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Sample records for integral thermonuclear neutronics

  1. Thermonuclear runaways on neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermonuclear runaways which develop when neutron stars of 0.476 solar masses accrete hydrogen-rich material at 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year have been followed using a numerical model. It is found that a thermal instability occurs at densities in excess of 10 to the 5th g/cu cm and that the maximum accumulated mass required to initiate the runaway is 0.7 x 10 to the -12th and 2.1 x 10 to the -12th solar masses for the mass accretion rates of 10 to the -10th and 2 x 10 to the -9th solar masses/year, respectively. Heating the of the neutron star envelope by hydrogen burning leads to the ignition of helium. The nonequilibrium burning of helium by a combination of (alpha, p), (p, gamma), and (alpha, gamma) reactions involving O-14, O-15, and other heavy nuclei provides the energy for an X-ray burst. The gross properties of these models bear suggestive resemblance to those observed for some X-ray burst sources.

  2. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Supid

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes neutron stars and thermonuclear x ray bursts. The contents include: 1) Neutron Stars: why do we care?; 2) Thermonuclear Bursts: why do we care?; 3) Neutron Stars: Mass, Radius and Spin: a. Continuum Spectroscopy of Bursts b. Spectral Lines from Bursts c. Timing Properties of Bursts; 4) Neutron Star Atmosphere: Thermonuclear Flame Spreading; and 5) Future Prospects and Conclusions.

  3. Probing thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, L.

    2008-12-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact stars that can be directly observed, which makes them ideal laboratories to study physics at extreme densities. Neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries accrete hydrogen and helium from a lower-mass companion star through Roche lobe overflow. This matter undergoes thermonuclear burning in the neutron star envelope, creating carbon and heavier elements. The fusion process may proceed in an unstable manner, resulting in a thermonuclear runaway. Within one second the entire surface is burned, which is observable as a sharp rise in the emitted X-ray flux: a type I X-ray burst. Afterwards the neutron star surface cools down on a timescale of ten to one hundred seconds. During these bursts the surface of an accreting neutron star can be observed directly, which makes them instrumental for studying this type of stars. We have studied rare kinds of X-ray bursts. One such rare burst is the superburst, which lasts a thousand times longer than an ordinary burst. Superbursts are thought to result from the explosive burning of a thick carbon layer, which lies deeper inside the neutron star, close to a layer known as the crust. A prerequisite for the occurrence of a superburst is a high enough temperature, which is set by the temperature of the crust and the heat conductivity of the envelope. The latter is lowered by the presence of heavy elements that are produced during normal X-ray bursts. Using a large set of observations from the Wide Field Camera's onboard the BeppoSAX satellite, we find that, at high accretion rate, sources which do not exhibit normal bursts likely have a longer superburst recurrence time, than the observed superburst recurrence time of one burster. We analyze in detail the first superburst from a transient source, which went into outburst only 55 days before the superburst. Recent models of the neutron star crust predict that this is too small a time to heat the crust sufficiently for superburst ignition, indicating

  4. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  5. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  6. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  7. X-ray bursts and neutron-star thermonuclear flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a model concerning the production of X-ray bursts by thermonuclear flashes in the freshly accreted matter near the surface of an accreting neutron star. An investigation is conducted regarding the physical processes relevant to such thermonuclear flashes. It is concluded that thermonuclear flashes may account for some, but not all, of the observed X-ray burst sources. Attention is given to a neutron star undergoing accretion of mass from a binary stellar companion, aspects of energetics, nuclear reactions, and heat transport mechanisms.

  8. Thermonuclear Burning as a Probe of Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a fundamental process taking place in the matter transferred onto neutron stars in accreting binary systems. The heat deposited by nuclear reactions becomes readily visible in the X-ray band when the burning is either unstable or marginally stable, and results in the rich phenomenology of X-ray bursts, superbursts, and mHz quasiperiodic oscillations. Fast X-ray timing observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) over the past decade have revealed a wealth of new phenomena associated with thermonuclear burning on neutron stars, including the discovery of nuclear powered pulsations during X-ray bursts and superbursts. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these new phenomena, with an emphasis on recent findings, and discuss what they are telling us about the structure of neutron stars.

  9. Thermonuclear Burning as a Probe of Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a fundamental process taking place in the matter transferred onto neutron stars in accreting binary systems. The heat deposited by nuclear reactions becomes readily visible in the X-ray band when the burning is either unstable or marginally stable, and results in the rich phenomenology of X-ray bursts, superbursts, and mHz quasiperiodic oscillations. Fast X-ray timing observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) over the past decade have revealed a wealth of new phenomena associated with thermonuclear burning on neutron stars, including the discovery of nuclear powered pulsations during X-ray bursts and superbursts. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these new phenomena, with an emphasis on recent findings, and discuss what they are telling us about the structure of neutron stars.

  10. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S. G.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one dimensional hydrodynamic computer code was used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes of 1.0 Msub solar neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. Simulations produce outbursts which last from about 750 seconds to about one week. Peak effective temeratures and luninosities were 26 million K and 80 thousand Lsub solar for the 10 km study and 5.3 millison and 600 Lsub solar for the 20 km study. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting about one ten thousandth seconds.

  11. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts lasting from approximately 750 seconds to approximately one week. The peak effective temperatures and luminosities are 2.6 x 10 to the 7th K and 8 x 10 to the 4th solar luminosities for the 10 km study and 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 600 solar luminosities for the 20 km study. It is found that hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting approximately 0.0001 second. The study assumes that the bursters and transient X-ray sources occur as a result of mass transfer from a secondary onto a neutron star in a fashion analogous to the nova phenomena. The peak temperatures and luminosities are found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the neutron stars and the calculations here, together with those in the literature, indicate that the actual radii of most neutron stars must be closer to 10 km than 20 km.

  12. Relativistic outflow from two thermonuclear shell flashes on neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, J. J. M.; Keek, L.; Cavecchi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    We study the exceptionally short (32-43 ms) precursors of two intermediate-duration thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from the neutron stars in 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549. They exhibit photon fluxes that surpass those at the Eddington limit later in the burst by factors of 2.6 to 3.1. We are able to explain both the short duration and the super-Eddington flux by mildly relativistic outflow velocities of 0.1c to 0.3c subsequent to the thermonuclear shell flashes on the neutron stars. These are the highest velocities ever measured from any thermonuclear flash. The precursor rise times are also exceptionally short: about 1 ms. This is inconsistent with predictions for nuclear flames spreading laterally as deflagrations and suggests detonations instead. This is the first time that a detonation is suggested for such a shallow ignition column depth (yign ≈ 1010 g cm-2). The detonation would possibly require a faster nuclear reaction chain, such as bypassing the α-capture on 12C with the much faster 12C(p,γ)13N(α,p)16O process previously proposed. We confirm the possibility of a detonation, albeit only in the radial direction, through the simulation of the nuclear burning with a large nuclear network and at the appropriate ignition depth, although it remains to be seen whether the Zel'dovich criterion is met. A detonation would also provide the fast flame spreading over the surface of the neutron star to allow for the short rise times. This needs to be supported by future two-dimensional calculations of flame spreading at the relevant column depth. As an alternative to the detonation scenario, we speculate on the possibility that the whole neutron star surface burns almost instantly in the auto-ignition regime. This is motivated by the presence of 150 ms precursors with 30 ms rise times in some superexpansion bursts from 4U 1820-30 at low ignition column depths of ~108 g cm-2.

  13. Thermonuclear processes on accreting neutron stars - A systematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayasli, S.; Joss, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    A series of model calculations for the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star is carried out. The neutron star mass, radius, core temperature, and surface magnetic field strength are systematically varied, as are the accretion rate onto the neutron star surface and the metallicity of the accreting matter, in order to determine the effects of these parameters on the properties of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers and the emitted X-ray bursts that result from such flashes. The core temperatures required for thermal equilibrium are found to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than estimated in earlier work. Owing to the effects of the gravitational redshift, the emitted X-ray bursts have lower peak luminosities and longer durations than those calculated in the Newtonian approximation. The entrainment of hydrogen into helium flashes can cause the flashes to exhibit a rather wide range of observable effects and can decrease by a factor of more than 2 the ratio of persistent accretion-driven luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity emitted by the neutron star.

  14. Search for thermonuclear neutrons in a mega-ampere plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Scholz, M.; Kalinowska, Z.; Bienkowska, B.; Karpinski, L.; Kortanek, J.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Tomaszewski, K.; Zielinska, E.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma focus experiments were carried out at a modified PF-1000 where the cathode disc was added in front of the anode. Experimental results indicated a fraction of thermonuclear neutrons on the mega-ampere current level. In order to prove the thermonuclear mechanism, the time of neutron production and the neutron energy spectrum were measured by time-of-flight (TOF) diagnostics. Neutron TOF signals showed that the neutron production was a multiphase process and more than one mechanism occurred simultaneously. The occurrence of the thermonuclear mechanism was most evident during the plasma stagnation at low deuterium pressures. At low filling pressures, the narrow width of the neutron energy spectra demonstrated an ion temperature of about 1 keV. The possibility of thermonuclear neutrons was studied also after the stagnation, during the main neutron emission. In this case, the thermonuclear mechanism could be verified by calculating the number of deuterons that participate in the fusion process. For the bulk of thermonuclear plasmas, a significant fraction of plasma should participate in fusion. Finally, the basic consideration of the thermonuclear mechanism in Z-pinches showed the reasonableness of the MagLIF concept.

  15. A fast neutron spectrum unfolding method using activation measurements and its application to restoration of a thermonuclear reactor blanket neutron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. M.; Shkurpelov, A. A.; Zagryadsky, V. A.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.; Shmonin, Yu. V.

    1982-12-01

    This article describes a fast neutron spectrum unfolding program. The program takes into account a priori information about the neutron spectrum, the experimental values of activation integrals errors and activation detector cross sections errors. The usefulness of the unfolding program was demonstrated by its application to the determination of neutron spectra from 1 to 14 MeV in the molten-salt blanket model of a thermonuclear reactor.

  16. Focused Study of Thermonuclear Bursts on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevez, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    X-ray bursters form a class of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries where accreted material from a donor star undergoes rapid thermonuclear burning in the surface layers of a neutron star. The flux released can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit and drive the photosphere to large radii. Such photospheric radius expansion bursts likely eject nuclear burning ashes into the interstellar medium, and may make possible the detection of photoionization edges. Indeed, theoretical models predict that absorption edges from 58Fe at 9.2 keV, 60Zn and 62Zn at 12.2 keV should be detectable by the future missions Simbol-X and NuSTAR. A positive detection would thus probe the nuclear burning as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, likely observations of atomic X-ray spectral components reflected from the inner accretion disk have been reported. The high spectral resolution capabilities of the focusing X-ray telescopes may therefore make possible to differentiate between the potential interpretations of the X-ray bursts spectral features.

  17. Probing thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars using burst rise oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2016-07-01

    Intense X-ray bursts (type-I bursts), originated from runaway thermonuclear processes, are observed from the surfaces of many accreting neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) systems and they provide an important tool to constrain the neutron star equation of state. Periodic intensity variations during these bursts, termed burst oscillations, are observed in about 10% of thermonuclear bursts. Oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear bursts are hypothesized to originate from an expanding hot-spot on the surface of the neutron star. We studied the evolution of oscillations during the rising phase of a large sample of thermonuclear bursts from 10 bursting neutron stars in order to probe the process of burning front propagation during an X-ray burst. Our results show observational evidences of expanding hot-spot with spin modulated flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force present as a result of the high stellar spin (270-620 Hz). This implies that the flame propagation is latitude-dependent and we address the factors affecting the detection and non-detection of burst rise oscillations in the light of this Coriolis force modulated flame spreading scenario.

  18. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: A New Probe of Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Observations of thermonuclear (also called Type 1) X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed large amplitude, high coherence X-ray brightness oscillations with frequencies in the 300 - 600 Hz range. Substantial spectral and timing evidence point to rotational modulation of the X-ray burst flux as the cause of these oscillations, and it is likely that they reveal the spin frequencies of neutron stars in LMXB from which they are detected. Here we review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and describe how they can be used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars as well as the physics of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars.

  19. Size-frequency distribution of gamma ray bursts from thermonuclear runaway on neutron stars accreting interstellar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Higdon, J.C.; Lingenfelter, R.E.

    1984-05-26

    We present some preliminary results of calculations we have made suggesting that runaway thermonuclear burning of interstellar gas accreted onto magnetic neutron stars can account for the observed size-frequency distribution of gamma ray bursts.

  20. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  1. Two-sided conical laser target for a neutron source of a hybrid nuclear-thermonuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, I. G.; Isaev, E. A.; Lebo, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulations suggest that a source of thermonuclear neutrons with a high pulse repetition rate and the number of neutrons of ~1017 per pulse, which is required for the development of nuclear-thermonuclear reactors, can be realised in the irradiation of a two-sided conical target simultaneously by a long and short laser pulses with energies of ~1 MJ and 50 kJ and durations of 100 – 250 ns and 0.1 – 1 ns. We consider the feasibility of verifying separate propositions of the proposed conception with the use of existing laser facilities.

  2. Thermonuclear processes and accretion onto neutron star envelopes - X-ray burst and transient sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code is used to investigate the evolution of thermonuclear runaways in the thick accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes of 1.0-solar-mass neutron stars having radii of 10 km and 20 km. The simulations produce outbursts that range in time scale from about 2000 seconds to more than a day. For the 10-km study, the peak effective temperature is 3.3 x 10 to the 7th K, and the peak luminosity is 2 x 10 to the 5th solar luminosities. The 20-km neutron star produces a peak effective temperature and luminosity of 5.3 x 10 to the 6th K and 5.9 x 10 to the 2nd solar luminosities. Also investigated are the effects of changes in the rates of the O-14(alpha, proton) and O-15(alpha, gamma) reactions on the evolution. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10-km neutron star produces a precursor lasting about 10 to the -6th sec. The evolution of a gas cloud impacting the surface of a 20-km, 1-solar-mass neutron star is studied in an attempt to simulate the magnetospheric gate model of the X-ray burst sources.

  3. Spreading of thermonuclear flames on the neutron star in SAX J1808.4-3658: an observational tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2005-01-01

    We analyse archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) proportional counter array (PCA) data of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the 2002 outburst of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX 51808.4-3658. We present evidence of a complex frequency modulation of oscillations during burst rise, and correlations among the time evolution of the oscillation frequency, amplitude, and the inferred burning region area. We discuss these findings in the context of a model, based on thermonuclear flame spreading on the neutron star surface, that can qualitatively explain these features. From our model, we infer that for the 2002 Oct. 15 thermonuclear burst, the ignition likely occurred in the mid-latitudes, the burning region took approx. 0.2 s to nearly encircle the equatorial region of the neutron star, and after that the lower amplitude oscillation originated from the remaining asymmetry of the burning front in the same hemisphere where the burst ignited. We emphasize that studies of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during burst rise can provide a powerful tool to understand thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron star surfaces under extreme physical conditions.

  4. Thermonuclear Bursts with Short Recurrence Times from Neutron Stars Explained by Opacity-driven Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, L.; Heger, A.

    2017-06-01

    Thermonuclear flashes of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars produce the frequently observed Type I X-ray bursts. It is the current paradigm that almost all material burns in a burst, after which it takes hours to accumulate fresh fuel for the next burst. In rare cases, however, bursts are observed with recurrence times as short as minutes. We present the first one-dimensional multi-zone simulations that reproduce this phenomenon. Bursts that ignite in a relatively hot neutron star envelope leave a substantial fraction of the fuel unburned at shallow depths. In the wake of the burst, convective mixing events driven by opacity bring this fuel down to the ignition depth on the observed timescale of minutes. There, unburned hydrogen mixes with the metal-rich ashes, igniting to produce a subsequent burst. We find burst pairs and triplets, similar to the observed instances. Our simulations reproduce the observed fraction of bursts with short waiting times of ∼30%, and demonstrate that short recurrence time bursts are typically less bright and of shorter duration.

  5. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  6. Fast-ion measurements with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy in thermonuclear plasmas: recent results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.

    2016-03-01

    A high-performance thermonuclear plasma is a strong source of nuclear radiation, which includes neutron emission from the main fusion reactions and gamma-rays born from the interaction of supra-thermal ions and plasma impurities. Spectroscopic measurements of both types of radiation are an indirect probe of the distribution function of the fast ions leading to nuclear emission. In this paper we present a selection of recent results obtained with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy as a means to study the energy distribution of supra-thermal particles in high-performance thermonuclear plasmas. We focus in particular on the advancements made possible by the combination of dedicated instrumentation and detailed models based on the nuclear physics behind the emission. Future developments are finally addressed, especially regarding the availability of compact detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, which open up to a full tomographic reconstruction of the fast-ion velocity space.

  7. ON THE CONSISTENCY OF NEUTRON-STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS FROM THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Duncan K.; Lampe, Nathanael

    2012-03-01

    The radius of neutron stars can in principle be measured via the normalization of a blackbody fitted to the X-ray spectrum during thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, although few previous studies have addressed the reliability of such measurements. Here we examine the apparent radius in a homogeneous sample of long, mixed H/He bursts from the low-mass X-ray binaries GS 1826-24 and KS 1731-26. The measured blackbody normalization (proportional to the emitting area) in these bursts is constant over a period of up to 60 s in the burst tail, even though the flux (blackbody temperature) decreased by a factor of 60%-75% (30%-40%). The typical rms variation in the mean normalization from burst to burst was 3%-5%, although a variation of 17% was found between bursts observed from GS 1826-24 in two epochs. A comparison of the time-resolved spectroscopic measurements during bursts from the two epochs shows that the normalization evolves consistently through the burst rise and peak, but subsequently increases further in the earlier epoch bursts. The elevated normalization values may arise from a change in the anisotropy of the burst emission or alternatively variations in the spectral correction factor, f{sub c} , of order 10%. Since burst samples observed from systems other than GS 1826-24 are more heterogeneous, we expect that systematic uncertainties of at least 10% are likely to apply generally to measurements of neutron-star radii, unless the effects described here can be corrected for.

  8. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-06-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}Ne(α, p){sup 21}Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  9. Probing the effects of a thermonuclear X-ray burst on the neutron star accretion flow with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Koljonen, K. I. I.; Chakrabarty, D.; Kara, E.; Altamirano, D.; Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Observational evidence has been accumulating that thermonuclear X-ray bursts ignited on the surface of neutron stars influence the surrounding accretion flow. Here, we exploit the excellent sensitivity of NuSTAR up to 79 keV to analyse the impact of an X-ray burst on the accretion emission of the neutron star LMXB 4U 1608-52. The ≃200 s long X-ray burst occurred during a hard X-ray spectral state, and had a peak intensity of ≃30-50 per cent of the Eddington limit with no signs of photospheric radius expansion. Spectral analysis suggests that the accretion emission was enhanced up to a factor of ≃5 during the X-ray burst. We also applied a linear unsupervised decomposition method, namely non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), to study this X-ray burst. We find that the NMF performs well in characterizing the evolution of the burst emission and is a promising technique to study changes in the underlying accretion emission in more detail than is possible through conventional spectral fitting. For the burst of 4U 1608-52, the NMF suggests a possible softening of the accretion spectrum during the X-ray burst, which could potentially be ascribed to cooling of a corona. Finally, we report a small (≃3 per cent) but significant rise in the accretion emission ≃0.5 h before the X-ray burst, although it is unclear whether this was related to the X-ray burst ignition.

  10. Analytic model to estimate thermonuclear neutron yield in z-pinches using the magnetic Noh problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Robert C.

    The objective was to build a model which could be used to estimate neutron yield in pulsed z-pinch experiments, benchmark future z-pinch simulation tools and to assist scaling for breakeven systems. To accomplish this, a recent solution to the magnetic Noh problem was utilized which incorporates a self-similar solution with cylindrical symmetry and azimuthal magnetic field (Velikovich, 2012). The self-similar solution provides the conditions needed to calculate the time dependent implosion dynamics from which batch burn is assumed and used to calculate neutron yield. The solution to the model is presented. The ion densities and time scales fix the initial mass and implosion velocity, providing estimates of the experimental results given specific initial conditions. Agreement is shown with experimental data (Coverdale, 2007). A parameter sweep was done to find the neutron yield, implosion velocity and gain for a range of densities and time scales for DD reactions and a curve fit was done to predict the scaling as a function of preshock conditions.

  11. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. II. EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of thermonuclear bursts observed from low-mass X-ray binaries offer a unique tool to measure neutron-star masses and radii. In this paper, we continue our systematic analysis of all the X-ray bursts observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from X-ray binaries. We determine the events that show clear evidence for photospheric radius expansion and measure the Eddington limits for these accreting neutron stars using the bolometric fluxes attained at the touchdown moments of each X-ray burst. We employ a Bayesian technique to investigate the degree to which the Eddington limit for each source remains constant between bursts. We find that for sources with a large number of radius expansion bursts, systematic uncertainties are at a 5%-10% level. Moreover, in six sources with only pairs of Eddington-limited bursts, the distribution of fluxes is consistent with a {approx}10% fractional dispersion. This indicates that the spectroscopic measurements of neutron-star masses and radii using thermonuclear X-ray bursts can reach the level of accuracy required to distinguish between different neutron-star equations of state, provided that uncertainties related to the overall flux calibration of X-ray detectors are of comparable magnitude.

  12. Experimental measurements of the 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J; Tan, W; Goerres, J; Wiescher, M; Cooper, R

    2007-05-08

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

  13. The LOFT perspective on neutron star thermonuclear bursts: White paper in support of the mission concept of the large observatory for X-ray timing

    SciTech Connect

    in't Zand, J. J.M.; Malone, Christopher M.; Altamirano, D.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Brown, E. F.; Cavecchi, Y.; Chakrabarty, D.; Chenevez, J.; Cumming, A.; Degenaar, N.; Falanga, M.; Galloway, D. K.; Heger, A.; Jose, J.; Keek, L.; Linares, M.; Mahmoodifar, S.; Mendez, M.; Miller, M. C.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Poutanen, J.; Rozanska, A.; Schatz, H.; Serino, M.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Thielemann, F. -K.; Watts, A. L.; Weinberg, N. N.; Woosley, S. E.; Yu, W.; Zhang, S.; Zingale, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Large Area Detector (LAD) on the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing ( LOFT ), with a 8.5 m 2 photon- collecting area in the 2–30 keV bandpass at CCD-class spectral resolving power (λ/Δλ = 10 – 100), is designed for optimum performance on bright X-ray sources. Thus, it is well-suited to study thermonuclear X-ray bursts from Galactic neutron stars. These bursts will typically yield 2 x 105 photon detections per second in the LAD, which is at least 15 times more than with any other instrument past, current or anticipated. The Wide Field Monitor (WFM) foreseen for LOFT uniquely combines 2–50 keV imaging with large (30%) prompt sky coverage. This will enable the detection of tens of thousands of thermonuclear X-ray bursts during a 3-yr mission, including tens of superbursts. Both numbers are similar or more than the current database gathered in 50 years of X-ray astronomy.

  14. Thermonuclear fusion in a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, V. P.

    2014-08-01

    Thermonuclear fusion induced by the irradiation of solid deuterated cluster targets and foils with fields of strong femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses is discussed. The thermonuclear-fusion process D( d, n)3He in a collision of two deuterons at an energy of 50 to 100 keV in a deuterium cluster target irradiated with a strong laser pulse is discussed. A theory of thermonuclear fusion proceeding upon the irradiation of clusters formed by deuterium iodide (DI) molecules with the field of a superintense femtosecond laser pulse is developed. This theory is based on an above-barrier process in which the sequential multiple inner ionization of atomic ions within a cluster is accompanied by field-induced outer ionization. The yield of neutrons from thermonuclear fusion in a deuteron-deuteron collision after the completion of a laser pulse is calculated. The yield of neutrons is determined for the thermonuclear-fusion reaction proceeding in the interaction of an intense picosecond laser pulse with thin TiD2 foils. A multiple ionization of titanium atoms at the front edge of the laser pulse is considered. The heating of free electron occurs in induced inverse bremsstrahlung in the process of electron scattering on multiply charged titanium ions. The yield of alpha particles in the thermonuclear-fusion reaction involving protons and 11B nuclei that is induced in microdrops by a strong laser field is determined. Experimental data on laser-induced thermonuclear fusion are discussed.

  15. The thermonuclear-flash model for X-ray burst sources - A new tool for observing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    The helium-flash model for X-ray burst sources, in which matter is presumed to accrete onto the surface of a neutron star, is discussed. Attention is given to the accretion process, nuclear burning, X-ray emission, and the energy released by convection as well as by radiative diffusion near the surface. The rise times of observed bursts, their spectral evolution, and the properties of the spectrally soft X-ray transients are considered. Problems in interpreting the continuum spectra are discussed, along with problems in the detection and measurement of line features in the spectra. Also considered are the ratio of time-averaged persistent luminosity to time-averaged burst luminosity, peak burst luminosities, and the possibility of detecting binary membership for burst sources.

  16. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  17. Thermonuclear model for high energy transients

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    The thermonuclear model for x- and ..gamma..-ray bursts is discussed. Different regimes of nuclear burning are reviewed, each appropriate to a given range of (steady state) accretion rate. Accretion rates in the range 10/sup -14/ to 10/sup -8/ Msub solar y/sup -1/ all appear capable of producing x-ray transients of various durations and intervals. Modifications introduced by radiatively driven mass loss, the thermal inertia of the envelope, different burning mechanisms, and two-dimensional considerations are discussed as are difficulties encountered when the thermonuclear model is confronted with observations of rapidly recurrent bursts (less than or equal to 10 min), and super-Eddington luminosities and temperatures. Results from a numerical simulation of a combined hydrogen-helium runaway initiated at pycnonuclear density are presented for the first time. The thermonuclear model for ..gamma..-ray bursts is also reviewed and updated, particularly with regard to the breakdown of the steady state hypothesis employed in previous work. Solely on the basis of nuclear instability, ..gamma..-ray bursts of various types appear possible for a very broad variety of accretion rates (approx. 10/sup -17/ to approx. 10/sup -11/ Msub solar y/sup -1/) although other considerations may restrict this range. The thermonuclear model appears capable of yielding a great diversity of high energy transient phenomena for various accretion rates, magnetic field configurations, and neutron star envelope histories.

  18. Thermonuclear land of plenty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasior, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the process of energy production in the stars has been identified as the thermonuclear fusion, this mechanism has been proclaimed as a future, extremely modern, reliable and safe for sustaining energetic needs of the humankind. However, the idea itself was rather straightforward and the first attempts to harness thermonuclear reactions have been taken yet in 40s of the twentieth century, it quickly appeared that physical and technical problems of domesticating exotic high temperature medium known as plasma are far from being trivial. Though technical developments as lasers, superconductors or advanced semiconductor electronics and computers gave significant contribution for the development of the thermonuclear fusion reactors, for a very long time their efficient performance was out of reach of technology. Years of the scientific progress brought the conclusions that for the development of the thermonuclear power plants an enormous interdisciplinary effort is needed in many fields of science covering not only plasma physics but also material research, superconductors, lasers, advanced diagnostic systems (e.g. spectroscopy, interferometry, scattering techniques, etc.) with huge amounts of data to be processed, cryogenics, measurement-control systems, automatics, robotics, nanotechnology, etc. Due to the sophistication of the problems with plasma control and plasma material interactions only such a combination of the research effort can give a positive output which can assure the energy needs of our civilization. In this paper the problems of thermonuclear technology are briefly outlined and it is shown why this domain can be a broad field for the experts dealing with electronics, optoelectronics, programming and numerical simulations, who at first glance can have nothing common with the plasma or nuclear physics.

  19. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  20. Variance Reduction Factor of Nuclear Data for Integral Neutronics Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, G. Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2015-01-15

    We propose a new quantity, a variance reduction factor, to identify nuclear data for which further improvements are required to reduce uncertainties of target integral neutronics parameters. Important energy ranges can be also identified with this variance reduction factor. Variance reduction factors are calculated for several integral neutronics parameters. The usefulness of the variance reduction factors is demonstrated.

  1. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-Ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Díaz-Trigo, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  2. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E. )

    1994-08-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. The authors compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and they examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  3. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1993-09-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. We compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and we examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  4. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehlau, Paul E.

    1994-08-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. We compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and we examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well.

  5. Localization of thermonuclear burning in accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutloukos, Stratos; Miller, Cole

    Nuclear-powered oscillations during Type-I X-ray bursts have so far revealed the spin of about twenty accreting millisecond pulsars in low-mass X-ray binaries. Constraining strong gravity through the emission from the hot spots on the neutron star surface requires understanding of the properties of such burst oscillations. We use adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical numerical computations to model the ignition and spreading of thermonuclear flames. Our preliminary simulations suggest that confinement of fuel is important for the localization of thermonuclear burning, like that required for the observed burst oscillations. This is consistent with spectral analyses of RXTE observations that we also present here. The software used in this work was in part developed by the DOE-supported ASCI/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. This work was supported by NSF Grant AST0708424.

  6. Design of an integrating type neutron dose monitor.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2011-07-01

    It is intended that deuterium-deuterium reaction experiments will be performed for the next phase of the large helical device (LHD) at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Japan. To protect workers against radiation, the characteristics of the radiation field at the LHD workplace should be evaluated. The neutron fluence at the workplace was calculated by means of the radiation transportation code. Since the neutron energy distribution at the workplace has a wide energy range, from thermal to fast neutrons, a neutron dose monitor had to be especially designed. The author designed an integrating type neutron dose monitor for this purpose. Since this monitor has good responses for dose evaluation in every energy range, it should be able to evaluate the dose at the LHD workplace accurately.

  7. Pathway parameter and thermonuclear functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.

    2008-04-01

    In the theory of thermonuclear reaction rates, analytical evaluation of thermonuclear functions for non-resonant reactions, including cases with cut-off and depletion of the tail of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function were considered in a series of papers by Mathai and Haubold [A.M. Mathai, H.J. Haubold, Modern Problems in Nuclear and Neutrino Astrophysics, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin, 1988]. In the present paper we study more general classes of thermonuclear functions by introducing a pathway parameter α, so that when α→1 the thermonuclear functions in the Maxwell-Boltzmannian case are recovered. We will also give interpretations for the pathway parameter α in the case of cut-off and in terms of moments. Non-extensive statistical mechanics, as developed by Tsallis [C. Tsallis, What should a statistical mechanics satisfy to reflect nature? Physica D 193 (2004) 3-34], provides the physical basis for the generalized thermonuclear functions considered in this paper.

  8. Thermonuclear model for. gamma. -ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.

    1981-08-26

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10/sup 12/ gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. /sup 13/ M/sub 0/yr/sup -1/ is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10/sup 20/ to 10/sup 22/ g km/sup -2/. Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into /sup 56/Ni releases from 10/sup 38/ to 10/sup 40/ erg km/sup -2/ and pushes hot plasma with ..beta.. > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard ..gamma..-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most ..gamma..-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered.

  9. Delayed neutron detection with an integrated differential die-away and delayed neutron instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Lee, Taehoon; Hu, Jianwei S; Hendricks, John; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded a multilab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass and detect the diversion of pins from spent nuclear fuel. The first two years of this NGSI effort was focused on quantifying the capability of a range of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) modeling and the second current phase involves measuring Spent Fuel. One of the techniques of interest in this paper involves measuring delayed neutrons. A delayed neutron instrument using 36 fission chambers and a 14 MeV neutron generator so called DT generator (Deuterium + Tritium) surrounding the fuel was previously studied as part of the NGSI effort. This paper will quantify the capability of a standalone delayed neutron instrument using 4 {sup 3}He gas filled tubes and a DT generator with significant spectrum tailoring, located far from the fuel. So that future research can assess how well a delayed neutron instrument will function as part of an integrated NDA system. A new design is going to be used to respond to the need of the techniques. This design has been modeled for a water media and is currently being optimized for borated water and air media as part of ongoing research. This new design was selected in order to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U, to use a more realistic neutron generator design in the model, to reduce cost and facilitate the integration of a delayed neutron (DN) with a differential die-away (DDA) instrument. Since this paper will focus on delayed neutron detection, the goal is to quantify the signal from {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu, which are the isotopes present in Spent Fuel that respond significantly to a neutron interrogation. This report will quantify the capability of this new delayed neutron design to measure the combined mass of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu for 16 of the 64 assemblies of the NGSI Spent Fuel library in one

  10. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  11. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  12. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

  13. Parameters of the focusing optics in a laser thermonuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N.G.; Belousov, N.I.; Vergunova, G.A.; Grishunin, P.A.; Danilov, A.E.; Lebo, I.G.; Rozanov, V.B.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Subbotin, V.I.; Fedotov, S.I.

    1985-03-01

    The energy balance of a laser thermonuclear reactor is considered and it is shown that the energy of the reaction products absorbed by the focusing optics of the reactor considerably exceeds the energy absorbed from the laser pulse. The x-ray spectrum of the target emission is calculated and used to find the minimum distances from the center of the chamber to the optical system. Variants of the gas shield are analyzed. The laser radiation brightness required to ignite the reaction is used to obtain a relationship between the minimum focal length and the optical strength of the material employed for the optics. It is shown that thermonuclear neutrons incident on the focusing system generate considerable thermal stresses and deformations.

  14. Strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions: Electron drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchuk, P. A.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a simple electron drop model. In the model we assume fusion in a potential that is screened by an effective electron cloud around colliding nuclei (extended Salpeter ion-sphere model). We calculate the mean-field screened Coulomb potentials for atomic nuclei with equal and nonequal charges, appropriate astrophysical S factors, and enhancement factors of reaction rates. As a byproduct, we study the analytic behavior of the screening potential at small separations between the reactants. In this model, astrophysical S factors depend not only on nuclear physics but on plasma screening as well. The enhancement factors are in good agreement with calculations by other methods. This allows us to formulate a combined, pure analytic model of strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions. The results can be useful for simulating nuclear burning in white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  15. Thermonuclear runaways in nova outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Anurag; Arnett, David; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Results of exploratory, two-dimensional numerical calculations of a local thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf are reported. It is found that the energy released by the runaway can induce a significant amount of vorticity near the burning region. Such mass motions account naturally for mixing of core matter into the envelope during the explosion. A new mechanism for the lateral spread of nuclear burning is also discussed.

  16. Simultaneous and integrated neutron-based techniques for material analysis of a metallic ancient flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Grazzi, F.; Sutton, L. F.; Scherillo, A.; Bognetti, L.; Bini, A.; Barzagli, E.; Schooneveld, E.; Andreani, C.

    2013-09-01

    A metallic 19th century flute was studied by means of integrated and simultaneous neutron-based techniques: neutron diffraction, neutron radiative capture analysis and neutron radiography. This experiment follows benchmark measurements devoted to assessing the effectiveness of a multitask beamline concept for neutron-based investigation on materials. The aim of this study is to show the potential application of the approach using multiple and integrated neutron-based techniques for musical instruments. Such samples, in the broad scenario of cultural heritage, represent an exciting research field. They may represent an interesting link between different disciplines such as nuclear physics, metallurgy and acoustics.

  17. An Am/Be neutron source and its use in integral tests of differential neutron reaction cross-section data.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Zaman, M R; Hossain, S M; Spahn, I; Sudár, S; Qaim, S M

    2010-09-01

    An Am/Be neutron source, installed recently at the Rajshahi University, is described. Neutron flux mapping was done using the nuclear reactions (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au, (113)In(n,gamma)(114m)In, (115)In(n,n'gamma)(115m)In and (58)Ni(n,p)(58)Co. An approximate validation of the neutron spectral shape was done using five neutron threshold detectors and the iterative unfolding code SULSA. Integral cross sections of the reactions (54)Fe(n,p)(54)Mn, (59)Co(n,p)(59)Fe and (92)Mo(n,p)(92m)Nb were measured with fast neutrons (E(n)>1.5MeV) and compared with data calculated using the neutron spectral distribution and the excitation function of each reaction given in data libraries: an agreement within +/-6% was found.

  18. Do spherical tokamaks have a thermonuclear future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, S. V.

    2012-12-01

    This work has been initiated by the publication of a review by B.V.Kuteev et al., "Intense Fusion Neutron Sources" [Plasma Physics Reports 36, 281 (2010)]. It is stated that the key thesis of the above review that a spherical tokamak can be recommended for research neutron sources and for demonstration hybrid systems as an alternative to expensive "classical" tokamaks of the JET and ITER type is inconsistent. The analysis of the experimental material obtained during the last 10 years in the course of studies on the existing spherical tokamaks shows that the TIN-ST fusion neutron source spherical tokamak proposed by the authors of the review and intended, according to the authors' opinion, to replace "monsters" in view of its table-top dimensions (2 m3) and laboratory-level energetics cannot be transformed into any noticeable stationary megawatt-power neutron source competing with the existing classical tokamaks (in particular, with JET with its quasi-steady DT fusion power at a level of 5 MW). Namely, the maximum plasma current in the proposed tokamak will be not 3 MA, as the authors suppose erroneously, but, according to the present-day practice of spherical tokamaks, within 0.6-0.7 MA, which will lead to a reduction on the neutron flux by two to three orders of magnitude from the expected 5 MW. The possibility of the maintenance of the stationary process itself even in such a "weakened" spherical tokamak is very doubtful. The experience of the largest existing devices of this type (such as NSTX and MAST) has shown that they are incapable of operating even in a quasi-steady operating mode, because the discharge in them is spontaneously interrupted about 1 s after the beginning of the current pulse, although its expected duration is of up to 5 s. The nature of this phenomenon is the subject of further study of the physics of spherical tokamaks. This work deals with a critical analysis of the available experimental data concerning such tokamaks and a discussion of

  19. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  20. Cosmic Chandlery with thermonuclear supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Calder, Alan C.; Krueger, Brendan K.; Jackson, A. P.; ...

    2017-05-30

    Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are bright stellar explosions, the light curves of which can be calibrated to allow for use as "standard candles" for measuring cosmological distances. Contemporary research investigates how the brightness of an event may be influenced by properties of the progenitor system that follow from properties of the host galaxy such as composition and age. The goals are to better understand systematic effects and to assess the intrinsic scatter in the brightness, thereby reducing uncertainties in cosmological studies. We present the results from ensembles of simulations in the single-degenerate paradigm addressing the influence of age and metallicitymore » on the brightness of an event and compare our results to observed variations of brightness that correlate with properties of the host galaxy. As a result, we also present results from "hybrid" progenitor models that incorporate recent advances in stellar evolution.« less

  1. Cosmic Chandlery with Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Krueger, B. K.; Jackson, A. P.; Willcox, D. E.; Miles, B. J.; Townsley, D. M.

    2017-05-01

    Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are bright stellar explosions, the light curves of which can be calibrated to allow for use as “standard candles” for measuring cosmological distances. Contemporary research investigates how the brightness of an event may be influenced by properties of the progenitor system that follow from properties of the host galaxy such as composition and age. The goals are to better understand systematic effects and to assess the intrinsic scatter in the brightness, thereby reducing uncertainties in cosmological studies. We present the results from ensembles of simulations in the single-degenerate paradigm addressing the influence of age and metallicity on the brightness of an event and compare our results to observed variations of brightness that correlate with properties of the host galaxy. We also present results from “hybrid” progenitor models that incorporate recent advances in stellar evolution.

  2. Simulating Thermonuclear Runaway in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursi, L. J.; Truran, J.; Zingale, M.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H. M.; MacNeice, P.

    2000-12-01

    A nova is a thought to result from a partially degenerate thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf. Material from the underlying white dwarf must be dredged up into the atmosphere in order to produce an explosion with the observed energies; the carbon and oxygen serve as catalysts for the hydrogen burning, allowing the much more temperature-sensitive CNO burning to occur. In order to understand this dredge-up problem, we are running two different types of simulations. The first are large-scale simulations with the FLASH code (Fryxell et al., 2000), using a one-dimensional set of initial conditions of a nova about to undergo runaway created by Ami Glasner. These initial conditions have been used in previous multidimensional simulations (Glasner et al. 1997; Kercek et al. 1998), but these simulations have given widely different results because of different mixing behaviors in the two codes. Our set of simulations will shed some light on this discrepancy; since our code has adaptive mesh refinement (MacNeice et al., 2000), we can afford to highly refine the region of the star where the mixing occurs, without the cost of highly refining the entire region. Because these large-scale computations are extremely compute-intensive, they are not appropriate for broad exploration of initial conditions. To do this, we use a One-Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) model which has been used in astrophysical models previously (Niemeyer & Kerstein, 1997). This allows us to use ODT simulations of the nova as experiments to guide us to interesting regimes to study further with multidimensional FLASH code simulations. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy Grant No. B341495 to the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago under the ASCI Strategic Alliances Program and by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  3. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  4. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the implosion requirements to achieve inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept were recently conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z coils. Despite the relatively slow implosion velocity (70 km/s) in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were approximately 3 keV, and thermonuclear DD neutron yields up to 2e12 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had a width ranging from 60-120 microns over a roughly 6 mm height and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray spectra from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.4 g/cm3 . In these experiments 1-5e10 secondary DT neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized. This is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the DT neutron time of flight spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and DD yields greater than 1e10. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to radiate away the laser energy deposited in the fuel also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as highmore » as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.« less

  6. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6-8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2-0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 × 1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1-2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  7. Enhancement of thermonuclear reaction rates in extremely dense stellar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Naoki; Kuwashima, Fumiyoshi; Munakata, Hiroharu

    1990-10-01

    The enhancement factor of the thermonuclear reaction rates is calculated for the extremely dense stellar plasmas in the liquid phase where the condition 3Gamma/tau less than or equal to 1.6 is not necessarily imposed. Here the parameter 3Gamma/tau corresponds to the ratio of the classical turning point radius at the Gamow peak and the mean interionic distance in the case of the pure Coulomb potential. Direct double integration is carried out to obtain the thermonuclear reaction rates. The result is presented in the form of an analytic fitting formula to facilitate applications. The present fitting formula is valid for 3Gamma/tau = 0-5.4. The present calculation is intended to serve as the best available one for the case that ions are in the semiquantum regime.

  8. Polarized fuel for controlled thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartalucci, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    The use of polarized nuclei as a fuel for thermonuclear fusion reactors was suggested more than 30 years ago, providing evidence for a significant increase of the total cross section. In particular, an enhancement factor close to 1.5 is expected in the energy range below 100 keV for the dominant nuclear fusion reactions 2H + 3H → 4He + n + 17.58 MeV and 2H + 3He → 4He + p + 18.34 MeV. Furthermore, the use of polarized fuel allows one to control the ejectile trajectories, via an enhancement in the forward-backward cross section asymmetry due to polarization. This allows some control on the energy transfer from the plasma to the reactor wall or helps concentrate the neutron flux to defined wall areas. Nevertheless, this idea was received with skepticism by the relevant scientific community, due to some uncertainty in the physics of the process, the low efficiency in the production of polarized beams for injection into plasma and the apparent difficulty of preserving the ion polarization for a time long compared with nuclear burning time. But more recently, as a consequence of significant progress in the field of atomic beam sources and polarized targets, the interest in this matter has been refreshed for both inertially and magnetically confined plasmas. The possibility of implementing nuclear polarization in present and future fusion reactors is discussed in this paper. In particular, the interaction between polarized ions and magnetic fields, both static and RF, which are typically used in a Tokamak for plasma heating via ion cyclotron resonance (ICRH), is considered. Also, experimental issues for practically performing a feasibility test on a real fusion reactors are illustrated.

  9. Controlled thermonuclear fusion, high temperature plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The primary source of nuclear energy comes from the fission process of heavy nuclei. To utilize the energy released by a thermonuclear fusion process, methods of controlling the fusion reaction were studied. This is controlled thermonuclear fusion technology. The fuel used in a thermonuclear fusion process are isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium and tritium. They can be extracted from the almost unlimited seawater. Nuclear fusion also produces very little radioactive waste. Thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy source with an almost unlimited supply; it is economical, safe, and relatively clean. Ways to raise plasma temperature to a very high level and to maintain it to allow fusion reactions to take place are studied. The physical laws of high temperature plasma was studied to reach this goal which resulted in the development of high temperature plasma physics.

  10. Ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions with antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Shmatov, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    The use of antimatter for the indirect ignition of staged thermonuclear microexplosions is proposed. The space propulsion system based on this method may become economically acceptable earlier than that which uses only the energy of annihilation. 19 refs.

  11. Neutronic calculation of fast reactors by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltashev, D. A.; Stakhanova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    This article considers neutronic calculation of a fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code. The main goal of development and application of integrated codes is a nuclear power plant safety justification. EUCLID/V1 is integrated code designed for coupled neutronics, thermomechanical and thermohydraulic fast reactor calculations under normal and abnormal operating conditions. EUCLID/V1 code is being developed in the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The integrated code has a modular structure and consists of three main modules: thermohydraulic module HYDRA-IBRAE/LM/V1, thermomechanical module BERKUT and neutronic module DN3D. In addition, the integrated code includes databases with fuel, coolant and structural materials properties. Neutronic module DN3D provides full-scale simulation of neutronic processes in fast reactors. Heat sources distribution, control rods movement, reactivity level changes and other processes can be simulated. Neutron transport equation in multigroup diffusion approximation is solved. This paper contains some calculations implemented as a part of EUCLID/V1 code validation. A fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 transient simulation (fuel assembly floating, decompression of passive feedback system channel) and cross-validation with MCU-FR code results are presented in this paper. The calculations demonstrate EUCLID/V1 code application for BREST-OD-300 simulating and safety justification.

  12. IGNITION COLUMN DEPTHS OF HELIUM-RICH THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 1728-34

    SciTech Connect

    Misanovic, Zdenka; Galloway, Duncan K.; Cooper, Randall L.

    2010-08-01

    We analyzed thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts observed from the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34 by RXTE, Chandra, and INTEGRAL. We compared the variation in burst energy and recurrence times as a function of accretion rate with the predictions of a numerical ignition model including a treatment of the heating and cooling in the crust. We found that the measured burst ignition column depths are significantly below the theoretically predicted values, regardless of the assumed thermal structure of the neutron star (NS) interior. While it is possible that the accretion rate measured by Chandra is underestimated, due to additional persistent spectral components outside the sensitivity band, the required correction factor is typically 3.6 and as high as 6, which is implausible. Furthermore, such underestimation is even more unlikely for RXTE and INTEGRAL, which have much broader bandpasses. Possible explanations for the observed discrepancy include shear-triggered mixing of the accreted helium to larger column depths, resulting in earlier ignition, or the fractional covering of the accreted fuel on the NS surface.

  13. Vulnerability assessment of a space based weapon platform electronics system exposed to a thermonuclear weapon detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.L.; Johnson, J.O.

    1994-05-01

    The utilization of reconnaissance/surveillance satellite and weapon platform assets in space will subject the sensitive electronic equipment to a variety of natural and man-made radiation environments. These include Van Allen Belt protons and electrons; galactic and solar flare protons; neutrons, gamma rays, and X-rays from fission and fusion weapons; and directed neutral particle beams and lasers. Electronic equipment, including modem integrated circuits, may undergo permanent or transient changes of the electrical properties of the active components when exposed to these sources of radiation. This report summarizes the results of the Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding code system -- MASH v1.0 calculations designed to estimate the dose to the critical electronics components of an idealized spaced based weapon platform from neutron and gamma-ray radiation emanating from a thermonuclear weapon detonation. The MASH calculations modeled several source/platform geometry configurations, obtaining results for multiple distances and weapon detonation positions relative to the platform. For certain source/platform orientations, the results indicate vulnerabilities to the C{sup 3} bay critical components box to radiation damage from a nuclear weapon detonation. Neutron protection factors ranged from 0.7 to 3.4 for the three platform configurations analyzed, and gamma-ray protection factors ranged from approximately 1.5 to 9.8. The results further indicate the source has a direct line-of-sight to the critical components box for certain source/platform orientations, regardless of the number of interceptors present. The merits of utilizing the MASH code system for estimating dose and shielding factors for spaced based assets has been demonstrated. The geometry configuration studied here is greatly simplified compared to those that will be encountered in an actual design.

  14. Numerical estimation of real and apparent integral neutron parameters used in nuclear borehole geophysics.

    PubMed

    Dworak, D; Drabina, A; Woźnicka, U

    2006-07-01

    The semi-empirical method of neutron logging tool calibration developed by Prof. J.A. Czubek uses the real and so-called apparent integral neutron parameters of geological formations. To this end, Czubek proposed a few separated calculation methods commonly based on analytical solutions of the neutron transport problem. A new calculation method for the neutron integral parameters is proposed. Quantities like slowing-down length, diffusion and migration lengths, probability to avoid absorption during slowing down, and thermal neutron absorption cross section can be easily approximated using Monte Carlo simulations. A comparison with the results of the analytical method developed by Czubek has been performed for many cases and the observed differences have been explained.

  15. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Casey, D. T.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E.; Eckart, M.; Erbert, G.; Farley, D.; Fair, J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frank, M.; Frenje, L. J. A.; Friedrich, S.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gibson, C.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Holder, J. P.; Holunda, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J.; Kohut, T.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemki, B.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; La Fortune, K.; Lagin, L.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; LaTray, D.; Leeper, R. J.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M.; Moreno, K. A.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C. D.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Rosen, M. D.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R.; Sater, J.; Sangster, C.; Schneider, M. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Walters, C.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2012-05-01

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 μm diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 ± 3) μm, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 ± 0.09) g cm-2 result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm-3. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 ± 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 1015 that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5±0.1)×1014 which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 ± 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date

  16. Thermonuclear runaways investigated using drip line beta decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrede, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    In close binary star systems, mass transfer onto the surface of a white dwarf or neutron star can lead to spectacular periodic emissions including classical novae and x-ray bursts. Accurate nuclear reaction rates are needed to model energy generation and nucleosynthesis in these thermonuclear runaways enabling meaningful comparisons to observations. An experimental program has been established at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to constrain the most influential nuclear physics uncertainties using the beta decays of nuclides adjacent to the proton drip line. In particular, the beta decays of 20Mg, 26P, and 31Cl have been used to investigate the 15O(α,γ)19Ne, 25Al(p,γ)26Si, and 30P(p,γ)31S reaction rates, respectively. These studies relate to the shapes of x-ray burst light curves, the production of the radionuclide 26Al in the Milky Way, and the identification of presolar nova grains in meteoritic material.

  17. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10{sup 12} have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm{sup 3}. In these experiments, up to 5 × 10{sup 10} secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm{sup 2}, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10{sup 10}. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  18. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Harding, Eric C.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Awe, Thomas James; Geissel, Matthias; Rovang, Dean C.; Smith, Ian C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew R.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Savage, Mark E.; Schroen, Diana G.; Stygar, William A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  19. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  20. The polonium-210 problem in thermonuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shchipakhin, O.L.; Borisov, N.B.; Churkin, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    Polonium 210 forms in the lithium-lead eutectic blanket of a thermonuclear reactor. On the basis of obtained experimental data some estimates have been calculated on the ITER blanket accident consequences. The LOCA type accident represents the failure of eutectic circuit in the process of transfusion of liquid eutectic from blanket to the tritium reprocessing plant.

  1. Laser Fusion - A New Thermonuclear Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ralph S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes thermonuclear processes induced by interaction of a laser beam with the surface of a fuel pellet. An expanding plasma is formed which results in compression of the element. Laser and reactor technology are discussed. Pictures and diagrams are included. (GH)

  2. Laser Fusion - A New Thermonuclear Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ralph S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes thermonuclear processes induced by interaction of a laser beam with the surface of a fuel pellet. An expanding plasma is formed which results in compression of the element. Laser and reactor technology are discussed. Pictures and diagrams are included. (GH)

  3. Computational Study of Integrated Neutron/Photon Imaging for Illicit Material Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    The feasibility of integration of photon and neutron radiography for nondestructive detection of illicit materials was examined. The MCNP5 code was used to model a radiography system consisting of accelerator-based neutron and photon sources and the imaging detector array, with an object under scrutiny placed between them. For this examination, the objects consisted of a matrix of low-Z and high-Z materials of various shapes and density. Transmission-radiography computations were carried out using 2.5-MeV deuterium-deuterium and 14-MeV deuterium-tritium neutron sources, and a 0.3-MeV photon source. The radiography tallies for both neutron and photon sources were modeled for the same geometry of the system. The photon-to- neutron transmission ratios were determined for each pixel of the detector array and utilized to identify the presence of specific materials in the radiographic images. By focusing on the inherent difference between neutron and photon interactions, it was possible to determine the shape and material composition of complex objects present within a pallet or a shipping container. The use of a single imaging array of scintillation detectors for simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons and photons is discussed, and its function in the dual neutron/photon radiography applications is addressed.

  4. Theoretical determination of the strength characteristics of multilayer materials intended for nuclear and thermonuclear engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovskii, I. V.; Leshukov, A. Yu.; Romashin, S. N.; Shorkin, V. S.

    2015-12-01

    A method is developed to estimate the integrity of multilayer structures. This method is based on the version of the theory of adhesion and cohesion interactions of structure elements that only takes into account their thermomechanical properties. The structures to be studied are the material of the multilayer wall of the liquid-metal thermonuclear reactor blanket and a heat-resistant magnet wire with a bimetallic conductor, which is the base of the windings of the magnetohydrodynamic machines and electric motors intended for operation at high temperatures under ionizing radiation in, e.g., the machines and facilities in nuclear and thermonuclear reactors.

  5. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Arthur J; Joergensen, Mads; Wang, Xiaoping; Mikkelson, Ruth L; Mikkelson, Dennis J; Lynch, Vickie E; Peterson, Peter F; Green, Mark L; Hoffmann, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  6. Numerical analysis of thermonuclear detonation in dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avronin, Y. N.; Bunatyan, A. A.; Gadzhiyev, A. D.; Mustafin, K. A.; Nurbakov, A. S.; Pisarev, V. N.; Feoktistov, L. P.; Frolov, V. D.; Shibarshov, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of thermonuclear combustion from the region heated to thermonuclear temperatures by an external source to the remaining part of the target was investigated. The target was a tube of inert material (gold, lead, beryllium, etc.) filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. It was determined analytically that thermonuclear combustion can propagate from a small portion of a nonspherical target to the remainder of the target and that a steady-state thermonuclear detonation wave can be formed. The role of various physical processes in thermonuclear detonation was investigated. Shock wave is the main mechanism underlying detonation propagation. The detonation rate and intensity of the thermonuclear reaction is influenced by the leakage of heat due to transvere heat conductivity. The critical diameter for thermonuclear detonation was determined approximately for a plasma filament encased in a housing with twice the density of the fuel.

  7. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    A novel power cycle for direct conversion of alpha-particle energy into electricity is proposed for an ignited plasma in a stellarator reactor. The plasma column is alternately compressed and expanded in minor radius by periodic variation of the toroidal magnetic field strength. As a result of the way a stellarator is expected to work, the plasma pressure during expansion is greater than the corresponding pressure during compression. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma during a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils, and direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. For a typical reactor, the average power obtained from this cycle (with a minor radius compression factor on the order of 50%) can be as much as 50% of the electrical power obtained from the thermonuclear neutrons without compressing the plasma. Thus, if it is feasible to vary the toroidal field strength, the power cycle provides an alternative scheme of energy conversion for a deuterium-tritium fueled reactor. The cycle may become an important method of energy conversion for advanced neutron-lean fueled reactors. By operating two or more reactors in tandem, the cycle can be made self-sustaining.

  8. Thermonuclear dynamo inside ultracentrifuge with supersonic plasma flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity implies the existence of virtual negative masses in the rotational reference frame of an ultracentrifuge with the negative mass density of the same order of magnitude as the positive mass density of a neutron star. In an ultracentrifuge, the repulsive gravitational field of this negative mass can simulate the attractive positive mass of a mini-neutron star, and for this reason can radially confine a dense thermonuclear plasma placed inside the centrifuge, very much as the positive mass of a star confines its plasma by its own attractive gravitational field. If the centrifuge is placed in an externally magnetic field to act as the seed field of a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the configuration resembles a magnetar driven by the release of energy through nuclear fusion, accelerating the plasma to supersonic velocities, with the magnetic field produced by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall of the centrifuge. Because of the supersonic flow and the high plasma density the configuration is stable.

  9. Thermonuclear dynamo inside ultracentrifuge with supersonic plasma flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, F.

    2016-01-15

    Einstein's general theory of relativity implies the existence of virtual negative masses in the rotational reference frame of an ultracentrifuge with the negative mass density of the same order of magnitude as the positive mass density of a neutron star. In an ultracentrifuge, the repulsive gravitational field of this negative mass can simulate the attractive positive mass of a mini-neutron star, and for this reason can radially confine a dense thermonuclear plasma placed inside the centrifuge, very much as the positive mass of a star confines its plasma by its own attractive gravitational field. If the centrifuge is placed in an externally magnetic field to act as the seed field of a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the configuration resembles a magnetar driven by the release of energy through nuclear fusion, accelerating the plasma to supersonic velocities, with the magnetic field produced by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall of the centrifuge. Because of the supersonic flow and the high plasma density the configuration is stable.

  10. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui Hamilton, William A.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-14

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  11. Merging white dwarfs and thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    van Kerkwijk, M H

    2013-06-13

    Thermonuclear supernovae result when interaction with a companion reignites nuclear fusion in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, causing a thermonuclear runaway, a catastrophic gain in pressure and the disintegration of the whole white dwarf. It is usually thought that fusion is reignited in near-pycnonuclear conditions when the white dwarf approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. I briefly describe two long-standing problems faced by this scenario, and the suggestion that these supernovae instead result from mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, including those that produce sub-Chandrasekhar-mass remnants. I then turn to possible observational tests, in particular, those that test the absence or presence of electron captures during the burning.

  12. Thermonuclear microdetonation macron accelerator for impact ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2008-03-01

    It is proposed to replace the expensive ~150 kJ petawatt laser as a means for the fast ignition of a highly compressed dense DT target by a small flyer plate propelled to high velocities by a thermonuclear microdetonation ignited at one end of a super-pinch. It appears that this can most efficiently be done with the previously proposed modification of the dense plasma focus device, adding a high voltage relativistic electron beam emitting diode inside the coaxial plasma focus discharge tube, igniting at the end of the plasma focus pinch column a thermonuclear detonation wave, propagating in the axial direction and accelerating at the end of the pinch a flyer plate to a velocity of 103 km s-1.

  13. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  14. Development and characterization of the integrated fiber-optic radiation sensor for the simultaneous detection of neutrons and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Lee, Bong Soo; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2011-04-01

    Sometimes, detection of thermal neutrons in the presence of gamma rays is required. This study developed and characterized an integrated fiber-optic radiation sensor for the simultaneous detection of thermal neutrons and gamma rays in a mixed radiation field. The performance of the integrated sensor was verified by measuring the distributions of thermal neutrons and gamma rays released from a nuclear fuel rod at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly. The experimental results show that the integrated sensor produced similar distribution patterns to those of thermal neutrons and gamma rays released from a fuel rod.

  15. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  16. Thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba and 141Pr using Am-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal-neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba(n, γ)139Ba and 141Pr(n, γ)142Pr were measured by activation method using an isotopic Am-Be neutron source. The estimations were with respect to that of 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reference monitors. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 138 Ba with respect to 55 Mn is 0.410±0.023 b and with respect to 197 Au is 0.386±0.019 b. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 141 Pr with respect to 55 Mn is 11.36±1.29 b and with respect to 197 Au is 10.43±1.14 b. The resonance integrals for 138 Ba are 0.380±0.033 b (55 Mn) and 0.364±0.027 b (197 Au) and for 141 Pr are 21.05±2.88 b (55 Mn) and 15.27±1.87 b (197 Au). The comparison between the present measurements and various reported values are discussed. The cross sections corresponding to the selected isotopes are measured using an Am-Be source facility for the first time.

  17. An integral equation arising in two group neutron transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassell, J. S.; Williams, M. M. R.

    2003-07-01

    An integral equation describing the fuel distribution necessary to maintain a flat flux in a nuclear reactor in two group transport theory is reduced to the solution of a singular integral equation. The formalism developed enables the physical aspects of the problem to be better understood and its relationship with the corresponding diffusion theory model is highlighted. The integral equation is solved by reducing it to a non-singular Fredholm equation which is then evaluated numerically.

  18. Analytical Model for the Thermonuclear Instability in IGNITOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Sonnino, G.; Coppi, B.

    2013-10-01

    The non-linear energy balance equation for thermal equilibrium and stability, is analytically and numerically investigated in order to study the thermonuclear instability in the IGNITOR experiment facility. The expressions for the ion and the electron thermal coefficients, introduced in the thermal energy balance equation, are obtained by solving the nonlinear transport equations relevant to several collisional transport regimes (in particular the banana regime). The differential equation for the temperature profile at equilibrium is solved and the resulting profile is compared with the results obtained by a full transport code. The growth of the perturbation in the temperature is analyzed by integrating the equation in time. A scenario is considered where IGNITOR is led to operate in a slightly sub-critical regime by adding a small fraction of 3He to the nominal 50-50 Deuterium-Tritium mixture and heating the plasma by ICRH power. Sponsored in part by the US DOE.

  19. Analysis of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Prototype of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)‡

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Scott, Dan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    TFTR produced world record of 10 million watts of controlled fusion power1 (CFP-1994) was summarized in Review1. We present evidence3 that: (1) TFTR input vs. output was 40 to 10 MW i.e. a power loss. (2) Review claims no experimental evidence for thermonuclear CFP production (only a calculation). (3) Ultra-high vacuum (UHV) required for τE = 0.2 s is 10-9 torr. TFTR had no UHV pumps, resulting in 10-3 torr, restricting τE <10-6 s, << thermalization time; 0.1 s., hence DT plasma did not occur. (4) Carbon ions were presented as D-T plasma. (5) Unknown neutron detector on unexplained neutron diamagnetic effect, measured ``fusion neutron power'' without particle energy identification, energy or coincidence. (6) 8 of 9 parameters claimed were inferred not measured. Quadratic test of TFTR data results2 in zero thermonuclear fusion power contribution to 10 MW: SFP = (0 +/- 1)%. ‡ Submitted to Physics of Plasmas†

  20. Integral experiments on thorium assemblies with D-T neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Yiwei; Feng, Song; Zheng, Lei; Lai, Caifeng; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Mei; Jiang, Li

    2017-09-01

    To validate nuclear data and code in the neutronics design of a hybrid reactor with thorium, integral experiments in two kinds of benchmark thorium assemblies with a D-T fusion neutron source have been performed. The one kind of 1D assemblies consists of polyethylene and depleted uranium shells. The other kind of 2D assemblies consists of three thorium oxide cylinders. The capture reaction rates, fission reaction rates, and (n, 2n) reaction rates in 232Th in the assemblies are measured by ThO2 foils. The leakage neutron spectra from the ThO2 cylinders are measured by a liquid scintillation detector. The experimental uncertainties in all the results are analyzed. The measured results are compared to the calculated ones with MCNP code and ENDF/B-VII.0 library data.

  1. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  2. Enterphase Integrity of Neutron Irradiated SiC Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.; Snead, L.L.

    1999-11-30

    SiC/SiC composites were fabricated from Hi-Nicalon{trademark} fibers with carbon, porous SiC and multilayer SiC interphases. These materials were then irradiated in the High Flux Beam Reactor with fast neutrons at 260 and 900-1060 degrees C to a dose of 1.1X10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} corresponding to 1.1 displacements per atom (dpa). Results are presented for bend strength of both non-irradiated and irradiated materials. Within the interphases studied the multilayer SiC interphase material showed the least degradation (8-20%) in ultimate bend stress, while porous SiC underwent the greatest degradation ({approximately}35%). The Fiber matrix interphases are studied with TEM for both nonirradiated and irradiated materials. While no irradiation induced microstructural evolution of the interphase was observed, debonding of the interphase from the fiber was observed for all cases. This debonding is attributed to tensile stresses developed at the interface due to densification of the Hi-Nicalon{trademark} fiber. Residual stress analysis of the fiber matrix interface indicates that the irradiation-induced densification of Hi-Nicalon{trademark} and the volumetric expansion of the CVD SiC matrix cause tensile stresses well in excess of those which can be withstood by these, or any other viable SiC composite interphase.

  3. Evidence of Spreading Layer Emission in a Thermonuclear Superburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K. I. I.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Kuulkers, E.

    2016-10-01

    When a neutron star (NS) accretes matter from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary, the accreted gas settles onto the stellar surface through a boundary/spreading layer. On rare occasions the accumulated gas undergoes a powerful thermonuclear superburst powered by carbon burning deep below the NS atmosphere. In this paper, we apply the non-negative matrix factorization spectral decomposition technique to show that the spectral variations during a superburst from 4U 1636-536 can be explained by two distinct components: (1) the superburst emission characterized by a variable temperature blackbody radiation component and (2) a quasi-Planckian component with a constant, ˜2.5 keV, temperature varying by a factor of ˜15 in flux. The spectrum of the quasi-Planckian component is identical in shape and characteristics to the frequency-resolved spectra observed in the accretion/persistent spectrum of NS low-mass X-ray binaries and agrees well with the predictions of the spreading layer model by Inogamov & Sunyaev. Our results provide yet more observational evidence that superbursts—and possibly also normal X-ray bursts—induce changes in the disc-star boundary.

  4. Detection of burning ashes from thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajava, J. J. E.; Nättilä, J.; Poutanen, J.; Cumming, A.; Suleimanov, V.; Kuulkers, E.

    2017-01-01

    When neutron stars (NS) accrete gas from low-mass binary companions, explosive nuclear burning reactions in the NS envelope fuse hydrogen and helium into heavier elements. The resulting thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts produce energy spectra that are fit well with black bodies, but a significant number of burst observations show deviations from Planck spectra. Here we present our analysis of RXTE/PCA observations of X-ray bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary HETE J1900.1-2455. We have discovered that the non-Planckian spectra are caused by photoionization edges. The anticorrelation between the strength of the edges and the colour temperature suggests that the edges are produced by the nuclear burning ashes that have been transported upwards by convection and become exposed at the photosphere. The atmosphere model fits show that occasionally the photosphere can consist entirely of metals, and that the peculiar changes in blackbody temperature and radius can be attributed to the emergence and disappearance of metals in the photosphere. As the metals are detected already in the Eddington-limited phase, it is possible that a radiatively driven wind ejects some of the burning ashes into the interstellar space.

  5. Nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae driven by asymmetric thermonuclear ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2012-11-01

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf. They can be used as mature cosmological standardized candles, leading to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. However, the explosion mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. In this paper, we first present nucleosynthetic features of a leading explosion scenario, namely a delayed-detonation scenario. Based on this, we propose a new and strong observational constraint on the explosion mechanism through emission lines from neutron-rich Fe-peaks. Especially, we show that an asymmetry in the explosion is likely a generic feature. We further argue that the diversity arising from various viewing angles can be an origin of observational diversities of SNe Ia seen in their spectral features (suspected possible biases in cosmology) and colors (related to the extinction estimate in cosmology). Using these new insights could open up a possibility of using SNe Ia as more precise distance indicators than currently employed.

  6. Nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae driven by asymmetric thermonuclear ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2012-11-12

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf. They can be used as mature cosmological standardized candles, leading to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. However, the explosion mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. In this paper, we first present nucleosynthetic features of a leading explosion scenario, namely a delayed-detonation scenario. Based on this, we propose a new and strong observational constraint on the explosion mechanism through emission lines from neutron-rich Fe-peaks. Especially, we show that an asymmetry in the explosion is likely a generic feature. We further argue that the diversity arising from various viewing angles can be an origin of observational diversities of SNe Ia seen in their spectral features (suspected possible biases in cosmology) and colors (related to the extinction estimate in cosmology). Using these new insights could open up a possibility of using SNe Ia as more precise distance indicators than currently employed.

  7. Fermi-GBM detection of a thermonuclear burst from 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenke, P.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2012-05-01

    We report the detection with Fermi-GBM (daily CTIME data, 12-25 keV band) of an X-ray burst from a location consistent with the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and thermonuclear burster 4U 1608-52. The burst peak occurred on May 2, 2012 at 06:47:54 UTC. The Fermi-GBM location of the burst is R.A.(J2000) = 241.3 deg, DEC(J2000) = -51.1 deg (1.8 deg from 4U 1608-52) with a 1 sigma error of 4.7 deg.

  8. ON THE COOLING TAILS OF THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS: THE IGR J17480-2446 LINK

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Van der Klis, M.

    2011-06-01

    The neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, recently discovered in the globular cluster Terzan 5, showed unprecedented bursting activity during its 2010 October-November outburst. We analyzed all X-ray bursts detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and find strong evidence that they all have a thermonuclear origin, despite the fact that many do not show the canonical spectral softening along the decay imprinted on type I X-ray bursts by the cooling of the neutron star photosphere. We show that the persistent-to-burst power ratio is fully consistent with the accretion-to-thermonuclear efficiency ratio along the whole outburst, as is typical for type I X-ray bursts. The burst energy, peak luminosity, and daily-averaged spectral profiles all evolve smoothly throughout the outburst, in parallel with the persistent (non-burst) luminosity. We also find that the peak-burst to persistent luminosity ratio determines whether or not cooling is present in the bursts from IGR J17480-2446, and argue that the apparent lack of cooling is due to the 'non-cooling' bursts having both a lower peak temperature and a higher non-burst (persistent) emission. We conclude that the detection of cooling along the decay is a sufficient, but not a necessary condition to identify an X-ray burst as thermonuclear. Finally, we compare these findings with X-ray bursts from other rapidly accreting neutron stars.

  9. MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cumming, A.; Keek, L.

    2012-04-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

  10. Fitting Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra Using Kalman Filter Integrated with Empire Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobre, G. P. A.; Herman, M.; Hoblit, S.; Palumbo, A.; Capote, R.; Trkov, A.

    2014-04-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) have proven to have a significant effect on criticality of selected benchmarks, in some cases as important as cross-sections. Therefore, a precise determination of uncertainties in PFNS is desired. Existing PFNS evaluations in nuclear data libraries relied so far almost exclusively on the Los Alamos model. However, deviations of evaluated data from available experiments have been noticed at both low and high neutron emission energies. New experimental measurements of PFNS have been recently published, thus demanding new evaluations. The present work describes the effort of integrating Kalman and EMPIRE codes in such a way to allow for parameter fitting of PFNS models. The first results are shown for the major actinides for two different PFNS models (Kornilov and Los Alamos). This represents the first step towards reevaluation of both cross-section and fission spectra data considering both microscopic and integral experimental data for major actinides.

  11. METHOD OF MEASURING THE INTEGRATED ENERGY OUTPUT OF A NEUTRONIC CHAIN REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sturm, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A method is presented for measuring the integrated energy output of a reactor conslsting of the steps of successively irradiating calibrated thin foils of an element, such as gold, which is rendered radioactive by exposure to neutron flux for periods of time not greater than one-fifth the mean life of the induced radioactlvity and producing an indication of the radioactivity induced in each foil, each foil belng introduced into the reactor immediately upon removal of its predecessor.

  12. Burst Oscillations: A New Spin on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have shown that the X-ray flux during thermonuclear X-ray bursts fr-om accreting neutron stars is often strongly pulsed at frequencies as high as 620 Hz. We now know that these oscillations are produced by spin modulation of the thermonuclear flux from the neutron star surface. In addition to revealing the spin frequency, they provide new ways to probe the properties and physics of accreting neutron stars. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these oscillations and discuss what they are telling us about neutron stars.

  13. Burst Oscillations: A New Spin on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have shown that the X-ray flux during thermonuclear X-ray bursts fr-om accreting neutron stars is often strongly pulsed at frequencies as high as 620 Hz. We now know that these oscillations are produced by spin modulation of the thermonuclear flux from the neutron star surface. In addition to revealing the spin frequency, they provide new ways to probe the properties and physics of accreting neutron stars. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these oscillations and discuss what they are telling us about neutron stars.

  14. 30S(α , p) Thermonuclear Reaction Rate from Experimental Level Structure of 34Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Chen, A. A.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    Type I X-ray bursts are the most frequent thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy. Owing to their recurrence from known astronomical objects, burst morphology is extensively documented, and they are modeled very successfully as neutron-deficient, thermonuclear runaway on the surface of accreting neutron stars. While reaction networks include hundreds of isotopes and thousands of nuclear processes, only a small subset appear to play a pivotal role. One such reaction is the 30S(α , p) reaction, which is believed to be a crucial link in the explosive helium burning which is responsible for the large energy flux. However, very little experimental information is available concerning the cross section itself, nor the 34Ar compound nucleus at the relevant energies. We performed the first study of the entrance channel via 30S alpha resonant elastic scattering using a state-of-the-art, low-energy, 30S radioactive ion beam. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics using a newly-developed active target. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation function reveals previously unknown resonances, including their quantum properties of spin, parity, width, and energy.

  15. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  16. Motofit - integrating neutron reflectometry acquisition, reduction and analysis into one, easy to use, package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The efficient use of complex neutron scattering instruments is often hindered by the complex nature of their operating software. This complexity exists at each experimental step: data acquisition, reduction and analysis, with each step being as important as the previous. For example, whilst command line interfaces are powerful at automated acquisition they often reduce accessibility by novice users and sometimes reduce the efficiency for advanced users. One solution to this is the development of a graphical user interface which allows the user to operate the instrument by a simple and intuitive "push button" approach. This approach was taken by the Motofit software package for analysis of multiple contrast reflectometry data. Here we describe the extension of this package to cover the data acquisition and reduction steps for the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer. Consequently, the complete operation of an instrument is integrated into a single, easy to use, program, leading to efficient instrument usage.

  17. Approximating the r-Process on Earth with Thermonuclear Explosions. Lessons Learned and Unanswered Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Stephen Allan

    2016-01-28

    During the astrophysical r-process, multiple neutron captures occur so rapidly on target nuclei that their daughter nuclei generally do not have time to undergo radioactive decay before another neutron is captured. The r-process can be approximately simulated on Earth in certain types of thermonuclear explosions through an analogous process of rapid neutron captures known as the "prompt capture" process. Between 1952 and 1969, 23 nuclear tests were fielded by the US which were involved (at least partially) with the "prompt capture" process. Of these tests, 15 were at least partially successful. Some of these tests were conducted under the Plowshare Peaceful Nuclear Explosion Program as scientific research experiments. It is now known that the USSR conducted similar nuclear tests during 1966 to 1979. The elements einsteinium and fermium were first discovered by this process. The most successful tests achieved 19 successive neutron captures on the initial target nuclei. A review of the US program, target nuclei used, heavy element yields, scientific achievements of the program, and how some of the results have been used by the astrophysical community is given. Finally, some unanswered questions concerning very neutron-rich nuclei that could potentially have been answered with additional nuclear experiments is presented.

  18. Approximating the r-Process on Earth with Thermonuclear Explosions: Lessons Learned and Unanswered Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S. A.

    During the astrophysical r-process, multiple neutron captures occur so rapidly on target nuclei that their daughter nuclei generally do not have time to undergo radioactive decay before another neutron is captured. The r-process can be approximately simulated on Earth in certain types of thermonuclear explosions through an analogous process of rapid neutron captures known as the "prompt capture" process. Between 1952 and 1969, 23 nuclear tests were fielded by the US which were involved (at least partially) with the "prompt capture" process. Of these tests, 15 were at least partially successful. Some of these tests were conducted under the Plowshare Peaceful Nuclear Explosion Program as scientific research experiments. It is now known that the USSR conducted similar nuclear tests during 1966 to 1979. The elements einsteinium and fermium were first discovered by this process. The most successful tests achieved 19 successive neutron captures on the initial target nuclei. A review of the US program, target nuclei used, heavy element yields, scientific achievements of the program, and how some of the results have been used by the astrophysical community is given. Finally, some unanswered questions concerning very neutron-rich nuclei that could potentially have been answered with additional nuclear experiments is presented.

  19. Criticality and axial offset searches based on the integrated neutron balance approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Osso, A.; Van Geemert, R.

    2013-07-01

    Criticality and axial offset (AO) searches are key features in the simulation of plant operation procedures. Typically, the dedicated algorithms consist of either a Newton method or a secant method that features the successive computation of difference quotients to be used as derivatives. Within this context, computational robustness and efficiency are of paramount importance. This applies in particular to when the variations imposed during the search are spatially heterogeneous, such as in the case of tuning control rod positions for achieving target AO. In order to optimize this kind of search capability in AREVA NP's reactor code ARTEMIS in accordance with this design principle, a generalized approach has been implemented that harmonizes very well numerically with the overall multi-physics iterative solution process. As embedded in the latter, the new neutronic integral re-balancing approach is defined through periodic whole-core space-energy integrations of the principal terms in the core-integrated process-rate balance terms (i.e. neutron absorption, production and leakage). This procedure yields sequences of single zero-dimensional equations from which the chosen tuning parameters can be solved directly in dependence of the imposed (and systematically fixed) values for the response quantities k{sub eff} and/or AO. The converged result of the iteration sequence of successively obtained search parameter values is final in terms of being fully consistent with the entire set of multi-physics equations while enabling the accurate fulfillment of the target response value. The k etc and AO searches can be pursued simultaneously. Judging from the results of pursued verifications, the neutronic integral re-balancing approach fulfils the above-mentioned expectations convincingly. Specific verification examples are presented, such as the determination of the insertion depth of a critical control bank, a double search on target criticality and target AO by adjusting the

  20. Thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction induced by pulsed neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Kye, Yong-Uk; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2017-10-01

    We measured the thermal neutron cross-section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction. Sm and Au foils with and without a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the electron linac. The induced activities of the reaction products were determined via high energy resolution HPGe detector. The present results: σ0,Sm =212±8 b and I0,Sm =3.02±0.19 kb are consistent with most of the existing reference data.

  1. Hydrodynamics and nucleosynthesis in neutron stars, supernovae, and the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.

    1996-03-01

    In this proposal we apply laboratory expertise in integrated numerical modeling of relativistic hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and thermonuclear reaction rates to forefront areas of basic research in areas of astrophysical interest. These studies include the last stages of a merging neutron-star binary system; the pre-collapse, collapse, and post-collapse evolution of supernova cores; the violent relaxation, protogalactic mergers, and stellar nucleosynthesis associated with galaxy formation and studies of primordial nucleosynthesis during the big bang. This project provides unique high-visibility solutions to current technical problems while enriching current laboratory capabilities in the relevant disciplines.

  2. Constraining the mass-radius relation of neutron stars through superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In't Zand, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Superbursts are thermonuclear X-ray flashes on neutron stars that last up to 14~hr. We propose to carry out 2 quick 25 ks XMM-Newton triggered observations on superbursts from any of 30 (candidate) superbursters that persistently radiate at 30% of Eddington or slower, with the purpose to carry out X-ray spectroscopy of the neutron star surface and constrain the mass-radius relation and equation of state of neutron stars. We will make use of superburst alerts from INTEGRAL/IBIS, Swift/BAT and ISS-MAXI. The potential of this program is at least as good as that of the program on EXO 0748-676, but at much reduced exposure requirements (50 ks in total).

  3. Constraining the mass-radius relation of neutron stars through superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, Jean

    2010-10-01

    Superbursts are thermonuclear X-ray flashes on neutron stars that last up to 14 hr. We propose to carry out 2 quick 25 ks XMM-Newton triggered observations on superbursts from any of 23 (candidate) superbursters that persistently radiate at 30% of Eddington or slower, to carry out high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the neutron star surface and constrain the mass-radius relation and equation of state of neutron stars. We will make use of superburst alerts from INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT. The potential of this program is at least as good as that of the program on EXO 0748-676, but at much reduced exposure requirements (50 ks in total).

  4. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Jacob; Kozub, Raymond L.; Smith, Michael S.; Scott, Jason; Lingerfelt, Eric

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is vital to simulate novae, supernovae, X-ray bursts, and other astrophysical events. To facilitate dissemination of this knowledge, a set of tools has been created for managing reaction rates, located at www.nucastrodata.org. One tool is a rate parameterizer, which provides a parameterization for nuclear reaction rate vs. temperature values in the most widely used functional form. Currently, the parameterizer uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM), which requires an initial estimate of the best-fit parameters. The initial estimate is currently provided randomly from a preselected pool. To improve the quality of fits, a new, active method of selecting parameters has been developed. The parameters of each set in the pool are altered for a few iterations to replicate the input data as closely as possible. Then, the set which most nearly matches the input data (based on chi squared) is used in the LMM as the initial estimate for the final fitting procedure. A description of the new, active algorithm and its performance will be presented. Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy.

  5. Bayesian Estimation of Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliadis, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Coc, A.; Timmes, F. X.; Starrfield, S.

    2016-11-01

    The problem of estimating non-resonant astrophysical S-factors and thermonuclear reaction rates, based on measured nuclear cross sections, is of major interest for nuclear energy generation, neutrino physics, and element synthesis. Many different methods have been applied to this problem in the past, almost all of them based on traditional statistics. Bayesian methods, on the other hand, are now in widespread use in the physical sciences. In astronomy, for example, Bayesian statistics is applied to the observation of extrasolar planets, gravitational waves, and Type Ia supernovae. However, nuclear physics, in particular, has been slow to adopt Bayesian methods. We present astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates based on Bayesian statistics. We develop a framework that incorporates robust parameter estimation, systematic effects, and non-Gaussian uncertainties in a consistent manner. The method is applied to the reactions d(p,γ)3He, 3He(3He,2p)4He, and 3He(α,γ)7Be, important for deuterium burning, solar neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  6. Development of an integrated Monte Carlo model for glioblastoma multiforme treated with boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Moghaddasi, Leyla; Bezak, Eva

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are notorious for their high fatality rate. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) being a biochemically targeted type of radiotherapy is a potent modality for GBM. In the current work, a BNCT treatment modelling framework for GBM was developed. Optimal Clinical Target Volume (CTV) margins for GBM-BNCT and the BNCT efficacy have been investigated. The model integrated a cell-based dosimetry model, an in-house-developed epithermal neutron beam model and previously-developed Microscopic Extension Probability (MEP) model. The system was defined as a cubic ICRP-brain phantom divided into 20 μm side voxels. The corresponding (10)B concentrations in GBM and normal brain cells were applied. The in-silico model was irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam using 2 and 2.5 cm CTV margins. Results from the cell-based dosimetry and the MEP models were combined to calculate GBM cell survival fractions (SF) post BNCT and compared to x-ray radiotherapy (XRT) SFs. Compared to XRT, the SF within the beam decreased by five orders of magnitudes and the total SF was reduced three times following BNCT. CTV extension by 0.5 cm reduced the SF by additional (53.8 ± 0.3)%. In conclusion, BNCT results in a more efficient cell kill. The extension of the CTV margin, however, may not increase the treatment outcome significantly.

  7. Development of an integrated thermal-hydraulics capability incorporating RELAP5 and PANTHER neutronics code

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.; Jones, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    Ensuring that safety analysis needs are met in the future is likely to lead to the development of new codes and the further development of existing codes. It is therefore advantageous to define standards for data interfaces and to develop software interfacing techniques which can readily accommodate changes when they are made. Defining interface standards is beneficial but is necessarily restricted in application if future requirements are not known in detail. Code interfacing methods are of particular relevance with the move towards automatic grid frequency response operation where the integration of plant dynamic, core follow and fault study calculation tools is considered advantageous. This paper describes the background and features of a new code TALINK (Transient Analysis code LINKage program) used to provide a flexible interface to link the RELAP5 thermal hydraulics code with the PANTHER neutron kinetics and the SIBDYM whole plant dynamic modelling codes used by Nuclear Electric. The complete package enables the codes to be executed in parallel and provides an integrated whole plant thermal-hydraulics and neutron kinetics model. In addition the paper discusses the capabilities and pedigree of the component codes used to form the integrated transient analysis package and the details of the calculation of a postulated Sizewell `B` Loss of offsite power fault transient.

  8. Effect of accidental steam entry on gas-cooled fast reactor integral neutronics parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Morman, J.A.; Bucher, R.G.; Smith, D.M.; Robinson, W.R.; Bennett, E.F.

    1980-10-01

    A possible accident scenario in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is the leakage of secondary steam into the core. A full-scale experimental study of the physics effects of such an accidental condition has been performed on the zero power reactor (ZPR)-9 critical facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The results of integral neutronics measurements performed on the simulated steam-flooded GCFR core are reported, and comparisons with corresponding results for the reference GCFR core presented. Results of calculations of these parameters with ENDF/B-IV nuclear data and standard design methods are also presented. 26 refs.

  9. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  10. On the helical instability and efficient stagnation pressure production in thermonuclear magnetized inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion experiments produce thermonuclear neutrons from plasma compressed to high convergence via z-pinch. Fusion fuel contained within a cylindrical metal liner is premagnetized with an axial field and laser-preheated prior to the liner's implosion by the JxB force. Convergence greater than 40 is inferred from x-ray self-emission spectroscopy and backlit x-ray radiography. The unprecedented stability is enabled by helical modes induced in the magnetized liner, the cause of which will be discussed, because of the suppression of the ubiquitous m=0 modes of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability found in many z-pinch implosions. The plasma temperature and flux are compressed to several keV and 100 MG at stagnation, enough to magnetically trap alpha particles and provide ``bootstrap'' self-heating when scaled to larger fusion yields with DT fuel. We present quantitative comparison between experimental observables and 3D modeling in support of the interpretation that this approach to laboratory fusion can scale to larger thermonuclear yields. Namely, the implosions efficiently convert liner kinetic energy to stagnated fuel internal energy with the expected pressures of 1 Gbar and burn durations of 2 ns, in agreement with both 2D and 3D modeling. Therefore, the analysis indicates the magnetized hot-spot dynamics are not dominated by implosion instability or residual kinetic energy in our best-performing experiments, wherein laser-induced non-fuel mix into the forming hot spot is low.

  11. THE RETURN OF THE BURSTS: THERMONUCLEAR FLASHES FROM CIRCINUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Homan, J.; Chakrabarty, D.; Watts, A.; Altamirano, D.; Degenaar, N.; Yang, Y.; Wijnands, R.; Armas-Padilla, M.; Cavecchi, Y.; Kalamkar, M.; Kaur, R.; Patruno, A.; Van der Klis, M.; Soleri, P.; Casella, P.; Rea, N.

    2010-08-10

    We report the detection of 15 X-ray bursts with RXTE and Swift observations of the peculiar X-ray binary Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) during its 2010 May X-ray re-brightening. These are the first X-ray bursts observed from the source after the initial discovery by Tennant and collaborators, 25 years ago. By studying their spectral evolution, we firmly identify nine of the bursts as type I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts. We obtain an arcsecond location of the bursts that confirms once and for all the identification of Cir X-1 as a type I X-ray burst source, and therefore as a low magnetic field accreting neutron star. The first five bursts observed by RXTE are weak and show approximately symmetric light curves, without detectable signs of cooling along the burst decay. We discuss their possible nature. Finally, we explore a scenario to explain why Cir X-1 shows thermonuclear bursts now but not in the past, when it was extensively observed and accreting at a similar rate.

  12. Thermonuclear and Beam-Target Fusion in Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-Pinch Implosions: Theory and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Deeney, C.; Cooper, G.; Franklin, J.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2005-10-01

    Recent experiments with 8 cm diameter deuterium gas puff implosions on the Z accelerator at currents from 13 to 17 MA demonstrated reproducible production of high neutron yields, up to ˜3x10^13. We report the results of 1-D and 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of these experiments. The simulations predict relatively low, ˜10-fold, radial compression ratios, and rapid bouncing of the imploded plasma due to small radiative energy losses. Simulated spectra with argon and freon R12 dopants in the deuterium agree with the observations. Calculated temperature, density, and inertial confinement time of the stagnated plasma are consistent with the hypothesis of thermonuclear origin of the observed neutrons. The alternative assumption of beam-target neutron generation in these experiments implies an unusually high, ˜10% efficiency of energy conversion into non-thermal deuterium ions, and multi-MA levels of the ion beam current.

  13. Thermonuclear supernova light curves: Progenitors and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.

    Thermonuclear Supernovae (TN SNe) are an extremely important tool in modern astronomy. In their role as cosmological distance probes, they have revealed the accelerated expansion of the universe and have begun to constrain the nature of the dark energy that may be driving that expansion. The next decade will see a succession of wide-field surveys producing thousands of TNSN detections each year. Traditional methods of SN analysis, rooted in time-intensive spectroscopic follow-up, will become completely impractical. To realize the potential of this coming tide of massive data sets, we will need to extract cosmographic parameters (redshift and luminosity distance) from SN photometry without any spectroscopic support. In this dissertation, I present the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method, an innovative new approach to the analysis of SN light curves. SOFT uses the framework of fuzzy set theory to perform direct comparisons of SN candidates against template light curves, simultaneously producing both classifications and cosmological parameter estimates. The SOFT method allows us to shed new light on two rich archival data sets. I revisit the IfA Deep Survey and HST GOODS to extract new and improved measurements of the TNSN rate from z=0.2 out to z=1.6. Our new analysis shows a steady increase in the TNSN rate out to z˜1, and adds support for a decrease in the rate at z=1.5. Comparing these rate measurements to theoretical models, I conclude that the progenitor scenario most favored by the collective observational data is a single degenerate model, regulated by a strong wind from the accreting white dwarf. Using a compilation of SN light curves from five recent surveys, I demonstrate that SOFT is able to derive useful constraints on cosmological models from a data set with no spectroscopic information at all. Looking ahead to the near future, I find that photometric analysis of data sets containing 2,000 SNe will be able to improve our constraints on

  14. Astrophysics Simulations from the ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes

    DOE Data Explorer

    The "Flash Center" works to solve the long-standing problem of thermonuclear flashes on the surfaces of compact stars such as neutron stars and white dwarfs, and in the interior of white dwarfs (i.e., Type I supernovae). The physical conditions, and many of the physical phenomena, are similar to those confronted by the Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship program. The (fully ionized) plasmas are at very high temperatures and densities; and the physical problems of nuclear ignition, deflagration or detonation, turbulent mixing, and interface dynamics for complex multicomponent fluids are common to the weapons program. Because virtually every aspect of this problem represents a computational Grand Challenge, large-scale numerical simulations are at the heart of its resolution (Taken from Executive Summary page). More than 35 simulations and computer animations developed through research at the "Flash Center" are available here. The collection offers .avi, .flv, or .mpeg file downloads as well as references to related research papers or presentations.

  15. ATR LEU Monolithic Foil-Type Fuel with Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber – Neutronics Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray Chang

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The burnable absorber - 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and to improve the peak ratio of the inner/outer heat flux. The present work investigates the LEU Monolithic foil-type fuel with 10B Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber (ICBA) design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of this proposed fuel designs. The proposed LEU fuel specification in this work is directly related to both the RERTR LEU Development Program and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) LEU Conversion Project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  16. Brazed dispersion strengthened copper: The effect of neutron irradiation and transmutation on bond integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Samal, P.; Troxell, J.D.

    1999-10-01

    Four types of brazes were used to join sheets of GLIDCOP{trademark} Al25. Miniature tensile specimens were fabricated from the joints and irradiated under various conditions for a study of their response to high temperature neutron irradiation in FFTF. Two of the sets of specimens, brazed with TiCuAg and TiCuNi, were found to possess low quality joints because of excessive diffusion of silver into the base metal in the case of TiCuAg, and melting of the base metal in the case of the TiCuNi. Joints produced with a CuAu braze were satisfactory for the unirradiated state, but transmutation of Au to Hg affected the integrity of the joints irradiated in a below-core position where the transmutation rate per dpa was rather high. A CuAg braze yielded satisfactory joints in the unirradiated state and held up well when the irradiated specimens were tested. However, transmutation of Ag to Cd leads to a high residual radioactivity that may limit the usefulness of this braze after exposure to neutron irradiation.

  17. Thermonuclear supernovae: simulations of the deflagration stage and their implications.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y; Rosenberg, Robert O

    2003-01-03

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation.

  18. Nuclear physics problems for accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.K.; Woosley, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of p(e/sup -/nu)n and of (p,..gamma..) reactions on /sup 56/Ni during a thermonuclear runaway on a neutron star surface is pointed out. A fast 16-isotope approximate nuclear reaction network is developed that is suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations of such events.

  19. On the Integration of a Readout System Dedicated for Neutron Discrimination in Harsh Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Krit, S.; Rahajandraibe, W.; Coulié-Castellani, K.; Micolau, G.; Lyoussi, A.

    2016-02-01

    New insights related to the integration of a readout system dedicated for the detection and discrimination of neutrons are presented here. This study takes place in the framework of the I_SMART European project. This system will have to work later in a harsh environment in terms of temperature and radiations, what makes not only the development of specifications for operation and reliability of the components necessary but also the investigation of margins for the interplay of the system. Implementation of the analog conditioning chain at transistor level (AMS (Analog/Mixed Signal) 0.35μm CMOS technology) is investigated here where electrical performances have been validated at SPICE-level simulations using "Spectre" simulator (SPICE-based) under Cadence DFII.

  20. Isotope effects in water as investigated by neutron diffraction and path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Philip S.; Fischer, Henry E.; Neuefeind, Jörg C.; Simonson, J. Mike; Markland, Thomas E.

    2012-07-01

    The structures of heavy and light water at 300 K were investigated by using a joint approach in which the method of neutron diffraction with oxygen isotope substitution was complemented by path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The diffraction results, which give intra-molecular O-D and O-H bond distances of 0.985(5) and 0.990(5) Å, were found to be in best agreement with those obtained by using the flexible anharmonic TTM3-F water model. Both techniques show a difference of ≃ 0.5% between the O-D and O-H intra-molecular bond lengths, and the results support a competing quantum effects model for water in which its structural and dynamical properties are governed by an offset between intra-molecular and inter-molecular quantum contributions. Further consideration of the O-O correlations is needed in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  1. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Christensen, K; Danly, C; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D; Grim, G P; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Merrill, F E; Skulina, K; Volegov, P; Wilde, C

    2015-12-01

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  2. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R. Danly, C.; Fatherley, V. E.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C.; Christensen, K.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G. P.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Skulina, K.

    2015-12-15

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pulse profiles for simulated thermonuclear bursts (Stevens+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer's line of sight, with an accuracy of <=3% compared to the true value and with <=5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to <=5%, with respective uncertainties of <=7% and <=10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ~1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are >~60deg. (2 data files).

  4. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  5. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is

  6. Thermonuclear Fusion: An Energy Source for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, William E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research in thermonuclear fusion with particular emphasis on the problem of confining hot plasma. Recent experiments indicate that magnetic bottles called tokamaks may achieve the necessary confinement times, and this break-through has given renewed optimism to the feasibility of commercial fusion power by the turn of the…

  7. Thermonuclear Fusion: An Energy Source for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, William E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research in thermonuclear fusion with particular emphasis on the problem of confining hot plasma. Recent experiments indicate that magnetic bottles called tokamaks may achieve the necessary confinement times, and this break-through has given renewed optimism to the feasibility of commercial fusion power by the turn of the…

  8. A Low-Power and In Situ Annealing Mitigation Technique for Fast Neutrons Irradiation of Integrated Temperature Sensing Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Laurent A.; Andre, Nicolas; Gerard, Pierre; Flandre, Denis; Ali, S. Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2015-07-01

    High doses of fast neutrons is detrimental to the performance of most common solid-state devices such as diodes and transistors. The ionizing effect is observed in particular for diodes used as simple integrated temperature sensors, or thermo-diodes, when their junction voltage is measured at constant current bias. In this work, we present a low-power and in situ mitigation technique based on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) micro-hot-plates to recover thermo-diodes. The basic operating principle consists in annealing the temperature-sensitive diodes integrated on the membrane during or after their irradiation in order to restore similar sensing characteristics over time. We measured thermo-diodes integrated to micro-hot-plates during their irradiation by fast neutrons (23 MeV peak) with total doses about 2.97±0.08 kGy. The membrane annealing is taking place at 450 deg. C using 40 mW of electrical power. Thanks to the annealing, the diode keeps a total measurement error below 0.5 deg. C. In this harsh radiation environment and beside the good tolerance of the thermo-diodes and the membrane materials to the total ionizing dose, the thermo-diode located on the heating membrane keeps a constant sensitivity. The demonstrated resistance of micro-hot-plates and the integrated thermo-diodes to fast neutron radiations can extend their use in nuclear plants and for radiation detectors. (authors)

  9. Monte Carlo analysis of a time-dependent neutron and secondary gamma-ray integral experiment on a thick concrete and steel shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, S. N.; Roussin, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis of a time-dependent neutron and secondary gamma-ray integral experiment on a thick concrete and steel shield is presented. The energy range covered in the analysis is 15-2 MeV for neutron source energies. The multigroup MORSE code was used with the VITAMIN C 171-36 neutron-gamma-ray cross-section data set. Both neutron and gamma-ray count rates and unfolded energy spectra are presented and compared, with good general agreement, with experimental results.

  10. MULTI-INSTRUMENT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS WITH SHORT RECURRENCE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Heger, A.; Galloway, D. K.; In't Zand, J. J. M.

    2010-07-20

    Type I X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries result from a thermonuclear runaway in the material accreted onto the neutron star. Although typical recurrence times are a few hours, consistent with theoretical ignition model predictions, there are also observations of bursts occurring as promptly as 10 minutes or less after the previous event. We present a comprehensive assessment of this phenomenon using a catalog of 3387 bursts observed with the BeppoSAX/WFCs and RXTE/PCA X-ray instruments. This catalog contains 136 bursts with recurrence times of less than 1 hr, that come in multiples of up to four events, from 15 sources. Short recurrence times are not observed from the so-called ultra-compact binaries, indicating that hydrogen-burning processes play a crucial role. As far as the neutron star spin frequency is known, these sources all spin fast at over 500 Hz; the rotationally induced mixing may explain burst recurrence times of the order of 10 minutes. Short recurrence time bursts generally occur at all mass accretion rates where normal bursts are observed, but for individual sources the short recurrence times may be restricted to a smaller interval of accretion rate. The fraction of such bursts is roughly 30%. We also report the shortest known recurrence time of 3.8 minutes.

  11. Vulnerability assessment of a space based weapon platform electronic system exposed to a thermonuclear weapon detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, C. L.; Johnson, J. O.

    Rapidly changing world events, the increased number of nations with inter-continental ballistic missile capability, and the proliferation of nuclear weapon technology will increase the number of nuclear threats facing the world today. Monitoring these nation's activities and providing an early warning and/or intercept system via reconnaissance and surveillance satellites and space based weapon platforms is a viable deterrent against a surprise nuclear attack. However, the deployment of satellite and weapon platform assets in space will subject the sensitive electronic equipment to a variety of natural and man-made radiation environments. These include Van Allen Belt protons and electrons; galactic and solar flare protons; and neutrons, gamma rays, and x-rays from intentionally detonated fission and fusion weapons. In this paper, the MASH vl.0 code system is used to estimate the dose to the critical electronics components of an idealized space based weapon platform from neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from a thermonuclear weapon detonation in space. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the platform fully loaded, and in several stages representing limited engagement scenarios. The results indicate vulnerabilities to the Command, Control, and Communication bay instruments from radiation damage for a nuclear weapon detonation for certain source/platform orientations. The distance at which damage occurs will depend on the weapon yield (n,(gamma)/kiloton) and size (kilotons).

  12. Use of liquid metals in nuclear and thermonuclear engineering, and in other innovative technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachkov, V. I.; Arnol'dov, M. N.; Efanov, A. D.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kozlov, F. A.; Loginov, N. I.; Orlov, Yu. I.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    By now, a good deal of experience has been gained with using liquid metals as coolants in nuclear power installations; extensive knowledge has been gained about the physical, thermophysical, and physicochemical properties of these coolants; and the scientific principles and a set of methods and means for handling liquid metals as coolants for nuclear power installations have been elaborated. Prototype and commercialgrade sodium-cooled NPP power units have been developed, including the BOR-60, BN-350, and BN-600 power units (the Soviet Union); the Rapsodie, Phenix, and Superphenix power units (France), the EBR-II power unit (the United States); and the PFR power unit (the United Kingdom). In Russia, dedicated nuclear power installations have been constructed, including those with a lead-bismuth coolant for nuclear submarines and with sodium-potassium alloy for spacecraft (the Buk and Topol installations), which have no analogs around the world. Liquid metals (primarily lithium and its alloy with lead) hold promise for use in thermonuclear power engineering, where they can serve not only as a coolant, but also as tritium-producing medium. In this article, the physicochemical properties of liquid metal coolants, as well as practical experience gained from using them in nuclear and thermonuclear power engineering and in innovative technologies are considered, and the lines of further research works are formulated. New results obtained from investigations carried out on the Pb-Bi and Pb for the SVBR and BREST fast-neutron reactors (referred to henceforth as fast reactors) and for controlled accelerator systems are described.

  13. Integrated doses calculation in evacuation scenarios of the neutron generator facility at Missouri S&T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.

    2016-08-01

    Any source of ionizing radiations could lead to considerable dose acquisition to individuals in a nuclear facility. Evacuation may be required when elevated levels of radiation is detected within a facility. In this situation, individuals are more likely to take the closest exit. This may not be the most expedient decision as it may lead to higher dose acquisition. The strategy followed in preventing large dose acquisitions should be predicated on the path that offers least dose acquisition. In this work, the neutron generator facility at Missouri University of Science and Technology was analyzed. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was used to model the entire floor of the generator's building. The simulated dose rates in the hallways were used to estimate the integrated doses for different paths leading to exits. It was shown that shortest path did not always lead to minimum dose acquisition and the approach was successful in predicting the expedient path as opposed to the approach of taking the nearest exit.

  14. Integrated P1 Hohlraum/Capsule Simulations with Comparison to Neutron and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, D. C.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P.; Jones, O. S.; Munro, D. H.; Peterson, J. L.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. K.; Benedetti, L. R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Knauer, J. P.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Yeamans, C. B.; McNaney, J. M.; Casey, D. T.; NIF Team

    2013-10-01

    We discuss integrated hohlraum/capsule simulations that drive a DT symcap capsule downward in a NIF experiment by increasing/decreasing the peak power in the upper/lower laser beams by 8%. This laser asymmetry results in a radiation drive P1/P0 at the capsule ablation surface of 2% and a downward capsule velocity of 125 microns/ns. The simulation shows small (<1%) changes in the P2 and P4 moments of the x-ray self-emission as compared to a simulation with no laser asymmetry. The calculated reduction in yield due to the induced P1 is 20%. Simulations for DT layered capsules for comparable velocities have yields an order of magnitude lower than simulations with stationary capsules. The velocity is measured by comparing the arrival times of DD and DT neutrons at detectors located at different locations. Preliminary data from a recent shot gives a downward velocity of order 100 microns/ns consistent with simulations. We also compare pre- and post-shot simulations with x-ray images at different energies. The ability to correct for capsule velocity, e.g., due to different upper/lower crossbeam transfer energies, is another tool in the quest for ignition. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-640047.

  15. Left–right asymmetry in integral spectra of γ-quanta in the interaction of nuclei with polarized thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Shul’gina, E. V.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents results of preliminarymeasurements of the left–right asymmetry in integral spectra of γ-quanta emitted in the interaction of polarized thermal neutrons with nuclei. These results indicate that for all cases of measured statistically significant P-odd asymmetry, the left–right asymmetry coefficient is much smaller than the P-odd asymmetry coefficient. This observation is not consistent with the predictions of theoretical calculations.

  16. Sonoluminescence, shock waves, and micro-thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.C.; Clarke, D.B.; White, J.W.; Young, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    We have performed numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the growth and collapse of a sonoluminescing bubble in a liquid. Our calculations show that spherically converging shock waves are generated during the collapse of the bubble. The combination of the shock waves and a realistic equation of state for the gas in the bubble provides an explanation for the measured picosecond optical pulse widths and indicates that the temperatures near the center of the bubble may exceed 3O eV. This leads naturally to speculation about obtaining micro-thermonuclear fusion in a bubble filled with deuterium (D{sub 2}) gas. Consequently, we performed numerical simulations of the collapse of a D{sub 2} bubble in D{sub 2}0. A pressure spike added to the periodic driving amplitude creates temperatures that may be sufficient to generate a very small, but measurable number of thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions in the bubble.

  17. Atypical Thermonuclear Supernovae from Tidally Crushed White Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Suggestive evidence has accumulated that intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) exist in some globular clusters. Some stars will inevitably wander sufficiently close to the hole to suffer a tidal disruption. IMBHs can disrupt not only solar-type stars but also compact white dwarf stars. We investigate the fate of white dwarfs that approach the hole close enough to be disrupted and compressed to such an extent that explosive nuclear burning is triggered. Based on a precise modeling of the gas dynamics together with the nuclear reactions, it is argued that thermonuclear ignition is a natural outcome for white dwarfs of all masses passing well within the tidal radius. A good fraction of the star is accreted, yielding high luminosities that persist for up to a year. A peculiar, underluminous thermonuclear explosion accompanied by a soft X-ray transient signal would, if detected, be a compelling testimony for the presence of an IMBH.

  18. Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel with high areal density.

    PubMed

    Betti, R; Zhou, C D; Anderson, K S; Perkins, L J; Theobald, W; Solodov, A A

    2007-04-13

    A novel method by C. Zhou and R. Betti [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 140 (2005)] to assemble and ignite thermonuclear fuel is presented. Massive cryogenic shells are first imploded by direct laser light with a low implosion velocity and on a low adiabat leading to fuel assemblies with large areal densities. The assembled fuel is ignited from a central hot spot heated by the collision of a spherically convergent ignitor shock and the return shock. The resulting fuel assembly features a hot-spot pressure greater than the surrounding dense fuel pressure. Such a nonisobaric assembly requires a lower energy threshold for ignition than the conventional isobaric one. The ignitor shock can be launched by a spike in the laser power or by particle beams. The thermonuclear gain can be significantly larger than in conventional isobaric ignition for equal driver energy.

  19. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.

    1986-01-01

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  20. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  1. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  2. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R.; Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Beklen, E.; Von Kienlin, A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  3. Evaluation of the cosmic-ray neutron method for measuring integral soil moisture dynamics of a forested head water catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, H. R.; Metzen, D.; Baatz, R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.; Huisman, J. A.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of low-energy secondary neutron intensity above the soil surface by cosmic-ray soil moisture probes (CRP) can be used to estimate soil moisture content. CRPs utilise the fact that high-energy neutrons initiated by cosmic rays are moderated (slowed to lower energies) most effectively by collisions with hydrogen atoms contained in water molecules in the soil. The conversion of neutron intensity to soil moisture content can potentially be complicated because neutrons are also moderated by aboveground water storage (e.g. vegetation water content, canopy storage of interception). Recently, it was demonstrated experimentally that soil moisture content derived from CRP measurements agrees well with average moisture content from gravimetric soil samples taken within the footprint of the cosmic ray probe, which is proposed to be up to several hundred meters in size [1]. However, the exact extension and shape of the CRP integration footprint is still an open question and it is also unclear how CRP measurements are affected by the soil moisture distribution within the footprint both in horizontal and vertical directions. In this paper, we will take advantage of an extensive wireless soil moisture sensor network covering most of the estimated footprint of the CRP. The network consists of 150 nodes and 900 soil moisture sensors which were installed in the small forested Wüstebach catchment (~27 ha) in the framework of the Transregio32 and the Helmholtz initiative TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) [2]. This unique soil moisture data set provides a consistent picture of the hydrological status of the catchment in a high spatial and temporal resolution and thus the opportunity to evaluate the CRP measurements in a rigorous way. We will present first results of the comparison with a specific focus on the sensitivity of the CRP measurements to soil moisture variation in both the horizontal and vertical direction. Furthermore, the influence of forest

  4. Possibilities of applications of fiber Bragg gratings for thermonuclear fusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasior, P.

    2016-09-01

    The research on harnessing thermonuclear fusion is considered to be important for reaching global energetic safety as the future thermonuclear fusion reactors offer an inexhaustible and CO2 emission free source of electric power. The development of thermonuclear fusion reactors is a great interdisciplinary effort which needs participation of scientists dealing with many fields of physics and engineering. Due to the experimental character of the works (the best example is the effort for the development of ITER - International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) its crucial part is in the design and application of diagnostics operating in harsh thermonuclear environments. Fiber optics and especially fiber Bragg gratings are components which can operate feasibly in both irradiation and electromagnetic interference conditions. This paper is to give a prospect of application of fiber Bragg grating sensors in devices aimed on the research in the thermonuclear fusion field.

  5. Integral Quantification of Soil Water Content at the Intermediate Catchment Scale by Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. One new measurement methodology for integral quantifications of mean areal soil water content at the intermediate catchment scale is the aboveground sensing of cosmic-ray neutrons, more precisely ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS). Ground albedo natural neutrons, are generated by collisions of secondary cosmic rays with land surface materials (soil, water, biomass, snow, etc). Neutrons measured at the air/ground interface correlate with soil moisture contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters. This correlation is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. The present study performed ground albedo neutron sensing in different locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with corn in 2010 and sunflowers in 2011, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains, Germany) in 2011. In order to test this method, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, calibration approach, and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations are also evaluated. Our observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil water content from GANS compared quantitatively with mean water content values derived from a network of classical devices (RMSE = 0.02 m3/m3 and r2 = 0.98) in three calibration periods with cropped-field conditions. Then, same calibration parameters corresponded

  6. Thermonuclear milestones: (2) Beginnings of the Soviet H-bomb program

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, G.A.

    1996-11-01

    Early Soviet theoretical work on thermonuclear ignition was adied by espionage, but many important ideas were conceived and developed independently {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+11B process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+11B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from 11B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+11B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+11B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+11B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  8. A Remarkable Three Hour Thermonuclear Burst from 4U 1820-30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Brown, Edward F.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed observational and theoretical study of an approximately three hour long X-ray burst (the "super burst") observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) from the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1820-30. This is the longest X-ray burst ever observed from this source, and perhaps one of the longest ever observed in great detail from any source. We show that the super burst is thermonuclear in origin. Its peak luminosity of approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 38) ergs s(exp -1) is consistent with the helium Eddington limit for a neutron star at approximately 7 kpc, as well as the peak luminosity of other, shorter, thermonuclear bursts from the same source. The super burst begins in the decaying tail of a more typical (approximately equal to 20 s duration) thermonuclear burst. These shorter, more frequent bursts are well known helium flashes from this source. The level of the accretion driven flux as well as the observed energy release of upwards of 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs indicate that helium could not be the energy source for the super burst. We outline the physics relevant to carbon production and burning on helium accreting neutron stars and present calculations of the thermal evolution and stability of a carbon layer and show that this process is the most likely explanation for the super burst. Ignition at the temperatures in the deep carbon "ocean" requires greater than 30 times the mass of carbon inferred from the observed burst energetics unless the He flash is able to trigger a deflagration from a much smaller mass of carbon. We show, however, that for large columns of accreted carbon fuel, a substantial fraction of the energy released in the carbon burning layer is radiated away as neutrinos, and the heat that is conducted from the burning layer in large part flows inward, only to be released on timescales longer than the observed burst. Thus the energy released during the event possibly exceeds that observed in X-rays by more than a factor of

  9. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for Measurement of Integral Soil Water Content at the Small Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. One largest initiative to cover the measuring gap of soil moisture between point scale and remote sensing observations is the COSMOS network (Zreda et al., 2012). Here, cosmic-ray neutron sensing, which may be more precisely named ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS), is applied. The measuring principle is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. Soil water content contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters is inversely correlated to the neutron flux at the air-ground interface. This approach is now implemented, e.g. in USA (Zreda et al., 2012) and Germany (Rivera Villarreyes et al., 2011), based on its simple installation and integral measurement of soil moisture at the small catchment scale. The present study performed Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing on farmland at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam and Berlin cropped with corn in 2010, sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. In order to test this methodology, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, several calibration approaches, role of vegetation cover and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations were also evaluated. Observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil moisture from GANS compared quantitatively with mean values derived from a network of classical devices under vegetated and non- vegetated conditions. The GANS approach responded well

  10. DABL69: A Broad-Group Neutron/Photon Cross-Section Library for Defense Nuclear Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    multigroup library denoted VITAMIN-E.4 This library achieves generality through: (a) its relatively fine 174- neutron , 38-gamma-ray energy group structure...Elemental Kerma Factors (Ca - W) Elemental Kerma Factors (Pb - Am) a Neutron flux spectrum in dry air at 2000m from a 252Cf source. b Standard...Table Pos. AMPX* MTNo. Source/Response 1 (9001) 14-MeV source distribution [ neutrons /source- neutron ] 2 (9002) Unclassified thermonuclear

  11. A 3D profile function suitable for integration of neutron time-of-flight single crystal diffraction peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Matthias J.

    2017-03-01

    A 3D profile function is presented suitable to integrate reflections arising in time-of-flight (TOF) single crystal neutron diffraction experiments. In order to account for the large asymmetry of the peak shape in the TOF direction, a 3D Gaussian ellipsoid in the pixel (x, z) and time-of-flight coordinates is convoluted with a rising and falling exponential along the time-of-flight direction. An analytic expression is derived, making it suitable for least-squares fitting. The application of this function in detector space or reciprocal space is straightforward.

  12. Q2 evolution of the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral for the neutron using a 3He target.

    PubMed

    Amarian, M; Auerbach, L; Averett, T; Berthot, J; Bertin, P; Bertozzi, W; Black, T; Brash, E; Brown, D; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cates, G D; Chai, Z; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; De Jager, C W; Deur, A; DiSalvo, R; Dieterich, S; Djawotho, P; Finn, M; Fissum, K; Fonvieille, H; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Goldberg, E; Gomez, J; Gorbenko, V; Hansen, J-O; Hersman, F W; Holmes, R; Huber, G M; Hughes, E W; Humensky, T B; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jensen, S; Jiang, X; Jones, C; Jones, G M; Jones, M; Jutier, C; Ketikyan, A; Kominis, I; Korsch, W; Kramer, K; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Lakuriqi, E; Laveissiere, G; Lerose, J; Liang, M; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G; Malov, S; Marroncle, J; McCormick, K; McKeown, R; Meziani, Z-E; Michaels, R; Mitchell, J; Papandreou, Z; Pavlin, T; Petratos, G G; Pripstein, D; Prout, D; Ransome, R; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rvachev, M; Sabatie, F; Saha, A; Slifer, K; Souder, P A; Saito, T; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Takahashi, K; Teijiro, S; Todor, L; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Urciuoli, G; Van Der Meer, R; Vernin, P; Voskanian, H; Wojtsekhowski, B; Xiong, F; Xu, W; Yang, J-C; Zhang, B; Zolnierczuk, P

    2002-12-09

    We present data on the inclusive scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized 3He target at energies from 0.862 to 5.06 GeV, obtained at a scattering angle of 15.5 degrees. Our data include measurements from the quasielastic peak, through the nucleon resonance region, and beyond, and were used to determine the virtual photon cross-section difference sigma(1/2)-sigma(3/2). We extract the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral for the neutron in the range of four-momentum transfer squared Q2 of 0.1-0.9 GeV2.

  13. MHD Stability of Polar Caps of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, C.; Brown, E. F.; Rosner, R.

    2000-12-01

    We assess the stability of magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor type modes driven by the overpressure of magnetically confined accreted matter on the surface of a neutron star. We employ the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy principle to analyze the stability of short-wavelength (ballooning) modes subject to line-tying in the neutron star crust. Research supported by ASCI/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago.

  14. Thermonuclear Supernova Explosions From Hybrid White Dwarf Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcox, Donald E.; Townsley, Dean; Calder, Alan; Denissenkov, Pavel; Herwig, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent results in stellar evolution in which convective boundary mixing in SAGB stars can give rise to hybrid white dwarf (WD) stars with a C-O core inside an O-Ne shell, we simulate thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae from these hybrid progenitors. We use the FLASH code to perform multidimensional simulations in the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) explosion paradigm from progenitor models produced with the MESA stellar evolution code that include the thermal energetics of the Urca process. We performed a suite of DDT simulations over a range of ignition conditions and compare to previous results from a suite of C-O white dwarfs. Despite significant variability within each suite, distinguishing trends are apparent in their Ni-56 yields and the kinetic properties of their ejecta. We comment on the feasibility of these hybrid WD explosions as the source of some classes of observed subluminous events. This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 and by resources at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University. The software used in this work was in part developed by the DOE-supported ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago.

  15. The classification of magnetohydrodynamic regimes of thermonuclear combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2014-10-10

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  16. Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, E.; Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.

    2005-10-21

    In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predictions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

  17. An integral test of the inelastic cross sections of Pb and Mo using measured neutron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.; Ford, C. H.; Wrights, G. N.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of measurements and calculations of fast neutron spectra from a radioactive neutron source inside spheres of Mo or Pb and from a cylindrical reactor containing a thick Pb or Mo reflector are used as a test of ENDF cross sections. The sphere leakage spectra were measured at a sphere-to-spectrometer distance of 2 meters using a 54 Ci spherical Am-Be neutron source. Reactor leakage spectrum measurements were made at the surface of the ZP-1 reactor when bare, with a Pb radial reflector 21 cm thick, and with a metallic Mo radial reflector 10 cm thick. In the case of the thin Mo sphere there is agreement between the calculation and measurement. The Pb calculation is much lower than the measurement except at the highest neutron energy. Two-dimensional calculations of reactor spectra result indicate that the reactor source is reasonably well known. Significant differences in leakage spectrum shape for both Mo and Pb reflectors suggest that there are large uncertainties in the inelastic cross sections for Pb and some for Mo.

  18. OCEAN: An ambitious experimental program for the qualification of integral capture cross sections of neutron absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelot, J. P.; Antony, M.; Bernard, D.; Leconte, P.; Testaniere, S.; Fougeras, P.

    2006-07-01

    OCEAN (Oscillation in Core of Samples of Neutron Absorbers) is an ambitious experimental program supported by EDF and CEA. It is carried out in the MINERVE reactor of CEA Cadarache which is a low-power uranium fueled pool reactor. It started in 2005 and will end in 2008. It aims at improving the knowledge on nuclear basic data for the neutron absorbers. It deals at the same time with the improvement of the calculation tools and with the feasibility studies on the new options of the fuel cycle. It particularly supports, for the LWR reactors, the studies on the increase of the fuel cycle length in nuclear power plants, and on the plutonium management. It also aims at qualifying the calculation tools as regard with new neutron absorbers. The main framework is the European JEFF3 project. More in details, it deals with providing precise experimental data (capture cross sections) about the following absorbers: Gd-155, Gd-157, Gd-Nat, Hf-177, Hf-178, Hf-179, Hf-180, Er-166, Er-167, Er-168, Er-170, Dy-160, Dy-161, Dy-162, Dy-163, Dy-164, Eu-151, Eu-nat, and Eu-153. The study of the neutron absorbers is performed on a large range of neutron spectra (over-moderated thermal spectrum, PWR UOx standard spectrum, PWR 100% MOX spectrum and epithermal HCLWR type spectrum) corresponding respectively to the R2-UO{sub 2}, R1-UO{sub 2}, R1-MOX and MORGANE-R experimental lattices inside the MINERVE reactor. This paper first presents the objectives of the OCEAN experimental program. Then the description of the MINERVE facility is given, focusing on the different core configurations that will be studied, and the oscillation technique is reminded. Besides, the oscillation samples specially fabricated for the OCEAN program are described. Finally, the first preliminary experimental results in the R1-UO{sub 2} lattice are given and commented. (authors)

  19. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION Nanostructures in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauz, V. I.; Martynenko, Yurii V.; Svechnikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Stankevich, V. G.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the presence of nano-sized and nano-structured erosion products not only affects the operation of thermonuclear devices but also, to a large extent, determines the safety and economy of future thermonuclear reactors. The formation mechanisms and the characteristics and properties of deposited films and nano-sized dust that form in tokamaks are reviewed.

  20. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction using electron linac-based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Do; Pham, Duc Khue; Kim, Tien Thanh; Kim, Guinyun; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won

    2011-01-01

    The thermal neutron cross-section and the resonance integral of the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction have been measured by the activation method using a 197Au(n,γ) 198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. The high-purity natural Ho and Au foils with and without a cadmium shield case of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated in a neutron field of the Pohang neutron facility. The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a calibrated p-type high-purity Ge detector. The correction factors for the γ-ray attenuation ( Fg), the thermal neutron self-shielding ( Gth), the resonance neutron self-shielding ( Gepi) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ( α) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross-section for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction has been determined to be 59.7 ± 2.5 barn, relative to the reference value of 98.65 ± 0.09 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. By assuming the cadmium cut-off energy of 0.55 eV, the resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction is 671 ± 47 barn, which is determined relative to the reference value of 1550 ± 28 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. The present results are, in general, good agreement with most of the previously reported data within uncertainty limits.

  1. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  2. Integration of Neutron Monitor Data with Spacecraft Observations: a Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Frank B.

    2000-07-01

    Beginning in the early 1950s, data from neutron monitors placed the taxonomy of cosmic ray temporal variations on a firm footing, extended the observations of the Sun as a transient source of high energy particles and laid the foundation of our early concepts of a heliosphere. The first major impact of the arrival of the Space Age in 1957 on our understanding of cosmic rays came from spacecraft operating beyond the confines of our magnetosphere. These new observations showed that Forbush decreases were caused by interplanetary disturbances and not by changes in the geomagnetic field; the existence of both the predicted solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field was confirmed; the Sun was revealed as a frequent source of energetic ions and electrons in the 10 100 MeV range; and a number of new, low-energy particle populations was discovered. Neutron monitor data were of great value in interpreting many of these new results. With the launch of IMP 6 in 1971, followed by a number of other spacecraft, long-term monitoring of low and medium energy galactic and anomalous cosmic rays and solar and interplanetary energetic particles, and the interplanetary medium were available on a continuous basis. Many synoptic studies have been carried out using both neutron monitor and space observations. The data from the Pioneer 10/11 and Voyagers 1/2 deep space missions and the journey of Ulysses over the region of the solar poles have significantly extended our knowledge of the heliosphere and have provided enhanced understanding of many effects that were first identified in the neutron monitor data. Solar observations are a special area of space studies that has had great impact on interpreting results from neutron monitors, in particular the identification of coronal holes as the source of high-speed solar wind streams and the recognition of the importance of coronal mass ejections in producing interplanetary disturbances and accelerating solar energetic particles. In the

  3. Neutron Diagnostic Development for the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kelly; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Jones, B.; Gomez, M. R.; Knapp, P. F.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Norris, E.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Frenje, J.; Lahmann, B.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Fittinghoff, D.; May, M.; Snyder, L.; Moy, K.; Buckles, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    We are studying Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) and Gas Puff fusion neutron sources on the Z accelerator. MagLIF experiments have produced up to 3e12 primary DD neutrons with 2-3 keV ion temperatures and 1-2 ns burn widths. Gas puff experiments have produced up to 5e13 primary DD neutrons with higher ion temperatures, longer burn times, and evidence of non-thermonuclear production. For MagLIF, the yield is expected to increase rapidly with increased energy coupling, yet it remains unclear if Gas Puffs would scale as attractively. We review neutron measurements for these experiments and plans for developing neutron diagnostics for these two very different sources. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, Roger B.; Fero, Arnold H.; Sejvar, James

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  5. Neutron beam measurement of industrial polymer materials for composition and bulk integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, M.; Rosta, L.; Heaton, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    Neutron beam techniques, among other non-destructive diagnostics, are particularly irreplaceable in the complete analysis of industrial materials and components when supplying fundamental information. In this paper, nanoscale small-angle neutron scattering analysis and prompt gamma activation analysis for the characterization of industrial polymers are considered. The basic theoretical aspects are briefly introduced and some applications are presented. The investigations of the SU-8 polymer in axial airflow microturbines—i.e. microelectromechanical systems—are presented foremost. Also presented are full and feasibility studies on polyurethanes, composites based on cross-linked polymers reinforced by carbon fibres and polymer cement concrete. The obtained results have provided a substantial contribution to the improvement of the considered materials, and indeed confirmed the industrial applicability of the adopted techniques in the analysis of polymers.

  6. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

    1997-12-16

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

  7. Integrated Fast Neutron Flux at the End of Phase-IV, Part 2 (50 GWd/t) MOX Zr Cladding Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gray Chang

    2004-10-01

    This report documents the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV and E > 1.0 MeV) distributions at the end of each cycle (127C to 132C) during the irradiation Phase-IV-2 (50 GWd/t) using the detailed ATR quarter core model calculated neutronic tallies. The integrated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluence distributions are tabulated in Tables 1 to 9. At the end of the Phase-IV part-2 irradiation, the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluences (E > 1.0 MeV) of the removed MOX capsules 5, 6, and 12 are 1.71, 1.68, and 1.68 x 1021 n/cm2, respectively.

  8. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) reactor building design study

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.L.; Blevins, J.D.; Delisle, M.W.; Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, Mississauga, ON )

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is at the midpoint of a two-year conceptual design. The ITER reactor building is a reinforced concrete structure that houses the tokamak and associated equipment and systems and forms a barrier between the tokamak and the external environment. It provides radiation shielding and controls the release of radioactive materials to the environment during both routine operations and accidents. The building protects the tokamak from external events, such as earthquakes or aircraft strikes. The reactor building requirements have been developed from the component designs and the preliminary safety analysis. The equipment requirements, tritium confinement, and biological shielding have been studied. The building design in progress requires continuous iteraction with the component and system designs and with the safety analysis. 8 figs.

  9. Multiplexing thermography for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor divertor targets

    SciTech Connect

    Itami, K.; Sugie, T.; Vayakis, G.; Walker, C.

    2004-10-01

    The concept of multiplexing thermography is applied to the design of the divertor thermography system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The combination of the front mirror with multiellipticity and a Czerney-Turner spectrometer with a 0.2 mm pitched multichannel detector enables a spatial resolution of 3 mm and a time resolution of 20 {mu}s above a target temperature of 300 deg. C to be achieved. This should be sufficient to measure ELM heat fluxes to the targets in ITER. To satisfy the measurement requirement, it is very important to keep an accurate alignment around the optical axis against movement of the vessel during the plasma discharges. Several key engineering problems, such as the survivability of components against mirror coating by redeposited divertor material, remain to be solved. Potential solutions have been identified.

  10. Joining of carbon-carbon composites for thermonuclear fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Salvo, M.; Lemoine, P.; Ferraris, M.; Montorsi, M.; Merola, M.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon (CfC) composites have been joined by using different joining agents: metals (silicon, aluminum, and titanium), an intermetallic compound (magnesium silicide, Mg{sub 2}Si), and glasses (borosilicates and zinc borates). These joining agents have been chosen by considering their possible use in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, as suggested by their low-activation properties, reasonably high working temperature, industrial feasibility, and potential scale-up of the joined carbon-carbon structures using pressureless-processing techniques. Each joined structure (CfC composite-joining material-CfC composite) has been first morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Then, single-lap shear tests have been performed on the most-promising joined structures, i.e., silicon- and aluminum-joined CfC-composite samples, which have shown an average shear strength of 22 and 10 MPa, respectively.

  11. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Gheshlaghi, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C3D6O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and -28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 106 K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 106 K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 107 K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  12. The Thermonuclear Runaway and the Classical Nova Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, S.; Iliadis, C.; Hix, W. R.

    2016-05-01

    Nova explosions occur on the white dwarf component of a cataclysmic variable binary stellar system that is accreting matter lost by its companion. When sufficient material has been accreted by the white dwarf, a thermonuclear runaway occurs and ejects material in what is observed as a classical nova explosion. We describe both the recent advances in our understanding of the progress of the outburst and outline some of the puzzles that are still outstanding. We report on the effects of improving both the nuclear reaction rate library and including a modern nuclear reaction network in our one-dimensional, fully implicit, hydrodynamic computer code. In addition, there has been progress in observational studies of supernovae Ia with implications about the progenitors, and we discuss that in this review.

  13. Acoustically driven spherical implosions and the possibility of thermonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, D. Felipe; Tessien, Ross

    2003-04-01

    Acoustically driven, gas-filled cavities in liquids have been known to collapse violently, generating short flashes of light of ~100-ps duration. More recently, the possibility of generating fusion reactions using acoustics (acoustic inertial confinement fusion) has been considered. Results of computer simulations using the HYADES hydrocode (Cascade Applied Sciences, Inc) plus the SESAME equations of state for free collapsing and acoustically driven cavities in molten metals will be presented as well as experimental data at high ambient pressures in different liquids. Back-of-the-envelope calculations in terms of the acoustical and thermodynamic parameters necessary to achieve thermonuclear reactions will be presented in an effort to evaluate the feasibility of acoustic ICF as an energy source.

  14. On some features of plane waves of thermonuclear burn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch'yan, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of a slow burn wave propagating over a precompressed thermonuclear fuel heated by several shock waves generated by a laser pulse is studied. It is shown that such a burn wave can rapidly increase the fuel density ahead of the wave front and transform to a pair of detonation waves moving in the opposite directions. Hydrodynamic equations with a linear velocity profile are solved. It is found that the proton beam intensity necessary for ignition increases with the initial fuel density in accordance with the known formula generalizing results of two-dimensional simulations. A possibility of using results of one-dimensional simulations for determining the energy of ignition of a cylindrical target is discussed.

  15. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  16. Transport simulation of ITER (International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor) startup

    SciTech Connect

    Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    The present International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) reference configurations are the Technology Phase,'' in which the plasma current is maintained noninductively at a subignition density, and the Physics Phase,'' which is ignited but requires inductive maintenance of the current. The WHIST 1.5-D transport code is used to evaluate the volt-second requirements of both configurations. A slow current ramp (60-80's) is required for fixed-radius startup in ITER to avoid hollow current density profiles. To reach the operating point requires about 203 V{center dot}s for the Technology Phase (18 MA) and about 270 V{center dot}s for the Physics Phase (22 MA). The resistive losses can be reduced with expanding-radius startup. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Multidimensional Simulations of Thermonuclear Supernovae from the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. J.; Heger, A.; Almgren, A.

    2012-07-01

    Theoretical models suggest that the first stars in the universe could have been very massive, with typical masses ≥ 100 M⊙ . Many of them might have died as energetic thermonuclear explosions known as pair-instability supernovae (PSNe). We present multidimensional numerical simulations of PSNe with the new radiation-hydrodynamics code CASTRO. Our models capture all explosive burning and follow the explosion until the shock breaks out from the stellar surface. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ˜ 20 - 100 sec after the explosion begins. Later, when the shock reaches the hydrogen envelope a strong reverse shock forms that rapidly develops additional Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova's ejecta and alter its observational signature. Our results provide useful predictions for the detection of PSNe by forthcoming telescopes.

  18. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Gheshlaghi, Maryam

    2016-03-15

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C{sub 3}D{sub 6}O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and −28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 10{sup 6} K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 10{sup 6} K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 10{sup 7} K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  19. Influence of thermonuclear effects on the collapse of supermassive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Pedro J.; Janka, H.-T.; Müller, E.; Müller, B.

    2011-09-01

    We present results of general relativistic simulations of collapsing supermassive stars using the two-dimensional general relativistic numerical code Nada, which solves the Einstein equations written in the BSSN formalism and the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations with high resolution shock capturing schemes. These numerical simulations use a tabulated equation of state which includes effects of radiation and gas pressure, and those associated with the electron-positron pairs. We also take into account the effect of thermonuclear energy released by hydrogen and helium burning. We find that objects with mass ≈ 5 × 105M and initial metallicity greater than ZCNO ≈ 0.004 do explode if non-rotating, while the threshold metallicity for an explosion is reduced to ZCNO ≈ 0.002 for objects uniformly rotating.

  20. Close Binary Progenitors and Ejected Companions of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Heber, U.; Nemeth, P.; Ziegerer, E.; Irrgang, A.; Schindewolf, M.; Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Barlow, B. N.; Bloemen, S.

    2017-03-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by cross-matching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. We found 72 sdO/B candidates with high Galactic restframe velocities, 12 of them might be unbound to our Galaxy. Furthermore, we discovered the second-most compact sdB+WD binary known. However, due to the low mass of the WD companion, it is unlikely to be a SN Ia progenitor.

  1. The Dynamic Mutation Characteristics of Thermonuclear Reaction in Tokamak

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given. PMID:24892099

  2. The dynamic mutation characteristics of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z 2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given.

  3. The Internal Structure and Propagation of Magnetohydrodynamical Thermonuclear Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2016-11-01

    We present general equations for non-ideal, reactive flow magnetohydrodynamics (RFMHD) in the form best suited for describing thermonuclear combustion in high-density degenerate matter of SNe Ia. The relative importance of various non-ideal effects is analyzed as a function of characteristic spatial and temporal scales of the problem. From the general RFMHD equations, we derive the one-dimensional ordinary differential equations describing the steady-state propagation of a planar thermonuclear flame front in a magnetic field. The physics of the flame is first studied qualitatively using a simple case of one-step Arrhenius kinetics, a perfect gas equation of state (EOS), and constant thermal conductivity coefficients. After that, the equations are solved, the internal flame front structure is calculated, and the flame velocity, S l , and flame thickness, δ l , are found for carbon-oxygen degenerate material of supernovae using a realistic EOS, transport properties, and detailed nuclear kinetics. The magnetic field changes the flame behavior significantly, both qualitatively and quantitatively, as compared to the non-magnetic case of classical combustion. (1) The magnetic field influences the evolutionarity of a flame front and makes it impossible for a flame to propagate steadily in a wide range of magnetic field strengths and orientations relative to the front. (2) When the flame moves steadily, it can propagate in several distinct modes, the most important being the slow C S and super-Alfvénic C sup modes. (3) The speed of the flame can be diminished or enhanced by up to several factors relative to the non-magnetic laminar flame speed.

  4. A neutron sensor based on synthetic single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Lerche, R A; Moran, M J

    2003-10-17

    We report the first neutron data for a single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond sensor. Results are presented for 2.5, 14.1, and 14.9 MeV incident neutrons. We show that the energy resolution for 14.1 MeV neutrons is at least 2.9% (as limited by the energy spread of the incident neutrons), and perhaps as good as 0.4% (as extrapolated from high resolution {alpha} particle data). This result could be relevant to fusion neutron spectroscopy at machines like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). We also show that our sensor has a high neutron linear attenuation coefficient, due to the high atomic density of diamond, and this could lead to applications in fission neutron detection.

  5. Fusion of neutron-rich oxygen isotopes in the crust of accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Dussan, H.; Berry, D. K.

    2008-04-15

    Fusion reactions in the crust of an accreting neutron star are an important source of heat, and the depth at which these reactions occur is important for determining the temperature profile of the star. Fusion reactions depend strongly on the nuclear charge Z. Nuclei with Z{<=}6 can fuse at low densities in a liquid ocean. However, nuclei with Z=8 or 10 may not burn until higher densities where the crust is solid and electron capture has made the nuclei neutron rich. We calculate the S factor for fusion reactions of neutron rich nuclei including {sup 24}O+{sup 24}O and {sup 28}Ne+{sup 28}Ne. We use a simple barrier penetration model. The S factor could be further enhanced by dynamical effects involving the neutron rich skin. This possible enhancement in S should be studied in the laboratory with neutron rich radioactive beams. We model the structure of the crust with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the crust of accreting neutron stars may contain micro-crystals or regions of phase separation. Nevertheless, the screening factors that we determine for the enhancement of the rate of thermonuclear reactions are insensitive to these features. Finally, we calculate the rate of thermonuclear {sup 24}O+{sup 24}O fusion and find that {sup 24}O should burn at densities near 10{sup 11} g/cm{sup 3}. The energy released from this and similar reactions may be important for the temperature profile of the star.

  6. Evaluation of cooling concepts and specimen geometries for high heat flux tests on neutron irradiated divertor elements

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, J.; Bolt. H.; Breitbach, G.

    1994-12-31

    To assess the lifetime and the long term heat removal capabilities of plasma facing components in future thermonuclear fusion reactors such as ITER, neutron irradiation and subsequent high heat flux tests will be most essential. The effect of neutron damage will be simulated in material test reactors (such as the HFR-Petten) in a fission neutron environment. To investigate the heat loads during normal and off-normal operation scenarios a 60 kW electron beam test stand (Juelich Divertor Test Facility in Hot Cells, JUDITH) has been installed in a hot cell which can be operated by remote handling techniques. In this facility inertially cooled test coupons can be handled as well as small actively cooled divertor mock-ups. A special clamping mechanism for small test coupons (25 mm x 25 mm x 35 mm) with an integrated coolant channel within a copper or TZM heat sink has been developed and tested in an electron beam test bed. This method is an attractive alternative to costly large scale tests on complete divertor modules. The temperature and stress fields in individual CFC or beryllium tiles brazed to metallic heat sink (e.g. copper or TZM) can be investigated before and after neutron irradiation with moderate efforts.

  7. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  8. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce (n, γ)141Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For 139 La with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For 140 Ce with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established 139La(n, γ)140La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce , though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data.

  9. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  10. Poloidal flux linkage requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have applied two computational models to calculate the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flattop phase of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the current ramp-up phase, we have used the TSC code to simulate the entire current ramp-up period as described in the TAC-3 Physics Report. We have extended the time of the simulation to cover the full current penetration time, that is, until the loop voltage is a constant throughout the plasma. Sensitivity studies have been performed with respect to current ramp-up time, impurity concentration, and to the time of onset of auxiliary heating. We have also used a steady state plasma equilibrium code that has the constant loop voltage constraint built in to survey the dependence of the steady state loop-voltage on the density and temperature profiles. This calculation takes into account the plasma bootstrap current contribution, including non-circular and collisional corrections. The results can be displayed as contours of the loop-voltage on a POPCON like diagram.

  11. Thermonuclear Burst Observations for Model Comparisons: A Reference Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Duncan K.; Goodwin, Adelle J.; Keek, Laurens

    2017-04-01

    We present observations of thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, selected for comparison with numerical models. We provide examples of four distinct cases of ignition: He-ignition in mixed H/He fuel (case 1); He-ignition in pure He fuel, following exhaustion of accreted H by steady burning (case 2); ignition in (almost) pure He accumulated from an evolved donor in an ultracompact system; and a superburst, thought to arise from ignition of carbon fuel produced as a by-product of H/He bursts. For regular bursts, we measured the recurrence time and calculated averaged burst profiles from RXTE observations. We also estimated the recurrence time for pairs of bursts, including those observed during a transient outburst, modelled using a numerical ignition code. For each example we list the burst properties including recurrence time, fluence, peak flux, the persistent flux level (and inferred accretion rate), and the ratio of persistent flux to fluence. In the accompanying material, we provide a bolometric lightcurve for each burst, determined from time-resolved spectral analysis. Along with the inferred or adopted parameters for each burst system, including distance, surface gravity, and redshift, these data are suggested as suitable test cases for ignition models.

  12. Divertor impurity monitor for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugie, T.; Ogawa, H.; Nishitani, T.; Kasai, S.; Katsunuma, J.; Maruo, M.; Ebisawa, K.; Ando, T.; Kita, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The divertor impurity monitoring system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has been designed. The main functions of this system are to identify impurity species and to measure the two-dimensional distributions of the particle influxes in the divertor plasmas. The wavelength range is 200-1000 nm. The viewing fans are realized by molybdenum mirrors located in the divertor cassette. With additional viewing fans seeing through the gap between the divertor cassettes, the region approximately from the divertor leg to the x point will be observed. The light from the divertor region passes through the quartz windows on the divertor port plug and the cryostat, and goes through the dog-leg optics in the biological shield. Three different type of spectrometers: (i) survey spectrometers for impurity species monitoring, (ii) filter spectrometers for the particle influx measurement with the spatial resolution of 10 mm and the time resolution of 1 ms, and (iii) high dispersion spectrometers for high resolution wavelength measurements are designed. These spectrometers are installed just behind the biological shield (for λ<450 nm) to prevent the transmission loss in fiber and in the diagnostic room (for λ⩾450 nm) from the point of view of accessibility and flexibility. The optics have been optimized by a ray trace analysis. As a result, 10-15 mm spatial resolution will be achieved in all regions of the divertor.

  13. Wideband Heterodyne QWIP Receiver Development for Thermonuclear Fusion Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.A.; Buchanan, M.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Liu, H.C.; Richards, R.K.; Simpson, M.L.

    1998-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostic applications for over 20 years. One area of this work has been the development of a diagnostic system for the measurement of the energy of alpha particles created in a thermonuclear fusion reactor. These particles originate with an energy of 3.5 MeV and cool to the thermal energy of the plasma (around 15 keV) after several seconds. To measure the velocity distribution of these alpha particles, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is under development based on a high power CO{sub 2} laser at 10 microns with a heterodyne receiver. The Doppler shift generated by Thomson scattering of the alpha particles requires a wideband heterodyne receiver (greater than 10 GHz). Because Mercury-Cadimum-Telluride (MCT) detectors are limited to a bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz, a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) detector was obtained from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and evaluated for its heterodyne performance using the heterodyne testing facility developed at ORNL.

  14. High energy components and collective modes in thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Cowley, S.; Detragiache, P.; Kulsrud, R.; Pegoraro, F.

    1986-02-01

    The theory of a class of collective modes of a thermonuclear magnetically confined plasma, with frequencies in the range of the ion cyclotron frequency and of its harmonics, is presented. These modes can be excited by their resonant cyclotron interaction with a plasma component of relatively high energy particles characterized by a strongly anisotropic distribution in velocity space. Normal modes that are spatially localized by the inhomogeneity of the plasma density are found. This ensures that the energy gained by their resonant interaction is not convected away. The mode spatial localization can be significantly altered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity for a given class of plasma density profiles. Special attention is devoted to the case of a spin polarized plasma, where the charged products of fusion reactions are anisotropically distributed. We show that for the mode of polarization that enhances nuclear reaction rates the tritium will be rapidly depolarized to toroidal configurations with relatively mild gradients of the confining magnetic field. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Optimized heavy ion beam probing for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Eliseev, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    The international workgroup developed the conceptual design of a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) diagnostics for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is intended for measurements of the plasma potential profile in a gradient area. Now we optimized it by the accurate analysis of the probing trajectories and variation of positions of the injection and detection points. Optimization allows us to reduce the energy of Tl+ beam from 5.6 to 3.4 MeV for standard ITER regime. The detector line starting at the plasma edge towards the center can get an outer part of the horizontal radial potential profile by variation of the energy. The observed radial interval is slightly increased up to 0.76<ρ<1 with respect to initial version 0.8<ρ<1, that allows to cover the region of the density gradient more reliably. Almost double reduction of the beam energy is a critical point. Thus we can significantly decrease the sizes of the accelerator and energy analyzer, the cost of the equipment, and impact of the diagnostics to the machine. Therefore the optimized HIBP design can be realized in ITER.

  16. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    neutron irradiation allows to infer energy-integrated neutron cross sections, i.e. ∫₀σ(E)φ(E)dE, where φ(E) is the neutron flux “seen” by the sample. This approach, which is usually defined and led by reactor physicists, is referred to as integral and is the object of this report. These two sources of information, i.e. differential and integral, are complementary and are used by the nuclear physicists in charge of producing the evaluated nuclear data files used by the nuclear community (ENDF, JEFF…). The generation of accurate nuclear data files requires an iterative process involving reactor physicists and nuclear data evaluators. This experimental program has been funded by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) and by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act. It has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation.

  17. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  18. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  19. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  20. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  1. SUPER-EDDINGTON FLUXES DURING THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Boutloukos, Stratos; Miller, M. Coleman; Lamb, Frederick K.

    2010-09-01

    It has been known for nearly three decades that the energy spectra of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are often well fit by Planck functions with temperatures so high that they imply a super-Eddington radiative flux at the emitting surface, even during portions of bursts when there is no evidence of photospheric radius expansion. This apparent inconsistency is usually set aside by assuming that the flux is actually sub-Eddington and that the fitted temperature is so high because the spectrum has been distorted by the energy-dependent opacity of the atmosphere. Here we show that the spectra predicted by currently available conventional atmosphere models appear incompatible with the highest precision measurements of burst spectra made using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, such as during the 4U 1820-30 superburst and a long burst from GX 17+2. In contrast, these measurements are well fit by Bose-Einstein spectra with high temperatures and modest chemical potentials. Such spectra are very similar to Planck spectra. They imply surface radiative fluxes more than a factor of 3 larger than the Eddington flux. We find that segments of many other bursts from many sources are well fit by similar Bose-Einstein spectra, suggesting that the radiative flux at the emitting surface also exceeds the Eddington flux during these segments. We suggest that burst spectra can closely approximate Bose-Einstein spectra and have fluxes that exceed the Eddington flux because they are formed by Comptonization in an extended, low-density radiating gas supported by the outward radiation force and confined by a tangled magnetic field.

  2. Spontaneous Formation of Detonations by Turbulent Flames in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.; Oran, E. S.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, the scenario best capable of explaining the observational properties of "normal" type Ia supernovae (SNIa), which are of primary importance for cosmology, is the delayed-detonation model. This model postulates that a subsonic thermonuclear deflagration, which originates close to the center of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) in a single-degenerate binary system, transitions to a supersonic detonation (deflagration-to-detonation transition, or DDT) during the later stages of the explosion. Modern large-scale multidimensional simulations of SNIa cannot capture the DDT process and, thus, are forced to make two crucial assumptions, namely (a) that DDT does occur at some point, and (b) when and where it occurs. Significant progress has been made over the years in elucidating the nature of DDT in terrestrial confined systems with walls, obstacles, or pre-existing shocks. It remains unclear, however, whether and how a detonation can form in an unpressurized, unconfined system such as the interior of a WD. Here we show, through first-principles numerical simulations, that sufficiently fast, but subsonic, turbulent flames in such unconfined environments are inherently susceptible to DDT. The associated mechanism is based on the unsteady evolution of turbulent flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations and is qualitatively different from the traditionally suggested gradient (spontaneous reaction wave) model. It also does not require the formation of distributed flames. The proposed mechanism predicts the DDT density in SNIa to be 107 g/cm3, in agreement with the values previously found to give the best match with observations. This DDT mechanism opens the possibility for eliminating the transition density as a free parameter and, thus, for developing fully self-consistent global multidimensional SNIa models. This work was supported in part by the Naval Research Laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and by the Department of Defense

  3. Scaling relations for a neutron yield in a plasma with inertial electrostatic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kurilenkov, Yu. K.

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the possibilities of producing a high-power source of thermonuclear neutrons under inertial electrostatic confinement of a plasma in the process of periodic oscillations of hydrogen isotope nuclei in the field of a virtual cathode of an electrostatic trap. The investigations are performed using analytical scaling relations, which explicitly give the dependence of a neutron yield on the electrostatic trap parameters under various operating conditions. Presented at the ECLIM 2016 conference (Moscow, 18 - 23 September 2016).

  4. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B process

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-15

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from {sup 11}B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+{sup 11}B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+{sup 11}B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+{sup 11}B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  5. Results from the MARBLE Campaign on the National Ignition Facility: Implosion of Foam-Filled Capsules for Studying Thermonuclear Burn in the Presence of Heterogeneous Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T. J.; Douglas, M. R.; Cardenas, T.; Devolder, B. G.; Fincke, J. R.; Gunderson, M. A.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Olson, R. E.; Randolph, R. B.; Shah, R. C.; Smidt, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    The MARBLE campaign on NIF investigates the effect of heterogeneous mix on thermonuclear burn for comparison to a probability distribution function (PDF) burn model. MARBLE utilizes plastic capsules filled with deuterated plastic foam and tritium gas. The ratio of DT to DD neutron yield is indicative of the degree to which the foam and the gas atomically mix. Platform development experiments have been performed to understand the behavior of the foam and of the gas separately using two types of capsule. The first uses partially deuterated foam and hydrogen gas fill to understand the burn in the foam. The second uses undeuterated foam and deuterium gas fill to understand the dynamics of the gas. Experiments using deuterated foam and tritium gas are planned. Results of these experiments, and the implications for our understanding of thermonuclear burn in heterogeneously mixed separated reactant experiments will be discussed. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  6. Conformational effect on small angle neutron scattering behavior of interacting polyelectrolyte solutions: a perspective of integral equation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Do, Changwoo; Hong, Kunlun; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Greg

    2012-01-01

    We present small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of deuterium oxide (D2O) solutions of linear and star sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) as a function of polyelectrolyte concentration. Emphasis is on understanding the dependence of their SANS coherent scattering cross section I(Q) on the molecular architecture of single polyelectrolyte. The key finding is that for a given concentration, star polyelectrolytes exhibit more pronounced characteristic peaks in I(Q), and the position of the first peak occurs at a smaller Q compared to their linear counterparts. Based on a model of integral equation theory, we first compare the SANS experimental I(Q) of salt free polyelectrolyte solutions with that predicted theoretically. Having seen their satisfactory qualitative agreement, the dependence of counterion association behavior on polyelectrolyte geometry and concentration is further explored. Our predictions reveal that the ionic environment of polyelectrolyte exhibits a strong dependence on polyelectrolyte geometry at lower polyelectrolyte concentration. However, when both linear and star polyelectrolytes exceed their overlap concentrations, the spatial distribution of counterion is found to be essentially insensitive to polyelectrolyte geometry due to the steric effect.

  7. Helium Burning on Neutron Stars: 2-dimensional Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryxell, B.; Zingale, M.; Timmes, F. X.; Olson, K.; Lamb, D.; Calder, A.; Dursi, J.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Tufo, H.

    1999-12-01

    We present a two dimensional, cylindrically symmetric simulation of an X-ray burst. The explosion was followed along a 2 km stretch of a neutron star atmosphere for a total time of 166 μ s. The calculation was performed using the FLASH code, a parallel, multidimensional, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamics code developed by the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, an ASCI Alliance Center. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Grant No. B341495.

  8. The Nova Outburst: Thermonuclear Runaways on Degenerated Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1999-07-08

    Observational and theoretical studies of the outbursts of classical novae have provided critical insights into a broad range of astrophysical phenomena. Thermonuclear runaways (TNRs) in accreted hydrogen-rich envelopes on the white dwarf (WD) components of close binary systems constitute not only the outburst mechanism for a classical nova explosion, but also the recurrent novae and a fraction of the symbiotic novae explosions. Studies of the general characteristics of these explosions, both in our own galaxy and in neighboring galaxies of varying metallicity, can teach us about binary stellar evolution, while studies of the evolution of nova binary systems can constrain models for the (as yet unidentified) progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Further, the empirical relation between the peak luminosity of a nova and the rate of decline, which presents a challenge to theoretical models, allows novae to be utilized as standard candles for distance determinations out to the Virgo Cluster. E xtensive studies of novae with IUE and the resulting abundance determinations have revealed the existence of oxygen-neon white dwarfs in some systems. The high levels of enrichment of novae ejecta in elements ranging from carbon to sulfur confirm that there is significant dredge-up of matter from the core of the underlying white dwarf and enable novae to contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Observations of the epoch of dust formation in the expanding shells of novae allow important constraints to be placed on the dust formation process and confirm that graphite, SiC, and SiO{sub 2} grains are formed by the outburst. It is possible that grains from novae were injected into the pre-solar nebula and can be identified with some of the pre-solar grains or ''stardust'' found in meteorites. Finally, g-ray observations during the first several years of their outburst, using the next generation of satellite observatories, could confirm

  9. Stability of carbon fusion on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp

    With observing missions like the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton and Chandra many thermonuclear activities on neutron stars have been observed, especially thermonuclear X-ray bursts on accreting neutron stars. Aside from frequent short type I X-ray bursts, rare and very long enduring high energetic bursts, the so-called superbursts, have been found. The large total released energy during a superburst indicates a larger ignition depth and higher ignition temperatures than it is the case for type I bursts. These ignition conditions lead to the conclusion, that unstable carbon burning triggers the thermonuclear runaway for the superburst. This work focusses on the carbon plasma layer and its nuclear fusion stability. With numerical simulations a stability analysis of the layer has been performed, in order to find precise conditions for unstable ignitions. The numerical model used in this thesis combines a full reaction network with a complex number perturbation stability analysis, in which effects of temperature, energy flux, composition and accretion rate on the stability were examined. Furthermore, different burning regimes in the carbon burning process have been investigated in order to determine the nature of the explosion as well as the exact ignition depth. For a few sets of parameters burning oscillations were investigated. For the neutron star KS 1731-260 the stability analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the carbon burning layer.

  10. Integration of cosmic-ray neutron probes into production agriculture: Lessons from the Platte River cosmic-ray neutron probe monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.; Franz, T. E.; Nguy-Robertson, A. L.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Suyker, A.; Arkebauer, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Projected increases in global population will put enormous pressure on fresh water resources in the coming decades. Approximately 70 percent of human water use is allocated to agriculture with 40 percent of global food production originating from irrigated lands. Growing demand for food will only worsen the strain placed on many irrigated agricultural systems resulting in an unsustainable reliance on groundwater. This work presents an overview of the Platte River Cosmic-ray Neutron Probe Monitoring Network, which consists of 10 fixed probes and 3 mobile probes located across the Platte River Basin. The network was installed in 2014 and is part of the larger US COSMOS (70+ probes) and global COSMOS networks (200+ probes). Here we will present an overview of the network, comparison of fixed neutron probe results across the basin, spatial mapping results of the mobile sensors at various sites and spatial scales, and lessons learned by working with various producers and water stakeholder groups. With the continued development of this technique, its incorporation for soil moisture management in large producer operations has the potential to increase irrigation water use efficiency in the Platte River Basin and beyond.

  11. Performance study of the neutron-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng; Li, Yulan; Niu, Libo; Deng, Zhi; Cheng, Xiaolei; He, Li; Zhang, Hongyan; Fu, Jianqiang; Yan, Yangyang; Cai, Yiming; Li, Yuanjing

    2017-02-01

    Fast neutron spectrometers will play an important role in the future of the nuclear industry and nuclear physics experiments, in tasks such as fast neutron reactor monitoring, thermo-nuclear fusion plasma diagnostics, nuclear reaction cross-section measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Recently, a new fast neutron spectrometer based on a GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier amplification)-TPC (Time Projection Chamber), named the neutron-TPC, has been under development at Tsinghua University. It is designed to have a high energy resolution, high detection efficiency, easy access to the medium material, an outstanding n/γ suppression ratio, and a wide range of applications. This paper presents the design, test, and experimental study of the neutron-TPC. Based on the experimental results, the energy resolution (FWHM) of the neutron-TPC can reach 15.7%, 10.3% and 7.0% with detection efficiency higher than 10-5 for 1.2 MeV, 1.81 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons respectively. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275109)

  12. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  13. Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-09-22

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  14. X-Ray Reflection and an Exceptionally Long Thermonuclear Helium Burst from IGR J17062-6143

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keek, L.; Iwakiri, W.; Serino, M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; in’t Zand, J. J. M.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2017-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars power brief but strong irradiation of their surroundings, providing a unique way to study accretion physics. We analyze MAXI/Gas Slit Camera and Swift/XRT spectra of a day-long flash observed from IGR J17062-6143 in 2015. It is a rare case of recurring bursts at a low accretion luminosity of 0.15% Eddington. Spectra from MAXI, Chandra, and NuSTAR observations taken between the 2015 burst and the previous one in 2012 are used to determine the accretion column. We find it to be consistent with the burst ignition column of 5x10(exp 10) g cm (exp -2), which indicates that it is likely powered by burning in a deep helium layer. The burst flux is observed for over a day, and decays as a straight power law: F gamma t (exp -1.15). The burst and persistent spectra are well described by thermal emission from the neutron star, Comptonization of this emission in a hot optically thin medium surrounding the star, and reflection off the photoionized accretion disk. At the burst peak, the Comptonized component disappears, when the burst may dissipate the Comptonizing gas, and it returns in the burst tail. The reflection signal suggests that the inner disk is truncated at approximately 102 gravitational radii before the burst, but may move closer to the star during the burst. At the end of the burst, the flux drops below the burst cooling trend for 2 days, before returning to the pre-burst level.

  15. X-Ray Reflection and an Exceptionally Long Thermonuclear Helium Burst from IGR J17062-6143

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keek, L.; Iwakiri, W.; Serino, M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; in’t Zand, J. J. M.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2017-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars power brief but strong irradiation of their surroundings, providing a unique way to study accretion physics. We analyze MAXI/Gas Slit Camera and Swift/XRT spectra of a day-long flash observed from IGR J17062-6143 in 2015. It is a rare case of recurring bursts at a low accretion luminosity of 0.15% Eddington. Spectra from MAXI, Chandra, and NuSTAR observations taken between the 2015 burst and the previous one in 2012 are used to determine the accretion column. We find it to be consistent with the burst ignition column of 5x10(exp 10) g cm (exp -2), which indicates that it is likely powered by burning in a deep helium layer. The burst flux is observed for over a day, and decays as a straight power law: F gamma t (exp -1.15). The burst and persistent spectra are well described by thermal emission from the neutron star, Comptonization of this emission in a hot optically thin medium surrounding the star, and reflection off the photoionized accretion disk. At the burst peak, the Comptonized component disappears, when the burst may dissipate the Comptonizing gas, and it returns in the burst tail. The reflection signal suggests that the inner disk is truncated at approximately 102 gravitational radii before the burst, but may move closer to the star during the burst. At the end of the burst, the flux drops below the burst cooling trend for 2 days, before returning to the pre-burst level.

  16. X-Ray Reflection and an Exceptionally Long Thermonuclear Helium Burst from IGR J17062-6143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keek, L.; Iwakiri, W.; Serino, M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; in’t Zand, J. J. M.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2017-02-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars power brief but strong irradiation of their surroundings, providing a unique way to study accretion physics. We analyze MAXI/Gas Slit Camera and Swift/XRT spectra of a day-long flash observed from IGR J17062-6143 in 2015. It is a rare case of recurring bursts at a low accretion luminosity of 0.15% Eddington. Spectra from MAXI, Chandra, and NuSTAR observations taken between the 2015 burst and the previous one in 2012 are used to determine the accretion column. We find it to be consistent with the burst ignition column of 5 × 1010 g cm‑2, which indicates that it is likely powered by burning in a deep helium layer. The burst flux is observed for over a day, and decays as a straight power law: F ∝ t ‑1.15. The burst and persistent spectra are well described by thermal emission from the neutron star, Comptonization of this emission in a hot optically thin medium surrounding the star, and reflection off the photoionized accretion disk. At the burst peak, the Comptonized component disappears, when the burst may dissipate the Comptonizing gas, and it returns in the burst tail. The reflection signal suggests that the inner disk is truncated at ∼102 gravitational radii before the burst, but may move closer to the star during the burst. At the end of the burst, the flux drops below the burst cooling trend for 2 days, before returning to the pre-burst level.

  17. Z-pinch plasma neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Clark, R. W.; Davis, J.; Chong, Y. K.; Deeney, C.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Franklin, J.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2007-02-15

    A deuterium gas-puff load imploded by a multi-MA current driver from a large initial diameter could be a powerful source of fusion neutrons, a plasma neutron source (PNS). Unlike the beam-target neutrons produced in Z-pinch plasmas in the 1950s and deuterium-fiber experiments in the 1980s, the neutrons generated in deuterium gas-puffs with current levels achieved in recent experiments on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories could contain a substantial fraction of thermonuclear origin. For recent deuterium gas-puff shots on Z, our analytic estimates and one- and two-dimensional simulations predict thermal neutron yields {approx}3x10{sup 13}, in fair agreement with the yields recently measured on Z [C. A. Coverdale et al., Phys. Plasmas (to be published)]. It is demonstrated that the hypothesis of a beam-target origin of the observed fusion neutrons implies a very high Z-pinch-driver-to-fast-ions energy transfer efficiency, 5 to 10%, which would make a multi-MA deuterium Z-pinch the most efficient light-ion accelerator. No matter what mechanism is eventually determined to be responsible for generating fusion neutrons in deuterium gas-puff shots on Z, the deuterium neutron yield is shown to scale as Y{sub n}{approx}I{sub m}{sup 4}, where I{sub m} is the peak current of the pinch. Theoretical estimates and numerical modeling of deuterium gas-puff implosions demonstrate that the yields of thermonuclear fusion neutrons that can be produced on ZR and the next-generation machines are sufficiently high to make PNS the most powerful, cost- and energy-efficient laboratory sources of 2.5-14 MeV fusion neutrons, just like plasma radiation sources are the most powerful sources of soft and keV x rays. In particular, the predicted deuterium-tritium thermal neutron-producing capability of PNS driven by the next-generation ZR and ZX accelerators is {approx}5x10{sup 16} and {approx}10{sup 18}, respectively.

  18. Classification of JET Neutron and Gamma Emissivity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, T.; Murari, A.; Kiptily, V.; Vega, J.; Contributors, JET

    2016-05-01

    In thermonuclear plasmas, emission tomography uses integrated measurements along lines of sight (LOS) to determine the two-dimensional (2-D) spatial distribution of the volume emission intensity. Due to the availability of only a limited number views and to the coarse sampling of the LOS, the tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET. In specific experimental conditions the availability of LOSs is restricted to a single view. In this case an explicit reconstruction of the emissivity profile is no longer possible. However, machine learning classification methods can be used in order to derive the type of the distribution. In the present approach the classification is developed using the theory of belief functions which provide the support to fuse the results of independent clustering and supervised classification. The method allows to represent the uncertainty of the results provided by different independent techniques, to combine them and to manage possible conflicts.

  19. In-situ determination of macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross-section of borehole model materials using the integrated flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menn, Scott A.; Hall, Hugh E.

    1995-02-01

    The integrated thermal neutron flux method of determining the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross-section of samples consisting of approx. 400 kg of unconsolidated geologic material, saturated with fresh water, to be used in borehole models is reported. One advantage of this method is that bulk cross-section determinations are made relative to a single standard, with fresh (distilled) water being used as the standard in this work. The values of matrix Σ determined for unconsolidated sand, limestone, and dolomite for the particular samples measured fall within the range of previously reported measurements of similar type samples. The method was checked using 50,000 ppm NaCl for which a value of 39.1 ± 0.5 c.u. was determined.

  20. Theoretical z -pinch scaling relations for thermonuclear-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Stygar, W A; Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Ives, H C; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Fehl, D L; Leeper, R J; Matzen, M K; McDaniel, D H; McGurn, J S; McKenney, J L; Muron, D J; Olson, C L; Porter, J L; Ramirez, J J; Seamen, J F; Speas, C S; Spielman, R B; Struve, K W; Torres, J A; Waisman, E M; Wagoner, T C; Gilliland, T L

    2005-08-01

    implosion time tau(i). For an accelerator coupled to a double-pinch-driven hohlraum that drives the implosion of an ICF fuel capsule, we find that the accelerator power and energy required to achieve high-yield fusion scale as tau(i)0.36 and tau(i)1.36, respectively. Thus the accelerator requirements decrease as the implosion time is decreased. However, the x-ray-power and thermonuclear-yield efficiencies of such a coupled system increase with tau(i). We also find that increasing the anode-cathode gap of the pinch from 2 to 4 mm increases the requisite values of P(a) and E(a) by as much as a factor of 2.

  1. Validating Neutron Star Radius Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2010-09-01

    Spectral analysis of transient neutron star X-ray emission during bursts and quiescence were both used to estimate the NS radii for different sources. The validities of these methods need to be verified by performing them on the same source respectively. Transient type-I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursters are excellent candidates for testing the consistency between these methods, since they were detected in both bursts and quiescence. Out of 3 candidates: Cen X-4, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52, 4U 1608-52 turns out to be the best one due to the lack of archival RXTE burst data for Cen X-4 and the previous reported significant luminosity and temperature variability for Aql X-1 in quiescence. Therefore, we propose a 25 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of 4U 1608-52.

  2. Model-Based Least Squares Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs: Integrating the ORNL HFIR CG1D Source Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Gregor, Jens; Bingham, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    At the present, neutron sources cannot be fabricated small and powerful enough in order to achieve high resolution radiography while maintaining an adequate flux. One solution is to employ computational imaging techniques such as a Magnified Coded Source Imaging (CSI) system. A coded-mask is placed between the neutron source and the object. The system resolution is increased by reducing the size of the mask holes and the flux is increased by increasing the size of the coded-mask and/or the number of holes. One limitation of such system is that the resolution of current state-of-the-art scintillator-based detectors caps around 50um. To overcome this challenge, the coded-mask and object are magnified by making the distance from the coded-mask to the object much smaller than the distance from object to detector. In previous work, we have shown via synthetic experiments that our least squares method outperforms other methods in image quality and reconstruction precision because of the modeling of the CSI system components. However, the validation experiments were limited to simplistic neutron sources. In this work, we aim to model the flux distribution of a real neutron source and incorporate such a model in our least squares computational system. We provide a full description of the methodology used to characterize the neutron source and validate the method with synthetic experiments.

  3. [Human life and energy production. Prospects opened up by controlled thermonuclear fusion].

    PubMed

    Escande, D

    1997-03-18

    The massive and presently increasing energy production is going to confront mankind with a very important problem in the forthcoming decades, in particular due to the vanishing of resources and to the greenhouse effect. The share of fossil fuels in the energy production will have to decrease, and other energy sources will be needed. Among them controlled thermonuclear fusion has may assets due to its non-radioactive fuel with plentiful supply, its non radioactive and non polluting ashes, its safety, its weak environmental impact, and its irrelevance to nuclear proliferation in a normal setting. During the last three decades, physicists have made a series of steps toward the peaceful use of the dominant source of energy in the Universe. They have learned how to confine by magnetic fields plasmas at temperatures of 200 millions degrees centigrade, and they have developed several specific technologies. This way, they produced 11 million watts of nuclear power by fusing two isotopes of hydrogen. These investigations are conducted in a responsible spirit, that of ecoproduction, where possible negative consequences are anticipated, are made as low as reasonably achievable, and their management is studied. Yet several fundamental issues still have to be solved before on economically efficient industrial thermonuclear power plant be operated. A huge international collaboration involving Japan, the USA, the Russian Federation, and the European Union joined with Switzerland and Canada, is presently designing the first experimental thermonuclear reactor, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). It would cost 9 billion dollars, a cost similar to other large scientific projects. This is an important step toward an electricity producing thermonuclear reactor that would be both safe and respectful of human health and of environment.

  4. The 14 MeV Neutron Irradiation Facility in MARIA Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopowicz, R.; Pytel, K.; Dorosz, M.; Zawadka, A.; Lechniak, J.; Lipka, M.; Marcinkowska, Z.; Wierzchnicka, M.; Malkiewicz, A.; Wilczek, I.; Krok, T.; Migdal, M.; Koziel, A.

    2015-07-01

    The MARIA reactor with thermal neutron flux density up to 3x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a number of vertical channels is well suited to material testing by thermal neutron treatment. Beside of that some fast neutron irradiation facilities are operated in MARIA reactor as well. One of them is thermal to 14 MeV neutron converter launched in 2014. It is especially devoted to fusion devices material testing irradiation. The ITER and DEMO research thermonuclear facilities are to be run using the deuterium - tritium fusion reaction. Fast neutrons (of energy approximately 14 MeV) resulting from the reaction are essential to carry away the released thermonuclear energy and to breed tritium. However, constructional materials of which thermonuclear reactors are to be built must be specially selected to survive intense fluxes of fast neutrons. Strong sources of 14 MeV neutrons are needed if research on resistance of candidate materials to such fluxes is to be carried out effectively. Nuclear reactor-based converter capable to convert thermal neutrons into 14 MeV fast neutrons may be used to that purpose. The converter based on two stage nuclear reaction on lithium-6 and deuterium compounds leading to 14 MeV neutron production. The reaction chain is begun by thermal neutron capture by lithium-6 nucleus resulted in triton release. The neutron and triton transport calculations have been therefore carried-out to estimate the thermal to 14 MeV neutron conversion efficiency and optimize converter construction. The usable irradiation space of ca. 60 cm{sup 3} has been obtained. The released energy have been calculated. Heat transport has been asses to ensure proper device cooling. A set of thermocouples has been installed in converter to monitor its temperature distribution on-line. Influence of converter on reactor operation has been studied. Safety analyses of steady states and transients have been done. Performed calculations and analyses allow designing the converter and

  5. Comparison of Integral Parameter Estimated Uncertainties in Fast Neutron Systems with COMMARA-2.1 and COMMARA-2.0 Covariance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2015-01-15

    This paper shows the main differences between the COMMARA-2.0 and COMMARA-2.1 evaluated covariance data in the uncertainty estimation of integral parameters of interest for a large number of typical innovative fast neutron systems. The study provides some guidelines to the nuclear data evaluators on which materials and which reaction types need to be evaluated most accurately to achieve reliable results in computational analyses of similar systems. The assessment of the quality and reliability of the covariance data is outside the scope of the study.

  6. Model Atmospheres for X-Ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Zach; von Steinkirch, Marina; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  7. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  8. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  9. Upgrade of the IGN-14 neutron generator for research on detection of fusion-plasma products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igielski, Andrzej; Kurowski, Arkadiusz; Janik, Władysław; Gabańska, Barbara; Woźnicka, Urszula

    2015-10-01

    The fast neutron generator (IGN-14) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków (Poland) is a laboratory multi-purpose experimental device. Neutrons are produced in a beam-target D-D or D-T reactions. A new vacuum chamber installed directly to the end of the ion guide of IGN-14 makes it possible to measure not only neutrons but also alpha particles in the presence of a mixed radiation field of other accompanying reaction products. The new experimental setup allows test detectors dedicated to spectrometric measurements of thermonuclear fusion reaction products.

  10. Neutron Fission of 235,237,239U and 241,243Pu: Cross Sections, Integral Cross Sections and Cross Sections on Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C

    2003-07-10

    In a recent paper submitted to Phys. Rev. C they have presented estimates for (n,f) cross sections on a series of Thorium, Uranium and Plutonium isotopes over the range E{sub n} = 0.1-2.5 MeV. The (n,f) cross sections for many of these isotopes are difficult or impossible to measure in the laboratory. The cross sections were obtained from previous (t,pf) reaction data invoking a model which takes into account the differences between (t,pf) and (n,f) reaction processes, and which includes improved estimates for the neutron compound formation process. The purpose of this note is: (1) to compare the estimated cross sections to current data files in both ENDF and ENDL databases; (2) to estimate ratios of cross sections relatively to {sup 235}U integrated over the ''tamped flattop'' critical assembly spectrum that was used in the earlier {sup 237}U report; and (3) to show the effect on the integral cross sections when the neutron capturing state is an excited rotational state or an isomer. The isomer and excited state results are shown for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}U.

  11. A neutron star with a carbon atmosphere in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wynn C G; Heinke, Craig O

    2009-11-05

    The surface of hot neutron stars is covered by a thin atmosphere. If there is accretion after neutron-star formation, the atmosphere could be composed of light elements (H or He); if no accretion takes place or if thermonuclear reactions occur after accretion, heavy elements (for example, Fe) are expected. Despite detailed searches, observations have been unable to confirm the atmospheric composition of isolated neutron stars. Here we report an analysis of archival observations of the compact X-ray source in the centre of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. We show that a carbon atmosphere neutron star (with low magnetic field) produces a good fit to the spectrum. Our emission model, in contrast with others, implies an emission size consistent with theoretical predictions for the radius of neutron stars. This result suggests that there is nuclear burning in the surface layers and also identifies the compact source as a very young ( approximately 330-year-old) neutron star.

  12. Neutrino Signal of Collapse-induced Thermonuclear Supernovae: The Case for Prompt Black Hole Formation in SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Kfir; Kushnir, Doron

    2016-09-01

    Collapse-induced thermonuclear explosion (CITE) may explain core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). We analyze the neutrino signal in CITE and compare it to the neutrino burst of SN 1987A. For strong (≳ {10}51 erg) CCSNe, such as SN 1987A, CITE predicts a proto-neutron star (PNS) accretion phase lasting up to a few seconds that is cut off by black hole (BH) formation. The neutrino luminosity can later be revived by accretion disk emission after a dead time of a few to a few tens of seconds. In contrast, the neutrino mechanism for CCSNe predicts a short (≲s) PNS accretion phase, followed by slowly declining PNS cooling luminosity. We repeat statistical analyses used in the literature to interpret the neutrino mechanism, and apply them to CITE. The first 1-2 s of the neutrino burst are equally compatible with CITE and with the neutrino mechanism. However, the data points toward a luminosity drop at t = 2-3 s, which is in some tension with the neutrino mechanism but can be naturally attributed to BH formation in CITE. The occurrence of neutrino signal events at 5 s suggests that, within CITE, the accretion disk formed by that time. We perform two-dimensional numerical simulations showing that CITE may be able to accommodate this disk formation time while reproducing the ejected 56Ni mass and ejecta kinetic energy within factors of 2-3 of observations. We estimate the accretion disk neutrino luminosity, finding it to be on the low side but compatible with the data to a factor of 10. Given comparable uncertainties in the disk luminosity simulation, we conclude that direct BH formation may have occurred in SN 1987A.

  13. The Joint European Torus (JET) pumped divertor results and their significance for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, M. L.; JET Team

    1996-05-01

    The effectiveness of the pumped divertor during the 1994/95 experimental campaign of the Joint European Torus (JET) [P.-H. Rebut, R. J. Bickerton, and B. E. Keen, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] has allowed the pursuit of a broad-based research program that is highly relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [K. Tomabechi and the ITER Team, Nucl. Fusion 31, 1135 (1991)]. High-performance hot-ion discharges with high confinement (H-modes) free of edge localized modes (ELMs) have set a JET record neutron rate in deuterium, but are limited by various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena to βN<1.8, where βN=β/(I/aB), β is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the toroidal field pressure, I is the plasma current, B is the toroidal field, and a is the horizontal minor radius of the plasma. Quasi-steady-state ELMy H-modes have also been studied at high power, high current, and high β. The underlying energy transport exhibits a gyro-Bohm dependence that is lost close to the H-mode threshold and at high β. ELMy H-modes with detached divertor plasmas and radiative power exhaust (the operating regime foreseen for ITER) reduce the power loading to the targets, but at the expense of main plasma confinement and purity. Beryllium has been compared with carbon fiber composite as a divertor target material and melting has been induced at ITER reference off-normal heat loads, but only a moderate degree of self-protection of the beryllium target was found.

  14. Integration of a 6LilnSe2 thermal neutron detector into a CubeSat instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egner, Joanna C.; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold; Stassun, Keivan G.; Buliga, Vladimir; Matei, Liviu; Bodnarik, Julia G.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a preliminary design for a neutron detection system that is compact, lightweight, and low power consuming, utilizing the CubeSat platform making it suitable for space-based applications. This is made possible using the scintillating crystal lithium indium diselenide (LiInSe26), the first crystal to include Li6 in the crystalline structure, and a silicon avalanche photodiode. The schematics of this instrument are presented as well as the response of the instrument to initial testing under alpha radiation. A principal aim of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of such a neutron detection system within a CubeSat platform. The entire end-to-end system presented here is 10×10×15 cm3, weighs 670 g, and requires 5 V direct current at 3 W.

  15. A review of the thermonuclear runaway model of a nova outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. M.; Starrfield, S.; Truran, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Kraft's (1963) model for a nova outburst caused by a thermonuclear runaway in the hydrogen-rich matter accreted onto the white dwarf in a binary system is reviewed. Hydrostatic and hydrodynamic studies of this phenomenon are summarized, analyses of shock ejection based on hydrodynamic computer codes are discussed, and one specific hydrodynamic code is outlined. Results obtained with this code are presented and evaluated for an initial model containing a white dwarf with a hydrogen-rich envelope of 0.0001 to 0.001 solar mass in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. It is shown that an implicit hydrodynamic computer code is required in order to study the thermonuclear-runaway phenomenon. The early evolution of three models with different intrinsic luminosities is illustrated, and enhancement of CNO nuclei at the bottom of the hydrogen-rich envelope is investigated. It is suggested that the concentration of C-13, N-15, and O-17 should be greatly enhanced in nova ejecta.

  16. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  17. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-01

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  18. Starquakes, Heating Anomalies, and Nuclear Reactions in the Neutron Star Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex Thomas

    When the most massive stars perish, their cores may remain intact in the form of extremely dense and compact stars. These stellar remnants, called neutron stars, are on the cusp of becoming black holes and reach mass densities greater than an atomic nucleus in their centers. Although the interiors of neutron stars were difficult to investigate at the time of their discovery, the advent of modern space-based telescopes (e.g., Chandra X-ray Observatory) has pushed our understanding of the neutron star interior into exciting new realms. It has been shown that the neutron star interior spans an enormous range of densities and contains many phases of matter, and further theoretical progress must rely on numerical calculations of neutron star phenomena built with detailed nuclear physics input. To further investigate the properties of the neutron star interior, this dissertation constructs numerical models of neutron stars, applies models to various observations of neutron star high-energy phenomena, and draws new conclusions about the neutron star interior from these analyses. In particular, we model the neutron star's outermost ? 1 km that encompasses the neutron star's envelope, ocean, and crust. The model must implement detailed nuclear physics to properly simulate the hydrostatic and thermal structure of the neutron star. We then apply our model to phenomena that occur in these layers, such as: thermonuclear bursts in the envelope, g-modes in the ocean, torsional oscillations of the crust, and crust cooling of neutron star transients. A comparison of models to observations provides new insights on the properties of dense matter that are often difficult to probe through terrestrial experiments. For example, models of the quiescent cooling of neutron stars, such as the accreting transient MAXI J0556-332, at late times into quiescence probe the thermal transport properties of the deep neutron star crust. This modeling provides independent data from astronomical

  19. Multiple X-ray bursts and the model of a spreading layer of accreting matter over the neutron star surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenev, S. A.; Chelovekov, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    We report the detection of series of close type I X-ray bursts consisting of two or three events with a recurrence time much shorter than the characteristic (at the observed mean accretion rate) time of matter accumulation needed for a thermonuclear explosion to be initiated on the neutron star surface during the JEM-X/INTEGRAL observations of several X-ray bursters. We show that such series of bursts are naturally explained in the model of a spreading layer of accreting matter over the neutron star surface in the case of a sufficiently high ( Ṁ ≳ 1 × 10-9 M ⊙ yr-1) accretion rate (corresponding to a mean luminosity L tot ≳ 1 × 1037erg s-1). The existence of triple bursts requires some refinement of the model—the importance of a central ring zone is shown. In the standard model of a spreading layer no infall of matter in this zone is believed to occur.

  20. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  1. A Deep Search for Prompt Radio Emission from Thermonuclear Supernovae with the Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomiuk, Laura; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Bruzewski, Seth; Foley, Ryan J.; Parrent, Jerod; Strader, Jay; Badenes, Carles; Fransson, Claes; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Rupen, Michael P.; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-04-01

    Searches for circumstellar material around Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are some of the most powerful tests of the nature of SN Ia progenitors, and radio observations provide a particularly sensitive probe of this material. Here, we report radio observations for SNe Ia and their lower-luminosity thermonuclear cousins. We present the largest, most sensitive, and spectroscopically diverse study of prompt ({{Δ }}t≲ 1 years) radio observations of 85 thermonuclear SNe, including 25 obtained by our team with the unprecedented depth of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. With these observations, SN 2012cg joins SN 2011fe and SN 2014J as an SN Ia with remarkably deep radio limits and excellent temporal coverage (six epochs, spanning 5-216 days after explosion, implying \\dot{M}/{v}w≲ 5× 10-9 M⊙) yr-1/(100 km s-1), assuming ɛB = 0.1 and ɛe = 0.1). All observations yield non-detections, placing strong constraints on the presence of circumstellar material. We present analytical models for the temporal and spectral evolution of prompt radio emission from thermonuclear SNe as expected from interaction with either wind-stratified or uniform density media. These models allow us to constrain the progenitor mass loss rates, with limits in the range of \\dot{M}≲ 10-9-10-4 M⊙ yr-1, assuming a wind velocity of vw = 100 km s-1. We compare our radio constraints with measurements of Galactic symbiotic binaries to conclude that ≲10% of thermonuclear SNe have red giant companions.

  2. The historical record for Sirius - Evidence for a white-dwarf thermonuclear runaway?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Kondo, Yoji; Sion, Edward M.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence was recently presented that in medieval times Sirius was a bright red star, rather than the present bluish-white star. Here, the results of attempts to detect possible planetary nebula ejecta toward Sirius using data obtained by the IUE are presented. Based on these results and in the light of recent advances in understanding white-dwarf evolution, it is proposed that Sirius B underwent a recent thermonuclear runaway event triggered by a diffusion-induced CN reaction.

  3. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  4. Rocket propulsion by thermonuclear micro-bombs ignited with intense relativistic electron beams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a method for the ignition of a thermonuclear microbomb by means of an intense relativistic electron beam with regard to its potential application to rocket propulsion. With such a system, exhaust velocities up to 1000 km/sec, corresponding to a specific impulse of 100,000 sec, seem to be within the realm of possibility. The rocket is propelled by a chain of thermonuclear microbombs exploded in a concave magnetic mirror produced by superconducting field coils. The magnetic pressure of the field reflects the fireball generated by the explosion. For the large capacitor bank required to generate the intense relativistic electron beam, a desirable lightweight design may be possible through use of ferroelectric materials. Because of the high cost of the T-D and He 3-D thermonuclear material, the system has to be optimized by minimizing the T-D and He 3-D consumption by a proper TD and He 3-D fuel to hydrogen propellant mass ratio, leading to a larger total system mass than would be absolutely necessary.

  5. Rocket propulsion by thermonuclear micro-bombs ignited with intense relativistic electron beams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a method for the ignition of a thermonuclear microbomb by means of an intense relativistic electron beam with regard to its potential application to rocket propulsion. With such a system, exhaust velocities up to 1000 km/sec, corresponding to a specific impulse of 100,000 sec, seem to be within the realm of possibility. The rocket is propelled by a chain of thermonuclear microbombs exploded in a concave magnetic mirror produced by superconducting field coils. The magnetic pressure of the field reflects the fireball generated by the explosion. For the large capacitor bank required to generate the intense relativistic electron beam, a desirable lightweight design may be possible through use of ferroelectric materials. Because of the high cost of the T-D and He 3-D thermonuclear material, the system has to be optimized by minimizing the T-D and He 3-D consumption by a proper TD and He 3-D fuel to hydrogen propellant mass ratio, leading to a larger total system mass than would be absolutely necessary.

  6. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  7. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  8. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  9. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  10. Future Probes of the Neutron Star Equation of State Using X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    Observations with NASA s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have resulted in the discovery of fast (200 - 600 Hz), coherent X-ray intensity oscillations (hereafter, %urstoscillations ) during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 12 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Although many of their detailed properties remain to be fully understood, it is now beyond doubt that these oscillations result from spin modulation of the thermonuclear burst flux from the neutron star surface. Among the new timing phenomena revealed by RXTE the burst oscillations are perhaps the best understood, in the sense that many of their properties can be explained in the framework of this relatively simple model. Because of this, detailed modelling of burst oscillations can be an extremely powerful probe of neutron star structure, and thus the equation of state (EOS) of supra-nuclear density matter. Both the compactness parameter beta = GM/c(sup 2)R, and the surface velocity, nu(sub rot) = Omega(sub spin)R, are encoded in the energy-dependent amplitude and shape of the modulation pulses. The new discoveries have spurred much new theoretical work on thermonuclear burning and propagation on neutron stars, so that in the near future it is not unreasonable to think that detailed physical models of the time dependent flux from burning neutron stars will be available for comparison with the observed pulse profiles from a future, large collecting area X-ray timing observatory. In addition, recent high resolution burst spectroscopy with XMM/Newton suggests the presence of redshifted absorption lines from the neutron star surface during bursts. This leads to the possibility of using large area, high spectral resolution measurements of X-ray bursts as a precise probe of neutron star structure. In this work I will explore the precision with which constraints on neutron star structure, and hence the dense matter EOS, can be made with the implementation of such programs.

  11. Thermonuclear Processes as a Principal Source of the Earth's Internal Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terez, E. I.; Terez, I. E.

    2011-12-01

    A cosmological model of the formation of the Solar System is presented. It is shown that the main source of the Earth's energy is delivered from the thermonuclear processes in the inner Earth's core consisting of metallic hydrides. Several theoretical studies showed that under low temperature (T<104 K) and sufficiently high density of plasma, the characteristics of nuclear synthesis could be explained only with some adjustments to a thermonuclear synthesis theory. By building a diagram of the mass luminosity for the giant planets and the Earth, Wang Hong-Zhang (1990) illustrated that this diagram was similar to the one corresponding to stars. This could have only one explanation-the energy is due to the thermonuclear reactions and the energy rate is increasing exponentially with temperature and pressure. In the local areas where thermonuclear reactions occur in the Earth core, one should expect a sharp increase in temperature which causes of the dissolution of hydrides, e.g. release of hydrogen from the hydride-ionic form to the proton gas in large quantities (Larin, 2005). The pressure in this zone would sharply rise, and this would cause expulsion of the streams of the hydrogen plasma outside of the Earth's core. As a result of the Earth rotation and existence of the Coriolis' acceleration, the hydrogen plumes (more exactly, the proton gas) characterized by a high electrical conductivity twirl in spirals in the outer core of the Earth. These spirals form solenoid and, as a result, create the dipole magnetic field of the Earth. The suggest hypothesis of the thermonuclear nature of the Earth's energy flux is a main reason for the endogenic geodynamic and tectonic processes in the Earth's history. This hypothesis is supported by known experimental facts, and it opens new ways to study not only our planet but other planets of the Solar System. One should note that according to accepted concepts, the dipole magnetic field could exist in planets with a sufficient

  12. SELF-REACTIVATING NEUTRON SOURCE FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1959-02-01

    Reactors of the type employing beryllium in a reflector region around the active portion and to a neutron source for use therewith are discussed. The neutron source is comprised or a quantity of antimony permanently incorporated in, and as an integral part of, the reactor in or near the beryllium reflector region. During operation of the reactor the natural occurring antimony isotope of atomic weight 123 absorbs neutrons and is thereby transformed to the antimony isotope of atomic weight 124, which is radioactive and emits gamma rays. The gamma rays react with the beryllium to produce neutrons. The beryllium and antimony thus cooperate to produce a built in neutron source which is automatically reactivated by the operation of the reactor itself and which is of sufficient strength to maintain the slow neutron flux at a sufficiently high level to be reliably measured during periods when the reactor is shut down.

  13. New INTEGRAL and Swift observations of the faint neutron-star X-ray transient SAX J1806.5-2215

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Santo, M.; Romano, P.; Ferrigno, C.; Sidoli, L.; Mereghetti, S.; Wijnands, R.; Bozzo, E.; Tarana, A.; Nucita, A.; Degenaar, N.; Kuulkers, E.

    2012-04-01

    One year after the beginning of its most recent outburst (ATels #3193, #3202, #3210, #3218), the faint neutron-star X-ray transient SAX J1806.5-2215 (in't Zand et al. 1998, NuPhS, 69, 228) was found (using a Swift/XRT observation) to be still in outburst in February 2012 (Atel #3926). At the same time, the Galactic Center region could be observed again by INTEGRAL. We have analyzed the first set of IBIS/ISGRI observations on the source collected between 10 and 19 February 2012 (satellite revolutions 1139-1142; effective exposure ~26 ks), that were quasi-simultaneous with the Swift/XRT observation reported in the ATel #3926.

  14. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  15. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  16. Accreting Millisecond Pulsars: Neutron Star Masses and Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2004-01-01

    High amplitude X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. The recent discovery of X-ray burst oscillations from two accreting millisecond pulsars has confirmed this basic picture and provided a new route to measuring neutron star properties and constraining the dense matter equation of state. I will briefly summarize the current observational understanding of accreting millisecond pulsars, and describe recent attempts to determine the mass and radius of the neutron star in XTE J1814-338.

  17. Neutron logging tool readings and neutron parameters of formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czubek, Jan A.

    1995-03-01

    A case history of the calibration of neutron porosity tools is given in the paper. The calibration of neutron porosity tools is one of the most difficult, complicated, and time consuming tasks in the well logging operations in geophysics. A semi empirical approach to this problem is given in the paper. It is based on the correlation of the tool readings observed in known environments with the apparent neutron parameters sensed by the tools. The apparent neutron parameters are functions of the true neutron parameters of geological formations and of the borehole material, borehole diameter, and the tool position inside the borehole. The true integral neutron transport parameters are obtained by the multigroup diffusion approximation for slowing down of neutrons and by one thermal neutron group for the diffusion. In the latter, the effective neutron temperature is taken into account. The problem of the thermal neutron absorption cross section of rocks is discussed in detail from the point of view of its importance for the well logging results and for the experimental techniques being used.

  18. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  19. Neutron Measurements In Sahand Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhanian, S.; Mohammad, M. A.; Golalikhani, M.; Moslehi-Fard, M.; Khorram, S.

    2010-07-01

    Experimental studies of neutron emission from a Filippov type plasma focus machine is reported here for different pressures and voltages in deuterium gas. The calibration method is discussed and time integrated and time resoled neutron signals and also the angular distribution anisotropy are studied in order to clarify the most probable mechanism for neutron production. The results showing the enhancement of neutron yield in the case of some krypton admixture is also presented.

  20. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  1. Alternative approaches to the design of targets for a hybrid thermonuclear station

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N G; Lebo, I G; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Feoktistov, L P; Tishkin, V F

    1998-04-30

    Targets with low degrees of compression, such as those with internal energy deposition, two-stage conical targets for lasers emitting pulses of duration of the order of 100 ns, and multilayer shell targets for short-pulse long-wavelength CO{sub 2} and CO lasers may prove acceptable for hybrid thermonuclear reactors with high values (of the order of 10{sup 3}) of the gain in the blanket. Estimates and one-dimensional calculations of the compression of such targets are reported for the laser radiation energy range 0.2-2 MJ. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  2. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  3. Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  4. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  5. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: The extraordinarily beautiful physical principle of thermonuclear charge design (on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the test of RDS-37 — the first Soviet two-stage thermonuclear charge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, German A.

    2005-11-01

    On 22 November 1955, the Semipalatinsk test site saw the test of the first domestic two-stage thermonuclear RDS-37 charge. The charge operation was based on the principle of radiation implosion. The kernel of the principle consists in the radiation generated in a primary A-bomb explosion and confined by the radiation-opaque casing propagating throughout the interior casing volume and flowing around the secondary thermonuclear unit. The secondary unit experiences a strong compression under the irradiation, with a resulting nuclear and thermonuclear explosion. The RDS-37 explosion was the strongest of all those ever realized at the Semipalatinsk test site. It produced an indelible impression on the participants in the test. This document-based paper describes the genesis of the ideas underlying the RDS-37 design and reflects the critical moments in its development. The advent of RDS-37 was an outstanding accomplishment of the scientists and engineers of our country.

  6. Time-dependent integral equations of neutron transport for calculating the kinetics of nuclear reactors by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidenko, V. D.; Zinchenko, A. S.; Harchenko, I. K.

    2016-12-01

    Integral equations for the shape functions in the adiabatic, quasi-static, and improved quasi-static approximations are presented. The approach to solving these equations by the Monte Carlo method is described.

  7. Time-dependent integral equations of neutron transport for calculating the kinetics of nuclear reactors by the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Davidenko, V. D. Zinchenko, A. S. Harchenko, I. K.

    2016-12-15

    Integral equations for the shape functions in the adiabatic, quasi-static, and improved quasi-static approximations are presented. The approach to solving these equations by the Monte Carlo method is described.

  8. A station blackout simulation for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor using the integrated primary and secondary system model

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper deals with thermal-hydraulic analysis of ANSR`s cooling systems during nominal and transient conditions, with the major effort focusing upon the construction and testing of computer models of the reactor`s primary, secondary and reflector vessel cooling systems. The code RELAP5 was used to simulate transients, such as loss of coolant accidents and loss of off-site power, as well as to model the behavior of the reactor in steady state. Three stages are involved in constructing and using a RELAP5 model: (1) construction and encoding of the desired model, (2) testing and adjustment of the model until a satisfactory steady state is achieved, and (3) running actual transients using the steady-state results obtained earlier as initial conditions. By use of the ANSR design specifications, a model of the reactor`s primary and secondary cooling systems has been constructed to run a transient simulating a loss of off-site power. This incident assumes a pump coastdown in both the primary and secondary loops. The results determine whether the reactor can survive the transition from forced convection to natural circulation.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  10. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  11. Stabilization of burn conditions in a thermonuclear reactor using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitela, Javier E.; Martinell, Julio J.

    1998-02-01

    In this work we develop an artificial neural network (ANN) for the feedback stabilization of a thermonuclear reactor at nearly ignited burn conditions. A volume-averaged zero-dimensional nonlinear model is used to represent the time evolution of the electron density, the relative density of alpha particles and the temperature of the plasma, where a particular scaling law for the energy confinement time previously used by other authors, was adopted. The control actions include the concurrent modulation of the D-T refuelling rate, the injection of a neutral He-4 beam and an auxiliary heating power modulation, which are constrained to take values within a maximum and minimum levels. For this purpose a feedforward multilayer artificial neural network with sigmoidal activation function is trained using a back-propagation through-time technique. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the behaviour of the resulting ANN-dynamical system configuration. It is concluded that the resulting ANN can successfully stabilize the nonlinear model of the thermonuclear reactor at nearly ignited conditions for temperature and density departures significantly far from their nominal operating values. The NN-dynamical system configuration is shown to be robust with respect to the thermalization time of the alpha particles for perturbations within the region used to train the NN.

  12. Reevaluation of thermonuclear reaction rate of 50Fe(p, 𝜸)51Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Ping; He, Jian-Jun; Chai, Wan-Dong; Hou, Su-Qing; Zhang, Li-Yong

    2016-11-01

    The thermonuclear rate of the 50Fe(p, 𝜸)51Co reaction in the Type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) temperature range has been reevaluated based on a recent precise mass measurement at CSRe Lanzhou, where the proton separation energy Sp = 142±77 keV has been determined firstly for the 51Co nucleus. Comparing to the previous theoretical predictions, the experimental Sp value has much smaller uncertainty. Based on the nuclear shell model and mirror nuclear structure information, we have calculated two sets of thermonuclear rates for the 50Fe(p, 𝜸)51Co reaction by utilizing the experimental Sp value. It shows that the statistical-model calculations are not ideally applicable for this reaction primarily because of the low density of low-lying excited states in 51Co. In this work, we recommend that a set of new reaction rates based on the mirror structure of 51Cr should be incorporated in future astrophysical network calculations. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China (2013MS0916) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11490562, 11405228)

  13. Thermonuclear .Ia Supernovae from Helium Shell Detonations: Explosion Models and Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ken J.; Kasen, Dan; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Bildsten, Lars; Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-06-01

    During the early evolution of an AM Canum Venaticorum system, helium is accreted onto the surface of a white dwarf under conditions suitable for unstable thermonuclear ignition. The turbulent motions induced by the convective burning phase in the He envelope become strong enough to influence the propagation of burning fronts and may result in the onset of a detonation. Such an outcome would yield radioactive isotopes and a faint rapidly rising thermonuclear ".Ia" supernova. In this paper, we present hydrodynamic explosion models and observable outcomes of these He shell detonations for a range of initial core and envelope masses. The peak UVOIR bolometric luminosities range by a factor of 10 (from 5 × 1041 to 5 × 1042 erg s-1), and the R-band peak varies from M R,peak = -15 to -18. The rise times in all bands are very rapid (<10 days), but the decline rate is slower in the red than in the blue due to a secondary near-IR brightening. The nucleosynthesis primarily yields heavy α-chain elements (40Ca through 56Ni) and unburnt He. Thus, the spectra around peak light lack signs of intermediate-mass elements and are dominated by Ca II and Ti II features, with the caveat that our radiative transfer code does not include the nonthermal effects necessary to produce He features.

  14. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Joseph; Longland, Richard; Iliadis, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Reliable reaction rates at high stellar temperatures are necessary for the study of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae and x-ray bursts. We suggest a new procedure for extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates to these higher temperatures (T > 1 GK) using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Current, generally accepted, procedures involve the use of the Gamow peak, which has been shown to be unreliable for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures [1]. Our new approach defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8^th, 50^th and 92^nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction contributions. The ETER is then used to define a reliable temperature for matching experimental rates to Hauser-Feshbach rates. The resulting matching temperature is often well above the previous result using the Gamow peak concept. Our new method should provide more accurate extrapolated rates since Hauser-Feshbach rates are more reliable at higher temperatures. These ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α) and (α,γ) reactions on a range of A = 20-40 target nuclei and results will be presented. [0pt] [1] J. R. Newton, C. Iliadis, A. E. Champagne, A. Coc, Y. Parpottas and R. Ugalde, Phys. Rev. C 75, 045801 (2007).

  15. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, J. R.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2008-08-01

    We address the problem of extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates toward high stellar temperatures (T>1 GK) by using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Reliable reaction rates at such temperatures are required for studies of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae, and x-ray bursts. Generally accepted methods are based on the concept of a Gamow peak. We follow recent ideas that emphasized the fundamental shortcomings of the Gamow peak concept for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures. Our new method defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8th, 50th, and 92nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction rate contributions. This definition is unambiguous and has a straightforward probability interpretation. The ETER is used to define a temperature at which Hauser-Feshbach rates can be matched to experimental rates. This matching temperature is usually much higher compared to previous estimates that employed the Gamow peak concept. We suggest that an increased matching temperature provides more reliable extrapolated reaction rates since Hauser-Feshbach results are more trustwhorthy the higher the temperature. Our ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α), and (α,γ) reactions on A=20-40 target nuclei. For many of the cases studied here, our extrapolated reaction rates at high temperatures differ significantly from those obtained using the Gamow peak concept.

  16. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and β- decay in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Gupta, S; Möller, P; Beard, M; Brown, E F; Deibel, A T; Gasques, L R; Hix, W R; Keek, L; Lau, R; Steiner, A W; Wiescher, M

    2014-01-02

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, β(-) decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This 'Urca' mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  17. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and decay in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Hendrik; Gupta, Sanjib; Moeller, Peter; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Deibel, A. T.; Gasques, Leandro; Hix, William Raphael; Keek, Laurens; Lau, Rita; Steiner, Andrew M; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This Urca mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs13 and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models1, 2 computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  18. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  19. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  20. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  1. Two-dimensional over-all neutronics analysis of the ITER device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimin, S.; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi; Satoh, Satoshi; Tada, Eisuke; Maki, Koichi

    1993-07-01

    The present work attempts to carry out a comprehensive neutronics analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) developed during the Conceptual Design Activities (CDA). The two-dimensional cylindrical over-all calculational models of ITER CDA device including the first wall, blanket, shield, vacuum vessel, magnets, cryostat and support structures were developed for this purpose with a help of the DOGII code. Two dimensional DOT 3.5 code with the FUSION-40 nuclear data library was employed for transport calculations of neutron and gamma ray fluxes, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and nuclear heating in reactor components. The induced activity calculational code CINAC was employed for the calculations of exposure dose rate after reactor shutdown around the ITER CDA device. The two-dimensional over-all calculational model includes the design specifics such as the pebble bed Li2O/Be layered blanket, the thin double wall vacuum vessel, the concrete cryostat integrated with the over-all ITER design, the top maintenance shield plug, the additional ring biological shield placed under the top cryostat lid around the above-mentioned top maintenance shield plug etc. All the above-mentioned design specifics were included in the employed calculational models. Some alternative design options, such as the water-rich shielding blanket instead of lithium-bearing one, the additional biological shield plug at the top zone between the poloidal field (PF) coil No. 5, and the maintenance shield plug, were calculated as well. Much efforts have been focused on analyses of obtained results. These analyses aimed to obtain necessary recommendations on improving the ITER CDA design.

  2. Ion Acceleration by Magnetic Pinch Instabilities- Powerful Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Since the 1950s pinch discharges with deuterium gas have been known to produce large neutron bursts. During these early quests for laboratory fusion it was initially believed that the heat produced in the pinch led to sufficently high temperatures that these neutrons resulted from thermonuclear (TN) burn. However, a series of careful measurements led by Stirling Colgate was carried out to show that these neutrons did not result form TN burn. Rather, they resulted from an m = 0 sausage mode instability that accelerated the ions, causing beam-target interactions. Today, this same mechanism is used in dense plasma focus machines to generate intense neutron pulses for neutron activation experiments. One such experiment, to test the citicality of aging plutonium, is currently being planned at the Nevada Test Site. Helping to characterize the neutrons from the dense palsma focus to be used in this large experiment was the last applied physics project that Stirling work on. In this talk we will summarize the physics issues involved both in the original discovery in the 1950s and in today's experiments.

  3. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  4. Neutron counting with cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Patrick; Crisanti, Marta; Mutti, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)

  5. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  6. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  7. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  8. Comparative study on neutron data in integral experiments of MYRRHA mockup critical cores in the VENUS-F reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, Antonín; Kochetkov, Anatoly; Baeten, Peter; Vittiglio, Guido; Wagemans, Jan; Bécares, Vicente

    2017-09-01

    VENUS-F is a fast, zero-power reactor with 30% wt. metallic uranium fuel and solid lead as coolant simulator. It serves as a mockup of the MYRRHA reactor core. This paper describes integral experiments performed in two critical VENUS-F core configurations (with and without graphite reflector). Discrepancies between experiments and Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5) of keff, fission rate spatial distribution and reactivity effects (lead void and fuel Doppler) depending on a nuclear data library used (JENDL-4.0, ENDF-B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, 3.2, 3.3T2) are presented.

  9. Failure of a Neutrino-driven Explosion after Core-collapse May Lead to a Thermonuclear Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that ∼10 s after the core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming that the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge et al. We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with a negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of ≲100 s (≈10 times the free-fall time), a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited, which unbinds the outer layers of the star, leading to a supernova. The energy released is small, ≲1050 erg, and negligible amounts of synthesized material (including 56Ni) are ejected, implying that these 1D simulations are unlikely to represent typical core-collapse supernovae. However, they do serve as a proof of concept that the core-collapse-induced thermonuclear explosions are possible, and more realistic two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are within current computational capabilities.

  10. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Hybrid reactor based on laser thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, N. G.; Belousov, N. I.; Grishunin, P. A.; Kalmykov, Yu K.; Lebo, I. G.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Subbotin, V. I.; Finkel'shteĭn, K. I.; Kharitonov, V. V.; Sherstnev, K. B.

    1987-10-01

    A physicotechnical and parametric analysis is used as the basis for a conceptual design of a thermonuclear inertial-confinement hybrid reactor as a breeder of fuel for fission nuclear power stations. It is proposed to use a laser as a driver in this reactor.

  11. FAILURE OF A NEUTRINO-DRIVEN EXPLOSION AFTER CORE-COLLAPSE MAY LEAD TO A THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that ∼10 s after the core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming that the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge et al. We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with a negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of ≲100 s (≈10 times the free-fall time), a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited, which unbinds the outer layers of the star, leading to a supernova. The energy released is small, ≲10{sup 50} erg, and negligible amounts of synthesized material (including {sup 56}Ni) are ejected, implying that these 1D simulations are unlikely to represent typical core-collapse supernovae. However, they do serve as a proof of concept that the core-collapse-induced thermonuclear explosions are possible, and more realistic two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are within current computational capabilities.

  12. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Films containing heavy hydrogen isotopes in laser thermonuclear fusion targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Yu A.; Bessarab, A. V.; Veselov, A. V.; Gavrilov, P. I.; Druzhinin, A. A.; Izgorodin, V. M.; Karel'skaya, T. V.; Kirillov, G. A.; Komleva, G. V.; Lyamin, G. A.; Nikolaev, G. P.; Pinegin, A. V.; Punin, V. T.; Rabinovich, K. G.; Romaev, V. N.; Rogachev, V. G.; Solomatina, E. Yu; Tarasova, N. N.; Tachaev, G. V.; Andryushin, V. V.; Emel'yanov, S. A.; Kryuchenkov, V. B.; Markelov, N. N.; Markushkin, Yu E.; Chirin, N. A.

    1994-02-01

    An investigation was made of fuel films in targets used in experiments on laser thermonuclear fusion in Iskra-4 and Iskra-5 systems. These films were formed from condensed deuterium and a deuterium—tritium mixture, and also from metal hydrides and polyethylene containing deuterium and tritium.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  15. Neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice; Menelle, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples) and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  16. Neutron Generation by Laser-Driven Spherically Convergent Plasma Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, G.; Yan, J.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Huo, W. Y.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, J.; Chen, Z.; Jiang, W.; Chen, L.; Tang, Q.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, F.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, W.; He, X. T.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a new laser-driven spherically convergent plasma fusion scheme (SCPF) that can produce thermonuclear neutrons stably and efficiently. In the SCPF scheme, laser beams of nanosecond pulse duration and 1 014- 1 015 W /cm2 intensity uniformly irradiate the fuel layer lined inside a spherical hohlraum. The fuel layer is ablated and heated to expand inwards. Eventually, the hot fuel plasmas converge, collide, merge, and stagnate at the central region, converting most of their kinetic energy to internal energy, forming a thermonuclear fusion fireball. With the assumptions of steady ablation and adiabatic expansion, we theoretically predict the neutron yield Yn to be related to the laser energy EL, the hohlraum radius Rh, and the pulse duration τ through a scaling law of Yn∝(EL/Rh1.2τ0.2 )2.5. We have done experiments at the ShengGuangIII-prototype facility to demonstrate the principle of the SCPF scheme. Some important implications are discussed.

  17. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  19. Study of spherical torus based volume neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1998-01-01

    With the worldwide development of fusion power focusing on the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), developmental strategies for the demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) are being discussed. A relatively prudent strategy is to construct and operate a small deuterium tritium fuelled volumetric neutron source (VNS) in parallel with ITER. The VNS is to provide, over a period less than 20 years, a relatively high fusion neutron fluence of 6 MW year m2 and wall loading of 1 MW m2 or more, over an accessible blanket test area of more than 10 m2. Such a VNS would complement ITER in testing, developing, and qualifying nuclear technology components, materials, and their combinations for DEMO and future commercial power plants. The effort of this study has established the potential of the spherical tokamak as a credible VNS concept that satisfies the above requirements.

  20. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  2. Stellar dynamics. The fastest unbound star in our Galaxy ejected by a thermonuclear supernova.

    PubMed

    Geier, S; Fürst, F; Ziegerer, E; Kupfer, T; Heber, U; Irrgang, A; Wang, B; Liu, Z; Han, Z; Sesar, B; Levitan, D; Kotak, R; Magnier, E; Smith, K; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Wainscoat, R; Waters, C

    2015-03-06

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with velocities so high that they exceed the escape velocity of the Galaxy. Several acceleration mechanisms have been discussed. Only one HVS (US 708, HVS 2) is a compact helium star. Here we present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of US 708. Traveling with a velocity of ~1200 kilometers per second, it is the fastest unbound star in our Galaxy. In reconstructing its trajectory, the Galactic center becomes very unlikely as an origin, which is hardly consistent with the most favored ejection mechanism for the other HVSs. Furthermore, we detected that US 708 is a fast rotator. According to our binary evolution model, it was spun-up by tidal interaction in a close binary and is likely to be the ejected donor remnant of a thermonuclear supernova. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Simulations of alpha particle ripple loss from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Miller, C.O.; White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    Calculations of collisional stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles from the new 20 toroidal field (TF) coil International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) predict small alpha ripple losses, less than 0.4%, close to the loss calculated for the full current operation of the earlier 24 TF coil design. An analytic fit is obtained to the ITER ripple data field demonstrating the nonlinear height dependence of the ripple minimum for D shaped ripple contours. In contrast to alpha loss simulations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), a simple Goldston, White, Boozer stochastic loss criterion ripple loss model is found to require an increased renormalization of the stochastic threshold {delta}{sub s}/{delta}{sub GWB} {ge} 1. Effects of collisions, sawtooth broadening and reversal of the grad B drift direction are included in the particle following simulations.

  4. Plasma physics effects on thermonuclear burn rate in the presence of hydrodynamic mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua; Kagan, Grigory; McDevitt, Christopher; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic mix can significantly degrade thermonuclear burn rate in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target. Successful mitigation requires a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms by which mix affects burn. Here we summarize the roles of three distinct plasma physics effects on burn rate. The first is the well-known effect of enhanced thermal energy loss from the hot spot and the mitigating role of self-generated or externally-applied magnetic field. The second is the fuel ion separation via inter-species ion diffusion driven by the powerful thermodynamic forces exacerbated by mix during the implosion process. The third is the fusion reactivity modification by fast ion transport in a mix-dominated ICF target, where hot plasma is intermingled with cold fuel.

  5. Diffuse Galactic antimatter from faint thermonuclear supernovae in old stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Roland M.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Panther, Fiona H.; Sim, Stuart; Baumgardt, Holger; Möller, Anais; Nataf, David M.; Ferrario, Lilia; Eldridge, J. J.; White, Martin; Tucker, Brad E.; Aharonian, Felix

    2017-06-01

    Our Galaxy hosts the annihilation of a few 1043 low-energy positrons every second. Radioactive isotopes capable of supplying such positrons are synthesized in stars, stellar remnants and supernovae. For decades, however, there has been no positive identification of a main stellar positron source, leading to suggestions that many positrons originate from exotic sources like the Galaxy's central supermassive black hole or dark matter annihilation. Here we show that a single type of transient source, deriving from stellar populations of age 3-6 Gyr and yielding ∼0.03 M ⊙ of the positron emitter 44Ti, can simultaneously explain the strength and morphology of the Galactic positron annihilation signal and the Solar System abundance of the 44Ti decay product 44Ca. This transient is likely the merger of two low-mass white dwarfs, observed in external galaxies as the sub-luminous, thermonuclear supernova known as SN 1991bg-like.

  6. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) shield and blanket work package report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This report summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. The purpose of this work was to prepare for the first international ITER workshop devoted to defining a basic ITER concept that will serve as a basis for an indepth conceptual design activity over the next 2-1/2 years. Primary tasks carried out during the past year included: design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. 44 refs., 31 figs., 29 tabs.

  7. The effect of relativistic Compton scattering on thermonuclear burn of pure deuterium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemizad, A.; Nazirzadeh, M.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-08-15

    The relativistic effects of the Compton scattering on the thermonuclear burn-up of pure deuterium fuel in non-equilibrium plasma have been studied by four temperature (4T) theory. In the limit of low electron temperatures and photon energies, the nonrelativistic Compton scattering is valid and a convenient approximation, but in the high energy exchange rates between electrons and photons, is seen to break down. The deficiencies of the nonrelativistic approximation can be overcome by using the relativistic correction in the photons kinetic equation. In this research, we have utilized the four temperature (4T) theory to calculate the critical burn-up parameter for pure deuterium fuel, while the Compton scattering is considered as a relativistic phenomenon. It was shown that the measured critical burn-up parameter in ignition with relativistic Compton scattering is smaller than that of the parameter in the ignition with the nonrelativistic Compton scattering.

  8. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Bartlett, A.H.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-02-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented.

  9. Mirror test for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor at the JET tokamak: An overview of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, M. J.; De Temmerman, G.; Coad, J. P.; Vince, J.; Drake, J. R.; Le Guern, F.; Murari, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Walker, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2006-06-01

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for plasma diagnosis that will be used at the next-step magnetic fusion experiment, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Any change of the mirror performance, in particular, reflectivity, will influence the quality and reliability of detected signals. At the instigation of the ITER Design Team, a dedicated technical and experimental activity aiming at the assessment of mirror surface degradation as a result of exposure to the plasma has been initiated on the JET tokamak. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the mirror test program, including design details of the mirror samples and their supports, their locations within JET, and the issue of optical characterization of the mirrors both before and after exposure. The postexposure characterization is particularly challenging in JET as a consequence of an environment in which both tritium and beryllium are present.

  10. Review of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) detailed design report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-18

    Dr. Martha Krebs, Director, Office of Energy Research at the US Department of Energy (DOE), wrote to the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC), in letters dated September 23 and November 6, 1996, requesting that FESAC review the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Detailed Design Report (DDR) and provide its view of the adequacy of the DDR as part of the basis for the United States decision to enter negotiations with the other interested Parties regarding the terms and conditions for an agreement for the construction, operations, exploitation and decommissioning of ITER. The letter from Dr. Krebs, referred to as the Charge Letter, provided context for the review and a set of questions of specific interest.

  11. The development and the tests of the electrostatic probe for dust particle collection in thermonuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Voityuk, A. N.; Zakharov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Formation of dust particles in thermonuclear reactors can greatly affect the plasma parameters and lead to accumulation of tritium. The rates of formation and deposition of dust need to be measured, and the parameters of formation of dust particles and clusters need to be studied. A model of a device for collection of fine conductive particles capable of removing them from the reactor chamber for future research is proposed in this paper. The dust collector's operation is based on a principle of applied electrostatic field. The model was tested in different operating conditions: in vacuum, at the atmospheric pressure in the atmosphere of air and dry nitrogen. The experiments were conducted with a stationary system and with the dust collector in motion relative to the dusty surface. It is shown that, during the probe moving relative to the surface, it can remove up to 95% of fine tungsten particles with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 μm.

  12. SPIRAL INSTABILITY CAN DRIVE THERMONUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS IN BINARY WHITE DWARF MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Rahul; Fisher, Robert; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-02-10

    Thermonuclear, or Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), originate from the explosion of carbon–oxygen white dwarfs, and serve as standardizable cosmological candles. However, despite their importance, the nature of the progenitor systems that give rise to SNe Ia has not been hitherto elucidated. Observational evidence favors the double-degenerate channel in which merging white dwarf binaries lead to SNe Ia. Furthermore, significant discrepancies exist between observations and theory, and to date, there has been no self-consistent merger model that yields a SNe Ia. Here we show that a spiral mode instability in the accretion disk formed during a binary white dwarf merger leads to a detonation on a dynamical timescale. This mechanism sheds light on how white dwarf mergers may frequently yield SNe Ia.

  13. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusion Working Group (FWG)) was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project.

  14. The Influence of Accretion Rate and Metallicity on Thermonuclear Bursts: Predictions from KEPLER Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Heger, Alexander; Galloway, Duncan K.

    2016-03-01

    Using the KEPLER hydrodynamics code, 464 models of thermonuclear X-ray bursters were performed across a range of accretion rates and compositions. We present the library of simulated burst profiles from this sample, and examine variations in the simulated light curve for different model conditions. We find that the recurrence time varies as a power law against accretion rate, and measure its slope while mixed H/He burning is occurring for a range of metallicities, finding the power law gradient to vary from η =1.1 to 1.24. We identify the accretion rates at which mixed H/He burning stops and a transition occurs to different burning regimes. We explore how varying the accretion rate and metallicity affects burst morphology in both the rise and tail.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Models of thermonuclear X-ray bursters (Lampe+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, N.; Heger, A.; Galloway, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using the KEPLER 1D hydrodynamics code (Woosley et al. 2004ApJS..151...75W), 464 models of thermonuclear X-ray bursters were performed across a range of accretion rates and compositions. We present the library of simulated burst profiles from this sample, and examine variations in the simulated light curve for different model conditions. We find that the recurrence time varies as a power law against accretion rate, and measure its slope while mixed H/He burning is occurring for a range of metallicities, finding the power law gradient to vary from {eta}=1.1 to 1.24. We identify the accretion rates at which mixed H/He burning stops and a transition occurs to different burning regimes. We explore how varying the accretion rate and metallicity affects burst morphology in both the rise and tail. (1 data file).

  16. RELATIVISTIC COLLAPSE AND EXPLOSION OF ROTATING SUPERMASSIVE STARS WITH THERMONUCLEAR EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Montero, Pedro J.; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Ewald

    2012-04-10

    We present results of general relativistic simulations of collapsing supermassive stars with and without rotation using the two-dimensional general relativistic numerical code Nada, which solves the Einstein equations written in the BSSN formalism and the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations with high-resolution shock-capturing schemes. These numerical simulations use an equation of state that includes the effects of gas pressure and, in a tabulated form, those associated with radiation and the electron-positron pairs. We also take into account the effect of thermonuclear energy released by hydrogen and helium burning. We find that objects with a mass of Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} and an initial metallicity greater than Z{sub CNO} Almost-Equal-To 0.007 do explode if non-rotating, while the threshold metallicity for an explosion is reduced to Z{sub CNO} Almost-Equal-To 0.001 for objects uniformly rotating. The critical initial metallicity for a thermonuclear explosion increases for stars with a mass Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }. For those stars that do not explode, we follow the evolution beyond the phase of black hole (BH) formation. We compute the neutrino energy loss rates due to several processes that may be relevant during the gravitational collapse of these objects. The peak luminosities of neutrinos and antineutrinos of all flavors for models collapsing to a BH are L{sub {nu}} {approx} 10{sup 55} erg s{sup -1}. The total radiated energy in neutrinos varies between E{sub {nu}} {approx} 10{sup 56} erg for models collapsing to a BH and E{sub {nu}} {approx} 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg for models exploding.

  17. Relativistic Collapse and Explosion of Rotating Supermassive Stars with Thermonuclear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Pedro J.; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Ewald

    2012-04-01

    We present results of general relativistic simulations of collapsing supermassive stars with and without rotation using the two-dimensional general relativistic numerical code Nada, which solves the Einstein equations written in the BSSN formalism and the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations with high-resolution shock-capturing schemes. These numerical simulations use an equation of state that includes the effects of gas pressure and, in a tabulated form, those associated with radiation and the electron-positron pairs. We also take into account the effect of thermonuclear energy released by hydrogen and helium burning. We find that objects with a mass of ≈5 × 105 M ⊙ and an initial metallicity greater than Z CNO ≈ 0.007 do explode if non-rotating, while the threshold metallicity for an explosion is reduced to Z CNO ≈ 0.001 for objects uniformly rotating. The critical initial metallicity for a thermonuclear explosion increases for stars with a mass ≈106 M ⊙. For those stars that do not explode, we follow the evolution beyond the phase of black hole (BH) formation. We compute the neutrino energy loss rates due to several processes that may be relevant during the gravitational collapse of these objects. The peak luminosities of neutrinos and antineutrinos of all flavors for models collapsing to a BH are L ν ~ 1055 erg s-1. The total radiated energy in neutrinos varies between E ν ~ 1056 erg for models collapsing to a BH and E ν ~ 1045-1046 erg for models exploding.

  18. A burst from a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Politano, M.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Studies which examine the consequences of accretion, at rates of 10(exp -9) solar mass/yr and 10(exp -10) solar mass/yr, onto an ONeMg white dwarf with a mass of 1.35 solar masses are performed. In these studies, a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic, one-dimensional computer code was used. The code now includes a network with 89 nuclei up to Ca-40, elemental diffusion, new opacities, and new equation of state. The initial abundance distribution corresponded to a mixture that was enriched to either 25, 50, or 75 percent in products of carbon burning. The remaining material in each case is assumed to have a solar composition. The evolution of the thermonuclear runaway in the 1.35 solar mass white dwarf, with M = 10(exp -9) solar mass, produced peak temperatures in the shell source exceeding 300 million degrees. The sequence produced significant amounts of Na-22 from proton captures onto Ne-20 and significant amounts of Al-26 from proton captures on Mg-24. This sequence ejected 5.2 x 10(exp -6) solar mass moving with speeds from approximately 100 km/s to 2300 km/s. When the mass accretion rate was decreased to 10(exp -10) solar mass, the resulting thermonuclear runaway produced a shock that moved through the outer envelope of the white dwarf and raised the surface luminosity to L greater than 10(exp 7) solar luminosity and the effective temperature to values exceeding 10(exp 7) K. The interaction of the material expanding from off of the white dwarf with the accretion disk should produce a burst of gamma-rays.

  19. A burst from a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, S.; Politano, M.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1992-02-01

    Studies which examine the consequences of accretion, at rates of 10-9 solar mass/yr and 10-10 solar mass/yr, onto an ONeMg white dwarf with a mass of 1.35 solar masses are performed. In these studies, a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic, one-dimensional computer code was used. The code now includes a network with 89 nuclei up to Ca-40, elemental diffusion, new opacities, and new equation of state. The initial abundance distribution corresponded to a mixture that was enriched to either 25, 50, or 75 percent in products of carbon burning. The remaining material in each case is assumed to have a solar composition. The evolution of the thermonuclear runaway in the 1.35 solar mass white dwarf, with M = 10-9 solar mass, produced peak temperatures in the shell source exceeding 300 million degrees. The sequence produced significant amounts of Na-22 from proton captures onto Ne-20 and significant amounts of Al-26 from proton captures on Mg-24. This sequence ejected 5.2 x 10-6 solar mass moving with speeds from approximately 100 km/s to 2300 km/s. When the mass accretion rate was decreased to 10-10 solar mass, the resulting thermonuclear runaway produced a shock that moved through the outer envelope of the white dwarf and raised the surface luminosity to L greater than 107 solar luminosity and the effective temperature to values exceeding 107 K. The interaction of the material expanding from off of the white dwarf with the accretion disk should produce a burst of gamma-rays.

  20. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  1. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  2. Neutron sawtooth behavior in the PLT, DIII-D, and TFTR tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lovberg, J.A.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Zaveryaev, V.S.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of the sawtooth instability on the 2.5 MeV neutron emission in the PLT, DIII-D, and TFTR tokamaks is studied. In thermonuclear plasmas, the instability typically results in a 20% reduction in emission. The time evolution of the thermonuclear neutron signal suggests that the sawtooth crash consists of four phases. First, the electron density profile flattens rapidly (in /approximately/30..mu..sec on PLT) but, in some cases, there is little associated change in neutron emission, suggesting that most reacting ions remain confined in the sawtooth region but do not completely mix. After the electron sawtooth, the ions continue to mix, resulting in a /approximately/10% reduction in neutron emission in /approximately/0.5 msec. The emission then decays more slowly during the final two phases. Thermalization of reacting ions on a /approximately/3/tau//sub ii/ time scale accounts for only /approximately/20% of the slow drop. Most of the slow drop seems to be caused by loss of ion energy from the mixing region (an ion heat pulse). 36 refs., 15 figs., 1 tabs.

  3. Neutron spectra from beam-target reactions in dense Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2015-10-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons emitted by a range of deuterium and deuterium-tritium Z-pinch devices is investigated computationally using a hybrid kinetic-MHD model. 3D MHD simulations are used to model the implosion, stagnation, and break-up of dense plasma focus devices at currents of 70 kA, 500 kA, and 2 MA and also a 15 MA gas puff. Instabilities in the MHD simulations generate large electric and magnetic fields, which accelerate ions during the stagnation and break-up phases. A kinetic model is used to calculate the trajectories of these ions and the neutron spectra produced due to the interaction of these ions with the background plasma. It is found that these beam-target neutron spectra are sensitive to the electric and magnetic fields at stagnation resulting in significant differences in the spectra emitted by each device. Most notably, magnetization of the accelerated ions causes the beam-target spectra to be isotropic for the gas puff simulations. It is also shown that beam-target spectra can have a peak intensity located at a lower energy than the peak intensity of a thermonuclear spectrum. A number of other differences in the shapes of beam-target and thermonuclear spectra are also observed for each device. Finally, significant differences between the shapes of beam-target DD and DT neutron spectra, due to differences in the reaction cross-sections, are illustrated.

  4. Neutron spectra from beam-target reactions in dense Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbe, B. Chittenden, J.

    2015-10-15

    The energy spectrum of neutrons emitted by a range of deuterium and deuterium-tritium Z-pinch devices is investigated computationally using a hybrid kinetic-MHD model. 3D MHD simulations are used to model the implosion, stagnation, and break-up of dense plasma focus devices at currents of 70 kA, 500 kA, and 2 MA and also a 15 MA gas puff. Instabilities in the MHD simulations generate large electric and magnetic fields, which accelerate ions during the stagnation and break-up phases. A kinetic model is used to calculate the trajectories of these ions and the neutron spectra produced due to the interaction of these ions with the background plasma. It is found that these beam-target neutron spectra are sensitive to the electric and magnetic fields at stagnation resulting in significant differences in the spectra emitted by each device. Most notably, magnetization of the accelerated ions causes the beam-target spectra to be isotropic for the gas puff simulations. It is also shown that beam-target spectra can have a peak intensity located at a lower energy than the peak intensity of a thermonuclear spectrum. A number of other differences in the shapes of beam-target and thermonuclear spectra are also observed for each device. Finally, significant differences between the shapes of beam-target DD and DT neutron spectra, due to differences in the reaction cross-sections, are illustrated.

  5. Multi-purpose fast neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Puryga, E. A.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Burdakov, A. V.; Grishnyaev, E. V.

    2013-08-01

    Diagnostics of hot ion component of plasma on the products of fusion reactions is widely used on thermonuclear facilities. In case of employment of neutron spectrometers, based on organics scintillators, there is advanced technique developed to eliminate neutron pulses from gamma background—digital pulse shape discrimination. For every DPSD application it is necessary to use the fast (2-5 ns) and precise (12 bit) transient ADC unit with large amount of onboard memory for storing every digitized scintillation pulses during shot time. At present time the duration of hot thermonuclear plasma burning in large tokamaks approximate to 1 min, and this requires very high onboard memory capacity (˜100 GB). This paper describes a neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time DPSD algorithm, implemented to ADC unit. This approach saves about two orders of onboard memory capacity, gives the possibility of instant use of outcome to feedback systems. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with help of 60Co and 252Cf radiation sources, and deuterium neutron generator.

  6. Observations of Millisecond Variability from Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    1997-04-01

    Observations carried out over the past year by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed both quasiperiodic and nearly coherent oscillations with frequencies from 300 - 1200 Hz in at least 10 low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. The X-ray luminosity from these systems is the result of accretion of matter into the deep gravitational potential well of a neutron star. Four of these sources show nearly coherent oscillations during some thermonuclear X-ray bursts which very likely reveal the long sought millisecond spin periods of neutron stars in at least some LMXB. The millisecond timescales of the quasiperiodic oscillations (QPO) are characteristic of processes occuring in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star and provide a new means to investigate the physics of neutron stars and their environs. I will review the discovery and current understanding of these kHz QPO, as they have come to be known, and briefly discuss what their study can teach us about neutron stars.

  7. Neutronization During Carbon Simmering In Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Héctor; Piro, Anthony L.; Schwab, Josiah; Badenes, Carles

    2016-07-01

    When a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor first ignites carbon in its core, it undergoes ˜103-104 years of convective burning prior to the onset of thermonuclear runaway. This carbon simmering phase is important for setting the thermal profile and composition of the white dwarf. Using the MESA stellar evolution code, we follow this convective burning and examine the production of neutron-rich isotopes. The neutron content of the SN fuel has important consequences for the ensuing nucleosynthesis, and in particular, for the production of secondary Fe-peak nuclei like Mn and stable Ni. These elements have been observed in the X-ray spectra of SN remnants like Tycho, Kepler, and 3C 397, and their yields can provide valuable insights into the physics of SNe Ia and the properties of their progenitors. We find that weak reactions during simmering can at most generate a neutron excess of ≈ 3 × 10-4. This is ≈ 70% lower than that found in previous studies that do not take the full density and temperature profile of the simmering region into account. Our results imply that the progenitor metallicity is the main contributor to the neutron excess in SN Ia fuel for Z ≳ 1/3 Z ⊙. Alternatively, at lower metallicities, this neutron excess provides a floor that should be present in any centrally-ignited SN Ia scenario.

  8. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, G.J.; Adams, J.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1997-12-01

    The performance of diagnostic systems are limited by their weakest constituents, including their calibration issues. Neutron diagnostics are notorious for problems encountered while determining their absolute calibrations, due mainly to the nature of the neutron transport problem. In order to facilitate the determination of an accurate and precise calibration, the diagnostic design should be such as to minimize the scattered neutron flux. ITER will use a comprehensive set of neutron diagnostics--comprising radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron spectrometers, a neutron activation system and internal and external fission chambers--to provide accurate measurements of fusion power and power densities as a function of time. The calibration of such an important diagnostic system merits careful consideration. Some thoughts have already been given to this subject during the conceptual design phase in relation to the time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron yield monitors. However, no overall calibration strategy has been worked out so far. This paper represents a first attempt to address this vital issue. Experience gained from present large tokamaks (JET, TFTR and JT60U) and proposals for ITER are reviewed. The need to use a 14-MeV neutron generator as opposed to radioactive sources for in-situ calibration of D-T diagnostics will be stressed. It is clear that the overall absolute determination of fusion power will have to rely on a combination of nuclear measuring techniques, for which the provision of accurate and independent calibrations will constitute an ongoing process as ITER moves from one phase of operation to the next.

  9. Updated summary of measurements and calculations of neutron and gamma-ray emission spectra from spheres pusled with 14-MeV neutrons: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.; Goldberg, E.; Howerton, R.J.; Komoto, T.T.; Pohl, B.A.

    1989-01-19

    New measurements of the neutron and gamma-ray emission spectra from materials of interest to thermonuclear reactors with a 14 MeV neutron source were done during 1986 and 1987. These measurements characterized by better resolution than those reported in the Summary published in 1982, were performed using the pulsed sphere and time-of-flight techniques. The detector used in these measurements was a NE-213 cylinder, 5.08 cm in diameter by 5.08 cm thick. The new measurements include the following materials: Be, C, N, H/sub 2/O, C/sub 2/F/sub 4/ (teflon), Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Cu, Ta, W, Au, Pb, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U. For all these materials, both the neutron and gamma emission spectra were measured. A complete tabulation of all the measurements done under the Pulse Sphere Program is presented. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  12. A neutron diffractometer for biological macromolecules using neutron imaging plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, S.; Karasawa, Y.; Tanaka, I.; Minezaki, Y.; Yonezawa, Y.; Niimura, N.

    Neutron imaging plates (NIPs), developed recently, have a good spatial resolution and availability of a large sensitive area. The NIPs having such characteristics may be particularly useful for neutron-diffraction measurements of biological macromolecules. We have constructed a neutron diffractometer dedicated to crystallography of biological macromolecules using the NIP, in the guide hall of the reactor JRR-3M at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Neutrons are monochromatized with an elastically-bent-silicon monochromator ( λ = 0.22 nm). The diffraction patterns are detected with the NIP of 400 × 520 mm 2 at a distance of 150-300 mm from a sample crystal. A sequence of the measurements (exposure, reading the NIP, erasure of the pattern, and starting the next exposure) is done automatically. We measured the diffraction patterns from hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, and obtained the patterns which can be processed to derive integrated intensity of each diffraction spot.

  13. Quasiparticle Interactions in Neutron Matter for Applications in Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambach, J; Ainsworth, T. L.; Pines, D.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic model for the quasiparticle interaction in neutron matter is presented. Both-particle (pp) and particle-hole (ph) correlations are included. The pp correlations are treated in semi-empirical way, while ph correlations are incorporated by solving coupled two-body equations for particle-hole interaction and the scattering amplitude of the Fermi sphere. The resulting integral equations self-consistently sum the ph reducible diagrams. Antisymmetry is kept at all stages and hence the forward-scattering sum rules for the scattering amplitude are obeyed. Results for Landau parameters and transport coefficients in a density regime representing the crust of a neutron star are presented. We also estimate the (1)S(sub 0) gap parameter for neutron superfluidity and comment briefly on neutron-star implications.

  14. Quasiparticle Interactions in Neutron Matter for Applications in Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambach, J.; Anisworth, T. L.; Pines, D.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic model for the quaisiparticle interaction in neutron matter is presented. Both particle-particle (pp) and particle-hole (ph) correlation are are included. The pp correlations are treated in semi-empirical way, while ph correlations are incorporated by solving coupled two-body equations for the particle hole interaction and the scattering amplitude on the Fermi sphere. The resulting integral equations self-consistently sum the ph reducible diagrams. Antisymmetry is kept at all stages and hence the forward-scattering sum rules are obeyed. Results for Landau parameters and transport coefficients in a density regime representing the crust of a neutron star are presented. We also estimate the S-1 gap parameter for neutron superfluidity and comment briefly on neutron-star implications.

  15. Integrated Fast Neutron Flux at the End of Phases I, II, III, and IV-1B of the MOX Zr-cladding Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Gray Chang

    2004-03-01

    This report using the detailed ATR quarter core model calculated neutronic tallies, the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV and E > 1.0 MeV) distributions at the end of Phase-I, -II, -III, and -IV Irradiation are tabulated in Table 1, 2, 3, and 4. At the end of the Phase-I irradiation, the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluences of the removed MOX capsules 1 and 8 are 2.68 and 2.68 x 1020 n/cm2, respectively. At the end of Phase-II Irradiation are tabulated in Table 2. At the end of the Phase-II irradiation, the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluences of the removed MOX capsules 9 and 2 are 6.78 and 6.79 x 1020 n/cm2, respectively. At the end of the Phase-III irradiation, the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluences of the removed MOX capsules 10 and 3 are 9.82 and 9.70 x 1020 n/cm2, respectively. And, at the end of the Phase-IV part 1B irradiation, the MCWO-calculated Zr-cladding fast neutron fluences of the removed MOX capsules 4 and 13 are 1.41 and 1.39 x 1021 n/cm2, respectively.

  16. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated 252Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements. PMID:27274944

  17. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated (252)Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements.

  18. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1960-04-19

    A compact electronic device capable of providing short time high density outputs of neutrons is described. The device of the invention includes an evacuated vacuum housing adapted to be supplied with a deuterium, tritium, or other atmosphere and means for establishing an electrical discharge along a path through the gas. An energized solenoid is arranged to constrain the ionized gas (plasma) along the path. An anode bearing adsorbed or adherent target material is arranged to enclose the constrained plasma. To produce neutrons a high voltage is applied from appropriate supply means between the plasma and anode to accelerate ions from the plasma to impinge upcn the target material, e.g., comprising deuterium.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  1. Fusion neutron source blanket: requirements for calculation accuracy and benchmark experiment precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirkin, A. V.; Alekseev, P. N.; Batyaev, V. F.; Gurevich, M. I.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Kuteev, B. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    In this report the calculation accuracy requirements of the main parameters of the fusion neutron source, and the thermonuclear blankets with a DT fusion power of more than 10 MW, are formulated. To conduct the benchmark experiments the technical documentation and calculation models were developed for two blanket micro-models: the molten salt and the heavy water solid-state blankets. The calculations of the neutron spectra, and 37 dosimetric reaction rates that are widely used for the registration of thermal, resonance and threshold (0.25-13.45 MeV) neutrons, were performed for each blanket micro-model. The MCNP code and the neutron data library ENDF/B-VII were used for the calculations. All the calculations were performed for two kinds of neutron source: source I is the fusion source, source II is the source of neutrons generated by the 7Li target irradiated by protons with energy 24.6 MeV. The spectral indexes ratios were calculated to describe the spectrum variations from different neutron sources. The obtained results demonstrate the advantage of using the fusion neutron source in future experiments.

  2. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  3. Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Anne C.

    1999-07-01

    The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to scientific, politician, and military participants in this project. I

  4. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  6. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  7. Influence of the tritium beta(-) decay on low-temperature thermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures

    PubMed

    Frolov

    2000-09-01

    Low-temperature (Tthermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures with various deuterium-tritium-helium-3 ratios is considered. The general dependence is studied for the critical burn-up parameter x(c)=rhor(c) upon the initial temperature T, density rho(0), and tritium molar concentration y for the [D]:y[T]:(1-y)[3He] mixture. In particular, it is shown that, if the tritium concentration y decreases, then the critical burn-up parameter x(c)(T,rho(0),y) grows very quickly (at fixed T and rho(0)). This means that tritium beta(-) decay significantly complicates thermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures.

  8. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  9. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-12-15

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  10. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  11. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  12. Study of Scattered Background Neutron in NIF and Time-of Flight (TOF) to Measure Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Moran, M; Phillips, T; Lerche, R; Koch, J; Eder, D

    2005-08-31

    Some of the planned core diagnostics for National Ignition Facility (NIF) will use neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy techniques to gather information for primary neutron yield measurement or neutron imaging. This technique has been widely and routinely used at other laser facilities including Nova and Omega. TOF methods will also be used to observe target fuel areal density <{rho}R> (radial integral of density) via measuring the number of primary 14.1 MeV neutrons that are down-scattered to lower energies by nuclear collisions inside the compressed target core. The substantially larger target chamber size and higher neutron yield for NIF raises issues related to the large number of scattered neutrons produced by high yield deuterium-tritium (D-T) shots at NIF. The effect of primary neutrons scattered by the walls of the massive target chamber and structures both inside and outside the chamber will contribute a significant scattered background signal when trying to determine the number of neutrons down-scattered from the target core. The optimum detector locations outside the target chamber or target bay wall will be proposed. Appropriate collimators at the chamber port and the bay wall (between the neutron source at target chamber center (TCC) and detector) that maximize detection of signal neutrons while minimizing the background from scattered neutrons and neutron induced gamma rays will also be presented.

  13. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Physics of the plasma corona in the problem of laser controlled thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, N. E.; Gorbunov, Leonid M.; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.

    1994-09-01

    A brief analysis is made of the most important nonlinear processes which result from the interaction of laser radiation with thermonuclear targets. lt is shown that problems in the physics of the plasma corona should be an essential part of any programme of research on laser controlled thermonuclear fusion. A list is given of the problems that have to be solved first before going to the next level of laser energies.

  14. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Model of mixing of shells of a thermonuclear laser target upon spherical compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmitrenko, N. V.; Proncheva, N. G.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.; Yakhin, R. A.

    2007-08-01

    Based on many direct numerical simulations of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities upon compression of laser thermonuclear targets, an efficient model is developed for describing the width of the mixing region taking into account the influence of the initial conditions on the mixing process dynamics. Approaches are proposed which are based on the evolution theory of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities [1], which was specially elaborated to describe the compression of targets for inertial thermonuclear fusion.

  15. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  16. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  17. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Papka, P.; Dobson, R. T.

    2010-01-05

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic design issues and analysis for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Watson, R.D. ); Hassanien, A.M. ); Goranson, P.L. . Fusion Engineering Design Center); Salmonson, J.C. . Special Projects)

    1990-01-01

    Critical Heat Flux (CHF), also called burnout, is one of the major design limits for water-cooled divertors in tokamaks. Another important design issue is the correct thermal modeling of the divertor plate geometry where heat is applied to only one side of the plate and highly subcooled flow boiling in internal passages is used for heat removal. This paper discusses analytical techniques developed to address these design issues, and the experimental evidence gathered in support of the approach. Typical water-cooled divertor designs for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are analyzed, and design margins estimated. Peaking of the heat flux at the tube-water boundary is shown to be an important issue, and design concerns which could lead to imposing large design safety margins are identified. The use of flow enhancement techniques such as internal twisted tapes and fins are discussed, and some estimates of the gains in the design margin are presented. Finally, unresolved issues and concerns regarding hydraulic design of divertors are summarized, and some experiments which could help the ITER final design process identified. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Thermonuclear targets for direct-drive ignition by a megajoule laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Garanin, S. G.; Gus’kov, S. Yu. Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A.

    2015-10-15

    Central ignition of a thin two-layer-shell fusion target that is directly driven by a 2-MJ profiled pulse of Nd laser second-harmonic radiation has been studied. The parameters of the target were selected so as to provide effective acceleration of the shell toward the center, which was sufficient for the onset of ignition under conditions of increased hydrodynamic stability of the ablator acceleration and compression. The aspect ratio of the inner deuterium-tritium layer of the shell does not exceed 15, provided that a major part (above 75%) of the outer layer (plastic ablator) is evaporated by the instant of maximum compression. The investigation is based on two series of numerical calculations that were performed using one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic codes. The first 1D code was used to calculate the absorption of the profiled laser-radiation pulse (including calculation of the total absorption coefficient with allowance for the inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance mechanisms) and the spatial distribution of target heating for a real geometry of irradiation using 192 laser beams in a scheme of focusing with a cubo-octahedral symmetry. The second 1D code was used for simulating the total cycle of target evolution under the action of absorbed laser radiation and for determining the thermonuclear gain that was achieved with a given target.

  20. Economic Impacts on the United States of Siting Decisions for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, J. P.; Hanson, M. E.; Huddleston, J. R.; Wolsko, T. D.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that examines and compares the probable short-term economic impacts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the United States (U.S.) if (1) ITER were to be sited in the U.S., or (2) ITER were to be sited in one of the other countries that, along with the U.S., is currently participating in the ITER program. Life-cycle costs associated with ITER construction, operation, and decommissioning are analyzed to assess their economic impact. A number of possible U.S. host and U.S. non-host technology and cost-sharing arrangements with the other ITER Parties are examined, although cost-sharing arrangements and the process by which the Parties will select a host country and an ITER site remain open issues. Both national and local/regional economic impacts, as measured by gross domestic product, regional output, employment, net exports, and income, are considered. These impacts represent a portion of the complex, interrelated set of economic considerations that characterize U.S. host and U.S. non-host participation in ITER. A number of other potentially important economic and noneconomic considerations are discussed qualitatively.

  1. Economic impacts on the United States of siting decisions for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Hanson, M.E.; Huddleston, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    This report presents the results of a study that examines and compares the probable short-term economic impacts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the United States (U.S.) if (1) ITER were to be sited in the U.S., or (2) ITER were to be sited in one of the other countries that, along with the U.S., is currently participating in the ITER program. Life-cycle costs associated with ITER construction, operation, and decommissioning are analyzed to assess their economic impact. A number of possible U.S. host and U.S. non-host technology and cost-sharing arrangements with the other ITER Parties are examined, although cost-sharing arrangements and the process by which the Parties will select a host country and an ITER site remain open issues. Both national and local/regional economic impacts, as measured by gross domestic product, regional output, employment, net exports, and income, are considered. These impacts represent a portion of the complex, interrelated set of economic considerations that characterize U.S. host and U.S. non-host participation in ITER. A number of other potentially important economic and noneconomic considerations are discussed qualitatively.

  2. First application of a TES microcalorimeter to a thermonuclear fusion plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, K.; Hoshino, A.; Ishisaki, Y.; Morita, U.; Ohashi, T.; Mihara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2006-04-01

    We report the first application of a superconductive transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter to a thermonuclear fusion plasma experiment in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). The TES microcalorimeter was installed in a portable adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR), which is originally designed for a rocket experiment. The ADR was directly connected to TPE-RX with a vacuum duct, and thin Toray-Lumirror or parylene films were used for entrance windows to allow soft X-rays coming into the detector with good efficiency. The detector box was designed to shield the strong magnetic field produced by ADR and TPE-RX. A total of 3472 counts of X-ray signals were detected in 0.2-3.0 keV for 210 plasma shots during the flat-top phase (35-70 ms) after discarding pile-up events. Combining the data with that measured in the energy range of 1.3-8 keV using a SiLi detector, we examined a wide band X-ray spectrum of the plasma. The obtained spectrum is dominated by thermal plasma emission, although at least four different temperature components are required to account for the whole band spectral shape. Impurities in the deuterium plasma are also investigated.

  3. Thermonuclear runaways in nova outbursts. 2: Effect of strong, instantaneous, local fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Anurag; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the manner in which nova outbursts are initiated on the surface of a white dwarf, we investigate the effects fluctuations have on the evolution of a thermonuclear runaway. Fluctuations in temperature density, or the composition of material in the burning shell may arise due to the chaotic flow field generated by convection when it occurs, or by the accretion process itself. With the aid of two-dimensional reactive flow calculations, we consider cases where a strong fluctutation in temperature arises during the early, quiescent accretion phase or during the later, more dynamic, explosion phase. In all cases we find that an instantaneous, local temperature fluctuation causes the affected material to become Rayleigh-Taylor unstable. The rapid rise and subsequent expansion of matter immediately cools the hot blob, which prevents the lateral propagation of burning. This suggests that local temperature fluctuations do not play a significant role in directly initiating the runaway, especially during the early stages. However, they may provide an efficient mechanism of mixing core material into the envelope (thereby pre-enriching the fuel for subsequent episodes of explosive hydrogen burning) and of mixing substantial amounts of the radioactive nucleus N-13 into the surface layers, making novae potential gamma-ray sources. This suggests that it is the global not the local, evolution of the core-envelope interface to high temperatures which dominates the development of the runaway. We also present a possible new scenario for the initiation of nova outbursts based on our results.

  4. Beryllium deposition on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor first mirrors: Layer morphology and influence on mirror reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    De Temmerman, G.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Seraydarian, R.; Schmid, K.; Kost, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Marot, L.

    2007-10-15

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of the optical diagnostic systems in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Reliability of these systems may be affected by mirror reflectivity changes induced by erosion and/or deposition of impurities (carbon, beryllium). The present study aims to assess the effect of beryllium (Be) deposition on the reflectivity of metallic mirrors and to collect data on the optical quality of these layers in terms of morphology, roughness, etc. Mirrors from molybdenum and copper were exposed in the PISCES-B linear plasma device to collect eroded material from graphite and beryllium targets exposed to beryllium-seeded deuterium plasma. After exposure, relative reflectivity of the mirrors was measured and different surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the properties of the deposited layers. Be layers formed in PISCES-B exhibit high levels of porosity which makes the reflectivity of the Be layers much lower than the reflectivity of pure Be. It is found that if Be deposition occurs on ITER first mirrors, the reflectivity of the coated mirrors will strongly depend on the layer morphology, which in turn depends on the deposition conditions.

  5. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Frontal Collision of Two Identical Plane Thermonuclear Burning Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Charakhch'yan, Alexander A.

    2013-10-01

    A one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density is simulated numerically. The solution of the problem includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to collide with each other at the symmetry plane. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burning wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0 , where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ~ 1 g/cm2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ~ 5 g/cm2.

  6. Exploring the experimental parameter space of sonoluminescence in the direction of thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, D. Felipe; Blecksmith, Sarah; Tessien, Ross; Mead, William C.

    2000-10-01

    The collapse of gas bubbles in liquids driven by oscillating pressures, also known as sonoluminescence or light-emitting acoustic cavitation, has been shown to generate photons with energies as high as 6 eV ( ~ 200 nm wavelength) [1]. In addition, computer simulations of such phenomenon give extremely high temperatures ( ~ 100,000 K) and pressures (100,000 atmospheres). Although these values are high, those needed to achieve thermonuclear fusion are still several orders of magnitude away. We will report on experimental efforts to achieve fusion by exploring the parameter space available to acoustic cavitation. [1] D. F. Gaitan and L. A. Crum, Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics, Austin, Texas, edited by M.F. Hamilton and D.T. Blackstock (Elsevier, New York, 1990), p. 459; Gaitan, D.F. , L. A. Crum, C. C. Church, and R. A. Roy, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 3166 (1992); B.P. Barber and S.J. Putterman, Nature 352, 318 (1991)

  7. Bulk-bronzied graphites for plasma-facing components in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Doerner, R.; Khandagle, M. . Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Causey, R.; Wilson, K. ); Croessmann, D.; Whitley, J. ); Holland, D.; Smolik, G. ); Matsuda, T.; Sogabe, T. (Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd., O

    1990-06-01

    Newly developed bulk-boronized graphites and boronized C-C composites with a total boron concentration ranging from 1 wt % to 30 wt % have been evaluated as plasma-facing component materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Bulk-boronized graphites have been bombarded with high-flux deuterium plasmas at temperatures between 200 and 1600{degree}C. Plasma interaction induced erosion of bulk-boronized graphites is observed to be a factor of 2--3 smaller than that of pyrolytic graphite, in regimes of physical sputtering, chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation. Postbombardment thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that bulk-boronized graphites enhance recombinative desorption of deuterium, which leads to a suppression of the formation of deuterocarbon due to chemical sputtering. The tritium inventory in graphite has been found to decrease by an order of magnitude due to 10 wt % bulk-boronization at temperatures above 1000{degree}C. The critical heat flux to induce cracking for bulk-boronized graphites has been found to be essentially the same as that for non-boronized graphites. Also, 10 wt % bulk-boronization of graphite hinders air oxidation nearly completely at 800{degree}C and reduces the steam oxidation rate by a factor of 2--3 at around 1100 and 1350{degree}C. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Design considerations for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, R.T.; Koski, J.A.; Watson, R.D.; Causey, R.A.; Croessmann, C.D.; Dempsey, J.F.; Hosking, M.; Neimer, K.A.; Russo, A.J.; Salmonson, J.C.; Stephens, J.; Smith, M.F.; Watkins, J.G.; Whitley, J.B.

    1989-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a joint design and R D project involving the USA, the Soviet Union, Japan and the European Community. These international partners are working together on the design of a fusion tokamak reactor that will operate in the D-T ignition regime. This report compiles the contributions to ITER made by Sandia National Laboratories in the area of design and R D for plasma facing components, such as the first wall and divertor. The following topics are discussed: divertor fabrication issues, divertor thermal-hydraulic analysis, separatrix sweeping effects, divertor tile 2-D stress analysis, electromechanical disruption effects, runaway electron and intense energy deposition analyses, lifetime analysis and tritium retention in plasma facing materials. Material properties for pyrolytic graphite and beryllium are presented. Use of pyrolytic graphite as the plasma facing material allows for operation with thicker graphite armor at the design heat flux level of 10 MW/m/sup 2/. The design of a divertor coated with plasma sprayed beryllium is presented as an attractive alternative to pyrolytic graphite armor tiles. Finally, the Sandia research and development plan for ITER is discussed. 82 figs.

  9. Collision Models for Plasma Simulation of Thermonuclear Burn: Comparison of Models and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winske, Dan; Albright, Brian; Bowers, Kevin; Lemons, Don

    2007-11-01

    There is renewed interest in examining plasma physics issues related to thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and fast ignition (FI): e.g., the rate of temperature equilibration of electrons and ions, the formation and/or depletion of high energy tails of ion velocity distributions of ions, the slowing of energetic ions in dense plasmas, etc. To address these types of questions, we have developed a new particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation capability, embodied in the code VPIC. To model TN-burn problems in dense plasmas, we have developed a new Coulomb collision model, based on the use of stochastic differential equations and well-known Spitzer rates to describe the collision process, which was presented at last year's meeting. Here we extend the model to included arbitrary weighting of individual simulation particles, rather than just separate weights for each plasma species, which is a feature intrinsic to VPIC. We compare test cases for plasma relaxation and slowing of fast beams using the new collision model with results obtained from an extension of standard particle-pairing collision models to weighted particles for parameter regimes of interest to ICF and FI.

  10. Tridimensional Thermonuclear Instability in Subignited Plasmas and on the Surface of the Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Coppi, B.

    2016-10-01

    Tridimensional modes involving an increase of the electron temperature can be excited as a result of α-particle heating in subignited D-T fusion burning plasmas when a nearly time- independent external source of heating is applied. The analyzed modes are shown to emerge from an axisymmetric toroidal configurations and are radially localized around rational magnetic surfaces corresponding to q(r =r0) =m0 /n0 where m0 and n0 are the relevant poloidal and toroidal mode numbers. The radial width of the mode is of the order of the thermal scale distances δT =D⊥e th /D∥e th 1/4 (R0 /n0) 1/2(dlnq/dr)0-1/2. The mode has a rather severe damping rate, that has to be overcome by the relevant heating rate. Thus the temperature range to be considered is that where the D-T plasma reactivity undergoes a relatively large increase as a function of temperature. This kind of theory has been applied to the plasmas that are envisioned to be associated with surface of pulsar and be subjects to (spatially) inhomogenous thermonuclear burning. Sponsored in part by the US DOE.

  11. Requirements for US regulatory approval of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, D.A.; Haire, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the first fusion machine that will have sufficient decay heat and activation product inventory to pose potential nuclear safety concerns. As a result, nuclear safety and environmental issues will be much more important in the approval process for the design, siting, construction, and operation of ITER in the United States than previous fusion devices, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The purpose of this report is (a) to provide an overview of the regulatory approval process for a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility; (b) to present the dose limits used by DOE to protect workers, the public, and the environment from the risks of exposure to radiation and hazardous materials; (c) to discuss some key nuclear safety-related issues that must be addressed early in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA) to obtain regulatory approval; and (d) to provide general guidelines to the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) concerning the development of a regulatory framework for the ITER project.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF A FAST NEUTRON MONITORING SYSTEM USING SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EFFECTS, PREAMPLIFIERS, INTEGRATED CIRCUITS, SOLAR CELLS, CALIFORNIUM , RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES, SENSITIVITY, GAMMA RAYS, TEMPERATURE, SILICON ALLOYS, GALLIUM ALLOYS, ARSENIC ALLOYS, CARBIDES, FAST NEUTRONS.

  13. Neutron Radiation Characteristics of Plutonium Dioxide Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1972-01-01

    The major sources of neutrons from plutonium dioxide nuclear fuel are considered in detail. These sources include spontaneous fission of several of the Pu isotopes, reactions with low Z impurities in the fuel, and reactions with O-18. For spontaneous fission neutrons a value of (1.95 plus or minus 0.07) X 1,000 n/s/q PuO2 is obtained. The neutron yield from (alpha, neutron) reactions with oxygen is calculated by integrating the reaction rate equation over all alpha particle energies and all center-of-mass angles. The results indicate a neutron emission rate of (1.42 plus or minus 0.32) X 10,000 n/s/q PuO2. The neutron yield from (alpha, neutron) reactions with low Z impurities in the fuel is presented in tabular form for one part per million of each impurity. The total neutron flux emitted from a particular fuel geometry is estimated by adding the neutron yield due to the induced fission to the other neutron sources.

  14. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    DOE PAGES

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-raymore » telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.« less

  15. Successive X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, T. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of a neutron star undergoing a series of thermonuclear flashes in its accreted hydrogen-rich layer has been numerically followed to determine the effects of the history of the neutron star's thermal and compositional structure on the properties of the emitted X-ray bursts. Burst characteristics are studied for a range of mass accretion rates, CNO abundances in the accreted matter, and initial thermal states of the underlying neutron star core; the bursts exhibit erratic behavior for low CNO metal abundances and cool neutron star cores, with the burst recurrence time scales varying by 1-2 orders of magnitude. There is typically a continued presence of a substantial amount of unburnt hydrogen in the accreted layer throughout the series of the X-ray burst events. Convective mixing during the quiescent phase leads to the inward transport of helium to high densities and eventually to the initiation of the next outburst. The resulting bursts can be weak and, in such cases, are characterized by short recurrence time scales (1-2 hr), low peak luminosities (0.1-0.2 times the Eddington value), and low alpha-values (about 20).

  16. Successive X-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, T. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of a neutron star undergoing a series of thermonuclear flashes in its accreted hydrogen-rich layer has been numerically followed to determine the effects of the history of the neutron star's thermal and compositional structure on the properties of the emitted X-ray bursts. Burst characteristics are studied for a range of mass accretion rates, CNO abundances in the accreted matter, and initial thermal states of the underlying neutron star core; the bursts exhibit erratic behavior for low CNO metal abundances and cool neutron star cores, with the burst recurrence time scales varying by 1-2 orders of magnitude. There is typically a continued presence of a substantial amount of unburnt hydrogen in the accreted layer throughout the series of the X-ray burst events. Convective mixing during the quiescent phase leads to the inward transport of helium to high densities and eventually to the initiation of the next outburst. The resulting bursts can be weak and, in such cases, are characterized by short recurrence time scales (1-2 hr), low peak luminosities (0.1-0.2 times the Eddington value), and low alpha-values (about 20).

  17. Nonequilibrium pulsed plasma: ICF target, neutron, and x-ray sources applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Y.

    2001-04-01

    The approaches based on the properties of nonequilibrium pulsed plasmas to develop ICF target design and some ICF application problems are discussed. The methods of the creation of pulsed plasmas with essential properties on the laser radiation absorption and the emission of soft x-ray, fast ions and thermonuclear neutrons are proposed. Theoretical and experimental results are presented on the following fields: 1) laser-produced plasma of porous matter of light elements as a direct ICF target absorber smoothing the laser energy deposition nonuniformities; 2) laser- produced plasma of the composed materials which are the porous medium of light elements with a distribute solid clusters of heavy elements as a wide-range x-ray converter of the ICF target at the direct irradiation by laser beams; 3) laser-produced plasma of regularly volume-structured matter consisting of an ensemble of alternate thin layers of high and low density material containing a thermonuclear fuel or an ensemble of microshells in contact with an one another mode of a material contain such a fuel as a high power neutron source with the intensity more than 1010 DT neutron per one joule of laser energy; 4) high-power- laser-produced plasma of thin foil as a source of light Mev- ions for the direct ignition of ICF target.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  19. A spherical shell target scheme for laser-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min-Qing; Cai, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Hua; Dong, Quan-Li; Zhou, Cang-Tao; Wu, Si-Zhong; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Cao, Li-Hua; Zheng, Chun-Yang; Wu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Mo; Pei, Wen-Bing; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, X. T.

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for neutron production is investigated in which an ultra-intense laser is irradiated into a two-layer (deuterium and aurum) spherical shell target through the cone shaped entrance hole. It is found that the energy conversion efficiency from laser to target can reach as high as 71%, and deuterium ions are heated to a maximum energy of several MeV from the inner layer surface. These ions are accelerated towards the center of the cavity and accumulated finally with a high density up to tens of critical density in several picoseconds. Two different mechanisms account for the efficient yield of the neutrons in the cavity: (1) At the early stage, the neutrons are generated by the high energy deuterium ions based on the "beam-target" approach. (2) At the later stage, the neutrons are generated by the thermonuclear fusion when the most of the deuterium ions reach equilibrium in the cavity. It is also found that a large number of deuterium ions accelerated inward can pass through the target center and the outer Au layer and finally stopped in the CD2 layer. This also causes efficient yield of neutrons inside the CD2 layer due to "beam-target" approach. A postprocessor has been designed to evaluate the neutron yield and the neutron spectrum is obtained.

  20. A spherical shell target scheme for laser-driven neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    He, Min-Qing Zhang, Hua; Wu, Si-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Mo; Cai, Hong-Bo Zhou, Cang-Tao; Cao, Li-Hua; Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, X. T.; Dong, Quan-Li; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Pei, Wen-Bing

    2015-12-15

    A scheme for neutron production is investigated in which an ultra-intense laser is irradiated into a two-layer (deuterium and aurum) spherical shell target through the cone shaped entrance hole. It is found that the energy conversion efficiency from laser to target can reach as high as 71%, and deuterium ions are heated to a maximum energy of several MeV from the inner layer surface. These ions are accelerated towards the center of the cavity and accumulated finally with a high density up to tens of critical density in several picoseconds. Two different mechanisms account for the efficient yield of the neutrons in the cavity: (1) At the early stage, the neutrons are generated by the high energy deuterium ions based on the “beam-target” approach. (2) At the later stage, the neutrons are generated by the thermonuclear fusion when the most of the deuterium ions reach equilibrium in the cavity. It is also found that a large number of deuterium ions accelerated inward can pass through the target center and the outer Au layer and finally stopped in the CD{sub 2} layer. This also causes efficient yield of neutrons inside the CD{sub 2} layer due to “beam-target” approach. A postprocessor has been designed to evaluate the neutron yield and the neutron spectrum is obtained.

  1. Accelerated Neutron Testing of Semiconductor Devices at the LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wender, S. A.; Bateman, F. B.; Haight, R. C.; Ullmann, J. L.

    1998-04-01

    The high-energy neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) produces beams of neutrons for accelerated testing of integrated circuit devices. Neutrons produced in the atmosphere by cosmic-rays are thought to be a significant threat to integrated circuits both at aircraft altitudes as well as at lower elevations. Neutrons have been shown to cause single event upsets, multiple event upsets, latchup and burnout in semiconductor devices. Neutrons are produced at LANSCE via spallation reactions with the 800 MeV pulsed proton beam. Proton beam currents of about 2 microamperes strike a tungsten target and produce a spectrum of neutrons whose energy and intensity can be precisely measured by time-of-flight techniques. The neutron spectrum produced in this manner has energies up to approximately 600 MeV and is very similar in shape to the atmospheric neutron spectrum at 40,000 ft. A flight path located at 20 m from the neutron production target is dedicated to accelerated testing of semiconductor devices. The integrated neutron flux above 1 MeV is about 10^6 n/cm^2/sec over an area about 10 cm in diameter. This intensity is about 10^5 (10^7) times greater than the cosmic-ray neutron flux at 40,000 ft (sea level).

  2. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  3. Quality assessment of neutron delivery system for small-angle neutron scattering diffractometers of the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at the FRM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Aurel; Pipich, Vitaliy; Ioffe, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Following the shutdown of FRJ-2 research reactor in Jülich, the pinhole small-angle neutron diffractometers KWS-1 and KWS-2 have been moved to the research reactor FRM II in Garching. The installation of these 40 m long instruments required the design and setup of new neutron guides with geometrical and optical features imposed by the instruments' positioning in the neutron guide hall, such as, the predetermined length and beam height as well as the foreseen improvement of the instrument performance. We report here about the quality assessment of the newly constructed neutron guides with respect to the optical, geometrical and alignment characteristics and the positioning of the velocity selector integrated in the neutron guide system by comparing the features of the measured neutron beams (in terms of neutron flux, intensity distribution and beam profile) with the results of the simulations of optimal neutron guide systems.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  5. Monte Carlo modelling of distributions of the d-d and d-t reaction products in a dedicated measuring chamber at the fast neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, U.; Dankowski, J.

    2015-04-01

    A fast neutron generator with a tritium target can be used to generate d-d and d-t reaction products corresponding to thermonuclear reactions in tokamaks or stellarators. In this way, convenient laboratory conditions for tests of spectrometric detectors - prior to their installation at the big fusion devices - can be achieved. Distributions of the alpha particles, protons, deuterons, and tritons generated by the fast neutron generator operating at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Cracow, Poland, were calculated by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) codes. Results of this MC modelling are presented.

  6. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  7. Multi-Mode transport modeling of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, G.; Kritz, A.H.; Kinsey, J.E.; Redd, A.J.

    1998-06-01

    Predictions are made for the performance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [R. Aymar, V. Chuyanov, M. Huguet, R. Parker, and Y. Shimomura, in {ital Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference, Montr{acute e}al, Canada 1996} (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1997), Paper IAEA-CN-64/01-1] design using the Multi-Mode model in the time-dependent one- and one-half-dimensional (1-1/2-D) BALDUR [C. E. Singer {ital et al.}, Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 49}, 275 (1988)] transport code. This model predicts the temperature and density profiles observed in present-day tokamak experiments more closely on the average than other models currently available. Simulations using the Multi-Mode transport model, with its inherent gyro-Bohm scaling, indicate that ITER will ignite, even with edge temperatures as low as 0.25 keV (L-mode, or low-confinement mode, boundary conditions) or with volume averaged density as low as 0.775{times}10{sup 20}m{sup {minus}3} (just below the Greenwald density limit, when T{sub edge}=0.75keV). The ignition is found to be thermally stable, and the fusion power production is easily controlled by varying plasma density, impurity content, or edge temperatures. The nonequilibrium impurity radiation model used in these simulations predicts that a significant fraction of the fusion power is radiated when conditions are close to marginal ignition. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. First operation with the JET International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, R.; Arnoux, G.; Beurskens, M.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Lomas, P.; Maddison, G.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Rimini, F.; Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Association EURATOM and others

    2013-05-15

    To consolidate International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design choices and prepare for its operation, Joint European Torus (JET) has implemented ITER's plasma facing materials, namely, Be for the main wall and W in the divertor. In addition, protection systems, diagnostics, and the vertical stability control were upgraded and the heating capability of the neutral beams was increased to over 30 MW. First results confirm the expected benefits and the limitations of all metal plasma facing components (PFCs) but also yield understanding of operational issues directly relating to ITER. H-retention is lower by at least a factor of 10 in all operational scenarios compared to that with C PFCs. The lower C content (≈ factor 10) has led to much lower radiation during the plasma burn-through phase eliminating breakdown failures. Similarly, the intrinsic radiation observed during disruptions is very low, leading to high power loads and to a slow current quench. Massive gas injection using a D{sub 2}/Ar mixture restores levels of radiation and vessel forces similar to those of mitigated disruptions with the C wall. Dedicated L-H transition experiments indicate a 30% power threshold reduction, a distinct minimum density, and a pronounced shape dependence. The L-mode density limit was found to be up to 30% higher than for C allowing stable detached divertor operation over a larger density range. Stable H-modes as well as the hybrid scenario could be re-established only when using gas puff levels of a few 10{sup 21} es{sup −1}. On average, the confinement is lower with the new PFCs, but nevertheless, H factors up to 1 (H-Mode) and 1.3 (at β{sub N}≈3, hybrids) have been achieved with W concentrations well below the maximum acceptable level.

  9. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  10. Neutron Star Seismology with Accreting Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    Neutron stars provide natural laboratories for the study of a number of important topics in fundamental physics, including the composition and equation of state (EOS) of cold matter at the highest densities achievable in nature. The physical conditions in their deep interiors cannot be replicated in terrestrial laboratories, and the nature of matter under such extreme conditions remains one of the major unsolved problems in physics. Direct measurement of the mass - radius relationship for neutron stars is very important for constraining the EOS of dense matter, however, since different phases of dense matter can have similar equations of state, mass and radius measurements alone are not very efficient in determining their interior composition. Additional, complementary observables are needed to more definitively probe the composition of neutron star cores. Asteroseismology, the measurement of the characteristic frequencies of the normal modes of oscillation of stars, can provide a powerful probe of their interiors. For example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the deep interior of the Sun. Comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved, but our recent work indicates that sensitive searches for the signatures of neutron star oscillations can be carried out using the high time resolution, pulse timing data obtained by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)-and in the case of a single source the XMM-Newton pn camera-from the population of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs, Strohmayer & Mahmoodifar 2014a), and in some thermonuclear burst sources (Strohmayer & Mahmoodifar 2014b). It is the primary aim of this proposal to carry out the first such comprehensive search for global oscillation modes across this entire source class of neutron stars using approximately 6 M-sec of RXTE and 100 k-sec of XMMNewton archival data, and thereby significantly advance the nascent field of neutron star seismology. We will

  11. Neutron-neutron and neutron-photon correlations with FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.

    2017-09-01

    For many years, the state of the art for modeling fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of emitted particles are correlated. The FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) code generates complete fission events. Event-by-event techniques such as those of FREYA are particularly useful because it is possible to obtain complete kinematic information on the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. We describe FREYA and compare our results with neutron-neutron, neutron-light fragment and neutron-photon correlation data.

  12. DISCOVERY OF A NEUTRON STAR OSCILLATION MODE DURING A SUPERBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmayer, Tod; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2014-10-01

    Neutron stars are among the most compact objects in the universe and provide a unique laboratory for the study of cold ultra-dense matter. While asteroseismology can provide a powerful probe of the interiors of stars, for example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the interior of the Sun, comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved. Here, we report the discovery of a coherent X-ray modulation from the neutron star 4U 1636–536 during the 2001 February 22 thermonuclear superburst seen with NASA's Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) that is very likely produced by a global oscillation mode. The observed frequency is 835.6440 ± 0.0002 Hz (1.43546 times the stellar spin frequency of 582.14323 Hz) and the modulation is well described by a sinusoid (A + Bsin (φ – φ{sub 0})) with a fractional half-amplitude of B/A = 0.19 ± 0.04% (4-15 keV). The observed frequency is consistent with the expected inertial frame frequency of a rotationally modified surface g-mode, an interfacial mode in the ocean-crust interface, or perhaps an r-mode. Observing an inertial frame frequency—as opposed to a co-rotating frame frequency—appears consistent with the superburst's thermal emission arising from the entire surface of the neutron star, and the mode may become visible by perturbing the local surface temperature. We briefly discuss the implications of the mode detection for the neutron star's projected velocity and mass. Our results provide further strong evidence that global oscillation modes can produce observable modulations in the X-ray flux from neutron stars.

  13. Conducting Polymers for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kimblin, Clare; Miller, Kirk; Vogel, Bob; Quam, Bill; McHugh, Harry; Anthony, Glen; Mike, Grover

    2007-12-01

    Conjugated polymers have emerged as an attractive technology for large-area electronic applications. As organic semiconductors, they can be used to make large-area arrays of diodes or transistors using fabrication techniques developed for polymer coatings, such as spraying and screen-printing. We have demonstrated both neutron and alpha detection using diodes made from conjugated polymers and have done preliminary work to integrate a boron carbide layer into the conventional polymer device structure to capture thermal neutrons. The polymer devices appear to be insensitive to gamma rays, due to their small physical thickness and low atomic number.

  14. Approaches to ultrafast neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.L.; Kalibjian, R.; Singh, M.S.; Wiedwald, J.D.; Campbell, D.E.; Campbell, E.M.; Cable, M.D.; Graves, W.R.; Lane, S.M.; Lerche, R.A.; Price, R.H.; Stearns, D.G.; Mourou, G.A.; Prussin, S.G.

    1985-05-01

    We discuss two approaches to obtain neutron detectors of very high temporal resolution. In the first approach, a uranium-coated cathode is used in a streak tube configuration. Secondary electrons accompanying the fission fragments from a neutron-uranium reaction are accelerated, focused through a pinhole, and streaked. Calculations show that 20-ps time resolution can be obtained. In the second approach, a uranium-coated cathode is integrated into a transmission line. State-of-the-art technology indicates that a time resolution of 20 ps can be obtained by gating the cathode with a fast electric pulse.

  15. NEUTRON COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, C.D.; Carlson, R.L.; Tubinis, M.P.

    1958-07-29

    An ionization chamber instrument is described for cylindrical electrodes with an ionizing gag filling the channber. The inner electrode is held in place by a hermetic insulating seal at one end of the outer electrode, the other end of the outer electrode being closed by a gas filling tube. The outer surface of the inner electrode is coated with an active material which is responsive to neutron bombardment, such as uranium235 or boron-10, to produce ionizing radiations in the gas. The transverse cross sectional area of the inner electrode is small in relation to that of the channber whereby substantially all of the radiations are directed toward the outer electrode.

  16. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  17. Neutron radiation characteristics of plutonium dioxide fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1972-01-01

    The major sources of neutrons from plutonium dioxide nuclear fuel are considered in detail. These sources include spontaneous fission of several of the Pu isotopes, (alpha, n) reactions with low Z impurities in the fuel, and (alpha, n) reactions with O-18. For spontaneous fission neutrons a value of (1.95 + or - 0.07) X 1,000 n/s/g PuO2 is obtained. The neutron yield from (alpha, n) reactions with oxygen is calculated by integrating the reaction rate equation over all alpha-particle energies and all center-of-mass angles. The results indicate a neutron emission rate of (1.14 + or - 0.26) X 10,000 n/s/g PuO2. The neutron yield from (alpha, n) reactions with low Z impurities in the fuel is presented in tabular form for one part part per million of each impurity. The total neutron yield due to the combined effects of all the impurities depends upon the fractional weight concentration of each impurity. The total neutron flux emitted from a particular fuel geometry is estimated by adding the neutron yield due to the induced fission to the other neutron sources.

  18. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  19. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N. E.

    2014-05-23

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and longlived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasistable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  20. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and long-lived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasi-stable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  1. Neutron Computed Tomography Using Real-Time Neutron Radiography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulcoski, Mark Francis

    Conventional neutron radiography of an object records a two-dimensional distribution of the neutron beam intensity after it has passed through an object. The neutron radiograph, whether static film or real-time, may be considered a "shadow graph" of the object. In a shadow graph, internal structures in an object may mask one another making it difficult or impossible to precisely define the internals of the object. This problem can be solved by tomographic imaging. A real-time neutron radiography facility was constructed including the capability of neutron tomography. The neutron beam was measured for total neutron flux ((1.0 (+OR-) 0.2) x 10('11) n/(m('2)-sec)), gold cadmium ratio (52 (+OR-) 3) and effective neutron temperature (83(DEGREES)C (+OR -) 8(DEGREES)C). The angular divergence or nonparallelism of the neutron beam was measured to be \\2.3(DEGREES) (+OR -) 0.1(DEGREES) thereby providing a means of quantifying the collimator effectiveness. The resolution capabilities of both static film and real-time neutron radiographs were quantified using a Fourier transform algorithm to calculate the modulation transfer function of both types of radiographs. The contrast sensitivity of both types of radiographs was measured as 3.1% for film and 4.0% for real-time radiographs. Two tomography algorithms, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the convolution method, were programmed on an Intellect 100 Image Processing System. The SIRT algorithm was found to be too large and slow on the Intellect 100 to produce useful tomographs. The convolution method produced results near the theoretical resolution limits for a given number of projections. A tomographic resolution of at least 1.3 mm was demonstrated using 200 projections. Computer running time for the convolution method was found to be (TURN)30 seconds for each projection used. A series of experiments were conducted using the convolution method investigating the effect of high and low pass

  2. Integral Equation Space-Energy Flux Synthesis for Spherical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    flux distribution eigenfunction An eigenvalue associated with in(r) n(E) neutron number density in units...technique for obtaining the spatial and energy neutron flux distributions in multiplying systems. In IES, the integral form of the neutron transport... FLUX SYNTHESIS FOR SPHERICAL SYSTEMS I. Introduction The calculations of neutron flux distributions and neutron growth rate (a) for multiplying

  3. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Chung, Kiwhan; Makela, Mark F.

    2009-06-30

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  4. Phase-resolved spectra of burst oscillations in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Miller, Jon M.

    2017-08-01

    Millisecond oscillations have been observed during thermonuclear bursts from many neutron stars (NS) in LMXBs. Their periods are comparable to the rotational period of the NS, and are thought to be produced by temperature anisotropies on the NS surface. Understanding and correcly modeling these oscillation is a powerful tool to constrain the NS interior. Studying these oscillations has thus far focused on modeling the oscillation profile form these pulsations using mostly XTE data. Here, we take a different approach and extract spectra at different phases of the oscillations. This allows us track the observed spectrum as the NS rotates. We are able to measure temperature changes as the star rotates. The temperature profiles from some bursts show asymetries likely due to Doppler effects. Here, we present detailed results from the phase spectra and discuss their implications on measurements of NS masses and radii.

  5. Numerical Analysis on Neutron Shielding Structure of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changle; Wu, Songtao; Yu, Jie; Sheng, Daolin

    2008-06-01

    The neutron shielding component of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a kind of structure resembling a wall in appearance. A FE (finite element) model is set up by using ANSYS code in terms of its structural features. Static analysis, thermal expansion analysis and dynamic analysis are performed. The static results show that the stress and displacement distribution are allowable, but the high stress appears in the junction between the upper and lower parts. The modal analysis indicates that the biggest deformation exists in the port area. Through modal superposition, the single-point response has been found with the lower rank frequency of the acceleration seismic response spectrum. But the deformation and the stress values are within the permissible limit. The analysis results would benefit the work in the next step and provide some reference for the implementation of the engineering plan in the future.

  6. [Integrity].

    PubMed

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  7. Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Ed

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in observations of the latter.

  8. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, Gandolfi; Steiner, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  9. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, S.; Steiner, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron- rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  10. Study of Thermonuclear Alfven Instabilities in Next Step Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; R. Budny; C.Z. Cheng; G.-Y. Fu; W.W. Heidbrink; G. Kramer; D. Meade; and R. Nazikian

    2002-07-02

    A study is presented for the stability of alpha-particle driven shear Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) for the normal parameters of the three major burning plasma proposals, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), FIRE (Fusion Ignition Research Experiment), and IGNITOR (Ignited Torus). A study of the JET (Joint European Torus) plasma, where fusion alphas were generated in tritium experiments, is also included to attempt experimental validation of the numerical predictions. An analytic assessment of Toroidal AE (TAE) stability is first presented, where the alpha particle beta due to the fusion reaction rate and electron drag is simply and accurately estimated in 7-20 keV plasma temperature regime. In this assessment the hot particle drive is balanced against ion-Landau damping of the background deuterons and electron collision effects and stability boundaries are determined. Then two numerical studies of AE instability are presented. In one the High-n stability code HINST is used . This code is capable of predicting instabilities of low and moderately high frequency Alfven modes. HINST computes the non-perturbative solution of the Alfven eigenmodes including effects of ion finite Larmor radius, orbit width, trapped electrons etc. The stability calculations are repeated using the global code NOVAK. We show that for these tokamaks the spectrum of the least stable AE modes are TAE that appear at medium-/high-n numbers. In HINST TAEs are locally unstable due to the alphas pressure gradient in all the devices under the consideration except IGNITOR. However, NOVAK calculations show that the global mode structure enhances the damping mechanisms and produces stability in all configurations considered here. A serious question remains whether the perturbation theory used in NOVAK overestimates the stability predictions, so that it is premature to conclude that the nominal operation of all three proposals are stable to AEs. In addition NBI ions produce a strong

  11. High luminosity, slow ejecta and persistent carbon lines: SN 2009dc challenges thermonuclear explosion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenberger, S.; Benetti, S.; Childress, M.; Pakmor, R.; Hachinger, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Stanishev, V.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Agnoletto, I.; Bufano, F.; Ergon, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kromer, M.; Navasardyan, H.; Nicolas, J.; Pastorello, A.; Prosperi, E.; Salgado, F.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-04-01

    Extended optical and near-IR observations reveal that SN 2009dc shares a number of similarities with normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but is clearly overluminous, with a (pseudo-bolometric) peak luminosity of log (L) = 43.47 (erg s-1). Its light curves decline slowly over half a year after maximum light [Δm15(B)true= 0.71], and the early-time near-IR light curves show secondary maxima, although the minima between the first and the second peaks are not very pronounced. The bluer bands exhibit an enhanced fading after ˜200 d, which might be caused by dust formation or an unexpectedly early IR catastrophe. The spectra of SN 2009dc are dominated by intermediate-mass elements and unburned material at early times, and by iron-group elements at late phases. Strong C II lines are present until ˜2 weeks past maximum, which is unprecedented in thermonuclear SNe. The ejecta velocities are significantly lower than in normal and even subluminous SNe Ia. No signatures of interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) are found in the spectra. Assuming that the light curves are powered by radioactive decay, analytic modelling suggests that SN 2009dc produced ˜1.8 M⊙ of 56Ni assuming the smallest possible rise time of 22 d. Together with a derived total ejecta mass of ˜2.8 M⊙, this confirms that SN 2009dc is a member of the class of possible super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia similar to SNe 2003fg, 2006gz and 2007if. A study of the hosts of SN 2009dc and other superluminous SNe Ia reveals a tendency of these SNe to explode in low-mass galaxies. A low metallicity of the progenitor may therefore be an important prerequisite for producing superluminous SNe Ia. We discuss a number of possible explosion scenarios, ranging from super-Chandrasekhar-mass white-dwarf progenitors over dynamical white-dwarf mergers and Type I? SNe to a core-collapse origin of the explosion. None of the models seems capable of explaining all properties of SN 2009dc, so that the true nature of this SN

  12. Neutron standard data

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.; Conde, H.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron standards are reviewed with emphasis on the evaluation for ENDFB-VI. Also discussed are the neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission, activation cross sections for neutron flux measurement, and standards for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV. Recommendations are made for future work. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  14. Pyrochemical neutron multiplicity counter design

    SciTech Connect

    Langner, D.G.; Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Pyrochemical process materials are difficult to measure using conventional neutron counting methods because of significant self- multiplication and variable ({alpha},n) reaction rates. Multiplicity counters measure the first three moments of the neutron multiplicity distribution and thus make it possible to determine sample mass even when multiplication and ({alpha},n) rate are unknown. A new multiplicity counter suitable for inplant measurement of pyrochemical process materials has been designed using Monte Carlo simulations. The goals were to produce a counter that has high neutron detection efficiency, low die-away time, a flat spatial efficiency profile, and is insensitive to the neutron energy spectrum. Monte Carlo calculations were performed for several prototype models consisting of four rings of 71-cm active length {sup 3}He tubes in a polyethylene body. The cadmium-lined sample well is 25 cm in diameter to accommodate a wide variety of inplant sample containers. The counter can be free-standing or in-line without mechanical modification. The calculations were performed to determine the above design criteria for several configurations of tube spacing, cadmium liners, and sample height. Calculations were also performed for distributed sample sources to understand the integrated effects of variable neutron spectra on the counter. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Quantitative radiography of magnetic fields using neutron spin phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Piegsa, F M; van den Brandt, B; Hautle, P; Kohlbrecher, J; Konter, J A

    2009-04-10

    We report on a novel neutron radiography technique that uses the Ramsey principle, a method similar to neutron spin echo. For the first time quantitative imaging measurements of magnetic objects and fields could be performed. The strength of the spin-dependent magnetic interaction is detected by a change in the Larmor precession frequency of the neutron spins. Hence, one obtains in addition to the normal attenuation radiography image a so-called neutron spin phase image, which provides a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic field integrated over the neutron flight path.

  16. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  17. Radiation hardness of a polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposited diamond detector irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Balducci, A.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M.E.; Pucella, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Ochiai, Kentaro; Nishitani, Takeo

    2006-02-15

    Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films are considered as neutron detectors for nuclear fusion devices because of their radiation hardness. Data about the radiation hardness of polycrystalline CVD diamond films exposed to 14 MeV neutron are missing in literature so the actual capability of CVD diamond detectors to withstand fusion device conditions must be truly demonstrated. In this work a polycrystalline CVD diamond detector, 101 {mu}m thick, was irradiated for the first time with 14 MeV neutrons produced by the Fusion Neutron Source of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the goal to study its radiation hardness. The 14 MeV neutron fluence was 8x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. The film performances were studied before and after the 14 MeV neutron irradiation by using 5.5 MeV {alpha} from {sup 241}Am source, both in the pumped and the 'as-grown' state. A comparison with previous measurements performed in more soft neutron spectra (mean neutron energy of 1-2 MeV) is reported pointing out the more damaging effects of the 14 MeV neutrons. It was found that annealing at 500 deg. C and redeposition of the gold contact followed by a proper pumping procedure will restore more than 70% the initial working conditions of the irradiated detector. An analysis of the neutron field expected in the neutron camera of the International Thermonuclear Reactor fusion tokamak was also performed, showing the capability of CVD diamond detector to withstand the 14 MeV neutron fluence expected in about one year of operation.

  18. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  19. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  20. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.; Carius, S.; Daemen, L.; DeVolder, B.; Frehaut, J.; Goulding, C.; Grace, R.; Green, R.; Lisowski, P.; Littleton, P.; King, J.; King, N.; Prael, R.; Stratton, T.; Turner, S.; Ullmann, J.; Venneri, F.; Yates, M.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  1. Accurate characterization of weak neutron fields by using a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Medkour Ishak-Boushaki, G; Allab, M

    2017-04-01

    A Bayesian analysis of data derived from neutron spectrometric measurements provides the advantage of determining rigorously integral physical quantities characterizing the neutron field and their respective related uncertainties. The first and essential step in a Bayesian approach is the parameterization of the investigated neutron spectrum. The aim of this paper is to investigate the sensitivity of the Bayesian results, mainly the neutron dose H(*)(10) required for radiation protection purposes and its correlated uncertainty, to the selected neutron spectrum parameterization.

  2. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  3. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    DOEpatents

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  6. Progress in preparing scenarios for operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sips, A. C. C.; Giruzzi, G.; Ide, S.; Kessel, C.; Luce, T. C.; Snipes, J. A.; Stober, J. K.

    2015-02-15

    The development of operating scenarios is one of the key issues in the research for ITER which aims to achieve a fusion gain (Q) of ∼10, while producing 500 MW of fusion power for ≥300 s. The ITER Research plan proposes a success oriented schedule starting in hydrogen and helium, to be followed by a nuclear operation phase with a rapid development towards Q ∼ 10 in deuterium/tritium. The Integrated Operation Scenarios Topical Group of the International Tokamak Physics Activity initiates joint activities among worldwide institutions and experiments to prepare ITER operation. Plasma formation studies report robust plasma breakdown in devices with metal walls over a wide range of conditions, while other experiments use an inclined EC launch angle at plasma formation to mimic the conditions in ITER. Simulations of the plasma burn-through predict that at least 4 MW of Electron Cyclotron heating (EC) assist would be required in ITER. For H-modes at q{sub 95} ∼ 3, many experiments have demonstrated operation with scaled parameters for the ITER baseline scenario at n{sub e}/n{sub GW} ∼ 0.85. Most experiments, however, obtain stable discharges at H{sub 98(y,2)} ∼ 1.0 only for β{sub N} = 2.0–2.2. For the rampup in ITER, early X-point formation is recommended, allowing auxiliary heating to reduce the flux consumption. A range of plasma inductance (l{sub i}(3)) can be obtained from 0.65 to 1.0, with the lowest values obtained in H-mode operation. For the rampdown, the plasma should stay diverted maintaining H-mode together with a reduction of the elongation from 1.85 to 1.4. Simulations show that the proposed rampup and rampdown schemes developed since 2007 are compatible with the present ITER design for the poloidal field coils. At 13–15 MA and densities down to n{sub e}/n{sub GW} ∼ 0.5, long pulse operation (>1000 s) in ITER is possible at Q ∼ 5, useful to provide neutron fluence for Test Blanket Module assessments. ITER scenario preparation

  7. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  8. Neutronic effects on tungsten-186 double neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Marc Alan

    target (beyond 0.4 mm depth) does not decrease as would be expected due to neutron attenuation. This observation was explained by the fact elevated temperatures in the interior of the target result in an increase in the 188W yield through Doppler broadening of cross sections, compensating for reduced yield due to neutron attenuation. Finally, this work supports earlier analyses that questioned the accuracy of the 187W thermal cross section and resonance integral.

  9. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ˜1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  10. Neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the development of an epithermal neutron source has been required by medical doctors for deeper neutron penetrations, which is to be used for deep tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastasis. Several attempts have already been made to realize an epithermal neutron field, such as the undermoderated neutron beam, the filtered neutron beam, and the use of a fission plate. At present, these facilities can not be used for actual therapy. For the treatment of deep tumor, another method has been also proposed in normal water in the body is replaced by heavy water to attain a deeper neutron penetration. At Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute, almost all physics problems have been settled relative to thermal neutron capture therapy that has been used for treating brain tumors and for biological experiments on malignant melanoma. Very recently feasibility studies to use heavy water have been started both theoretically and experimentally. The calculation shows the deeper penetration of neutrons as expected. Two kinds of experiments were done by using the KUR guide tube: 1. Thermal neutron penetration measurement. 2. Heavy water uptake in vitro sample. In addition to the above experiment using heavy water, the development of a new epithermal neutron source using a large fission plate is in progress, which is part of a mockup experiment of an atomic bomb field newly estimated.

  11. High-energy transients. [from weakly and strongly magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1991-01-01

    The observational characteristics of X-ray bursts are reviewed and the thermonuclear-flash model is examined to assess the suitability of the model and the sources of X- and gamma-ray bursts. The profiles of X-ray bursts from five different sources are delineated, and the global analysis of nuclear burning is discussed to review th range possible X-ray burst behavior. The analysis by Fushiki and Lamb (1987) is noted for the description of regions which lie away from the steady-state cut. The discussion of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts emphasizes the source GB880205, and it is shown that Raman and cyclotron resonant scattering can explain the observed positions, strengths, and widths of the dips in the spectrum. X-ray bursts are theorized to emanate from weakly magnetic neutron stars, and gamma-ray bursts are shown to be the products of strongly magnetic neutron stars.

  12. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  13. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  14. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  15. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  16. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ananyev, S. S. Spitsyn, A. V. Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-15

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion–fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium–tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m{sup 3}Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium–tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  18. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  19. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  20. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  1. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  2. Neutronic Reactor Design to Reduce Neutron Loss

    DOEpatents

    Miles, F. T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall. The wall is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and moderator containing fertile material. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. Since the steel has a smaller capture cross section for the fast neutrons, greater nunnbers of neutrons will pass into the blanket, thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor. (AEC)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR DESIGN TO REDUCE NEUTRON LOSS

    DOEpatents

    Mills, F.T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall which is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and fertile material having moderator. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. As the steel has a smaller capture cross-section for the fast neutrons, then greater numbers of the neutrons will pass into the blanket thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor.

  4. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Nuclear-powered millisecond pulsars and the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Morgan, Edward H; Muno, Michael P; Galloway, Duncan K; Wijnands, Rudy; Van Der Klis, Michiel; Markwardt, Craig B

    2003-07-03

    Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars that are thought to have been spun-up by mass accretion from a stellar companion. It is not known whether there is a natural brake for this process, or if it continues until the centrifugal breakup limit is reached at submillisecond periods. Many neutron stars that are accreting mass from a companion star exhibit thermonuclear X-ray bursts that last tens of seconds, caused by unstable nuclear burning on their surfaces. Millisecond-period brightness oscillations during bursts from ten neutron stars (as distinct from other rapid X-ray variability that is also observed) are thought to measure the stellar spin, but direct proof of a rotational origin has been lacking. Here we report the detection of burst oscillations at the known spin frequency of an accreting millisecond pulsar, and we show that these oscillations always have the same rotational phase. This firmly establishes burst oscillations as nuclear-powered pulsations tracing the spin of accreting neutron stars, corroborating earlier evidence. The distribution of spin frequencies of the 11 nuclear-powered pulsars cuts off well below the breakup frequency for most neutron-star models, supporting theoretical predictions that gravitational radiation losses can limit accretion torques in spinning up millisecond pulsars.

  6. Gravitational Waves from Rotating Neutron Stars and Evaluation of fast Chirp Transform Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    X-ray observations suggest that neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) are rotating with frequencies from 300 - 600 Hz. These spin rates are significantly less than the break-up rates for essentially all realistic neutron star equations of state, suggesting that some process may limit the spin frequencies of accreting neutron stars to this range. If the accretion induced spin up torque is in equilibrium with gravitational radiation losses, these objects could be interesting sources of gravitational waves. I present a brief summary of current measurements of neutron star spins in LMXBs based on the observations of high-Q oscillations during thermonuclear bursts (so called 'burst oscillations'). Further measurements of neutron star spins will be important in exploring the gravitational radiation hypothesis in more detail. To this end I also present a study of fast chirp transform (FCT) techniques as described by Jenet and Prince in the context of searching for the chirping signals observed during X-ray bursts.

  7. Urca Cooling Pairs in the Neutron Star Ocean and Their Effect on Superbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex; Meisel, Zach; Schatz, Hendrik; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    An accretion outburst onto a neutron star deposits hydrogen-rich and/or helium-rich material into the neutron star’s envelope. Thermonuclear burning of accreted material robustly produces Urca pairs—pairs of nuclei that undergo cycles of {e}--capture and {β }--decay. The strong T 5 dependence of the Urca cooling neutrino luminosity means that Urca pairs in the neutron star interior potentially remove heat from accretion-driven nuclear reactions. In this study, we identify Urca pairs in the neutron star’s ocean—a plasma of ions and electrons overlaying the neutron star crust—and demonstrate that Urca cooling occurs at all depths in the ocean. We find that Urca pairs in the ocean and crust lower the ocean’s steady-state temperature during an accretion outburst and that unstable carbon ignition, which is thought to trigger superbursts, occurs deeper than it would otherwise. Cooling superburst light curves, however, are only marginally impacted by cooling from Urca pairs because the superburst peak radiative luminosity {L}{peak} is always much greater than the Urca pair neutrino luminosity {L}ν in the hot post-superburst ocean.

  8. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jason E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, Anthony E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Schmidt, Andrea E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Welch, Dale

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation during the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.

  9. Gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars and evaluation of fast chirp transform techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2002-04-01

    X-ray observations suggest that neutron stars in low mass x-ray binaries (LMXB) are rotating with frequencies in the range 300-600 Hz. These spin rates are significantly less than the break-up rates for essentially all realistic neutron star equations of state, suggesting that some process may limit the spin frequencies of accreting neutron stars to this range. If the accretion-induced spin up torque is in equilibrium with gravitational radiation losses, these objects could be interesting sources of gravitational waves. I present a brief summary of current measurements of neutron star spins in LMXBs based on the observations of high-Q oscillations during thermonuclear bursts (so-called 'burst oscillations'). Further measurements of neutron star spins will be important in exploring the gravitational radiation hypothesis in more detail. To this end, I also present a study of fast chirp transform (FCT) techniques as described by Jenet and Prince (Prince T A and Jenet F A 2000 Phys. Rev. D 62 122001) in the context of searching for the chirping signals observed during x-ray bursts.

  10. Neutron Induced D Breakup in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schroder, W. U.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to study the deuteron breakup reaction D(n,n ') np in the thermonuclear environment created in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility. Neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV generated in the primary D-T fusion reactions scatter elastically and inelastically off the dense (cryogenic) D-T fuel assembly surrounding the central hot spot at peak fuel compression. These neutrons also induce a breakup of the fuel deuterons. The corresponding breakup cross section is measured relative to elastic n -D and n -T scattering, i.e., simultaneously in the same environment. Apart from astrophysical and technological interest, the neutron-induced deuteron breakup reaction is of interest to the physics of nucleon -nucleon forces. For example, theoretical calculations predict a noticeable influence of nucleonic three-body forces on the magnitude of the breakup cross section. Preliminary results from measurements of the neutron contribution in the 2- to 6-MeV range show reasonable agreement with the published ENDL 2008.2 semi-empirical cross-section. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Solar neutron emissivity during the large flare on 1982 June 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Kanbach, G.; Flueckiger, E.; Golliez, F.

    1987-01-01

    For the solar neutron event on June 3, 1982, it is shown here that the combined SMM Gamma Ray Spectrometer and Jungfraujoch neutron monitor data require a time-extended emission of neutrons at the sun with energies of 100 MeV to about 2 GeV. The solar neutron emissivity spectrum is shown to have a strong downward curvature or truncation between 2 and 4 GeV. A Bessel function and truncated power law give acceptable fits to the observational data, but only the power law can explain the rapid rise of the neutron monitor count rate. The integrated emissivity of neutrons above E(n) of 100 MeV is strongly constrained at 8 x 10 to the 28th neutrons/sr and is essentially independent of neutron spectral shape. At neutron energies of about 100 MeV, good agreement is found for both spectral forms with observations of neutron decay protons.

  12. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  13. Laser initiated thermonuclear reactions. January 1970-May 1981 (citations from the Searchable Physics Information Notices data base). Report for January 1970-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The use of lasers for the initiation of thermonuclear reactions is considered. Emphasis is placed on the initiator (primarily a carbon dioxide laser) and the properties of the target material. The latter is usually in the form of spherical glass particles. Methods for the confinement of the plasma are also discussed. (Contains 105 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Neutron anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone.

  15. Thermonuclear breakup reactions of light nuclei. II - Gamma-ray line production and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    1989-01-01

    The main consequence of nuclear breakup reactions in high-temperature plasmas is shown to be to reduce the production of the gamma-ray lines, due to the breakup of these species at high temperature. Results of the emissivities of all the relevant gamma-ray lines are discussed. It is shown that the magnitude of the breakup effect on the line emissivities depends strongly on temperature, but more importantly on the plasma density and on the available time for the ion processes. Other effects considered include the production of neutrons (from the breakup of helium) and its consequences (such as the production of gamma rays from n-capture reactions and dynamical effects in accretion disk plasmas).

  16. Thermonuclear breakup reactions of light nuclei. II - Gamma-ray line production and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    1989-01-01

    The main consequence of nuclear breakup reactions in high-temperature plasmas is shown to be to reduce the production of the gamma-ray lines, due to the breakup of these species at high temperature. Results of the emissivities of all the relevant gamma-ray lines are discussed. It is shown that the magnitude of the breakup effect on the line emissivities depends strongly on temperature, but more importantly on the plasma density and on the available time for the ion processes. Other effects considered include the production of neutrons (from the breakup of helium) and its consequences (such as the production of gamma rays from n-capture reactions and dynamical effects in accretion disk plasmas).

  17. Characterization of a Boron Carbide Heterojunction Neutron Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    bias as a function of temperature. (c) A zero-offset bias is observed in a diode exposed to light , but diminishes in a diode operated in the dark...heterojunction diodes have been built and tested. These diodes have demonstrated potential for high efficiency neutron detection and possible integration into a...first-of-its-kind real-time solid-state neutron spectrometer. To realize these goals, the diodes must be optimized to increase neutron detection

  18. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A.

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  19. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  20. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Richard V.; Hankins, Dale E.; Tomasino, Luigi; Gomaa, Mohamed A. M.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  1. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  2. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  3. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  4. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-17

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  5. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  6. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  7. Measurement of neutron flux and beam divergence at the cold neutron guide system of the new Munich research reactor FRM-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitelhack, K.; Schanzer, C.; Kastenmüller, A.; Röhrmoser, A.; Daniel, C.; Franke, J.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kudryashov, V.; Maier, D.; Päthe, D.; Petry, W.; Schöffel, T.; Schreckenbach, K.; Urban, A.; Wildgruber, U.

    2006-05-01

    A sophisticated neutron guide system has been installed at the new Munich neutron source FRM-II to transport neutrons from the D 2 cold neutron source to several instruments, which are situated in a separate neutron guide hall. The guide system takes advantage of supermirror coatings and includes a worldwide unique "twisted" guide for a desired phase space transformation of the neutron beam. During the initial reactor commissioning in summer 2004, the integral and differential neutron flux as well as the distribution of beam divergence at the exit of two representative and the twisted neutron guide were measured using time-of-flight spectroscopy and gold-foil activation. The experimental results can be compared to extensive simulation calculations based on MCNP and McStas. The investigated guides fulfill the expectations of providing high neutron fluxes and reveal good quality with respect to the reflective coatings and the installation precision.

  8. Development of a Bonner Sphere neutron spectrometer from a commercial neutron dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. C.; Fung, K. Y.; Kwok, T.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lin, Y. C.; Liu, H.; Luk, K. B.; Ngai, H. Y.; Pun, C. S. J.; Wong, H. L. H.

    2016-11-01

    Bonner Spheres have been used widely for the measurement of neutron spectra with neutron energies ranged from thermal up to at least 20 MeV . A Bonner Sphere neutron spectrometer (BSS) was developed by extending a Berthold LB 6411 neutron-dose-rate meter. The BSS consists of a 3He thermal-neutron detector with integrated electronics, a set of eight polyethylene spherical shells and two optional lead shells of various sizes. The response matrix of the BSS was calculated with GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation. The BSS had a calibration uncertainty of ± 8.6% and a detector background rate of (1.57 ± 0.04) × 10-3 s-1. A spectral unfolding code NSUGA was developed. The NSUGA code utilizes genetic algorithms and has been shown to perform well in the absence of a priori information.

  9. ON THE EFFECT OF EXPLOSIVE THERMONUCLEAR BURNING ON THE ACCRETED ENVELOPES OF WHITE DWARFS IN CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sion, Edward M.; Sparks, Warren E-mail: warrensparks@comcast.net

    2014-11-20

    The detection of heavy elements at suprasolar abundances in the atmospheres of some accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables (CVs), coupled with the high temperatures needed to produce these elements, requires explosive thermonuclear burning. The central temperatures of any formerly more massive secondary stars in CVs undergoing hydrostatic CNO burning are far too low to produce these elements. Evidence is presented that at least some CVs contain donor secondaries that have been contaminated by white dwarf remnant burning during the common envelope phase and are transferring this material back to the white dwarf. This scenario does not exclude the channel in which formerly more massive donor stars underwent CNO processing in systems with thermal timescale mass transfer. Implications for the progenitors of CVs are discussed and a new scenario for the white dwarf's accretion-nova-outburst is given.

  10. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z-Pinch Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin; Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert; Mostrom, Chris; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Fusion yields from dense, Z-pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z-Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code LSP, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region. This research was developed with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  11. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z-Pinch Simulations.

    PubMed

    Offermann, Dustin T; Welch, Dale R; Rose, Dave V; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert E; Mostrom, Chris B; Schmidt, Andrea E W; Link, Anthony J

    2016-05-13

    Fusion yields from dense, Z-pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z-Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code Lsp, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region.

  12. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  13. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  14. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (sigma{sub -N}) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between sigma{sub -N} and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

  15. LGB neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    The double pulse signature of the Gadolinium Lithium Borate Cerium doped plastic detector suggests its effectiveness for analyzing neutrons while providing gamma ray insensitivity. To better understand this detector, a californium gamma/neutron time of flight facility was constructed in our lab. Reported here are efforts to understand the properties and applications of the LGB detector with regards to neutron spectroscopy.

  16. Perforated diode neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Walter J.

    A novel design of neutron sensor was investigated and developed. The perforated, or micro-structured, diode neutron sensor is a concept that has the potential to enhance neutron sensitivity of a common solid-state sensor configuration. The common thin-film coated diode neutron sensor is the only semiconductor-based neutron sensor that has proven feasible for commercial use. However, the thin-film coating restricts neutron counting efficiency and severely limits the usefulness of the sensor. This research has shown that the perforated design, when properly implemented, can increase the neutron counting efficiency by greater than a factor of 4. Methods developed in this work enable detectors to be fabricated to meet needs such as miniaturization, portability, ruggedness, and adaptability. The new detectors may be used for unique applications such as neutron imaging or the search for special nuclear materials. The research and developments described in the work include the successful fabrication of variant perforated diode neutron detector designs, general explanations of fundamental radiation detector design (with added focus on neutron detection and compactness), as well as descriptive theory and sensor design modeling useful in predicting performance of these unique solid-state radiation sensors. Several aspects in design, fabrication, and operational performance have been considered and tested including neutron counting efficiency, gamma-ray response, perforation shapes and depths, and silicon processing variations. Finally, the successfully proven technology was applied to a 1-dimensional neutron sensor array system.

  17. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  18. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  19. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  20. Single event phenomena in atmospheric neutron environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, C.A.; Hughlock, B.W.; Katoozi, M.; LaRue, G.S. ); Wender, S.A. )

    1993-12-01

    As integrated circuit technology achieves higher density through smaller feature sizes and as the airplane manufacturing industry integrates more sophisticated electronic components into the design of new aircraft, it has become increasingly important to evaluate the contribution of single event effects, primarily Single Event Upset (SEU), to the safety and reliability of commercial aircraft. In contrast to the effects of radiation on electronic systems in space applications for which protons and heavy ions are of major concern, in commercial aircraft applications the interactions of high energy neutrons are the dominant cause of single event effects. These high energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of solar and galactic cosmic rays, principally protons and heavy ions, in the upper atmosphere. This paper will describe direct experimental measurements of neutron-induced Single Event Effect (SEE) rates in commercial high density static random access memories in a neutron environment characteristic of that at commercial airplane altitudes. The first experimental measurements testing current models for neutron-silicon burst generation rates will be presented, as well as measurements of charge collection in silicon test structures as a function of neutron energy. These are the first laboratory SEE and charge collection measurements using a particle beam having a continuum energy spectrum and with a shape nearly identical to that observed during flight.