richard M.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Given the emergent interest in biomarkers for mood disorders, we assessed gene expression in the choroid plexus (CP), the region that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Genes that are expressed in the CP can be secreted into the CSF and may be potential biomarker candidates. Given that we have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor family members are differentially expressed in post-mortem brain of subjects with MDD and the CP is a known source of growth factors in the brain, we posed the question whether growth factor dysregulation would be found in the CP of subjects with MDD. We performed laser capture microscopy of the CP at the level of the hippocampus in subjects with MDD and psychiatrically normal controls. We then extracted, amplified, labeled, and hybridized the cRNA to Illumina BeadChips to assess gene expression. In controls, the most highly abundant known transcript was transthyretin. Moreover, half of the 14 most highly expressed transcripts in controls encode ribosomal proteins. Using BeadStudio software, we identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed (p < 0.05) between control and MDD samples. Using pathway analysis we noted that the top network altered in subjects with MDD included multiple members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed downregulation of several transcripts that interact with the extracellular matrix in subjects with MDD. These results suggest that there may be an altered cytoskeleton in the CP in MDD subjects that may lead to a disrupted blood-CSF-brain barrier. PMID:24795602

  20. Alcohol intake alters immune responses and promotes CNS viral persistence in mice.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Jennifer M; Taylor, Jonathan; Raué, Hans-Peter; Slifka, Mark K; Huang, Elaine

    2016-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to progressive liver disease and is associated with a variety of extrahepatic effects, including central nervous system (CNS) damage and neuropsychiatric impairments. Alcohol abuse can exacerbate these adverse effects on brain and behavior, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. This study investigated the role of alcohol in regulating viral persistence and CNS immunopathology in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), a model for HCV infections in humans. Female and male BALB/c mice (n=94) were exposed to alcohol (ethanol; EtOH) and water (or water only) using a two-bottle choice paradigm, followed one week later by infection with either LCMV clone 13 (causes chronic infection similar to chronic HCV), LCMV Armstrong (causes acute infection), or vehicle. Mice were monitored for 60days post-infection and continued to receive 24-h access to EtOH and water. Animals infected with LCMV clone 13 drank more EtOH, as compared to those with an acute or no viral infection. Six weeks after infection with LCMV clone 13, mice with EtOH exposure evidenced higher serum viral titers, as compared to mice without EtOH exposure. EtOH intake was also associated with reductions in virus-specific CD8(+) T cell frequencies (particularly CD11a(hi) subsets) and evidence of persistent CNS viremia in chronically infected mice. These findings support the hypothesis that EtOH use and chronic viral infection can result in combined toxic effects accelerating CNS damage and neuropsychiatric dysfunction and suggest that examining the role of EtOH in regulating viral persistence and CNS immunopathology in mice infected with LCMV can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of comorbid alcohol use disorder and chronic viral infection. PMID:27269869

  1. The Oral Intake of Organic Germanium, Ge-132, Elevates α-Tocopherol Levels in the Plas-ma and Modulates Hepatic Gene Expression Profiles to Promote Immune Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Takeda, Tomoya; Tokuji, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The common water-soluble organic germanium compound poly-trans-[(2-carboxyethyl) germasesquioxane] (Ge-132) exhibits activities related to immune responses and antioxidant induction. In this study, we evaluated the antioxidative effect of dietary Ge-132 in the plasma of mice. Male ICR mice (seven mice per group) received an AIN-76 diet with 0.05% Ge-132; three groups received the Ge-132-containing diet for 0, 1 or 4 days. The plasma alpha-tocopherol (α-tocopherol) concentration increased from 6.85 to 9.60 μg/ml after 4 days of Ge-132 intake (p<0.05). We evaluated the changes in hepatic gene expression related to antioxidative activity as well as in the entire expression profile after one day of Ge-132 intake, using DNA microarray technology. We identified 1,220 genes with altered expression levels greater than 1.5-fold (increased or decreased) as a result of Ge-132 intake, and α-tocopherol transfer protein (Ttpa) gene expression was increased 1.62-fold. Immune activation was identified as the category with the most changes (containing 60 Gene Ontology (GO) term biological processes (BPs), 41 genes) via functional clustering analysis of altered gene expression. Ge-132 affected genes in clusters related to ATP production (22 GO term BPs, 21 genes), lipid metabolism (4 GO term BPs, 38 genes) and apoptosis (5 GO term BPs). Many GO term BPs containing these categories were significantly affected by the Ge-132 intake. Oral Ge-132 intake may therefore have increased plasma α-tocopherol levels by up-regulating α-tocopherol transfer protein (Ttpa) gene expression.

  2. Cardiac connexin-43 and PKC signaling in rats with altered thyroid status without and with omega-3 fatty acids intake.

    PubMed

    Szeiffová Bačová, B; Egan Beňová, T; Viczenczová, C; Soukup, T; Rauchová, H; Pavelka, S; Knezl, V; Barančík, M; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Thyroid hormones are powerful modulators of heart function and susceptibility to arrhythmias via both genomic and non-genomic actions. We aimed to explore expression of electrical coupling protein connexin-43 (Cx43) in the heart of rats with altered thyroid status and impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation. Adult male Lewis rats were divided into following six groups: euthyroid controls, hyperthyroid (treated with T(3)) and hypothyroid (treated with methimazol) with or without six-weeks lasting supplementation with omega-3 (20 mg/100 g/day). Left and right ventricles, septum and atria were used for immunoblotting of Cx43 and protein kinase C (PKC). Total expression of Cx43 and its phosphorylated forms were significantly increased in all heart regions of hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid controls. In contrast, the total levels of Cx43 and its functional phosphorylated forms were decreased in atria and left ventricle of hyperthyroid rats. In parallel, the expression of PKC epsilon that phosphorylates Cx43, at serine 368, was increased in hypothyroid but decreased in hyperthyroid rat hearts. Omega-3 intake did not significantly affect either Cx43 or PKC epsilon alterations. In conclusion, there is an inverse relationship between expression of cardiac Cx43 and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones. It appears that increased propensity of hyperthyroid while decreased of hypothyroid individuals to malignant arrhythmias may be in part attributed to the changes in myocardial Cx43.

  3. Cardiac connexin-43 and PKC signaling in rats with altered thyroid status without and with omega-3 fatty acids intake.

    PubMed

    Szeiffová Bačová, B; Egan Beňová, T; Viczenczová, C; Soukup, T; Rauchová, H; Pavelka, S; Knezl, V; Barančík, M; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Thyroid hormones are powerful modulators of heart function and susceptibility to arrhythmias via both genomic and non-genomic actions. We aimed to explore expression of electrical coupling protein connexin-43 (Cx43) in the heart of rats with altered thyroid status and impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation. Adult male Lewis rats were divided into following six groups: euthyroid controls, hyperthyroid (treated with T(3)) and hypothyroid (treated with methimazol) with or without six-weeks lasting supplementation with omega-3 (20 mg/100 g/day). Left and right ventricles, septum and atria were used for immunoblotting of Cx43 and protein kinase C (PKC). Total expression of Cx43 and its phosphorylated forms were significantly increased in all heart regions of hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid controls. In contrast, the total levels of Cx43 and its functional phosphorylated forms were decreased in atria and left ventricle of hyperthyroid rats. In parallel, the expression of PKC epsilon that phosphorylates Cx43, at serine 368, was increased in hypothyroid but decreased in hyperthyroid rat hearts. Omega-3 intake did not significantly affect either Cx43 or PKC epsilon alterations. In conclusion, there is an inverse relationship between expression of cardiac Cx43 and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones. It appears that increased propensity of hyperthyroid while decreased of hypothyroid individuals to malignant arrhythmias may be in part attributed to the changes in myocardial Cx43. PMID:27643942

  4. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  5. Renal cortex taurine content regulates renal adaptive response to altered dietary intake of sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, R W; Gusowski, N; Dabbagh, S

    1985-01-01

    Rats fed a reduced sulfur amino acid diet (LTD) or a high-taurine diet (HTD) demonstrate a renal adaptive response. The LTD results in hypotaurinuria and enhanced brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) accumulation of taurine. The HTD causes hypertaurinuria and reduced BBMV uptake. This adaptation may relate to changes in plasma or renal cortex taurine concentration. Rats were fed a normal-taurine diet (NTD), LTD, or HTD for 14 d or they underwent: (a) 3% beta-alanine for the last 8 d of each diet; (b) 3 d of fasting; or (c) a combination of 3% beta-alanine added for 8 d and 3 d of fasting. Each maneuver lowered the cortex taurine concentration, but did not significantly lower plasma taurine values compared with controls. Increased BBMV taurine uptake occurred after each manipulation. Feeding 3% glycine did not alter the plasma, renal cortex, or urinary taurine concentrations, or BBMV uptake of taurine. Feeding 3% methionine raised plasma and urinary taurine excretion but renal tissue taurine was unchanged, as was initial BBMV uptake. Hence, nonsulfur-containing alpha-amino acids did not change beta-amino acid transport. The increase in BBMV uptake correlates with the decline in renal cortex and plasma taurine content. However, since 3% methionine changed plasma taurine without altering BBMV uptake, it is more likely that the change in BBMV uptake and the adaptive response expressed at the brush border surface relate to changes in renal cortex taurine concentrations. Finally, despite changes in urine and renal cortex taurine content, brain taurine values were unchanged, which suggests that this renal adaptive response maintains stable taurine concentrations where taurine serves as a neuromodulator. PMID:3935668

  6. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  7. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genomic Aberrations Frequently Alter Chromatin Regulatory Genes in Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F.; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C. David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ~8 Mb segment at 3p21.1–p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (~23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (~40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. PMID:27072194

  9. Altered sleep-wake cycles and food intake: the Ramadan model.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Thomas; Waterhouse, Jim

    2007-02-28

    In this review the effects of diurnal fasting on normal physiological processes are considered. Ramadan is placed in a circadian context, food and fluid ingestion being displaced to the pre-sunrise and post-sunset hours. Over the holy month, negative energy balance is often experienced, though this deficit is not a universal finding. Responses to exercise during the day show influences consistent with hypohydration and an increased reliance on fat as a source of fuel for exercise. Muscle performance and psychomotor performance are impaired as the month of fasting progresses but it is not clear how circadian rhythms in responses to activity are altered. For some measures at rest there is a reduction in amplitude and a delay in acrophase. Health-related benefits are reflected in a rise in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and individuals with predispositions for coronary heart disease are not at increased risk of cardiovascular disorders due to fasting. The physiological adjustments during the month have some similarities to the disturbances in circadian rhythms experienced in different circumstances. The Ramadan model provides an alternative to those for ageing, nocturnal shift-work and time-zone transitions in understanding the links between behaviour and endogenous circadian rhythms. PMID:17081572

  10. Altered sleep-wake cycles and food intake: the Ramadan model.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Thomas; Waterhouse, Jim

    2007-02-28

    In this review the effects of diurnal fasting on normal physiological processes are considered. Ramadan is placed in a circadian context, food and fluid ingestion being displaced to the pre-sunrise and post-sunset hours. Over the holy month, negative energy balance is often experienced, though this deficit is not a universal finding. Responses to exercise during the day show influences consistent with hypohydration and an increased reliance on fat as a source of fuel for exercise. Muscle performance and psychomotor performance are impaired as the month of fasting progresses but it is not clear how circadian rhythms in responses to activity are altered. For some measures at rest there is a reduction in amplitude and a delay in acrophase. Health-related benefits are reflected in a rise in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and individuals with predispositions for coronary heart disease are not at increased risk of cardiovascular disorders due to fasting. The physiological adjustments during the month have some similarities to the disturbances in circadian rhythms experienced in different circumstances. The Ramadan model provides an alternative to those for ageing, nocturnal shift-work and time-zone transitions in understanding the links between behaviour and endogenous circadian rhythms.

  11. Effects of PTEN gene alteration in patients with gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asgar; Mishra, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Sadhana; Arora, Asit; Saluja, Sundeep Singh

    2015-12-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an aggressive malignancy usually diagnosed in an advanced stage. We investigated the effects of alterations of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene on the occurrence and development of GBC, which has not been previously reported. A total 141 cases of GBC were analyzed for mutation, expression, and methylation across the nine exons of the PTEN gene. DNA sequencing methods were applied for mutation detection, whereas protein expression and methylation status were evaluated by immunohistochemical and methylation-specific PCR analysis, respectively. Novel PTEN mutations were observed in 6.3% of cases (9/141), and they included two silent mutations. In mutant cases, according to changes in codons, the respective amino acid sequences were also changed, which caused of proteins. A high percentage (72%) of loss of protein expression was observed more often in cases than in control samples. Interestingly, all nine cases with mutations showed loss of PTEN expression, whereas four of these nine cases showed positive promoter methylation. Hypermethylation was significantly more common in older patients than in younger ones (P<0.02). These findings suggest that PTEN mutations and inactivation may play an important role in the development and progression of gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26586294

  12. Feed intake alters immune cell functions and ovarian infiltration in broiler hens: implications for reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zu-Chen; Xie, Yi-Lun; Chang, Chai-Ju; Su, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yu-Hui; Huang, San-Yuan; Walzem, Rosemary L; Chen, Shuen-Ei

    2014-06-01

    Leukocytes are known to participate in ovarian activities in several species, but there is a surprising lack of information for the common chicken. Broiler hens consuming feed ad libitum (AL) exhibit a number of ovarian irregularities, but leukocyte functions are unstudied. In contrast to feed-restricted (R) hens, AL feeding for 7 wk significantly reduced egg production and clutch length while increasing pause length and atretic follicle numbers (P < 0.05). Granulosa cells from F1 follicles of AL hens contained less progesterone, and follicle walls were thicker with loose fibrous morphology and had less collagenase-3-like gelatinolytic activity but more IL-1beta (P < 0.05) production, suggestive of slower maturation in ovulatory process and inflamed necrosis. Interestingly, while highly infiltrated with immune cells, particularly heterophils, IL-1beta, MMP-22-like, and gelatinase A activities were reduced in AL hen peripheral heterophils and monocytes (P < 0.05); however, AL monocytes showed an increase in phagocytosis rate (P < 0.05). Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates was also suppressed in AL heterophils but increased in AL monocytes (P < 0.05). In contrast to leukocyte-free control, both AL and R heterophils and monocytes suppressed progesterone production and increased cell death in a dose-dependent manner when coincubated with granulosa cells at different ratios (P < 0.05). AL monocytes suppressed progesterone production more, but AL heterophils were less proapoptotic when compared to their R counterparts (P < 0.05). Alterations of cellular ceramide content (P < 0.05) corresponded to the discrepancy between heterophil and monocyte functionality. In conclusion, leukocyte dysfunction contributes to impaired ovarian activities of overfed broiler hens. PMID:24829031

  13. 9 CFR 85.8 - Interstate movement of swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. 85.8 Section 85.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. Swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd, and... are from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd; (2) The date of the herd's last...

  14. 9 CFR 85.8 - Interstate movement of swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. 85.8 Section 85.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. Swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd, and... are from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd; (2) The date of the herd's last...

  15. 9 CFR 85.8 - Interstate movement of swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. 85.8 Section 85.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. Swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd, and... are from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd; (2) The date of the herd's last...

  16. 9 CFR 85.8 - Interstate movement of swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. 85.8 Section 85.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. Swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd, and... are from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd; (2) The date of the herd's last...

  17. 9 CFR 85.8 - Interstate movement of swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. 85.8 Section 85.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... negative gene-altered vaccinated herd. Swine from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd, and... are from a qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herd; (2) The date of the herd's last...

  18. Antipsychotic pathway genes with expression altered in opposite direction by antipsychotics and amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ko, Françoise; Tallerico, Teresa; Seeman, Philip

    2006-08-01

    To develop a new strategy for identifying possible psychotic- or antipsychotic-related pathway genes, rats were treated with clinical doses of haloperidol and clozapine for 4 days, and the altered expression of genes was compared with the genes altered in expression after amphetamine sensitization. The objective was to identify genes with expression altered in the same direction by haloperidol and clozapine but in the opposite direction in the amphetamine-sensitized rat striatum. These criteria were met by 21 genes, consisting of 15 genes upregulated by amphetamine, and 6 genes downregulated by amphetamine. Of the 21 genes, 15 are not presently identified, and only 3 genes (cathepsin K, GRK6, and a gene with accession number AI177589) are located in chromosome regions known to be associated with schizophrenia.

  19. Novel genes dramatically alter regulatory network topology in amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Zmasek, Christian M; Dishaw, Larry J; Mueller, M Gail; Ye, Yuzhen; Litman, Gary W; Godzik, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulation in protein networks often utilizes specialized domains that 'join' (or 'connect') the network through specific protein-protein interactions. The innate immune system, which provides a first and, in many species, the only line of defense against microbial and viral pathogens, is regulated in this way. Amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae), whose genome was recently sequenced, occupies a unique position in the evolution of innate immunity, having diverged within the chordate lineage prior to the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates. Results The repertoire of several families of innate immunity proteins is expanded in amphioxus compared to both vertebrates and protostome invertebrates. Part of this expansion consists of genes encoding proteins with unusual domain architectures, which often contain both upstream receptor and downstream activator domains, suggesting a potential role for direct connections (shortcuts) that bypass usual signal transduction pathways. Conclusion Domain rearrangements can potentially alter the topology of protein-protein interaction (and regulatory) networks. The extent of such arrangements in the innate immune network of amphioxus suggests that domain shuffling, which is an important mechanism in the evolution of multidomain proteins, has also shaped the development of immune systems. PMID:18680598

  20. Nucleotide Excision Repair Gene Polymorphisms, Meat Intake and Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Butler, Lesley M.; Keku, Temitope; Antwi, Samuel; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S.; Hu, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Much of the DNA damage from colon cancer-related carcinogens, including heterocyclic amines (HCA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from red meat cooked at high temperature, are repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Thus, we examined whether NER non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) modified the association between red meat intake and colon cancer risk. Methods The study consists of 244 African-American and 311 white colon cancer cases and population-based controls (331 African Americans and 544 whites) recruited from 33 counties in North Carolina from 1996 to 2000. Information collected by food frequency questionnaire on meat intake and preparation methods were used to estimate HCA and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, a PAH) intake. We tested 7 nsSNPs in 5 NER genes: XPC A499V and K939Q, XPD D312N and K751Q, XPF R415Q, XPG D1104H, and RAD23B A249V. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Results Among African Americans, we observed a statistically significant positive association between colon cancer risk and XPC 499 AV+VV genotype (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7, AA as referent), and an inverse association with XPC 939 QQ (OR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.2, 0.8, KK as referent). These associations were not observed among whites. For both races combined, there was interaction between the XPC 939 genotype, well-done red meat intake and colon cancer risk (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.0, 2.2 for high well-done red meat and KK genotype as compared to low well-done red meat and KK genotype, pinteraction =0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that NER nsSNPs are associated with colon cancer risk and may modify the association between well-done red meat intake and colon cancer risk. PMID:24607854

  1. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Pedersen, Philip J.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Jelsing, Jacob; Hansen, Henrik H.; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of the central nervous system in mediating metabolic effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is poorly understood. Using a rat model of RYGB, we aimed to identify changes in gene expression of key hypothalamic neuropeptides known to be involved in the regulation of energy balance. Methods Lean male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB or sham surgery. Body weight and food intake were monitored bi-weekly for 60 days post-surgery. In situ hybridization mRNA analysis of hypothalamic AgRP, NPY, CART, POMC and MCH was applied to RYGB and sham animals and compared with ad libitum fed and food-restricted rats. Furthermore, in situ hybridization mRNA analysis of dopaminergic transmission markers (TH and DAT) was applied in the midbrain. Results RYGB surgery significantly reduced body weight and intake of a highly palatable diet but increased chow consumption compared with sham operated controls. In the arcuate nucleus, RYGB surgery increased mRNA levels of orexigenic AgRP and NPY, whereas no change was observed in anorexigenic CART and POMC mRNA levels. A similar pattern was seen in food-restricted versus ad libitum fed rats. In contrast to a significant increase of orexigenic MCH mRNA levels in food-restricted animals, RYGB did not change MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus. In the VTA, RYGB surgery induced a reduction in mRNA levels of TH and DAT, whereas no changes were observed in the substantia nigra relative to sham surgery. Conclusion RYGB surgery increases the mRNA levels of hunger-associated signaling markers in the rat arcuate nucleus without concomitantly increasing downstream MCH expression in the lateral hypothalamus, suggesting that RYGB surgery puts a brake on orexigenic hypothalamic output signals. In addition, down-regulation of midbrain TH and DAT expression suggests that altered dopaminergic activity also contributes to the reduced intake of palatable food in RYGB rats. PMID:27069869

  2. Serum Metabolite Profiles and Target Tissue Gene Expression Define the Effect of Cholecalciferol Intake on Calcium Metabolism in Rats and Mice1,2

    PubMed Central

    Fleet, James C.; Gliniak, Christy; Zhang, Zhentao; Xue, Yingben; Smith, Kathleen B.; McCreedy, Rebecca; Adedokun, Sunday A.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of cholecalciferol (VD3) intake on VD3 status and markers of calcium (Ca) homeostasis in mice and rats. Serum 25 hydroxycholecalciferol (25OH-VD3) concentrations were increased in animals fed diets containing 400–20,000 international units (IU) VD3/kg (37 nmol·L−1·1000 IU VD3−1), but body weight, serum Ca, and duodenal gene expression were not altered. High-VD3 intake decreased serum 1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2-VD3] and renal 25 hydroxycholecalciferol-1ahydroxylase (CYP27B1) mRNA, suggesting that rodents tolerate high-VD3 intake by suppressing the activity of the VD3 endocrine system. Serum 25OH-VD3 declined when animals were fed diets containing 1000 to 25 IU VD3/kg (9–11 wk, inflection at 200 IU/kg, 4-fold steeper slope below this). Neither body weight nor serum Ca were influenced by low-VD3 intake. However, mice fed the 25-IU/kg diet had lower serum 1,25(OH)2-VD3, duodenal calbindin D9k mRNA, bone mineral density, and renal 25 hydroxycholecalciferol-24 hydroxylase mRNA, whereas renal CYP27B1 mRNA was elevated when rodents were fed ,200 IU VD3/kg. These data reveal a stress on VD3 and Ca metabolism at low dietary VD3 intake. Dietary Ca restriction (0.25 vs. 0.5%, 9 wk) increased serum 1,25(OH)2-VD3 and was 30% greater in rats fed a 10,000-IU VD3/kg diet. High-VD3 intake did not prevent Ca restriction-induced bone loss. Our data show that modeling human VD3 status requires lower intake than the current NRC rodent requirement (1000-IU/kg diet). Also, although rodents are very tolerant of high-VD3 intake, it cannot compensate for moderate Ca restriction. PMID:18492843

  3. Variations in the WNK1 gene modulates the effect of dietary intake of sodium and potassium on blood pressure determination.

    PubMed

    Osada, Yuko; Miyauchi, Rie; Goda, Toshinao; Kasezawa, Nobuhiko; Horiike, Hiromi; Iida, Mariko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, Kimiko

    2009-08-01

    WNK lysine-deficient protein kinase 1 (WNK1) is a member of the WNK family of serine/threonine kinases with no lysine (K), and these kinases have been implicated as important modulators of salt homeostasis in the kidney. It is well known that high dietary sodium and low dietary potassium have been implicated in the etiology of increased blood pressure. However, the blood pressure response to dietary sodium and potassium intake varies considerably among individuals. In this study, we have detected that the haplotypes of the WNK1 gene are associated with blood pressure variations in the general Japanese population. In addition, we investigated the interactions between the haplotypes of the WNK1 gene and dietary sodium and potassium intake for determining inter-individual variations in blood pressure. Our data support the hypothesis that part of the variation in blood pressure response to dietary sodium and potassium intake among individuals can be explained by variations in the WNK1 gene.

  4. Does Increased Exercise or Physical Activity Alter Ad-Libitum Daily Energy Intake or Macronutrient Composition in Healthy Adults? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Joseph E.; Herrmann, Stephen D.; Lambourne, Kate; Szabo, Amanda N.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The magnitude of the negative energy balance induced by exercise may be reduced due to compensatory increases in energy intake. Objective To address the question: Does increased exercise or physical activity alter ad-libitum daily energy intake or macronutrient composition in healthy adults? Data Sources PubMed and Embase were searched (January 1990–January 2013) for studies that presented data on energy and/or macronutrient intake by level of exercise, physical activity or change in response to exercise. Ninety-nine articles (103 studies) were included. Study Eligibility Criteria Primary source articles published in English in peer-reviewed journals. Articles that presented data on energy and/or macronutrient intake by level of exercise or physical activity or changes in energy or macronutrient intake in response to acute exercise or exercise training in healthy (non-athlete) adults (mean age 18–64 years). Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods Articles were grouped by study design: cross-sectional, acute/short term, non-randomized, and randomized trials. Considerable heterogeneity existed within study groups for several important study parameters, therefore a meta-analysis was considered inappropriate. Results were synthesized and presented by study design. Results No effect of physical activity, exercise or exercise training on energy intake was shown in 59% of cross-sectional studies (n = 17), 69% of acute (n = 40), 50% of short-term (n = 10), 92% of non-randomized (n = 12) and 75% of randomized trials (n = 24). Ninety-four percent of acute, 57% of short-term, 100% of non-randomized and 74% of randomized trials found no effect of exercise on macronutrient intake. Forty-six percent of cross-sectional trials found lower fat intake with increased physical activity. Limitations The literature is limited by the lack of adequately powered trials of sufficient duration, which have prescribed and measured exercise energy expenditure

  5. Polymorphisms in Metabolism/Antioxidant Genes May Mediate the Effect of Dietary Intake on Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Rick J.; Robinson, Dennis P.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Bamlet, William R.; Tan, XiangLin; Cunningham, Julie M.; Li, Ying; Rider, David N.; Oberg, Ann L.; Rabe, Kari G.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Sinha, Rashmi; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives A source of variation for inconsistent dietary-pancreatic cancer associations may be individuals carrying constitutional metabolism/antioxidant gene variants differentially benefit compared to homozygous individuals. Seventy-six tag SNPs were genotyped in thirteen candidate genes to test differential associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods A clinic-based case-control design was used to rapidly ascertain 251 cases and 970 frequency matched controls who provided blood samples and completed a 144-item food frequency questionnaire. SNPs were evaluated using a dominant genetic model and dietary categories split on controls’ median intake. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for potential confounders. Results Significant increased associations (Bonferroni corrected P ≤ 0.0007) were observed for carriers of ≥ 1 minor allele for rs3816257 (glucosidase, alpha; acid [GAA]) and lower intake of deep-yellow vegetables (1.90[1.28,2.83]); and carriers of no minor allele for rs12807961 (catalyase [CAT]) and high total grains intake (2.48[1.50,4.09]) while those with ≥ 1 minor allele had a decreasing slope (across grains). The reference group was no minor alleles with low dietary intake. Conclusions Inter-individual variation in metabolism/antioxidant genes could interact with dietary intake to influence pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:24051964

  6. Shift work or food intake during the rest phase promotes metabolic disruption and desynchrony of liver genes in male rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Saderi, Nadia; Basualdo, María del Carmen; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2013-01-01

    In the liver, clock genes are proposed to drive metabolic rhythms. These gene rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) mainly by food intake and via autonomic and hormonal pathways. Forced activity during the normal rest phase, induces also food intake, thus neglecting the signals of the SCN, leading to conflicting time signals to target tissues of the SCN. The present study explored in a rodent model of night-work the influence of food during the normal sleep period on the synchrony of gene expression between clock genes and metabolic genes in the liver. Male Wistar rats were exposed to forced activity for 8 h either during the rest phase (day) or during the active phase (night) by using a slow rotating wheel. In this shift work model food intake shifts spontaneously to the forced activity period, therefore the influence of food alone without induced activity was tested in other groups of animals that were fed ad libitum, or fed during their rest or active phase. Rats forced to be active and/or eating during their rest phase, inverted their daily peak of Per1, Bmal1 and Clock and lost the rhythm of Per2 in the liver, moreover NAMPT and metabolic genes such as Pparα lost their rhythm and thus their synchrony with clock genes. We conclude that shift work or food intake in the rest phase leads to desynchronization within the liver, characterized by misaligned temporal patterns of clock genes and metabolic genes. This may be the cause of the development of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in individuals engaged in shift work.

  7. Shift Work or Food Intake during the Rest Phase Promotes Metabolic Disruption and Desynchrony of Liver Genes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C.; Saderi, Nadia; Basualdo, María del Carmen; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N.; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2013-01-01

    In the liver, clock genes are proposed to drive metabolic rhythms. These gene rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) mainly by food intake and via autonomic and hormonal pathways. Forced activity during the normal rest phase, induces also food intake, thus neglecting the signals of the SCN, leading to conflicting time signals to target tissues of the SCN. The present study explored in a rodent model of night-work the influence of food during the normal sleep period on the synchrony of gene expression between clock genes and metabolic genes in the liver. Male Wistar rats were exposed to forced activity for 8 h either during the rest phase (day) or during the active phase (night) by using a slow rotating wheel. In this shift work model food intake shifts spontaneously to the forced activity period, therefore the influence of food alone without induced activity was tested in other groups of animals that were fed ad libitum, or fed during their rest or active phase. Rats forced to be active and/or eating during their rest phase, inverted their daily peak of Per1, Bmal1 and Clock and lost the rhythm of Per2 in the liver, moreover NAMPT and metabolic genes such as Pparα lost their rhythm and thus their synchrony with clock genes. We conclude that shift work or food intake in the rest phase leads to desynchronization within the liver, characterized by misaligned temporal patterns of clock genes and metabolic genes. This may be the cause of the development of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in individuals engaged in shift work. PMID:23565183

  8. Consistent Prebiotic Effect on Gut Microbiota With Altered FODMAP Intake in Patients with Crohn's Disease: A Randomised, Controlled Cross-Over Trial of Well-Defined Diets

    PubMed Central

    Halmos, Emma P; Christophersen, Claus T; Bird, Anthony R; Shepherd, Susan J; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Altering FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) intake has substantial effects on gut microbiota. This study aimed to investigate effects of altering FODMAP intake on markers of colonic health in patients with Crohn's disease. Methods: After evaluation of their habitual diet, 9 patients with clinically quiescent Crohn's disease were randomised to 21 days of provided low or typical (“Australian”) FODMAP diets with ≥21-day washout in between. Five-day fecal samples were collected at the end of each diet and analyzed for calprotectin, pH, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and bacterial abundance. Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded daily. Results: Eight participants collected feces and were adherent to the diets. FODMAP intake differed across the three dietary periods with lowaltering dietary FODMAP intake is associated with marked changes in fecal microbiota, most consistent with a prebiotic effect of increasing FODMAPs as shown in an irritable bowel/healthy cohort. This strategy might be favorable for gut health in Crohn's disease, but at the cost of inducing symptoms. PMID:27077959

  9. Constant light induces alterations in melatonin levels, food intake, feed efficiency, visceral adiposity, and circadian rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Cyrilla H; Murphy, Helen M

    2009-10-01

    Melatonin levels, metabolic parameters, circadian rhythm activity patterns, and behavior were observed in rats subjected to a 12-h/12-h light/dark cycle (LD) compared to animals exposed to continuous dark (DD) or continuous light (LL). LD and DD animals were similar in melatonin levels, food intake, relative food intake, feed efficiency, water intake, circadian activity levels, and behavior. LL animals had lower melatonin levels in the subjective dark compared to LD and DD animals. Food intake, relative food intake, and water intake values were lower and feed efficiency was more positive in LL animals compared to LD and DD animals. In addition, LL animals exhibited greater visceral adiposity than the other two groups. The circadian rhythmicity of activity became free-running in LL animals and there was a decrease in overall activity. Notable behavioral changes in LL animals were an increase in irritability and excitability. Results indicate that a decrease in melatonin levels and concomitant changes in metabolism, circadian rhythms, and behavior are consequences of exposure to constant light. PMID:19761654

  10. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  11. Genome-wide gene expression analysis identifies K-ras as a regulator of alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; van der Stap, Lena D; Chen, Jihuan; Sabino, Valentina; Wagner, Ulrich; Zorrilla, Eric P; Schumann, Gunter; Roberts, Amanda J; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2010-06-21

    Adaptations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) have been implicated in alcohol and drug addiction. To identify genes that may contribute to excessive drinking, here we performed microarray analyses in laser microdissected rat ACC after a single or repeated administration of an intoxicating dose of alcohol (3 g/kg). Expression of the small G protein K-ras was differentially regulated following both single and repeated alcohol administration. We also observed that voluntary alcohol intake in K-ras heterozygous null mice (K-ras(+/-)) did not increase after withdrawal from repeated cycles of intermittent ethanol vapor exposure, unlike in their wild-type littermates. To identify K-ras regulated pathways, we then profiled gene expression in the ACC of K-ras(+/-), heterozygous null mice for the K-ras negative regulator Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) and wild-type mice following repeated administration of an intoxicating dose of alcohol. Pathway analysis showed that alcohol differentially affected various pathways in a K-ras dependent manner - some of which previously shown to be regulated by alcohol - including the insulin/PI3K pathway, the NF-kappaB, the phosphodiesterases (PDEs) pathway, the Jak/Stat and the adipokine signaling pathways. Altogether, the data implicate K-ras-regulated pathways in the regulation of excessive alcohol drinking after a history of dependence.

  12. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  13. Alteration of plant meristem function by manipulation of the Retinoblastoma-like plant RRB gene

    DOEpatents

    Durfee, Tim; Feiler, Heidi; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Jenkins, Susan; Roe, Judith; Zambryski, Patricia

    2007-01-16

    This invention provides methods and compositions for altering the growth, organization, and differentiation of plant tissues. The invention is based on the discovery that, in plants, genetically altering the levels of Retinoblastoma-related gene (RRB) activity produces dramatic effects on the growth, proliferation, organization, and differentiation of plant meristem.

  14. Misexpression screen for genes altering the olfactory map in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Zhou, Weiguang; Yin, Chong; Chen, Weitao; Ozawa, Rie; Ang, Lay-Hong; Anandan, Lavanya; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hing, Huey

    2006-04-01

    Despite the identification of a number of guidance molecules, a comprehensive picture has yet to emerge to explain the precise anatomy of the olfactory map. From a misexpression screen of 1,515 P{GS} lines, we identified 23 genes that, when forcibly expressed in the olfactory receptor neurons, disrupted the stereotyped anatomy of the Drosophila antennal lobes. These genes, which have not been shown previously to control olfactory map development, encode novel proteins as well as proteins with known roles in axonal outgrowth and cytoskeletal remodeling. We analyzed Akap200, which encodes a Protein Kinase A-binding protein. Overexpression of Akap200 resulted in fusion of the glomeruli, while its loss resulted in misshapen and ectopic glomeruli. The requirement of Akap200 validates our screen as an effective approach for recovering genes controlling glomerular map patterning. Our finding of diverse classes of genes reveals the complexity of the mechanisms that underlie olfactory map development.

  15. Sickness behavior induced by cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a murine head and neck cancer model is associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Molkentine, Jessica M; Vermeer, Daniel W; Walker, Adam K; Feng, Rebekah; Holder, Gerard; Luu, Katherine; Mason, Ryan M; Saligan, Leo; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-15

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possible mechanisms of the behavioral alterations that develop in response to cancer and to cancer therapy. For this purpose we used a syngeneic heterotopic mouse model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer in which cancer therapy is curative. Mice implanted or not with HPV+ tumor cells were exposed to sham treatment or a regimen of cisplatin and radiotherapy (chemoradiation). Sickness was measured by body weight loss and reduced food intake. Motivation was measured by burrowing, a highly prevalent species specific behavior. Tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual decrease in burrowing over time and increased brain and liver inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by 28 days post tumor implantation. Chemoradiation administered to healthy mice resulted in a mild decrease in burrowing, body weight, and food intake. Chemoradiation in tumor-bearing mice decreased tumor growth and abrogated liver and brain inflammation, but failed to attenuate burrowing deficits. PCR array analysis of selected hypoxia and mitochondrial genes revealed that both the tumor and chemoradiation altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism within the liver and brain and increased expression of genes related to HIF-1α signaling within the brain. The most prominent changes in brain mitochondrial genes were noted in tumor-bearing mice treated with chemoradiation. These findings indicate that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction following cancer and cancer therapy may be a strategy for prevention of cancer-related symptoms.

  16. Parasite-induced alteration of plastic response to predation threat: increased refuge use but lower food intake in Gammarus pulex infected with the acanothocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dianne, Lucile; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Bauer, Alexandre; Guvenatam, Arnaud; Rigaud, Thierry

    2014-03-01

    Larvae of many trophically-transmitted parasites alter the behaviour of their intermediate host in ways that increase their probability of transmission to the next host in their life cycle. Before reaching a stage that is infective to the next host, parasite larvae may develop through several larval stages in the intermediate host that are not infective to the definitive host. Early predation at these stages results in parasite death, and it has recently been shown that non-infective larvae of some helminths decrease such risk by enhancing the anti-predator defences of the host, including decreased activity and increased sheltering. However, these behavioural changes may divert infected hosts from an optimal balance between survival and foraging (either seeking food or a mate). In this study, this hypothesis was tested using the intermediate host of the acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus laevis, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex. We compared activity, refuge use, food foraging and food intake of hosts experimentally infected with the non-infective stage (acanthella), with that of uninfected gammarids. Behavioural assays were conducted in four situations varying in predation risk and in food accessibility. Acanthella-infected amphipods showed an increase in refuge use and a general reduction in activity and food intake. There was no effect of parasite intensity on these traits. Uninfected individuals showed plastic responses to water-borne cues from fish by adjusting refuge use, activity and food intake. They also foraged more when the food was placed outside the refuge. At the intra-individual level, refuge use and food intake were positively correlated in infected gammarids only. Overall, our findings suggest that uninfected gammarids exhibit risk-sensitive behaviour including increased food intake under predation risk, whereas gammarids infected with the non-infective larvae of P. laevis exhibit a lower motivation to feed, irrespective of predation risk

  17. Parasite-induced alteration of plastic response to predation threat: increased refuge use but lower food intake in Gammarus pulex infected with the acanothocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dianne, Lucile; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Bauer, Alexandre; Guvenatam, Arnaud; Rigaud, Thierry

    2014-03-01

    Larvae of many trophically-transmitted parasites alter the behaviour of their intermediate host in ways that increase their probability of transmission to the next host in their life cycle. Before reaching a stage that is infective to the next host, parasite larvae may develop through several larval stages in the intermediate host that are not infective to the definitive host. Early predation at these stages results in parasite death, and it has recently been shown that non-infective larvae of some helminths decrease such risk by enhancing the anti-predator defences of the host, including decreased activity and increased sheltering. However, these behavioural changes may divert infected hosts from an optimal balance between survival and foraging (either seeking food or a mate). In this study, this hypothesis was tested using the intermediate host of the acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus laevis, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex. We compared activity, refuge use, food foraging and food intake of hosts experimentally infected with the non-infective stage (acanthella), with that of uninfected gammarids. Behavioural assays were conducted in four situations varying in predation risk and in food accessibility. Acanthella-infected amphipods showed an increase in refuge use and a general reduction in activity and food intake. There was no effect of parasite intensity on these traits. Uninfected individuals showed plastic responses to water-borne cues from fish by adjusting refuge use, activity and food intake. They also foraged more when the food was placed outside the refuge. At the intra-individual level, refuge use and food intake were positively correlated in infected gammarids only. Overall, our findings suggest that uninfected gammarids exhibit risk-sensitive behaviour including increased food intake under predation risk, whereas gammarids infected with the non-infective larvae of P. laevis exhibit a lower motivation to feed, irrespective of predation risk

  18. Lactase gene c/t(-13910) polymorphism, calcium intake, and pQCT bone traits in Finnish adults.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Sanna; Laaksonen, Marika; Mikkilä, Vera; Sievänen, Harri; Mononen, Nina; Räsänen, Leena; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli T; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho J

    2011-02-01

    Genetic lactase nonpersistence may influence calcium intake and thereby bone health. We investigated in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finn Study whether young adults aged 31-46 years with the C/C(-13910) genotype are more susceptible to reduced bone phenotypes, low-energy fractures, and low calcium intake than subjects with other lactase genotypes. We also analyzed the gene-environment interactions on bone with calcium intake and physical activity. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography bone traits were measured from the distal and shaft sites of the radius and tibia. The total number of those subjects whose nondominant forearm was measured and the lactase genotype was defined was 1551. Information on diet, lifestyle factors, and fractures was collected with questionnaires. The mean intake of calcium was the lowest in men with the C/C(-13910) genotype (P = 0.001). Men with the T/T(-13910) genotype had ~3% higher trabecular density at the distal radius and distal tibia compared to other lactase genotypes (P = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). In women, we found no evidence of the gene effect at the radius and tibia. No major interactions of the C/T(-13910) polymorphism with calcium intake or physical activity on bone phenotypes were found in either sex. In conclusion, the C/T(-13910) polymorphism was associated with trabecular density at the distal radius and tibia in men. These differences may be due to the differences in calcium intake between the lactase genotypes.

  19. Genetic alterations of the cohesin complex genes in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Thota, Swapna; Viny, Aaron D; Makishima, Hideki; Spitzer, Barbara; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Levine, Ross L; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2014-09-11

    Somatic cohesin mutations have been reported in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To account for the morphologic and cytogenetic diversity of these neoplasms, a well-annotated cohort of 1060 patients with myeloid malignancies including MDS (n = 386), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) (n = 55), MDS/MPNs (n = 169), and AML (n = 450) were analyzed for cohesin gene mutational status, gene expression, and therapeutic and survival outcomes. Somatic cohesin defects were detected in 12% of patients with myeloid malignancies, whereas low expression of these genes was present in an additional 15% of patients. Mutations of cohesin genes were mutually exclusive and mostly resulted in predicted loss of function. Patients with low cohesin gene expression showed similar expression signatures as those with somatic cohesin mutations. Cross-sectional deep-sequencing analysis for clonal hierarchy demonstrated STAG2, SMC3, and RAD21 mutations to be ancestral in 18%, 18%, and 47% of cases, respectively, and each expanded to clonal dominance concordant with disease transformation. Cohesin mutations were significantly associated with RUNX1, Ras-family oncogenes, and BCOR and ASXL1 mutations and were most prevalent in high-risk MDS and secondary AML. Cohesin defects were associated with poor overall survival (27.2 vs 40 months; P = .023), especially in STAG2 mutant MDS patients surviving >12 months (median survival 35 vs 50 months; P = .017). PMID:25006131

  20. Liver lipid content and inflammometabolic indices in peripartal dairy cows are altered in response to prepartal energy intake and postpartal intramammary inflammatory challenge.

    PubMed

    Graugnard, D E; Moyes, K M; Trevisi, E; Khan, M J; Keisler, D; Drackley, J K; Bertoni, G; Loor, J J

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of feeding a control diet (CON) or a moderate energy diet (overfed, OVE) during the dry period (∼45d) and a postpartum intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge on blood metabolic and inflammatory indices, milk production, and hepatic gene expression. A subset of cows (n=9/diet) in CON (1.34 Mcal/kg of dry matter) and OVE (1.62 Mcal/kg of dry matter) received an intramammary LPS challenge (200 μg; CON-LPS, OVE-LPS, respectively). Liver biopsies were harvested at -14 d from calving, and postpartum at 2.5h post-LPS on d 7, 14, and 30. Prepartum, the OVE group was in more positive energy balance (EB) and had greater body condition score compared with CON. In contrast, during wk 1 postpartum and before the LPS challenge, the OVE group was in greater negative EB than CON. Prepartal diet did not affect postpartal milk production or dry matter intake. At 2h postchallenge on d 7, we observed an increase in serum nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and bilirubin and a decrease in hydroxybutyrate, regardless of diet. That was coupled with greater haptoglobin in OVE-LPS compared with CON-LPS. In addition, OVE-LPS cows versus CON nonchallenged, OVE nonchallenged, and CON-LPS had greater liver triacylglycerol (TAG) concentration 2.5h postchallenge on d 7. The concentration of TAG in liver of OVE-LPS remained elevated by 30d postpartum. The liver TAG concentration in OVE-LPS compared with CON-LPS cows was associated with greater serum concentration of NEFA and reactive oxygen metabolites on d 10 and 14 postpartum. Cows in OVE-LPS also had greater concentrations of ceruloplasmin, cholesterol, and vitamin E from d 10 through 21. Among 28 genes associated with fatty acid oxidation, inflammation, oxidative stress, and gluconeogenesis, only SAA3 (which encodes an acute phase protein) was greater in CON-LPS compared with OVE-LPS at 2.5h postchallenge. Expression of HP, which encodes another acute phase protein, was greater in OVE-LPS than in CON

  1. Alterations in vascular gene expression in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Parker, Belinda S; Argani, Pedram; Cook, Brian P; Liangfeng, Han; Chartrand, Scott D; Zhang, Mindy; Saha, Saurabh; Bardelli, Alberto; Jiang, Yide; St Martin, Thia B; Nacht, Mariana; Teicher, Beverly A; Klinger, Katherine W; Sukumar, Saraswati; Madden, Stephen L

    2004-11-01

    The molecular signature that defines tumor microvasculature will likely provide clues as to how vascular-dependent tumor proliferation is regulated. Using purified endothelial cells, we generated a database of gene expression changes accompanying vascular proliferation in invasive breast cancer. In contrast to normal mammary vasculature, invasive breast cancer vasculature expresses extracellular matrix and surface proteins characteristic of proliferating and migrating endothelial cells. We define and validate the up-regulated expression of VE-cadherin and osteonectin in breast tumor vasculature. In contrast to other tumor types, invasive breast cancer vasculature induced a high expression level of specific transcription factors, including SNAIL1 and HEYL, that may drive gene expression changes necessary for breast tumor neovascularization. We demonstrate the expression of HEYL in tumor endothelial cells and additionally establish the ability of HEYL to both induce proliferation and attenuate programmed cell death of primary endothelial cells in vitro. We also establish that an additional intracellular protein and previously defined metastasis-associated gene, PRL3, appears to be expressed predominately in the vasculature of invasive breast cancers and is able to enhance the migration of endothelial cells in vitro. Together, our results provide unique insights into vascular regulation in breast tumors and suggest specific roles for genes in driving tumor angiogenesis. PMID:15520192

  2. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  3. POTENTIAL ALTERATIONS IN GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH CARCINOGEN EXPOSURE IN MYA ARENARIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadal cancers in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) have been found at high prevalences (20-40%) in populations in eastern Maine. The aetiology of these tumours is unknown. We hypothesized that gene expression would be altered in gonadal tumours and that examination of gene expres...

  4. Computational identification of altered metabolism using gene expression and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hojung; Lee, Jinwon; Lee, Doheon

    2009-07-01

    Understanding altered metabolism is an important issue because altered metabolism is often revealed as a cause or an effect in pathogenesis. It has also been shown to be an important factor in the manipulation of an organism's metabolism in metabolic engineering. Unfortunately, it is not yet possible to measure the concentration levels of all metabolites in the genome-wide scale of a metabolic network; consequently, a method that infers the alteration of metabolism is beneficial. The present study proposes a computational method that identifies genome-wide altered metabolism by analyzing functional units of KEGG pathways. As control of a metabolic pathway is accomplished by altering the activity of at least one rate-determining step enzyme, not all gene expressions of enzymes in the pathway demonstrate significant changes even if the pathway is altered. Therefore, we measure the alteration levels of a metabolic pathway by selectively observing expression levels of significantly changed genes in a pathway. The proposed method was applied to two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression profiles measured in very high-gravity (VHG) fermentation. The method identified altered metabolic pathways whose properties are related to ethanol and osmotic stress responses which had been known to be observed in VHG fermentation because of the high sugar concentration in growth media and high ethanol concentration in fermentation products. With the identified altered pathways, the proposed method achieved best accuracy and sensitivity rates for the Red Star (RS) strain compared to other three related studies (gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA), significance analysis of microarray to gene set (SAM-GS), reporter metabolite), and for the CEN.PK 113-7D (CEN) strain, the proposed method and the GSEA method showed comparably similar performances.

  5. Identification of cancer-driver genes in focal genomic alterations from whole genome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho; Hur, Youngmi; Lee, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) are the main genomic events that occur during the initiation and development of cancer. Distinguishing driver aberrant regions from passenger regions, which might contain candidate target genes for cancer therapies, is an important issue. Several methods for identifying cancer-driver genes from multiple cancer patients have been developed for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. However, for NGS data, methods for the SNP array cannot be directly applied because of different characteristics of NGS such as higher resolutions of data without predefined probes and incorrectly mapped reads to reference genomes. In this study, we developed a wavelet-based method for identification of focal genomic alterations for sequencing data (WIFA-Seq). We applied WIFA-Seq to whole genome sequencing data from glioblastoma multiforme, ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma, and identified focal genomic alterations, which contain candidate cancer-related genes as well as previously known cancer-driver genes. PMID:27156852

  6. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas.

  7. High wholegrain barley β-glucan lowers food intake but does not alter small intestinal macronutrient digestibility in ileorectostomised rats.

    PubMed

    Belobrajdic, Damien P; Hino, Shingo; Kondo, Takashi; Jobling, Stephen A; Morell, Matthew K; Topping, David L; Morita, Tatsuya; Bird, Anthony R

    2016-09-01

    Using barley cultivars differing widely in β-glucan content, we aimed to determine their effects on small intestinal macronutrient digestion in 24 ileorectostomised rats. The rats were fed 1 of 4 experimental diets, each containing a different barley variety, for 11 d. The diets had a content of 0, 2.1, 2.6 and 4.3 g of β-glucan/100 g. Feed intake and faecal excretion of fat, protein, starch, and non-starch polysaccharides were determined in the final 5 d of the study and apparent macronutrient digestibility calculated. Higher dietary levels of β-glucan (2.6% and 4.3%) lowered feed intake (by 15 and 19%, respectively) but final body weight was only lowered by the 4.3% β-glucan diet relative to rats fed the 0% β-glucan diet (all ps < 0.05). Protein, lipid and starch digestibility was unrelated to the dietary β-glucan content. Higher dietary levels of barley β-glucan lower feed intake of ileorectostomised rats, which is independent of intestinal fermentation and unrelated to macronutrient digestibility. PMID:27282074

  8. Altered baseline brain activities before food intake in obese men: a resting state fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Tian, Derun; Yu, Chunshui; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xiao; von Deneen, Karen M; Zang, Yufeng; Walter, Martin; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity as a chronic disease has become a global epidemic. However, why obese individuals eat more still remains unclear. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found abnormal brain activations in obese people. In the present study, we used resting state functional MRI to observe spontaneous blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations during both hunger and satiety states in 20 lean and 20 obese men. Using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis method, we measured temporal homogeneity of the regional BOLD signals. We found that, before food intake, obese men had significantly increased synchronicity of activity in the left putamen relative to lean men. Decreased synchronicity of activity was found in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial prefrontal cortex(MPFC) in the obese subjects. And, the ratings of hunger of the obese subjects were higher than those of the lean subjects before food intake. After food intake, we did not find the significant differences between the obese men and the lean men. In all participations, synchronicity of activity increased from the fasted to the satiated state in the OFC. The results indicated that OFC plays an important role in feeding behavior, and OFC signaling may be disordered in obesity. Obese men show less inhibitory control during fasting state. This study has provided strong evidence supporting the hypothesis that there is a hypo-functioning reward circuitry in obese individuals, in which the frontal cortex may fail to inhibit the striatum, and consequently lead to overeating and obesity. PMID:25459293

  9. In vitro - in vivo correlation of gene expression alterations induced by liver carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Heise, T; Schug, M; Storm, D; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H; Ahr, H J; Hellwig, B; Rahnenfuhrer, J; Ghallab, A; Guenther, G; Sisnaiske, J; Reif, R; Godoy, P; Mielke, H; Gundert-Remy, U; Lampen, A; Oberemm, A; Hengstler, J G

    2012-01-01

    Although cultivated hepatocytes are widely used in the studies of drug metabolism, their application in toxicogenomics is considered as problematic, because previous studies have reported only little overlap between chemically induced gene expression alterations in liver in vivo and in cultivated hepatocytes. Here, we identified 22 genes that were altered in livers of rats after oral administration of the liver carcinogens aflatoxin B1 (AB1), 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), methapyrilene (MP) or piperonyl-butoxide (PBO). The functions of the 22 genes have been classified into two groups. Genes related to stress response, DNA repair or metabolism and genes associated with cell proliferation, respectively. Next, rat hepatocyte sandwich cultures were exposed to AB1, 2-NF, MP or PBO for 24h and expression of the above mentioned genes was determined by RT-qPCR. Significant correlations between the degree of gene expression alterations in vivo and in vitro were obtained for the stress, DNA repair and metabolism associated genes at concentrations covering a range from cytotoxic concentrations to non-toxic/in vivo relevant concentrations. In contrast to the stress associated genes, no significant in vivo/in vitro correlation was obtained for the genes associated with cell proliferation. To understand the reason of this discrepancy, we compared replacement proliferation in vivo and in vitro. While hepatocytes in vivo, killed after administration of hepatotoxic compounds, are rapidly replaced by proliferating surviving cells, in vitro no replacement proliferation as evidenced by BrdU incorporation was observed after washing out hepatotoxic concentrations of MP. In conclusion, there is a good correlation between gene expression alterations induced by liver carcinogens in vivo and in cultivated hepatocytes. However, it should be considered that cultivated primary hepatocytes do not show replacement proliferation explaining the in vivo/in vitro discrepancy concerning proliferation

  10. Altered Expression of Diabetes-Related Genes in Alzheimer's Disease Brains: The Hisayama Study

    PubMed Central

    Hokama, Masaaki; Oka, Sugako; Leon, Julio; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Iwaki, Toru; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Tomio; LaFerla, Frank M.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered to be a risk factor for dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanism underlying this risk is not well understood. We examined gene expression profiles in postmortem human brains donated for the Hisayama study. Three-way analysis of variance of microarray data from frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and hippocampus was performed with the presence/absence of AD and vascular dementia, and sex, as factors. Comparative analyses of expression changes in the brains of AD patients and a mouse model of AD were also performed. Relevant changes in gene expression identified by microarray analysis were validated by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The hippocampi of AD brains showed the most significant alteration in gene expression profile. Genes involved in noninsulin-dependent DM and obesity were significantly altered in both AD brains and the AD mouse model, as were genes related to psychiatric disorders and AD. The alterations in the expression profiles of DM-related genes in AD brains were independent of peripheral DM-related abnormalities. These results indicate that altered expression of genes related to DM in AD brains is a result of AD pathology, which may thereby be exacerbated by peripheral insulin resistance or DM. PMID:23595620

  11. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  12. Polymorphisms in the selenoprotein S and 15-kDa selenoprotein genes are associated with altered susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Alison; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Relton, Caroline; Ahn, Yoon-Ok

    2010-01-01

    Selenium (Se), a dietary trace metal essential for human health, is incorporated into ~25 selenoproteins including selenoprotein S (SelS) and the 15-kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) both of which have functions in the endoplasmic reticulum protein unfolding response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variants in such selenoprotein genes are associated with altered risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). A Korean population of 827 patients with CRC and 733 healthy controls was genotyped for 7 SNPs in selenoprotein genes and one SNP in the gene encoding manganese superoxide dismutase using Sequenom technology. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that after adjustment for lifestyle factors three SNP variants were associated with altered disease risk. There was a mean odds ratio of 2.25 [95% CI 1.13,4.48] in females homozygous TT for rs34713741 in SELS with the T variant being associated with higher risk of rectal cancer, and odds ratios of 2.47 and 2.51, respectively, for rs5845 and rs5859 in SEP15 with the minor A and T alleles being associated with increased risk of male rectal cancer. The data indicate that the minor alleles for rs5845, rs5859 and rs34713741 are associated with increased rectal cancer risk and that the effects of the three SNPs are dependent on gender. The results highlight potential links between Se, the function of two selenoproteins involved in the protein unfolding response and CRC risk. Further studies are required to investigate whether the effects of the variants on CRC risk are also modulated by dietary Se intake. PMID:21052528

  13. QRFP in female rats: effects on high fat food intake and hypothalamic gene expression across the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D

    2011-06-01

    Pyroglutamylated arginine-phenylalanineamide peptide (QRFP) is a neuropeptide involved in feeding behavior. Central administration of QRFP selectively increases the intake of a high fat diet in male rats. QRFP administration also stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in male and female rats. Prepro-QRFP mRNA is expressed in localized regions of the mediobasal hypothalamus which are abundant in neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and receptor systems important for food intake regulation and reproductive behaviors. The current experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of centrally administered QRFP-26 on the intake of a high fat diet (HFD, 60%kcal from fat) in female rats and to investigate alterations in hypothalamic prepro-QRFP and its receptors, GPR130a and GPR103b, mRNA levels over the estrous cycle. In Experiment 1, female rats were administered QRFP-26 (intracerebroventricular; 0.3nmol, 0.5nmol, 1.0nmol) in rats consuming either a HFD or a low fat diet. All doses of QRFP-26 selectively increased the intake of the HFD in female rats. These data suggest that QRFP-26 regulates the intake of energy dense foods in female rats, which is similar to previous findings in male rats. In Experiment 2, hypothalamic levels of prepro-QRFP mRNA and its receptors were assessed during diestrus, proestrus, or estrus. The level of prepro-QRFP mRNA in the ventromedial/arcuate nucleus (VMH/ARC) of the hypothalamus was increased during proestrus, which suggests that endogenous estrogen levels regulate QRFP expression in the VMH/ARC. These data suggest that QRFP may play a role in coordinating feeding behaviors with reproductive function when energy demand is increased.

  14. Altered physiology of rainbow trout in response to modified energy intake combined with pulp and paper effluent exposure.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Michael R; Landman, Michael J; Finley, Megan A; West, David W

    2008-02-01

    Two experiments using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were conducted to examine the combined effects of energy intake as manipulated by ration and pulp and paper mill effluent exposure over either one, or two consecutive reproductive cycles. This study demonstrated that the level of energy intake affected the full range of measured parameters from energy allocation to somatic growth and the gonadal development, steroid production and hematology. Increasing ration level expectedly increased growth, condition, liver and gonad size. Female trout in the higher ration treatments produced more follicles and had larger eggs, investing the same relative proportion of total energy into ovarian development. Sex steroid levels and hematological parameters were also positively influenced by increasing ration level in males and females. By far, the most dramatic impact of reduced ration on reproduction was to substantially reduce the frequency of sexually maturing fish. The effects of effluent exposure were not as marked as those linked to ration level and typically did not manifest unless fish were exposed through two consecutive reproductive cycles. The physiological effects of pulp and paper effluent exposure observed in these experiments were not consistent between the two experiments conducted herein, nor were they consistent with previously observed impacts in similar experiments with this effluent. Effluent exposure over one reproductive cycle did not impact physiological parameters in trout. However, when effluent exposure was maintained over two reproductive cycles, a new pattern of effluent response emerged including increased condition factor in both sexes, a decrease in the potential ability of the blood of females to transport oxygen, and increased sex steroids and reproductive investment in males. Effluent was also observed to cause reduced growth in male trout over two years. The effects of ration on gonad and liver size were far more obvious and consistent

  15. The expression of p73 is increased in lung cancer, independent of p53 gene alteration

    PubMed Central

    Tokuchi, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kobayashi, Y; Hayashi, M; Nishida, K; Hayashi, S; Imai, K; Nakachi, K; Ishikawa, Y; Nakagawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Tsuchiya, E

    1999-01-01

    p73 gene, a new p53 homologue, has been identified: it supposedly acts as tumour suppressor gene in neuroblastoma. To clarify whether p73 might be involved in lung carcinogenesis, we examined p73 expression in resected lung cancer and paired normal lung in 60 cases using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also examined p73 gene status in three representative cases using Southern blot, and p53 gene alteration in 49 cases using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct sequence. In 87% of the cases (52/60) p73 expression in tumour was more than twice as high as that in paired normal lung tissues, and the difference between p73 expression in tumour and normal lung tissue was significant (P < 0.0001). However, Southern blot analysis revealed that none of the cases showed p73 gene amplification. Compared with clinicopathological characteristics, p73 expression correlates significantly with histological differences and age of patient, independently (P < 0.05). Concerning p53 gene status, 43% (21/49) showed p53 gene alteration, but there was no correlation between p73 overexpression and p53 gene alteration. Our results suggest that need for further functional analysis of the role of p73 in lung carcinogenesis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408409

  16. Extreme obesity is associated with variation in genes related to the circadian rhythm of food intake and hypothalamic signaling.

    PubMed

    Mariman, Edwin C M; Bouwman, Freek G; Aller, Erik E J G; van Baak, Marleen A; Wang, Ping

    2015-06-01

    The hypothalamus is important for regulation of energy intake. Mutations in genes involved in the function of the hypothalamus can lead to early-onset severe obesity. To look further into this, we have followed a strategy that allowed us to identify rare and common gene variants as candidates for the background of extreme obesity from a relatively small cohort. For that we focused on subjects with a well-selected phenotype and on a defined gene set and used a rich source of genetic data with stringent cut-off values. A list of 166 genes functionally related to the hypothalamus was generated. In those genes complete exome sequence data from 30 extreme obese subjects (60 genomes) were screened for novel rare indel, nonsense, and missense variants with a predicted negative impact on protein function. In addition, (moderately) common variants in those genes were analyzed for allelic association using the general population as reference (false discovery rate<0.05). Six novel rare deleterious missense variants were found in the genes for BAIAP3, NBEA, PRRC2A, RYR1, SIM1, and TRH, and a novel indel variant in LEPR. Common variants in the six genes for MBOAT4, NPC1, NPW, NUCB2, PER1, and PRRC2A showed significant allelic association with extreme obesity. Our findings underscore the complexity of the genetic background of extreme obesity involving rare and common variants of genes from defined metabolic and physiologic processes, in particular regulation of the circadian rhythm of food intake and hypothalamic signaling.

  17. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  18. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  19. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Berthrong, Sean T; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Pineiro, Gervasio; Jackson, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH{sub 4}{sup +} in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils.

  1. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Gene Polymorphism Modifies the Effect of Coffee Intake on Incidence of Acute Coronary Events

    PubMed Central

    Happonen, Pertti; Voutilainen, Sari; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Salonen, Jukka T.

    2006-01-01

    Background The role of coffee intake as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated for decades. We examined whether the relationship between coffee intake and incidence of CHD events is dependent on the metabolism of circulating catecholamines, as determined by functional polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cohort of 773 men who were 42 to 60 years old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984–89, 78 participants experienced an acute coronary event during an average follow-up of 13 years. In logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, family history of CHD, vitamin C deficiency, blood pressure, plasma cholesterol concentration, and diabetes, the odds ratio (90% confidence interval) comparing heavy coffee drinkers with the low activity COMT genotype with those with the high activity or heterozygotic genotypes was 3.2 (1.2–8.4). Urinary adrenaline excretion increased with increasing coffee intake, being over two-fold in heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers (p = 0.008 for trend). Conclusions/Significance Heavy coffee consumption increases the incidence of acute coronary events in men with low but not high COMT activity. Further studies are required to determine to which extent circulating catecholamines mediate the relationship between coffee intake and CHD. PMID:17205121

  2. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  3. Epigenetic and Genetic Alterations Affect the WWOX Gene in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ekizoglu, Seda; Bulut, Pelin; Karaman, Emin; Kilic, Erkan; Buyru, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Different types of genetic and epigenetic changes are associated with HNSCC. The molecular mechanisms of HNSCC carcinogenesis are still undergoing intensive investigation. WWOX gene expression is altered in many cancers and in a recent work reduced WWOX expression has been associated with miR-134 expression in HNSCC. In this study we investigated the WWOX messenger RNA expression levels in association with the promoter methylation of the WWOX gene and miR-134 expression levels in 80 HNSCC tumor and non-cancerous tissue samples. Our results show that WWOX expression is down-regulated especially in advanced-stage tumor samples or in tumors with SCC. This down-regulation was associated with methylation of the WWOX promoter region but not with miR-134 expression. There was an inverse correlation between the expression level and promoter methylation. We also analyzed whole exons and exon/intron boundries of the WWOX gene by direct sequencing. In our study group we observed 10 different alterations in the coding sequences and 18 different alterations in the non-coding sequences of the WWOX gene in HNSCC tumor samples. These results indicate that the WWOX gene can be functionally inactivated by promoter methylation, epigenetically or by mutations affecting the sequences coding for the enzymatic domain of the gene, functionally. We conclude that inactivation of WWOX gene contributes to the progression of HNSCC. PMID:25612104

  4. Chronic mild stress alters circadian expressions of molecular clock genes in the liver.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsukita, Sohei; Kaneko, Keizo; Shirai, Yuta; Munakata, Yuichiro; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Chronic stress is well known to affect metabolic regulation. However, molecular mechanisms interconnecting stress response systems and metabolic regulations have yet to be elucidated. Various physiological processes, including glucose/lipid metabolism, are regulated by the circadian clock, and core clock gene dysregulation reportedly leads to metabolic disorders. Glucocorticoids, acting as end-effectors of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, entrain the circadian rhythms of peripheral organs, including the liver, by phase-shifting core clock gene expressions. Therefore, we examined whether chronic stress affects circadian expressions of core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver using the chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure. In BALB/c mice, CMS elevated and phase-shifted serum corticosterone levels, indicating overactivation of the HPA axis. The rhythmic expressions of core clock genes, e.g., Clock, Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1, were altered in the liver while being completely preserved in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuculeus (SCN), suggesting that the SCN is not involved in alterations in hepatic core clock gene expressions. In addition, circadian patterns of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes, e.g., peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Ppar) α, Pparγ-1, Pparγ-coactivator-1α, and phosphoenolepyruvate carboxykinase, were also disturbed by CMS. In contrast, in C57BL/6 mice, the same CMS procedure altered neither serum corticosterone levels nor rhythmic expressions of hepatic core clock genes and metabolism-related genes. Thus, chronic stress can interfere with the circadian expressions of both core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver possibly involving HPA axis overactivation. This mechanism might contribute to metabolic disorders in stressful modern societies.

  5. Adipocyte gene expression is altered in formerly obese mice and as a function of diet composition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan S; Becker, Kevin G; Prabhu, Vinayakumar; Cooke, David W

    2008-06-01

    In the development of obesity, the source of excess energy may influence appetite and metabolism. To determine the effects of differences in diet composition in obesity, mice were fed either a high-carbohydrate diet (HC; 10% fat energy) or a high-fat energy-restricted diet (HFR; 60% fat energy) over 18 wk in weight-matched groups of mice. To identify obesity-associated genes with persistently altered expression following weight reduction, mice were fed either a standard low-fat diet (LF; 10% fat energy), an unrestricted high-fat diet (HF; 60% fat energy), or a HF diet followed by weight reduction (WR). Mice fed a HF diet had significantly greater gonadal fat mass and higher whole blood glucose concentrations than mice fed an HC diet. Of the mice fed a high-fat diet, total body weight and serum insulin concentrations were greater in HF than in HFR. Microarray analysis revealed that HF vs. HC feeding resulted in global differences in adipocyte gene expression patterns. Although we identified genes whose expression was altered in both moderately and severely obese mice, there were also a large number of genes with altered expression only in severe obesity. Formerly obese, WR mice did not differ significantly from lean controls in total body weight or physiological measures. However, microarray analysis revealed distinctly different patterns of adipocyte gene expression. Furthermore, there were 398 genes with altered expression in HF mice that persisted in WR mice. Genes with persistently altered expression following obesity may play a role in rebound weight gain following weight reduction.

  6. Maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation interact to influence body weight, insulin resistance, and food intake regulatory gene expression in rat offspring in a sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Huot, Pedro S P; Ly, Anna; Szeto, Ignatius M Y; Reza-López, Sandra A; Cho, Daniel; Kim, Young-In; Anderson, G Harvey

    2016-04-01

    Maternal intake of multivitamins or folic acid above the basal dietary requirement alters the growth and metabolic trajectory of rat offspring. We hypothesized that a modest increase in the folic acid content of maternal diets would alter the offspring's metabolic phenotype, and that these effects could be corrected by matching the folic acid content of the offspring's diet with that of the maternal diet. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a control or a 2.5× folic acid-supplemented diet prior to mating and during pregnancy and lactation. At weaning, pups from each maternal diet group were randomized to the control or to the 2.5× folic acid-supplemented diet for 25 weeks. Male pups from dams fed the folic acid-supplemented diet were 3.7% heavier than those from control-fed dams and had lower mRNA expression for leptin receptor Obrb isoform (Lepr) (11%) and Agouti-related protein (Agrp) (14%). In contrast, female pups from folic acid-supplemented dams were 5% lighter than those from control-fed dams and had lower proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) (42%), Lepr (32%), and Agrp (13%), but higher neuropeptide Y (Npy) (18%) mRNA expression. Folic acid supplementation ameliorated the alterations induced by maternal folic acid supplementation in male pups and led to the lowest insulin resistance, but the effects were smaller in female pups and led to the highest insulin resistance. In conclusion, maternal folic acid supplementation at 2.5× the control level was associated with alterations in body weight and hypothalamic gene expression in rat offspring in a sex-specific manner, and some of these effects were attenuated by postweaning folic acid supplementation.

  7. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  8. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  9. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  10. Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwald, Anne G.; Arora, Gaurav; Ferrandino, Rocco; Gerace, Erica L.; Mohammednetej, Maedeh; Nosair, Waseem; Rattila, Shemona; Subic, Amanda Zirzow; Rolfes, Ronda

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an important human fungal pathogen whose incidence continues to rise. Because many clinical isolates are resistant to azole drugs, the drugs of choice to treat such infections are members of the echinocandin family, although there are increasing reports of resistance to these drugs as well. In efforts to better understand the genetic changes that lead to altered responses to echinocandins, we screened a transposon-insertion library of mutants for strains to identify genes that are important for cellular responses to caspofungin, a member of this drug family. We identified 16 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased tolerance, and 48 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased sensitivity compared to the wild-type parental strain. Four of the genes identified as causing sensitivity are orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes encoding proteins important for the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. In addition, several other genes are orthologs of the high affinity Ca2+ uptake system (HACS) complex genes. We analyzed disruption mutants representing all 64 genes under 33 different conditions, including the presence of cell wall disrupting agents and other drugs, a variety of salts, increased temperature, and altered pH. Further, we generated knockout mutants in different genes within the CWI pathway and the HACS complex, and found that they too exhibited phenotypes consistent with defects in cell wall construction. Our results indicate that small molecules that inhibit the CWI pathway, or that the HACS complex, may be an important means of increasing the efficacy of caspofungin. PMID:27449515

  11. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  12. The interaction between the interleukin 6 receptor gene genotype and dietary energy intake on abdominal obesity in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Song, Yixuan; Miyaki, Koichi; Araki, Jungo; Zhang, Ling; Omae, Kazuyuki; Muramatsu, Masaaki

    2007-07-01

    Previous reports have shown that the Asp358Ala (T/G) polymorphism of the interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but few studies have examined this association in the Japanese population. We performed the current study to investigate the relationship between the IL6R Asp358Ala (T/G) polymorphism and obesity in healthy Japanese men. Two hundred eighty-five healthy Japanese men (age, 46.1 +/- 11.5 years [mean +/- SD]; waist circumference [WC], 83.9 +/- 9.3 cm; body mass index, 23.3 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2)) employed by a Japanese company were enrolled in this study. Height, weight, and WC were measured, and daily energy intake levels were assessed by self-reported questionnaires. Genotyping of polymorphisms was performed by using melting curve analysis; no association was found between IL6R genotype and WC or body mass index. However, when the subjects were stratified by IL6R genotype, an association between WC and dietary energy intake level was found in the TT + GT-type subjects (P for linear regression = .048), but not in GG subjects (P for linear regression = .555). In addition, logistic regression analysis revealed that the interaction of IL6R (GG vs TT + GT) genotypes and dietary energy intake levels affected risk for abdominal obesity (P for interaction = .030). We concluded that the IL6R Asp358Ala (T/G) polymorphism appears to interact with energy intake and affect abdominal obesity in Japanese men. The interaction of this genotype and energy intake warrants further study.

  13. Food intake and body positional change alter the circadian rhythm of atrial natriuretic peptides excretion into human urine.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Giordano, A T

    1991-01-01

    The 98 amino acid (a.a.) N-terminus of the 126 a.a. atrial natriuretic factor prohormone contains two natriuretic and vasodilatory peptides consisting of a.a. 1-30 (proANF 1-30) and a.a. 31-67 (proANF 31-67). The N-terminus and C-terminus (a.a. 99-126, i.e., ANF--also a vasodilatory peptide) circulate normally in humans with a circadian peak at 04:00 h in plasma. To determine if the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone are present in urine and possibly have a circadian variation in urine, six healthy volunteers had urine samples hourly while awake and every 3 h during sleep for five consecutive days obtained for radioimmunoassay. The sleep-awake pattern was varied so that after 2 days of normal sleep (supine)-awake (upright) positions, these volunteers were supine from 15:00 h on the third day until 10:00 h of the fourth day. They were then upright until 19:00 h that day when they became supine again until 02:30 h, and then were upright until 10:00 h of day 5. Three radioimmunoassays that immunologically recognize (a) the whole N-terminus (i.e., amino acids 1-98), (b) the midportion of the N-terminus (amino acids 31-67), and (c) the C-terminus of the ANF prohormone were utilized. ProANF 1-98, proANF 31-67, and the ANF radioimmunoassays each detected their respective peptides in urine. A circadian peak for each of these peptides was detected at 04:00 to 05:00 h whether the person was supine or upright during the night, which were significantly (p less than 0.001) higher than their concentrations in the afternoon of the previous days. Assuming a supine position during the day caused a significant (p less than 0.01) two- to threefold increase in these peptides in the urine. Food intake also increased the concentrations of proANF 1-98, proANF 31-67, and ANF in urine (p less than 0.001). Fluid intake when abstaining from food throughout the day lowered the concentration of these peptides in the urine. It was concluded that there is a circadian rhythm in both

  14. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring

    PubMed Central

    George, Lindsey A.; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M.; Uthlaut, Adam B.; Smith, Derek T.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic “thriftiness” of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  15. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M; Uthlaut, Adam B; Smith, Derek T; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2012-04-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic "thriftiness" of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  16. Timing of fat and liquid sugar intake alters substrate oxidation and food efficiency in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Foppen, Ewout; van der Spek, Rianne; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the amount of ingested calories, both timing of food intake and meal composition are determinants of body weight gain. However, at present, it is unknown if the inappropriate timing of diet components is responsible for body weight gain. In the present study, we therefore studied a time-dependent effect of the diet composition on energy homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chow ad libitum (chow group) or a choice diet with saturated fat, a 30% sugar solution, chow and tap water. The choice diet was provided either with all components ad libitum (AL), with ad libitum access to chow, tap water and a 30% sugar solution, but with access to saturated fat only during the light period (LF), or with ad libitum access to chow, tap water and saturated fat, but access to a 30% sugar solution only during the light period (LS). Caloric intake and body weight gain were monitored during 31 days. Energy expenditure was measured in the third week in calorimetric cages. All rats on a choice diet showed hyperphagia and gained more body weight compared to the chow group. Within the choice diet groups, rats on the LS diet were most food efficient (i.e. gained most body weight per ingested calorie) and showed a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) with an anti-phasic pattern, whereas no differences in locomotor activity or heat production were found. Collectively these data indicate that the timing of the diet composition affects food efficiency, most likely due to a shifted oxidation pattern, which can predispose for obesity. Further studies are underway to assess putative mechanisms involved in this dysregulation.

  17. Effects of γ-aminobutyric acid on feed intake, growth performance and expression of related genes in growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Wang, D M; Chacher, B; Liu, H Y; Wang, J K; Lin, J; Liu, J X

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on feed intake, growth performance and expression of related genes in growing lambs. A total of 24 lambs weaned at age of 50 days were divided into four block of six based on their BW, six lambs within a block were allocated to three pairs, which were then assigned randomly to three treatments with addition of rumen-protected GABA at levels of 0, 70 or 140 mg/day for 6 weeks. Dry matter intake was recorded weekly in three consecutive days, and BW was recorded every two weeks. At the end of the trial, four lambs from each group were slaughtered, and duodenum and ileum mucosa were obtained for measurement of mRNA abundance of GABA receptor and cholecystokinin receptor. Dry matter intake was higher (P<0.01) in the lambs fed 140 mg/day GABA than that in the control or 70 mg GABA-fed lambs. Average daily gain and nutrients digestibility were not different (P>0.05) among treatments. Lambs fed 140 mg/day GABA had higher mRNA abundance of GABA-B receptor (P<0.01) and lower mRNA abundance of cholecystokinin-2 receptor (P<0.01) in duodenum mucosa. Serum CCK content was lower (P<0.01) in lambs fed 140 mg/day GABA than that in control. It is indicated that GABA may enhance feed intake by regulating GABA- and cholecystokinin-related genes.

  18. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  19. Inferring causal genomic alterations in breast cancer using gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the primary objectives in cancer research is to identify causal genomic alterations, such as somatic copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations, during tumor development. Many valuable studies lack genomic data to detect CNV; therefore, methods that are able to infer CNVs from gene expression data would help maximize the value of these studies. Results We developed a framework for identifying recurrent regions of CNV and distinguishing the cancer driver genes from the passenger genes in the regions. By inferring CNV regions across many datasets we were able to identify 109 recurrent amplified/deleted CNV regions. Many of these regions are enriched for genes involved in many important processes associated with tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Genes in these recurrent CNV regions were then examined in the context of gene regulatory networks to prioritize putative cancer driver genes. The cancer driver genes uncovered by the framework include not only well-known oncogenes but also a number of novel cancer susceptibility genes validated via siRNA experiments. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first effort to systematically identify and validate drivers for expression based CNV regions in breast cancer. The framework where the wavelet analysis of copy number alteration based on expression coupled with the gene regulatory network analysis, provides a blueprint for leveraging genomic data to identify key regulatory components and gene targets. This integrative approach can be applied to many other large-scale gene expression studies and other novel types of cancer data such as next-generation sequencing based expression (RNA-Seq) as well as CNV data. PMID:21806811

  20. Altered gene expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Guillozet-Bongaarts, A L; Hyde, T M; Dalley, R A; Hawrylycz, M J; Henry, A; Hof, P R; Hohmann, J; Jones, A R; Kuan, C L; Royall, J; Shen, E; Swanson, B; Zeng, H; Kleinman, J E

    2014-01-01

    The underlying pathology of schizophrenia (SZ) is likely as heterogeneous as its symptomatology. A variety of cortical and subcortical regions, including the prefrontal cortex, have been implicated in its pathology, and a number of genes have been identified as risk factors for disease development. We used in situ hybridization (ISH) to examine the expression of 58 genes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, comprised of Brodmann areas 9 and 46) from 19 individuals with a premorbid diagnosis of SZ and 33 control individuals. Genes were selected based on: (1) previous identification as risk factors for SZ; (2) cell type markers or (3) laminar markers. Cell density and staining intensity were compared in the DLPFC, as well as separately in Brodmann areas 9 and 46. The expression patterns of a variety of genes, many of which are associated with the GABAergic system, were altered in SZ when compared with controls. Additional genes, including C8orf79 and NR4A2, showed alterations in cell density or staining intensity between the groups, highlighting the need for additional studies. Alterations were, with only a few exceptions, limited to Brodmann area 9, suggesting regional specificity of pathology in the DLPFC. Our results agree with previous studies on the GABAergic involvement in SZ, and suggest that areas 9 and 46 may be differentially affected in the disease. This study also highlights additional genes that may be altered in SZ, and indicates that these potentially interesting genes can be identified by ISH and high-throughput image analysis techniques. PMID:23528911

  1. Gene Body Methylation can alter Gene Expression and is a Therapeutic Target in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Han, Han; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation in promoters is well known to silence genes and is the presumed therapeutic target of methylation inhibitors. Gene body methylation is positively correlated with expression yet its function is unknown. We show that 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment not only reactivates genes but decreases the over-expression of genes, many of which are involved in metabolic processes regulated by c-MYC. Down-regulation is caused by DNA demethylation of the gene bodies and restoration of high levels of expression requires remethylation by DNMT3B. Gene body methylation may therefore be an unexpected therapeutic target for DNA methylation inhibitors, resulting in the normalization of gene over-expression induced during carcinogenesis. Our results provide direct evidence for a causal relationship between gene body methylation and transcription. PMID:25263941

  2. Effects of level of nutrient intake and age on mammalian target of rapamycin, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 gene network expression in skeletal muscle of young Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Drackley, J K; Stamey-Lanier, J A; Keisler, D; Loor, J J

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which level of nutrient intake enhances skeletal muscle growth in young ruminants are not fully understood. We examined mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene network expression in semitendinosus muscle tissue of young male Holstein calves fed a conventional milk replacer plus conventional starter (CON) or an enhanced milk replacer plus high-protein starter (ENH) for 5 wk followed by a conventional starter or a high-protein starter until 10 wk of age. Feeding ENH led to greater concentration of plasma IGF-1 and leptin and greater carcass protein and fat mass throughout the study. Despite the greater plasma IGF-1 and protein mass at wk 5, calves fed ENH had lower expression of IGF1R, INSR, and RPS6KB1 but greater expression of IRS1 and PDPK1 in muscle tissue. Except for IGF1R expression, which did not differ at wk 10, these differences persisted at wk 10, suggesting a long-term effect of greater nutrient intake on physiological and molecular mechanisms. Components of mTOR complex (mTORC)1 and mTORC2 (RICTOR and RPTOR) and FOXO1 expression decreased by wk 10 regardless of diet. Overall, the present data revealed that greater nutrient intake throughout the milk-fed and early postweaning phase alters body mass composition partly by altering hormonal and molecular profiles of genes associated with glucose and amino acid signaling. Those networks may play a crucial role in coordinating neonatal muscle growth and metabolism in response to level of nutrient intake.

  3. Dietary selenomethionine intake increases exon-specific DNA methylation of p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. Our previous studies suggest that dietary selenium (Se) may alter DNA methylation, and the purpose of this study was to inv...

  4. Dietary selenium intake increases exon-specific DNA methylation of p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. Our previous studies suggest that dietary selenium (Se) may alter DNA methylation, and the purpose of this study was to inv...

  5. MicroRNA-Offset RNA Alters Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Aronovitz, Mark J.; Baur, Wendy E.; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-offset RNAs (moRs) were first identified in simple chordates and subsequently in mouse and human cells by deep sequencing of short RNAs. MoRs are derived from sequences located immediately adjacent to microRNAs (miRs) in the primary miR (pri-miR). Currently moRs are considered to be simply a by-product of miR biosynthesis that lack biological activity. Here we show for the first time that a moR is biologically active. We demonstrate that endogenous or over-expressed moR-21 significantly alters gene expression and inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In addition, we find that miR-21 and moR-21 may regulate different genes in a given pathway and can oppose each other in regulating certain genes. We report that there is a “seed region” of moR-21 as well as a “seed match region” in the target gene 3’UTR that are indispensable for moR-21-mediated gene down-regulation. We further demonstrate that moR-21-mediated gene repression is Argonaute 2 (Ago2) dependent. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that microRNA offset RNA alters gene expression and is biologically active. PMID:27276022

  6. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  7. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  8. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-12-09

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma.

  9. Altered Expression of Fibrosis Genes in Capsules of Failed Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implants

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Alka; Othman, Maha W.; Al Shahwan, Sami; Al Jadaan, Ibrahim; Owaydha, Ohood; Khan, Zahid; Edward, Deepak P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implant is an aqueous shunt device used to control intraocular pressure in glaucoma. Implant failure results from impervious encapsulation of the shunt plate causing increased hydraulic resistance and raised intraocular pressure. We hypothesized that deregulation of fibrosis pathway contributes to capsular resistance. We tested this by studying fibrosis related gene expression in failed AGV implants. Methods Differential gene expression was examined in failed AGV capsules and compared to normal control tenon. Following total RNA extraction, 84 key genes in fibrosis pathway were examined by real-time PCR using RT2 Profiler PCR Array. Relative gene expression was calculated using ΔΔCt method. Gene specific TaqMan assays were used to validate select genes with ≥2 fold differential expression in the array expression profile. Results We observed differential expression in several genes in the fibrosis pathway. Almost half (39/84) of examined genes showed ≥2 fold differential expression in majority of capsules examined on the array. TaqMan assays for select genes including CCN2 (CTGF), THBS1, SERPINE1, THBS2, COL3A1, MMP3, and IL1A in an increased validation sample set showed significant changes in expression (p value from <0.001 to 0.022) at a high frequency in concurrence with our array results. Conclusions Pathway-focused analyses identified candidate genes with altered expression providing molecular evidence for deregulation of the fibrosis pathway in AGV failure. PMID:25879570

  10. Aged human muscle demonstrates an altered gene expression profile consistent with an impaired response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Jozsi, A C; Dupont-Versteegden, E E; Taylor-Jones, J M; Evans, W J; Trappe, T A; Campbell, W W; Peterson, C A

    2000-12-01

    The gene expression profile of skeletal muscle from healthy older (62-75 years old) compared with younger (20-34 years old) men demonstrated elevated expression of genes typical of a stress or damage response, and decreased expression of a gene encoding a DNA repair/cell cycle checkpoint protein. Although the expression of these genes was relatively unaffected by a single bout of resistance exercise in older men, acute exercise altered gene expression in younger men such that post-exercise gene expression in younger men was similar to baseline gene expression in older men. The lack of response of muscle from older subjects to resistance exercise was also apparent in the expression of the inflammatory response gene IL-1beta, which did not differ between the age groups at baseline, but increased within 24 h of the exercise bout only in younger subjects. Other genes with potentially important roles in the adaptation of muscle to exercise, specifically in the processes of angiogenesis and cell proliferation, showed a similar response to exercise in older compared with younger subjects. Only one gene encoding the multifunctional, early growth response transcription factor EGR-1, showed an opposite pattern of expression in response to exercise, acutely decreasing in younger and increasing in older subjects. These results may provide a molecular basis for the inherent variability in the response of muscle from older as compared with younger individuals to resistance training.

  11. Image Defocus and Altered Retinal Gene Expression in Chick: Clues to the Pathogenesis of Ametropia

    PubMed Central

    McGlinn, Alice M.; Baldwin, Donald A.; Tobias, John W.; Iuvone, P. Michael; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Because of the retina's role in refractive development, this study was conducted to analyze the retinal transcriptome in chicks wearing a spectacle lens, a well-established means of inducing refractive errors, to identify gene expression alterations and to develop novel mechanistic hypotheses about refractive development. Methods. One-week-old white Leghorn chicks wore a unilateral spectacle lens of +15 or −15 D for 6 hours or 3 days. With total RNA from the retina/(retinal pigment epithelium, RPE), chicken gene microarrays were used to compare gene expression levels between lens-wearing and contralateral control eyes (n = 6 chicks for each condition). Normalized microarray signal intensities were evaluated by analysis of variance, using a false discovery rate of <10% as the statistical criterion. Selected differentially expressed genes were validated by qPCR. Results. Very few retina/RPE transcripts were differentially expressed after plus lens wear. In contrast, approximately 1300 transcripts were differentially expressed under each of the minus lens conditions, with minimal overlap. For each condition, low fold-changes typified the altered transcriptome. Differentially regulated genes under the minus lens conditions included many potentially informative signaling molecules and genes whose protein products have roles in intrinsic retinal circadian rhythms. Conclusions. Plus or minus lens wear induce markedly different, not opposite, alterations in retina/RPE gene expression. The initial retinal responses to defocus are quite different from those when the eye growth patterns are well established, suggesting that different mechanisms govern the initiation and persistence or progression of refractive errors. The gene lists identify promising signaling candidates and regulatory pathways for future study, including a potential role for circadian rhythms in refractive development. PMID:21642623

  12. Alterations in inflammatory biomarkers and energy intake in cancer cachexia: a prospective study in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bye, Asta; Wesseltoft-Rao, Nima; Iversen, Per Ole; Skjegstad, Grete; Holven, Kirsten B; Ulven, Stine; Hjermstad, Marianne J

    2016-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammatory response is proposed as an underlying mechanism for development of cancer cachexia. We conducted a prospective study to examine changes in inflammatory biomarkers during the disease course and the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and cachexia in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Twenty patients, median (range) age 67.5 (35-79) years, 5 females, were followed for median 5.5 (1-12) months. Cachexia was diagnosed according to the 2011 consensus-based classification system (weight loss >5 % past six months, BMI < 20 kg/m(2) and weight loss >2 %, or sarcopenia) and the modified Glasgow Prognostic score (mGPS) that combines CRP and albumin levels. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by enzyme immunoassays. The patients had increased levels of most inflammatory biomarkers, albeit not all statistically significant, both at study entry and close to death, indicating ongoing inflammation. According to the consensus-based classification system, eleven (55 %) patients were classified as cachectic upon inclusion. They did not differ from non-cachectic patients with regard to inflammatory biomarkers or energy intake. According to the mGPS, seven (35 %) were defined as cachectic and had a higher IL-6 (p < 0.001) than the non-cachectic patients. They also had a slightly, but insignificantly longer survival than non-cachectic patients (p = 0.08). The mGPS should be considered as an additional framework for identification of cancer cachexia. PMID:27119533

  13. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions.

  14. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions. PMID:26615010

  15. Overall alteration of circadian clock gene expression in the chestnut cold response.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Cristian; Ramos, Alberto; Acebo, Paloma; Contreras, Angela; Casado, Rosa; Allona, Isabel; Aragoncillo, Cipriano

    2008-01-01

    Cold acclimation in woody plants may have special features compared to similar processes in herbaceous plants. Recent studies have shown that circadian clock behavior in the chestnut tree (Castanea sativa) is disrupted by cold temperatures and that the primary oscillator feedback loop is not functional at 4 degrees C or in winter. In these conditions, CsTOC1 and CsLHY genes are constantly expressed. Here, we show that this alteration also affects CsPRR5, CsPRR7 and CsPRR9. These genes are homologous to the corresponding Arabidopsis PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR genes, which are also components of the circadian oscillator feedback network. The practically constant presence of mRNAs of the 5 chestnut genes at low temperature reveals an unknown aspect of clock regulation and suggests a mechanism regulating the transcription of oscillator genes as a whole.

  16. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-05-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) μ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain.

  17. Curcumin Intake Affects miRNA Signature in Murine Melanoma with mmu-miR-205-5p Most Significantly Altered

    PubMed Central

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Laschke, Matthias W.; Leidinger, Petra; Menger, Michael D.; Meese, Eckart; Mahlknecht, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer with estimated 48,000 deaths per year worldwide. The polyphenol curcumin derived from the plant Curcuma longa is well known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancerogenic properties. Accordingly, dietary intake of this compound may be suitable for melanoma prevention. However, how this compound affects basic cellular mechanisms in developing melanoma still remains elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate for the first time the impact of oral curcumin administration on the miRNA signature of engrafting melanoma. For this purpose, the effects of a 4% curcumin diet were tested on melanoma, which were established by injection of murine B78H1 cells in the flank of C57BL/6 mice. Curcumin diet or standard chow (control) was administered two weeks prior to injection of tumor cells until termination of the experiment. High throughput chip-based array analysis was deployed to detect alterations in the miRNA signature of the tumors. Curcumin treatment significantly reduced the growth of the flank tumors. Furthermore the miRNA expression signature in tumors was substantially altered by curcumin intake with mmu-miR-205-5p over 100 times higher expressed when compared to controls. The expression levels of identified key miRNAs in the tumor samples were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). A comparable expression pattern of these miRNAs was also detected in other curcumin-treated melanoma cell lines under in vitro conditions. Putative targets of curcumin-induced up-regulated miRNAs were enriched in ‘o-glycan biosynthesis’, ‘endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing’ and different cancer-related pathways. Western Blot analyses revealed that of these targets anti-apoptotic B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were significantly down-regulated in curcumin-treated tumors. These findings demonstrate a profound alteration of the mi

  18. Immunosenescence is associated with altered gene expression and epigenetic regulation in primary and secondary immune organs

    PubMed Central

    Sidler, Corinne; Wóycicki, Rafał; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Metz, Gerlinde; Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Deterioration of the immune system (immunosenescence) with age is associated with an increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disease and cancer, and reduced responsiveness to vaccination. Immunosenescence entails a reduced supply of naïve T cells from the thymus and increased specialization of peripheral T cell clones. Both thymic involution and peripheral T cell homeostasis are thought to involve cellular senescence. In order to analyze this at the molecular level, we studied gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, and genome stability in the thymus and spleen of 1-, 4-, and 18-month-old Long Evans rats. In the thymus, altered gene expression, DNA and histone H3K9 hypomethylation, increased genome instability, and apoptosis were observed in 18-month-old animals compared to 1- and 4-month-old animals. In the spleen, alterations in gene expression and epigenetic regulation occurred already by the age of 4 months compared to 1 month and persisted in 18-month-old compared to 1-month-old rats. In both organs, these changes were accompanied by the altered composition of resident T cell populations. Our study suggests that both senescence and apoptosis may be involved in altered organ function. PMID:24151501

  19. Identification of Gene Networks for Residual Feed Intake in Angus Cattle Using Genomic Prediction and RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kristina L; Welly, Bryan T; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Young, Amy E; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Rincon, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in feed conversion efficiency can improve the sustainability of beef cattle production, but genomic selection for feed efficiency affects many underlying molecular networks and physiological traits. This study describes the differences between steer progeny of two influential Angus bulls with divergent genomic predictions for residual feed intake (RFI). Eight steer progeny of each sire were phenotyped for growth and feed intake from 8 mo. of age (average BW 254 kg, with a mean difference between sire groups of 4.8 kg) until slaughter at 14-16 mo. of age (average BW 534 kg, sire group difference of 28.8 kg). Terminal samples from pituitary gland, skeletal muscle, liver, adipose, and duodenum were collected from each steer for transcriptome sequencing. Gene expression networks were derived using partial correlation and information theory (PCIT), including differentially expressed (DE) genes, tissue specific (TS) genes, transcription factors (TF), and genes associated with RFI from a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Relative to progeny of the high RFI sire, progeny of the low RFI sire had -0.56 kg/d finishing period RFI (P = 0.05), -1.08 finishing period feed conversion ratio (P = 0.01), +3.3 kg^0.75 finishing period metabolic mid-weight (MMW; P = 0.04), +28.8 kg final body weight (P = 0.01), -12.9 feed bunk visits per day (P = 0.02) with +0.60 min/visit duration (P = 0.01), and +0.0045 carcass specific gravity (weight in air/weight in air-weight in water, a predictor of carcass fat content; P = 0.03). RNA-seq identified 633 DE genes between sire groups among 17,016 expressed genes. PCIT analysis identified >115,000 significant co-expression correlations between genes and 25 TF hubs, i.e. controllers of clusters of DE, TS, and GWAS SNP genes. Pathway analysis suggests low RFI bull progeny possess heightened gut inflammation and reduced fat deposition. This multi-omics analysis shows how differences in RFI genomic breeding values can impact other

  20. Identification of Gene Networks for Residual Feed Intake in Angus Cattle Using Genomic Prediction and RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kristina L; Welly, Bryan T; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Young, Amy E; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Rincon, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in feed conversion efficiency can improve the sustainability of beef cattle production, but genomic selection for feed efficiency affects many underlying molecular networks and physiological traits. This study describes the differences between steer progeny of two influential Angus bulls with divergent genomic predictions for residual feed intake (RFI). Eight steer progeny of each sire were phenotyped for growth and feed intake from 8 mo. of age (average BW 254 kg, with a mean difference between sire groups of 4.8 kg) until slaughter at 14-16 mo. of age (average BW 534 kg, sire group difference of 28.8 kg). Terminal samples from pituitary gland, skeletal muscle, liver, adipose, and duodenum were collected from each steer for transcriptome sequencing. Gene expression networks were derived using partial correlation and information theory (PCIT), including differentially expressed (DE) genes, tissue specific (TS) genes, transcription factors (TF), and genes associated with RFI from a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Relative to progeny of the high RFI sire, progeny of the low RFI sire had -0.56 kg/d finishing period RFI (P = 0.05), -1.08 finishing period feed conversion ratio (P = 0.01), +3.3 kg^0.75 finishing period metabolic mid-weight (MMW; P = 0.04), +28.8 kg final body weight (P = 0.01), -12.9 feed bunk visits per day (P = 0.02) with +0.60 min/visit duration (P = 0.01), and +0.0045 carcass specific gravity (weight in air/weight in air-weight in water, a predictor of carcass fat content; P = 0.03). RNA-seq identified 633 DE genes between sire groups among 17,016 expressed genes. PCIT analysis identified >115,000 significant co-expression correlations between genes and 25 TF hubs, i.e. controllers of clusters of DE, TS, and GWAS SNP genes. Pathway analysis suggests low RFI bull progeny possess heightened gut inflammation and reduced fat deposition. This multi-omics analysis shows how differences in RFI genomic breeding values can impact other

  1. Identification of Gene Networks for Residual Feed Intake in Angus Cattle Using Genomic Prediction and RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Kristina L.; Welly, Bryan T.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Young, Amy E.; Porto-Neto, Laercio R.; Reverter, Antonio; Rincon, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in feed conversion efficiency can improve the sustainability of beef cattle production, but genomic selection for feed efficiency affects many underlying molecular networks and physiological traits. This study describes the differences between steer progeny of two influential Angus bulls with divergent genomic predictions for residual feed intake (RFI). Eight steer progeny of each sire were phenotyped for growth and feed intake from 8 mo. of age (average BW 254 kg, with a mean difference between sire groups of 4.8 kg) until slaughter at 14–16 mo. of age (average BW 534 kg, sire group difference of 28.8 kg). Terminal samples from pituitary gland, skeletal muscle, liver, adipose, and duodenum were collected from each steer for transcriptome sequencing. Gene expression networks were derived using partial correlation and information theory (PCIT), including differentially expressed (DE) genes, tissue specific (TS) genes, transcription factors (TF), and genes associated with RFI from a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Relative to progeny of the high RFI sire, progeny of the low RFI sire had -0.56 kg/d finishing period RFI (P = 0.05), -1.08 finishing period feed conversion ratio (P = 0.01), +3.3 kg^0.75 finishing period metabolic mid-weight (MMW; P = 0.04), +28.8 kg final body weight (P = 0.01), -12.9 feed bunk visits per day (P = 0.02) with +0.60 min/visit duration (P = 0.01), and +0.0045 carcass specific gravity (weight in air/weight in air—weight in water, a predictor of carcass fat content; P = 0.03). RNA-seq identified 633 DE genes between sire groups among 17,016 expressed genes. PCIT analysis identified >115,000 significant co-expression correlations between genes and 25 TF hubs, i.e. controllers of clusters of DE, TS, and GWAS SNP genes. Pathway analysis suggests low RFI bull progeny possess heightened gut inflammation and reduced fat deposition. This multi-omics analysis shows how differences in RFI genomic breeding values can impact other

  2. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Interact with Dietary Fat Intakes to Modulate the Plasma TG Response to a Fish Oil Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208) participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9–2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA). Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187) and ACOX1 (rs17583163) genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation. PMID:24647074

  3. Genes and small RNA transcripts exhibit dosage-dependent expression pattern in maize copy-number alterations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes that tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplica...

  4. Consistently altered expression of gene sets in postmortem brains of individuals with major psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Darby, M M; Yolken, R H; Sabunciyan, S

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gene expression in postmortem brain is an important tool for understanding the pathogenesis of serious psychiatric disorders. We hypothesized that major molecular deficits associated with psychiatric disease would affect the entire brain, and such deficits may be shared across disorders. We performed RNA sequencing and quantified gene expression in the hippocampus of 100 brains in the Stanley Array Collection followed by replication in the orbitofrontal cortex of 57 brains in the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium. We then identified genes and canonical pathway gene sets with significantly altered expression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the hippocampus and in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression in the orbitofrontal cortex. Although expression of individual genes varied, gene sets were significantly enriched in both of the brain regions, and many of these were consistent across diagnostic groups. Further examination of core gene sets with consistently increased or decreased expression in both of the brain regions and across target disorders revealed that ribosomal genes are overexpressed while genes involved in neuronal processes, GABAergic signaling, endocytosis and antigen processing have predominantly decreased expression in affected individuals compared to controls without a psychiatric disorder. Our results highlight pathways of central importance to psychiatric health and emphasize messenger RNA processing and protein synthesis as potential therapeutic targets for all three of the disorders. PMID:27622934

  5. Consistently altered expression of gene sets in postmortem brains of individuals with major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Darby, M M; Yolken, R H; Sabunciyan, S

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gene expression in postmortem brain is an important tool for understanding the pathogenesis of serious psychiatric disorders. We hypothesized that major molecular deficits associated with psychiatric disease would affect the entire brain, and such deficits may be shared across disorders. We performed RNA sequencing and quantified gene expression in the hippocampus of 100 brains in the Stanley Array Collection followed by replication in the orbitofrontal cortex of 57 brains in the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium. We then identified genes and canonical pathway gene sets with significantly altered expression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the hippocampus and in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression in the orbitofrontal cortex. Although expression of individual genes varied, gene sets were significantly enriched in both of the brain regions, and many of these were consistent across diagnostic groups. Further examination of core gene sets with consistently increased or decreased expression in both of the brain regions and across target disorders revealed that ribosomal genes are overexpressed while genes involved in neuronal processes, GABAergic signaling, endocytosis and antigen processing have predominantly decreased expression in affected individuals compared to controls without a psychiatric disorder. Our results highlight pathways of central importance to psychiatric health and emphasize messenger RNA processing and protein synthesis as potential therapeutic targets for all three of the disorders. PMID:27622934

  6. Altered gene expression profiles in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing body of epidemiologic and biochemical evidence implying the role of cerebral insulin resistance in Alzheimer-type dementia. For a better understanding of the insulin effect on the central nervous system, we performed microarray-based global gene expression profiling in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of streptozotocin-induced and spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats as model animals for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Results Following pathway analysis and validation of gene lists by real-time polymerase chain reaction, 30 genes from the hippocampus, such as the inhibitory neuropeptide galanin, synuclein gamma and uncoupling protein 2, and 22 genes from the prefrontal cortex, e.g. galanin receptor 2, protein kinase C gamma and epsilon, ABCA1 (ATP-Binding Cassette A1), CD47 (Cluster of Differentiation 47) and the RET (Rearranged During Transfection) protooncogene, were found to exhibit altered expression levels in type 2 diabetic model animals in comparison to non-diabetic control animals. These gene lists proved to be partly overlapping and encompassed genes related to neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, neuronal development, insulin secretion, oxidative damage and DNA repair. On the other hand, no significant alterations were found in the transcriptomes of the corpus striatum in the same animals. Changes in the cerebral gene expression profiles seemed to be specific for the type 2 diabetic model, as no such alterations were found in streptozotocin-treated animals. Conclusions According to our knowledge this is the first characterization of the whole-genome expression changes of specific brain regions in a diabetic model. Our findings shed light on the complex role of insulin signaling in fine-tuning brain functions, and provide further experimental evidence in support of the recently elaborated theory of type 3 diabetes. PMID:22369239

  7. Comparison of gene expression profiles altered by comfrey and riddelliine in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan; Dial, Stacey; Fuscoe, James; Chen, Tao

    2007-01-01

    Background Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) is a perennial plant and has been consumed by humans as a vegetable, a tea and an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. It, however, is hepatotoxic and carcinogenic in experimental animals and hepatotoxic in humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) exist in many plants and many of them cause liver toxicity and/or cancer in humans and experimental animals. In our previous study, we found that the mutagenicity of comfrey was associated with the PAs contained in the plant. Therefore, we suggest that carcinogenicity of comfrey result from those PAs. To confirm our hypothesis, we compared the expression of genes and processes of biological functions that were altered by comfrey (mixture of the plant with PAs) and riddelliine (a prototype of carcinogenic PA) in rat liver for carcinogenesis in this study. Results Groups of 6 Big Blue Fisher 344 rats were treated with riddelliine at 1 mg/kg body weight by gavage five times a week for 12 weeks or fed a diet containing 8% comfrey root for 12 weeks. Animals were sacrificed one day after the last treatment and the livers were isolated for gene expression analysis. The gene expressions were investigated using Applied Biosystems Rat Whole Genome Survey Microarrays and the biological functions were analyzed with Ingenuity Analysis Pathway software. Although there were large differences between the significant genes and between the biological processes that were altered by comfrey and riddelliine, there were a number of common genes and function processes that were related to carcinogenesis. There was a strong correlation between the two treatments for fold-change alterations in expression of drug metabolizing and cancer-related genes. Conclusion Our results suggest that the carcinogenesis-related gene expression patterns resulting from the treatments of comfrey and riddelliine are very similar, and PAs contained in comfrey are the main active components responsible for carcinogenicity of

  8. Persistent Alterations of Gene Expression Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Daniel Y.; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Shields, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers’ blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. PMID:26294040

  9. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE ALTERS GENE EXPRESSION IN THE DEVELOPING MURINE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horn, Kristin H.; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of passive smoke exposures on the developing brain. Objective The purpose of the current study was to identify changes in gene expression in the murine hippocampus as a consequence of in utero exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke (an experimental equivalent of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS)) at exposure levels that do not result in fetal growth inhibition. Methods A whole body smoke inhalation exposure system was utilized to deliver ETS to pregnant C57BL/6J mice for six hours/day from gestational days 6–17 (gd 6–17) [for microarray] or gd 6–18.5 [for fetal phenotyping]. Results There were no significant effects of ETS exposure on fetal phenotype. However, 61 “expressed” genes in the gd 18.5 fetal hippocampus were differentially regulated (up- or down-regulated by 1.5 fold or greater) by maternal exposure to ETS. Of these 61 genes, 25 genes were upregulated while 36 genes were downregulated. A systems biology approach, including computational methodologies, identified cellular response pathways, and biological themes, underlying altered fetal programming of the embryonic hippocampus by in utero cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions Results from the present study suggest that even in the absence of effects on fetal growth, prenatal smoke exposure can alter gene expression during the “early” period of hippocampal growth and may result in abnormal hippocampal morphology, connectivity, and function. PMID:19969065

  10. CRY1 circadian gene variant interacts with carbohydrate intake for insulin resistance in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hassan S.; Smith, Caren E.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Parnell, Laurence D.; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Ordovás, José M.; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation in the circadian system induced by variants of clock genes has been associated with type 2 diabetes. Evidence for the role of cryptochromes, core components of the system, in regulating glucose homeostasis is not supported by CRY1 candidate gene association studies for diabetes and insulin resistance in human, suggesting possible dietary influences. The purpose of this study was to test for interactions between a CRY1 polymorphism, rs2287161, and carbohydrate intake on insulin resistance in two independent populations: a Mediterranean (n=728) and an European origin North American population (n=820). Linear regression interaction models were performed in two populations to test for gene–diet interactions on fasting insulin and glucose and two insulin-related traits, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). In addition, fixed effects meta-analyses for these interactions were performed. Cohort-specific interaction analyses showed significant interactions between the CRY1 variant and dietary carbohydrates for insulin resistance in both populations (p<0.05). Findings from the meta-analyses of carbohydrate–single nucleotide polymorphism interactions indicated that an increase in carbohydrate intake (% of energy intake) was associated with a significant increase in HOMA-IR (p=0.011), fasting insulin (p=0.007) and a decrease in QUICKI (p=0.028), only among individuals homozygous for the minor C allele. This novel finding supports the link between the circadian system and glucose metabolism and suggests the importance this CRY1 locus in developing personalized nutrition programs aimed at reducing insulin resistance and diabetes risk. PMID:24548145

  11. Alterations in Gene Expression and DNA Methylation during Murine and Human Lung Alveolar Septation

    PubMed Central

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K.; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  12. Altered circadian rhythm and metabolic gene profile in rats subjected to advanced light phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level.

  13. Altered Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Gene Profile in Rats Subjected to Advanced Light Phase Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:25837425

  14. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects.

  15. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects. PMID:26063602

  16. Altered Stra13 and Dec2 circadian gene expression in hypoxic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Lacoche, Samuel; Dulong, Sandrine; Grechez-Cassiau, Aline; Filipski, Elisabeth; Li, Xiao-Mei; Levi, Francis; Berra, Edurne; Delaunay, Franck; Teboul, Michele

    2008-05-16

    The circadian system regulates rhythmically most of the mammalian physiology in synchrony with the environmental light/dark cycle. Alteration of circadian clock gene expression has been associated with tumour progression but the molecular links between the two mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we show that Stra13 and Dec2, two circadian transcriptional regulators which play a crucial role in cell proliferation and apoptosis are overexpressed and no longer rhythmic in serum shocked fibroblasts treated with CoCl{sub 2,} a substitute of hypoxia. This effect is associated with a loss of circadian expression of the clock genes Rev-erb{alpha} and Bmal1, and the clock-controlled gene Dbp. Consistently, cotransfection assays demonstrate that STRA13 and DEC2 both antagonize CLOCK:BMAL1 dependent transactivation of the Rev-erb{alpha} and Dbp promoters. Using a transplantable osteosarcoma tumour model, we show that hypoxia is associated with altered circadian expression of Stra13, Dec2, Rev-erb{alpha}, Bmal1 and Dbp in vivo. These observations collectively support the notion that overexpression of Stra13 and Dec2 links hypoxia signalling to altered circadian clock gene expression.

  17. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Laminin-binding integrin gene copy number alterations in distinct epithelial-type cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harryman, William L; Pond, Erika; Singh, Parminder; Little, Andrew S; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Nagle, Raymond B; Cress, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Background: The laminin-binding integrin (LBI) family are cell adhesion molecules that are essential for invasion and metastasis of human epithelial cancers and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance. We investigated whether copy number alteration (CNA) or mutations of a five-gene signature (ITGB4, ITGA3, LAMB3, PLEC, and SYNE3), representing essential genes for LBI adhesion, would correlate with patient outcomes within human epithelial-type tumor data sets currently available in an open access format. Methods: We investigated the relative alteration frequency of an LBI signature panel (integrin β4 (ITGB4), integrin α3 (ITGA3), laminin β3 chain (LAMB3), plectin (PLEC), and nesprin 3 (SYNE3)), independent of the epithelial cancer type, within publically available and published data using cBioPortal and Oncomine software. We rank ordered the results using a 20% alteration frequency cut-off and limited the analysis to studies containing at least 100 samples. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were analyzed to determine if alterations in the LBI signature correlated with patient survival. The Oncomine data mining tool was used to compare the heat map expression of the LBI signature without SYNE3 (as this was not included in the Oncomine database) to drug resistance patterns. Results: Twelve different cancer types, representing 5,647 samples, contained at least a 20% alteration frequency of the five-gene LBI signature. The frequency of alteration ranged from 38.3% to 19.8%. Within the LBI signature, PLEC was the most commonly altered followed by LAMB3, ITGB4, ITGA3, and SYNE3 across all twelve cancer types. Within cancer types, there was little overlap of the individual amplified genes from each sample, suggesting different specific amplicons may alter the LBI adhesion structures. Of the twelve cancer types, overall survival was altered by CNA presence in bladder urothelial carcinoma (p=0.0143*) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma and endocervical adenocarcinoma (p=0

  19. Altered Gene Expression Pattern in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Marek; Burzynska, Beata; Michalak, Marcin; Gora, Monika; Winkler, Aleksandra; Maciejak, Agata; Leszczynska, Agata; Gajda, Ewa; Kochanowski, Janusz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. Methods and Results Twenty-eight patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were included. The blood was collected on the 1st day of myocardial infarction, after 4–6 days, and after 6 months. Control group comprised 14 patients with stable coronary artery disease, without history of myocardial infarction. Gene expression analysis was performed with Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarrays and GCS3000 TG system. Lists of genes showing altered expression levels (fold change >1.5, p<0.05) were submitted to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Gene lists from each group were examined for canonical pathways and molecular and cellular functions. Comparing acute phase of MI with the same patients after 6 months (stable phase) and with control group we found 24 genes with changed expression. In canonical analysis three pathways were highlighted: signaling of PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), IL-10 and IL-6 (interleukin 10 and 6). Conclusions In the acute phase of STEMI, dozens of genes from several pathways linked with lipid/glucose metabolism, platelet function and atherosclerotic plaque stability show altered expression. Up-regulation of SOCS3 and FAM20 genes in the first days of myocardial infarction is observed in the vast majority of patients. PMID:23185530

  20. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  1. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming.

  2. Identification of genes whose expression is altered by obesity throughout the arterial tree

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Davis, J. Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    We used next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology on the whole transcriptome to identify genes whose expression is consistently affected by obesity across multiple arteries. Specifically, we examined transcriptional profiles of the iliac artery as well as the feed artery, first, second, and third branch order arterioles in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and diaphragm muscles from obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. Within the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, the number of genes differentially expressed with obesity tended to increase with increasing branch order arteriole number (i.e., decreasing size of the artery). This trend was opposite in the diaphragm. We found a total of 15 genes that were consistently upregulated with obesity (MIS18A, CTRB1, FAM151B, FOLR2, PXMP4, OAS1B, SREBF2, KLRA17, SLC25A44, SNX10, SLFN3, MEF2BNB, IRF7, RAD23A, LGALS3BP) and five genes that were consistently downregulated with obesity (C2, GOLGA7, RIN3, PCP4, CYP2E1). A small fraction (∼9%) of the genes affected by obesity was modulated across all arteries examined. In conclusion, the present study identifies a select number of genes (i.e., 20 genes) whose expression is consistently altered throughout the arterial network in response to obesity and provides further insight into the heterogeneous vascular effects of obesity. Although there is no known direct function of the majority of 20 genes related to vascular health, the obesity-associated upregulation of SREBF2, LGALS3BP, IRF7, and FOLR2 across all arteries is suggestive of an unfavorable vascular phenotypic alteration with obesity. These data may serve as an important resource for identifying novel therapeutic targets against obesity-related vascular complications. PMID:25271210

  3. Identification of genes whose expression is altered by obesity throughout the arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Thorne, Pamela K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Rector, R Scott; Davis, J Wade; Laughlin, M Harold

    2014-11-15

    We used next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology on the whole transcriptome to identify genes whose expression is consistently affected by obesity across multiple arteries. Specifically, we examined transcriptional profiles of the iliac artery as well as the feed artery, first, second, and third branch order arterioles in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and diaphragm muscles from obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. Within the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, the number of genes differentially expressed with obesity tended to increase with increasing branch order arteriole number (i.e., decreasing size of the artery). This trend was opposite in the diaphragm. We found a total of 15 genes that were consistently upregulated with obesity (MIS18A, CTRB1, FAM151B, FOLR2, PXMP4, OAS1B, SREBF2, KLRA17, SLC25A44, SNX10, SLFN3, MEF2BNB, IRF7, RAD23A, LGALS3BP) and five genes that were consistently downregulated with obesity (C2, GOLGA7, RIN3, PCP4, CYP2E1). A small fraction (∼9%) of the genes affected by obesity was modulated across all arteries examined. In conclusion, the present study identifies a select number of genes (i.e., 20 genes) whose expression is consistently altered throughout the arterial network in response to obesity and provides further insight into the heterogeneous vascular effects of obesity. Although there is no known direct function of the majority of 20 genes related to vascular health, the obesity-associated upregulation of SREBF2, LGALS3BP, IRF7, and FOLR2 across all arteries is suggestive of an unfavorable vascular phenotypic alteration with obesity. These data may serve as an important resource for identifying novel therapeutic targets against obesity-related vascular complications.

  4. Sequential Infection with Common Pathogens Promotes Human-like Immune Gene Expression and Altered Vaccine Response.

    PubMed

    Reese, Tiffany A; Bi, Kevin; Kambal, Amal; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Beura, Lalit K; Bürger, Matheus C; Pulendran, Bali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David; Haining, W Nicholas; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-05-11

    Immune responses differ between laboratory mice and humans. Chronic infection with viruses and parasites are common in humans, but are absent in laboratory mice, and thus represent potential contributors to inter-species differences in immunity. To test this, we sequentially infected laboratory mice with herpesviruses, influenza, and an intestinal helminth and compared their blood immune signatures to mock-infected mice before and after vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV-17D). Sequential infection altered pre- and post-vaccination gene expression, cytokines, and antibodies in blood. Sequential pathogen exposure induced gene signatures that recapitulated those seen in blood from pet store-raised versus laboratory mice, and adult versus cord blood in humans. Therefore, basal and vaccine-induced murine immune responses are altered by infection with agents common outside of barrier facilities. This raises the possibility that we can improve mouse models of vaccination and immunity by selective microbial exposure of laboratory animals to mimic that of humans. PMID:27107939

  5. Role of Genetic Alterations in the NLRP3 and CARD8 Genes in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paramel, G. V.; Sirsjö, A.; Fransén, K.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of a common inflammatory disease is influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors contributing to the susceptibility of disease. Studies have reported that these exogenous and endogenous components may perturb the balance of innate immune response by activating the NLRP3 inflammasome. The multimeric NLRP3 complex results in the caspase-1 activation and the release of potent inflammatory cytokines, like IL-1β. Several studies have been performed on the association of the genetic alterations in genes encoding NLRP3 and CARD8 with the complex diseases with inflammatory background, like inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes. The aim of the present review is therefore to summarize the literature regarding genetic alterations in these genes and their association with health and disease. PMID:25788762

  6. Polymorphic core promoter GA-repeats alter gene expression of the early embryonic developmental genes.

    PubMed

    Valipour, E; Kowsari, A; Bayat, H; Banan, M; Kazeminasab, S; Mohammadparast, S; Ohadi, M

    2013-12-01

    Protein complexes that bind to 'GAGA' DNA elements are necessary to replace nucleosomes to create a local chromatin environment that facilitates a variety of site-specific regulatory responses. Three to four elements are required for the disruption of a preassembled nucleosome. We have previously identified human protein-coding gene core promoters that are composed of exceptionally long GA-repeats. The functional implication of those GA-repeats is beginning to emerge in the core promoter of the human SOX5 gene, which is involved in multiple developmental processes. In the current study, we analyze the functional implication of GA-repeats in the core promoter of two additional genes, MECOM and GABRA3, whose expression is largely limited to embryogenesis. We report a significant difference in gene expression as a result of different alleles across those core promoters in the HEK-293 cell line. Across-species homology check for the GABRA3 GA-repeats revealed that those repeats are evolutionary conserved in mouse and primates (p<1 × 10(-8)). The MECOM core promoter GA-repeats are also conserved in numerous species, of which human has the longest repeat and complexity. We propose a novel role for GA-repeat core promoters to regulate gene expression in the genes involved in development and evolution.

  7. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Courtney E.; Tolba, Mai F.; Rondelli, Catherine M.; Xu, Meixiang; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE) is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM) for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50) significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM) analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development. PMID:26339600

  8. Rescue of Metabolic Alterations in AR113Q Skeletal Muscle by Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Elisa; Yu, Zhigang; Chua, Jason P; Shimamura, Ryosuke; Zhao, Lili; Zhu, Fan; Venneti, Sriram; Pennuto, Maria; Guan, Yuanfang; Hung, Gene; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-09-27

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a progressive degenerative disorder, is caused by a CAG/glutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (polyQ AR). Recent studies demonstrate that skeletal muscle is an important site of toxicity that contributes to the SBMA phenotype. Here, we sought to identify critical pathways altered in muscle that underlie disease manifestations in AR113Q mice. This led to the unanticipated identification of gene expression changes affecting regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, similar to those triggered by denervation. AR113Q muscle exhibits diminished glycolysis, altered mitochondria, and an impaired response to exercise. Strikingly, the expression of genes regulating muscle energy metabolism is rescued following peripheral polyQ AR gene silencing by antisense oligonucleotides (ASO), a therapeutic strategy that alleviates disease. Our data establish the occurrence of a metabolic imbalance in SBMA muscle triggered by peripheral expression of the polyQ AR and indicate that alterations in energy utilization contribute to non-neuronal disease manifestations. PMID:27681426

  9. Rescue of Metabolic Alterations in AR113Q Skeletal Muscle by Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Elisa; Yu, Zhigang; Chua, Jason P; Shimamura, Ryosuke; Zhao, Lili; Zhu, Fan; Venneti, Sriram; Pennuto, Maria; Guan, Yuanfang; Hung, Gene; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-09-27

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a progressive degenerative disorder, is caused by a CAG/glutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (polyQ AR). Recent studies demonstrate that skeletal muscle is an important site of toxicity that contributes to the SBMA phenotype. Here, we sought to identify critical pathways altered in muscle that underlie disease manifestations in AR113Q mice. This led to the unanticipated identification of gene expression changes affecting regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, similar to those triggered by denervation. AR113Q muscle exhibits diminished glycolysis, altered mitochondria, and an impaired response to exercise. Strikingly, the expression of genes regulating muscle energy metabolism is rescued following peripheral polyQ AR gene silencing by antisense oligonucleotides (ASO), a therapeutic strategy that alleviates disease. Our data establish the occurrence of a metabolic imbalance in SBMA muscle triggered by peripheral expression of the polyQ AR and indicate that alterations in energy utilization contribute to non-neuronal disease manifestations.

  10. PRENATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE ALTERS STEADY-STATE AND ACTIVATED GENE EXPRESSION IN THE ADULT RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Katarzyna A.; Lussier, Alexandre A.; Neumann, Sarah M.; Pavlidis, Paul; Kobor, Michael S.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with alterations in numerous physiological systems, including the stress and immune systems . We have previously shown that PAE increases the course and severity of arthritis in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. While the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully known, changes in neural gene expression are emerging as important factors in the etiology of PAE effects. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) play key roles in neuroimmune function, PAE-induced alterations to their transcriptome may underlie abnormal steady-state functions and responses to immune challenge. The current study examined brains from adult PAE and control females from our recent AA study to determine whether PAE causes long-term alterations in gene expression and whether these mediate the altered severity and course of arthritis in PAE females Methods Adult females from PAE, pair-fed [PF], and ad libitum-fed control [C]) groups were injected with either saline or complete Freund’s adjuvant. Animals were terminated at the peak of inflammation or during resolution (days 16 and 39 post-injection, respectively); cohorts of saline-injected PAE, PF and C females were terminated in parallel. Gene expression was analyzed in the PFC and HPC using whole genome mRNA expression microarrays. Results Significant changes in gene expression in both the PFC and HPC were found in PAE compared to controls in response to ethanol exposure alone (saline-injected females), including genes involved in neurodevelopment, apoptosis, and energy metabolism. Moreover, in response to inflammation (adjuvant-injected females), PAE animals showed unique expression patterns, while failing to exhibit the activation of genes and regulators involved in the immune response observed in control and pair-fed animals. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that PAE affects neuroimmune function at the level of gene expression

  11. Polarity gene alterations in pure invasive micropapillary carcinomas of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pure invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is a special type of breast carcinoma characterised by clusters of cells presenting polarity abnormalities. The biological alterations underlying this pattern remain unknown. Methods Pangenomic analysis (n = 39), TP53 (n = 43) and PIK3CA (n = 41) sequencing in a series of IMPCs were performed. A subset of cases was also analysed with whole-exome sequencing (n = 4) and RNA sequencing (n = 6). Copy number variation profiles were compared with those of oestrogen receptors and grade-matched invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of no special type. Results Unsupervised analysis of genomic data distinguished two IMPC subsets: one (Sawtooth/8/16) exhibited a significant increase in 16p gains (71%), and the other (Firestorm/Amplifier) was characterised by a high frequency of 8q (35%), 17q (20% to 46%) and 20q (23% to 30%) amplifications and 17p loss (74%). TP53 mutations (10%) were more frequently identified in the amplifier subset, and PIK3CA mutations (4%) were detected in both subsets. Compared to IDC, IMPC exhibited specific loss of the 6q16-q22 region (45%), which is associated with downregulation of FOXO3 and SEC63 gene expression. SEC63 and FOXO3 missense mutations were identified in one case each (2%). Whole-exome sequencing combined with RNA sequencing of IMPC allowed us to identify somatic mutations in genes involved in polarity, DNAH9 and FMN2 (8% and 2%, respectively) or ciliogenesis, BBS12 and BBS9 (2% each) or genes coding for endoplasmic reticulum protein, HSP90B1 and SPTLC3 (2% each) and cytoskeleton, UBR4 and PTPN21 (2% each), regardless of the genomic subset. The intracellular biological function of the mutated genes identified by gene ontology analysis suggests a driving role in the clinicopathological characteristics of IMPC. Conclusion In our comprehensive molecular analysis of IMPC, we identified numerous genomic alterations without any recurrent fusion genes. Recurrent somatic mutations of genes

  12. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki; Fujiwara, Hironori; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  13. Alteration of gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle of rats exposed to microgravity during a spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Wayne E.; Bhasin, Shalender; Lalani, Rukhsana; Datta, Anuj; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting during spaceflights, we investigated whether intramuscular gene expression profiles are affected, by using DNA microarray methods. Male rats sent on the 17-day NASA STS-90 Neurolab spaceflight were sacrificed 24 hours after return to earth (MG group). Ground control rats were maintained for 17 days in flight-simulated cages (CS group). Spaceflight induced a 19% and 23% loss of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle mass, respectively, as compared to ground controls. Muscle RNA was analyzed by the Clontech Atlas DNA expression array in four rats, with two MG/ CS pairs for the tibialis anterior, and one pair for the gastrocnemius. Alterations in gene expression were verified for selected genes by reverse-transcription PCR. In both muscles of MG rats, mRNAs for 12 genes were up-regulated by over 2-fold, and 38 were down-regulated compared to controls. There was inhibition of genes for cell proliferation and growth factor cascades, including cell cycle genes and signal transduction proteins, such as p21 Cip1, retinoblastoma (Rb), cyclins G1/S, -E and -D3, MAP kinase 3, MAD3, and ras related protein RAB2. These data indicate that following exposure to microgravity, there is downregulation of genes involved in regulation of muscle satellite cell replication.

  14. Preliminary evidence of phenytoin-induced alterations in embryonic gene expression in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Musselman, A C; Bennett, G D; Greer, K A; Eberwine, J H; Finnell, R H

    1994-01-01

    SWV mouse embryos collected on gestational days (GD) 9:12 and 10:00 following chronic in utero exposure to teratogenic concentrations of phenytoin were utilized for in situ transcription studies of gene expression. The substrate cDNA obtained from the frozen embryo sections was amplified into radiolabelled antisense RNA (RT/aRNA) and used as a probe to screen a panel of 20 cDNA clones representing genes that are important regulators of craniofacial and neural development. The magnitude of alteration in gene expression following phenytoin treatment was determined densitometrically by changes in the hybridization intensity of the aRNA probes to the cDNA clones immobilized to the slot blots. We found that both Wnt-1 and the calcium channel gene were developmentally regulated, as their level of expression decreased significantly between the two collection times. Phenytoin treatment produced a significant downregulation in the level of expression for 25% of the genes examined in the GD 9:12 embryos, including the growth factors TGF-beta and NT3, the proto-oncogene Wnt-1, the nicotinic receptor, and the voltage sensitive calcium channel gene. Additional changes in the coordinate expression of several of the growth and transcription factors were observed at both gestational timepoints. The application of RT/aRNA technology has extended our appreciation of the normal patterns of gene expression during craniofacial and neural development, and provided the first demonstration of multiple coordinate changes in transcription patterns following teratogenic insult.

  15. Alterations of gene expression in skin and lung of mice exposed to light and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Balansky, Roumen M; D'Agostini, Francesco; Lubet, Ronald A; De Flora, Silvio

    2004-10-01

    We previously showed that sunlight-mimicking light induces genotoxic damage not only in skin but also even in lung, bone marrow, and peripheral blood of hairless mice. Moreover, light and smoke acted synergically in the respiratory tract. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we investigated by cDNA-arrays the expression of 746 toxicologically relevant genes in skin and lungs of mice exposed for 28 days to light and/or environmental cigarette smoke. Glutathione-S-transferase-Pi and catalase were overexpressed in the lungs of mice exposed to light only. Moreover, the light induced in skin the expression of genes involved in carcinogenesis, photoaging, and production of genotoxic and oxidizing derivatives traveling at a distance. Smoke induced the expression of multiple genes in both skin and lung, which reflect adaptive responses and mechanisms related to cancer and, possibly, to emphysema and stroke. As shown in mice exposed to both light and smoke, the light tended to increase smoke-induced gene expression in lungs, while smoke tended to attenuate light-induced gene expression in skin. The oral administration of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac inhibited the light-induced overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 and oxidative stress-related genes in skin, and down-regulated smoke-induced genes involved in oxidative stress, removal of damaged proteins, inflammation, and immune response in lung. These results provide a mechanistic insight explaining the systemic alterations induced by both light and smoke in mouse skin and lungs.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in nitric oxide synthase genes modify the relationship between vegetable and fruit intake and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xuesong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Yaqun; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Qin, Qin; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zahm, Shelia H.; Holford, Theodore R.; Leaderer, Brian; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals is involved in carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that high vegetable and fruit intake may reduce the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) as vegetables and fruit are rich in antioxidants. The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction of vegetable and fruit intake with genetic polymorphisms in oxidative stress pathway genes and NHL risk. This hypothesis was investigated in a population-based case-control study of NHL and NHL histological subtype in Connecticut women including 513 histologically confirmed incident cases and 591 randomly selected controls. Gene-vegetable/fruit joint effects were estimated using unconditional logistic regression model. The false discovery rate method was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons. Significant interactions with vegetable and fruit intake were mainly found for genetic polymorphisms on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes among those with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Follicular lymphoma (FL). Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOS1 gene were found to significantly modify the association between total vegetable and fruit intake and risk of NHL overall, as well as the risk of follicular lymphoma (FL). When vegetables, bean vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, green leafy vegetables, red vegetables, yellow/orange vegetables, fruit, and citrus fruit were examined separately, strong interaction effects were narrowed to vegetable intake among DLBCL patients. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in oxidative stress pathway genes, especially in the nitric oxide synthase genes, modify the association between vegetable and fruit intake and risk of NHL. PMID:19423521

  17. Altered Gene Expression in Schizophrenia: Findings from Transcriptional Signatures in Fibroblasts and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Cattane, Nadia; Minelli, Alessandra; Milanesi, Elena; Maj, Carlo; Bignotti, Stefano; Bortolomasi, Marco; Chiavetto, Luisella Bocchio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole-genome expression studies in the peripheral tissues of patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ) can provide new insight into the molecular basis of the disorder and innovative biomarkers that may be of great utility in clinical practice. Recent evidence suggests that skin fibroblasts could represent a non-neural peripheral model useful for investigating molecular alterations in psychiatric disorders. Methods A microarray expression study was conducted comparing skin fibroblast transcriptomic profiles from 20 SCZ patients and 20 controls. All genes strongly differentially expressed were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in fibroblasts and analyzed in a sample of peripheral blood cell (PBC) RNA from patients (n = 25) and controls (n = 22). To evaluate the specificity for SCZ, alterations in gene expression were tested in additional samples of fibroblasts and PBCs RNA from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) (n = 16; n = 21, respectively) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) patients (n = 15; n = 20, respectively). Results Six genes (JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1, TCF4) were significantly upregulated in SCZ compared to control fibroblasts. In blood, an increase in expression levels was confirmed only for EGR1, whereas JUN was downregulated; no significant differences were observed for the other genes. EGR1 upregulation was specific for SCZ compared to MDD and BD. Conclusions Our study reports the upregulation of JUN, HIST2H2BE, FOSB, FOS, EGR1 and TCF4 in the fibroblasts of SCZ patients. A significant alteration in EGR1 expression is also present in SCZ PBCs compared to controls and to MDD and BD patients, suggesting that this gene could be a specific biomarker helpful in the differential diagnosis of major psychoses. PMID:25658856

  18. Relative Fluid Novelty Differentially Alters the Time Course of Limited-Access Ethanol and Water Intake in Selectively Bred High Alcohol Preferring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linsenbardt, David N.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of previous alcohol (ethanol) drinking experience on increasing the rate and amount of future ethanol consumption might be a genetically-regulated phenomenon critical to the development and maintenance of repeated excessive ethanol abuse. We have recently found evidence supporting this view, wherein inbred C57BL/6J (B6) mice develop progressive increases in the rate of binge-ethanol consumption over repeated Drinking-in-the-Dark (DID) ethanol access sessions (i.e. ‘front-loading’). The primary goal of the present study was to evaluate identical parameters in High Alcohol Preferring (HAP) mice to determine if similar temporal alterations in limited-access ethanol drinking develop in a population selected for high ethanol preference/intake under continuous (24hr) access conditions. Methods Using specialized volumetric drinking devices, HAP mice received 14 daily 2 hour DID ethanol or water access sessions. A subset of these mice was then given one day access to the opposite assigned fluid on day 15. Home cage locomotor activity was recorded concomitantly on each day of these studies. The possibility of behavioral/metabolic tolerance was evaluated on day 16 using experimenter administered ethanol. Results The amount of ethanol consumed within the first 15 minutes of access increased markedly over days. However, in contrast to previous observations in B6 mice, ethanol front-loading was also observed on day 15 in mice that only had previous DID experience with water. Furthermore, a decrease in the amount of water consumed within the first 15 minutes of access compared to animals given repeated water access was observed on day 15 in mice with 14 previous days of ethanol access. Conclusions These data further illustrate the complexity and importance of the temporal aspects of limited-access ethanol consumption, and suggest that previous procedural/fluid experience in HAP mice selectively alters the time course of ethanol and water consumption

  19. Spaceflight induces both transient and heritable alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiufang; Long, Likun; Zhang, Yunhong; Xue, Yiqun; Liu, Jingchun; Lin, Xiuyun; Liu, Bao

    2009-03-01

    Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved, which may provoke stress responses and jeopardize genome integrity. Given the inherent property of epigenetic modifications to respond to intrinsic as well as external perturbations, it is conceivable that epigenetic markers like DNA methylation may undergo alterations in response to spaceflight. We report here that extensive alteration in both DNA methylation and gene expression occurred in rice plants subjected to a spaceflight, as revealed by a set of characterized sequences including 6 transposable elements (TEs) and 11 cellular genes. We found that several features characterize the alterations: (1) All detected alterations are hypermethylation events; (2) whereas alteration in both CG and CNG methylation occurred in the TEs, only alteration in CNG methylation occurred in the cellular genes; (3) alteration in expression includes both up- and down-regulations, which did not show a general correlation with alteration in methylation; (4) altered methylation patterns in both TEs and cellular genes are heritable to progenies at variable frequencies; however, stochastic reversion to wild-type patterns and further de novo changes in progenies are also apparent; and (5) the altered expression states in both TEs and cellular genes are also heritable to selfed progenies but with markedly lower transmission frequencies than altered DNA methylation states. Furthermore, we found that a set of genes encoding for the various putative DNA methyltransferases, 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeller (DDM1) and siRNA-related proteins are extremely sensitive to perturbation by spaceflight, which might be an underlying cause for the altered methylation patterns in the space-flown plants. We discuss implications of spaceflight-induced epigenetic variations with regard to health safety

  20. Contrasting effects of different levels of food intake and adiposity on LH secretion and hypothalamic gene expression in sheep.

    PubMed

    Archer, Z A; Rhind, S M; Findlay, P A; Kyle, C E; Thomas, L; Marie, M; Adam, C L

    2002-11-01

    Body reserves (long-term) and food intake (short-term) both contribute nutritional feedback to the hypothalamus. Reproductive neuroendocrine output (GnRH/LH) is stimulated by increased food intake and not by high adiposity in sheep, but it is unknown whether appetite-regulating hypothalamic neurons show this differential response. Castrated male sheep (Scottish Blackface) with oestradiol implants were studied in two 4 week experiments. In Experiment 1, sheep were fed to maintain the initial body condition (BC) score of 2.0+/-0.00 (lower BC (LBC), n=7) or 2.9+/-0.09 (higher BC (HBC), n=9), and liveweight of 43+/-1.1 and 59+/-1.6 kg respectively. LBC and HBC sheep had similar mean plasma LH concentration, pulse frequency and amplitude, but HBC animals had higher mean plasma concentrations of insulin (P<0.01), leptin (P<0.01) and glucose (P<0.01). Gene expression (measured by in situ hybridisation) in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) was higher in LBC than HBC sheep for neuropeptide Y (NPY; 486% of HBC, P<0.01), agouti-related peptide (AGRP; 467%, P<0.05) and leptin receptor (OB-Rb; 141%, P<0.05), but lower for cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART; 92%, P<0.05) and similar between groups for pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). In Experiment 2, sheep with initial mean BC score 2.4+/-0.03 and liveweight 55+/-0.8 kg were fed a liveweight-maintenance ration (low intake, LI, n=7) while sheep with initial mean BC score 2.0+/-0.03 and liveweight 43+/-1.4 kg were fed freely so that BC score increased to 2.5+/-0.00 and liveweight increased to 54+/-1.4 kg (high intake, HI, n=9). Compared with LI, HI sheep had higher mean plasma LH (P<0.05), baseline LH (P<0.01) and pulse amplitude (P<0.01) and showed a trend towards higher pulse frequency. Although there were no differences in final mean plasma concentrations, there were significant increases over time in mean concentrations of insulin (P<0.001), leptin (P<0.05) and glucose (P<0.001) in HI sheep. Gene expression

  1. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs). These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA) mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter) the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent). Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1) were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) were

  2. Carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Le Gall, Maude

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates represent more than 50% of the energy sources present in most human diets. Sugar intake is regulated by metabolic, neuronal, and hedonic factors, and gene polymorphisms are involved in determining sugar preference. Nutrigenomic adaptations to carbohydrate availability have been evidenced in metabolic diseases, in the persistence of lactose digestion, and in amylase gene copy number. Furthermore, dietary oligosaccharides, fermentable by gut flora, can modulate the microbiotal diversity to the benefit of the host. Genetic diseases linked to mutations in the disaccharidase genes (sucrase-isomaltase, lactase) and in sugar transporter genes (sodium/glucose cotransporter 1, glucose transporters 1 and 2) severely impact carbohydrate intake. These diseases are revealed upon exposure to food containing the offending sugar, and withdrawal of this sugar from the diet prevents disease symptoms, failure to thrive, and premature death. Tailoring the sugar composition of diets to optimize wellness and to prevent the chronic occurrence of metabolic diseases is a future goal that may yet be realized through continued development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics approaches. PMID:22656375

  3. Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations.

    PubMed

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Smidler, Andrea L; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Church, George M

    2014-07-17

    Gene drives may be capable of addressing ecological problems by altering entire populations of wild organisms, but their use has remained largely theoretical due to technical constraints. Here we consider the potential for RNA-guided gene drives based on the CRISPR nuclease Cas9 to serve as a general method for spreading altered traits through wild populations over many generations. We detail likely capabilities, discuss limitations, and provide novel precautionary strategies to control the spread of gene drives and reverse genomic changes. The ability to edit populations of sexual species would offer substantial benefits to humanity and the environment. For example, RNA-guided gene drives could potentially prevent the spread of disease, support agriculture by reversing pesticide and herbicide resistance in insects and weeds, and control damaging invasive species. However, the possibility of unwanted ecological effects and near-certainty of spread across political borders demand careful assessment of each potential application. We call for thoughtful, inclusive, and well-informed public discussions to explore the responsible use of this currently theoretical technology. PMID:25035423

  4. Norepinephrine transporter knock-out alters expression of the genes connected with antidepressant drugs action.

    PubMed

    Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Kusmider, Maciej; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Pabian, Paulina; Zurawek, Dariusz; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2015-01-12

    Norepinephrine transporter knock-out mice (NET-KO) exhibit depression-resistant phenotypes. They manifest significantly shorter immobility times in both the forced swim test and the tail suspension test. Moreover, biochemical studies have revealed the up-regulation of other monoamine transporters (dopamine and serotonin) in the brains of NET-KO mice, similar to the phenomenon observed after the chronic pharmacological blockade of norepinephrine transporter by desipramine in wild-type (WT) animals. NET-KO mice are also resistant to stress, as we demonstrated previously by measuring plasma corticosterone concentration. In the present study, we used a microdissection technique to separate target brain regions and the TaqMan Low Density Array approach to test the expression of a group of genes in the NET-KO mice compared with WT animals. A group of genes with altered expression were identified in four brain structures (frontal and cingulate cortices, dentate gyrus of hippocampus and basal-lateral amygdala) of NET-KO mice compared with WT mice. These genes are known to be altered by antidepressant drugs administration. The most interesting gene is Crh-bp, which modulates the activity of corticotrophin--releasing hormone (CRH) and several CRH-family members. Generally, genetic disturbances within noradrenergic neurons result in biological changes, such as in signal transduction and intercellular communication, and may be linked to changes in noradrenaline levels in the brains of NET-KO mice.

  5. Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations

    PubMed Central

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Smidler, Andrea L; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Gene drives may be capable of addressing ecological problems by altering entire populations of wild organisms, but their use has remained largely theoretical due to technical constraints. Here we consider the potential for RNA-guided gene drives based on the CRISPR nuclease Cas9 to serve as a general method for spreading altered traits through wild populations over many generations. We detail likely capabilities, discuss limitations, and provide novel precautionary strategies to control the spread of gene drives and reverse genomic changes. The ability to edit populations of sexual species would offer substantial benefits to humanity and the environment. For example, RNA-guided gene drives could potentially prevent the spread of disease, support agriculture by reversing pesticide and herbicide resistance in insects and weeds, and control damaging invasive species. However, the possibility of unwanted ecological effects and near-certainty of spread across political borders demand careful assessment of each potential application. We call for thoughtful, inclusive, and well-informed public discussions to explore the responsible use of this currently theoretical technology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03401.001 PMID:25035423

  6. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  7. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  8. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  9. Adipose and Muscle Tissue Gene Expression of Two Genes (NCAPG and LCORL) Located in a Chromosomal Region Associated with Cattle Feed Intake and Gain

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm-Perry, Amanda K.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Oliver, William T.; Sexten, Andrea K.; Miles, Jeremy R.; Rempel, Lea A.; Cushman, Robert A.; Freetly, Harvey C.

    2013-01-01

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic markers in both genes were associated with average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) in a crossbred population of beef steers. These markers were also associated with hot carcass weight, ribeye area and adjusted fat thickness suggesting that they may have a role in lean muscle growth and/or fat deposition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the transcript abundance of either of these genes in cattle adipose and muscle tissue was associated with variation in feed intake and average daily gain phenotypes. Transcript abundance for NCAPG and LCORL in adipose and muscle tissue was measured in heifers (adipose only), cows and steers using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adipose tissue from cows and heifers, a negative correlation between LCORL transcript abundance and ADFI were detected (P = 0.05). In the muscle tissue from cows, transcript abundance of NCAPG was associated with ADG (r = 0.26; P = 0.009). A positive correlation between LCORL transcript abundance from muscle tissue of steers and ADFI was detected (P = 0.04). LCORL protein levels in the muscle of steers were investigated and were associated with ADFI (P = 0.01). These data support our earlier genetic associations with ADFI and ADG within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues. PMID:24278337

  10. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain.

    PubMed

    Lindholm-Perry, Amanda K; Kuehn, Larry A; Oliver, William T; Sexten, Andrea K; Miles, Jeremy R; Rempel, Lea A; Cushman, Robert A; Freetly, Harvey C

    2013-01-01

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic markers in both genes were associated with average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) in a crossbred population of beef steers. These markers were also associated with hot carcass weight, ribeye area and adjusted fat thickness suggesting that they may have a role in lean muscle growth and/or fat deposition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the transcript abundance of either of these genes in cattle adipose and muscle tissue was associated with variation in feed intake and average daily gain phenotypes. Transcript abundance for NCAPG and LCORL in adipose and muscle tissue was measured in heifers (adipose only), cows and steers using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adipose tissue from cows and heifers, a negative correlation between LCORL transcript abundance and ADFI were detected (P = 0.05). In the muscle tissue from cows, transcript abundance of NCAPG was associated with ADG (r = 0.26; P = 0.009). A positive correlation between LCORL transcript abundance from muscle tissue of steers and ADFI was detected (P = 0.04). LCORL protein levels in the muscle of steers were investigated and were associated with ADFI (P = 0.01). These data support our earlier genetic associations with ADFI and ADG within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues.

  11. Contemporary human-altered landscapes and oceanic barriers reduce bumble bee gene flow.

    PubMed

    Jha, S

    2015-03-01

    Much of the world's terrestrial landscapes are being altered by humans in the form of agriculture, urbanization and pastoral systems, with major implications for biodiversity. Bumble bees are one of the most effective pollinators in both natural and cultivated landscapes, but are often the first to be extirpated in human-altered habitats. Yet, little is known about the role of natural and human-altered habitats in promoting or limiting bumble bee gene flow. In this study, I closely examine the genetic structure of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, across the southwestern US coast and find strong evidence that natural oceanic barriers, as well as contemporary human-altered habitats, limit bee gene flow. Heterozygosity and allelic richness were lower in island populations, while private allelic richness was higher in island populations compared to mainland populations. Genetic differentiation, measured for three indices across the 1000 km study region, was significantly greater than the null expectation (F(ST) = 0.041, F'(ST) = 0.044 and D(est) = 0.155) and correlated with geographic distance. Furthermore, genetic differentiation patterns were most strongly correlated with contemporary (2011) not past (2006, 2001) resistance maps calibrated for high dispersal limitation over oceans, impervious habitat and croplands. Despite the incorporation of dramatic elevation gradients, the analyses reveal that oceans and contemporary human land use, not mountains, are the primary dispersal barriers for B. vosnesenskii gene flow. These findings reinforce the importance of maintaining corridors of suitable habitat across the distribution range of native pollinators to promote their persistence and safeguard their ability to provide essential pollination services.

  12. Alterations in Mc1r gene expression are associated with regressive pigmentation in Astyanax cavefish.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Bethany A; Gross, Joshua B

    2015-11-01

    Diverse changes in coloration across distant taxa are mediated through alterations in certain highly conserved pigmentation genes. Among these genes, Mc1r is a frequent target for mutation, and many documented alterations involve coding sequence changes. We investigated whether regulatory mutations in Mc1r may also contribute to pigmentation loss in the blind Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. This species comprises multiple independent cave populations that have evolved reduced (or absent) melanic pigmentation as a consequence of living in darkness for millions of generations. Among the most salient cave-associated traits, complete absence (albinism) or reduced levels of pigmentation (brown) have long been the focus of degenerative pigmentation research in Astyanax. These two Mendelian traits have been linked to specific coding mutations in Oca2 (albinism) and Mc1r (brown). However, four of the seven caves harboring the brown phenotype exhibit unaffected coding sequences compared to surface fish. Thus, diverse genetic changes involving the same genes likely impact reduced pigmentation among cavefish populations. Using both sequence and expression analyses, we show that certain cave-dwelling populations harboring the brown mutation have substantial alterations to the putative Mc1r cis-regulatory region. Several of these sequence mutations in the Mc1r 5' region were present across multiple, independent cave populations. This study suggests that pigmentation reduction in Astyanax cavefish evolves through a combination of both coding and cis-regulatory mutations. Moreover, this study represents one of the first attempts to identify regulatory alterations linked to regressive changes in cave-dwelling populations of A. mexicanus. PMID:26462499

  13. Alterations in Mc1r gene expression are associated with regressive pigmentation in Astyanax cavefish.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Bethany A; Gross, Joshua B

    2015-11-01

    Diverse changes in coloration across distant taxa are mediated through alterations in certain highly conserved pigmentation genes. Among these genes, Mc1r is a frequent target for mutation, and many documented alterations involve coding sequence changes. We investigated whether regulatory mutations in Mc1r may also contribute to pigmentation loss in the blind Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. This species comprises multiple independent cave populations that have evolved reduced (or absent) melanic pigmentation as a consequence of living in darkness for millions of generations. Among the most salient cave-associated traits, complete absence (albinism) or reduced levels of pigmentation (brown) have long been the focus of degenerative pigmentation research in Astyanax. These two Mendelian traits have been linked to specific coding mutations in Oca2 (albinism) and Mc1r (brown). However, four of the seven caves harboring the brown phenotype exhibit unaffected coding sequences compared to surface fish. Thus, diverse genetic changes involving the same genes likely impact reduced pigmentation among cavefish populations. Using both sequence and expression analyses, we show that certain cave-dwelling populations harboring the brown mutation have substantial alterations to the putative Mc1r cis-regulatory region. Several of these sequence mutations in the Mc1r 5' region were present across multiple, independent cave populations. This study suggests that pigmentation reduction in Astyanax cavefish evolves through a combination of both coding and cis-regulatory mutations. Moreover, this study represents one of the first attempts to identify regulatory alterations linked to regressive changes in cave-dwelling populations of A. mexicanus.

  14. Conditional deletion of Msx homeobox genes in the uterus inhibits blastocyst implantation by altering uterine receptivity.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Takiko; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Tranguch, Susanne; Xie, Huirong; Fujita, Tomoko; Hirota, Yasushi; Lydon, John; DeMayo, Francesco; Maxson, Robert; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2011-12-13

    An effective bidirectional communication between an implantation-competent blastocyst and the receptive uterus is a prerequisite for mammalian reproduction. The blastocyst will implant only when this molecular cross-talk is established. Here we show that the muscle segment homeobox gene (Msh) family members Msx1 and Msx2, which are two highly conserved genes critical for epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development, also play crucial roles in embryo implantation. Loss of Msx1/Msx2 expression correlates with altered uterine luminal epithelial cell polarity and affects E-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation through the control of Wnt5a expression. Application of Wnt5a in vitro compromised blastocyst invasion and trophoblast outgrowth on cultured uterine epithelial cells. The finding that Msx1/Msx2 genes are critical for conferring uterine receptivity and readiness to implantation could have clinical significance, because compromised uterine receptivity is a major cause of pregnancy failure in IVF programs.

  15. Addiction and reward-related genes show altered expression in the postpartum nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changjiu; Eisinger, Brian Earl; Driessen, Terri M.; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Motherhood involves a switch in natural rewards, whereby offspring become highly rewarding. Nucleus accumbens (NAC) is a key CNS region for natural rewards and addictions, but to date no study has evaluated on a large scale the events in NAC that underlie the maternal change in natural rewards. In this study we utilized microarray and bioinformatics approaches to evaluate postpartum NAC gene expression changes in mice. Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET) indicated that postpartum (relative to virgin) NAC gene expression profile was significantly enriched for genes related to addiction and reward in five of five independently curated databases (e.g., Malacards, Phenopedia). Over 100 addiction/reward related genes were identified and these included: Per1, Per2, Arc, Homer2, Creb1, Grm3, Fosb, Gabrb3, Adra2a, Ntrk2, Cry1, Penk, Cartpt, Adcy1, Npy1r, Htr1a, Drd1a, Gria1, and Pdyn. ToppCluster analysis found maternal NAC expression profile to be significantly enriched for genes related to the drug action of nicotine, ketamine, and dronabinol. Pathway analysis indicated postpartum NAC as enriched for RNA processing, CNS development/differentiation, and transcriptional regulation. Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis (WGCNA) identified possible networks for transcription factors, including Nr1d1, Per2, Fosb, Egr1, and Nr4a1. The postpartum state involves increased risk for mental health disorders and MSET analysis indicated postpartum NAC to be enriched for genes related to depression, bipolar disorder (BPD), and schizophrenia. Mental health related genes included: Fabp7, Grm3, Penk, and Nr1d1. We confirmed via quantitative PCR Nr1d1, Per2, Grm3, Penk, Drd1a, and Pdyn. This study indicates for the first time that postpartum NAC involves large scale gene expression alterations linked to addiction and reward. Because the postpartum state also involves decreased response to drugs, the findings could provide insights into how to mitigate addictions. PMID:25414651

  16. Alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes in rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Finch, G.L.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Activation of the K-ras protooncogene and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are events common to many types of human cancers. Molecular epidemiology studies have associated mutational profiles in these genes with specific exposures. The purpose of this paper is to review investigations that have examined the role of the K-ras and p53 genes in lung tumors induced in the F344 rat by mutagenic and nonmutagenic exposures. Mutation profiles within the K-ras and p53 genes, if present in rat lung tumors, would help to define some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer induction by various environmental agents. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas were induced by tetranitromethane (TNM), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), beryllium metal, plutonium-239, X-ray, diesel exhaust, or carbon black. These agents were chosen because the tumors they produced could arise via different types of DNA damage. Mutation of the K-ras gene was determined by approaches that included DNA transfection, direct sequencing, mismatch hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency for mutation of the K-ras gene was exposure dependent. The transition mutations formed could have been derived from deamination of cytosine. Alteration in the p53 gene was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis for p53 protein and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 4 to 9. None of the 93 adenocarinomas examined was immunoreactive toward the anti-p53 antibody CM1. In contrast, 14 of 71 squamous cell carcinomas exhibited nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with no correlation to type of exposure. However, SSCP analysis only detected mutations in 2 of 14 squamous cell tumors that were immunoreactive, suggesting that protein stabilization did not stem from mutations within the p53 gene. Thus, the p53 gene does not appear to be involved in the genesis of most rat lung tumors. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 48 refs.

  17. Intracellular Streptococcus pyogenes in Human Macrophages Display an Altered Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Hertzén, Erika; Johansson, Linda; Kansal, Rita; Hecht, Alexander; Dahesh, Samira; Janos, Marton; Nizet, Victor; Kotb, Malak; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen, which has recently gained recognition as an intracellular microorganism during the course of severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. Although the surface anchored M protein has been identified as a pivotal factor affecting phagosomal maturation and S. pyogenes survival within macrophages, the overall transcriptional profile required for the pathogen to adapt and persist intracellularly is as of yet unknown. To address this, the gene expression profile of S. pyogenes within human macrophages was determined and compared to that of extracellular bacteria using customized microarrays and real-time qRT-PCR. In order to model the early phase of infection involving adaptation to the intracellular compartment, samples were collected 2h post-infection. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 145 streptococcal genes was significantly altered in the intracellular environment. The majority of differentially regulated genes were associated with metabolic and energy-dependent processes. Key up-regulated genes in early phase intracellular bacteria were ihk and irr, encoding a two-component gene regulatory system (TCS). Comparison of gene expression of selected genes at 2h and 6h post-infection revealed a dramatic shift in response regulators over time with a down-regulation of ihk/irr genes concurring with an up-regulation of the covR/S TCS. In re-infection assays, intracellular bacteria from the 6h time point exhibited significantly greater survival within macrophages than did bacteria collected at the 2h time point. An isogenic S. pyogenes mutant deficient in ihk/irr displayed significantly reduced bacterial counts when compared to wild-type bacteria following infection of macrophages. The findings illustrate how gene expression of S. pyogenes during the intracellular life cycle is fine-tuned by temporal expression of specific two-component systems. PMID:22511985

  18. Intracellular Streptococcus pyogenes in human macrophages display an altered gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Hertzén, Erika; Johansson, Linda; Kansal, Rita; Hecht, Alexander; Dahesh, Samira; Janos, Marton; Nizet, Victor; Kotb, Malak; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen, which has recently gained recognition as an intracellular microorganism during the course of severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis. Although the surface anchored M protein has been identified as a pivotal factor affecting phagosomal maturation and S. pyogenes survival within macrophages, the overall transcriptional profile required for the pathogen to adapt and persist intracellularly is as of yet unknown. To address this, the gene expression profile of S. pyogenes within human macrophages was determined and compared to that of extracellular bacteria using customized microarrays and real-time qRT-PCR. In order to model the early phase of infection involving adaptation to the intracellular compartment, samples were collected 2h post-infection. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 145 streptococcal genes was significantly altered in the intracellular environment. The majority of differentially regulated genes were associated with metabolic and energy-dependent processes. Key up-regulated genes in early phase intracellular bacteria were ihk and irr, encoding a two-component gene regulatory system (TCS). Comparison of gene expression of selected genes at 2h and 6h post-infection revealed a dramatic shift in response regulators over time with a down-regulation of ihk/irr genes concurring with an up-regulation of the covR/S TCS. In re-infection assays, intracellular bacteria from the 6h time point exhibited significantly greater survival within macrophages than did bacteria collected at the 2h time point. An isogenic S. pyogenes mutant deficient in ihk/irr displayed significantly reduced bacterial counts when compared to wild-type bacteria following infection of macrophages. The findings illustrate how gene expression of S. pyogenes during the intracellular life cycle is fine-tuned by temporal expression of specific two-component systems.

  19. Levonorgestrel enhances spermatogenesis suppression by testosterone with greater alteration in testicular gene expression in men.

    PubMed

    Lue, YanHe; Wang, Christina; Cui, YuGui; Wang, XingHai; Sha, JiaHao; Zhou, ZuoMin; Xu, Jun; Wang, Charles; Hikim, Amiya P Sinha; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2009-03-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that combined treatment of testosterone with a progestin induces a more rapid and greater suppression of spermatogenesis than testosterone treatment alone. We hypothesized that the suppressive effects of the combination of testosterone undecanoate (TU) injections plus oral levonorgestrel (LNG) on spermatogenesis may be mediated through a greater perturbation of testicular gene expression than TU alone. To test this hypothesis, we performed open testicular biopsy on 12 different adult healthy subjects: 1) four healthy men as controls; 2) four men 2 wk after TU treatment; and 3) four men 2 wk after TU + LNG administration. RNA isolated from biopsies was used for DNA microarray using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene expression with >or=2-fold changes (P < 0.05) compared with control was analyzed using the National Institutes of Health Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery 2008 resource. The TU treatment altered the gene expression in 109 transcripts, whereas TU + LNG altered the gene expression in 207 transcripts compared with control. Both TU and TU + LNG administration suppressed gene expression of insulin-like 3; cytochrome P450, family 17, subfamily A1 in Leydig cells; and inhibin alpha in Sertoli cells; they increased proapoptotic transcripts BCL2-like 14, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3; and they decreased X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein. In comparison with TU treatment alone, TU + LNG treatment upregulated insulin-like 6 and relaxin 1, and downregulated RNA-binding protein transcripts. We conclude that TU + LNG administration induces more changes in testicular gene expression than TU alone. This exploratory study provided a novel and valuable database to study the mechanisms of action of hormonal regulation of spermatogenesis in men and identified testicular-specific molecules that may serve as potential targets for male contraceptive

  20. An acute dose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid alters gene expression in multiple mouse brain regions.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, B J; Saini, U T; Robinson, B L; Ali, S F; Patterson, T A

    2010-10-13

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is normally found in the brain in low concentrations and may function as a neurotransmitter, although the mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. GHB has been used as a general anesthetic and is currently used to treat narcolepsy and alcoholism. Recreational use of GHB is primarily as a "club drug" and a "date rape drug," due to its amnesic effects. For this study, the hypothesis was that behavioral and neurochemical alterations may parallel gene expression changes in the brain after GHB administration. Adult male C57/B6N mice (n=5/group) were administered a single dose of 500 mg/kg GHB (i.p.) and were sacrificed 1, 2 and 4 h after treatment. Control mice were administered saline. Brains were removed and regionally dissected on ice. Total RNA from the hippocampus, cortex and striatum was extracted, amplified and labeled. Gene expression was evaluated using Agilent whole mouse genome 4x44K oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray data were analyzed by ArrayTrack and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using P < or = 0.01 and a fold change > or = 1.7 as the criteria for significance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) showed that samples from each time point clustered into distinct treatment groups with respect to sacrifice time. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was used to identify involved pathways. The results show that GHB induces gene expression alterations in hundreds of genes in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum, and the number of affected genes increases throughout a 4-h time course. Many of these DEGs are involved in neurological disease, apoptosis, and oxidative stress.

  1. Long-Term Oil Contamination Alters the Molecular Ecological Networks of Soil Microbial Functional Genes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuting; Zhao, Huihui; Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Guanghe; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    With knowledge on microbial composition and diversity, investigation of within-community interactions is a further step to elucidate microbial ecological functions, such as the biodegradation of hazardous contaminants. In this work, microbial functional molecular ecological networks were studied in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils to determine the possible influences of oil contamination on microbial interactions and potential functions. Soil samples were obtained from an oil-exploring site located in South China, and the microbial functional genes were analyzed with GeoChip, a high-throughput functional microarray. By building random networks based on null model, we demonstrated that overall network structures and properties were significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated soils (P < 0.001). Network connectivity, module numbers, and modularity were all reduced with contamination. Moreover, the topological roles of the genes (module hub and connectors) were altered with oil contamination. Subnetworks of genes involved in alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were also constructed. Negative co-occurrence patterns prevailed among functional genes, thereby indicating probable competition relationships. The potential "keystone" genes, defined as either "hubs" or genes with highest connectivities in the network, were further identified. The network constructed in this study predicted the potential effects of anthropogenic contamination on microbial community co-occurrence interactions.

  2. Long-Term Oil Contamination Alters the Molecular Ecological Networks of Soil Microbial Functional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuting; Zhao, Huihui; Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Guanghe; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    With knowledge on microbial composition and diversity, investigation of within-community interactions is a further step to elucidate microbial ecological functions, such as the biodegradation of hazardous contaminants. In this work, microbial functional molecular ecological networks were studied in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils to determine the possible influences of oil contamination on microbial interactions and potential functions. Soil samples were obtained from an oil-exploring site located in South China, and the microbial functional genes were analyzed with GeoChip, a high-throughput functional microarray. By building random networks based on null model, we demonstrated that overall network structures and properties were significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated soils (P < 0.001). Network connectivity, module numbers, and modularity were all reduced with contamination. Moreover, the topological roles of the genes (module hub and connectors) were altered with oil contamination. Subnetworks of genes involved in alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were also constructed. Negative co-occurrence patterns prevailed among functional genes, thereby indicating probable competition relationships. The potential “keystone” genes, defined as either “hubs” or genes with highest connectivities in the network, were further identified. The network constructed in this study predicted the potential effects of anthropogenic contamination on microbial community co-occurrence interactions. PMID:26870020

  3. Fetal and neonatal exposure to the endocrine disruptor methoxychlor causes epigenetic alterations in adult ovarian genes.

    PubMed

    Zama, Aparna Mahakali; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2009-10-01

    Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals during development could alter the epigenetic programming of the genome and result in adult-onset disease. Methoxychlor (MXC) and its metabolites possess estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities. Previous studies showed that fetal/neonatal exposure to MXC caused adult ovarian dysfunction due to altered expression of key ovarian genes including estrogen receptor (ER)-beta, which was down-regulated, whereas ERalpha was unaffected. The objective of the current study was to evaluate changes in global and gene-specific methylation patterns in adult ovaries associated with the observed defects. Rats were exposed to MXC (20 microg/kgxd or 100 mg/kg.d) between embryonic d 19 and postnatal d 7. We performed DNA methylation analysis of the known promoters of ERalpha and ERbeta genes in postnatal d 50-60 ovaries using bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCRs. Developmental exposure to MXC led to significant hypermethylation in the ERbeta promoter regions (P < 0.05), whereas the ERalpha promoter was unaffected. We assessed global DNA methylation changes using methylation-sensitive arbitrarily primed PCR and identified 10 genes that were hypermethylated in ovaries from exposed rats. To determine whether the MXC-induced methylation changes were associated with increased DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) levels, we measured the expression levels of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, and Dnmt3l using semiquantitative RT-PCR. Whereas Dnmt3a and Dnmt3l were unchanged, Dnmt3b expression was stimulated in ovaries of the 100 mg/kg MXC group (P < 0.05), suggesting that increased DNMT3B may cause DNA hypermethylation in the ovary. Overall, these data suggest that transient exposure to MXC during fetal and neonatal development affects adult ovarian function via altered methylation patterns.

  4. Mechanical Force Alters Morphogenetic Movements and Segmental Gene Expression Patterns during Drosophila Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an organism is accompanied by various cellular morphogenetic movements, changes in cellular as well as nuclear morphology and transcription programs. Recent evidence suggests that intra and inter-cellular connections mediated by various adhesion proteins contribute to defining nuclear morphology. In addition, three dimensional organization of the cell nucleus regulate the transcription programs. However the link between cellular morphogenetic movements and its coupling to nuclear function in a developmental context is poorly understood. In this paper we use a point perturbation by tissue level laser ablation and sheet perturbation by application of force using magnetic tweezers to alter cellular morphogenetic movements and probe its impact on nuclear morphology and segmental gene expression patterns. Mechanical perturbations during blastoderm stage in a developing Drosophila embryo resulted in localized alterations in nuclear morphology and cellular movement. In addition, global defects in germ-band (GB) extension and retraction are observed when external force is applied during morphogenetic movements, suggesting a long-range physical coupling within the GB layer of cells. Further local application of force resulted in redistribution of non muscle myosin-II in the GB layer. Finally these perturbations lead to altered segmental gene (engrailed) expression patterns later during the development. Our observations suggest that there exists a tight regulation between nuclear morphology and cellular adhesive connections during morphogenetic movement of cells in the embryo. The observed spatial changes in patterning genes, with perturbation, highlight the importance of nuclear integrity to cellular movement in establishing gene expression program in a developmental system. PMID:22470437

  5. Alterations in Hepatic FGF21, Co-Regulated Genes, and Upstream Metabolic Genes in Response to Nutrition, Ketosis and Inflammation in Peripartal Holstein Cows.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Haji; Batistel, Fernanda; Drackley, James K; Loor, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has emerged as a key metabolic regulator produced by liver. To gather preliminary data on the potential importance of FGF1, co-regulated genes, and upstream metabolic genes, we examined the hepatic mRNA expression in response to nutrition and inflammation in dairy cows. In experiment 1, induction of ketosis through feed restriction on d 5 postpartum upregulated FGF21, its co-receptor KLB, and PPARA but only elicited a numerical increase in serum FGF21 concentration. In experiment 2, cows in control (CON) or receiving 50 g/d of L-carnitine (C50) from -14 through 21 d had increased FGF21, PPARA, and NFIL3 on d 10 compared with d 2 postpartum. In contrast, compared with CON and C50, 100 g/d L-carnitine (C100) resulted in lower FGF21, KLB, ANGPTL4, and ARNTL expression on d 10. In experiment 3, cows were fed during the dry period either a higher-energy (OVE; 1.62 Mcal/kg DM) or lower-energy (CON; 1.34 Mcal/kg DM) diet and received 0 (OVE:N, CON:N) or 200 μg of LPS (OVE:Y, CON:Y) into the mammary gland at d 7 postpartum. For FGF21 mRNA expression in CON, the LPS challenge (CON:Y) prevented a decrease in expression between d 7 and 14 postpartum such that cows in CON:N had a 4-fold lower expression on d 14 compared with d 7. The inflammatory stimulus induced by LPS in CON:Y resulted in upregulation of PPARA on d 14 to a similar level as cows in OVE:N. In OVE:Y, expression of PPARA was lower than CON:N on d 7 and remained unchanged on d 14. On d 7, LPS led to a 4-fold greater serum FGF21 only in OVE but not in CON cows. In fact, OVE:Y reached the same serum FGF21 concentration as CON:N, suggesting a carryover effect of dietary energy level on signaling mechanisms within liver. Overall, results indicate that nutrition, ketosis, and inflammation during the peripartal period can alter hepatic FGF21, co-regulated genes, and upstream metabolic genes to various extents. The functional outcome of these changes merits further study

  6. Alterations in Hepatic FGF21, Co-Regulated Genes, and Upstream Metabolic Genes in Response to Nutrition, Ketosis and Inflammation in Peripartal Holstein Cows

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Haji; Batistel, Fernanda; Drackley, James K.; Loor, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has emerged as a key metabolic regulator produced by liver. To gather preliminary data on the potential importance of FGF1, co-regulated genes, and upstream metabolic genes, we examined the hepatic mRNA expression in response to nutrition and inflammation in dairy cows. In experiment 1, induction of ketosis through feed restriction on d 5 postpartum upregulated FGF21, its co-receptor KLB, and PPARA but only elicited a numerical increase in serum FGF21 concentration. In experiment 2, cows in control (CON) or receiving 50 g/d of L-carnitine (C50) from -14 through 21 d had increased FGF21, PPARA, and NFIL3 on d 10 compared with d 2 postpartum. In contrast, compared with CON and C50, 100 g/d L-carnitine (C100) resulted in lower FGF21, KLB, ANGPTL4, and ARNTL expression on d 10. In experiment 3, cows were fed during the dry period either a higher-energy (OVE; 1.62 Mcal/kg DM) or lower-energy (CON; 1.34 Mcal/kg DM) diet and received 0 (OVE:N, CON:N) or 200 μg of LPS (OVE:Y, CON:Y) into the mammary gland at d 7 postpartum. For FGF21 mRNA expression in CON, the LPS challenge (CON:Y) prevented a decrease in expression between d 7 and 14 postpartum such that cows in CON:N had a 4-fold lower expression on d 14 compared with d 7. The inflammatory stimulus induced by LPS in CON:Y resulted in upregulation of PPARA on d 14 to a similar level as cows in OVE:N. In OVE:Y, expression of PPARA was lower than CON:N on d 7 and remained unchanged on d 14. On d 7, LPS led to a 4-fold greater serum FGF21 only in OVE but not in CON cows. In fact, OVE:Y reached the same serum FGF21 concentration as CON:N, suggesting a carryover effect of dietary energy level on signaling mechanisms within liver. Overall, results indicate that nutrition, ketosis, and inflammation during the peripartal period can alter hepatic FGF21, co-regulated genes, and upstream metabolic genes to various extents. The functional outcome of these changes merits further study

  7. Embryonic Atrazine Exposure Elicits Alterations in Genes Associated with Neuroendocrine Function in Adult Male Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Weber, Gregory J; Jannasch, Amber S; Horzmann, Katharine A; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    The developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) hypothesis states that exposure to environmental stressors early in life can elicit genome and epigenome changes resulting in an increased susceptibility of a disease state during adulthood. Atrazine, a common agricultural herbicide used throughout the Midwestern United States, frequently contaminates potable water supplies and is a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical. In our previous studies, zebrafish was exposed to 0, 0.3, 3, or 30 parts per billion (μg/l) atrazine through embryogenesis, rinsed, and allowed to mature to adulthood. A decrease in spawning was observed with morphological alterations in offspring. In addition, adult females displayed an increase in ovarian progesterone and follicular atresia, alterations in levels of a serotonin metabolite and serotonin turnover in brain tissue, and transcriptome changes in brain and ovarian tissue supporting neuroendocrine alterations. As reproductive dysfunction is also influenced by males, this study assessed testes histology, hormone levels, and transcriptomic profiles of testes and brain tissue in the adult males. The embryonic atrazine exposure resulted in no alterations in body or testes weight, gonadosomatic index, testes histology, or levels of 11-ketotestosterone or testosterone. To further investigate potential alterations, transcriptomic profiles of adult male testes and brain tissue was completed. This analysis demonstrated alterations in genes associated with abnormal cell and neuronal growth and morphology; molecular transport, quantity, and production of steroid hormones; and neurotransmission with an emphasis on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axes. Overall, this data indicate future studies should focus on additional neuroendocrine endpoints to determine potential functional impairments. PMID:27413107

  8. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  9. Molecular classification of thyroid lesions by combined testing for miRNA gene expression and somatic gene alterations.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Dennis; Beaudenon-Huibregtse, Sylvie; Haynes, Brian C; Giordano, Thomas J; Labourier, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Multiple molecular markers contribute to the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer and can provide valuable information to improve disease diagnosis and patient management. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of miRNA gene expression in diverse thyroid lesions (n = 534) and developed predictive models for the classification of thyroid nodules, alone or in combination with genotyping. Expression profiling by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in surgical specimens (n = 257) identified specific miRNAs differentially expressed in 17 histopathological categories. Eight supervised machine learning algorithms were trained to discriminate benign from malignant lesions and evaluated for accuracy and robustness. The selected models showed invariant area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) in cross-validation (0.89), optimal AUC (0.94) in an independent set of preoperative thyroid nodule aspirates (n = 235), and classified 92% of benign lesions as low risk/negative and 92% of malignant lesions as high risk/positive. Surgical and preoperative specimens were further tested for the presence of 17 validated oncogenic gene alterations in the BRAF, RAS, RET or PAX8 genes. The miRNA-based classifiers complemented and significantly improved the diagnostic performance of the 17-mutation panel (p < 0.001 for McNemar's tests). In a subset of resected tissues (n = 54) and in an independent set of thyroid nodules with indeterminate cytology (n = 42), the optimized ThyraMIR Thyroid miRNA Classifier increased diagnostic sensitivity by 30-39% and correctly classified 100% of benign nodules negative by the 17-mutation panel. In contrast, testing with broad targeted next-generation sequencing panels decreased diagnostic specificity by detecting additional mutations of unknown clinical significance in 19-39% of benign lesions. Our results demonstrate that, independent of mutational status, miRNA expression profiles are strongly

  10. Unique mutation portraits and frequent COL2A1 gene alteration in chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Totoki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Hosoda, Fumie; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Ogura, Koichi; Yoshida, Aki; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Arai, Yasuhito; Toguchida, Junya; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Miyano, Satoru; Kawai, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequent malignant bone tumor. However, the etiological background of chondrosarcomagenesis remains largely unknown, along with details on molecular alterations and potential therapeutic targets. Massively parallel paired-end sequencing of whole genomes of 10 primary chondrosarcomas revealed that the process of accumulation of somatic mutations is homogeneous irrespective of the pathological subtype or the presence of IDH1 mutations, is unique among a range of cancer types, and shares significant commonalities with that of prostate cancer. Clusters of structural alterations localized within a single chromosome were observed in four cases. Combined with targeted resequencing of additional cartilaginous tumor cohorts, we identified somatic alterations of the COL2A1 gene, which encodes an essential extracellular matrix protein in chondroskeletal development, in 19.3% of chondrosarcoma and 31.7% of enchondroma cases. Epigenetic regulators (IDH1 and YEATS2) and an activin/BMP signal component (ACVR2A) were recurrently altered. Furthermore, a novel FN1-ACVR2A fusion transcript was observed in both chondrosarcoma and osteochondromatosis cases. With the characteristic accumulative process of somatic changes as a background, molecular defects in chondrogenesis and aberrant epigenetic control are primarily causative of both benign and malignant cartilaginous tumors. PMID:25024164

  11. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of key genes involved in fracture healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, N. Patrick; Androjna, Caroline; Hill, Esther; Globus, Ruth K.; Midura, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Fracture healing in animal models has been shown to be altered in both ground based analogs of spaceflight and in those exposed to actual spaceflight. The molecular mechanisms behind altered fracture healing as a result of chronic exposure to microgravity remain to be elucidated. This study investigates temporal gene expression of multiple factors involved in secondary fracture healing, specifically those integral to the development of a soft tissue callus and the transition to that of hard tissue. Skeletally mature female rats were subjected to a 4 week period of simulated microgravity and then underwent a closed femoral fracture procedure. Thereafter, they were reintroduced to the microgravity and allowed to heal for a 1 or 2 week period. A synchronous group of weight bearing rats was used as a normal fracture healing control. Utilizing Real-Time quantitative PCR on mRNA from fracture callus tissue, we found significant reductions in the levels of transcripts associated with angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. These data suggest an altered fracture healing process in a simulated microgravity environment, and these alterations begin early in the healing process. These findings may provide mechanistic insight towards developing countermeasure protocols to mitigate these adaptations.

  12. Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation. The 5-year survival rate of histologic grade III chondrosarcoma is less than 30%. An animal model of chondrosarcoma has been established - namely, the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma (SRC) - and shown to resemble the human disease. Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy. Methods To examine the effect of the microenvironment, SRC tumors were initiated at different transplantation sites. Pyrosequencing assays were utilized to assess the DNA methylation of the tumors, and SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced to determine the gene expression profiles of the tumors. Based on the gene expression analysis, subsequent functional assays were designed to determine the relevancy of the specific genes in the development and progression of the SRC. Results The site of transplantation had a significant impact on the epigenetic and gene expression profiles of SRC tumors. Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile. Subsequent functional analysis of differentially expressed genes, albeit preliminary, provided some insight into the role that thymosin-β4, c-fos, and CTGF may play in chondrosarcoma development and progression. Conclusion This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors. We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, specific functional analysis indicates that thymosin-β4 may have a role

  13. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD. PMID:25300922

  14. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  15. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  16. Prickle1 stunts limb growth through alteration of cell polarity and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt/PCP signaling plays a critical role in multiple developmental processes, including limb development. Wnt5a, a ligand of the PCP pathway, signals through the Ror2/Vangl2 or the Vangl2/Ryk complex to regulate limb development along the proximal-distal axis in mice. Based on the interaction between Van Gogh and Prickle in Drosophila, we hypothesized the vertebrate Prickle1 have similar function as Vangl2 in limb development. Results We show Prickle1 is expressed in the skeletal condensates that will differentiate into chondrocytes and later form bones. Disrupted Prickle1 function in Prickle1C251X/C251X mouse mutants alters expression of genes such as Bmp4, Fgf8, Vangl2 and Wnt5a. These expression changes correlate with shorter and wider bones in the limbs and loss of one phalangeal segment in digits 2-5 of Prickle1C251X mutants. These growth defects along the proximal-distal axis are also associated with increased cell death in the growing digit tip, reduced cell death in the interdigital membrane and disrupted chondrocyte polarity. Conclusions We suggest Prickle1 is part of the Wnt5a/PCP signaling, regulating cell polarity and affecting expression of multiple factors to stunt limb growth through altered patterns of gene expression, including the PCP genes Wnt5a and Vangl2. PMID:23913870

  17. Tumor promoters alter gene expression and protein phosphorylation in avian cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Laszlo, A.; Radke, K.; Chin, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1981-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) on the synthesis and modification of polypeptides in normal avian cells and cells infected by wild-type and temperature-sensitive Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected alterations in both the abundance of cellular polypeptides and in their phosphorylation that seem unique to TPA treatment. However, the state of phosphorylation of the major putative substrate for the action of the src gene-associated protein kinase, the 34- to 36-kilodalton protein, was not altered. Moreover, examination of the phosphorylated amino acid content of total cellular phosphoproteins revealed that the response to TPA was not associated with detectable increases in their phosphotyrosine content. These results make it unlikely that TPA acts by the activation of the phosphorylating activity of the cellular proto-src gene or by the activation of other cellular phosphotyrosine-specific kinases. We have shown previously that temperature-sensitive RSV-infected cells at nonpermissive temperature demonstrate an increased sensitivity to TPA treatment (Bissell, M.J., Hatie, C. and Calfin, M. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 348-352). Our present results indicate that this is not due to reactivation of the phosphorylating activity of the defective src gene product or to its leakiness, and they lend support to the notion of multistep viral carcinogenesis.

  18. The effect of dietary fat intake on hepatic gene expression in LG/J AND SM/J mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The liver plays a major role in regulating metabolic homeostasis and is vital for nutrient metabolism. Identifying the genetic factors regulating these processes could lead to a greater understanding of how liver function responds to a high-fat diet and how that response may influence susceptibilities to obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this study we examine differences in hepatic gene expression between the LG/J and SM/J inbred mouse strains and how gene expression in these strains is affected by high-fat diet. LG/J and SM/J are known to differ in their responses to a high-fat diet for a variety of obesity- and diabetes-related traits, with the SM/J strain exhibiting a stronger phenotypic response to diet. Results Dietary intake had a significant effect on gene expression in both inbred lines. Genes up-regulated by a high-fat diet were involved in biological processes such as lipid and carbohydrate metabolism; protein and amino acid metabolic processes were down regulated on a high-fat diet. A total of 259 unique transcripts exhibited a significant diet-by-strain interaction. These genes tended to be associated with immune function. In addition, genes involved in biochemical processes related to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) manifested different responses to diet between the two strains. For most of these genes, SM/J had a stronger response to the high-fat diet than LG/J. Conclusions These data show that dietary fat impacts gene expression levels in SM/J relative to LG/J, with SM/J exhibiting a stronger response. This supports previous data showing that SM/J has a stronger phenotypic response to high-fat diet. Based upon these findings, we suggest that SM/J and its cross with the LG/J strain provide a good model for examining non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its role in metabolic syndrome. PMID:24499025

  19. Altered Protein Composition and Gene Expression in Strabismic Human Extraocular Muscles and Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Andrea B.; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Altick, Amy L.; Quilici, David R.; Wen, Dan; Johnson, L. Alan; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether structural protein composition and expression of key regulatory genes are altered in strabismic human extraocular muscles. Methods Samples from strabismic horizontal extraocular muscles were obtained during strabismus surgery and compared with normal muscles from organ donors. We used proteomics, standard and customized PCR arrays, and microarrays to identify changes in major structural proteins and changes in gene expression. We focused on muscle and connective tissue and its control by enzymes, growth factors, and cytokines. Results Strabismic muscles showed downregulation of myosins, tropomyosins, troponins, and titin. Expression of collagens and regulators of collagen synthesis and degradation, the collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and its inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1 and TIMP2, was upregulated, along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNF receptors, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), as well as proteoglycans. Growth factors controlling extracellular matrix (ECM) were also upregulated. Among 410 signaling genes examined by PCR arrays, molecules with downregulation in the strabismic phenotype included GDNF, NRG1, and PAX7; CTGF, CXCR4, NPY1R, TNF, NTRK1, and NTRK2 were upregulated. Signaling molecules known to control extraocular muscle plasticity were predominantly expressed in the tendon rather than the muscle component. The two horizontal muscles, medial and lateral rectus, displayed similar changes in protein and gene expression, and no obvious effect of age. Conclusions Quantification of proteins and gene expression showed significant differences in the composition of extraocular muscles of strabismic patients with respect to important motor proteins, elements of the ECM, and connective tissue. Therefore, our study supports the emerging view that the molecular composition of strabismic muscles is substantially altered. PMID:27768799

  20. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  1. Alteration of acylphosphatase levels in familial Alzheimer's disease fibroblasts with presenilin gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Liguri, G; Cecchi, C; Latorraca, S; Pieri, A; Sorbi, S; Degl'Innocenti, D; Ramponi, G

    1996-06-01

    Acylphosphatase (AcPase), an enzyme that modulates the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase by hydrolysing its phosphorylated moiety, has been found to be significantly higher in cultured skin fibroblasts from donors affected by early onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD) with PS-1 and PS-2 gene mutations. Of the two known isoenzymes of acylphosphatase, only the erythrocyte one accounts for the total increase in activity. No relevant alteration was observed in phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity (PTPase), in Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na+, K(+)-ATPase activities of the same cells as compared to age-matched controls. This finding could suggest a possible explanation for the calcium-dependent biochemical alterations previously described in Alzheimer's disease fibroblasts. PMID:8805118

  2. Silver nanoparticles mediated altered gene expression of melanin biosynthesis genes in Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandhya; Singh, H B

    2015-03-01

    Melanin production in many fungal phytopathogens has been investigated to play direct or indirect role in pathogenesis. However, in Bipolaris sorokiniana, the spot blotch pathogen of wheat, much less is known about the role melanin play in pathogenesis. As an extension of our previous report, the present study aims to investigate the plausible association between melanin production and virulence factor in B. sorokiniana. In the previous study, we carried out analysis on the antifungal efficacy of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against B. sorokiniana. The present investigation revealed the gene expression analysis of melanin biosynthesis genes viz. polyketide synthase (PKS1) and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1) under the influence of AgNPs. The 0.05mg/ml concentration of AgNPs yielded noticeable inhibition of B. sorokiniana growth, while 0.1mg/ml concentration of AgNPs accounted for complete inhibition of pathogen growth. In addition, the semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis exhibited reduced expression of PKS1 and SCD1 under the influence of AgNPs treatment. Furthermore, the qRT-PCR demonstrated 6.47 and 1.808 fold significant decrease in the expression pattern of PKS1 and SCD1, respectively, in B. sorokiniana treated with AgNPs. The present study provides probable understanding of molecular events underlying the antifungal role of AgNPs against B. sorokiniana.

  3. Chromosomal position shift of a regulatory gene alters the bacterial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Michael; Zaldastanishvili, Elisabed; Sobetzko, Patrick; Lafon, Corinne; Mourez, Michael; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-09-30

    Recent studies strongly suggest that in bacterial cells the order of genes along the chromosomal origin-to-terminus axis is determinative for regulation of the growth phase-dependent gene expression. The prediction from this observation is that positional displacement of pleiotropic genes will affect the genetic regulation and hence, the cellular phenotype. To test this prediction we inserted the origin-proximal dusB-fis operon encoding the global regulator FIS in the vicinity of replication terminus on both arms of the Escherichia coli chromosome. We found that the lower fis gene dosage in the strains with terminus-proximal dusB-fis operons was compensated by increased fis expression such that the intracellular concentration of FIS was homeostatically adjusted. Nevertheless, despite unchanged FIS levels the positional displacement of dusB-fis impaired the competitive growth fitness of cells and altered the state of the overarching network regulating DNA topology, as well as the cellular response to environmental stress, hazardous substances and antibiotics. Our finding that the chromosomal repositioning of a regulatory gene can determine the cellular phenotype unveils an important yet unexplored facet of the genetic control mechanisms and paves the way for novel approaches to manipulate bacterial physiology. PMID:26170236

  4. Chromosomal position shift of a regulatory gene alters the bacterial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Michael; Zaldastanishvili, Elisabed; Sobetzko, Patrick; Lafon, Corinne; Mourez, Michael; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-09-30

    Recent studies strongly suggest that in bacterial cells the order of genes along the chromosomal origin-to-terminus axis is determinative for regulation of the growth phase-dependent gene expression. The prediction from this observation is that positional displacement of pleiotropic genes will affect the genetic regulation and hence, the cellular phenotype. To test this prediction we inserted the origin-proximal dusB-fis operon encoding the global regulator FIS in the vicinity of replication terminus on both arms of the Escherichia coli chromosome. We found that the lower fis gene dosage in the strains with terminus-proximal dusB-fis operons was compensated by increased fis expression such that the intracellular concentration of FIS was homeostatically adjusted. Nevertheless, despite unchanged FIS levels the positional displacement of dusB-fis impaired the competitive growth fitness of cells and altered the state of the overarching network regulating DNA topology, as well as the cellular response to environmental stress, hazardous substances and antibiotics. Our finding that the chromosomal repositioning of a regulatory gene can determine the cellular phenotype unveils an important yet unexplored facet of the genetic control mechanisms and paves the way for novel approaches to manipulate bacterial physiology.

  5. Mutations that alter the timing and pattern of cubitus interruptus gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Slusarski, D.C.; Motzny, C.K.; Holmgren, R.

    1995-01-01

    The cubitus interruptus (ci) gene is a member of the Drosophila segment polarity gene family and encodes a protein with a zinc finger domain homologous to the vertebrate Gli genes and the nematode tra-1 gene. Three classes of existing mutations in the ci locus alter the regulation of ci expression and can be used to examine ci function during development. The first class of ci mutations causes interruptions in wing veins four and five due to inappropriate expression of the ci product in the posterior compartment of imaginal discs. The second class of mutations eliminates ci protein early in embryogenesis and causes the deletion of structures that are derived from the region including and adjacent to the engrailed expressing cells. The third class of mutations eliminates ci protein later in embryogenesis and blocks the formation of the ventral naked cuticle. The loss of ci expression at these two different stages in embryonic development correlates with the subsequent elimination of wingless expression. Adults heterozygous for the unique ci{sup Ce} mutation have deletions between wing veins three and four. A similar wing defect is present in animals mutant for the segment polarity gene fused that encodes a putative serine/threonine kinase. In ci{sup Ce}/+ and fused mutants, the deletions between wing veins three and four correlate with increased ci protein levels in the anterior compartment. Thus, proper regulation of both the ci mRNA and protein appears to be critical for normal Drosophila development. 47 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. RNA-Seq Identifies Key Reproductive Gene Expression Alterations in Response to Cadmium Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hanyang; Lu, Xing; Cen, Xiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Feng; Zhong, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice. PMID:24982889

  7. RNA-Seq identifies key reproductive gene expression alterations in response to cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanyang; Lu, Xing; Cen, Xiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Feng; Zhong, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice. PMID:24982889

  8. Altered amygdalar resting-state connectivity in depression is explained by both genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tornador, Cristian; Falcón, Carles; Bargalló, Nuria; Nenadic, Igor; Deco, Gustavo; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that alterations of the amygdalar resting-state fMRI connectivity play an important role in the etiology of depression. While both depression and resting-state brain activity are shaped by genes and environment, the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors mediating the relationship between amygdalar resting-state connectivity and depression remain largely unexplored. Likewise, novel neuroimaging research indicates that different mathematical representations of resting-state fMRI activity patterns are able to embed distinct information relevant to brain health and disease. The present study analyzed the influence of genes and environment on amygdalar resting-state fMRI connectivity, in relation to depression risk. High-resolution resting-state fMRI scans were analyzed to estimate functional connectivity patterns in a sample of 48 twins (24 monozygotic pairs) informative for depressive psychopathology (6 concordant, 8 discordant and 10 healthy control pairs). A graph-theoretical framework was employed to construct brain networks using two methods: (i) the conventional approach of filtered BOLD fMRI time-series and (ii) analytic components of this fMRI activity. Results using both methods indicate that depression risk is increased by environmental factors altering amygdalar connectivity. When analyzing the analytic components of the BOLD fMRI time-series, genetic factors altering the amygdala neural activity at rest show an important contribution to depression risk. Overall, these findings show that both genes and environment modify different patterns the amygdala resting-state connectivity to increase depression risk. The genetic relationship between amygdalar connectivity and depression may be better elicited by examining analytic components of the brain resting-state BOLD fMRI signals. PMID:26096943

  9. Altered amygdalar resting-state connectivity in depression is explained by both genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tornador, Cristian; Falcón, Carles; Bargalló, Nuria; Nenadic, Igor; Deco, Gustavo; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that alterations of the amygdalar resting-state fMRI connectivity play an important role in the etiology of depression. While both depression and resting-state brain activity are shaped by genes and environment, the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors mediating the relationship between amygdalar resting-state connectivity and depression remain largely unexplored. Likewise, novel neuroimaging research indicates that different mathematical representations of resting-state fMRI activity patterns are able to embed distinct information relevant to brain health and disease. The present study analyzed the influence of genes and environment on amygdalar resting-state fMRI connectivity, in relation to depression risk. High-resolution resting-state fMRI scans were analyzed to estimate functional connectivity patterns in a sample of 48 twins (24 monozygotic pairs) informative for depressive psychopathology (6 concordant, 8 discordant and 10 healthy control pairs). A graph-theoretical framework was employed to construct brain networks using two methods: (i) the conventional approach of filtered BOLD fMRI time-series and (ii) analytic components of this fMRI activity. Results using both methods indicate that depression risk is increased by environmental factors altering amygdalar connectivity. When analyzing the analytic components of the BOLD fMRI time-series, genetic factors altering the amygdala neural activity at rest show an important contribution to depression risk. Overall, these findings show that both genes and environment modify different patterns the amygdala resting-state connectivity to increase depression risk. The genetic relationship between amygdalar connectivity and depression may be better elicited by examining analytic components of the brain resting-state BOLD fMRI signals.

  10. OMP gene deletion results in an alteration in odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, S L; Kent, P F; Margolis, F L

    2003-12-01

    Previous behavioral work, using a complex five-odorant identification task, demonstrated that olfactory marker protein (OMP) is critically involved in odor processing to the extent that its loss results in an alteration in odorant quality perception. Exactly how the lack of OMP exerts its influence on the perception of odorant quality is unknown. However, there is considerable neurophysiological evidence that different odorants produce different spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity at the level of the mucosa and that these patterns predict the psychophysically determined perceptual relationship among odorants. In this respect, OMP gene deletion is known to result in a constellation of physiologic defects (i.e., marked reduction in the electroolfactogram (EOG) and altered response and recovery kinetics) that would be expected to alter the odorant-induced spatiotemporal activity patterns that are characteristic of different odorants. This, in turn, would be expected to alter the spatiotemporal patterning of information that results from the mucosal projection onto the bulb, thereby changing odorant quality perception. To test the hypothesis that odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns are altered in mice lacking the gene for OMP, we optically recorded the fluorescent changes in response to odorant stimulation from both the septum and turbinates of both OMP-null and control mice using a voltage-sensitive dye (di-4-ANEPPS Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and a Dalsa 120 x 120, 12-bit CCD camera. To maintain continuity with the previous behavioral work, the odorants 2-propanol, citral, carvone, ethylacetoacetate, and propyl acetate were again used. Each odorant was randomly presented to each mucosal surface in a Latin-Square design. The results of this study demonstrated that, for both mouse strains, there do indeed exist different spatiotemporal activity patterns for different odorants. More importantly, however, these patterns significantly differed between OMP

  11. Variance of gene expression identifies altered network constraints in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Mar, Jessica C; Matigian, Nicholas A; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Mellick, George D; Sue, Carolyn M; Silburn, Peter A; McGrath, John J; Quackenbush, John; Wells, Christine A

    2011-08-01

    Gene expression analysis has become a ubiquitous tool for studying a wide range of human diseases. In a typical analysis we compare distinct phenotypic groups and attempt to identify genes that are, on average, significantly different between them. Here we describe an innovative approach to the analysis of gene expression data, one that identifies differences in expression variance between groups as an informative metric of the group phenotype. We find that genes with different expression variance profiles are not randomly distributed across cell signaling networks. Genes with low-expression variance, or higher constraint, are significantly more connected to other network members and tend to function as core members of signal transduction pathways. Genes with higher expression variance have fewer network connections and also tend to sit on the periphery of the cell. Using neural stem cells derived from patients suffering from Schizophrenia (SZ), Parkinson's disease (PD), and a healthy control group, we find marked differences in expression variance in cell signaling pathways that shed new light on potential mechanisms associated with these diverse neurological disorders. In particular, we find that expression variance of core networks in the SZ patient group was considerably constrained, while in contrast the PD patient group demonstrated much greater variance than expected. One hypothesis is that diminished variance in SZ patients corresponds to an increased degree of constraint in these pathways and a corresponding reduction in robustness of the stem cell networks. These results underscore the role that variation plays in biological systems and suggest that analysis of expression variance is far more important in disease than previously recognized. Furthermore, modeling patterns of variability in gene expression could fundamentally alter the way in which we think about how cellular networks are affected by disease processes.

  12. Whey protein isolate decreases murine stomach weight and intestinal length and alters the expression of Wnt signalling-associated genes.

    PubMed

    McAllan, Liam; Speakman, John R; Cryan, John F; Nilaweera, Kanishka N

    2015-01-28

    The present study examined the underlying mechanisms by which whey protein isolate (WPI) affects energy balance. C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet containing 10% energy from fat, 70% energy from carbohydrate (35% energy from sucrose) and 20% energy from casein or WPI for 15 weeks. Mice fed with WPI had reduced weight gain, cumulative energy intake and dark-phase VO2 compared with casein-fed mice (P< 0.05); however, WPI intake had no significant effects on body composition, meal size/number, water intake or RER. Plasma levels of insulin, TAG, leptin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide 1 remained unchanged. Notably, the intake of WPI reduced stomach weight and both length and weight of the small intestine (P< 0.05). WPI intake reduced the gastric expression of Wingless/int-1 5a (Wnt5a) (P< 0.01) and frizzled 4 (Fzd4) (P< 0.01), with no change in the expression of receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2) and LDL receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5). In the ileum, WPI increased the mRNA expression of Wnt5a (P< 0.01) and caused a trend towards an increase in the expression of Fzd4 (P= 0.094), with no change in the expression of Ror2 and Lrp5. These genes were unresponsive in the duodenum. Among the nutrient-responsive genes, WPI specifically reduced ileal mRNA expression of peptide YY (P< 0.01) and fatty acid transporter protein 4 (P< 0.05), and decreased duodenal mRNA expression of the insulin receptor (P= 0.05), with a trend towards a decreased expression of Na-glucose co-transporter 1 (P= 0.07). The effects of WPI on gastrointestinal Wnt signalling may explain how this protein affects gastrointestinal structure and function and, in turn, energy intake and balance.

  13. Operator Sequence Alters Gene Expression Independently of Transcription Factor Occupancy in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hernan G.; Sanchez, Alvaro; Boedicker, James Q.; Osborne, Melisa; Gelles, Jeff; Kondev, Jane; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A canonical quantitative view of transcriptional regulation holds that the only role of operator sequence is to set the probability of transcription factor binding, with operator occupancy determining the level of gene expression. In this work, we test this idea by characterizing repression in vivo and the binding of RNA polymerase in vitro in experiments where operators of various sequences were placed either upstream or downstream from the promoter in Escherichia coli. Surprisingly, we find that operators with a weaker binding affinity can yield higher repression levels than stronger operators. Repressor bound to upstream operators modulates promoter escape, and the magnitude of this modulation is not correlated with the repressor-operator binding affinity. This suggests that operator sequences may modulate transcription by altering the nature of the interaction of the bound transcription factor with the transcriptional machinery, implying a new layer of sequence dependence that must be confronted in the quantitative understanding of gene expression. PMID:22840405

  14. Transcriptional profiling of Chromosome 17 QTL for carbohydrate and total calorie intake in a mouse congenic strain reveals candidate genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Ganesh; Richards, Brenda K. Smith

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS The genetic basis for ingestive behaviors is virtually unknown. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for carbohydrate and energy intake map to mouse chromosome 17 and were previously confirmed by a congenic strain bearing CAST/Ei (CAST) donor segment on the C57BL/6J (B6) background. METHODS We used microarray technology to facilitate gene identification. Gene expression was compared between the B6.CAST-17 (BC-17) congenic and B6 strains in two diets: 1) chow, and 2) carbohydrate/protein vs. fat/protein. RESULTS Within the QTL and unique to macronutrient selection, Agpat1 (acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1) was differentially expressed in hypothalamus. Irrespective of diet, the gene with the highest fold difference in congenic mice was trefoil factor 3 (Tff3) in liver. Several genes involved in fat metabolism were decreased in carbohydrate-preferring congenic mice, while genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism were increased. In particular, the glyoxalase pathway was enhanced including Glo1, Glo2, and dLDH. Higher expression of Glo1 mRNA in BC-17 congenic mice corresponded to increased protein expression revealed by Western blot, and to higher GLO1 activity in blood. CONCLUSION These genes represent new candidates for nutrient intake phenotypes. We propose that increased GLO1 in the BC-17 strain supports its need to protect against dietary oxidants resulting from high carbohydrate intake. PMID:19776624

  15. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  16. Rapid alterations of gene expression and cytosine methylation in newly synthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhao; Zhong, Lan; Wu, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jianbo

    2009-02-01

    Allopolyploidy is an important speciation mechanism and is ubiquitous among plants. Brassica napus is a model system for studying the consequences of hybridization and polyploidization on allopolyploid genome. In this research, two sets of plant materials were used to investigate the transcriptomic and epigenetic changes in the early stages of allopolyploid formation. The first comparison was between a synthetic B. napus allotetraploid and its diploid progenitors, B. rapa (AA genome) and B. oleracea (CC genome). Using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) approaches, ~4.09 and 6.84% of the sequences showed changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in synthesized B. napus compared to its diploid progenitors. The proportions of C-genome-specific gene silencing and DNA methylation alterations were significantly greater than those of A-genome-specific alterations. The second comparison was between amphihaploid and amphidiploid B. napus organs grown on synthesized dimorphic plants. About 0.73% of the cDNA-AFLP fragments and 1.94% of the MSAP fragments showed changes in gene expression and DNA methylation. We sequenced 103 fragments that differed in the synthetic/parental or the amphihaploid/amphidiploid cDNA-AFLP and MSAP comparisons. Sequence analysis revealed these fragments were involved in various biological pathways. Our results provided evidence for genome-wide changes in gene expression and DNA methylation occurring immediately after hybridization and polyploidization in synthetic B. napus. Moreover, this study contributed to the elucidation of genome doubling effects on responses of transcriptome and epigenetics in B. napus.

  17. Ethanol alters gene expression and cell organization during optic vesicle evagination.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ledo, A; Cavodeassi, F; Carreño, H; Aijón, J; Arévalo, R

    2013-10-10

    Ethanol has been described as a teratogen in vertebrate development. During early stages of brain formation, ethanol affects the evagination of the optic vesicles, resulting in synophthalmia or cyclopia, phenotypes where the optic vesicles partially or totally fuse. The mechanisms by which ethanol affects the morphogenesis of the optic vesicles are however largely unknown. In this study we make use of in situ hybridization, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry to show that ethanol has profound effects on cell organization and gene expression during the evagination of the optic vesicles. Exposure to ethanol during early eye development alters the expression patterns of some genes known to be important for eye morphogenesis, such as rx3/1 and six3a. Furthermore, exposure to ethanol interferes with the acquisition of neuroepithelial features by the eye field cells, which is clear at ultrastructual level. Indeed, ethanol disrupts the acquisition of fusiform cellular shapes within the eye field. In addition, tight junctions do not form and retinal progenitors do not properly polarize, as suggested by the mis-localization and down-regulation of zo1. We also show that the ethanol-induced cyclopic phenotype is significantly different to that observed in cyclopic mutants, suggesting a complex effect of ethanol on a variety of targets. Our results show that ethanol not only disrupts the expression pattern of genes involved in retinal morphogenesis, such as rx3 and rx1, but also disrupts the changes in cell polarity that normally occur during eye field splitting. Thus, ethylic teratology seems to be related not only to modifications in gene expression and cell death but also to alterations in cell morphology.

  18. Vinclozolin alters the expression of hormonal and stress genes in the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide used in agriculture that can reach aquatic ecosystems and affect the organisms living there. Its effects have been intensively studied in vertebrates, where it acts as an antiandrogen, but there is a lack of information about its mechanistic effects on invertebrates. In this work, we analyzed the response of genes related to the endocrine system, the stress response, and the detoxification mechanisms of Chironomus riparius fourth instar larvae after 24h and 48h exposures to 20 (69.9nM), 200 (699nM), and 2000μg/L (6.99μM) of Vinclozolin. Survival analysis showed that this compound has low toxicity, as it was not lethal for this organism at the concentrations used. However, this fungicide was shown to modify the transcriptional activity of the ecdysone response pathway genes EcR, E74, and Kr-h1 by increasing their mRNA levels. While no changes were observed in disembodied, a gene related with the ecdysone synthesis metabolic pathway, Cyp18A1, which is involved in the inactivation of the active form of ecdysone, was upregulated. Additionally, the expression of two genes related to other hormones, FOXO and MAPR, did not show any changes when Vinclozolin was present. The analysis of stress response genes showed significant changes in the mRNA levels of Hsp70, Hsp24, and Gp93, indicating that Vinclozolin activates the cellular stress mechanisms. Finally, the expressions of the genes Cyp4G and GstD3, which encode enzymes involved in phase I and phase II detoxification, respectively, were analyzed. It was found that their mRNA levels were altered by Vinclozolin, suggesting their involvement in the degradation of this compound. For the first time, these results show evidence that Vinclozolin can modulate gene expression, leading to possible significant endocrine alterations of the insect endocrine system. These results also offer new clues about the mode of action of this compound in invertebrates.

  19. Vinclozolin alters the expression of hormonal and stress genes in the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide used in agriculture that can reach aquatic ecosystems and affect the organisms living there. Its effects have been intensively studied in vertebrates, where it acts as an antiandrogen, but there is a lack of information about its mechanistic effects on invertebrates. In this work, we analyzed the response of genes related to the endocrine system, the stress response, and the detoxification mechanisms of Chironomus riparius fourth instar larvae after 24h and 48h exposures to 20 (69.9nM), 200 (699nM), and 2000μg/L (6.99μM) of Vinclozolin. Survival analysis showed that this compound has low toxicity, as it was not lethal for this organism at the concentrations used. However, this fungicide was shown to modify the transcriptional activity of the ecdysone response pathway genes EcR, E74, and Kr-h1 by increasing their mRNA levels. While no changes were observed in disembodied, a gene related with the ecdysone synthesis metabolic pathway, Cyp18A1, which is involved in the inactivation of the active form of ecdysone, was upregulated. Additionally, the expression of two genes related to other hormones, FOXO and MAPR, did not show any changes when Vinclozolin was present. The analysis of stress response genes showed significant changes in the mRNA levels of Hsp70, Hsp24, and Gp93, indicating that Vinclozolin activates the cellular stress mechanisms. Finally, the expressions of the genes Cyp4G and GstD3, which encode enzymes involved in phase I and phase II detoxification, respectively, were analyzed. It was found that their mRNA levels were altered by Vinclozolin, suggesting their involvement in the degradation of this compound. For the first time, these results show evidence that Vinclozolin can modulate gene expression, leading to possible significant endocrine alterations of the insect endocrine system. These results also offer new clues about the mode of action of this compound in invertebrates. PMID:26966872

  20. Brain region-specific altered expression and association of mitochondria-related genes in autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) has been observed in approximately five percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). MtD could impair highly energy-dependent processes such as neurodevelopment, thereby contributing to autism. Most of the previous studies of MtD in autism have been restricted to the biomarkers of energy metabolism, while most of the genetic studies have been based on mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite the mtDNA, most of the proteins essential for mitochondrial replication and function are encoded by the genomic DNA; so far, there have been very few studies of those genes. Therefore, we carried out a detailed study involving gene expression and genetic association studies of genes related to diverse mitochondrial functions. Methods For gene expression analysis, postmortem brain tissues (anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), motor cortex (MC) and thalamus (THL)) from autism patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) were obtained from the Autism Tissue Program (Princeton, NJ, USA). Quantitative real-time PCR arrays were used to quantify the expression of 84 genes related to diverse functions of mitochondria, including biogenesis, transport, translocation and apoptosis. We used the delta delta Ct (∆∆Ct) method for quantification of gene expression. DNA samples from 841 Caucasian and 188 Japanese families were used in the association study of genes selected from the gene expression analysis. FBAT was used to examine genetic association with autism. Results Several genes showed brain region-specific expression alterations in autism patients compared to controls. Metaxin 2 (MTX2), neurofilament, light polypeptide (NEFL) and solute carrier family 25, member 27 (SLC25A27) showed consistently reduced expression in the ACG, MC and THL of autism patients. NEFL (P = 0.038; Z-score 2.066) and SLC25A27 (P = 0.046; Z-score 1.990) showed genetic association with autism in Caucasian and Japanese samples, respectively. The expression of

  1. Genetic and epigenetic alteration of the NF2 gene in sporadic meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Jesus; Bello, M Josefa; Arjona, Dolores; Alonso, M Eva; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; Amiñoso, Cinthia; de Campos, Jose M; Isla, Alberto; Vaquero, Jesus; Rey, Juan A

    2005-03-01

    The role of the NF2 gene in the development of meningiomas has recently been documented; inactivating mutations plus allelic loss at 22q, the site of this gene (at 22q12), have been identified in both sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 2-associated tumors. Although epigenetic inactivation through aberrant CpG island methylation of the NF2 5' flanking region has been documented in schwannoma (another NF2-associated neoplasm), data on participation of this epigenetic modification in meningiomas are not yet widely available. Using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) plus sequencing, we assessed the presence of aberrant promoter NF2 methylation in a series of 88 meningiomas (61 grade I, 24 grade II, and 3 grade III), in which the allelic constitution at 22q and the NF2 mutational status also were determined by RFLP/microsatellite and PCR-SSCP analyses. Chromosome 22 allelic loss, NF2 gene mutation, and aberrant NF2 promoter methylation were detected in 49%, 24%, and 26% of cases, respectively. Aberrant NF2 methylation with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 22q was found in five cases, and aberrant methylation with NF2 mutation in another; LOH 22q and the mutation were found in 16 samples. The aberrant methylation of the NF2 gene also was the sole alteration in 15 samples, most of which were from grade I tumors. These results indicate that aberrant NF2 hypermethylation may participate in the development of a significant proportion of sporadic meningiomas, primarily those of grade I.

  2. Gene alterations in radiation-induced F344 rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, G.; Hahn, F.F.

    1994-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is frequently altered in all major histopathologic types of human lung tumors. Reported p53 mutations include base substitutions, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions. Point mutations resulting in base substitutions are clustered within a highly conserved region of the gene encoding exons 508, and mutations in this region substantially extend the half-life of the p53 protein. In addition to its prominent importance in lung carcinogenesis, the p53 gene plays a critical role in the cellular response to genetic damage caused by radiation. Specifically, the protein product of p53 induces a pause or block at the G{sub 1} to S boundary of the cell cycle following radiation-caused DNA damage. This G{sub 1} block may allow the cell time to repair the damaged DNA prior to replication. Cells lacking a functional p53 protein fail to pause for repair and consequently accumulate mutations in the genome at an accelerated rate. p53 has also been implicated as a controlling factor in apoptosis or in programmed cell death induced by DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. The p53 gene is mutated in approximately 50% of squamous cell carcinomas from uranium miners who inhaled high doses of radon daughters. The purpose of the present study was to determine if a similar percentage of squamous cell carcinomas with p53 mutations developed in the lungs of rats exposed to aerosols of {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}.

  3. Verticillium dahliae alters Pseudomonas spp. populations and HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of strawberry.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Nadine J; Gadkar, Vijay J; Filion, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by beneficial root-associated bacteria is an important mechanism for the biological control of plant pathogens. However, little is known about the biotic factors affecting HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of plants. In this study, real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to investigate the effect of the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae on hcnC (encoding for HCN biosynthesis) gene expression in Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. Strawberry plants were inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 and (or) V. dahliae and grown in pots filled with nonsterilized field soil. RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil sampled at 0, 15, 30, and 45 days following inoculation with V. dahliae and used for qRT-PCR analyses. Populations of V. dahliae and Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 were also monitored using a culture-independent qPCR approach. hcnC expression was detected at all sampling dates. The presence of V. dahliae had a significant stimulation effect on hcnC gene expression and also increased the population of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. However, the V. dahliae population was not altered by the presence of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effect of a plant pathogen on HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere soil.

  4. Verticillium dahliae alters Pseudomonas spp. populations and HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of strawberry.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Nadine J; Gadkar, Vijay J; Filion, Martin

    2010-11-01

    The production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by beneficial root-associated bacteria is an important mechanism for the biological control of plant pathogens. However, little is known about the biotic factors affecting HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere of plants. In this study, real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to investigate the effect of the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae on hcnC (encoding for HCN biosynthesis) gene expression in Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. Strawberry plants were inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 and (or) V. dahliae and grown in pots filled with nonsterilized field soil. RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil sampled at 0, 15, 30, and 45 days following inoculation with V. dahliae and used for qRT-PCR analyses. Populations of V. dahliae and Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 were also monitored using a culture-independent qPCR approach. hcnC expression was detected at all sampling dates. The presence of V. dahliae had a significant stimulation effect on hcnC gene expression and also increased the population of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. However, the V. dahliae population was not altered by the presence of Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effect of a plant pathogen on HCN gene expression in the rhizosphere soil. PMID:21076481

  5. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki; Fujiwara, Hironori; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-02-15

    Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines - 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells - were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppressions of oxidative stress and cell proliferation.

  6. Epigenetic alteration of imprinted genes during neural differentiation of germline-derived pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Jeong; Choi, Na Young; Lee, Seung-Won; Ko, Kisung; Hwang, Tae Sook; Han, Dong Wook; Lim, Jisun; Schöler, Hans R; Ko, Kinarm

    2016-03-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are unipotent stem cells in the testes that give rise to sperm, can be converted into germline-derived pluripotent stem (gPS) by self-induction. The androgenetic imprinting pattern of SSCs is maintained even after their reprogramming into gPS cells. In this study, we used an in vitro neural differentiation model to investigate whether the imprinting patterns are maintained or altered during differentiation. The androgenetic patterns of H19, Snrpn, and Mest were maintained even after differentiation of gPS cells into NSCs (gPS-NSCs), whereas the fully unmethylated status of Ndn in SSCs was altered to somatic patterns in gPS cells and gPS-NSCs. Thus, our study demonstrates epigenetic alteration of genomic imprinting during the induction of pluripotency in SSCs and neural differentiation, suggesting that gPS-NSCs can be a useful model to study the roles of imprinted genes in brain development and human neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. A gain-of-function mutation in the ROC1 gene alters plant architecture in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiqing; Song, Li; Yang, Yaxuan; Liu, Dong

    2013-02-01

    Plant architecture is an important agronomic trait and is useful for identification of plant species. The molecular basis of plant architecture, however, is largely unknown. Forward genetics was used to identify an Arabidopsis mutant with altered plant architecture. Using genetic and molecular approaches, we analyzed the roles of a mutated cyclophilin in the control of plant architecture. The Arabidopsis mutant roc1 has reduced stem elongation and increased shoot branching, and the mutant phenotypes are strongly affected by temperature and photoperiod. Map-based cloning and transgenic experiments demonstrated that the roc1 mutant phenotypes are caused by a gain-of-function mutation in a cyclophilin gene, ROC1. Besides, application of the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) further suppresses stem elongation in the mutant. GA treatment enhances the accumulation of mutated but not of wildtype (WT) ROC1 proteins. The roc1 mutation does not seem to interfere with GA biosynthesis or signaling. GA signaling, however, antagonizes the effect of the roc1 mutation on stem elongation. The altered plant architecture may result from the activation of an R gene by the roc1 protein. We also present a working model for the interaction between the roc1 mutation and GA signaling in regulating stem elongation. PMID:23206262

  8. A Polymorphism in the 5′-Untranslated Region of the Porcine Cholecystokinin Type A Receptor Gene Affects Feed Intake and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Houston, R. D.; Haley, C. S.; Archibald, A. L.; Cameron, N. D.; Plastow, G. S.; Rance, K. A.

    2006-01-01

    The location and utilization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes with significant effects on economically important traits are becoming increasingly important in livestock breeding programs. The porcine cholecystokinin type A receptor (CCKAR) is a candidate gene for performance traits, due to its known role in the physiological control of feed intake, satiety, and obesity. We investigated the association of CCKAR polymorphisms with feeding, growth, and efficiency traits in an F2 population derived from a cross between Meishan and Large White founder animals and in lines of Large White pigs that had been divergently selected on the basis of lean growth efficiency traits. In the F2 population, CCKAR genotype was significantly associated with daily feed intake and average daily gain. The effects of the polymorphisms were then assessed in a larger-scale analysis of segregating commercial lines. A newly discovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) had highly significant effects on feed intake, average daily gain, and days to 110 kg, which were not seen for a previously reported SNP within the CCKAR gene. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the novel SNP disrupts the binding of the YY1 transcription factor, which raises the possibility that it is the causal variant. The 5′-UTR SNP could be utilized as a molecular genetic test for increased feed intake, faster lean growth, and reduced days to market weight in segregating commercial lines. PMID:16951077

  9. Parturition in dairy cows temporarily alters the expression of genes in circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Crookenden, M A; Heiser, A; Murray, A; Dukkipati, V S R; Kay, J K; Loor, J J; Meier, S; Mitchell, M D; Moyes, K M; Walker, C G; Roche, J R

    2016-08-01

    Extensive metabolic and physiologic changes occur during the peripartum, concurrent with a high incidence of infectious disease. Immune dysfunction is a likely contributor to the increased risk of disease at this time. Studies using high-yielding, total mixed ration-fed cows have indicated that neutrophil function is perturbed over the transition period; however, this reported dysfunction has yet to be investigated in moderate-yielding, grazing dairy cows. Therefore, we investigated changes in the expression of genes involved in neutrophil function. Blood was collected from cows at 5 time points over the transition period: precalving (-1wk; n=46), day of calving (d 0; n=46), and postcalving at wk 1 (n=46), wk 2 (n=45), and wk 4 (n=43). Neutrophils were isolated by differential centrifugation and gene expression was investigated. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR with custom-designed primer pairs and Roche Universal Probe Library (Roche, Basel, Switzerland) chemistry, combined with microfluidics integrated fluidic circuit chips (96.96 Dynamic Array, San Francisco, CA) were used to investigate the expression of 78 genes involved in neutrophil function and 18 endogenous control genes. Statistical significance between time points was determined using a repeated measures ANOVA. Genes that were differentially expressed over the transition period included those involved in neutrophil adhesion (SELL, ITGB2, and ITGBX), mediation of the immune response (TLR4, HLA-DRA, and CXCR2), maturation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis (MCL1, BCL2, FASLG, and RIPK1), and control of gene expression (PPARG, PPARD, and STAT3). We noted reduced gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNG, TNF, IL12, and CCL2) on the day of calving, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine gene expression (IL10) was upregulated. Increased gene expression of antimicrobial peptides (BNBD4, DEFB10, and DEFB1) occurred on the day of calving. Collectively, transcription profiles are indicative of

  10. Parturition in dairy cows temporarily alters the expression of genes in circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Crookenden, M A; Heiser, A; Murray, A; Dukkipati, V S R; Kay, J K; Loor, J J; Meier, S; Mitchell, M D; Moyes, K M; Walker, C G; Roche, J R

    2016-08-01

    Extensive metabolic and physiologic changes occur during the peripartum, concurrent with a high incidence of infectious disease. Immune dysfunction is a likely contributor to the increased risk of disease at this time. Studies using high-yielding, total mixed ration-fed cows have indicated that neutrophil function is perturbed over the transition period; however, this reported dysfunction has yet to be investigated in moderate-yielding, grazing dairy cows. Therefore, we investigated changes in the expression of genes involved in neutrophil function. Blood was collected from cows at 5 time points over the transition period: precalving (-1wk; n=46), day of calving (d 0; n=46), and postcalving at wk 1 (n=46), wk 2 (n=45), and wk 4 (n=43). Neutrophils were isolated by differential centrifugation and gene expression was investigated. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR with custom-designed primer pairs and Roche Universal Probe Library (Roche, Basel, Switzerland) chemistry, combined with microfluidics integrated fluidic circuit chips (96.96 Dynamic Array, San Francisco, CA) were used to investigate the expression of 78 genes involved in neutrophil function and 18 endogenous control genes. Statistical significance between time points was determined using a repeated measures ANOVA. Genes that were differentially expressed over the transition period included those involved in neutrophil adhesion (SELL, ITGB2, and ITGBX), mediation of the immune response (TLR4, HLA-DRA, and CXCR2), maturation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis (MCL1, BCL2, FASLG, and RIPK1), and control of gene expression (PPARG, PPARD, and STAT3). We noted reduced gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNG, TNF, IL12, and CCL2) on the day of calving, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine gene expression (IL10) was upregulated. Increased gene expression of antimicrobial peptides (BNBD4, DEFB10, and DEFB1) occurred on the day of calving. Collectively, transcription profiles are indicative of

  11. Abundance of ruminal bacteria, epithelial gene expression, and systemic biomarkers of metabolism and inflammation are altered during the peripartal period in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Minuti, A; Palladino, A; Khan, M J; Alqarni, S; Agrawal, A; Piccioli-Capelli, F; Hidalgo, F; Cardoso, F C; Trevisi, E; Loor, J J

    2015-12-01

    membrane transporters MCT1 and UTB to peak levels at 28 DIM reflected the higher intake and fermentability of the lactation diet. In addition, those changes in the diet after calving resulted in an increase of butyrate and a decrease of ruminal pH and acetate, which partly explain the increase of Anaerovibrio lipolytica, Prevotella bryantii, and Megasphaera elsdenii and the decrease of fibrolytic bacteria (Fibrobacter succinogenes, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus). Overall, these multitier changes revealed important features associated with the transition into lactation. Alterations in ruminal epithelium gene expression could be driven by nutrient intake-induced changes in microbes; microbial metabolism; and the systemic metabolic, hormonal, and immune changes. Understanding causes and mechanisms driving the interaction among ruminal bacteria and host immunometabolic responses merits further study.

  12. Abundance of ruminal bacteria, epithelial gene expression, and systemic biomarkers of metabolism and inflammation are altered during the peripartal period in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Minuti, A; Palladino, A; Khan, M J; Alqarni, S; Agrawal, A; Piccioli-Capelli, F; Hidalgo, F; Cardoso, F C; Trevisi, E; Loor, J J

    2015-12-01

    membrane transporters MCT1 and UTB to peak levels at 28 DIM reflected the higher intake and fermentability of the lactation diet. In addition, those changes in the diet after calving resulted in an increase of butyrate and a decrease of ruminal pH and acetate, which partly explain the increase of Anaerovibrio lipolytica, Prevotella bryantii, and Megasphaera elsdenii and the decrease of fibrolytic bacteria (Fibrobacter succinogenes, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus). Overall, these multitier changes revealed important features associated with the transition into lactation. Alterations in ruminal epithelium gene expression could be driven by nutrient intake-induced changes in microbes; microbial metabolism; and the systemic metabolic, hormonal, and immune changes. Understanding causes and mechanisms driving the interaction among ruminal bacteria and host immunometabolic responses merits further study. PMID:26409956

  13. Alterations in gene expression in rat skin exposed to 56Fe ions and dietary vitamin A acetate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ronghe; Burns, Fredric J; Chen, Haobin; Chen, Shuaili; Wu, Feng

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to examine gene expression patterns in rat skin exposed to a beam of (56)Fe ions, a surrogate for the high-energy, heavy-ion galactic radiation background, as a basis for obtaining a better understanding of the possible mechanism(s) behind the radioprotective activity of vitamin A. A 2 x 4-cm rectangle of dorsal rat skin was exposed to 1.01 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe ions generated by the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Gene expression patterns were monitored in either the presence or absence of a 250-ppm dietary supplement of vitamin A acetate in powdered lab chow. Although vitamin A and other retinoids show anti-carcinogenic activity in several animal models, the underlying changes in gene expression have not been examined extensively. At either 1 or 7 day after irradiation, a 1-cm square of irradiated and control rat skin was excised and analyzed using the Affymetrix rat microarray (RG_U34A) system. Microarray responses were displayed and processed by GeneSpring 7.0 and GOTree software. At 1 day after 3 Gy of (56)Fe-ion irradiation, the expression of 110 genes was significantly up-regulated (P < = 0.05) in comparison to levels in control rat skin, while no genes were altered by the vitamin A acetate supplement alone. Combined with (56)Fe-ion radiation, the vitamin A acetate supplement blocked the expression of 88 (80%) of the 110 genes and eliminated 16 of 18 gene categories that were significantly altered (all increased) by the (56)Fe-ion radiation. Categories with large numbers of genes eliminated by the retinoid included response to stress, 33 genes; response to biotic stimulus, 38 genes; signal transduction, 35 genes; and regulation of cellular/physiological process, 40 genes. Even for immune response and response to biotic stimulus, the only two categories that remained significantly altered in the presence of the vitamin, the combined number of altered genes was reduced from 74 to 13. No

  14. Neurulation abnormalities secondary to altered gene expression in neural tube defect susceptible Splotch embryos.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G D; An, J; Craig, J C; Gefrides, L A; Calvin, J A; Finnell, R H

    1998-01-01

    The murine mutant Splotch (Sp) is a well-established model for studying neural tube closure defects. In the current investigation, the progression through neural tube closure (NTC) as well as the expression patterns of 12 developmentally regulated genes were examined in the neural tissue of wildtype (+/+), Splotch heterozygous (Sp/+), and Splotch homozygous (Sp/Sp) embryos during neurulation. The overall growth of the embryos, as measured by the number of somite pairs, did not differ significantly between the three genotypes at any of the collection time-points. There was, however, a significant delay in the progression through NTC for both the Sp/+ and Sp/Sp embryos. A univariate analysis on the expression of the 12 candidate genes (bcl-2, FBP-2, Hmx-2, Msx-3, N-cam, N-cad, noggin, p53, Pax-3, Shh, Wee-1, wnt-1) revealed that although 11 were statistically altered, across time or by genotype, there were no significant interactions between gestation age and genotype for any of these genes during NTC. However, a multivariate statistical analysis on the simultaneous expression of these genes revealed interactions at both gestation day (GD) 8:12 (day:hour) and 9:00 among Pax-3, N-cam, N-cad, bcl-2, p53, and Wee-1 that could potentially explain the aberrant NTC. The data from these studies suggest that a disruption in the genes that govern the cell cycle or extracellular matrices of the developing neural tube might play a critical role in the occurrence of the NTDs observed in Splotch embryos.

  15. GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS ALTERS APOPTOTIC AND INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION OF TROPHOBASTS FROM HUMAN TERM PLACENTA

    PubMed Central

    MAGEE, Thomas R.; ROSS, Michael G.; WEDEKIND, Lauren; DESAI, Mina; KJOS, Siri; BELKACEMI, Louiza

    2014-01-01

    AIM Increased placental growth secondary to reduced apoptosis may contribute to the development of macrosomia in GDM pregnancies. We hypothesize that reduced apoptosis in GDM placentas is caused by dysregulation of apoptosis related genes from death receptors or mitochondrial pathway or both to enhance placental growth in GDM pregnancies. METHODS Newborn and placental weights from women with no pregnancy complications (controls; N=5), or with GDM (N=5) were recorded. Placental villi from both groups were either fixed for TUNEL assay, or snap frozen for gene expression analysis by apoptosis PCR microarrays and qPCR. RESULTS Maternal, placental and newborn weights were significantly higher in the GDM group vs. Controls. Apoptotic index of placentas from the GDM group was markedly lower than the Controls. At a significant threshold of 1.5, seven genes (BCL10, BIRC6, BIRC7, CASP5, CASP8P2, CFLAR, and FAS) were down regulated, and 13 genes (BCL2, BCL2L1, BCL2L11, CASP4, DAPK1, IκBκE, MCL1, NFκBIZ, NOD1, PEA15, TNF, TNFRSF25, and XIAP) were unregulated in the GDM placentas. qPCR confirmed the consistency of the PCR microarray. Using Western blotting we found significantly decreased placental pro-apoptotic FAS receptor and FAS ligand (FASL), and increased mitochondrial anti-apoptotic BCL2 post GDM insult. Notably, caspase-3, which plays a central role in the execution-phase of apoptosis, and its substrate poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were significantly down regulated in GDM placentas, as compared to non-diabetic Control placentas. CONCLUSION . Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) are at increased risk for having macrosomic newborns, and larger placentas with reduced apoptosis. Decreased apoptosis subsequent to alterations in apoptotic and inflammatory genes may promote elevated weight in the GDM placentas. PMID:24768206

  16. Identification of frequent BRAF copy number gain and alterations of RAF genes in Chinese prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guoping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Mao, Xueying; Zhang, Yanling; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Hylands, Lucy; Song, Rongrong; Berney, Daniel M; Clark, Jeremy; Cooper, Colin; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that TMPRSS2:ERG fusion genes and PTEN loss, which are common in Western prostate cancers are infrequent in Chinese cases. As previous studies indicated a higher frequency of RAS and BRAF mutation rates in Eastern Asian than in Western prostate cancers and fusion genes involving the RAF family genes BRAF and RAF1 were recently identified in prostate cancer in the American population, we investigated BRAF and RAF1 alterations in Chinese prostate cancer. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that BRAF was truncated in five of 200 informative Chinese cases (2.5%) and that RAF1 was truncated in three of 204 informative cases (1.5%) and genomic rearrangements of these genes were significantly correlated with high Gleason scores (>7; P < 0.01) and have a trend to appear in high clinical stage disease. A high frequency of BRAF and RAF1 copy number gain was found (29 and 15%, respectively). BRAF copy number gain in Chinese cancers was significantly higher than in UK cases (9.2%)(P < 0.001) and correlated with a number of clinical parameters. High-level expression of BRAF was found by immunohistochemistry in Chinese cancer samples compared with adjacent nonmalignant epithelial cells, which was correlated with high BRAF copy number. We also identified KRAS codon 12 mutations in three of 96 Chinese cases, no BRAF V600E mutations were observed. Our finding suggests that the activation of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway may be frequent in Chinese prostate cancer, with RAF gene copy number gain potentially being the main contributor.

  17. Rotating wall vessel exposure alters protein secretion and global gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Helena; O'Neill, Alex J.; Blake, Katy L.; Walther, Meik; Long, Paul F.; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is routinely recovered from air and surface samples taken aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and poses a health threat to crew. As bacteria respond to the low shear forces engendered by continuous rotation conditions in a Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) and the reduced gravitational field of near-Earth flight by altering gene expression, we examined the effect of low-shear RWV growth on protein secretion and gene expression by three S. aureus isolates. When cultured under 1 g, the total amount of protein secreted by these strains varied up to fourfold; under continuous rotation conditions, protein secretion by all three strains was significantly reduced. Concentrations of individual proteins were differentially reduced and no evidence was found for increased lysis. These data suggest that growth under continuous rotation conditions reduces synthesis or secretion of proteins. A limited number of changes in gene expression under continuous rotation conditions were noted: in all isolates vraX, a gene encoding a polypeptide associated with cell wall stress, was down-regulated. A vraX deletion mutant of S. aureus SH1000 was constructed: no differences were found between SH1000 and ΔvraX with respect to colony phenotype, viability, protein export, antibiotic susceptibility, vancomycin kill kinetics, susceptibility to cold or heat and gene modulation. An ab initio protein-ligand docking simulation suggests a major binding site for β-lactam drugs such as imipenem. If such changes to the bacterial phenotype occur during spaceflight, they will compromise the capacity of staphylococci to cause systemic infection and to circumvent antibacterial chemotherapy.

  18. Ghrelin gene products and the regulation of food intake and gut motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Asakawa, Akihiro; Fujimiya, Mineko; Lee, Shou-Dong; Inui, Akio

    2009-12-01

    A breakthrough using "reverse pharmacology" identified and characterized acyl ghrelin from the stomach as the endogenous cognate ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) 1a. The unique post-translational modification of O-n-octanoylation at serine 3 is the first in peptide discovery history and is essential for GH-releasing ability. Des-acyl ghrelin, lacking O-n-octanoylation at serine 3, is also produced in the stomach and remains the major molecular form secreted into the circulation. The third ghrelin gene product, obestatin, a novel 23-amino acid peptide identified from rat stomach, was found by comparative genomic analysis. Three ghrelin gene products actively participate in modulating appetite, adipogenesis, gut motility, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, immune, sleep, memory, anxiety, cognition, and stress. Knockdown or knockout of acyl ghrelin and/or GHS-R1a, and overexpression of des-acyl ghrelin show benefits in the therapy of obesity and metabolic syndrome. By contrast, agonism of acyl ghrelin and/or GHS-R1a could combat human anorexia-cachexia, including anorexia nervosa, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver cirrhosis, chronic kidney disease, burn, and postsurgery recovery, as well as restore gut dysmotility, such as diabetic or neurogenic gastroparesis, and postoperative ileus. The ghrelin acyl-modifying enzyme, ghrelin O-Acyltransferase (GOAT), which attaches octanoate to serine-3 of ghrelin, has been identified and characterized also from the stomach. To date, ghrelin is the only protein to be octanylated, and inhibition of GOAT may have effects only on the stomach and is unlikely to affect the synthesis of other proteins. GOAT may provide a critical molecular target in developing novel therapeutics for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:20038570

  19. Intake port

    DOEpatents

    Mendler, Edward Charles

    2005-02-01

    The volumetric efficiency and power of internal combustion engines is improved with an intake port having an intake nozzle, a venturi, and a surge chamber. The venturi is located almost halfway upstream the intake port between the intake valves and the intake plenum enabling the venturi throat diameter to be exceptionally small for providing an exceptionally high ram velocity and an exceptionally long and in turn high efficiency diffuser flowing into the surge chamber. The intake port includes an exceptionally large surge chamber volume for blow down of the intake air into the working cylinder of the engine.

  20. Climate change alters reproductive isolation and potential gene flow in an annual plant.

    PubMed

    Franks, Steven J; Weis, Arthur E

    2009-11-01

    Climate change will likely cause evolution due not only to selection but also to changes in reproductive isolation within and among populations. We examined the effects of a natural drought on the timing of flowering in two populations of Brassica rapa and the consequences for predicted reproductive isolation and potential gene flow. Seeds were collected before and after a 5-year drought in southern California from two populations varying in soil moisture. Lines derived from these seeds were raised in the greenhouse under wet and drought conditions. We found that the natural drought caused changes in reproductive timing and that the changes were greater for plants from the wet than from the dry site. This differential shift caused the populations to become more phenological similar, which should lead to less reproductive isolation and increased gene flow. We estimated a high level of assortative mating by flowering time, which potentially contributed to the rapid evolution of phenological traits following the drought. Estimates of assortative mating were higher for the wet site population, and assortative mating was reduced following the drought. This study shows that climate change can potentially alter gene flow and reproductive isolation within and among populations, strongly influencing evolution.

  1. Arsenic-induced alteration in the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Burns, Anna L; Hiriart, Marcia; Cebrián, Mariano E; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2007-12-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The present revision focuses on the effect of arsenic on tissues that participate directly in glucose homeostasis, integrating the most important published information about the impairment of the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes by arsenic as one of the possible mechanisms by which it leads to the disease. Many factors are involved in the manner in which arsenic contributes to the occurrence of diabetes. The reviewed studies suggest that arsenic might increase the risk for type 2 diabetes via multiple mechanisms, affecting a cluster of regulated events, which in conjunction trigger the disease. Arsenic affects insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue by modifying the expression of genes involved in insulin resistance and shifting away cells from differentiation to the proliferation pathway. In the liver arsenic disturbs glucose production, whereas in pancreatic beta-cells arsenic decreases insulin synthesis and secretion and reduces the expression of antioxidant enzymes. The consequences of these changes in gene expression include the reduction of insulin secretion, induction of oxidative stress in the pancreas, alteration of gluconeogenesis, abnormal proliferation and differentiation pattern of muscle and adipocytes as well as peripheral insulin resistance.

  2. Arsenic-induced alteration in the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Villasenor, Andrea Burns, Anna L.; Hiriart, Marcia; Cebrian, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2007-12-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The present revision focuses on the effect of arsenic on tissues that participate directly in glucose homeostasis, integrating the most important published information about the impairment of the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes by arsenic as one of the possible mechanisms by which it leads to the disease. Many factors are involved in the manner in which arsenic contributes to the occurrence of diabetes. The reviewed studies suggest that arsenic might increase the risk for type 2 diabetes via multiple mechanisms, affecting a cluster of regulated events, which in conjunction trigger the disease. Arsenic affects insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue by modifying the expression of genes involved in insulin resistance and shifting away cells from differentiation to the proliferation pathway. In the liver arsenic disturbs glucose production, whereas in pancreatic beta-cells arsenic decreases insulin synthesis and secretion and reduces the expression of antioxidant enzymes. The consequences of these changes in gene expression include the reduction of insulin secretion, induction of oxidative stress in the pancreas, alteration of gluconeogenesis, abnormal proliferation and differentiation pattern of muscle and adipocytes as well as peripheral insulin resistance.

  3. Altered gene dosage confirms the genetic interaction between FIAT and αNAC

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatnejad, Bahareh; Mandic, Vice; Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Akhouayri, Omar; Arabian, Alice; St-Arnaud, René

    2014-01-01

    Factor inhibiting ATF4-mediated transcription (FIAT) interacts with Nascent polypeptide associated complex And coregulator alpha (αNAC). In cultured osteoblastic cells, this interaction contributes to maximal FIAT-mediated inhibition of Osteocalcin (Ocn) gene transcription. We set out to demonstrate the physiological relevance of this interaction by altering gene dosage in compound Fiat and Naca (encoding αNAC) heterozygous mice. Compound Naca+/−; Fiat+/− heterozygous animals were viable, developed normally, and exhibited no significant difference in body weight compared with control littermate genotypes. Animals with a single Fiat allele had reduced Fiat mRNA expression without changes in the expression of related family members. Expression of the osteocyte differentiation marker Dmp1 was elevated in compound heterozygotes. Static histomorphometry parameters were assessed at 8 weeks of age using microcomputed tomography (μCT). Trabecular measurements were not different between genotypes. Cortical thickness and area were not affected by gene dosage, but we measured a significant increase in cortical porosity in compound heterozygous mice, without changes in biomechanical parameters. The bone phenotype of compound Naca+/−; Fiat+/− heterozygotes confirms that FIAT and αNAC are part of a common genetic pathway and support a role for the FIAT/αNAC interaction in normal bone physiology. PMID:24440290

  4. Association of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene variant (rs9939609) with dietary intake in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Tiina; Lindström, Jaana; Paananen, Jussi; Eriksson, Johan G; Karhunen, Leila; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti

    2012-11-28

    A cluster of variants in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with the common form of obesity. Well-documented dietary data are required for identifying how the genetic risk can be modified by dietary factors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the FTO risk allele (rs9939609) and dietary intake, and to evaluate how dietary intake affects the association between FTO and BMI in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study during a mean follow-up of 3·2 years. A total of 479 (BMI >25 kg/m2) men and women were genotyped for rs9939609. The participants completed a 3 d food record at baseline and before every annual study visit. The average intakes at baseline and during the years 1, 2 and 3 were calculated. At baseline, the FTO variant rs9939609 was not associated with the mean values of total energy intake, macronutrients or fibre. At baseline, a higher BMI by the FTO risk genotype was detected especially in those who reported a diet high in fat with mean BMI of 30·6 (sd 4·1), 31·3 (sd 4·6) and 34·5 (sd 6·2) kg/m2 for TT, TA and AA carriers, respectively (P =0·005). Higher BMI was also observed in those who had a diet low in carbohydrates (P =0·028) and fibre (P =0·015). However, in the analyses adjusted for total energy intake, age and sex, significant interactions between FTO and dietary intakes were not found. These findings suggest that the association between the FTO genotype and obesity is influenced by the components of dietary intake, and the current dietary recommendations are particularly beneficial for those who are genetically susceptible for obesity.

  5. Genetic Variants in the FADS Gene: Implications for Dietary Recommendations for Fatty Acid Intake

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rasika A.; Pani, Vrindarani; Chilton, Floyd H.

    2014-01-01

    Unequivocally, genetic variants within the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) cluster are determinants of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) levels in circulation, cells and tissues. A recent series of papers have addressed these associations in the context of ancestry; evidence clearly supports that the associations are robust to ethnicity. However ∼80% of African Americans carry two copies of the alleles associated with increased levels of arachidonic acid, compared to only ∼45% of European Americans raising important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions induced by a modern western diet are differentially driving the risk of diseases of inflammation in diverse populations, and are these interactions leading to health disparities. We highlight an important aspect thus far missing in the debate regarding dietary recommendations; we content that current evidence from genetics strongly suggest that an individual's, or at the very least the population from which an individual is sampled, genetic architecture must be factored into dietary recommendations currently in place. PMID:24977108

  6. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    unloading in spaceflight, we conducted genome wide microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from the mouse pelvis. Specifically, 16 week old mice were subjected to 15 days spaceflight onboard NASA's STS-131 space shuttle mission. The pelvis of the mice was dissected, the bone marrow was flushed and the bones were briefly stored in RNAlater. The pelvii were then homogenized, and RNA was isolated using TRIzol. RNA concentration and quality was measured using a Nanodrop spectrometer, and 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. Samples of cDNA were analyzed using an Affymetrix GeneChip\\S Gene 1.0 ST (Sense Target) Array System for Mouse and GenePattern Software. We normalized the ST gene arrays using Robust Multichip Average (RMA) normalization, which summarizes perfectly matched spots on the array through the median polish algorithm, rather than normalizing according to mismatched spots. We also used Limma for statistical analysis, using the BioConductor Limma Library by Gordon Smyth, and differential expression analysis to identify genes with significant changes in expression between the two experimental conditions. Finally we used GSEApreRanked for Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), with Kolmogorov-Smirnov style statistics to identify groups of genes that are regulated together using the t-statistics derived from Limma. Preliminary results show that 6,603 genes expressed in pelvic bone had statistically significant alterations in spaceflight compared to ground controls. These prominently included cell cycle arrest molecules p21, and p18, cell survival molecule Crbp1, and cell cycle molecules cyclin D1, and Cdk1. Additionally, GSEA results indicated alterations in molecular targets of cyclin D1 and Cdk4, senescence pathways resulting from abnormal laminin maturation, cell-cell contacts via E-cadherin, and several pathways relating to protein translation and metabolism. In total 111 gene sets out of 2,488, about 4%, showed statistically significant set alterations. These

  7. Chronic antidepressant treatments resulted in altered expression of genes involved in inflammation in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Alboni, Silvia; Benatti, Cristina; Montanari, Claudia; Tascedda, Fabio; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2013-12-01

    To gain insight into the possible immune targets of antidepressant, we evaluated the expression of several inflammatory mediators in the hypothalamus of rats chronically (28 days) treated with the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (5mg/kg, i.p.) or the tricyclic compound imipramine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). We focused our attention on the hypothalamus as it plays a key role in determining many of the somatic symptoms experienced by depressed patients. This brain region, critical also for expression of motivated behaviours, participates in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in stress response as well as coordinates physiological functions such as sleep and food intake that have been found altered in a high percentage of depressed patients. Notably, hypothalamus is a key structure for brain cytokine expression and function as it integrates signals from the neuro, immune, endocrine systems. By means of quantitative Real Time PCR experiments we demonstrated that a chronic treatment with either fluoxetine or imipramine resulted in a reduction of IL-6 and IFN-γ mRNAs and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus. Moreover, we demonstrated that hypothalamic expression of members of IL-18 system was differentially affected by chronic antidepressant treatments. Chronically administered fluoxetine decreased IL-8 and CX3CL1 hypothalamic expression, while a chronic treatment with imipramine decreased p11 mRNA. Our data suggest that a shift in the balance of the inflammation toward an anti-inflammatory state in the hypothalamus may represent a common mechanism of action of both the chronic treatments with fluoxetine and imipramine.

  8. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H. PMID:25257191

  9. Perinatal asphyxia alters neuregulin-1 and COMT gene expression in the medial prefrontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Iwata, Keiko; Iwata, Yasuhide; Anitha, Ayyappan; Takahashi, Taro; Yamada, Kohei; Vasu, Mahesh Mundalil; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Mori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that perinatal complications, particularly hypoxia-related ones, increase the risk of schizophrenia. Recent genetic studies of the disorder have identified several putative susceptibility genes, some of which are known to be regulated by hypoxia. It can be postulated therefore that birth complications that cause hypoxia in the fetal brain may be associated with a dysregulation in the expression of some of the schizophrenia candidate genes. To test this, we used an animal model of perinatal asphyxia, in which rat pups were exposed to 15 min of intrauterine anoxia during Caesarean section birth, and examined the expression of mRNA of five of the putative susceptibility genes (NRG1, ErbB4, AKT1, COMT and BDNF) by real-time quantitative PCR in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus at 6 and 12 weeks after birth. The expression of NRG1 mRNA was significantly decreased in the mPFC, but not in the hippocampus, at 6 and 12 weeks after birth. In addition, a significant increase in COMT mRNA expression was observed in the mPFC at 12 weeks. The alteration in mRNA levels of NRG1 and COMT was not associated with a change in their protein levels. These results suggest that perinatal asphyxia may lead to disturbances in the PFC, which in turn may exert a long-lasting influence on the expression of specific genes, such as NRG1 and COMT. Our results also suggest that translational interruption may occur in this model of perinatal asphyxia. PMID:25194460

  10. ALTERED EXPRESSION OF NEUROPLASTICITY-RELATED GENES IN THE BRAIN OF DEPRESSED SUICIDES

    PubMed Central

    FUCHSOVA, B.; ALVAREZ JULIÁ, A.; RIZAVI, H. S.; FRASCH, A. C.; PANDEY, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the neuronal membrane glycoprotein M6a (GPM6A), the proteolipid protein (PLP/DM20) family member, is downregulated in the hippocampus of chronically stressed animals. Its neuroplastic function involves a role in neurite formation, filopodium outgrowth and synaptogenesis through an unknown mechanism. Disruptions in neuroplasticity mechanisms have been shown to play a significant part in the etiology of depression. Thus, the current investigation examined whether GPM6A expression is also altered in human depressed brain. Methods Expression levels and coexpression patterns of GPM6A, GPM6B, and PLP1 (two other members of PLP/DM20 family) as well as of the neuroplasticity-related genes identified to associate with GPM6A were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in postmortem samples from the hippocampus (n =18) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) (n= 25) of depressed suicide victims and compared with control subjects (hippocampus n= 18; PFC n =25). Neuroplasticity-related proteins that form complexes with GPM6A were identified by coimmunoprecipitation technique followed by mass spectrometry. Results Results indicated transcriptional downregulation of GPM6A and GPM6B in the hippocampus of depressed suicides. The expression level of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CAMK2A) and coronin1A (CORO1A) was also significantly decreased. Subsequent analysis of coexpression patterns demonstrated coordinated gene expression in the hippocampus and in the PFC indicating that the function of these genes might be coregulated in the human brain. However, in the brain of depressed suicides this coordinated response was disrupted. Conclusions Disruption of coordinated gene expression as well as abnormalities in GPM6A and GPM6B expression and expression of the components of GPM6A complexes were detected in the brain of depressed suicides. PMID:25934039

  11. Altered gene expression in rat mesenteric tissue following in vivo exposure to a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dagues, Nicolas . E-mail: nicolas.dagues@pfizer.com; Pawlowski, Valerie; Guigon, Ghislaine; Ledieu, David; Sobry, Cecile; Hanton, Gilles; Freslon, Jean-Louis; Chevalier, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Vascular injury is a relatively common finding during the pre-clinical toxicity testing of drugs. The mechanisms of the injury are poorly understood and in turn, sensitive and specific biomarkers for pre-clinical and clinical monitoring do not exist. The present study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug-induced vascular injury in mesenteric tissue of rats treated with the selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor CI-1044. In a time-course study, male Sprague Dawley rats were given daily doses of 40 or 80 mg/kg for 1, 2 or 3 successive days and were euthanized the following day. Gene expression profiles in mesenteric tissue were determined using Affymetrix RG{sub U}34A microarrays and fibrinogen and cytokine measurements were performed in blood samples. Hierarchical clustering analysis produced a clear pattern separation of the animals with inflammation, animal with inflammation and necrosis and animals without any lesion. Genes associated with inflammation, procoagulation, extracellular matrix remodeling were up-regulated. An altered expression of genes involved in vascular tone regulation, lipid and glucose metabolism was also observed. Selected genes expression changes were confirmed by TaqMan real-time RT-PCR. The inflammatory process was also detected in the bloodstream at the protein level since fibrinogen, IL6 and IL1{beta} concentrations were increased in treated animals. Overall, the present study reveals several molecular changes supporting the hypothesis by which PDE4 inhibitor-induced vascular lesions in rats are triggered by an inflammatory mechanism and/or a vascular tone dysregulation.

  12. Altered hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression correlates with heat stroke severity in a conscious rodent model.

    PubMed

    Audet, Gerald N; Dineen, Shauna M; Quinn, Carrie M; Leon, Lisa R

    2016-04-15

    It has been suggested that heat-induced hypothalamic damage mediates core temperature (Tc) disturbances during heat stroke (HS) recovery; this is significant as hypothermia and/or fever have been linked to severity and overall pathological insult. However, to date there has been a lack of histological evidence in support of these claims. We hypothesized that local hypothalamic cytokines and/or chemokines, known regulators of Tc, are mediating the elevation in Tc during HS recovery even in the absence of histological damage. In experiment 1, the hypothalamus of Fischer 344 rats was examined for 84 cytokine/chemokine genes (real-time PCR) at multiple time points (Tc,Max, 1, 3, and 10 days) during mild HS recovery. In experiment 2, the hypothalamus of three different HS severities (MILD, moderate [MOD], and severe [SEV]) in rats were examined for the same genes as experiment 1 as well as six oxidative damage markers, at a single intermediate time point (1 day). Systemic cytokines were also analyzed in experiment 2 across the three severities. There were significant alterations in 25 cytokines/chemokines expression at Tc,Max, but little or no changes in expression at longer time points in experiment 1. In experiment 2 there were significant changes in gene expression in SEV rats only, with MILD and MOD rats showing baseline expression at 1 day, despite an absence of systemic cytokine expression in any severity. There was also no change in any oxidative marker of damage at 1 day, regardless of severity. In conclusion, we show only limited changes during long term recovery from HS, but demonstrate differences in hypothalamic gene expression patterns that may be driving HS pathology and morbidity. These findings contribute to our overall understanding of HS pathology in the CNS, as well as providing avenues for future pharmacological intervention. PMID:26876741

  13. Chronic LSD alters gene expression profiles in the mPFC relevant to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martin, David A; Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Nichols, David E; Nichols, Charles D

    2014-08-01

    Chronic administration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) every other day to rats results in a variety of abnormal behaviors. These build over the 90 day course of treatment and can persist at full strength for at least several months after cessation of treatment. The behaviors are consistent with those observed in animal models of schizophrenia and include hyperactivity, reduced sucrose-preference, and decreased social interaction. In order to elucidate molecular changes that underlie these aberrant behaviors, we chronically treated rats with LSD and performed RNA-sequencing on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an area highly associated with both the actions of LSD and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. We observed widespread changes in the neurogenetic state of treated animals four weeks after cessation of LSD treatment. QPCR was used to validate a subset of gene expression changes observed with RNA-Seq, and confirmed a significant correlation between the two methods. Functional clustering analysis indicates differentially expressed genes are enriched in pathways involving neurotransmission (Drd2, Gabrb1), synaptic plasticity (Nr2a, Krox20), energy metabolism (Atp5d, Ndufa1) and neuropeptide signaling (Npy, Bdnf), among others. Many processes identified as altered by chronic LSD are also implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and genes affected by LSD are enriched with putative schizophrenia genes. Our results provide a relatively comprehensive analysis of mPFC transcriptional regulation in response to chronic LSD, and indicate that the long-term effects of LSD may bear relevance to psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia. PMID:24704148

  14. Chronic LSD alters gene expression profiles in the mPFC relevant to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martin, David A; Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Nichols, David E; Nichols, Charles D

    2014-08-01

    Chronic administration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) every other day to rats results in a variety of abnormal behaviors. These build over the 90 day course of treatment and can persist at full strength for at least several months after cessation of treatment. The behaviors are consistent with those observed in animal models of schizophrenia and include hyperactivity, reduced sucrose-preference, and decreased social interaction. In order to elucidate molecular changes that underlie these aberrant behaviors, we chronically treated rats with LSD and performed RNA-sequencing on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an area highly associated with both the actions of LSD and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. We observed widespread changes in the neurogenetic state of treated animals four weeks after cessation of LSD treatment. QPCR was used to validate a subset of gene expression changes observed with RNA-Seq, and confirmed a significant correlation between the two methods. Functional clustering analysis indicates differentially expressed genes are enriched in pathways involving neurotransmission (Drd2, Gabrb1), synaptic plasticity (Nr2a, Krox20), energy metabolism (Atp5d, Ndufa1) and neuropeptide signaling (Npy, Bdnf), among others. Many processes identified as altered by chronic LSD are also implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and genes affected by LSD are enriched with putative schizophrenia genes. Our results provide a relatively comprehensive analysis of mPFC transcriptional regulation in response to chronic LSD, and indicate that the long-term effects of LSD may bear relevance to psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia.

  15. Methamphetamine and HIV-Tat alter murine cardiac DNA methylation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Christopher A; Fields, Earl; Jedrzejczak, Mark J; Jiao, Zhe; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Shang, Joan; Torres, Rebecca A; Lewis, William

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the individual and combined effects of HIV-1 and methamphetamine (N-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-amine, METH) on cardiac dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of HIV/AIDS. METH is abused epidemically and is frequently associated with acquisition of HIV-1 infection or AIDS. We employed microarrays to identify mRNA differences in cardiac left ventricle (LV) gene expression following METH administration (10d, 3mg/kg/d, subcutaneously) in C57Bl/6 wild-type littermates (WT) and Tat-expressing transgenic (TG) mice. Arrays identified 880 differentially expressed genes (expression fold change>1.5, p<0.05) following METH exposure, Tat expression, or both. Using pathway enrichment analysis, mRNAs encoding polypeptides for calcium signaling and contractility were altered in the LV samples. Correlative DNA methylation analysis revealed significant LV DNA methylation changes following METH exposure and Tat expression. By combining these data sets, 38 gene promoters (27 related to METH, 11 related to Tat) exhibited differences by both methods of analysis. Among those, only the promoter for CACNA1C that encodes L-type calcium channel Cav1.2 displayed DNA methylation changes concordant with its gene expression change. Quantitative PCR verified that Cav1.2 LV mRNA abundance doubled following METH. Correlative immunoblots specific for Cav1.2 revealed a 3.5-fold increase in protein abundance in METH LVs. Data implicate Cav1.2 in calcium dysregulation and hypercontractility in the murine LV exposed to METH. They suggest a pathogenetic role for METH exposure to promote LV dysfunction that outweighs Tat-induced effects. PMID:26307267

  16. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  17. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids.

  18. Neonatal Bisphenol A exposure alters sexually dimorphic gene expression in the postnatal rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinyan; Mickens, Jillian A; McCaffrey, Katherine A; Leyrer, Stephanie M; Patisaul, Heather B

    2012-01-01

    Developmental exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), a component of polycarbonate and epoxy resins, has been purported to adversely impact reproductive function in female rodents. Because neonatal life is a critical window for the sexual dimorphic organization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, interference with this process could underlie compromised adult reproductive physiology. The goal of the present study was to determine if neonatal BPA exposure interferes with sex specific gene expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), ER beta (ERβ) and kisspeptin (Kiss1) in the anterior and mediobasal hypothalamus. Long Evans (LE) neonatal rats were exposed to vehicle, 10μg estradiol benzoate (EB), 50mg/kg BPA or 50μg/kg BPA by subcutaneous injection daily from postnatal day 0 (PND 0) to PND 2. Gene expression was assessed by in situ hybridization on PNDs 4 and 10. Within the anterior hypothalamus ERα expression was augmented by BPA in PND 4 females, then fell to male-typical levels by PND 10. ERβ expression was not altered by BPA on PND 4, but significantly decreased or eliminated in both sexes by PND 10. Kiss1 expression was diminished by BPA in the anterior hypothalamus, especially in females. There were no significant impacts of BPA in the mediobasal hypothalamus. Collectively, BPA effects did not mirror those of EB. The results show that neonatal hypothalamic ER and Kiss1 expression is sensitive to BPA exposure. This disruption may alter sexually dimorphic hypothalamic organization and underlie adult reproductive deficiencies. Additionally, the discordant effects of EB and BPA indicate that BPA likely disrupts hypothalamic organization by a mechanism other than simply acting as an estrogen mimic.

  19. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. PMID:22705584

  20. A Casparian strip domain-like gene, CASPL, negatively alters growth and cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghua; Ding, Changqing; Xu, Baochen; Chen, Cuiting; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, Jim; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2015-01-01

    A cold-induced transcript encoding a Casparian strip membrane domain (CASP)-like protein (ClCASPL) was identified in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that ClCASPL-GFP is localized in the plasma membrane. The orthologous gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCASPL4C1) was also found to play an important role in cold tolerance. Expression analysis using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that AtCASPL4C1 is widely expressed in a variety of organs and is cold inducible. Analysis of AtCASPL4C1 T-DNA knock-out plants showed altered growth dynamics, faster growth, increased biomass (dry weight) and earlier flowering compared to wild type (Col-0) and ClCASPL overexpressing plants. AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants showed elevated tolerance to cold stress, while overexpressing CICASPL resulted in increased sensitivity to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants did not display significant alterations in the Casparian strip formation in roots. Thus, the combination of these results suggests a role for CICASPL and AtCASPL4C1 beyond Casparian strip formation in roots, possibly indicating a more fundamental role in vascular tissue. PMID:26399665

  1. A Casparian strip domain-like gene, CASPL, negatively alters growth and cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghua; Ding, Changqing; Xu, Baochen; Chen, Cuiting; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, Jim; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2015-09-24

    A cold-induced transcript encoding a Casparian strip membrane domain (CASP)-like protein (ClCASPL) was identified in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that ClCASPL-GFP is localized in the plasma membrane. The orthologous gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCASPL4C1) was also found to play an important role in cold tolerance. Expression analysis using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that AtCASPL4C1 is widely expressed in a variety of organs and is cold inducible. Analysis of AtCASPL4C1 T-DNA knock-out plants showed altered growth dynamics, faster growth, increased biomass (dry weight) and earlier flowering compared to wild type (Col-0) and ClCASPL overexpressing plants. AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants showed elevated tolerance to cold stress, while overexpressing CICASPL resulted in increased sensitivity to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants did not display significant alterations in the Casparian strip formation in roots. Thus, the combination of these results suggests a role for CICASPL and AtCASPL4C1 beyond Casparian strip formation in roots, possibly indicating a more fundamental role in vascular tissue.

  2. A Casparian strip domain-like gene, CASPL, negatively alters growth and cold tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinghua; Ding, Changqing; Xu, Baochen; Chen, Cuiting; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, Jim; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2015-01-01

    A cold-induced transcript encoding a Casparian strip membrane domain (CASP)-like protein (ClCASPL) was identified in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that ClCASPL-GFP is localized in the plasma membrane. The orthologous gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCASPL4C1) was also found to play an important role in cold tolerance. Expression analysis using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that AtCASPL4C1 is widely expressed in a variety of organs and is cold inducible. Analysis of AtCASPL4C1 T-DNA knock-out plants showed altered growth dynamics, faster growth, increased biomass (dry weight) and earlier flowering compared to wild type (Col-0) and ClCASPL overexpressing plants. AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants showed elevated tolerance to cold stress, while overexpressing CICASPL resulted in increased sensitivity to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, AtCASPL4C1 knock-out plants did not display significant alterations in the Casparian strip formation in roots. Thus, the combination of these results suggests a role for CICASPL and AtCASPL4C1 beyond Casparian strip formation in roots, possibly indicating a more fundamental role in vascular tissue. PMID:26399665

  3. Colon cancer and gene alterations: their immunological implications and suggestions for prognostic indices and improvements in biotherapy.

    PubMed

    Contasta, Ida; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Berghella, Anna Maria; Del Beato, Tiziana; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Studies have shown that changes occur in c-Ki-ras, p53, and Bcl2 gene structure and function during the various stages of human colon carcinogenesis. Alterations of these genes are responsible for the establishment of a state of continuous stimulus for cell division and apoptotic inhibition at physiological and pharmacological levels. This paper focuses on the results of our research aimed at investigating how these gene alterations influence tumoral mechanisms on an immunological level and how immunological parameters can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. Overall, our data suggest that an alteration in the c-Ki-ras gene results in a switch to a suppressive type of immune response, determining an impairment of immune cell activation at both antigen- presenting-cell and T-cell levels. c-Ki-ras gene mutations, p53 deletions, and Bc12 expression, on the other hand, can be used as prognostic markers for the passage of normal tissue to adenoma and adenoma to carcinoma. The p53 oncogene does not appear to impair patients' immunological response further. In conclusion, an evaluation of c-Ki-ras, rather than p53 gene alterations, would seem to be more relevant in colon cancer prevention programs and biotherapy improvement.

  4. Afforestation Alters the Composition of Functional Genes in Soil and Biogeochemical Processes in South American Grasslands▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berthrong, Sean T.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Piñeiro, Gervasio; Jackson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH4+ in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils. PMID:19700539

  5. Targeted genomic sequencing of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma reveals recurrent alterations in NF-κB regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Gabriel K; Sholl, Lynette M; Lindeman, Neal I; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm with a variable and unpredictable clinical course. The genetic alterations that drive tumorigenesis in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma are largely unknown. One recent study performed BRAF sequencing and found V600E mutations in 5 of 27 (19%) cases. No other recurrent genetic alterations have been reported. The aim of the present study was to identify somatic alterations in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma by targeted sequencing of a panel of 309 known cancer-associated genes. DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 13 cases of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and submitted for hybrid capture-based enrichment and massively parallel sequencing with the Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Recurrent loss-of-function alterations were observed in tumor suppressor genes involved in the negative regulation of NF-κB activation (5 of 13 cases, 38%) and cell cycle progression (4 of 13 cases, 31%). Loss-of-function alterations in the NF-κB regulatory pathway included three cases with frameshift mutations in NFKBIA and two cases with bi-allelic loss of CYLD. Both cases with CYLD loss were metastases and carried concurrent alterations in at least one cell cycle regulatory gene. Alterations in cell cycle regulatory genes included two cases with bi-allelic loss of CDKN2A, one case with bi-allelic loss of RB1, and one case with a nonsense mutation in RB1. Last, focal copy-number gain of chromosome 9p24 including the genes CD274 (PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (PD-L2) was noted in three cases, which represents a well-described mechanism of immune evasion in cancer. These findings provide the first insight into the unique genomic landscape of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and suggest shared mechanisms of tumorigenesis with a subset of other tumor types, notably B-cell lymphomas.

  6. In vivo alteration of the keratin 17 gene in hair follicles by oligonucleotide-directed gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Yoon, K

    2003-12-01

    Using intradermal injection of a chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotide (RDO) or a single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssODN) into murine skin, we attempted to make a dominant mutation (R94p) in the conserve alpha-helical domain of keratin 17 (K17), the same mutation found in pachyononychia congenichia type 2 (PC-2) patients with phenotypes ranging from twisted hair and multiple pilosebaceous cysts. Both K17A-RDO and -ssODN contained a single base mismatch (CGC to CCC) to alter the normal K17 sequence to cause an amino acid substitution (R94P). The complexes consisting of oligonucleotides and cationic liposomes were injected to C57B1/6 murine skin at 2 and 5 day after birth. Histological examination of skin biopsies at postnatal day 8 from several mice showed consistent twisted hair shafts or broken hair follicles at the sebaceous gland level and occasional rupture of the hair bulb or epidermal cyst-like changes. In the injected area, the number of full anagen hair follicles decrease by 50%. Injection of the control oligonucleotide, identical to K17A-RDO but containing no mismatch to the normal sequence, did not result in any detectable abnormality. The frequency of gene alteration was lower than 3%, according to the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the genomic DNA isolated by dissection of hair follicles from slides. Although intradermal injection of K17A-RDO or K17-ssODN caused a dominant mutation in K17 affecting hair growth and morphology, these phenotypic changes were transient either due to the compensation of K17 by other keratins or the replacement of the mutated cells by normal surrounding cells during hair growth.

  7. Alteration of the SETBP1 Gene and Splicing Pathway Genes SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 in Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hye-Ran; Baek, Hee-Jo; Kook, Hoon; Cho, Duck; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent somatic SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) and splicing pathway gene mutations have recently been found in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. These mutations have been comprehensively analyzed in adult AML, but not in childhood AML. We investigated possible alteration of the SETBP1, splicing factor 3B subunit 1 (SF3B1), U2 small nuclear RNA auxiliary factor 1 (U2AF1), and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) genes in childhood AML. Methods Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed to reveal chromosomal and genetic alterations. Sequence alterations in the SETBP1, SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes were examined by using direct sequencing in a cohort of 53 childhood AML patients. Results Childhood AML patients did not harbor any recurrent SETBP1 gene mutations, although our study did identify a synonymous mutation in one patient. None of the previously reported aberrations in the mutational hotspot of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were identified in any of the 53 patients. Conclusions Alterations of the SETBP1 gene or SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes are not common genetic events in childhood AML, implying that the mutations are unlikely to exert a driver effect in myeloid leukemogenesis during childhood. PMID:25553291

  8. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  9. Cellular extract facilitates nuclear reprogramming by altering DNA methylation and pluripotency gene expression.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xian-Rong; Lan, Dao-Liang; Li, Jian; Zi, Xiang-Dong; Ma, Li; Wang, Yong

    2014-06-01

    The functional reprogramming of a differentiated cell to a pluripotent state presents potential beneficial applications in disease mechanisms and regenerative medicine. Epigenetic modifications enable differentiated cells to perpetuate molecular memory to retain their identity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the reprogramming modification of yak fibroblast cells that were permeabilized and incubated in the extracts of mesenchymal stem cells derived from mice adipose tissue [adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)]. According to the results, the treatment of ADSC extracts promoted colony formation. Moreover, pluripotent gene expression was associated with the loss of repressive histone modifications and increased global demethylation. The genes Col1a1 and Col1a2, which are typically found in differentiated cells only, demonstrated decreased expression and increased methylation in the 5'-flanking regulatory regions. Moreover, yak fibroblast cells that were exposed to ADSC extracts resulted in significantly different eight-cell and blastocyst formation rates of cloned embryos compared with their untreated counterparts. This investigation provides the first evidence that nuclear reprogramming of yak fibroblast cells is modified after the ADSC extract treatment. This research also presents a methodology for studying the dedifferentiation of somatic cells that can potentially lead to an efficient way of reprogramming somatic cells toward a pluripotent state without genetic alteration. PMID:24738992

  10. A protein constructed de novo enables cell growth by altering gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Digianantonio, Katherine M.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in protein design rely on rational and computational approaches to create novel sequences that fold and function. In contrast, natural systems selected functional proteins without any design a priori. In an attempt to mimic nature, we used large libraries of novel sequences and selected for functional proteins that rescue Escherichia coli cells in which a conditionally essential gene has been deleted. In this way, the de novo protein SynSerB3 was selected as a rescuer of cells in which serB, which encodes phosphoserine phosphatase, an enzyme essential for serine biosynthesis, was deleted. However, SynSerB3 does not rescue the deleted activity by catalyzing hydrolysis of phosphoserine. Instead, SynSerB3 up-regulates hisB, a gene encoding histidinol phosphate phosphatase. This endogenous E. coli phosphatase has promiscuous activity that, when overexpressed, compensates for the deletion of phosphoserine phosphatase. Thus, the de novo protein SynSerB3 rescues the deletion of serB by altering the natural regulation of the His operon. PMID:26884172

  11. Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter the Gene Expression Profile of Neuron-Enriched Cultures from Neonatal Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Kimura-Kuroda, Junko; Nishito, Yasumasa; Yanagisawa, Hiroko; Kuroda, Yoichiro; Komuta, Yukari; Kawano, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids are considered safe because of their low affinities to mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) relative to insect nAChRs. However, because of importance of nAChRs in mammalian brain development, there remains a need to establish the safety of chronic neonicotinoid exposures with regards to children’s health. Here we examined the effects of long-term (14 days) and low dose (1 μM) exposure of neuron-enriched cultures from neonatal rat cerebellum to nicotine and two neonicotinoids: acetamiprid and imidacloprid. Immunocytochemistry revealed no differences in the number or morphology of immature neurons or glial cells in any group versus untreated control cultures. However, a slight disturbance in Purkinje cell dendritic arborization was observed in the exposed cultures. Next we performed transcriptome analysis on total RNAs using microarrays, and identified significant differential expression (p < 0.05, q < 0.05, ≥1.5 fold) between control cultures versus nicotine-, acetamiprid-, or imidacloprid-exposed cultures in 34, 48, and 67 genes, respectively. Common to all exposed groups were nine genes essential for neurodevelopment, suggesting that chronic neonicotinoid exposure alters the transcriptome of the developing mammalian brain in a similar way to nicotine exposure. Our results highlight the need for further careful investigations into the effects of neonicotinoids in the developing mammalian brain. PMID:27782041

  12. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hong-mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury. PMID:27006086

  13. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  14. Chronic intake of a cafeteria diet and subsequent abstinence. Sex-specific effects on gene expression in the mesolimbic reward system.

    PubMed

    Ong, Zhi Yi; Wanasuria, Ayumi F; Lin, Mark Z P; Hiscock, Jennifer; Muhlhausler, Beverly S

    2013-06-01

    Studies examining the impact of chronic palatable food intake on the mesolimbic reward system have been conducted almost exclusively in males. This study aimed to determine the effects of chronic intake of a palatable cafeteria diet and subsequent abstinence on fat mass, food intake and key gene expression of the mesolimbic reward system in both males and females. Albino Wistar rats were fed for 8 weeks on standard chow (Control, n=5 males, 5 females) or cafeteria diet (CD; n=16 males, 16 females). The cafeteria diet was then removed from a subset of CD rats for 72 h (CD-Withdrawal group, CD-W). The nucleus accumbens (NAc) was isolated and mRNA expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine active transporter (DAT), D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, and μ-opioid receptor determined by qRT-PCR. Chronic cafeteria diet intake increased fat mass in all CD rats but body weight and chow intake were reduced during the period of cafeteria diet abstinence. TH mRNA was reduced in male CD and CD-W rats, but increased in female CD and CD-W rats. D1 mRNA was reduced in CD and CD-W females, but increased in CD males, compared to Controls. μ-opioid receptor expression was reduced in CD and CD-W males but not females. These data highlight the importance of investigating sex differences in the neurobiological response to palatable food intake and the need for future studies in this area to include both sexes.

  15. Delayed Satiety-Like Actions and Altered Feeding Microstructure by a Selective Type 2 Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Agonist in Rats: Intra-Hypothalamic Urocortin 3 Administration Reduces Food Intake by Prolonging the Post-Meal Interval

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Éva M; Inoue, Koki; Zhao, Yu; Rivier, Jean E; Vale, Wylie W; Szücs, Attila; Koob, George F; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2009-01-01

    Brain corticotropin-releasing factor/urocortin (CRF/Ucn) systems are hypothesized to control feeding, with central administration of ‘type 2’ urocortins producing delayed anorexia. The present study sought to identify the receptor subtype, brain site, and behavioral mode of action through which Ucn 3 reduces nocturnal food intake in rats. Non-food-deprived male Wistar rats (n = 176) were administered Ucn 3 into the lateral (LV) or fourth ventricle, or into the ventromedial or paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus (VMN, PVN) or the medial amygdala (MeA), regions in which Ucn 3 is expressed in proximity to CRF2 receptors. LV Ucn 3 suppressed ingestion during the third–fourth post-injection hours. LV Ucn 3 anorexia was reversed by cotreatment with astressin2-B, a selective CRF2 antagonist and not observed following equimole subcutaneous or fourth ventricle administration. Bilateral intra-VMN and intra-PVN infusion, more potently than LV infusion, reduced the quantity (57–73%) and duration of ingestion (32–68%) during the third–fourth post-infusion hours. LV, intra-PVN and intra-VMN infusion of Ucn 3 slowed the eating rate and reduced intake by prolonging the post-meal interval. Intra-VMN Ucn 3 reduced feeding bout size, and intra-PVN Ucn 3 reduced the regularity of eating from pellet to pellet. Ucn 3 effects were behaviorally specific, because minimal effective anorectic Ucn 3 doses did not alter drinking rate or promote a conditioned taste aversion, and site-specific, because intra-MeA Ucn 3 produced a nibbling pattern of more, but smaller meals without altering total intake. The results implicate the VMN and PVN of the hypothalamus as sites for Ucn 3-CRF2 control of food intake. PMID:17019404

  16. The combined effects of temperature and CO2 lead to altered gene expression in Acropora aspera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, D.; Bobeszko, T.; Ainsworth, T.; Leggat, W.

    2013-12-01

    This study explored the interactive effects of near-term CO2 increases (40-90 ppm above current ambient) during a simulated bleaching event (34 °C for 5 d) of Acropora aspera by linking physiology to expression patterns of genes involved in carbon metabolism. Symbiodinium photosynthetic efficiency ( F v / F m ) was significantly depressed by the bleaching event, while elevated pressure of CO2 (pCO2) slightly mitigated the effects of increased temperature on F v / F m during the final 4 d of the recovery period, however, did not affect the loss of symbionts. Elevated pCO2 alone had no effect on F v / F m or symbiont density. Expression of targeted Symbiodinium genes involved in carbon metabolism and heat stress response was not significantly altered by either increased temperature and/or CO2. Of the selected host genes, two carbonic anhydrase isoforms (coCA2 and coCA3) exhibited the largest changes, most notably in crossed bleaching and elevated pCO2 treatments. CA2 was significantly down-regulated on day 14 in all treatments, with the greatest decrease in the crossed treatment (relative expression compared to control = 0.16; p < 0.05); CA3 showed a similar trend, with expression levels 0.20-fold of controls on day 14 ( p < 0.05) in the elevated temperature/pCO2 treatment. The synergistic effects of ocean acidification and bleaching were evident during this study and demonstrate that increased pCO2 in surface waters will impact corals much sooner than many studies utilising end-of-century pCO2 concentrations would indicate.

  17. Genetic variation in the lactase gene, dairy product intake and risk for prostate cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Travis, Ruth C; Appleby, Paul N; Siddiq, Afshan; Allen, Naomi E; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Feller, Silke; Tjønneland, Anne; Føns Johnsen, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Ramón Quirós, J; González, Carlos A; Sánchez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elisavet; Oustoglou, Erifili; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B as; Stattin, Pär; Ferrari, Pietro; Johansson, Mattias; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J

    2013-04-15

    High dairy protein intake has been found to be associated with increased prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). To further examine this possible relationship, we investigated the hypothesis that a genetic polymorphism in the lactase (LCT) gene might be associated with elevated dairy product intake and increased prostate cancer risk in a case-control study nested in EPIC. The C/T-13910 lactase variant (rs4988235) was genotyped in 630 men with prostate cancer and 873 matched control participants. Dairy product consumption was assessed by diet questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) for prostate cancer in relation to lactase genotype were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Lactase genotype frequency varied significantly between countries, with frequencies of the T (lactase persistence) allele ranging from 7% in Greece to 79% in Denmark. Intake of milk and total dairy products varied significantly by lactase genotype after adjustment for recruitment center; adjusted mean intakes of milk were 44.4, 69.8 and 82.3 g/day among men with CC, CT and TT genotypes, respectively. The lactase variant was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk, both in our data (adjusted OR for TT vs. CC homozygotes: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.76-1.59) and in a meta-analysis of all the published data (combined OR for T allele carriers vs. CC homozygotes: 1.12, 0.96-1.32). These findings show that while variation in the lactase gene is associated with milk intake in men, the lactase polymorphism does not have a large effect on prostate cancer risk. PMID:22965418

  18. Genetic variation in the lactase gene, dairy product intake and risk for prostate cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Travis, Ruth C; Appleby, Paul N; Siddiq, Afshan; Allen, Naomi E; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Feller, Silke; Tjønneland, Anne; Føns Johnsen, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Ramón Quirós, J; González, Carlos A; Sánchez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elisavet; Oustoglou, Erifili; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B as; Stattin, Pär; Ferrari, Pietro; Johansson, Mattias; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J

    2013-04-15

    High dairy protein intake has been found to be associated with increased prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). To further examine this possible relationship, we investigated the hypothesis that a genetic polymorphism in the lactase (LCT) gene might be associated with elevated dairy product intake and increased prostate cancer risk in a case-control study nested in EPIC. The C/T-13910 lactase variant (rs4988235) was genotyped in 630 men with prostate cancer and 873 matched control participants. Dairy product consumption was assessed by diet questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) for prostate cancer in relation to lactase genotype were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Lactase genotype frequency varied significantly between countries, with frequencies of the T (lactase persistence) allele ranging from 7% in Greece to 79% in Denmark. Intake of milk and total dairy products varied significantly by lactase genotype after adjustment for recruitment center; adjusted mean intakes of milk were 44.4, 69.8 and 82.3 g/day among men with CC, CT and TT genotypes, respectively. The lactase variant was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk, both in our data (adjusted OR for TT vs. CC homozygotes: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.76-1.59) and in a meta-analysis of all the published data (combined OR for T allele carriers vs. CC homozygotes: 1.12, 0.96-1.32). These findings show that while variation in the lactase gene is associated with milk intake in men, the lactase polymorphism does not have a large effect on prostate cancer risk.

  19. Alteration of gene expression profiles in the brain of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to KC-400 or PCB126.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kei; Sei, Naomi; Oshima, Yuji; Tashiro, Kosuke; Shimasaki, Yohei; Honjo, Tsuneo

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known as neurotoxic chemicals and possibly alter animal behavior. We previously reported that PCB-exposure induced abnormal schooling behavior in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). This abnormal behavior might be caused by the functional alteration of central or terminal nervous system. To understand the mechanism(s) of behavioral change by PCB-exposure, we analyzed the gene expression profiles in the brain of medaka exposed to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) or a PCB mixture (Kanechlor-400: KC-400) using a cDNA microarray that we constructed. Twelve FLF-II strain medaka (six individuals per treatment) were dietary exposed to PCB126 (0.01 microg/g b.w./day) or KC-400 (1 microg/g b.w./day) for three weeks. For the control, six fish were fed a control diet. After the exposure period, fish were dissected, and the brain samples were collected. The samples from control fish were pooled and used as a common reference in the microarray experiment. Microarray data were normalized by the LOWESS method, and we screened the genes whose expression levels were altered more than 1.5-fold. Gene expression profiling showed 97 down-regulated and 379 up-regulated genes in the brain of medaka exposed to PCB126. KC-400 exposure suppressed 15 genes and induced 266 genes in medaka brain. Among these genes, the expression levels of 7 and 188 genes were commonly down- or up-regulated, respectively in both treatment groups. On the other hand, 31 gene expressions were significantly different between PCB126 and KC-400 treatment groups, and three out of 31 genes were received opposite effects. In addition, the microarray data showed that thyroid hormone-responsive genes were up-regulated by PCB-exposure, which may imply that PCBs or their metabolites mimic thyroid hormone effects in the brain of PCB-exposed medaka. PMID:18374953

  20. SAMP8 mice have altered hippocampal gene expression in long term potentiation, phosphatidylinositol signaling, and endocytosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Armbrecht, Harvey J; Siddiqui, Akbar M; Green, Michael; Farr, Susan A; Kumar, Vijaya B; Banks, William A; Patrick, Ping; Shah, Gul N; Morley, John E

    2014-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8) strain exhibits decreased learning and memory and increased amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation at 12 months. To detect differences in gene expression in SAMP8 mice, we used a control mouse that was a 50% cross between SAMP8 and CD-1 mice and which showed no memory deficits (50% SAMs). We then compared gene expression in the hippocampus of 4- and 12-month-old SAMP8 and control mice using Affymetrix gene arrays. At 12 months, but not at 4 months, pathway analysis revealed significant differences in the long term potentiation (6 genes), phosphatidylinositol signaling (6 genes), and endocytosis (10 genes) pathways. The changes in long term potentiation included mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling (N-ras, cAMP responsive element binding protein [CREB], protein phosphatase inhibitor 1) and Ca-dependent signaling (inositol triphosphate [ITP] receptors 1 and 2 and phospholipase C). Changes in phosphatidylinositol signaling genes suggested altered signaling through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and Western blotting revealed phosphorylation changes in serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and 70S6K. Changes in the endocytosis pathway involved genes related to clathrin-mediated endocytosis (dynamin and clathrin). Endocytosis is required for receptor recycling, is involved in Aβ metabolism, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol signaling. In summary, these studies demonstrate altered gene expression in 3 SAMP8 hippocampal pathways associated with memory formation and consolidation. These pathways might provide new therapeutic targets in addition to targeting Aβ metabolism itself.

  1. Does protein intake alter the precursors for synthesis of lactose and non-essential amino acids by the mammary glands of lactating mice?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aims were to: 1) develop a [U-13C]glucose tracer approach to establish the pathways of and substrates used for milk lactose and casein synthesis in the mouse mammary gland and 2) determine the influence of protein intake on this partition and use for milk synthesis. In Study 1, we determined th...

  2. Regulatory SNPs Alter the Gene Expression of Diabetic Retinopathy Associated Secretary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chian-Feng; Liou, Shiow-Wen; Wu, Hsin-Han; Lin, Chin-Hui; Huang, Li-Shan; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common microvascular complication in both type I and type II diabetes. Several previous reports indicated the serum centration of some secretary factors were highly associated with DR. Therefore, we hypothesis regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) genotype in secretary factors may alter these gene expression and lead to DR. Methods: At first, pyrosequencing were applying to screen the SNPs which present allele frequency different in DR and DNR. Then individual genotyping was processed by Taqman assays in Taiwanese DR and DNR patients. To evaluate the effect of SNP allele on transcriptional activity, we measured promoter activity using luciferase reporter constructs. Results: We found the frequencies of the CC, CG, and GG genotype of the rs2010963 polymorphism were 15.09%, 47.14%, and 37.74% in DR and 12.90%, 19.35%, and 67.74% in DNR, respectively (p = 0.0205). The prevalence of DR was higher (p = 0.00793) in patients with the CC or CG genotype (62.26% and 32.26% for DR and DNR, respectively) compared with the patients with the GG genotype. To evaluate the effect of rs2010963-C allele on transcriptional activity, we measured promoter activity using luciferase reporter constructs. The rs2010963-C reporter showed 1.6 to 2-fold higher luciferase activity than rs2010963-G in 3 cell lines. Conclusion: Our data proposed rs2010963-C altered the expression level of VEGFA in different tissues. We suggested small increase but long term exposure to VEGFA may lead to DR finally.

  3. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  4. Regulatory SNPs Alter the Gene Expression of Diabetic Retinopathy Associated Secretary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chian-Feng; Liou, Shiow-Wen; Wu, Hsin-Han; Lin, Chin-Hui; Huang, Li-Shan; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common microvascular complication in both type I and type II diabetes. Several previous reports indicated the serum centration of some secretary factors were highly associated with DR. Therefore, we hypothesis regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) genotype in secretary factors may alter these gene expression and lead to DR. Methods: At first, pyrosequencing were applying to screen the SNPs which present allele frequency different in DR and DNR. Then individual genotyping was processed by Taqman assays in Taiwanese DR and DNR patients. To evaluate the effect of SNP allele on transcriptional activity, we measured promoter activity using luciferase reporter constructs. Results: We found the frequencies of the CC, CG, and GG genotype of the rs2010963 polymorphism were 15.09%, 47.14%, and 37.74% in DR and 12.90%, 19.35%, and 67.74% in DNR, respectively (p = 0.0205). The prevalence of DR was higher (p = 0.00793) in patients with the CC or CG genotype (62.26% and 32.26% for DR and DNR, respectively) compared with the patients with the GG genotype. To evaluate the effect of rs2010963-C allele on transcriptional activity, we measured promoter activity using luciferase reporter constructs. The rs2010963-C reporter showed 1.6 to 2-fold higher luciferase activity than rs2010963-G in 3 cell lines. Conclusion: Our data proposed rs2010963-C altered the expression level of VEGFA in different tissues. We suggested small increase but long term exposure to VEGFA may lead to DR finally. PMID:27648002

  5. Alteration of BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of RNA Pol III-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Yanmei; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated that alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular Pol III gene production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. We have reported that alcohol intake increases Pol III gene transcription to promote cell transformation and tumor formation in vitro and in vivo. Studies revealed that tumor suppressors, pRb, p53, PTEN and Maf1 repress the transcription of Pol III genes. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its mutation is tightly related to breast cancer development. However, it is not clear whether BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of Pol III genes. At the present studies, we report that restoring BRCA1 in HCC 1937 cells, which is a BRCA1 deficient cell line, represses Pol III gene transcription. Expressing mutant or truncated BRCA1 in these cells does not affect the ability of repression on Pol III genes. Our analysis has demonstrated that alcohol induces Pol III gene transcription. More importantly, overexpression of BRCA1 in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (MCF-7) decreases the induction of tRNA(Leu) and 5S rRNA genes by alcohol, whereas reduction of BRCA1 by its siRNA slightly increases the transcription of the class of genes. This suggests that BRCA1 is associated with alcohol-induced deregulation of Pol III genes. These studies for the first time demonstrate the role of BRCA1 in induction of Pol III genes by alcohol and uncover a novel mechanism of alcohol-associated breast cancer.

  6. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. PMID:27129738

  7. Feeding period restriction alters the expression of peripheral circadian rhythm genes without changing body weight in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gung; Kong, Jinuk; Choi, Goun; Park, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Jae Bum

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the circadian clock is closely associated with metabolic regulation. However, whether an impaired circadian clock is a direct cause of metabolic dysregulation such as body weight gain is not clearly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that body weight gain in mice is not significantly changed by restricting feeding period to daytime or nighttime. The expression of peripheral circadian clock genes was altered by feeding period restriction, while the expression of light-regulated hypothalamic circadian clock genes was unaffected by either a normal chow diet (NCD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). In the liver, the expression pattern of circadian clock genes, including Bmal1, Clock, and Per2, was changed by different feeding period restrictions. Moreover, the expression of lipogenic genes, gluconeogenic genes, and fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver was also altered by feeding period restriction. Given that feeding period restriction does not affect body weight gain with a NCD or HFD, it is likely that the amount of food consumed might be a crucial factor in determining body weight. Collectively, these data suggest that feeding period restriction modulates the expression of peripheral circadian clock genes, which is uncoupled from light-sensitive hypothalamic circadian clock genes.

  8. Increasing Maternal or Post-Weaning Folic Acid Alters Gene Expression and Moderately Changes Behavior in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kuizon, Salomon; Buenaventura, Diego; Stapley, Nathan W.; Ruocco, Felicia; Begum, Umme; Guariglia, Sara R.; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have indicated that altered maternal micronutrients and vitamins influence the development of newborns and altered nutrient exposure throughout the lifetime may have potential health effects and increased susceptibility to chronic diseases. In recent years, folic acid (FA) exposure has significantly increased as a result of mandatory FA fortification and supplementation during pregnancy. Since FA modulates DNA methylation and affects gene expression, we investigated whether the amount of FA ingested during gestation alters gene expression in the newborn cerebral hemisphere, and if the increased exposure to FA during gestation and throughout the lifetime alters behavior in C57BL/6J mice. Methods Dams were fed FA either at 0.4 mg or 4 mg/kg diet throughout the pregnancy and the resulting pups were maintained on the diet throughout experimentation. Newborn pups brain cerebral hemispheres were used for microarray analysis. To confirm alteration of several genes, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analyses were performed. In addition, various behavior assessments were conducted on neonatal and adult offspring. Results Results from microarray analysis suggest that the higher dose of FA supplementation during gestation alters the expression of a number of genes in the newborns’ cerebral hemispheres, including many involved in development. QRT-PCR confirmed alterations of nine genes including down-regulation of Cpn2, Htr4, Zfp353, Vgll2 and up-regulation of Xist, Nkx6-3, Leprel1, Nfix, Slc17a7. The alterations in the expression of Slc17a7 and Vgll2 were confirmed at the protein level. Pups exposed to the higher dose of FA exhibited increased ultrasonic vocalizations, greater anxiety-like behavior and hyperactivity. These findings suggest that although FA plays a significant role in mammalian cellular machinery, there may be a loss of benefit from higher amounts of FA. Unregulated high FA supplementation during pregnancy and throughout the

  9. TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD. V M Richardson', J T Hamm2, and L S Birnbaum1. 'USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 'Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, ...

  10. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  11. Parathyroid hormone ablation alters erythrocyte parameters that are rescued by calcium-sensing receptor gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jose R; Youte, Rodeler; Brown, Edward M; Pollak, Martin R; Goltzman, David; Karaplis, Andrew; Pong, Lie-Chin; Chien, Lawrence; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Rivera, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    The mechanisms by which parathyroid hormone (PTH) produces anemia are unclear. Parathyroid hormone secretion is regulated by the extracellular Ca2+ -sensing receptor. We investigated the effects of ablating PTH on hematological indices and erythrocytes volume regulation in wild-type, PTH-null, and Ca2+ -sensing receptor-null/PTH-null mice. The erythrocyte parameters were measured in whole mouse blood, and volume regulatory systems were determined by plasma membrane K+ fluxes, and osmotic fragility was measured by hemoglobin determination at varying osmolarities. We observed that the absence of PTH significantly increases mean erythrocyte volume and reticulocyte counts, while decreasing erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These changes were accompanied by increases in erythrocyte cation content, a denser cell population, and increased K+ permeability, which were in part mediated by activation of the K+ /Cl- cotransporter and Gardos channel. In addition we observed that erythrocyte osmotic fragility in PTH-null compared with wild-type mice was enhanced. When Ca2+ -sensing receptor gene was deleted on the background of PTH-null mice, we observed that several of the alterations in erythrocyte parameters of PTH-null mice were largely rescued, particularly those related to erythrocyte volume, K+ fluxes and osmotic fragility, and became similar to those observed in wild-type mice. Our results demonstrate that Ca2+ -sensing receptor and parathyroid hormone are functionally coupled to maintain erythrocyte homeostasis. PMID:23528155

  12. Female Mice are Resistant to Fabp1 Gene Ablation-Induced Alterations in Brain Endocannabinoid Levels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Chung, Sarah; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Dangott, Lawrence J; Peng, Xiaoxue; Kaczocha, Martin; Murphy, Eric J; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1, L-FABP) is not detectable in the brain, Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) markedly increases endocannabinoids (EC) in brains of male mice. Since the brain EC system of females differs significantly from that of males, it was important to determine if LKO differently impacted the brain EC system. LKO did not alter brain levels of arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing EC, i.e. arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but decreased non-ARA-containing N-acylethanolamides (OEA, PEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) that potentiate the actions of AEA and 2-AG. These changes in brain potentiating EC levels were not associated with: (1) a net decrease in levels of brain membrane proteins associated with fatty acid uptake and EC synthesis; (2) a net increase in brain protein levels of cytosolic EC chaperones and enzymes in EC degradation; or (3) increased brain protein levels of EC receptors (CB1, TRVP1). Instead, the reduced or opposite responsiveness of female brain EC levels to loss of FABP1 (LKO) correlated with intrinsically lower FABP1 level in livers of WT females than males. These data show that female mouse brain endocannabinoid levels were unchanged (AEA, 2-AG) or decreased (OEA, PEA, 2-OG) by complete loss of FABP1 (LKO). PMID:27450559

  13. Alteration of Gene Expression during the Induction of Freezing Tolerance in Brassica napus Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Flanagan, A M; Singh, J

    1987-11-01

    Brassica napus suspension-cultured cells can be hardened to a lethal temperature for 50% of the sample of -20 degrees C in eight days at room temperature with abscisic acid. During the induction of freezing tolerance, changes were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of [(35)S]methionine labeled polypeptides. In hardening cells, a 20 kilodalton polypeptide was induced on day 2 and its level increased during hardening. The induction of freezing tolerance with nonmaximal hardening regimens also resulted in increases in the 20 kilodalton polypeptide. The 20 kilodalton polypeptide was associated with a membrane fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum and was resolved as a single spot by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In vitro translation of mRNA indicate alteration of gene expression during abscisic acid induction of freezing tolerance. The new mRNA encodes a 20 kilodalton polypeptide associated with increased freezing tolerance induced by either abscisic acid or high sucrose. A 20 kilodalton polypeptide was also translated by mRNA isolated from cold-hardened B. napus plants. PMID:16665763

  14. Alteration of gene expression during the induction of freezing tolerance in Brassica napus suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Flanagan, A.M.; Singh, J.

    1987-11-01

    Brassica napus suspension-cultured cells can be hardened to a lethal temperature for 50% of the sample of -20/sup 0/C in eight days at room temperature with abscisic acid. During the induction of freezing tolerance, changes were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of (/sup 35/S)methionine labeled polypeptides. In hardening cells, a 20 kilodalton polypeptide was induced on day 2 and its level increased during hardening. The induction of freezing tolerance with nonmaximal hardening regimens also resulted in increases in the 20 kilodalton polypeptide. The 20 kilodalton polypeptide was associated with a membrane fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum and was resolved as a single spot by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In vitro translation of mRNA indicate alteration of gene expression during abscisic acid induction of freezing tolerance. The new mRNA encodes a 20 kilodalton polypeptide associated with increased freezing tolerance induced by either abscisic acid or high sucrose. A 20 kilodalton polypeptide was also translated by mRNA isolated from cold-hardened B. napus plants.

  15. Reverting cholesterol auxotrophy of NS0 cells by altering epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Seth, Gargi; Ozturk, Mustafa; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2006-03-01

    NS0 is a cholesterol-requiring mouse myeloma cell line widely used in the production of recombinant antibodies. We have previously reported that the deficiency of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type7 (Hsd17b7) is responsible for the cholesterol auxotrophy of NS0 cells. Here we demonstrate DNA methylation to be the mechanism underlying transcriptional suppression of Hsd17b7 in cholesterol dependent NS0 cells. Analysis of the DNA methylation pattern revealed methylation of the CpG-rich region upstream of the Hsd17b7 transcription start site in NS0 cells. This is in contrast to the unmethylated status of this sequence in a naturally isolated cholesterol independent revertant cell population (NS0_r). This transcriptional repression was relieved after treating cells with the demethylating drug, 5-azacytidine. Drug treatment also gave rise to high frequency cholesterol-independent variants. Characterization of revertants revealed substantially elevated transcript level of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type7 (Hsd17b7) gene along with hypomethylation of the CpG-rich region. These results affirm that deficiency of Hsd17b7 causes cholesterol dependence of NS0 cells. Furthermore, induction of cholesterol independence by altering DNA methylation pattern alludes to the role of epigenetics in the metabolic adaptation of NS0 cells. With the widespread use of NS0 cells, this finding will have a significant impact on the optimization of recombinant antibody production processes. PMID:16189819

  16. Alterations in expression of genes coding for key astrocytic proteins in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, P; Bélanger, M; Butterworth, R F

    2001-12-01

    Cerebral edema and hepatic encephalopathy are major complications of acute liver failure. Brain herniation caused by increased intracranial pressure as a result of cell swelling is the major cause of death in this condition. Evidence available currently suggests that the rapid accumulation of ammonia by the brain is the major cause of the central nervous system complications of acute liver failure. Increased brain ammonia may cause cell swelling via the osmotic effects of an increase in astrocytic glutamine concentrations or by inhibition of glutamate removal from brain extracellular space. Acute liver failure results in altered expression of several genes in brain, some of which code for important proteins involved in CNS function such as the glucose (GLUT-1) and glutamate (GLT-1) transporters, the astrocytic structural protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) the "peripheral-type" benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) and the water channel protein, aquaporin IV. Loss of expression of GLT-1 results in increased extracellular brain glutamate in acute liver failure. Experimental acute liver failure also results in post-translational modifications of the serotonin and noradrenaline transporters resulting in increased extracellular concentrations of these monoamines. Therapeutic measures currently used to prevent and treat brain edema and encephalopathy in patients with acute liver failure include mild hypothermia and the ammonia-lowering agent L-ornithine-L-aspartate. PMID:11746425

  17. Water stress alters lignin content and related gene expression in two sugarcane genotypes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Adriana Brombini; Bottcher, Alexandra; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vicentini, Renato; Brito, Michael dos Santos; Creste, Silvana; Landell, Marcos G A; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-05-20

    The lignin deposition in the stem of two sugarcane genotypes was assessed on exposure to water stress. The lignin content and the morphoanatomical characterization of the stem indicated that IACSP94-2094 plants are more lignified than those of IACSP95-5000 genotype, under normal water supply conditions, which was especially associated with higher lignin contents in the rind of mature internodes. Water deficit had negative impact on the biomass production, mostly with IACSP94-2094 plants, possibly due to stress severity or higher susceptibility of that genotype during the stem-lengthening phase. Water deficit led to significant alterations in the expression levels of lignin biosynthesis genes and led to an approximate 60% increase of lignin content in the rind of young internodes in both genotypes. It is concluded that the young rind region was more directly affected by water stress and, depending on the genotype, a higher lignin accumulation may occur in the stem, thus implying lower quality biomass for bioethanol production.

  18. Altered expression of genes involved in progesterone biosynthesis, metabolism and action in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Sinreih, Maša; Hevir, Neli; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2013-02-25

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies worldwide. It is associated with prolonged exposure to estrogens that is unopposed by the protective effects of progesterone, which suggests that altered progesterone biosynthesis, metabolism and actions might be implicated in the development of EC. Our aim was to evaluate these processes through quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis in up to 47 pairs of EC tissue and adjacent control endometrium. First, we examined the expression of genes encoding proteins associated with progesterone biosynthesis: steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR); a side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1); and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/ketosteroid isomerase (HSD3B). There were 1.9- and 10.0-fold decreased expression of STAR and CYP11A1, respectively, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium, with no significant differences in the expression of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. Next, we examined expression of genes encoding five progesterone metabolizing enzymes: the 3-keto and 20-ketosteroid reductases (AKR1C1-AKR1C3) and 5α-reductases (SRD5A1 and SRD5A2); and the opposing 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B2). These genes are expressed in EC and adjacent control endometrium. No statistically significant differences were seen in mRNA levels of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and SRD5A1. Expression of HSD17B2 was 3.0-fold increased, and expression of SRD5A2 was 3.7-fold decreased, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium. We also examined mRNA levels of progesterone receptors A and B (PGR), and separately the expression of progesterone receptor B (PR-B). Here we saw 1.8- and 2.0-fold lower mRNA levels of PGR and PR-B, respectively, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium. This down-regulation of STAR, CYP11A1 and PGR in endometrial cancer may lead to decreased progesterone biosynthesis and actions although the effects on progesterone levels should be further studied.

  19. Alterations in penicillin binding protein gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and their correlation with susceptibility patterns.

    PubMed

    Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Tachibana, Mineji; Nakanishi, Kyoko; Nakao, Shoko; Saito, Kumiko; Toyoshima, Eri; Sato, Maki; Takahashi, Toru; Osanai, Shinobu; Itoh, Yoshihisa; Kikuchi, Kenjiro

    2003-08-01

    Penicillin binding protein (pbp) gene alterations of 328 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were examined for a correlation with their antibiotic-resistance. The frequency of penicillin G (PEN-G) resistance was determined to clarify susceptibility to several antibiotics, namely PEN-G, ampicillin, sulbactam/ampicillin, cefozopram, panipenem (PAPM), clarithromycin (CLR), azithromycin (AZM) and levofloxacin (LVX). Oligonucleotide primers for three pbp genes (pbp1a, pbp2x and pbp2b) were used to detect mutations in pbp. Of the strains, 25.9% were classified as Pen-Gs, 68.0% as Pen-Gir and 6.1% as Pen-Gr. The polymerase chain reaction product for wild-type pbp1a was found in 185 isolates, that for wild-type pbp2x was found in 66 isolates and that for wild-type pbp2b was found in 213 isolates. None of these three genes was detectable in 100 isolates while all of them were detected in 64 isolates (1aw/2xw/2bw). Of those 64 isolates with 1aw/2xw/2bw, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of PEN-G was < or =0.06 mg/l for 54 isolates and 0.12 mg/l for 10 isolates. Of the 272 strains for which the MIC of PAPM was < or =0.03 mg/l, there were 85 Pen-Gs, 184 Pen-Gir and three Pen-Gr isolates. Three strains for which the MIC of LVX was > or =4.0 mg/l included one Pen-Gs and two Pen-Gir isolates. The MICs of CLR correlated significantly with those of AZM. The MIC of CLR was > or =1 mg/l for 216 isolates, and the MIC of AZM was > or =1 mg/l for 244 of them. These data suggested that PAPM may be effective against S. pneumoniae infection, although acquisition of resistance should be considered. LVX also seemed to be effective against S. pneumoniae.

  20. Metabolism of Fructooligosaccharides in Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III via Differential Gene Transcription and Alteration of Cell Membrane Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Guozhong; Chen, Wei; Guo, Benheng

    2015-11-01

    Although fructooligosaccharides (FOS) can selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics and beneficially modulate the balance of intestinal microbiota, knowledge of the molecular mechanism for FOS metabolism by probiotics is still limited. Here a combined transcriptomic and physiological approach was used to survey the global alterations that occurred during the logarithmic growth of Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III using FOS or glucose as the sole carbon source. A total of 363 genes were differentially transcribed; in particular, two gene clusters were induced by FOS. Gene inactivation revealed that both of the clusters participated in the metabolism of FOS, which were transported across the membrane by two phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and were subsequently hydrolyzed by a β-fructofuranosidase (SacA) in the cytoplasm. Combining the measurements of the transcriptome- and membrane-related features, we discovered that the genes involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids (FAs) were repressed in cells grown on FOS; as a result, the FA profiles were altered by shortening of the carbon chains, after which membrane fluidity increased in response to FOS transport and utilization. Furthermore, incremental production of acetate was observed in both the transcriptomic and the metabolic experiments. Our results provided new insights into gene transcription, the production of metabolites, and membrane alterations that could explain FOS metabolism in L. plantarum.

  1. Metabolism of Fructooligosaccharides in Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III via Differential Gene Transcription and Alteration of Cell Membrane Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Guozhong; Chen, Wei; Guo, Benheng

    2015-11-01

    Although fructooligosaccharides (FOS) can selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics and beneficially modulate the balance of intestinal microbiota, knowledge of the molecular mechanism for FOS metabolism by probiotics is still limited. Here a combined transcriptomic and physiological approach was used to survey the global alterations that occurred during the logarithmic growth of Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III using FOS or glucose as the sole carbon source. A total of 363 genes were differentially transcribed; in particular, two gene clusters were induced by FOS. Gene inactivation revealed that both of the clusters participated in the metabolism of FOS, which were transported across the membrane by two phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and were subsequently hydrolyzed by a β-fructofuranosidase (SacA) in the cytoplasm. Combining the measurements of the transcriptome- and membrane-related features, we discovered that the genes involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids (FAs) were repressed in cells grown on FOS; as a result, the FA profiles were altered by shortening of the carbon chains, after which membrane fluidity increased in response to FOS transport and utilization. Furthermore, incremental production of acetate was observed in both the transcriptomic and the metabolic experiments. Our results provided new insights into gene transcription, the production of metabolites, and membrane alterations that could explain FOS metabolism in L. plantarum. PMID:26319882

  2. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  3. cDNA microarray reveals the alterations of cytoskeleton-related genes in osteoblast under high magneto-gravitational environment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Airong; Di, Shengmeng; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Zongcheng; Li, Jingbao; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Pengfei; Yin, Dachuan; Shang, Peng

    2009-07-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  4. Lack of SOD1 gene mutations and activity alterations in two Italian families with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gestri, D; Cecchi, C; Tedde, A; Latorraca, S; Orlacchio, A; Grassi, E; Massaro, A M; Liguri, G; St George-Hyslop, P H; Sorbi, S

    2000-08-11

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal disorder, which results from the degeneration of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Approximately 20% of the inherited autosomal dominant cases are due to mutations within the gene coding for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a cytosolic homodimeric enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of toxic superoxide anion. We investigated the presence of SOD1 gene mutations and activity alterations in two unrelated families of ALS patients from Elba, an island of central Italy. No mutation in SOD1 exon 1 to 5 and no activity alteration were observed in all members of the two analyzed ALS families (FALS). These data show an apparent heterogeneous distribution of ALS patients with SOD1 gene mutations among different populations and suggest that another genetic locus could be involved in the disease. PMID:10961653

  5. Ginseng extracts restore high-glucose induced vascular dysfunctions by altering triglyceride metabolism and downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-Huen; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Chu, John Man-Tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-Man; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-Wan; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  6. Mutations that alter RNA splicing of the human HPRT gene: a review of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, J P; Rogan, P K; Cariello, N; Nicklas, J A

    1998-11-01

    The human HPRT gene contains spans approximately 42,000 base pairs in genomic DNA, has a mRNA of approximately 900 bases and a protein coding sequence of 657 bases (initiation codon AUG to termination codon UAA). This coding sequence is distributed into 9 exons ranging from 18 (exon 5) to 184 (exon 3) base pairs. Intron sizes range from 170 (intron 7) to 13,075 (intron 1) base pairs. In a database of human HPRT mutations, 277 of 2224 (12.5%) mutations result in alterations in splicing of the mRNA as analyzed by both reverse transcriptase mediated production of a cDNA followed by PCR amplification and cDNA sequencing and by genomic DNA PCR amplification and sequencing. Mutations have been found in all eight 5' (donor) and 3' (acceptor) splice sequences. Mutations in the 5' splice sequences of introns 1 and 5 result in intron inclusion in the cDNA due to the use of cryptic donor splice sequences within the introns; mutations in the other six 5' sites result in simple exon exclusion. Mutations in the 3' splice sequences of introns 1, 3, 7 and 8 result in partial exon exclusion due to the use of cryptic acceptor splice sequences within the exons; mutations in the other four 3' sites result in simple exon exclusion. A base substitution in exon 3 (209G-->T) creates a new 5' (donor) splice site which results in the exclusion of 110 bases of exon 3 from the cDNA. Two base substitutions in intron 8 (IVS8-16G-->A and IVS8-3T-->G) result in the inclusion of intron 8 sequences in the cDNA due to the creation of new 3' (acceptor) splice sites. Base substitution within exons 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 also result in splice alterations in cDNA. Those in exons 1 and 6 are at the 3' end of the exon and may directly affect splicing. Those within exons 3 and 4 may be the result of the creation of nonsense codons, while those in exon 8 cannot be explained by this mechanism. Lastly, many mutations that affect splicing of the HPRT mRNA have pleiotropic effects in that multiple cDNA products are

  7. Interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms, dietary fat intake, obesity and serum lipid concentrations in black and white South African women.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Yael T; van der Merwe, Lize; Evans, Juliet; Collins, Malcolm; Lambert, Estelle V; September, Alison V; Goedecke, Julia H

    2014-06-24

    This study investigated interactions between dietary fat intake and IL-6 polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white South African (SA) women. Normal-weight and obese, black and white women underwent measurements of body composition, serum lipids and dietary fat intake, and were genotyped for the IL-6 -174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms. In black women the IVS4 +869 G allele was associated with greater adiposity, and with increasing dietary fat intake adiposity increased in the IVS3 +281 GT+GG and IVS4 +869 AA or AG genotypes. In white women, with increasing omega-3 (n-3) intake and decreasing n-6:n-3 ratio, body mass index (BMI) decreased in those with the -174 C allele, IVS3 +281 T allele and IVS4 +869 AG genotype. In the white women, those with the IVS3 +281 T allele had lower triglycerides. Further, with increasing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA); triglyceride and total cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (T-C:HDL-C) ratio decreased in those with the -174 C allele. In black women, with increasing total fat intake, triglycerides and T-C:HDL-C ratio increased in those with the IVS4 +869 G allele. This study is the first to show that dietary fat intake modulates the relationship between the IL-6 -174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white SA women.

  8. Low carbohydrate/high-fat diet attenuates cardiac hypertrophy, remodeling, and altered gene expression in hypertension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary fat intake on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and accompanying structural and molecular remodeling in response to hypertension are not understood. The present study compared the effects of a high-fat versus a low-fat diet on development of left ventricular hype...

  9. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  10. Changes in LDL Oxidative Status and Oxidative and Inflammatory Gene Expression after Red Wine Intake in Healthy People: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Di Renzo, Laura; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Gualtieri, Paola; Gratteri, Santo; Tomasi, Diego; Gaiotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. Micronutrients modulate immune system and exert a protective action by reducing low density lipoproteins (LDL) oxidation via induction of antioxidant enzymes. We evaluated the gene expression of oxidative stress (HOSp), inflammasome (HIp), and human drug metabolism pathways (HDM) and ox-LDL level at baseline and after the intake of red wine naturally enriched with resveratrol (NPVRW), in association with or without a McDonald's meal (McDM). The ox-LDL levels significantly increase comparing baseline (B) versus McDM and decreased comparing McDM versus McDM + NPVRW (P ≤ 0.05). Percentages of significant genes expressed after each nutritional intervention were the following: (1) B versus McDM, 2.88% HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 3.37% of HDMp; (2) B versus McDM + NPVRW, 1.44% of HOSp, 4.81% of HIp, and 0.96% of HDMp; (3) McDM versus McDM + NPVRW, 2.40% of HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 5.77% of HDMp; (4) B versus NPVRW, 4.80% HOSp, 3.85% HIp, and 3.85% HDMp. NPVRW intake reduced postprandial ox-LDL and the expression of inflammation and oxidative stress related genes. Chronic studies on larger population are necessary before definitive conclusions. PMID:26101461

  11. Changes in LDL Oxidative Status and Oxidative and Inflammatory Gene Expression after Red Wine Intake in Healthy People: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Laura; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Carraro, Alberto; Valente, Roberto; Gualtieri, Paola; Gratteri, Santo; Tomasi, Diego; Gaiotti, Federica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. Micronutrients modulate immune system and exert a protective action by reducing low density lipoproteins (LDL) oxidation via induction of antioxidant enzymes. We evaluated the gene expression of oxidative stress (HOSp), inflammasome (HIp), and human drug metabolism pathways (HDM) and ox-LDL level at baseline and after the intake of red wine naturally enriched with resveratrol (NPVRW), in association with or without a McDonald's meal (McDM). The ox-LDL levels significantly increase comparing baseline (B) versus McDM and decreased comparing McDM versus McDM + NPVRW (P ≤ 0.05). Percentages of significant genes expressed after each nutritional intervention were the following: (1) B versus McDM, 2.88% HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 3.37% of HDMp; (2) B versus McDM + NPVRW, 1.44% of HOSp, 4.81% of HIp, and 0.96% of HDMp; (3) McDM versus McDM + NPVRW, 2.40% of HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 5.77% of HDMp; (4) B versus NPVRW, 4.80% HOSp, 3.85% HIp, and 3.85% HDMp. NPVRW intake reduced postprandial ox-LDL and the expression of inflammation and oxidative stress related genes. Chronic studies on larger population are necessary before definitive conclusions. PMID:26101461

  12. Changes in LDL Oxidative Status and Oxidative and Inflammatory Gene Expression after Red Wine Intake in Healthy People: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Laura; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Carraro, Alberto; Valente, Roberto; Gualtieri, Paola; Gratteri, Santo; Tomasi, Diego; Gaiotti, Federica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. Micronutrients modulate immune system and exert a protective action by reducing low density lipoproteins (LDL) oxidation via induction of antioxidant enzymes. We evaluated the gene expression of oxidative stress (HOSp), inflammasome (HIp), and human drug metabolism pathways (HDM) and ox-LDL level at baseline and after the intake of red wine naturally enriched with resveratrol (NPVRW), in association with or without a McDonald's meal (McDM). The ox-LDL levels significantly increase comparing baseline (B) versus McDM and decreased comparing McDM versus McDM + NPVRW (P ≤ 0.05). Percentages of significant genes expressed after each nutritional intervention were the following: (1) B versus McDM, 2.88% HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 3.37% of HDMp; (2) B versus McDM + NPVRW, 1.44% of HOSp, 4.81% of HIp, and 0.96% of HDMp; (3) McDM versus McDM + NPVRW, 2.40% of HOSp, 2.40% of HIp, and 5.77% of HDMp; (4) B versus NPVRW, 4.80% HOSp, 3.85% HIp, and 3.85% HDMp. NPVRW intake reduced postprandial ox-LDL and the expression of inflammation and oxidative stress related genes. Chronic studies on larger population are necessary before definitive conclusions.

  13. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  14. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  15. Altered gene expression in HepG2 cells exposed to a methanolic coal dust extract.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Castilla, Angelica; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to coal dust has been associated with different chronic diseases and mortality risk. This airborne pollutant is produced during coal mining and transport activities, generating environmental and human toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a coal dust methanolic extract on HepG2, a human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Cells were exposed to 5-100ppm methanolic coal extract for 12h, using DMSO as control. MTT and comet assays were used for the evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. Real time PCR was utilized to quantify relative expression of genes related to oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism and DNA damage. Coal extract concentrations did not induce significant changes in HepG2 cell viability after 12h exposure; however, 50 and 100ppm of the coal extract produced a significant increase in genetic damage index with respect to negative control. Compared to vehicle control, mRNA CYP1A1 (up to 163-fold), NQO1 (up to 4.7-fold), and GADD45B (up to 4.7-fold) were up regulated, whereas PRDX1, SOD, CAT, GPX1, XPA, ERCC1 and APEX1 remained unaltered. This expression profile suggests that cells exposed to coal dust extract shows aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated alterations, changes in cellular oxidative status, and genotoxic effects. These findings share some similarities with those observed in liver of mice captured near coal mining areas, and add evidence that living around these industrial operations may be negatively impacting the biota and human health. PMID:25305735

  16. Genetic Association and Altered Gene Expression of Mir-155 in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Soldà, Giulia; Gemmati, Donato; Orioli, Elisa; Zeri, Giulia; Benedetti, Maria Donata; Salviati, Alessandro; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio; Duga, Stefano; Asselta, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by chronic inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. As microRNA (miRNA)-dependent alterations in gene expression in hematopoietic cells are critical for mounting an appropriate immune response, miRNA deregulation may result in defects in immune tolerance. In this frame, we sought to explore the possible involvement of miRNAs in MS pathogenesis by monitoring the differential expression of 22 immunity-related miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients and healthy controls, by using a microbead-based technology. Three miRNAs resulted >2 folds up-regulated in MS vs controls, whereas none resulted down-regulated. Interestingly, the most up-regulated miRNA (mir-155; fold change = 3.30; P = 0.013) was previously reported to be up-regulated also in MS brain lesions. Mir-155 up-regulation was confirmed by qPCR experiments. The role of mir-155 in MS susceptibility was also investigated by genotyping four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping in the mir-155 genomic region. A haplotype of three SNPs, corresponding to a 12-kb region encompassing the last exon of BIC (the B-cell Integration Cluster non-coding RNA, from which mir-155 is processed), resulted associated with the disease status (P = 0.035; OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.05–1.77), suggesting that this locus strongly deserves further investigations. PMID:22272099

  17. Altered signalling and gene expression associated with the immune system and the inflammatory response in obesity.

    PubMed

    Gil, Angel; María Aguilera, Concepción; Gil-Campos, Mercedes; Cañete, Ramón

    2007-10-01

    White adipose tissue functions not only as an energy store but also as an important endocrine organ and is involved in the regulation of many pathological processes. The obese state is characterised by a low-grade systemic inflammation, mainly a result of increased adipocyte as well as fat resident- and recruited-macrophage activity. In the past few years, various products of adipose tissue including adipokines and cytokines have been characterised and a number of pathways linking adipose tissue metabolism with the immune system have been identified. In obesity, the pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of adipokines and cytokines through intracellular signalling pathways mainly involve the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) systems as well as the I kappa B kinase beta (IKK-beta). Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, which lead to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, are also important in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Obesity increases the expression of leptin and other cytokines, as well as some macrophage and inflammatory markers, and decreases adiponectin expression in adipose tissue. A number of cytokines, e.g. tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and some pro-inflammatory interleukins, leuckocyte antigens, chemochines, surface adhesion molecules and metalloproteases are up-regulated whereas other factors are down-regulated. The present paper will focus on the molecular mechanisms linking obesity and inflammation with emphasis on the alteration of signalling and gene expression in adipose cell components.

  18. Altered gene expression in HepG2 cells exposed to a methanolic coal dust extract.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Castilla, Angelica; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to coal dust has been associated with different chronic diseases and mortality risk. This airborne pollutant is produced during coal mining and transport activities, generating environmental and human toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a coal dust methanolic extract on HepG2, a human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Cells were exposed to 5-100ppm methanolic coal extract for 12h, using DMSO as control. MTT and comet assays were used for the evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. Real time PCR was utilized to quantify relative expression of genes related to oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism and DNA damage. Coal extract concentrations did not induce significant changes in HepG2 cell viability after 12h exposure; however, 50 and 100ppm of the coal extract produced a significant increase in genetic damage index with respect to negative control. Compared to vehicle control, mRNA CYP1A1 (up to 163-fold), NQO1 (up to 4.7-fold), and GADD45B (up to 4.7-fold) were up regulated, whereas PRDX1, SOD, CAT, GPX1, XPA, ERCC1 and APEX1 remained unaltered. This expression profile suggests that cells exposed to coal dust extract shows aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated alterations, changes in cellular oxidative status, and genotoxic effects. These findings share some similarities with those observed in liver of mice captured near coal mining areas, and add evidence that living around these industrial operations may be negatively impacting the biota and human health.

  19. Progestin-Containing Contraceptives Alter Expression of Host Defense-Related Genes of the Endometrium and Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Goldfien, Gabriel A.; Barragan, Fatima; Chen, Joseph; Takeda, Margaret; Irwin, Juan C.; Perry, Jean; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Smith-McCune, Karen K.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that progestin-containing contraceptives increase susceptibility to HIV, although the underlying mechanisms involving the upper female reproductive tract are undefined. To determine the effects of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on gene expression and physiology of human endometrial and cervical transformation zone (TZ), microarray analyses were performed on whole tissue biopsies. In endometrium, activated pathways included leukocyte chemotaxis, attachment, and inflammation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users, and individual genes included pattern recognition receptors, complement components, and other immune mediators. In cervical TZ, progestin treatment altered expression of tissue remodeling and viability but not immune function genes. Together, these results indicate that progestins influence expression of immune-related genes in endometrium relevant to local recruitment of HIV target cells with potential to increase susceptibility and underscore the importance of the upper reproductive tract when assessing the safety of contraceptive products. PMID:25634912

  20. Parasitic castration by the digenian trematode Allopodocotyle sp. alters gene expression in the brain of the host mollusc Haliotis asinina.

    PubMed

    Rice, Tamika; McGraw, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Elizabeth K; Reverter, Antonio; Jackson, Daniel J; Degnan, Bernard M

    2006-06-26

    Infection of molluscs by digenean trematode parasites typically results in the repression of reproduction -- the so-called parasitic castration. This is known to occur by altering the expression of a range of host neuropeptide genes. Here we analyse the expression levels of 10 members of POU, Pax, Sox and Hox transcription factor gene families, along with genes encoding FMRFamide, prohormone convertase and beta-tubulin, in the brain ganglia of actively reproducing (summer), non-reproducing (winter) and infected Haliotis asinina (a vetigastropod mollusc). A number of the regulatory genes are differentially expressed in parasitised H. asinina, but in only a few cases do expression patterns in infected animals match those occurring in animals where reproduction is normally repressed.

  1. Progestin-Containing Contraceptives Alter Expression of Host Defense-Related Genes of the Endometrium and Cervix.

    PubMed

    Goldfien, Gabriel A; Barragan, Fatima; Chen, Joseph; Takeda, Margaret; Irwin, Juan C; Perry, Jean; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Giudice, Linda C

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that progestin-containing contraceptives increase susceptibility to HIV, although the underlying mechanisms involving the upper female reproductive tract are undefined. To determine the effects of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on gene expression and physiology of human endometrial and cervical transformation zone (TZ), microarray analyses were performed on whole tissue biopsies. In endometrium, activated pathways included leukocyte chemotaxis, attachment, and inflammation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users, and individual genes included pattern recognition receptors, complement components, and other immune mediators. In cervical TZ, progestin treatment altered expression of tissue remodeling and viability but not immune function genes. Together, these results indicate that progestins influence expression of immune-related genes in endometrium relevant to local recruitment of HIV target cells with potential to increase susceptibility and underscore the importance of the upper reproductive tract when assessing the safety of contraceptive products.

  2. Infection of Apple by Apple Stem Grooving Virus Leads to Extensive Alterations in Gene Expression Patterns but No Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Shaojie; Fan, Zaifeng; Guo, Liyun; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of viral diseases, transcriptome profiling has been widely used to correlate host gene expression change patterns with disease symptoms during viral infection in many plant hosts. We used infection of apple by Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), which produces no disease symptoms, to assess the significance of host gene expression changes in disease development. We specifically asked the question of whether such asymptomatic infection is attributed to limited changes in host gene expression. Using RNA-seq, we identified a total of 184 up-regulated and 136 down-regulated genes in apple shoot cultures permanently infected by ASGV in comparison with virus-free shoot cultures. As in most plant hosts showing disease symptoms during viral infection, these differentially expressed genes encode known or putative proteins involved in cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, response to biotic and abiotic stress, development and fruit ripening, phytohormone function, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, translation, transport, and photosynthesis. Thus, global host gene expression changes do not necessarily lead to virus disease symptoms. Our data suggest that the general approaches to correlate host gene expression changes under viral infection conditions to specific disease symptom, based on the interpretation of transcription profiling data and altered individual gene functions, may have limitations depending on particular experimental systems. PMID:24736405

  3. Gene expression in liver and adipose tissue is altered during and after temporary changes to postpartum milking frequency.

    PubMed

    Grala, T M; Phyn, C V C; Kay, J K; Rius, A G; Lucy, M C; Littlejohn, M D; Snell, R G; Roche, J R

    2014-05-01

    Short-term changes to milking frequency can alter the metabolic status of dairy cows depending on the duration, magnitude, and stage of lactation at which the milking frequency changes occur. Additionally, effects of altered milking frequency that are subsequent to cows returning to a normal twice-daily (2×) milking regimen are not well established. This study tested the hypothesis that plasma concentrations of key hormones and metabolites and transcription of genes involved in the somatotropic axis and lipid metabolism would be altered in liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue from cows milked with different frequencies. Multiparous Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were allocated to 2× milking for the whole lactation, or once-(1×) or 3 times-(3×) daily milking for 3 or 6 wk, immediately postpartum, and then 2× milking for the remainder of the lactation. Liver and subcutaneous fat were biopsied at wk 1 (liver only), 3, 6, and 9 postpartum, and transcription of genes involved in the somatotropic axis and lipid metabolism were measured. At wk 3, cows milked 3× had lower hepatic expression of growth hormone receptor (GHR1A) compared with cows milked 2× or 1×, and lower IGF1 expression compared with cows milked 1×, indicating greater uncoupling of the somatotropic axis. At wk 6, reduced transcription of total GHR and GHR1B occurred in the adipose tissue of cows milked 3×. Cows milked 1× had greater transcription in adipose tissue of lipogenesis genes at wk 3 and 6, and lipolysis genes at wk 6, compared with cows milked 2×, indicating a period of increased fatty acid storage, followed by increased fatty acid reesterification. At wk 9, cows previously milked 3× for 6 wk maintained lower transcription of genes involved in lipogenesis, lipolysis, and ketolysis in adipose tissue compared with cows milked 2×, indicating that the effects of 3× milking persist for at least 3 wk after switching to 2× milking. Results indicate that alterations to milking frequency

  4. Nesfatin-1 suppresses energy intake, co-localises ghrelin in the brain and gut, and alters ghrelin, cholecystokinin and orexin mRNA expression in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, B; Unniappan, S

    2012-02-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a novel anorectic peptide encoded in the precursor protein nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). We recently reported the presence and appetite suppressing effects of nesfatin-1 in goldfish. Nesfatin-1 has been co-localised with ghrelin in the stomach of rats. Whether nesfatin-1 influences other appetite regulatory peptides in goldfish remains unclear. The main objectives of the present study were to investigate whether nesfatin-1 co-localises ghrelin in goldfish, and to test whether exogenous nesfatin-1 influences endogenous ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and orexin A (OXA). We found co-localisation of nesfatin-1-like and ghrelin-like immunoreactivity in the enteroendocrine cells of the goldfish anterior intestine (J-loop). Furthermore, co-localisation of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 was also observed in the posterior nucleus lateralis tuberis of the goldfish hypothalamus, a brain region implicated in the regulation of food intake. These findings suggest a functional relationship between ghrelin and nesfatin-1 in goldfish. In support of this, i.c.v. administration of goldfish (gf) nesfatin-1 [25 ng/g body weight (BW)], suppressed food intake and the expression of mRNAs encoding preproghrelin, ghrelin receptor (GHS-R 1a-1), CCK and NUCB2 in the forebrain of fed fish, as well as ghrelin and NUCB2 mRNA in the hypothalamus of unfed fish, both at 1 h post-injection. Nesfatin-1 stimulated hypothalamic CCK mRNA expression at 30 min post-injection in fed fish, and inhibited OXA mRNA in the unfed fish hypothalamus 1 h post-injection. Similarly, i.c.v. injections of gfghrelin (1 ng/g BW), although stimulating food intake, suppressed NUCB2 and preproghrelin mRNAs, but not ghrelin receptor mRNA expression in the forebrain. It is also evident that exogenous ghrelin and nesfatin-1 mRNAs encoding these peptides. Our novel results indicate interactions between nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, CCK and orexin, and show that nesfatin-1 acts on other appetite regulatory peptides in a time

  5. Specific Secondary Genetic Alterations in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Provide Prognostic Information Independent of the Gene Expression–Based Proliferation Signature

    PubMed Central

    Salaverria, Itziar; Zettl, Andreas; Beà, Sílvia; Moreno, Victor; Valls, Joan; Hartmann, Elena; Ott, German; Wright, George; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Grogan, Thomas M.; Delabie, Jan; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Montserrat, Emili; Muller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Staudt, Louis M.; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare the genetic relationship between cyclin D1–positive and cyclin D1–negative mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) and to determine whether specific genetic alterations may add prognostic information to survival prediction based on the proliferation signature of MCLs. Patients and Methods Seventy-one cyclin D1–positive and six cyclin D1–negative MCLs previously characterized by gene expression profiling were examined by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Results Cyclin D1–negative MCLs were genetically characterized by gains of 3q, 8q, and 15q, and losses of 1p, 8p23-pter, 9p21-pter, 11q21–q23, and 13q that were also the most common alterations in conventional MCLs. Parallel analysis of CGH aberrations and locus-specific gene expression profiles in cyclin D1–positive patients showed that chromosomal imbalances had a substantial impact on the expression levels of the genes located in the altered regions. The analysis of prognostic factors revealed that the proliferation signature, the number of chromosomal aberrations, gains of 3q, and losses of 8p, 9p, and 9q predicted survival of MCL patients. A multivariate analysis showed that the gene expression-based proliferation signature was the strongest predictor for shorter survival. However, 3q gains and 9q losses provided prognostic information that was independent of the proliferative activity. Conclusion Cyclin D1–positive and –negative MCLs share the same secondary genetic aberrations, supporting the concept that they correspond to the same genetic entity. The integration of genetic information on chromosome 3q and 9q alterations into a proliferation signature-based model may improve the ability to predict survival in patients with MCL. PMID:17296973

  6. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  7. Anomalous altered expressions of downstream gene-targets in TP53-miRNA pathways in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sanga; Mukherjee, Nupur; Das, Smarajit; Das, Pijush; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, continues to grow. Change in the expression of TP53 in HNSCC affects its downstream miRNAs and their gene targets, anomalously altering the expressions of the five genes, MEIS1, AGTR1, DTL, TYMS and BAK1. These expression alterations follow the repression of TP53 that upregulates miRNA-107, miRNA- 215, miRNA-34 b/c and miRNA-125b, but downregulates miRNA-155. The above five so far unreported genes are the targets of these miRNAs. Meta-analyses of microarray and RNA-Seq data followed by qRT-PCR validation unravel these new ones in HNSCC. The regulatory roles of TP53 on miRNA-155 and miRNA-125b differentiate the expressions of AGTR1 and BAK1in HNSCC vis-à-vis other carcinogenesis. Expression changes alter cell cycle regulation, angiogenic and blood cell formation, and apoptotic modes in affliction. Pathway analyses establish the resulting systems-level functional and mechanistic insights into the etiology of HNSCC.

  8. Soy but not bisphenol A (BPA) or the phytoestrogen genistin alters developmental weight gain and food intake in pregnant rats and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinyan; Echelberger, Roger; Liu, Min; Sluzas, Emily; McCaffrey, Katherine; Buckley, Brian; Patisaul, Heather B

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are hypothesized to promote obesity and early puberty but their interactive effects with hormonally active diets are poorly understood. Here we assessed individual and combinatorial effects of soy diet or the isoflavone genistein (GEN; administered as the aglycone genistin GIN) with bisphenol A (BPA) on body weight, ingestive behavior and female puberal onset in Wistar rats. Soy-fed dams gained less weight during pregnancy and, although they consumed more than dams on a soy-free diet during lactation, did not become heavier. Their offspring (both sexes), however, became significantly heavier (more pronounced in males) pre-weaning. Soy also enhanced food intake and accelerated female pubertal onset in the offspring. Notably, pubertal onset was also advanced in females placed on soy diet at weaning. Males exposed to BPA plus soy diet, but not BPA alone, had lighter testes. BPA had no independent effects.

  9. Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) juice intake protects against alterations to proteins involved in inflammatory and lipolysis pathways in the adipose tissue of obese mice fed a cafeteria diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity has been studied as a metabolic and an inflammatory disease and is characterized by increases in the production of pro-inflammatory adipokines in the adipose tissue. To elucidate the effects of natural dietary components on the inflammatory and metabolic consequences of obesity, we examined the effects of unripe, ripe and industrial acerola juice (Malpighia emarginata DC.) on the relevant inflammatory and lipolysis proteins in the adipose tissue of mice with cafeteria diet-induced obesity. Materials/methods Two groups of male Swiss mice were fed on a standard diet (STA) or a cafeteria diet (CAF) for 13 weeks. Afterwards, the CAF-fed animals were divided into five subgroups, each of which received a different supplement for one further month (water, unripe acerola juice, ripe acerola juice, industrial acerola juice, or vitamin C) by gavage. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blotting, a colorimetric method and histology were utilized to assess the observed data. Results The CAF water (control obese) group showed a significant increase in their adiposity indices and triacylglycerol levels, in addition to a reduced IL-10/TNF-α ratio in the adipose tissue, compared with the control lean group. In contrast, acerola juice and Vitamin C intake ameliorated the weight gain, reducing the TAG levels and increasing the IL-10/TNF-α ratio in adipose tissue. In addition, acerola juice intake led to reductions both in the level of phosphorylated JNK and to increases in the phosphorylation of IκBα and HSLser660 in adipose tissue. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that acerola juice reduces low-grade inflammation and ameliorates obesity-associated defects in the lipolytic processes. PMID:24495336

  10. Mutants of Neurospora crassa that alter gene expression and conidia development.

    PubMed Central

    Madi, L; Ebbole, D J; White, B T; Yanofsky, C

    1994-01-01

    Several genes have been identified that are highly expressed during conidiation. Inactivation of these genes has no observable phenotypic effect. Transcripts of two such genes, con-6 and con-10, are normally absent from vegetative mycelia. To identify regulatory genes that affect con-6 and/or con-10 expression, strains were prepared in which the regulatory regions for these genes were fused to a gene conferring hygromycin resistance. Mutants were then selected that were resistant to the drug during mycelial growth. Mutations in several of the isolates had trans effects; they activated transcription of the corresponding intact gene and, in most isolates, one or more of the other con genes. Most interestingly, resistant mutants were obtained that were defective at different stages of conidiation. One mutant conidiated under conditions that do not permit conidiation in wild type. Images PMID:8016143

  11. Gene-Diet Interaction between SIRT6 and Soybean Intake for Different Levels of Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kexin; Xiang, Xiao; Li, Na; Huang, Shaoping; Qin, Xueying; Wu, Yiqun; Tang, Xun; Gao, Pei; Li, Jing; Wu, Tao; Chen, Dafang; Hu, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Soybean is a common food for the Chinese people. We aimed to investigate the risk for brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) with inflammatory-related SNPs and soybean. baPWV was measured, and 16 inflammatory-related SNPs located on ADIPOQ, CDH13, SIRT3, SIRT6, CXCL12, CXCR4, NOS1, PON1 and CDKN2B were genotyped in 1749 Chinese participants recruited from various communities. ADIPOQ rs12495941 (GT/TT vs. GG: crude OR = 1.27, p = 0.044) and SIRT6 rs107251 (CT/TT vs. CC: crude OR = 0.74, p = 0.009) were associated with abnormal baPWV (baPWV ≥ 1700 cm/s). After adjustment for conventional environmental risk factors, rs12495941 was associated with abnormal baPWV (GT/TT vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.43, p = 0.011), but the association between rs107251 and abnormal baPWV was not significant (CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 0.83, p = 0.173). The interaction between rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Compared with a high level of soybean intake, a low level of soybean intake can significantly decrease the risk of abnormal baPWV in individuals of rs107251 CT/TT genotypes (≤100 vs. >100 g/week: adjusted OR = 0.542, p = 0.003). In this study, associations between ADIPOQ rs12495941, SIRT6 rs107251 and baPWV, as well as an interaction between SIRT6 rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV were found. PMID:26114387

  12. Repeated intrauterine infusions of lipopolysaccharide alter gene expression and lifespan of the bovine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Lüttgenau, J; Lingemann, B; Wellnitz, O; Hankele, A K; Schmicke, M; Ulbrich, S E; Bruckmaier, R M; Bollwein, H

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation of the uterus is associated with disturbed ovarian function and reduced reproductive performance in dairy cows. To investigate the influence of endometritis on the bovine corpus luteum, 8 heifers received intrauterine infusions with either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; 9mL) or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 3µg/kg of body weight diluted in 9mL of PBS) at 6-h intervals from 12h before and until 9d after ovulation during 2 cycles in a random order (ovulation=d 1). An untreated cycle was examined before and after PBS and LPS cycles, and the mean values from both untreated cycles were used as control. In all cycles, blood sampling and ultrasonography of the ovaries were performed on d 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18, and then every 2d until ovulation. Endometrial cells were collected for cytology and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR on d 0, 6, and 9, and on d 0 and 6, respectively, and luteal tissue was collected for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR on d 6 and 9. Both, PBS and LPS infusions induced subclinical endometritis, which was accompanied by increased endometrial mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines IL1β, IL8, and tumor necrosis factor α. Additionally, LPS challenge induced premature luteolysis, which was characterized by increased plasma concentrations of PGF2α metabolite, decreased plasma progesterone concentrations, and reduced luteal size and blood flow compared with the control. The luteal mRNA expression of the LPS receptor TLR4, PGE synthase, and the apoptosis-related factor CASP3 were higher, and those of steroidogenic factors STAR and HSD3B, the PGF receptor, and the angiogenic factor VEGFA121 were lower after LPS challenge compared with the control. In conclusion, repeated intrauterine LPS infusions during the first 9d of the estrous cycle alter gene expression and shorten the lifespan of the bovine corpus luteum. PMID:27179870

  13. Recruitment to the Nuclear Periphery Can Alter Expression of Genes in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Finlan, Lee E.; Sproul, Duncan; Thomson, Inga; Boyle, Shelagh; Kerr, Elizabeth; Perry, Paul; Ylstra, Bauke; Chubb, Jonathan R.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial organisation of the genome in the nucleus has a role in the regulation of gene expression. In vertebrates, chromosomal regions with low gene-density are located close to the nuclear periphery. Correlations have also been made between the transcriptional state of some genes and their location near the nuclear periphery. However, a crucial issue is whether this level of nuclear organisation directly affects gene function, rather than merely reflecting it. To directly investigate whether proximity to the nuclear periphery can influence gene expression in mammalian cells, here we relocate specific human chromosomes to the nuclear periphery by tethering them to a protein of the inner nuclear membrane. We show that this can reversibly suppress the expression of some endogenous human genes located near the tethering sites, and even genes further away. However, the expression of many other genes is not detectably reduced and we show that location at the nuclear periphery is not incompatible with active transcription. The dampening of gene expression around the nuclear periphery is dependent on the activity of histone deacetylases. Our data show that the radial position within the nucleus can influence the expression of some, but not all, genes. This is compatible with the suggestion that re-localisation of genes relative to the peripheral zone of the nucleus could be used by metazoans to modulate the expression of selected genes during development and differentiation. PMID:18369458

  14. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  15. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel; Vever, Henriette; Knoop, Ann S; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-12-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p < 0.05), and the gene expression alterations were confirmed using qRT-PCR. Ten of these 26 genes could be linked in a network associated with cellular proliferation, growth, and development. TFF3, which encodes for trefoil factor 3 and is an estrogen-responsive oncogene shown to play a functional role in tamoxifen resistance and metastasis of ER+ breast cancer, was also shown to be upregulated in an AI-resistant cell line model, and reduction of TFF3 levels using TFF3-specific siRNAs decreased the growth of both the AI-resistant and -sensitive parental cell lines. Moreover, overexpression of TFF3 in parental AI-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cells resulted in reduced sensitivity to the AI exemestane, whereas TFF3 overexpression had no effect on growth in the absence of exemestane, indicating that TFF3 mediates growth and survival signals that abrogate the growth inhibitory effect of exemestane. We identified a panel of 26 genes exhibiting altered expression associated with disease recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy, including TFF3, which was shown to

  16. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel; Vever, Henriette; Knoop, Ann S; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-12-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p < 0.05), and the gene expression alterations were confirmed using qRT-PCR. Ten of these 26 genes could be linked in a network associated with cellular proliferation, growth, and development. TFF3, which encodes for trefoil factor 3 and is an estrogen-responsive oncogene shown to play a functional role in tamoxifen resistance and metastasis of ER+ breast cancer, was also shown to be upregulated in an AI-resistant cell line model, and reduction of TFF3 levels using TFF3-specific siRNAs decreased the growth of both the AI-resistant and -sensitive parental cell lines. Moreover, overexpression of TFF3 in parental AI-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cells resulted in reduced sensitivity to the AI exemestane, whereas TFF3 overexpression had no effect on growth in the absence of exemestane, indicating that TFF3 mediates growth and survival signals that abrogate the growth inhibitory effect of exemestane. We identified a panel of 26 genes exhibiting altered expression associated with disease recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy, including TFF3, which was shown to

  17. Alterations in Gene Expression in Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice Lacking Niemann-Pick Type C1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, Mahua; Thinakaran, Gopal; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer’s disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-derived β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg) mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet), Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and APP

  18. Tolerance and responsive gene expression of Sogatella furcifera under extreme temperature stresses are altered by its vectored plant virus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Donglin; Zhong, Ting; Feng, Wendi; Zhou, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a newly emerged fijivirus causing great loss to rice production in eastern and southeastern Asian countries in recent years, is efficiently transmitted by a rice pest, white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent, circulative propagative manner and can be considered as an insect virus. In this study, SRBSDV infection in WBPH was found to increase the vector’s death rate under extreme cold stress but improve its survival rate under extreme heat stress. Digital gene expression profiling based on RNA-Seq revealed different gene regulation patterns in WBPH under viral and/or temperature stress. Under cold stress, the virus infection upregulated 1540 genes and downregulated 131 genes in the insect, most of which were related to membrane properties and biological processes of actin and cytoskeleton; whereas under heat stress, it upregulated 363 genes and downregulated 548 genes, most of which were associated to metabolism and intracellular organelles. Several types of stress-responsive genes involving intestinal mucin, cuticle protein, ubiquitin protease, immune response, RNA interference and heat shock response, were largely upregulated under cold stress, but largely downregulated under heat stress, by SRBSDV infection. Our results suggest two distinct mechanisms of virus-altered vector insect tolerance to temperature stress. PMID:27531640

  19. Tolerance and responsive gene expression of Sogatella furcifera under extreme temperature stresses are altered by its vectored plant virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Donglin; Zhong, Ting; Feng, Wendi; Zhou, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a newly emerged fijivirus causing great loss to rice production in eastern and southeastern Asian countries in recent years, is efficiently transmitted by a rice pest, white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent, circulative propagative manner and can be considered as an insect virus. In this study, SRBSDV infection in WBPH was found to increase the vector's death rate under extreme cold stress but improve its survival rate under extreme heat stress. Digital gene expression profiling based on RNA-Seq revealed different gene regulation patterns in WBPH under viral and/or temperature stress. Under cold stress, the virus infection upregulated 1540 genes and downregulated 131 genes in the insect, most of which were related to membrane properties and biological processes of actin and cytoskeleton; whereas under heat stress, it upregulated 363 genes and downregulated 548 genes, most of which were associated to metabolism and intracellular organelles. Several types of stress-responsive genes involving intestinal mucin, cuticle protein, ubiquitin protease, immune response, RNA interference and heat shock response, were largely upregulated under cold stress, but largely downregulated under heat stress, by SRBSDV infection. Our results suggest two distinct mechanisms of virus-altered vector insect tolerance to temperature stress. PMID:27531640

  20. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fabricio G.; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N.; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H.G.; Doroshow, James H.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters. PMID:25758781

  1. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fabricio G; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H G; Doroshow, James H; Reinhold, William C; Pommier, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters.

  2. cDNA microarray reveals the alterations of cytoskeleton-related genes in osteoblast under high magneto-gravitational environment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Airong; Di, Shengmeng; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Zongcheng; Li, Jingbao; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Pengfei; Yin, Dachuan; Shang, Peng

    2009-07-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:19578720

  3. Morquio A Syndrome-Associated Mutations: A Review of Alterations in the GALNS Gene and a New Locus-Specific Database

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, Amelia; Caciotti, Anna; Atwood, Robert; Davidson, Kathryn; Du, Chaoyi; Francis-Lyon, Patricia; Harmatz, Paul; Mealiffe, Matthew; Mooney, Sean; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Ryles, April; Zawadzki, Karl A; Miller, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from deficient activity of the enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) due to alterations in the GALNS gene, which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and effects on multiple organ systems. The GALNS alterations associated with Morquio A are numerous and heterogeneous, and new alterations are continuously identified. To aid detection and interpretation of GALNS alterations, from previously published research, we provide a comprehensive and up-to-date listing of 277 unique GALNS alterations associated with Morquio A identified from 1,091 published GALNS alleles. In agreement with previous findings, most reported GALNS alterations are missense changes and even the most frequent alterations are relatively uncommon. We found that 48% of patients are assessed as homozygous for a GALNS alteration, 39% are assessed as heterozygous for two identified GALNS alterations, and in 13% of patients only one GALNS alteration is detected. We report here the creation of a locus-specific database for the GALNS gene (http://galns.mutdb.org/) that catalogs all reported alterations in GALNS to date. We highlight the challenges both in alteration detection and genotype–phenotype interpretation caused in part by the heterogeneity of GALNS alterations and provide recommendations for molecular testing of GALNS. PMID:25137622

  4. Alteration of gene expression in human middle ear epithelial cells induced by influenza A virus and its implication for the pathogenesis of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hua Hua; Long, James P; Li, Daneng; DeMaria, Thomas F

    2004-10-01

    Influenza A virus infection plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced acute otitis media in children. An understanding of how influenza A virus modulates host cellular responses is critically important in efforts to explore the molecular mechanisms of this synergism. We used microarray technology to characterize the mRNA expression profile in human middle ear epithelial cells induced by influenza A virus. Alterations of mRNA expression in 142 out of approximately 12,600 genes were observed at 24h after virus infection. Of these 142 genes with altered expression, interferon inducible genes, chemokine and cytokine genes, pro- and antiapoptotic genes, signal transduction and transcription factors, cellular immune response, cell cycle and metabolism genes were the most prominent. Our results reveal several previously unknown alterations of host gene expression induced by influenza A virus which may provide new targets for further analysis of its role in this particular host-pathogen interaction.

  5. Alterations in gene expression during fasting-induced atresia of early secondary ovarian follicles of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoji; Luckenbach, J Adam; Young, Graham; Swanson, Penny

    2016-11-01

    Molecular processes that either regulate ovarian atresia or are consequences of atresia are poorly understood in teleost fishes. We hypothesized that feed restriction that perturbs normal ovarian growth and induces follicular atresia would alter ovarian gene expression patterns. Previtellogenic, two-year old coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were subjected to prolonged fasting to induce atresia or maintained on a normal feeding schedule that would promote continued ovarian development. To identify genes that were specifically up- or down-regulated during oocyte growth in healthy, growing fish compared to fasted fish, reciprocal suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries were generated using ovaries from fed and fasted animals. Differential expression of genes identified by SSH was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The SSH library representing genes elevated in ovaries of fed fish relative to those of fasted fish contained steroidogenesis-related genes (e.g., hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase), Tgf-beta superfamily members (e.g., anti-Mullerian hormone) and cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins (e.g., type I keratin s8). Overall, these genes were associated with steroid production, cell proliferation and differentiation, and ovarian epithelialization. The library representing genes elevated in ovaries of fasted fish relative to fed fish contained genes associated with apoptosis (e.g., programmed cell death protein 4), cortical alveoli (e.g., alveolin), the zona pellucida (e.g., zona pellucida protein c), and microtubules (e.g., microtubule associated protein tau). Elevated expression of this suite of genes was likely associated with the initiation of atresia and/or a reduced rate of follicle development in response to fasting. This study revealed ovarian genes involved in normal early secondary oocyte growth and potential early markers of atresia.

  6. Alterations in gene expression during fasting-induced atresia of early secondary ovarian follicles of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoji; Luckenbach, J Adam; Young, Graham; Swanson, Penny

    2016-11-01

    Molecular processes that either regulate ovarian atresia or are consequences of atresia are poorly understood in teleost fishes. We hypothesized that feed restriction that perturbs normal ovarian growth and induces follicular atresia would alter ovarian gene expression patterns. Previtellogenic, two-year old coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were subjected to prolonged fasting to induce atresia or maintained on a normal feeding schedule that would promote continued ovarian development. To identify genes that were specifically up- or down-regulated during oocyte growth in healthy, growing fish compared to fasted fish, reciprocal suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries were generated using ovaries from fed and fasted animals. Differential expression of genes identified by SSH was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The SSH library representing genes elevated in ovaries of fed fish relative to those of fasted fish contained steroidogenesis-related genes (e.g., hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase), Tgf-beta superfamily members (e.g., anti-Mullerian hormone) and cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins (e.g., type I keratin s8). Overall, these genes were associated with steroid production, cell proliferation and differentiation, and ovarian epithelialization. The library representing genes elevated in ovaries of fasted fish relative to fed fish contained genes associated with apoptosis (e.g., programmed cell death protein 4), cortical alveoli (e.g., alveolin), the zona pellucida (e.g., zona pellucida protein c), and microtubules (e.g., microtubule associated protein tau). Elevated expression of this suite of genes was likely associated with the initiation of atresia and/or a reduced rate of follicle development in response to fasting. This study revealed ovarian genes involved in normal early secondary oocyte growth and potential early markers of atresia. PMID:27320185

  7. Identification of germline alterations in breast cancer predisposition genes among Malaysian breast cancer patients using panel testing.

    PubMed

    Ng, P S; Wen, W X; Fadlullah, M Z H; Yoon, S Y; Lee, S Y; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Mohd Taib, N A; Teo, S H

    2016-10-01

    Although an association between protein-truncating variants and breast cancer risk has been established for 11 genes, only alterations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PALB2 have been reported in Asian populations. Given that the age of onset of breast cancer is lower in Asians, it is estimated that inherited predisposition to breast cancer may be more significant. To determine the potential utility of panel testing, we investigated the prevalence of germline alterations in 11 established and 4 likely breast cancer genes in a cross-sectional hospital-based cohort of 108 moderate to high-risk breast cancer patients using targeted next generation sequencing. Twenty patients (19%) were identified to carry deleterious mutations, of whom 13 (12%) were in the BRCA1 or BRCA2, 6 (6%) were in five other known breast cancer predisposition genes and 1 patient had a mutation in both BRCA2 and BARD1. Our study shows that BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for the majority of genetic predisposition to breast cancer in our cohort of Asian women. Although mutations in other known breast cancer genes are found, the functional significance and breast cancer risk have not yet been determined, thus limiting the clinical utility of panel testing in Asian populations. PMID:26757417

  8. Genetic alterations of chromosomes, p53 and p16 genes in low- and high-grade bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    ABAT, DENIZ; DEMIRHAN, OSMAN; INANDIKLIOGLU, NIHAL; TUNC, ERDAL; ERDOGAN, SEYDA; TASTEMIR, DENIZ; USLU, INAYET NUR; TANSUG, ZUHTU

    2014-01-01

    A majority of patients with bladder cancer present with superficial disease and subsequently, some patients show progression to muscle invasive or metastatic disease. Bladder cancer has a complex genetic process and identification of the genetic alterations which occur during progression may lead to the understanding of the nature of the disease and provide the possibility of early treatment. The aim of the present study was to compare the structural and numerical chromosomal differences and changes in the p16 and p53 genes between low-grade (LG) and high-grade (HG) bladder cancer (BC) using cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic methods. Between March 2009 and March 2010, cytogenetic analyses were carried out on tumor and blood samples in 34 patients with transitional cell type BC, and on blood samples of 34 healthy patients as a control group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the p16 and p53 genes were also used to screen the alterations in these genes in 32 patients with BC. The patients were divided into two groups (LG and HG) and the findings were compared. A total of 11 (32.3%) patients exhibited LGBC, 22 (64.7%) exhibited HGBC and one (3%) patient exhibited carcinoma in situ. There were no differences between the LGBC and HGBC groups according to the number of chromosomal aberrations (P=0.714); however, differences between alterations of the p16 and p53 genes were significant (P=0.002 and P=0.039). Almost all structural abnormalities were found to be located to the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions in patients with HG tumors. In conclusion, the p16 and p53 genes were altered more prominently in patients with HG tumors compared with LG tumors. The structural abnormalities in the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions were observed more frequently in patients with HG tumors. These regions may play significant roles in the progression of BC, but further studies are required to find candidate genes for a panel of BC. PMID:24959214

  9. Early and sustained altered expression of aging-related genes in young 3xTg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, V; D'Aurora, M; Granzotto, A; Stuppia, L; Sensi, S L

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurological condition associated with a genetic profile that is still not completely understood. In this study, using a whole gene microarray approach, we investigated age-dependent gene expression profile changes occurring in the hippocampus of young and old transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) and wild-type (WT) mice. The aim of the study was to assess similarities between aging- and AD-related modifications of gene expression and investigate possible interactions between the two processes. Global gene expression profiles of hippocampal tissue obtained from 3xTg-AD and WT mice at 3 and 12 months of age (m.o.a.) were analyzed by hierarchical clustering. Interaction among transcripts was then studied with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software, a tool that discloses functional networks and/or pathways associated with sets of specific genes of interest. Cluster analysis revealed the selective presence of hundreds of upregulated and downregulated transcripts. Functional analysis showed transcript involvement mainly in neuronal death and autophagy, mitochondrial functioning, intracellular calcium homeostasis, inflammatory response, dendritic spine formation, modulation of synaptic functioning, and cognitive decline. Thus, overexpression of AD-related genes (such as mutant APP, PS1, and hyperphosphorylated tau, the three genes that characterize our model) appears to favor modifications of additional genes that are involved in AD development and progression. The study also showed overlapping changes in 3xTg-AD at 3 m.o.a. and WT mice at 12 m.o.a., thereby suggesting altered expression of aging-related genes that occurs earlier in 3xTg-AD mice. PMID:24525730

  10. Altered gene expression in the brain and liver of female fathead minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to fadrozole

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Larkin, Patrick; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2008-06-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a small fish species widely used for ecotoxicology research and regulatory testing in North America. This study used a novel 2000 gene oligonucleotide microarray to evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on gene expression in the liver and brain tissue of exposed females. Exposure to 60 μg 1-1 fadrozole/L for 7 d, resulted in the significant (p<0.05; high-moderate agreement among multiple probes spotted on the array) up-regulation of approximately 47 genes in brain and 188 in liver, and the significant down-regulation of 61 genes in brain and 162 in liver. In particular, fadrozole exposure elicited significant up-regulation of five genes in brain involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and altered the expression of over a dozen cytoskeleton-related genes. In the liver, there was notable down-regulation of genes coding for vitellogenin precursors, vigillin, and fibroin-like ovulatory proteins which were consistent with an expected reduction in plasma estradiol concentrations as a result of fadrozole exposure and an associated reduction in measured plasma vitellogenin concentrations. These changes coincided with a general down-regulation of genes coding for non-mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and proteins that play a role in translation. With the exception of the fibroin-like ovulatory proteins, real-time PCR results largely corroborated the microarray responses. Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  11. Expression of ras oncogenes in cultured human cells alters the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cytokine genes.

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, G D; Ernst, T J; Pratt, E S; Zenzie, B W; Rheinwald, J G; Griffin, J D

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous production of cytokines such as the hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), IL-1, or IL-6 has been demonstrated in numerous human and murine neoplasms, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of several paraneoplastic syndromes such as leukocytosis, fever, and hypercalcemia. Because of the high frequency with which mutations in ras protooncogenes have been detected in human tumors, as well as evidence linking ras gene products to activation of certain cellular functions, we investigated whether ras mutations might influence the regulation of cytokine genes. Normal human fibroblasts transfected with a mutant val12 H-ras oncogene expressed increased levels of mRNA transcripts encoding granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), and IL-1 beta compared with controls. Human mesothelioma cells transfected with a mutant asp12 N-ras oncogene exhibited similar alterations in cytokine gene expression. Estimates of transcriptional activity by nuclear run-on analysis revealed a selective increase in transcription only for the IL-1 gene. Analysis of mRNA half-life demonstrated a marked increase in the stability of numerous cytokine transcripts, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1, and IL-6. The addition of anti-IL-1 neutralizing antibody to cultures of cells expressing ras mutants did not block the expression of any of the cytokines examined, suggesting that the baseline expression of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-6 was not a secondary event due to the increased transcription of IL-1. These results indicate that mutations in ras genes may alter expression of several cytokine genes through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Images PMID:2212010

  12. A single generation of domestication heritably alters the expression of hundreds of genes

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Mark R.; Marine, Melanie L.; Fox, Samuel E.; French, Rod A.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic underpinnings associated with the earliest stages of plant and animal domestication have remained elusive. Because a genome-wide response to selection can take many generations, the earliest detectable changes associated with domestication may first manifest as heritable changes to global patterns of gene expression. Here, to test this hypothesis, we measured differential gene expression in the offspring of wild and first-generation hatchery steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared in a common environment. Remarkably, we find that there were 723 genes differentially expressed between the two groups of offspring. Reciprocal crosses reveal that the differentially expressed genes could not be explained by maternal effects or by chance differences in the background levels of gene expression among unrelated families. Gene-enrichment analyses reveal that adaptation to the novel hatchery environment involved responses in wound healing, immunity and metabolism. These findings suggest that the earliest stages of domestication may involve adaptation to highly crowded conditions. PMID:26883375

  13. A single generation of domestication heritably alters the expression of hundreds of genes.

    PubMed

    Christie, Mark R; Marine, Melanie L; Fox, Samuel E; French, Rod A; Blouin, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The genetic underpinnings associated with the earliest stages of plant and animal domestication have remained elusive. Because a genome-wide response to selection can take many generations, the earliest detectable changes associated with domestication may first manifest as heritable changes to global patterns of gene expression. Here, to test this hypothesis, we measured differential gene expression in the offspring of wild and first-generation hatchery steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared in a common environment. Remarkably, we find that there were 723 genes differentially expressed between the two groups of offspring. Reciprocal crosses reveal that the differentially expressed genes could not be explained by maternal effects or by chance differences in the background levels of gene expression among unrelated families. Gene-enrichment analyses reveal that adaptation to the novel hatchery environment involved responses in wound healing, immunity and metabolism. These findings suggest that the earliest stages of domestication may involve adaptation to highly crowded conditions.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analysis on the alteration of gene expression in ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) larvae associated with salinity change

    PubMed Central

    LU, Xin-Jiang; ZHANG, Hao; YANG, Guan-Jun; LI, Ming-Yun; CHEN, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) fish, which are an amphidromous species distributed in East Asia, live in brackish water (BW) during their larval stage and in fresh water (FW) during their adult stage. In this study, we found that FW-acclimated ayu larvae exhibited a slower growth ratio compared with that of BW-acclimated larvae. However, the mechanism underlying FW acclimation on growth suppression is poorly known. We employed transcriptome analysis to investigate the differential gene expression of FW acclimation by RNA sequencing. We identified 158 upregulated and 139 downregulated transcripts in FW-acclimated ayu larvae compared with that in BW-acclimated larvae. As determined by Gene Ontology annotation and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway mapping, functional annotation of the genes covered diverse biological functions and processes, and included neuroendocrinology, osmotic regulation, energy metabolism, and the cytoskeleton. Transcriptional expression of several differentially expressed genes in response to FW acclimation was further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. In accordance with transcriptome analysis, iodothyronine deiodinase (ID), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1 (BHMT), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase B (aldolase B), tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), and Na+-K+ ATPase (NKA) were upregulated after FW acclimation. Furthermore, the mRNA expressions of b-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and transgelin were downregulated after FW acclimation. Our data indicate that FW acclimation reduced the growth rate of ayu larvae, which might result from the expression alteration of genes related to endocrine hormones, energy metabolism, and direct osmoregulation. PMID:27265650

  15. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in the Drinking Water Alters the Expression of Immune Response Genes in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kozul, Courtney D.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Davey, Jennifer C.; Gosse, Julie A.; Nomikos, Athena P.; Eisenhauer, Phillip L.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Thorpe, Jessica E.; Ihnat, Michael A.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to drinking water arsenic is a significant worldwide environmental health concern. Exposure to As is associated with an increased risk of lung disease, which may make it a unique toxicant, because lung toxicity is usually associated with inhalation rather than ingestion. Objectives The goal of this study was to examine mRNA and protein expression changes in the lungs of mice exposed chronically to environmentally relevant concentrations of As in the food or drinking water, specifically examining the hypothesis that As may preferentially affect gene and protein expression related to immune function as part of its mechanism of toxicant action. Methods C57BL/6J mice fed a casein-based AIN-76A defined diet were exposed to 10 or 100 ppb As in drinking water or food for 5–6 weeks. Results Whole genome transcriptome profiling of animal lungs revealed significant alterations in the expression of many genes with functions in cell adhesion and migration, channels, receptors, differentiation and proliferation, and, most strikingly, aspects of the innate immune response. Confirmation of mRNA and protein expression changes in key genes of this response revealed that genes for interleukin 1β, interleukin 1 receptor, a number of toll-like receptors, and several cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly altered in the lungs of As-exposed mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that chronic low-dose As exposure at the current U.S. drinking-water standard can elicit effects on the regulation of innate immunity, which may contribute to altered disease risk, particularly in lung. PMID:19654921

  16. Altered Gene Transcription in Human Cells Treated with Ludox® Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Fede, Caterina; Millino, Caterina; Pacchioni, Beniamina; Celegato, Barbara; Compagnin, Chiara; Martini, Paolo; Selvestrel, Francesco; Mancin, Fabrizio; Celotti, Lucia; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Mognato, Maddalena; Cagnin, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have found extensive applications in industrial manufacturing, biomedical and biotechnological fields. Therefore, the increasing exposure to such ultrafine particles requires studies to characterize their potential cytotoxic effects in order to provide exhaustive information to assess the impact of nanomaterials on human health. The understanding of the biological processes involved in the development and maintenance of a variety of pathologies is improved by genome-wide approaches, and in this context, gene set analysis has emerged as a fundamental tool for the interpretation of the results. In this work we show how the use of a combination of gene-by-gene and gene set analyses can enhance the interpretation of results of in vitro treatment of A549 cells with Ludox® colloidal amorphous silica nanoparticles. By gene-by-gene and gene set analyses, we evidenced a specific cell response in relation to NPs size and elapsed time after treatment, with the smaller NPs (SM30) having higher impact on inflammatory and apoptosis processes than the bigger ones. Apoptotic process appeared to be activated by the up-regulation of the initiator genes TNFa and IL1b and by ATM. Moreover, our analyses evidenced that cell treatment with Ludox® silica nanoparticles activated the matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP1, MMP10 and MMP9. The information derived from this study can be informative about the cytotoxicity of Ludox® and other similar colloidal amorphous silica NPs prepared by solution processes. PMID:25170680

  17. Single Gene Deletions of Orexin, Leptin, Neuropeptide Y, and Ghrelin Do Not Appreciably Alter Food Anticipatory Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gunapala, Keith M.; Gallardo, Christian M.; Hsu, Cynthia T.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Timing activity to match resource availability is a widely conserved ability in nature. Scheduled feeding of a limited amount of food induces increased activity prior to feeding time in animals as diverse as fish and rodents. Typically, food anticipatory activity (FAA) involves temporally restricting unlimited food access (RF) to several hours in the middle of the light cycle, which is a time of day when rodents are not normally active. We compared this model to calorie restriction (CR), giving the mice 60% of their normal daily calorie intake at the same time each day. Measurement of body temperature and home cage behaviors suggests that the RF and CR models are very similar but CR has the advantage of a clearly defined food intake and more stable mean body temperature. Using the CR model, we then attempted to verify the published result that orexin deletion diminishes food anticipatory activity (FAA) but observed little to no diminution in the response to CR and, surprisingly, that orexin KO mice are refractory to body weight loss on a CR diet. Next we tested the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormone, leptin, using mouse mutants. NPY deletion did not alter the behavior or physiological response to CR. Leptin deletion impaired FAA in terms of some activity measures, such as walking and rearing, but did not substantially diminish hanging behavior preceding feeding time, suggesting that leptin knockout mice do anticipate daily meal time but do not manifest the full spectrum of activities that typify FAA. Ghrelin knockout mice do not have impaired FAA on a CR diet. Collectively, these results suggest that the individual hormones and neuropepetides tested do not regulate FAA by acting individually but this does not rule out the possibility of their concerted action in mediating FAA. PMID:21464907

  18. Mutation of the RDR1 gene caused genome-wide changes in gene expression, regional variation in small RNA clusters and localized alteration in DNA methylation in rice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous small (sm) RNAs (primarily si- and miRNAs) are important trans/cis-acting regulators involved in diverse cellular functions. In plants, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are essential for smRNA biogenesis. It has been established that RDR2 is involved in the 24 nt siRNA-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recent studies have suggested that RDR1 is involved in a second RdDM pathway that relies mostly on 21 nt smRNAs and functions to silence a subset of genomic loci that are usually refractory to the normal RdDM pathway in Arabidopsis. Whether and to what extent the homologs of RDR1 may have similar functions in other plants remained unknown. Results We characterized a loss-of-function mutant (Osrdr1) of the OsRDR1 gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) derived from a retrotransposon Tos17 insertion. Microarray analysis identified 1,175 differentially expressed genes (5.2% of all expressed genes in the shoot-tip tissue of rice) between Osrdr1 and WT, of which 896 and 279 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively, in Osrdr1. smRNA sequencing revealed regional alterations in smRNA clusters across the rice genome. Some of the regions with altered smRNA clusters were associated with changes in DNA methylation. In addition, altered expression of several miRNAs was detected in Osrdr1, and at least some of which were associated with altered expression of predicted miRNA target genes. Despite these changes, no phenotypic difference was identified in Osrdr1 relative to WT under normal condition; however, ephemeral phenotypic fluctuations occurred under some abiotic stress conditions. Conclusions Our results showed that OsRDR1 plays a role in regulating a substantial number of endogenous genes with diverse functions in rice through smRNA-mediated pathways involving DNA methylation, and which participates in abiotic stress response. PMID:24980094

  19. Methylome analysis reveals alterations in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of left ventricle development genes in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Bong-Seok; Koh, In-Uk; Bae, Jae-Bum; Yu, Ho-Yeong; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Lee, Hae-Young; Kim, Jae-Joong; Choi, Murim; Choi, Sun Shim

    2016-08-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is one of the main causes of heart failure (called cardiomyopathies) in adults. Alterations in epigenetic regulation (i.e., DNA methylation) have been implicated in the development of DCM. Here, we identified a total of 1828 differentially methylated probes (DMPs) using the Infinium 450K HumanMethylation Bead chip by comparing the methylomes between 18 left ventricles and 9 right ventricles. Alterations in DNA methylation levels were observed mainly in lowly methylated regions corresponding to promoter-proximal regions, which become hypermethylated in severely affected left ventricles. Subsequent mRNA microarray analysis showed that the effect of DNA methylation on gene expression regulation is not unidirectional but is controlled by the functional sub-network context. DMPs were significantly enriched in the transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) we tested. Alterations in DNA methylation were specifically enriched in the cis-regulatory regions of cardiac development genes, the majority of which are involved in ventricular development (e.g., TBX5 and HAND1).

  20. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters expression of neurogenesis-related genes in an ex vivo cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christina R; Allan, Andrea M

    2014-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to long-lasting changes in functional and genetic programs of the brain, which may underlie behavioral alterations seen in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Aberrant fetal programming during gestational alcohol exposure is a possible mechanism by which alcohol imparts teratogenic effects on the brain; however, current methods used to investigate the effects of alcohol on development often rely on either direct application of alcohol in vitro or acute high doses in vivo. In this study, we used our established moderate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) model, resulting in maternal blood alcohol content of approximately 20 mM, and subsequent ex vivo cell culture to assess expression of genes related to neurogenesis. Proliferating and differentiating neural progenitor cell culture conditions were established from telencephalic tissue derived from embryonic day (E) 15-17 tissue exposed to alcohol via maternal drinking throughout pregnancy. Gene expression analysis on mRNA derived in vitro was performed using a microarray, and quantitative PCR was conducted for genes to validate the microarray. Student's t tests were performed for statistical comparison of each exposure under each culture condition using a 95% confidence interval. Eleven percent of genes on the array had significantly altered mRNA expression in the prenatal alcohol-exposed neural progenitor culture under proliferating conditions. These include reduced expression of Adora2a, Cxcl1, Dlg4, Hes1, Nptx1, and Vegfa and increased expression of Fgf13, Ndn, and Sox3; bioinformatics analysis indicated that these genes are involved in cell growth and proliferation. Decreased levels of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a were also found under proliferating conditions. Under differentiating conditions, 7.3% of genes had decreased mRNA expression; these include Cdk5rap3, Gdnf, Hey2, Heyl, Pard6b, and Ptn, which are associated with survival and differentiation as indicated by bioinformatics analysis

  1. Intake of Red Wine in Different Meals Modulates Oxidized LDL Level, Oxidative and Inflammatory Gene Expression in Healthy People: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Di Renzo, Laura; Valente, Roberto; Colica, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have found that adherence to the Mediterranean Diet, including consumption of red wine, is associated with beneficial effects on oxidative and inflammatory conditions. We evaluate the outcome of consumption of a McDonald's Meal (McD) and a Mediterranean Meal (MM), with and without the additive effect of red wine, in order to ascertain whether the addition of the latter has a positive impact on oxidized (ox-) LDL and on expression of oxidat