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Sample records for integrase reveals key

  1. Unmasking the ancestral activity of integron integrases reveals a smooth evolutionary transition during functional innovation

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; Loot, Celine; Parissi, Vincent; Nivina, Aleksandra; Bouchier, Christiane; Mazel, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine (Y)-recombinases have evolved to deliver mechanistically different reactions on a variety of substrates, but these evolutionary transitions are poorly understood. Among them, integron integrases are hybrid systems recombining single- and double-stranded DNA partners. These reactions are asymmetric and need a replicative resolution pathway, an exception to the canonical second strand exchange model of Y-recombinases. Integron integrases possess a specific domain for this specialized pathway. Here we show that despite this, integrases are still capable of efficiently operating the ancestral second strand exchange in symmetrical reactions between double-stranded substrates. During these reactions, both strands are reactive and Holliday junction resolution can follow either pathway. A novel deep-sequencing approach allows mapping of the crossover point for the second strand exchange. The persistence of the ancestral activity in integrases illustrates their robustness and shows that innovation towards new recombination substrates and resolution pathways was a smooth evolutionary process. PMID:26961432

  2. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for β-retroviral intasome function

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA (vDNA) into host target (tDNA), which is an essential step in the lifecycle of all retroviruses1. Prior structural characterization of IN-vDNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV) revealed a functional IN tetramer2–5, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera will employ tetrameric IN6–9. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallography, we determine here an unexpected octameric IN architecture for the β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) intasome. The structure is composed of two core IN dimers, which interact with the vDNA ends and structurally mimic the PFV IN tetramer, and two flanking IN dimers that engage the core structure via their IN C-terminal domains (CTDs). Contrary to the belief that tetrameric IN components are sufficient to catalyze integration, the flanking IN dimers were necessary for MMTV IN activity. The IN octamer solves a conundrum for the β- as well as α-retroviruses by providing critical CTDs to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis due to evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain (CCD)-CTD linker regions. The octameric architecture of the MMTV intasome provides a new paradigm for the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  3. Retroviral Integrase Structure and DNA Recombination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Due to the importance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase as a drug target, the biochemistry and structural aspects of retroviral DNA integration have been the focus of intensive research during the past three decades. The retroviral integrase enzyme acts on the linear double-stranded viral DNA product of reverse transcription. Integrase cleaves specific phosphodiester bonds near the viral DNA ends during the 3′ processing reaction. The enzyme then uses the resulting viral DNA 3′-OH groups during strand transfer to cut chromosomal target DNA, which simultaneously joins both viral DNA ends to target DNA 5′-phosphates. Both reactions proceed via direct transesterification of scissile phosphodiester bonds by attacking nucleophiles: a water molecule for 3′ processing, and the viral DNA 3′-OH for strand transfer. X-ray crystal structures of prototype foamy virus integrase-DNA complexes revealed the architectures of the key nucleoprotein complexes that form sequentially during the integration process and explained the roles of active site metal ions in catalysis. X-ray crystallography furthermore elucidated the mechanism of action of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors, which are currently used to treat AIDS patients, and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of viral drug resistance. PMID:25705574

  4. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Brandon L.; Larue, Ross C.; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein–protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins. PMID:26858406

  5. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  6. Sequence specificity of viral end DNA binding by HIV-1 integrase reveals critical regions for protein-DNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, D; Craigie, R

    1998-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase specifically recognizes and cleaves viral end DNA during the initial step of retroviral integration. The protein and DNA determinants of the specificity of viral end DNA binding have not been clearly identified. We have used mutational analysis of the viral end LTR sequence, in vitro selection of optimal viral end sequences, and specific photocrosslinking to identify regions of integrase that interact with specific bases in the LTR termini. The results highlight the involvement of the disordered loop of the integrase core domain, specifically residues Q148 and Y143, in binding to the terminal portion of the viral DNA ends. Additionally, we have identified positions upstream in the LTR termini which interact with the C-terminal domain of integrase, providing evidence for the role of that domain in stabilization of viral DNA binding. Finally, we have located a region centered 12 bases from the viral DNA terminus which appears essential for viral end DNA binding in the presence of magnesium, but not in the presence of manganese, suggesting a differential effect of divalent cations on sequence-specific binding. These results help to define important regions of contact between integrase and viral DNA, and assist in the formulation of a molecular model of this vital interaction. PMID:9755183

  7. Functional Interactions of the HHCC Domain of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integrase Revealed by Nonoverlapping Complementation and Zinc-Dependent Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Leon, Oscar; Greenfield, Norma J.; Roth, Monica J.

    1999-01-01

    The retroviral integrase (IN) is required for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome. The N terminus of IN contains an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved among all retroviruses. To study the function of the HHCC domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus IN, the first N-terminal 105 residues were expressed independently. This HHCC domain protein is found to complement a completely nonoverlapping construct lacking the HHCC domain for strand transfer, 3′ processing and coordinated disintegration reactions, revealing trans interactions among IN domains. The HHCC domain protein binds zinc at a 1:1 ratio and changes its conformation upon binding to zinc. The presence of zinc within the HHCC domain stimulates selective integration processes. Zinc promotes the dimerization of the HHCC domain and protects it from N-ethylmaleimide modification. These studies dissect and define the requirement for the HHCC domain, the exact function of which remains unknown. PMID:9971758

  8. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2012-02-07

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly.

  9. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  10. Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Neda; Radak, Djordje; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and “driver genes.” We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies “key” genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs. PMID:23977067

  11. The A128T resistance mutation reveals aberrant protein multimerization as the primary mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Sharma, Amit; Slaughter, Alison; Jena, Nivedita; Koh, Yasuhiro; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Larue, Ross C; Patel, Pratiq A; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Kessl, Jacques J; Engelman, Alan; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-05-31

    Allosteric HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors (ALLINIs) are a very promising new class of anti-HIV-1 agents that exhibit a multimodal mechanism of action by allosterically modulating IN multimerization and interfering with IN-lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 binding. Selection of viral strains under ALLINI pressure has revealed an A128T substitution in HIV-1 IN as a primary mechanism of resistance. Here, we elucidated the structural and mechanistic basis for this resistance. The A128T substitution did not affect the hydrogen bonding between ALLINI and IN that mimics the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction but instead altered the positioning of the inhibitor at the IN dimer interface. Consequently, the A128T substitution had only a minor effect on the ALLINI IC50 values for IN-LEDGF/p75 binding. Instead, ALLINIs markedly altered the multimerization of IN by promoting aberrant higher order WT (but not A128T) IN oligomers. Accordingly, WT IN catalytic activities and HIV-1 replication were potently inhibited by ALLINIs, whereas the A128T substitution in IN resulted in significant resistance to the inhibitors both in vitro and in cell culture assays. The differential multimerization of WT and A128T INs induced by ALLINIs correlated with the differences in infectivity of HIV-1 progeny virions. We conclude that ALLINIs primarily target IN multimerization rather than IN-LEDGF/p75 binding. Our findings provide the structural foundations for developing improved ALLINIs with increased potency and decreased potential to select for drug resistance. PMID:23615903

  12. Structural Studies of the HIV-1 Integrase Protein: Compound Screening and Characterization of a DNA-Binding Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the HIV integrase protein and mechanisms of resistance to HIV integrase inhibitors is complicated by the lack of a full length HIV integrase crystal structure. Moreover, a lentiviral integrase structure with co-crystallised DNA has not been described. For these reasons, we have developed a structural method that utilizes free software to create quaternary HIV integrase homology models, based partially on available full-length prototype foamy virus integrase structures as well as several structures of truncated HIV integrase. We have tested the utility of these models in screening of small anti-integrase compounds using randomly selected molecules from the ZINC database as well as a well characterized IN:DNA binding inhibitor, FZ41, and a putative IN:DNA binding inhibitor, HDS1. Docking studies showed that the ZINC compounds that had the best binding energies bound at the IN:IN dimer interface and that the FZ41 and HDS1 compounds docked at approximately the same location in integrase, i.e. behind the DNA binding domain, although there is some overlap with the IN:IN dimer interface to which the ZINC compounds bind. Thus, we have revealed two possible locations in integrase that could potentially be targeted by allosteric integrase inhibitors, that are distinct from the binding sites of other allosteric molecules such as LEDGF inhibitors. Virological and biochemical studies confirmed that HDS1 and FZ41 share a similar activity profile and that both can inhibit each of integrase and reverse transcriptase activities. The inhibitory mechanism of HDS1 for HIV integrase seems to be at the DNA binding step and not at either of the strand transfer or 3' processing steps of the integrase reaction. Furthermore, HDS1 does not directly interact with DNA. The modeling and docking methodology described here will be useful for future screening of integrase inhibitors as well as for the generation of models for the study of integrase drug resistance. PMID:26046987

  13. New applications for phage integrases.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Paul C M; Colloms, Sean; Rosser, Susan; Stark, Marshall; Smith, Margaret C M

    2014-07-29

    Within the last 25 years, bacteriophage integrases have rapidly risen to prominence as genetic tools for a wide range of applications from basic cloning to genome engineering. Serine integrases such as that from ϕC31 and its relatives have found an especially wide range of applications within diverse micro-organisms right through to multi-cellular eukaryotes. Here, we review the mechanisms of the two major families of integrases, the tyrosine and serine integrases, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type as they are applied in genome engineering and synthetic biology. In particular, we focus on the new areas of metabolic pathway construction and optimization, biocomputing, heterologous expression and multiplexed assembly techniques. Integrases are versatile and efficient tools that can be used in conjunction with the various extant molecular biology tools to streamline the synthetic biology production line. PMID:24857859

  14. New Applications for Phage Integrases

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C.M.; Colloms, Sean; Rosser, Susan; Stark, Marshall; Smith, Margaret C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the last 25 years, bacteriophage integrases have rapidly risen to prominence as genetic tools for a wide range of applications from basic cloning to genome engineering. Serine integrases such as that from ϕC31 and its relatives have found an especially wide range of applications within diverse micro-organisms right through to multi-cellular eukaryotes. Here, we review the mechanisms of the two major families of integrases, the tyrosine and serine integrases, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type as they are applied in genome engineering and synthetic biology. In particular, we focus on the new areas of metabolic pathway construction and optimization, biocomputing, heterologous expression and multiplexed assembly techniques. Integrases are versatile and efficient tools that can be used in conjunction with the various extant molecular biology tools to streamline the synthetic biology production line. PMID:24857859

  15. HIV-1 Group O Integrase Displays Lower Enzymatic Efficiency and Higher Susceptibility to Raltegravir than HIV-1 Group M Subtype B Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Depatureaux, Agnès; Quashie, Peter K.; Mesplède, Thibault; Han, Yingshan; Koubi, Hannah; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 group O (HIV-O) is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase coding region. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on enzyme function and susceptibility to integrase inhibitors. Accordingly, we cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 group O clades A and B, an HIV-O divergent strain, and HIV-1 group M (HIV-M, subtype B), used as a reference. To assess enzymatic function of HIV-O integrase, we carried out strand transfer and 3′ processing assays with various concentrations of substrate (DNA target and long terminal repeats [LTR], respectively) and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of various concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki) and 50% effective concentration (EC50) values were calculated for HIV-O integrases and HIV-O viruses, respectively, and compared with those of HIV-M. The results showed that HIV-O integrase displayed lower activity in strand transfer assays than did HIV-M enzyme, whereas 3′ processing activities were similar to those of HIV-M. HIV-O integrases were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL) in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. Molecular modeling suggests that two key polymorphic residues that are close to the integrase catalytic site, 74I and 153A, may play a role in these differences. PMID:25224008

  16. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3'-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme-DNA interactions in the active site.

    PubMed

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves

    2016-08-19

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3'-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and -1 bases, which flank the 3'-processing site, play a critical role for 3'-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3'-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3'-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the -1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3'-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3'-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  17. Identification of the lambda integrase surface that interacts with Xis reveals a residue that is also critical for Int dimer formation.

    PubMed

    Warren, David; Sam, My D; Manley, Kate; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Lee, Sang Yeol; Abbani, Mohamad; Wojciak, Jonathan M; Clubb, Robert T; Landy, Arthur

    2003-07-01

    Lambda integrase (Int) is a heterobivalent DNA-binding protein that together with the accessory DNA-bending proteins IHF, Fis, and Xis, forms the higher-order protein-DNA complexes that execute integrative and excisive recombination at specific loci on the chromosomes of phage lambda and its Escherichia coli host. The large carboxyl-terminal domain of Int is responsible for binding to core-type DNA sites and catalysis of DNA cleavage and ligation reactions. The small amino-terminal domain (residues 1-70), which specifies binding to arm-type DNA sites distant from the regions of strand exchange, consists of a three-stranded beta-sheet, proposed to recognize the cognate DNA site, and an alpha-helix. We report here that a site on this alpha-helix is critical for both homomeric interactions between Int protomers and heteromeric interactions with Xis. The mutant E47A, which was identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, abolishes interactions between Int and Xis bound at adjacent binding sites and reduces interactions between Int protomers bound at adjacent arm-type sites. Concomitantly, this residue is essential for excisive recombination and contributes to the efficiency of the integrative reaction. NMR titration data with a peptide corresponding to Xis residues 57-69 strongly suggest that the carboxyl-terminal tail of Xis and the alpha-helix of the aminoterminal domain of Int comprise the primary interaction surface for these two proteins. The use of a common site on lambda Int for both homotypic and heterotypic interactions fits well with the complex regulatory patterns associated with this site-specific recombination reaction.

  18. Characterization of the DNA-binding activity of HIV-1 integrase using a filter binding assay.

    PubMed

    Haugan, I R; Nilsen, B M; Worland, S; Olsen, L; Helland, D E

    1995-12-26

    Based on the selective binding of proteins and DNA to distinct filter materials a double-layered dot blot radio assay was developed to evaluate the binding of DNA to HIV-1 integrase. In this assay the DNA-binding was found to be independent of Mn2+ concentration, inhibited by concentrations of Mg2+ above 5 mM, abolished by zinc chelation and inhibited by monoclonal antibodies reacting with either the N-terminal or C-terminal regions of integrase. Atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed the molar ratio between integrase and zinc to be close to 1. It is concluded that both the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions of integrase are involved in DNA-binding and that the reported double-layered dot blot radio assay is well suited for further characterization of the integrase.

  19. Clostridium clariflavum: Key Cellulosome Players Are Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Lior; Morag, Ely; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium clariflavum is an anaerobic, cellulosome-forming thermophile, containing in its genome genes for a large number of cellulosomal enzyme and a complex scaffoldin system. Previously, we described the major cohesin-dockerin interactions of the cellulosome components, and on this basis a model of diverse cellulosome assemblies was derived. In this work, we cultivated C. clariflavum on cellobiose-, microcrystalline cellulose-, and switchgrass-containing media and isolated cell-free cellulosome complexes from each culture. Gel filtration separation of the cellulosome samples revealed two major fractions, which were analyzed by label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in order to identify the key players of the cellulosome assemblies therein. From the 13 scaffoldins present in the C. clariflavum genome, 11 were identified, and a variety of enzymes from different glycoside hydrolase and carbohydrate esterase families were identified, including the glycoside hydrolase families GH48, GH9, GH5, GH30, GH11, and GH10. The expression level of the cellulosomal proteins varied as a function of the carbon source used for cultivation of the bacterium. In addition, the catalytic activity of each cellulosome was examined on different cellulosic substrates, xylan and switchgrass. The cellulosome isolated from the microcrystalline cellulose-containing medium was the most active of all the cellulosomes that were tested. The results suggest that the expression of the cellulosome proteins is regulated by the type of substrate in the growth medium. Moreover, both cell-free and cell-bound cellulosome complexes were produced which together may degrade the substrate in a synergistic manner. These observations are compatible with our previously published model of cellulosome assemblies in this bacterium. PMID:25991683

  20. Retroviral Integrase: Then and Now.

    PubMed

    Andrake, Mark D; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-11-01

    The retroviral integrases are virally encoded, specialized recombinases that catalyze the insertion of viral DNA into the host cell's DNA, a process that is essential for virus propagation. We have learned a great deal since the existence of an integrated form of retroviral DNA (the provirus) was first proposed by Howard Temin in 1964. Initial studies focused on the genetics and biochemistry of avian and murine virus DNA integration, but the pace of discovery increased substantially with advances in technology, and an influx of investigators focused on the human immunodeficiency virus. We begin with a brief account of the scientific landscape in which some of the earliest discoveries were made, and summarize research that led to our current understanding of the biochemistry of integration. A more detailed account of recent analyses of integrase structure follows, as they have provided valuable insights into enzyme function and raised important new questions.

  1. DAXX interacts with phage ΦC31 integrase and inhibits recombination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-zhong; Ji, Chao-neng; Xu, Guan-lan; Pang, Rong-yan; Yao, Ji-hua; Zhu, Huan-zhang; Xue, Jing-lun; Jia, William

    2006-01-01

    Phage ΦC31 integrase has potential as a means of inserting therapeutic genes into specific sites in the human genome. However, the possible interactions between ΦC31 integrase and cellular proteins have never been investigated. Using pLexA-ΦC31 integrase as bait, we screened a pB42AD-human fetal brain cDNA library for potential interacting cellular proteins. Among 61 positives isolated from 106 independent clones, 51 contained DAXX C-terminal fragments. The strong interaction between DAXX and ΦC31 was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Deletion analysis revealed that the fas-binding domain of DAXX is also the region for ΦC31 binding. Hybridization between a ΦC31 integrase peptide array and an HEK293 cell extract revealed that a tetramer, 451RFGK454, in the C-terminus of ΦC31 is responsible for the interaction with DAXX. This tetramer is also necessary for ΦC31 integrase activity as removal of this tetramer resulted in a complete loss of integrase activity. Co-expression of DAXX with ΦC31 integrase in a HEK293-derived ΦC31 integrase activity reporter cell line significantly reduced the ΦC31-mediated recombination rate. Knocking down DAXX with a DAXX-specific duplex RNA resulted in increased recombination efficiency. Therefore, endogenous DAXX may interact with ΦC31 causing a mild inhibition in the integration efficiency. This is the first time that ΦC31 was shown to interact with an important cellular protein and the potential effect of this interaction should be further studied. PMID:17098929

  2. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  3. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  4. Inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Fesen, M R; Kohn, K W; Leteurtre, F; Pommier, Y

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to further extend the number of targets for development of antiretroviral agents, we have used an in vitro integrase assay to investigate a variety of chemicals, including topoisomerase inhibitors, antimalarial agents, DNA binders, naphthoquinones, the flavone quercetin, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester as potential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors. Our results show that although several topoisomerase inhibitors--including doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, ellipticines, and quercetin--are potent integrase inhibitors, other topoisomerase inhibitors--such as amsacrine, etoposide, teniposide, and camptothecin--are inactive. Other intercalators, such as chloroquine and the bifunctional intercalator ditercalinium, are also active. However, DNA binding does not correlate closely with integrase inhibition. The intercalator 9-aminoacridine and the polyamine DNA minor-groove binders spermine, spermidine, and distamycin have no effect, whereas the non-DNA binders primaquine, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibit the integrase. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester was the only compound that inhibited the integration step to a substantially greater degree than the initial cleavage step of the enzyme. A model of 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone interaction with the zinc finger region of the retroviral integrase protein is proposed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8460151

  5. Indole-based allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pratiq A; Kvaratskhelia, Nina; Mansour, Yara; Antwi, Janet; Feng, Lei; Koneru, Pratibha; Kobe, Mathew J; Jena, Nivedita; Shi, Guqin; Mohamed, Mosaad S; Li, Chenglong; Kessl, Jacques J; Fuchs, James R

    2016-10-01

    Employing a scaffold hopping approach, a series of allosteric HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors (ALLINIs) have been synthesized based on an indole scaffold. These compounds incorporate the key elements utilized in quinoline-based ALLINIs for binding to the IN dimer interface at the principal LEDGF/p75 binding pocket. The most potent of these compounds displayed good activity in the LEDGF/p75 dependent integration assay (IC50=4.5μM) and, as predicted based on the geometry of the five- versus six-membered ring, retained activity against the A128T IN mutant that confers resistance to many quinoline-based ALLINIs. PMID:27568085

  6. Allosteric Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kushol; Brady, Troy; Dyer, Benjamin M.; Malani, Nirav; Hwang, Young; Male, Frances; Nolte, Robert T.; Wang, Liping; Velthuisen, Emile; Jeffrey, Jerry; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the presence of antiviral agents results in evolution of drug-resistant variants, motivating the search for additional drug classes. Here we report studies of GSK1264, which was identified as a compound that disrupts the interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and the cellular factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. GSK1264 displayed potent antiviral activity and was found to bind at the site occupied by LEDGF/p75 on IN by x-ray crystallography. Assays of HIV replication in the presence of GSK1264 showed only modest inhibition of the early infection steps and little effect on integration targeting, which is guided by the LEDGF/p75·IN interaction. In contrast, inhibition of late replication steps was more potent. Particle production was normal, but particles showed reduced infectivity. GSK1264 promoted aggregation of IN and preformed LEDGF/p75·IN complexes, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition. LEDGF/p75 was not displaced from IN during aggregation, indicating trapping of LEDGF/p75 in aggregates. Aggregation assays with truncated IN variants revealed that a construct with catalytic and C-terminal domains of IN only formed an open polymer associated with efficient drug-induced aggregation. These data suggest that the allosteric inhibitors of IN are promising antiviral agents and provide new information on their mechanism of action. PMID:24904063

  7. Preliminary study on the DNA-binding properties of phage ΦC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihui; Fang, Yuxiang; Wang, Rencheng; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Jinzhong

    2011-09-15

    ΦC31 integrase is a member of the large serine subfamily and is required for the recombination of the phage genome into the host chromosome, either to establish or exit from the lysogenic state. This enzyme can also mediate site-specific integration in mammalian cells in a cofactor-independent manner and has been considered as a potentially powerful tool for gene therapy. It has previously been reported that DAXX interacts with ΦC31 integrase and markedly inhibits its integration efficiency, and the 451RFGK454 tetramer of ΦC31 integrase has been identified as the interacting motif. Here, we report that both the deletion of the tetramer or the replacement of Arg with His greatly reduced the recombination activity of the ΦC31 integrase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further demonstrated that the DNA-binding ability and binding specificity of the two mutants were dramatically reduced. Bioinformatic analysis indicated a probable helix-turn-helix-like DNA-binding motif between residues 415-525, a region that contains the tetramer motif. However, neither truncated Int(415-525) nor Int(△415-525) alone could bind to the attB target sequence. Results of a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay indicated that Int(415-525) did not fold correctly into a helix-turn-helix-like structure, which may be one of the reasons for its lack of DNA-binding ability. Thus, the identification and confirmation of four key amino acids in the DNA-binding specificity and recombination activity of ΦC31 integrase provide information about the domain structure and function of the large C-terminal region and suggest important implications for the more efficient use of integrase in gene transfer and gene therapy. PMID:21679753

  8. Subtype diversity associated with the development of HIV-1 resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Lowe, Matthew; Moisi, Daniela; Hardy, Isabelle; Gagnon, Simon; Charest, Hugues; Baril, Jean Guy; Wainberg, Mark A; Roger, Michel

    2011-05-01

    We used genotypic and phylogenetic analysis to determine integrase diversity among subtypes, and studied natural polymorphisms and mutations implicated in resistance to integrase inhibitors (INI) in treatment-naïve persons (n = 220) and -experienced individuals (n = 24). Phylogenetics revealed 7 and 10% inter-subtype diversity in the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease regions, respectively. Integrase sequencing identified a novel A/B recombinant in which all viruses in a male-sex-male (MSM) transmission cluster (n = 12) appeared to possess subtype B in integrase and subtype A in the remainder of the pol region. Natural variations and signature polymorphisms were observed at codon positions 140, 148, 151, 157, and 160 among HIV subtypes. These variations predicted higher genetic barriers to G140S and G140C in subtypes C, CRF02_AG, and A/CRF01_AE, as well as higher genetic barriers toward acquisition of V151I in subtypes CRF02_AG and A/CRF01_AE. The E157Q and E160Q mutational motif was observed in 35% of INI-naïve patients harboring subtype C infections, indicating intra-subtype variations. Thirteen patients failed raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens within 8 ± 1 months, in association with the major Q148K/R/H and G140A/S (n = 8/24) or N155H (n = 5/24) mutational pathways. Of note, the remaining patients on RAL regimens for 14 ± 3 months harbored no or only minor integrase mutations/polymorphisms (T66I, T97A, H114P, S119P, A124S, G163R, I203M, R263K). These results demonstrate the importance of understanding subtype variability in the development of resistance to INIs.

  9. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, Duane P; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear cDNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3’ OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3’ OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS. PMID:26322168

  10. The discovery of allyltyrosine based tripeptides as selective inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Neal; Gordon, Christopher P; Boyle, Timothy P; Vandegraaf, Nicholas; Deadman, John; Rhodes, David I; Coates, Jonathan A; Pyne, Stephen G; Keller, Paul A; Bremner, John B

    2016-07-01

    From library screening of synthetic antimicrobial peptides, an O-allyltyrosine-based tripeptide was identified to possess inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase (IN) exhibiting an IC50 value of 17.5 μM in a combination 3'-processing and strand transfer microtitre plate assay. The tripeptide was subjected to structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies with 28 peptides, incorporating an array of natural and non-natural amino acids. Resulting SAR analysis revealed the allyltyrosine residue was a key feature for IN inhibitory activity whilst incorporation of a lysine residue and extended hydrophilic chains bearing a terminal methyl ester was advantageous. Addition of hydrophobic aromatic moieties to the N-terminal of the scaffold afforded compounds with improved inhibitory activity. Consolidation of these functionalities lead to the development of the tripeptide 96 which specifically inhibited the IN strand-transfer reaction with an IC50 value of 2.5 μM.

  11. The Stringent Response Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Dissemination by Regulating Integron Integrase Expression in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Strugeon, Emilie; Tilloy, Valentin; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Class 1 integrons are genetic systems that enable bacteria to capture and express gene cassettes. These integrons, when isolated in clinical contexts, most often carry antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. They play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. The key element of integrons is the integrase, which allows gene cassettes to be acquired and shuffled. Planktonic culture experiments have shown that integrase expression is regulated by the bacterial SOS response. In natural settings, however, bacteria generally live in biofilms, which are characterized by strong antibiotic resilience and by increased expression of stress-related genes. Here, we report that under biofilm conditions, the stringent response, which is induced upon starvation, (i) increases basal integrase and SOS regulon gene expression via induction of the SOS response and (ii) exerts biofilm-specific regulation of the integrase via the Lon protease. This indicates that biofilm environments favor integron-mediated acquisition of antibiotic resistance and other adaptive functions encoded by gene cassettes. PMID:27531906

  12. DNA cleavage is independent of synapsis during Streptomyces phage phiBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Jin; Ou, Xijun; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Xiaoming

    2010-10-01

    Bacteriophage-encoded serine recombinases have great potential in genetic engineering but their catalytic mechanisms have not been adequately studied. Integration of ϕBT1 and ϕC31 via their attachment (att) sites is catalyzed by integrases of the large serine recombinase subtype. Both ϕBT1 and ϕC31 integrases were found to cleave single-substrate att sites without synaptic complex formation, and ϕBT1 integrase relaxed supercoiled DNA containing a single integration site. Systematic mutation of the central att site dinucleotide revealed that cleavage was independent of nucleotide sequence, but rejoining was crucially dependent upon complementarity of the cleavage products. Recombination between att sites containing dinucleotides with antiparallel complementarity led to antiparallel recombination. Integrase-substrate pre-incubation experiments revealed that the enzyme can form an attP-integrase tetramer complex that then captures naked attB DNA, and suggested that two alternative assembly pathways can lead to synaptic complex formation.

  13. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Larue, Ross C.; Plumb, Matthew R.; Crowe, Brandon L.; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S.; Roth, Monica J.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Foster, Mark P.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-01-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1–720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  14. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  15. Domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 responsible for polynucleotidyl transfer and zinc binding.

    PubMed Central

    Bushman, F D; Engelman, A; Palmer, I; Wingfield, P; Craigie, R

    1993-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 carries out a set of polynucleotidyl transfer reactions that result in the covalent attachment of the retroviral cDNA to host DNA. We have analyzed the activities of a set of deletion derivatives of the integrase protein. The analysis reveals that a central domain of only 137 amino acids is sufficient in vitro to catalyze a subset of the reactions carried out by the complete protein. This polypeptide contains an amino acid sequence motif, Asp-Xaa39-58-Asp-Xaa35-Glu (DX39-58DX35E, where X and the subscript indicate the intervening amino acids between the invariant acidic residues), that is found in the integrases of retroviruses and retrotransposons and also the transposase proteins of some bacterial transposable elements. We also find that the integrase protein can bind Zn2+, and the histidine and cysteine residues of another conserved motif (HX3-7HX23-32CX2C) are required for efficient Zn2+ binding. The activities displayed by deletion mutants suggest to us possible functions for the various parts of integrase. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8386373

  16. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  17. Tight Regulation of the intS Gene of the KplE1 Prophage: A New Paradigm for Integrase Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Panis, Gaël; Duverger, Yohann; Courvoisier-Dezord, Elise; Champ, Stéphanie; Talla, Emmanuel; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2010-01-01

    Temperate phages have the ability to maintain their genome in their host, a process called lysogeny. For most, passive replication of the phage genome relies on integration into the host's chromosome and becoming a prophage. Prophages remain silent in the absence of stress and replicate passively within their host genome. However, when stressful conditions occur, a prophage excises itself and resumes the viral cycle. Integration and excision of phage genomes are mediated by regulated site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine and serine recombinases. In the KplE1 prophage, site-specific recombination is mediated by the IntS integrase and the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF). We previously described a sub-family of temperate phages that is characterized by an unusual organization of the recombination module. Consequently, the attL recombination region overlaps with the integrase promoter, and the integrase and RDF genes do not share a common activated promoter upon lytic induction as in the lambda prophage. In this study, we show that the intS gene is tightly regulated by its own product as well as by the TorI RDF protein. In silico analysis revealed that overlap of the attL region with the integrase promoter is widely encountered in prophages present in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting a general occurrence of negatively autoregulated integrase genes. The prediction that these integrase genes are negatively autoregulated was biologically assessed by studying the regulation of several integrase genes from two different Escherichia coli strains. Our results suggest that the majority of tRNA-associated integrase genes in prokaryotic genomes could be autoregulated and that this might be correlated with the recombination efficiency as in KplE1. The consequences of this unprecedented regulation for excisive recombination are discussed. PMID:20949106

  18. Detection of drug resistance-associated mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase derived from drug-naive individuals in Surabaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kotaki, Tomohiro; Khairunisa, Siti Qamariyah; Sukartiningrum, Septhia Dwi; Witaningrum, Adiana Mutamsari; Rusli, Musofa; Diansyah, M Noor; Arfijanto, M Vitanata; Rahayu, Retno Pudji; Nasronudin; Kameoka, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes serious health problems in Indonesia, information in regard to drug resistance is limited. We performed a genotypic study on HIV-1 integrase derived from drug-naive individuals in Surabaya, Indonesia. Sequencing analysis revealed that no primary mutations associated with drug resistance to integrase inhibitors were detected; however, secondary mutations, V72I, L74I/M, V165I, V201I, I203M, and S230N, were detected in more than 5% of samples. In addition, V201I was conserved among all samples. Most integrase genes were classified into CRF01_AE genes. Interestingly, 40% of the CRF01_AE genes had an unusual insertion in the C-terminus of integrase. These mutations and insertions were considered natural polymorphisms since these mutations coincided with previous reports, and integrase inhibitors have not been used in Indonesia. Our results indicated that further studies may be required to assess the impact of these mutations on integrase inhibitors prior to their introduction into Indonesia.

  19. Novel Key Metabolites Reveal Further Branching of the Roquefortine/Meleagrin Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Marco I.; Ali, Hazrat; Lankhorst, Peter P.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Vreeken, Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic profiling and structural elucidation of novel secondary metabolites obtained from derived deletion strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum were used to reassign various previously ascribed synthetase genes of the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway to their corresponding products. Next to the structural characterization of roquefortine F and neoxaline, which are for the first time reported for P. chrysogenum, we identified the novel metabolite roquefortine L, including its degradation products, harboring remarkable chemical structures. Their biosynthesis is discussed, questioning the exclusive role of glandicoline A as key intermediate in the pathway. The results reveal that further enzymes of this pathway are rather unspecific and catalyze more than one reaction, leading to excessive branching in the pathway with meleagrin and neoxaline as end products of two branches. PMID:24225953

  20. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of Central European mitochondrial genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Adler, Christina J.; Roth, Christina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Karimnia, Sarah; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Meller, Harald; Ganslmeier, Robert; Friederich, Susanne; Dresely, Veit; Nicklisch, Nicole; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Sirocko, Frank; Reich, David; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.

    2014-01-01

    The processes which shaped modern European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation remain unclear. The initial peopling by Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers ~42kyrs ago and the immigration of Neolithic farmers into Europe ~8kyrs ago appear to have played important roles, but do not explain present-day mtDNA diversity. We generated mtDNA profiles of 364 individuals from prehistoric cultures in Central Europe to perform a chronological study, spanning the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age (5,500–1,550 cal BC). We use this transect through time to identify four marked shifts in genetic composition during the Neolithic period, revealing a key role for Late Neolithic cultures in shaping modern Central European genetic diversity. PMID:24115443

  1. Systematic prioritization and integrative analysis of copy number variations in schizophrenia reveal key schizophrenia susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  2. Molecular features related to HIV integrase inhibition obtained from structure- and ligand-based approaches.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Luciana L; Maltarollo, Vinícius G; de Lima, Emmanuela Ferreira; Weber, Karen C; Honorio, Kathia M; da Silva, Albérico B F

    2014-01-01

    Among several biological targets to treat AIDS, HIV integrase is a promising enzyme that can be employed to develop new anti-HIV agents. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanistic interpretation of HIV-1 integrase inhibition and to rationalize the molecular features related to the binding affinity of studied ligands. A set of 79 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and its relationship with biological activity are investigated employing 2D and 3D QSAR models, docking analysis and DFT studies. Analyses of docking poses and frontier molecular orbitals revealed important features on the main ligand-receptor interactions. 2D and 3D models presenting good internal consistency, predictive power and stability were obtained in all cases. Significant correlation coefficients (r(2) = 0.908 and q(2)= 0.643 for 2D model; r(2)= 0.904 and q(2)= 0.719 for 3D model) were obtained, indicating the potential of these models for untested compounds. The generated holograms and contribution maps revealed important molecular requirements to HIV-1 IN inhibition and several evidences for molecular modifications. The final models along with information resulting from molecular orbitals, 2D contribution and 3D contour maps should be useful in the design of new inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity within the chemical diversity of the data. PMID:24416129

  3. Quantitative proteomics reveals that peroxidases play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mudassar Nawaz; Sakata, Katsumi; Hiraga, Susumu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-12-01

    Soybean is an important legume crop that exhibits markedly reduced growth and yields under flooding conditions. To unravel the mechanisms involved in recovery after flooding in soybean root, gel-free proteomic analysis was performed. Morphological analysis revealed that growth suppression was more severe with increased flooding duration. Out of a total of 1645 and 1707 identified proteins, 73 and 21 proteins were changed significantly during the recovery stage following 2 and 4 days flooding, respectively. Based on the proteomic, clustering, and in silico protein-protein interaction analyses, six key enzymes were analyzed at the mRNA level. Lipoxygenase 1, which was increased at the protein level during the recovery period, was steadily down-regulated at the mRNA level. The peroxidase superfamily protein continuously increased in abundance during the course of recovery and was up-regulated at the mRNA level. HAD acid phosphatase was decreased at the protein level and down-regulated at the transcript level, while isoflavone reductase and an unknown protein were increased at both the protein and mRNA levels. Consistent with these findings, the enzymatic activity of peroxidase was decreased under flooding stress but increased significantly during the recovery sage. These results suggest that peroxidases might play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots through the scavenging of toxic radicals.

  4. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results.

  5. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular docking of calix[4]arene-based β-diketo derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaigang; Zhao, Yu; Ma, Chao; Li, Zhipeng; Xu, Xuemei; Hu, Liming; Huang, Nianyu; He, Hongqiu

    2015-03-01

    In this publication, we design and report the synthesis of calix[4]arene-based β-diketo derivatives as novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. The target compounds were obtained using Claisen condensation, and their structures were characterized by NMR and ESI-MS. Preliminary bioassays showed that calix[4]arene-based β-diketo derivatives inhibit strand transfer (ST) with IC50 values between 5.9 and 21.2 µM. Docking studies revealed the predominant binding modes that were distinct from the binding modes of raltegravir, which suggests a novel binding region in the IN active site. Moreover, these compounds are predicted not to interact with some of the key amino acids (GLN148 and ASN155) implicated in viral resistance. Therefore, this series of compounds can further be investigated for a possible chemotype to circumvent resistance to clinical HIV-1 IN inhibitors.

  6. Genetic and Ultrastructural Analysis Reveals the Key Players and Initial Steps of Bacterial Magnetosome Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kolinko, Isabel; Uebe, René; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria contain well-ordered nanocrystals for magnetic navigation and have recently emerged as the most sophisticated model system to study the formation of membrane bounded organelles in prokaryotes. Magnetosome biosynthesis is thought to begin with the formation of a dedicated compartment, the magnetosome membrane (MM), in which the biosynthesis of a magnetic mineral is strictly controlled. While the biomineralization of magnetosomes and their subsequent assembly into linear chains recently have become increasingly well studied, the molecular mechanisms and early stages involved in MM formation remained poorly understood. In the Alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, approximately 30 genes were found to control magnetosome biosynthesis. By cryo-electron tomography of several key mutant strains we identified the gene complement controlling MM formation in this model organism. Whereas the putative magnetosomal iron transporter MamB was most crucial for the process and caused the most severe MM phenotype upon elimination, MamM, MamQ and MamL were also required for the formation of wild-type-like MMs. A subset of seven genes (mamLQBIEMO) combined within a synthetic operon was sufficient to restore the formation of intracellular membranes in the absence of other genes from the key mamAB operon. Tracking of de novo magnetosome membrane formation by genetic induction revealed that magnetosomes originate from unspecific cytoplasmic membrane locations before alignment into coherent chains. Our results indicate that no single factor alone is essential for MM formation, which instead is orchestrated by the cumulative action of several magnetosome proteins. PMID:27286560

  7. A pangenomic analysis of the Nannochloropsis organellar genomes reveals novel genetic variations in key metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae in the genus Nannochloropsis are photosynthetic marine Eustigmatophytes of significant interest to the bioenergy and aquaculture sectors due to their ability to efficiently accumulate biomass and lipids for utilization in renewable transportation fuels, aquaculture feed, and other useful bioproducts. To better understand the genetic complement that drives the metabolic processes of these organisms, we present the assembly and comparative pangenomic analysis of the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes from Nannochloropsis salina CCMP1776. Results The chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of N. salina are 98.4% and 97% identical to their counterparts in Nannochloropsis gaditana. Comparison of the Nannochloropsis pangenome to other algae within and outside of the same phyla revealed regions of significant genetic divergence in key genes that encode proteins needed for regulation of branched chain amino synthesis (acetohydroxyacid synthase), carbon fixation (RuBisCO activase), energy conservation (ATP synthase), protein synthesis and homeostasis (Clp protease, ribosome). Conclusions Many organellar gene modifications in Nannochloropsis are unique and deviate from conserved orthologs found across the tree of life. Implementation of secondary and tertiary structure prediction was crucial to functionally characterize many proteins and therefore should be implemented in automated annotation pipelines. The exceptional similarity of the N. salina and N. gaditana organellar genomes suggests that N. gaditana be reclassified as a strain of N. salina. PMID:24646409

  8. Many-objective optimization and visual analytics reveal key trade-offs for London's water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Evgenii S.; Huskova, Ivana; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.; Harou, Julien J.; Lambert, Chris; Reed, Patrick M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we link a water resource management simulator to multi-objective search to reveal the key trade-offs inherent in planning a real-world water resource system. We consider new supplies and demand management (conservation) options while seeking to elucidate the trade-offs between the best portfolios of schemes to satisfy projected water demands. Alternative system designs are evaluated using performance measures that minimize capital and operating costs and energy use while maximizing resilience, engineering and environmental metrics, subject to supply reliability constraints. Our analysis shows many-objective evolutionary optimization coupled with state-of-the art visual analytics can help planners discover more diverse water supply system designs and better understand their inherent trade-offs. The approach is used to explore future water supply options for the Thames water resource system (including London's water supply). New supply options include a new reservoir, water transfers, artificial recharge, wastewater reuse and brackish groundwater desalination. Demand management options include leakage reduction, compulsory metering and seasonal tariffs. The Thames system's Pareto approximate portfolios cluster into distinct groups of water supply options; for example implementing a pipe refurbishment program leads to higher capital costs but greater reliability. This study highlights that traditional least-cost reliability constrained design of water supply systems masks asset combinations whose benefits only become apparent when more planning objectives are considered.

  9. Human endogenous retrovirus K10 encodes a functional integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Y; Ayukawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Kanda, T; Yoshiike, K

    1996-01-01

    We cloned a human endogenous retrovirus K1O DNA fragment encoding integrase and expressed it as a fusion protein with Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein. Integrase activities were measured in vitro by using a double-stranded oligonucleotide as a substrate mimicking viral long terminal repeats (LTR). The fusion protein was highly active for both terminal cleavage and strand transfer in the presence of Mn2+ on the K1O LTR substrate. It was also active on both Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 LTR substrates, whereas Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrases were active only on their corresponding LTR substrates. The results strongly suggest that K1O encodes a functional integrase with relaxed substrate specificity. PMID:8627815

  10. Raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Cecilia

    2008-08-01

    Merck & Co has developed and launched raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in treatment-experienced adult patients who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. This drug is the lead from a series of integrase strand transfer inhibitors and, by April 2008, it had been launched in Canada, the US, the UK, France, Germany and Spain, and had been filed for approval in Japan.

  11. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-15

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time — with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24–72 h). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress was measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 was experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation. - Highlights: • Low dose ionizing radiation altered homeostasis in 3D skin tissue model. • Global gene/protein/metabolite data integrated using complementary statistical approaches • Time and location-specific change in matrix regulation

  12. Data Integration Reveals Key Homeostatic Mechanisms Following Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time - with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24 – 72 hr). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress were measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 were experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation.

  13. Investigation on the sucrose binding pocket of HIV-1 Integrase by molecular dynamics and synergy experiments.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Esposito, Francesca; Morreale, Francesca; Martini, Riccardo; Tramontano, Enzo; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes whose catalytic activity depends on multimeric assembly are targets for inhibitors that perturb the interactions between the protein subunits such as the HIV-1 Integrase (IN). Sucrose has been recently crystallized in complex with IN revealing an allosteric binding pocket at the monomer-monomer interface. Herein, molecular dynamics were applied to theoretically test the effect of this small ligand on IN. As a result, such a compound increases the mutual free energy of binding between the two interacting monomers. Biological experiments confirmed the computational forecast. PMID:26048795

  14. Support Vector Machine (SVM) Models for Predicting Inhibitors of the 3' Processing Step of HIV-1 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouyi; Wang, Maolin; Kang, Hang; Kirchmair, Johannes; Tan, Lu; Yan, Aixia

    2013-10-01

    Inhibition of the 3' processing step of HIV-1 integrase by small molecule inhibitors is one of the most promising strategies for the treatment of AIDS. Using a support vector machine (SVM) approach, we developed six classification models for predicting 3'P inhibitors. The models are based on up to 48 selected molecular descriptors and a comprehensive data set of 1253 molecules, with measured activities ranging from nanomolar to micromolar IC50 values. Model B2, the most robust SVM model, obtains a prediction accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 93 %, 81 %, 94 % and 0.67 on the test set, respectively. The presence of hydrogen bonding features and hydrophilicity in general were identified as key determinants of inhibitory activity. Further important properties include molecular refractivity, π atom charge, total charge, lone pair electronegativity, and effective atom polarizability. Comparative fragment-based analysis of the active and inactive molecules corroborated these observations and revealed several characteristic structural elements of 3'P inhibitors. The models built in this study can be obtained from the authors.

  15. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part II. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-23

    We report molecular modeling and functional confirmation of Ole and HT binding to HIV-1 integrase. Docking simulations identified two binding regions for Ole within the integrase active site. Region I encompasses the conserved D64-D116-E152 motif, while region II involves the flexible loop region formed by amino acid residues 140-149. HT, on the other hand, binds to region II. Both Ole and HT exhibit favorable interactions with important amino acid residues through strong H-bonding and van der Waals contacts, predicting integrase inhibition. To test and confirm modeling predictions, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 integrase activities including 3'-processing, strand transfer, and disintegration. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on all three activities, with EC{sub 50}s in the nanomolar range. These studies demonstrate that molecular modeling of target-ligand interaction coupled with structural-activity analysis should facilitate the design and identification of innovative integrase inhibitors and other therapeutics.

  16. Metabolomic analysis reveals that carnitines are key regulatory metabolites in phase transition of the locusts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Wu, Zeming; Wang, Xianhui; Yang, Pengcheng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang; Kang, Le

    2012-02-28

    Phenotypic plasticity occurs prevalently and plays a vital role in adaptive evolution. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the expression of alternate phenotypes remain unknown. Here, a density-dependent phase polyphenism of Locusta migratoria was used as the study model to identify key signaling molecules regulating the expression of phenotypic plasticity. Metabolomic analysis, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showed that solitarious and gregarious locusts have distinct metabolic profiles in hemolymph. A total of 319 metabolites, many of which are involved in lipid metabolism, differed significantly in concentration between the phases. In addition, the time course of changes in the metabolic profiles of locust hemolymph that accompany phase transition was analyzed. Carnitine and its acyl derivatives, which are involved in the lipid β-oxidation process, were identified as key differential metabolites that display robust correlation with the time courses of phase transition. RNAi silencing of two key enzymes from the carnitine system, carnitine acetyltransferase and palmitoyltransferase, resulted in a behavioral transition from the gregarious to solitarious phase and the corresponding changes of metabolic profiles. In contrast, the injection of exogenous acetylcarnitine promoted the acquisition of gregarious behavior in solitarious locusts. These results suggest that carnitines mediate locust phase transition possibly through modulating lipid metabolism and influencing the nervous system of the locusts. PMID:22328148

  17. Metabolomic analysis reveals that carnitines are key regulatory metabolites in phase transition of the locusts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Wu, Zeming; Wang, Xianhui; Yang, Pengcheng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang; Kang, Le

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity occurs prevalently and plays a vital role in adaptive evolution. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the expression of alternate phenotypes remain unknown. Here, a density-dependent phase polyphenism of Locusta migratoria was used as the study model to identify key signaling molecules regulating the expression of phenotypic plasticity. Metabolomic analysis, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, showed that solitarious and gregarious locusts have distinct metabolic profiles in hemolymph. A total of 319 metabolites, many of which are involved in lipid metabolism, differed significantly in concentration between the phases. In addition, the time course of changes in the metabolic profiles of locust hemolymph that accompany phase transition was analyzed. Carnitine and its acyl derivatives, which are involved in the lipid β-oxidation process, were identified as key differential metabolites that display robust correlation with the time courses of phase transition. RNAi silencing of two key enzymes from the carnitine system, carnitine acetyltransferase and palmitoyltransferase, resulted in a behavioral transition from the gregarious to solitarious phase and the corresponding changes of metabolic profiles. In contrast, the injection of exogenous acetylcarnitine promoted the acquisition of gregarious behavior in solitarious locusts. These results suggest that carnitines mediate locust phase transition possibly through modulating lipid metabolism and influencing the nervous system of the locusts. PMID:22328148

  18. Systems analysis of eleven rodent disease models reveals an inflammatome signature and key drivers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ming; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Xia; Zhu, Jun; Stepaniants, Serguei; Zhang, Chunsheng; Meng, Qingying; Peters, Mette; He, Yudong; Ni, Chester; Slipetz, Deborah; Crackower, Michael A; Houshyar, Hani; Tan, Christopher M; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; O'Neill, Gary; Jane Luo, Mingjuan; Thieringer, Rolf; Yuan, Jeffrey; Chiu, Chi-Sung; Yee Lum, Pek; Lamb, John; Boie, Yves; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Schadt, Eric E; Dai, Hongyue; Roberts, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Common inflammatome gene signatures as well as disease-specific signatures were identified by analyzing 12 expression profiling data sets derived from 9 different tissues isolated from 11 rodent inflammatory disease models. The inflammatome signature significantly overlaps with known drug targets and co-expressed gene modules linked to metabolic disorders and cancer. A large proportion of genes in this signature are tightly connected in tissue-specific Bayesian networks (BNs) built from multiple independent mouse and human cohorts. Both the inflammatome signature and the corresponding consensus BNs are highly enriched for immune response-related genes supported as causal for adiposity, adipokine, diabetes, aortic lesion, bone, muscle, and cholesterol traits, suggesting the causal nature of the inflammatome for a variety of diseases. Integration of this inflammatome signature with the BNs uncovered 151 key drivers that appeared to be more biologically important than the non-drivers in terms of their impact on disease phenotypes. The identification of this inflammatome signature, its network architecture, and key drivers not only highlights the shared etiology but also pinpoints potential targets for intervention of various common diseases. PMID:22806142

  19. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Key Proteins and Phosphoproteins upon Seed Germination of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kun; Zhen, Shoumin; Cheng, Zhiwei; Cao, Hui; Ge, Pei; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the oldest cultivated crops and the second most important food crop in the world. Seed germination is the key developmental process in plant growth and development, and poor germination directly affects plant growth and subsequent grain yield. In this study, we performed the first dynamic proteome analysis of wheat seed germination using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomic approach. A total of 166 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 73 unique proteins were identified, which are mainly involved in storage, stress/defense/detoxification, carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell metabolism, and transcription/translation/transposition. The identified DEPs and their dynamic expression profiles generally correspond to three distinct seed germination phases after imbibition: storage degradation, physiological processes/morphogenesis, and photosynthesis. Some key DEPs involved in storage substance degradation and plant defense mechanisms, such as globulin 3, sucrose synthase type I, serpin, beta-amylase, and plastid ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) small subunit, were found to be phosphorylated during seed germination. Particularly, the phosphorylation site Ser355 was found to be located in the enzyme active region of beta-amylase, which promotes substrate binding. Phosphorylated modification of several proteins could promote storage substance degradation and environmental stress defense during seed germination. The central metabolic pathways involved in wheat seed germination are proposed herein, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cereal seed germination. PMID:26635843

  20. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Key Proteins and Phosphoproteins upon Seed Germination of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Dong, Kun; Zhen, Shoumin; Cheng, Zhiwei; Cao, Hui; Ge, Pei; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the oldest cultivated crops and the second most important food crop in the world. Seed germination is the key developmental process in plant growth and development, and poor germination directly affects plant growth and subsequent grain yield. In this study, we performed the first dynamic proteome analysis of wheat seed germination using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomic approach. A total of 166 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 73 unique proteins were identified, which are mainly involved in storage, stress/defense/detoxification, carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell metabolism, and transcription/translation/transposition. The identified DEPs and their dynamic expression profiles generally correspond to three distinct seed germination phases after imbibition: storage degradation, physiological processes/morphogenesis, and photosynthesis. Some key DEPs involved in storage substance degradation and plant defense mechanisms, such as globulin 3, sucrose synthase type I, serpin, beta-amylase, and plastid ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) small subunit, were found to be phosphorylated during seed germination. Particularly, the phosphorylation site Ser(355) was found to be located in the enzyme active region of beta-amylase, which promotes substrate binding. Phosphorylated modification of several proteins could promote storage substance degradation and environmental stress defense during seed germination. The central metabolic pathways involved in wheat seed germination are proposed herein, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cereal seed germination. PMID:26635843

  1. Metaproteomic Analysis of a Chemosynthetic Hydrothermal Vent Community Reveals Insights into Key-Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, I.; Stokke, R.; Lanzen, A.; Pedersen, R.; Øvreås, L.; Urich, T.

    2010-12-01

    In 2005 researchers at the Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, Norway, discovered two active vent fields at the southwestern Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. The fields harbours both low-temperature iron deposits and high-temperature white smoker vents. Distinct microbial mats were abundantly present and located in close vicinity to the hydrothermal vent sites. Characteristics of the mat environment were steep physical and chemical gradients with temperatures ranging from 10°C in the top layer to 90°C at 10 cm bsf and high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methane. The work presented here focus on the In situ community activities, and is part of an integrated strategy combining metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics to in-depth characterise these newly discovered hydrothermal vent communities. Extracted proteins were separated via SDS-PAGE. Peptides extracted after In-gel tryptic digest was injected into an Ultimate 3000 nanoLC system connected to a linear quadropole ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap XL) mass spectrometer equipped with a nanoelectrospray ion source. A custom database of open reading frames (ORFs) from the combined metatranscriptome and metagenome datasets was implemented and searched against using Mascot 2.2; the IRMa tool box [1] was used in peptide validation. Validated ORFs were subjected to a Blastp search against Refseq with an E-value cut-off of 0.001. A total of 1097 proteins with ≥ 2 peptides were identified of which 921 gave a hit against Refseq, containing 519 unique proteins. Key enzymes of the sulfur oxidation pathway (sox) were found, which were taxonomically affiliated to Epsilonproteobacteria. In addition, this group actively expressed hydrogenases and membrane proteins involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chains. Enzymes of dissimilatory sulfate-reduction (APS-reductase, AprAB and DsrA2) were found with closest hit to members of the Deltaproteobacteria. These findings indicate an

  2. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  3. The Chlamydomonas genome reveals the evolution of key animal and plant functions.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Sabeeha S; Prochnik, Simon E; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H; Karpowicz, Steven J; Witman, George B; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R; Sanderfoot, Anton A; Spalding, Martin H; Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Lobanov, Alexey V; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V; Paulsen, Ian T; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-10-12

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the approximately 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  4. Genomes of cryptic chimpanzee Plasmodium species reveal key evolutionary events leading to human malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Plenderleith, Lindsey J.; Liu, Weimin; Loy, Dorothy E.; Learn, Gerald H.; Li, Yingying; Shaw, Katharina S.; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Speede, Sheri; Shaw, George M.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Brisson, Dustin; Rayner, Julian C.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2016-01-01

    African apes harbour at least six Plasmodium species of the subgenus Laverania, one of which gave rise to human Plasmodium falciparum. Here we use a selective amplification strategy to sequence the genome of chimpanzee parasites classified as Plasmodium reichenowi and Plasmodium gaboni based on the subgenomic fragments. Genome-wide analyses show that these parasites indeed represent distinct species, with no evidence of cross-species mating. Both P. reichenowi and P. gaboni are 10-fold more diverse than P. falciparum, indicating a very recent origin of the human parasite. We also find a remarkable Laverania-specific expansion of a multigene family involved in erythrocyte remodelling, and show that a short region on chromosome 4, which encodes two essential invasion genes, was horizontally transferred into a recent P. falciparum ancestor. Our results validate the selective amplification strategy for characterizing cryptic pathogen species, and reveal evolutionary events that likely predisposed the precursor of P. falciparum to colonize humans. PMID:27002652

  5. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Witman, George B.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F.; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Spalding, Martin H.; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T.; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Ferris, Patrick; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A.; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V.; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M.; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C.; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M. Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M.; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T.; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y. Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the ∼120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  6. Genomes of cryptic chimpanzee Plasmodium species reveal key evolutionary events leading to human malaria.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Sesh A; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Liu, Weimin; Loy, Dorothy E; Learn, Gerald H; Li, Yingying; Shaw, Katharina S; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Speede, Sheri; Shaw, George M; Bushman, Frederic D; Brisson, Dustin; Rayner, Julian C; Sharp, Paul M; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2016-01-01

    African apes harbour at least six Plasmodium species of the subgenus Laverania, one of which gave rise to human Plasmodium falciparum. Here we use a selective amplification strategy to sequence the genome of chimpanzee parasites classified as Plasmodium reichenowi and Plasmodium gaboni based on the subgenomic fragments. Genome-wide analyses show that these parasites indeed represent distinct species, with no evidence of cross-species mating. Both P. reichenowi and P. gaboni are 10-fold more diverse than P. falciparum, indicating a very recent origin of the human parasite. We also find a remarkable Laverania-specific expansion of a multigene family involved in erythrocyte remodelling, and show that a short region on chromosome 4, which encodes two essential invasion genes, was horizontally transferred into a recent P. falciparum ancestor. Our results validate the selective amplification strategy for characterizing cryptic pathogen species, and reveal evolutionary events that likely predisposed the precursor of P. falciparum to colonize humans.

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Key Genes Related to Betalain Biosynthesis in Pulp Coloration of Hylocereus polyrhizus.

    PubMed

    Qingzhu, Hua; Chengjie, Chen; Zhe, Chen; Pengkun, Chen; Yuewen, Ma; Jingyu, Wu; Jian, Zheng; Guibing, Hu; Jietang, Zhao; Yonghua, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Betalains have high nutritional value and bioactivities. Red pulp pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only fruit containing abundant betalains for consumer. However, no information is available about genes involved in betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus. Herein, two cDNA libraries of pitaya pulps with two different coloration stages (white and red pulp stages) of Guanhuahong (H. polyrhizus) were constructed. A total of about 12 Gb raw RNA-Seq data was generated and was de novo assembled into 122,677 transcripts with an average length of 1183 bp and an N50 value of 2008. Approximately 99.99% of all transcripts were annotated based on seven public databases. A total of 8871 transcripts were significantly regulated. Thirty-three candidate transcripts related to betalain biosynthesis were obtained from the transcriptome data. Transcripts encoding enzymes involved in betalain biosynthesis were analyzed using RT-qPCR at the whole pulp coloration stages of H. polyrhizus (7-1) and H. undatus (132-4). Nine key transcripts of betalain biosynthesis were identified. They were assigned to four kinds of genes in betalain biosynthetic pathway, including tyrosinase, 4, 5-DOPA dioxygenase extradiol, cytochrome P450 and glucosyltransferase. Ultimately, a preliminary betalain biosynthetic pathway for pitaya was proposed based on betalain analyses, gene expression profiles and published documents.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Key Genes Related to Betalain Biosynthesis in Pulp Coloration of Hylocereus polyrhizus

    PubMed Central

    Qingzhu, Hua; Chengjie, Chen; Zhe, Chen; Pengkun, Chen; Yuewen, Ma; Jingyu, Wu; Jian, Zheng; Guibing, Hu; Jietang, Zhao; Yonghua, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Betalains have high nutritional value and bioactivities. Red pulp pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only fruit containing abundant betalains for consumer. However, no information is available about genes involved in betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus. Herein, two cDNA libraries of pitaya pulps with two different coloration stages (white and red pulp stages) of Guanhuahong (H. polyrhizus) were constructed. A total of about 12 Gb raw RNA-Seq data was generated and was de novo assembled into 122,677 transcripts with an average length of 1183 bp and an N50 value of 2008. Approximately 99.99% of all transcripts were annotated based on seven public databases. A total of 8871 transcripts were significantly regulated. Thirty-three candidate transcripts related to betalain biosynthesis were obtained from the transcriptome data. Transcripts encoding enzymes involved in betalain biosynthesis were analyzed using RT-qPCR at the whole pulp coloration stages of H. polyrhizus (7-1) and H. undatus (132-4). Nine key transcripts of betalain biosynthesis were identified. They were assigned to four kinds of genes in betalain biosynthetic pathway, including tyrosinase, 4, 5-DOPA dioxygenase extradiol, cytochrome P450 and glucosyltransferase. Ultimately, a preliminary betalain biosynthetic pathway for pitaya was proposed based on betalain analyses, gene expression profiles and published documents. PMID:26779215

  9. The role of lysine 186 in HIV-1 integrase multimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoux, Lionel; Sebastian, Sarah; Muesing, Mark A.; Luban, Jeremy . E-mail: luban@irb.unisi.ch

    2007-07-20

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes biochemical reactions required for viral cDNA insertion into host cell chromosomal DNA, an essential step in the HIV-1 replication cycle. In one of these reactions, the two ends of the linear viral cDNA are believed to be simultaneously ligated to chromosomal DNA by a tetrameric form of IN. The structure of the full-length IN tetramer is not known but a model consisting of the N-terminal domain and the catalytic core revealed basic residues 186 to 188 at the interface between the two IN dimers. We found that alteration of these residues, in particular changing IN lysine residue 186 to glutamate (K186Q), impairs IN oligomerization in the yeast two-hybrid system and decreases oligomeric forms of IN within virions. When expressed independently of other viral proteins in human cells, IN-K186Q did not concentrate in the nucleus as did wild-type IN. Co-expression of wild-type IN restored the multimerization defects of IN-K186Q, in both the two-hybrid system and in virions, and also rescued the nuclear targeting defects. Virions bearing IN-K186Q were not infectious in a single cycle of replication but when mixed virions containing two different IN mutants were produced, IN-K186Q was capable of complementing the catalytically inactive mutant IN-D116A. Our biochemical and functional data support the crystallographic model in which IN residue K186 lies at the interface between IN dimers and suggest that tetramerization is important, not only for concerted integration, but also for IN nuclear targeting.

  10. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  11. Low-Temperature Biodiesel Research Reveals Potential Key to Successful Blend Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now, issues with cold weather performance have prevented biodiesel blends from being widely adopted. Some biodiesel blends have exhibited unexplained low-temperature performance problems even at blend levels as low as 2% by volume. The most common low-temperature performance issue is vehicle stalling caused by fuel filter clogging, which prevents fuel from reaching the engine. Research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reveals the properties responsible for these problems, clearing a path for the development of solutions and expanded use of energy-conserving and low-emissions alternative fuel. NREL researchers set out to study the unpredictable nature of biodiesel crystallization, the condition that impedes the flow of fuel in cold weather. Their research revealed for the first time that saturated monoglyceride impurities common to the biodiesel manufacturing process create crystals that can cause fuel filter clogging and other problems when cooling at slow rates. Biodiesel low-temperature operational problems are commonly referred to as 'precipitates above the cloud point (CP).' NREL's Advanced Biofuels team spiked distilled soy and animal fat-derived B100, as well as B20, B10, and B5 biodiesel blends with three saturated monoglycerides (SMGs) at concentration levels comparable to those of real-world fuels. Above a threshold or eutectic concentration, the SMGs (monomyristin, monopalmitin, and monostearin) were shown to significantly raise the biodiesel CP, and had an even greater impact on the final melting temperature. Researchers discovered that upon cooling, monoglyceride initially precipitates as a metastable crystal, but it transforms over time or upon slight heating into a more stable crystal with a much lower solubility and

  12. Simian-Tropic HIV as a Model To Study Drug Resistance against Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wares, Melissa; Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Sandstrom, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance represents a key aspect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment failure. It is important to develop nonhuman primate models for studying issues of drug resistance and the persistence and transmission of drug-resistant viruses. However, relatively little work has been conducted using either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or SIV/HIV recombinant viruses for studying resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Here, we used a T-cell-tropic SIV/HIV recombinant virus in which the capsid and vif regions of HIV-1 were replaced with their SIV counterparts (simian-tropic HIV-1 [stHIV-1](SCA,SVIF)) to study the impact of a number of drug resistance substitutions in the integrase coding region at positions E92Q, G118R, E138K, Y143R, S153Y, N155H, and R263K on drug resistance, viral infectivity, and viral replication capacity. Our results show that each of these substitutions exerted effects that were similar to their effects in HIV-1. Substitutions associated with primary resistance against dolutegravir were more detrimental to stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) infectiousness than were resistance substitutions associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir, consistent with data that have been reported for HIV-1. These findings support the role of stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) as a useful model with which to evaluate the role of INSTI resistance substitutions on viral persistence, transmissibility, and pathogenesis in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:25583721

  13. A study revealing the key aroma compounds of steamed bread made by Chinese traditional sourdough*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-hua; Wu, Tao; Sadiq, Faizan A.; Yang, Huan-yi; Liu, Tong-jie; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing

    2016-01-01

    Aroma of Chinese steamed bread (CSB) is one of the important parameters that determines the overall quality attributes and consumer acceptance. However, the aroma profile of CSB still remains poorly understood, mainly because of relying on only a single method for aroma extraction in previous studies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the volatile aroma compounds of five different samples of CSB using three different aroma extraction methods, namely solid-phase microextraction (SPME), simultaneous distillation–extraction (SDE), and purge and trap (P&T). All samples showed a unique aroma profile, which could be attributed to their unique microbial consortia. (E)-2-Nonenal and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal were the most prevalent aromatic compounds revealed by SDE, which have not been reported previously, while ethanol and acetic acid proved to be the most dominant compounds by both SPME and P&T. Our approach of combining three different aroma extraction methods provided better insights into the aroma profile of CSB, which had remained largely unknown in previous studies. PMID:27704748

  14. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  15. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  16. Long-term monitoring reveals carbon–nitrogen metabolism key to microcystin production in eutrophic lakes

    PubMed Central

    Beversdorf, Lucas J.; Miller, Todd R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental drivers contributing to cyanobacterial dominance in aquatic systems have been extensively studied. However, understanding of toxic vs. non-toxic cyanobacterial population dynamics and the mechanisms regulating cyanotoxin production remain elusive, both physiologically and ecologically. One reason is the disconnect between laboratory and field-based studies. Here, we combined 3 years of temporal data, including microcystin (MC) concentrations, 16 years of long-term ecological research, and 10 years of molecular data to investigate the potential factors leading to the selection of toxic Microcystis and MC production. Our analysis revealed that nitrogen (N) speciation and inorganic carbon (C) availability might be important drivers of Microcystis population dynamics and that an imbalance in cellular C: N ratios may trigger MC production. More specifically, precipitous declines in ammonium concentrations lead to a transitional period of N stress, even in the presence of high nitrate concentrations, that we call the “toxic phase.” Following the toxic phase, temperature and cyanobacterial abundance remained elevated but MC concentrations drastically declined. Increases in ammonium due to lake turnover may have led to down regulation of MC synthesis or a shift in the community from toxic to non-toxic species. While total phosphorus (P) to total N ratios were relatively low over the time-series, MC concentrations were highest when total N to total P ratios were also highest. Similarly, high C: N ratios were also strongly correlated to the toxic phase. We propose a metabolic model that corroborates molecular studies and reflects our ecological observations that C and N metabolism may regulate MC production physiologically and ecologically. In particular, we hypothesize that an imbalance between 2-oxoglutarate and ammonium in the cell regulates MC synthesis in the environment. PMID:26029192

  17. Characterization of a C3 Deoxygenation Pathway Reveals a Key Branch Point in Aminoglycoside Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Meinan; Ji, Xinjian; Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Chen; Su, Li; Ding, Wei; Deng, Zixin; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-25

    Apramycin is a clinically interesting aminoglycoside antibiotic (AGA) containing a highly unique bicyclic octose moiety, and this octose is deoxygenated at the C3 position. Although the biosynthetic pathways for most 2-deoxystreptamine-containing AGAs have been well characterized, the pathway for apramycin biosynthesis, including the C3 deoxygenation process, has long remained unknown. Here we report detailed investigation of apramycin biosynthesis by a series of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatical studies. We show that AprD4 is a novel radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme, which uses a noncanonical CX3CX3C motif for binding of a [4Fe-4S] cluster and catalyzes the dehydration of paromamine, a pseudodisaccharide intermediate in apramycin biosynthesis. We also show that AprD3 is an NADPH-dependent reductase that catalyzes the reduction of the dehydrated product from AprD4-catalyzed reaction to generate lividamine, a C3' deoxygenated product of paromamine. AprD4 and AprD3 do not form a tight catalytic complex, as shown by protein complex immunoprecipitation and other assays. The AprD4/AprD3 enzyme system acts on different pseudodisaccharide substrates but does not catalyze the deoxygenation of oxyapramycin, an apramycin analogue containing a C3 hydroxyl group on the octose moiety, suggesting that oxyapramycin and apramycin are partitioned into two parallel pathways at an early biosynthetic stage. Functional dissection of the C6 dehydrogenase AprQ shows the crosstalk between different AGA biosynthetic gene clusters from the apramycin producer Streptomyces tenebrarius, and reveals the remarkable catalytic versatility of AprQ. Our study highlights the intriguing chemistry in apramycin biosynthesis and nature's ingenuity in combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products.

  18. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongbin; Wang, Qilei; Zhang, Long; Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  19. Knockout Mice Reveal Key Roles for Claudin 18 in Alveolar Barrier Properties and Fluid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanglei; Flodby, Per; Luo, Jiao; Kage, Hidenori; Sipos, Arnold; Gao, Danping; Ji, Yanbin; Beard, LaMonta L.; Marconett, Crystal N.; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Minoo, Parviz; Liebler, Janice M.; Zhou, Beiyun; Crandall, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Claudin proteins are major constituents of epithelial and endothelial tight junctions (TJs) that regulate paracellular permeability to ions and solutes. Claudin 18, a member of the large claudin family, is highly expressed in lung alveolar epithelium. To elucidate the role of claudin 18 in alveolar epithelial barrier function, we generated claudin 18 knockout (C18 KO) mice. C18 KO mice exhibited increased solute permeability and alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) compared with wild-type control mice. Increased AFC in C18 KO mice was associated with increased β-adrenergic receptor signaling together with activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, higher epithelial sodium channel, and Na-K-ATPase (Na pump) activity and increased Na-K-ATPase β1 subunit expression. Consistent with in vivo findings, C18 KO alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) monolayers exhibited lower transepithelial electrical resistance and increased solute and ion permeability with unchanged ion selectivity. Claudin 3 and claudin 4 expression was markedly increased in C18 KO mice, whereas claudin 5 expression was unchanged and occludin significantly decreased. Microarray analysis revealed changes in cytoskeleton-associated gene expression in C18 KO mice, consistent with observed F-actin cytoskeletal rearrangement in AEC monolayers. These findings demonstrate a crucial nonredundant role for claudin 18 in the regulation of alveolar epithelial TJ composition and permeability properties. Increased AFC in C18 KO mice identifies a role for claudin 18 in alveolar fluid homeostasis beyond its direct contributions to barrier properties that may, at least in part, compensate for increased permeability. PMID:24588076

  20. Characterization of a C3 Deoxygenation Pathway Reveals a Key Branch Point in Aminoglycoside Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Meinan; Ji, Xinjian; Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Chen; Su, Li; Ding, Wei; Deng, Zixin; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-25

    Apramycin is a clinically interesting aminoglycoside antibiotic (AGA) containing a highly unique bicyclic octose moiety, and this octose is deoxygenated at the C3 position. Although the biosynthetic pathways for most 2-deoxystreptamine-containing AGAs have been well characterized, the pathway for apramycin biosynthesis, including the C3 deoxygenation process, has long remained unknown. Here we report detailed investigation of apramycin biosynthesis by a series of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatical studies. We show that AprD4 is a novel radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme, which uses a noncanonical CX3CX3C motif for binding of a [4Fe-4S] cluster and catalyzes the dehydration of paromamine, a pseudodisaccharide intermediate in apramycin biosynthesis. We also show that AprD3 is an NADPH-dependent reductase that catalyzes the reduction of the dehydrated product from AprD4-catalyzed reaction to generate lividamine, a C3' deoxygenated product of paromamine. AprD4 and AprD3 do not form a tight catalytic complex, as shown by protein complex immunoprecipitation and other assays. The AprD4/AprD3 enzyme system acts on different pseudodisaccharide substrates but does not catalyze the deoxygenation of oxyapramycin, an apramycin analogue containing a C3 hydroxyl group on the octose moiety, suggesting that oxyapramycin and apramycin are partitioned into two parallel pathways at an early biosynthetic stage. Functional dissection of the C6 dehydrogenase AprQ shows the crosstalk between different AGA biosynthetic gene clusters from the apramycin producer Streptomyces tenebrarius, and reveals the remarkable catalytic versatility of AprQ. Our study highlights the intriguing chemistry in apramycin biosynthesis and nature's ingenuity in combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products. PMID:27120352

  1. Irreversible inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase by dicaffeoylquinic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, K; Cordeiro, M L; Atienza, J; Robinson, W E; Chow, S A

    1999-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses require integration of a double-stranded DNA copy of the RNA genome into the host cell chromosome for productive infection. The viral enzyme, integrase, catalyzes the integration of retroviral DNA and represents an attractive target for developing antiretroviral agents. We identified several derivatives of dicaffeoylquinic acids (DCQAs) that inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture and catalytic activities of HIV-1 integrase in vitro. The specific step at which DCQAs inhibit the integration in vitro and the mechanism of inhibition were examined in the present study. Titration experiments with different concentrations of HIV-1 integrase or DNA substrate found that the effect of DCQAs was exerted on the enzyme and not the DNA. In addition to HIV-1, DCQAs also inhibited the in vitro activities of MLV integrase and truncated variants of feline immunodeficiency virus integrase, suggesting that these compounds interacted with the central core domain of integrase. The inhibition on retroviral integrases was relatively specific, and DCQAs had no effect on several other DNA-modifying enzymes and phosphoryltransferases. Kinetic analysis and dialysis experiments showed that the inhibition of integrase by DCQAs was irreversible. The inhibition did not require the presence of a divalent cation and was unaffected by preassembling integrase onto viral DNA. The results suggest that the irreversible inhibition by DCQAs on integrase is directed toward conserved amino acid residues in the central core domain during catalysis.

  2. Irreversible Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase by Dicaffeoylquinic Acids†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Cordeiro, Mara L.; Atienza, Jocelyn; Robinson, W. Edward; Chow, Samson A.

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses require integration of a double-stranded DNA copy of the RNA genome into the host cell chromosome for productive infection. The viral enzyme, integrase, catalyzes the integration of retroviral DNA and represents an attractive target for developing antiretroviral agents. We identified several derivatives of dicaffeoylquinic acids (DCQAs) that inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture and catalytic activities of HIV-1 integrase in vitro. The specific step at which DCQAs inhibit the integration in vitro and the mechanism of inhibition were examined in the present study. Titration experiments with different concentrations of HIV-1 integrase or DNA substrate found that the effect of DCQAs was exerted on the enzyme and not the DNA. In addition to HIV-1, DCQAs also inhibited the in vitro activities of MLV integrase and truncated variants of feline immunodeficiency virus integrase, suggesting that these compounds interacted with the central core domain of integrase. The inhibition on retroviral integrases was relatively specific, and DCQAs had no effect on several other DNA-modifying enzymes and phosphoryltransferases. Kinetic analysis and dialysis experiments showed that the inhibition of integrase by DCQAs was irreversible. The inhibition did not require the presence of a divalent cation and was unaffected by preassembling integrase onto viral DNA. The results suggest that the irreversible inhibition by DCQAs on integrase is directed toward conserved amino acid residues in the central core domain during catalysis. PMID:10074185

  3. Communications: Electron polarization critically stabilizes the Mg2+ complex in the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yunpeng; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z. H.; Zhang, Dawei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed dynamics study of the catalytic core domain (CCD) of HIV-1 integrase using both polarized and nonpolarized force fields. The numerical results reveal the critical role of protein polarization in stabilizing Mg2+ coordination complex in CCD. Specifically, when nonpolarized force field is used, a remarkable drift of the Mg2+ complex away from its equilibrium position is observed, which causes the binding site blocked by the Mg2+ complex. In contrast, when polarized force field is employed in MD simulation, HIV-1 integrase CCD structure is stabilized and both the position of the Mg2+ complex and the binding site are well preserved. The detailed analysis shows the transition of α-helix to 310-helix adjacent to the catalytic loop (residues 139-147), which correlates with the dislocation of the Mg2+ complex. The current study demonstrates the importance of electronic polarization of protein in stabilizing the metal complex in the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase.

  4. Critical contacts between HIV-1 integrase and viral DNA identified by structure-based analysis and photo-crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, T M; Esposito, D; Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of HIV-1 integrase reveals a cluster of lysine residues near the active site. Using site-directed mutagenesis and photo-crosslinking we find that Lys156 and Lys159 are critical for the functional interaction of integrase with viral DNA. Mutation of Lys156 or Lys159 to glutamate led to a loss of both 3' processing and strand transfer activities in vitro while maintaining the ability to interact with nonspecific DNA and support disintegration. However, mutation of both residues to glutamate produced a synergistic effect eliminating nearly all nonspecific DNA interaction and disintegration activity. In addition, virus containing either of these changes was replication-defective at the step of integration. Photo-crosslinking, using 5-iododeoxyuracil-substituted oligonucleotides, suggests that Lys159 interacts at the N7 position of the conserved deoxyadenosine adjacent to the scissile phosphodiester bond of viral DNA. Sequence conservation throughout retroviral integrases and certain bacterial transposases (e.g. Tn10/IS10) supports the premise that within those families of polynucleotidyl transferases, these residues are strategic for DNA interaction. PMID:9362498

  5. A novel family of integrases associated with prophages and genomic islands integrated within the tRNA-dihydrouridine synthase A (dusA) gene

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Daniel N.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic islands play a key role in prokaryotic genome plasticity. Genomic islands integrate into chromosomal loci such as transfer RNA genes and protein coding genes, whilst retaining various cargo genes that potentially bestow novel functions on the host organism. A gene encoding a putative integrase was identified at a single site within the 5′ end of the dusA gene in the genomes of over 200 bacteria. This integrase was discovered to be a component of numerous genomic islands, which appear to share a target site within the dusA gene. dusA encodes the tRNA-dihydrouridine synthase A enzyme, which catalyses the post-transcriptional reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine in tRNA. Genomic islands encoding homologous dusA-associated integrases were found at a much lower frequency within the related dusB and dusC genes, and non-dus genes. Excision of these dusA-associated islands from the chromosome as circularized intermediates was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Analysis of the dusA-associated islands indicated that they were highly diverse, with the integrase gene representing the only universal common feature. PMID:25883135

  6. Expanding the diversity of oenococcal bacteriophages: insights into a novel group based on the integrase sequence.

    PubMed

    Jaomanjaka, Fety; Ballestra, Patricia; Dols-lafargue, Marguerite; Le Marrec, Claire

    2013-09-01

    Temperate bacteriophages are a contributor of the genetic diversity in the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni. We used a classification scheme for oenococcal prophages based on integrase gene polymorphism, to analyze a collection of Oenococcus strains mostly isolated in the area of Bordeaux, which represented the major lineages identified through MLST schemes in the species. Genome sequences of oenococcal prophages were clustered into four integrase groups (A to D) which were related to the chromosomal integration site. The prevalence of each group was determined and we could show that members of the intB- and intC-prophage groups were rare in our panel of strains. Our study focused on the so far uncharacterized members of the intD-group. Various intD viruses could be easily isolated from wine samples, while intD lysogens could be induced to produce phages active against two permissive O. oeni isolates. These data support the role of this prophage group in the biology of O. oeni. Global alignment of three relevant intD-prophages revealed significant conservation and highlighted a number of unique ORFs that may contribute to phage and lysogen fitness.

  7. Cell type differences in activity of the Streptomyces bacteriophage phiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Maucksch, Christof; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Hennen, Elisabeth; Bohla, Alexander; Hoffmann, Florian; Elfinger, Markus; Rosenecker, Joseph; Rudolph, Carsten

    2008-10-01

    Genomic integration by the Streptomyces bacteriophage C31 integrase is a promising tool for non-viral gene therapy of various genetic disorders. We investigated the C31 integrase recombination activity in T cell derived cell lines, primary T lymphocytes and CD34(+) haematopoietic stem cells in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells and cell lines derived from lung-, liver- and cervix-tissue. In T cell lines, enhanced long-term expression above control was observed only with high amounts of integrase mRNA. Transfections of C31 integrase plasmids were not capable of mediating enhanced long-term transgene expression in T cell lines. In contrast, moderate to high efficiency could be detected in human mesenchymal stem cells, human lung, liver and cervix carcinoma cell lines. Up to 100-fold higher levels of recombination product was found in C31 integrase transfected A549 lung than Jurkat T cells. When the C31 integrase activity was normalized to the intracellular integrase mRNA levels, a 16-fold difference was found. As one possible inhibitor of the C31 integrase, we found 3- to 5-fold higher DAXX levels in Jurkat than in A549 cells, which could in addition to other yet unknown factors explain the observed discrepancy of C31 integrase activity.

  8. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Heather A.; Masukawa, Keven M.; Rubins, Kathleen; Bushman, Frederic; Jorgensen, William L.; Lins, Roberto; Briggs, James; Mccammon, Andy

    2000-05-11

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  9. Inhibitors of HIV-1 replication that inhibit HIV integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W E; Reinecke, M G; Abdel-Malek, S; Jia, Q; Chow, S A

    1996-01-01

    HIV-1 replication depends on the viral enzyme integrase that mediates integration of a DNA copy of the virus into the host cell genome. This enzyme represents a novel target to which antiviral agents might be directed. Three compounds, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 1-methoxyoxalyl-3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and L-chicoric acid, inhibit HIV-1 integrase in biochemical assays at concentrations ranging from 0.06-0.66 microgram/ml; furthermore, these compounds inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture at 1-4 microgram/ml. The toxic concentrations of these compounds are fully 100-fold greater than their antiviral concentrations. These compounds represent a potentially important new class of antiviral agents that may contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of viral integration. Thus, the dicaffeoylquinic acids are promising leads to new anti-HIV therapeutics and offer a significant advance in the search for new HIV enzyme targets as they are both specific for HIV-1 integrase and active against HIV-1 in tissue culture. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8692814

  10. Developing a dynamic pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Carlson, H A; Masukawa, K M; Rubins, K; Bushman, F D; Jorgensen, W L; Lins, R D; Briggs, J M; McCammon, J A

    2000-06-01

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of "dynamic" pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a "static" pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors. PMID:10841789

  11. Resistance Mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase Selected with Elvitegravir Confer Reduced Susceptibility to a Wide Range of Integrase Inhibitors▿

    PubMed Central

    Goethals, Olivia; Clayton, Reginald; Van Ginderen, Marcia; Vereycken, Inge; Wagemans, Elisabeth; Geluykens, Peggy; Dockx, Koen; Strijbos, Rudy; Smits, Veerle; Vos, Ann; Meersseman, Geert; Jochmans, Dirk; Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique; Hallenberger, Sabine; Hertogs, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome is an essential step in the life cycle of retroviruses and is facilitated by the viral integrase enzyme. The first generation of integrase inhibitors recently approved or currently in late-stage clinical trials shows great promise for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, but virus is expected to develop resistance to these drugs. Therefore, we used a novel resistance selection protocol to follow the emergence of resistant HIV in the presence of the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir (GS-9137). We find the primary resistance-conferring mutations to be Q148R, E92Q, and T66I and demonstrate that they confer a reduction in susceptibility not only to elvitegravir but also to raltegravir (MK-0518) and other integrase inhibitors. The locations of the mutations are highlighted in the catalytic sites of integrase, and we correlate the mutations with expected drug-protein contacts. In addition, mutations that do not confer reduced susceptibility when present alone (H114Y, L74M, R20K, A128T, E138K, and S230R) are also discussed in relation to their position in the catalytic core domain and their proximity to known structural features of integrase. These data broaden the understanding of antiviral resistance against integrase inhibitors and may give insight facilitating the discovery of second-generation compounds. PMID:18715920

  12. Striking Plasticity of CRISPR-Cas9 and Key Role of Non-target DNA, as Revealed by Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system recently emerged as a transformative genome-editing technology that is innovating basic bioscience and applied medicine and biotechnology. The endonuclease Cas9 associates with a guide RNA to match and cleave complementary sequences in double stranded DNA, forming an RNA:DNA hybrid and a displaced non-target DNA strand. Although extensive structural studies are ongoing, the conformational dynamics of Cas9 and its interplay with the nucleic acids during association and DNA cleavage are largely unclear. Here, by employing multi-microsecond time scale molecular dynamics, we reveal the conformational plasticity of Cas9 and identify key determinants that allow its large-scale conformational changes during nucleic acid binding and processing. We show how the “closure” of the protein, which accompanies nucleic acid binding, fundamentally relies on highly coupled and specific motions of the protein domains, collectively initiating the prominent conformational changes needed for nucleic acid association. We further reveal a key role of the non-target DNA during the process of activation of the nuclease HNH domain, showing how the nontarget DNA positioning triggers local conformational changes that favor the formation of a catalytically competent Cas9. Finally, a remarkable conformational plasticity is identified as an intrinsic property of the HNH domain, constituting a necessary element that allows for the HNH repositioning. These novel findings constitute a reference for future experimental studies aimed at a full characterization of the dynamic features of the CRISPR-Cas9 system, and—more importantly—call for novel structure engineering efforts that are of fundamental importance for the rational design of new genome-engineering applications. PMID:27800559

  13. The key microorganisms for anaerobic degradation of pentachlorophenol in paddy soil as revealed by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hui; Liu, Chengshuai; Li, Fangbai; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Manjia; Hu, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a common residual persistent pesticide in paddy soil and has resulted in harmful effect on soil ecosystem. The anaerobic microbial transformation of PCP, therefore, has been received much attentions, especially the functional microbial communities for the reductive transformation. However, the key functional microorganisms for PCP mineralization in the paddy soil still remain unknown. In this work, DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) was applied to explore the key microorganisms responsible for PCP mineralization in paddy soil. The SIP results indicated that the dominant bacteria responsible for PCP biodegradation belonged to the genus Dechloromonas of the class β-Proteobacteria. In addition, the increased production of (13)CH4 and (13)CO2 indicated that the addition of lactate enhanced the rate of biodegradation and mineralization of PCP. Two archaea classified as the genera of Methanosaeta and Methanocella of class Methanobacteria were enriched in the heavy fraction when with lactate, whereas no archaea was detected in the absence of lactate. These findings provide direct evidence for the species of bacteria and archaea responsible for anaerobic PCP or its breakdown products mineralization and reveal a new insight into the microorganisms linked with PCP degradation in paddy soil.

  14. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  15. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs. PMID:27565348

  16. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Ealy, Julie B.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu; Katzman, Michael

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  17. Influence of Drug Resistance Mutations on the Activity of HIV-1 Subtypes A and B Integrases: a Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, O A; Zatsepin, T S; Agapkina, Yu Yu; Isaguliants, M G; Gottikh, M B

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) DNA into the genome of an infected cell is one of the key steps in the viral replication cycle. The viral enzyme integrase (IN), which catalyzes the integration, is an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. However, the HIV-1 therapy often results in the IN gene mutations inducing viral resistance to integration inhibitors. To assess the impact of drug resistance mutations on the activity of IN of HIV-1 subtype A strain FSU-A, which is dominant in Russia, variants of the consensus IN of this subtype containing the primary resistance mutations G118R and Q148K and secondary compensatory substitutions E138K and G140S were prepared and characterized. Comparative study of these enzymes with the corresponding mutants of IN of HIV-1 subtype B strains HXB-2 was performed. The mutation Q148K almost equally reduced the activity of integrases of both subtypes. Its negative effect was partially compensated by the secondary mutations E138K and G140S. Primary substitution G118R had different influence on the activity of proteins of the subtypes A and B, and the compensatory effect of the secondary substitution E138K also depended on the viral subtype. Comparison of the mutants resistance to the known strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a new inhibitor XZ-259 (a dihydro-1H-isoindol derivative), showed that integrases of both subtypes with the Q148K mutation were insensitive to raltegravir and elvitegravir but were effectively inhibited by XZ-259. The substitution G118R slightly reduced the efficiency of IN inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir and caused no resistance to XZ_259.

  18. A molecular phylogeny of Acronychia, Euodia, Melicope and relatives (Rutaceae) reveals polyphyletic genera and key innovations for species richness.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, Marc S; Wen, Jun; Wagner, Warren L

    2014-10-01

    We present the first detailed phylogenetic study of the genus Melicope, the largest genus of the Citrus family (Rutaceae). The phylogenetic analysis sampled about 50% of the 235 accepted species of Melicope as well as representatives of 26 related genera, most notably Acronychia and Euodia. The results based on five plastid and nuclear markers have revealed that Acronychia, Euodia and Melicope are each not monophyletic in their current circumscriptions and that several small genera mainly from Australia and New Caledonia need to be merged with one of the three genera to ensure monophyly at the generic level. The phylogenetic position of the drupaceous Acronychia in relation to Melicope, which has capsular or follicular fruits, remains unclear and Acronychia might be a separate genus or a part of Melicope. The seed coats of Melicope, Acronychia and related genera show adaptations to bird-dispersal, which might be regarded as key innovations for species radiations. Euodia and its relatives, which lack these adaptations, include only about 20 species while the Melicope-Acronychia group consists of about 340 species. The drupaceous genera Comptonella, Dutaillyea, Picrella and Sarcomelicope are nested within Melicope and need to be merged with Melicope. The expanded genus is a prime example of the artificial classification system of Engler, who defined Rutaceous subfamilies mainly based on gynoecial and fruit characters. PMID:24971739

  19. Genome Alignment Spanning Major Poaceae Lineages Reveals Heterogeneous Evolutionary Rates and Alters Inferred Dates for Key Evolutionary Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiyin; Wang, Jingpeng; Jin, Dianchuan; Guo, Hui; Lee, Tae-Ho; Liu, Tao; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-06-01

    Multiple comparisons among genomes can clarify their evolution, speciation, and functional innovations. To date, the genome sequences of eight grasses representing the most economically important Poaceae (grass) clades have been published, and their genomic-level comparison is an essential foundation for evolutionary, functional, and translational research. Using a formal and conservative approach, we aligned these genomes. Direct comparison of paralogous gene pairs all duplicated simultaneously reveal striking variation in evolutionary rates among whole genomes, with nucleotide substitution slowest in rice and up to 48% faster in other grasses, adding a new dimension to the value of rice as a grass model. We reconstructed ancestral genome contents for major evolutionary nodes, potentially contributing to understanding the divergence and speciation of grasses. Recent fossil evidence suggests revisions of the estimated dates of key evolutionary events, implying that the pan-grass polyploidization occurred ∼96 million years ago and could not be related to the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction as previously inferred. Adjusted dating to reflect both updated fossil evidence and lineage-specific evolutionary rates suggested that maize subgenome divergence and maize-sorghum divergence were virtually simultaneous, a coincidence that would be explained if polyploidization directly contributed to speciation. This work lays a solid foundation for Poaceae translational genomics.

  20. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses reveal key innate immune signatures in the host response to the gastrointestinal pathogen Campylobacter concisus.

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Deshpande, Nandan P; Man, Si Ming; Burgos-Portugal, Jose A; Khattak, Faisal A; Raftery, Mark J; Wilkins, Marc R; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2015-02-01

    Pathogenic species within the genus Campylobacter are responsible for a considerable burden on global health. Campylobacter concisus is an emergent pathogen that plays a role in acute and chronic gastrointestinal disease. Despite ongoing research on Campylobacter virulence mechanisms, little is known regarding the immunological profile of the host response to Campylobacter infection. In this study, we describe a comprehensive global profile of innate immune responses to C. concisus infection in differentiated THP-1 macrophages infected with an adherent and invasive strain of C. concisus. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), quantitative PCR (qPCR), mass spectrometry, and confocal microscopy, we observed differential expression of pattern recognition receptors and robust upregulation of DNA- and RNA-sensing molecules. In particular, we observed IFI16 inflammasome assembly in C. concisus-infected macrophages. Global profiling of the transcriptome revealed the significant regulation of a total of 8,343 transcripts upon infection with C. concisus, which included the activation of key inflammatory pathways involving CREB1, NF-κB, STAT, and interferon regulatory factor signaling. Thirteen microRNAs and 333 noncoding RNAs were significantly regulated upon infection, including MIR221, which has been associated with colorectal carcinogenesis. This study represents a major advance in our understanding of host recognition and innate immune responses to infection by C. concisus. PMID:25486993

  1. Pyruvate kinase and aspartate-glutamate carrier distributions reveal key metabolic links between neurons and glia in retina

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Ken J.; Du, Jianhai; Sloat, Stephanie R.; Contreras, Laura; Linton, Jonathan D.; Turner, Sally J.; Sadilek, Martin; Hurley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships between neurons and glia must adapt to structures, functions, and metabolic roles of the tissues they are in. We show here that Müller glia in retinas have specific enzyme deficiencies that can enhance their ability to synthesize Gln. The metabolic cost of these deficiencies is that they impair the Müller cell’s ability to metabolize Glc. We show here that the cells can compensate for this deficiency by using metabolites produced by neurons. Müller glia are deficient for pyruvate kinase (PK) and for aspartate/glutamate carrier 1 (AGC1), a key component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In contrast, photoreceptor neurons express AGC1 and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase, which is commonly associated with aerobic glycolysis in tumors, proliferating cells, and some other cell types. Our findings reveal a previously unidentified type of metabolic relationship between neurons and glia. Müller glia compensate for their unique metabolic adaptations by using lactate and aspartate from neurons as surrogates for their missing PK and AGC1. PMID:25313047

  2. Phylogenetic structure and evolution of regulatory genes and integrases of P2-like phages.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Hanna; Cardoso-Palacios, Carlos; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Anders S

    2011-07-01

    The phylogenetic relationships and structural similarities of the proteins encoded within the regulatory region (containing the integrase gene and the lytic-lysogenic transcriptional switch genes) of P2-like phages were analyzed, and compared with the phylogenetic relationship of P2-like phages inferred from four structural genes. P2-like phages are thought to be one of the most genetically homogenous phage groups but the regulatory region nevertheless varies extensively between different phage genomes.   The analyses showed that there are many types of regulatory regions, but two types can be clearly distinguished; regions similar either to the phage P2 or to the phage 186 regulatory regions. These regions were also found to be most frequent among the sequenced P2-like phage or prophage genomes, and common in phages using Escherichia coli as a host. Both the phylogenetic and the structural analyses showed that these two regions are related. The integrases as well as the cox/apl genes show a common monophyletic origin but the immunity repressor genes, the type P2 C gene and the type 186 cI gene, are likely of different origin. There was no indication of recombination between the P2-186 types of regulatory genes but the comparison of the phylogenies of the regulatory region with the phylogeny based on four structural genes revealed recombinational events between the regulatory region and the structural genes. Less common regulatory regions were phylogenetically heterogeneous and typically contained a fusion of genes from distantly related or unknown phages and P2-like genes.

  3. Phylogenetic structure and evolution of regulatory genes and integrases of P2-like phages

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Hanna; Cardoso-Palacios, Carlos; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Anders S.

    2011-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships and structural similarities of the proteins encoded within the regulatory region (containing the integrase gene and the lytic–lysogenic transcriptional switch genes) of P2-like phages were analyzed, and compared with the phylogenetic relationship of P2-like phages inferred from four structural genes. P2-like phages are thought to be one of the most genetically homogenous phage groups but the regulatory region nevertheless varies extensively between different phage genomes.   The analyses showed that there are many types of regulatory regions, but two types can be clearly distinguished; regions similar either to the phage P2 or to the phage 186 regulatory regions. These regions were also found to be most frequent among the sequenced P2-like phage or prophage genomes, and common in phages using Escherichia coli as a host. Both the phylogenetic and the structural analyses showed that these two regions are related. The integrases as well as the cox/apl genes show a common monophyletic origin but the immunity repressor genes, the type P2 C gene and the type 186 cI gene, are likely of different origin. There was no indication of recombination between the P2–186 types of regulatory genes but the comparison of the phylogenies of the regulatory region with the phylogeny based on four structural genes revealed recombinational events between the regulatory region and the structural genes. Less common regulatory regions were phylogenetically heterogeneous and typically contained a fusion of genes from distantly related or unknown phages and P2-like genes. PMID:23050214

  4. Representing Microbial Dormancy in Soil Decomposition Models Improves Model Performance and Reveals Key Ecosystem Controls on Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhuang, Q.; Wang, G.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change and subsequent responses of plant and microbial communities and nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and strategy may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to microbial physiology and community changes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. In this study, we developed an explicit microbial-enzyme decomposition model and examined model performance with and without representation of dormancy at six temperate forest sites with observed soil efflux ranged from 4 to 10 years across different forest types. We then extrapolated the model to all temperate forests in the Northern Hemisphere (25-50°N) to investigate spatial controls on microbial and soil C dynamics. Both models captured the observed soil heterotrophic respiration (RH), yet no-dormancy model consistently exhibited large seasonal amplitude and overestimation in microbial biomass. Spatially, the total RH from temperate forests based on dormancy model amounts to 6.88PgC/yr, and 7.99PgC/yr based on no-dormancy model. However, no-dormancy model notably overestimated the ratio of microbial biomass to SOC. Spatial correlation analysis revealed key controls of soil C:N ratio on the active proportion of microbial biomass, whereas local dormancy is primarily controlled by soil moisture and temperature, indicating scale-dependent environmental and biotic controls on microbial and SOC dynamics. These developments should provide essential support to modeling future soil carbon dynamics and enhance the avenue for collaboration between empirical soil experiment and modeling in the sense that more microbial physiological measurements are needed to better constrain and evaluate the models.

  5. Structure of the Trehalose-6-phosphate Phosphatase from Brugia malayi Reveals Key Design Principles for Anthelmintic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farelli, Jeremiah D.; Galvin, Brendan D.; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E.; Causey, Thomas B.; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible. PMID:24992307

  6. Comparative metabolic profiling reveals the key role of amino acids metabolism in the rapamycin overproduction by Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohua; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Huanhuan; Huang, Di; Wen, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Rapamycin is an important natural macrolide antibiotic with antifungal, immunosuppressive and anticancer activity produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. In this study, a mutant strain obtained by ultraviolet mutagenesis displayed higher rapamycin production capacity compared to the wild-type S. hygroscopicus ATCC 29253. To gain insights into the mechanism of rapamycin overproduction, comparative metabolic profiling between the wild-type and mutant strain was performed. A total of 86 metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pattern recognition methods, including principal component analysis, partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis, were employed to determine the key biomarkers. The results showed that 22 potential biomarkers were closely associated with the increase of rapamycin production and the tremendous metabolic difference was observed between the two strains. Furthermore, metabolic pathway analysis revealed that amino acids metabolism played an important role in the synthesis of rapamycin, especially lysine, valine, tryptophan, isoleucine, glutamate, arginine and ornithine. The inadequate supply of amino acids, or namely "nitrogen starvation" occurred in the mutant strain. Subsequently, the exogenous addition of amino acids into the fermentation medium of the mutant strain confirmed the above conclusion, and rapamycin production of the mutant strain increased to 426.7 mg/L after adding lysine, approximately 5.8-fold of that in the wild-type strain. Finally, the results of real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays demonstrated that dihydrodipicolinate synthase involved with lysine metabolism played vital role in the biosynthesis of rapamycin. These findings will provide a theoretical basis for further improving production of rapamycin.

  7. Structure of the trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Brugia malayi reveals key design principles for anthelmintic drugs.

    PubMed

    Farelli, Jeremiah D; Galvin, Brendan D; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E; Causey, Thomas B; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2014-07-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible.

  8. Transcriptome Phase Distribution Analysis Reveals Diurnal Regulated Biological Processes and Key Pathways in Rice Flag Leaves and Seedling Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Xing, Zhuo; Yang, Wenqiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Han; Gong, Xiaojie; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Zhenhai; Hu, Xingming; Wang, Dong; Qian, Qian; Wang, Tai; Su, Zhen; Xue, Yongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Plant diurnal oscillation is a 24-hour period based variation. The correlation between diurnal genes and biological pathways was widely revealed by microarray analysis in different species. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the major food staple for about half of the world's population. The rice flag leaf is essential in providing photosynthates to the grain filling. However, there is still no comprehensive view about the diurnal transcriptome for rice leaves. In this study, we applied rice microarray to monitor the rhythmically expressed genes in rice seedling and flag leaves. We developed a new computational analysis approach and identified 6,266 (10.96%) diurnal probe sets in seedling leaves, 13,773 (24.08%) diurnal probe sets in flag leaves. About 65% of overall transcription factors were identified as flag leaf preferred. In seedling leaves, the peak of phase distribution was from 2:00am to 4:00am, whereas in flag leaves, the peak was from 8:00pm to 2:00am. The diurnal phase distribution analysis of gene ontology (GO) and cis-element enrichment indicated that, some important processes were waken by the light, such as photosynthesis and abiotic stimulus, while some genes related to the nuclear and ribosome involved processes were active mostly during the switch time of light to dark. The starch and sucrose metabolism pathway genes also showed diurnal phase. We conducted comparison analysis between Arabidopsis and rice leaf transcriptome throughout the diurnal cycle. In summary, our analysis approach is feasible for relatively unbiased identification of diurnal transcripts, efficiently detecting some special periodic patterns with non-sinusoidal periodic patterns. Compared to the rice flag leaves, the gene transcription levels of seedling leaves were relatively limited to the diurnal rhythm. Our comprehensive microarray analysis of seedling and flag leaves of rice provided an overview of the rice diurnal transcriptome and indicated some diurnal regulated biological

  9. Genetic and Biochemical Assays Reveal a Key Role for Replication Restart Proteins in Group II Intron Retrohoming

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Truong, David M.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns retrohome by an RNP-based mechanism in which the intron RNA reverse splices into a DNA site and is reverse transcribed by the associated intron-encoded protein. The resulting intron cDNA is then integrated into the genome by cellular mechanisms that have remained unclear. Here, we used an Escherichia coli genetic screen and Taqman qPCR assay that mitigate indirect effects to identify host factors that function in retrohoming. We then analyzed mutants identified in these and previous genetic screens by using a new biochemical assay that combines group II intron RNPs with cellular extracts to reconstitute the complete retrohoming reaction in vitro. The genetic and biochemical analyses indicate a retrohoming pathway involving degradation of the intron RNA template by a host RNase H and second-strand DNA synthesis by the host replicative DNA polymerase. Our results reveal ATP-dependent steps in both cDNA and second-strand synthesis and a surprising role for replication restart proteins in initiating second-strand synthesis in the absence of DNA replication. We also find an unsuspected requirement for host factors in initiating reverse transcription and a new RNA degradation pathway that suppresses retrohoming. Key features of the retrohoming mechanism may be used by human LINEs and other non-LTR-retrotransposons, which are related evolutionarily to mobile group II introns. Our findings highlight a new role for replication restart proteins, which function not only to repair DNA damage caused by mobile element insertion, but have also been co-opted to become an integral part of the group II intron retrohoming mechanism. PMID:23637634

  10. The evaluation of catechins that contain a galloyl moiety as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Chen, Wei; Yi, Kejia; Wu, Zhiqiang; Si, Yiling; Han, Weidong; Zhao, Yali

    2010-12-01

    Four catechins with the galloyl moiety, including catechin gallate (CG), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and epicatechin gallate (ECG), were found to inhibit HIV-1 integrase effectively as determined by our ELISA method. In our docking study, it is proposed that when the HIV-1 integrase does not combine with virus DNA, the four catechins may bind to Tyr143 and Gln148, thus altering the flexibility of the loop (Gly140-Gly149), which could lead to an inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity. In addition, after combining HIV-1 integrase with virus DNA, the four catechins may bind between the integrase and virus DNA, consequently, disrupt this interaction. Thus, the four catechins may reduce the activity of HIV-1 integrase by disrupting its interaction with virus DNA. The four catechins have a highly cooperative inhibitory effect (IC₅₀=0.1 μmol/L). Our study suggests that catechins with the galloyl moiety could be a novel and effective class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  11. Fluorescent protein-based detection of φC31 integrase activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taian; Fang, Yongxiang; Jia, Huaijie; Chen, Guohua; Guan, Qisai; He, Xiaobing; Yao, Wenjuan; Zeng, Shuang; Jing, Zhizhong

    2013-10-15

    The enzyme φC31 integrase from Streptomyces phage has been documented as functional in mammalian cells and, therefore, has the potential to be a powerful gene manipulation tool. However, the activity of this enzyme is cell-type dependent. The more active mutant forms of φC31 integrase are required. Therefore, a rapid and effective method should be developed to detect the intracellular activity of φC31 integrase. We devised in this study an integrase-inversion cassette that contains the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and the reverse complementary DsRed gene, which are flanked by attB and reverse complementary attP. This cassette can be inverted by φC31 integrase, thereby altering the fluorescent protein expression. Thus, φC31 integrase activity can be qualitatively or quantitatively evaluated based on the detected fluorescence. Furthermore, this cassette-based method was applied to several cell types, demonstrating that it is an efficient and reliable tool for measuring φC31 integrase activity in mammalian cells.

  12. Bovine Lactoferrampin, Human Lactoferricin, and Lactoferrin 1-11 Inhibit Nuclear Translocation of HIV Integrase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Winston Yan; Wong, Jack Ho; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Cheung, Randy Chifai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate fragments derived from human and bovine lactoferrins for ability to inhibit nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. It was shown that human lactoferricin, human lactoferrin 1-11, and bovine lactoferrampin reduced nuclear distribution of HIV-1 integrase. Bovine lactoferrampin could inhibit both the activity and nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. Human lactoferrampin, bovine lactoferricin, and bovine lactoferrin 1-11 had no effect on HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation. Human lactoferrampin which inhibited the activity of integrase did not prevent its nuclear translocation. Human lactoferricin and lactoferrin 1-11 did not inhibit HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation despite their ability to attenuate the enzyme activity. The discrepancy between the findings on reduction of HIV-1 activity and inhibition of nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase was due to the different mechanisms involved. A similar reasoning can also be applied to the different inhibitory potencies of the milk peptides on different HIV enzymes, i.e., nuclear translocation.

  13. In vitro activities of purified visna virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Katzman, M; Sudol, M

    1994-01-01

    Although integration generally is considered a critical step in the retrovirus life cycle, it has been reported that visna virus, which causes degenerative neurologic disease in sheep, can productively infect sheep choroid plexus cells without detectable integration. To ascertain whether the integrase (IN) of visna virus is an inherently defective enzyme and to create tools for further study of integration of the phylogenetically related human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we purified visna virus IN by using a bacterial expression system and applied various in vitro oligonucleotide-based assays to studying this protein. We found that visna virus IN demonstrates the full repertoire of in vitro functions characteristic of retroviral integrases. In particular, visna virus IN exhibits site-specific endonuclease activity following the invariant CA found two nucleotides from the 3' ends of viral DNA (processing activity), joins processed oligonucleotides to various sites on other oligonucleotides (strand transfer or integration activity), and reverses the integration reaction by resolving a complex that mimics one end of viral DNA integrated into host DNA (disintegration activity). In addition, although it has been reported that purified HIV-1 IN cannot specifically nick visna virus DNA ends, purified visna virus IN does specifically process and integrate HIV-1 DNA ends. Images PMID:8189495

  14. Integrase, LEDGF/p75 and HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Poeschla, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV integrates a DNA copy of its genome into a host cell chromosome in each replication cycle. The essential DNA cleaving and joining chemistry of integration is known, but there is less understanding of the process as it occurs in a cell, where two complex and dynamic macromolecular entities are joined: the viral pre-integration complex and chromatin. Among implicated cellular factors, much recent attention has coalesced around LEDGF/p75, a nuclear protein that may act as a chromatin docking factor or receptor for lentiviral pre-integration complexes. LEDGF/p75 tethers HIV integrase to chromatin, protects it from degradation, and strongly influences the genome-wide pattern of HIV integration. Depleting the protein from cells and/or over-expressing its integrase-binding domain blocks viral replication. Current goals are to establish the underlying mechanisms and to determine whether this knowledge can be exploited for antiviral therapy or for targeting lentiviral vector integration in human gene therapy. PMID:18264802

  15. Efficient magnesium-dependent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1995-01-01

    The integrase protein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has generally been reported to require Mn2+ for efficient in vitro activity. We have reexamined the divalent metal ion requirements of HIV-1 integrase and find that the protein is capable of promoting efficient 3' processing and DNA strand transfer with either Mn2+ or Mg2+. The metal ion preference depended upon the reaction conditions. HIV-1 integrase displayed significantly less nonspecific nuclease activity in reaction mixtures containing Mg2+ than it did under the previously described reaction conditions with mixtures containing Mn2+. PMID:7637039

  16. The same site on the integrase-binding domain of lens epithelium–derived growth factor is a therapeutic target for MLL leukemia and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Pollock, Jonathan; He, Shihan; Miao, Hongzhi; Purohit, Trupta; Yokom, Adam; Hess, Jay L.; Muntean, Andrew G.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) is a chromatin-associated protein implicated in leukemia and HIV type 1 infection. LEDGF associates with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins and menin and is required for leukemic transformation. To better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the LEDGF integrase-binding domain (IBD) interaction with MLL fusion proteins in leukemia, we determined the solution structure of the MLL-IBD complex. We found a novel MLL motif, integrase domain binding motif 2 (IBM2), which binds to a well-defined site on IBD. Point mutations within IBM2 abolished leukemogenic transformation by MLL-AF9, validating that this newly identified motif is essential for the oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins. Interestingly, the IBM2 binding site on IBD overlaps with the binding site for the HIV integrase (IN), and IN was capable of efficiently sequestering IBD from the menin-MLL complex. A short IBM2 peptide binds to IBD directly and inhibits both the IBD-MLL/menin and IBD-IN interactions. Our findings show that the same site on IBD is involved in binding to MLL and HIV-IN, revealing an attractive approach to simultaneously target LEDGF in leukemia and HIV. PMID:25305204

  17. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Efficient Gene Transfer to Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells with Minimal Genotoxic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Helen E.; Nowrouzi, Ali; Fronza, Raffaele; McDonald, Robert A.; Kane, Nicole M.; Alba, Raul; Delles, Christian; Sessa, William C.; Schmidt, Manfred; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that injury-induced neointima formation was rescued by adenoviral-Nogo-B gene delivery. Integrase-competent lentiviral vectors (ICLV) are efficient at gene delivery to vascular cells but present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. Conversely, integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLV) offer additional benefits through reduced mutagenesis risk, but this has not been evaluated in the context of vascular gene transfer. Here, we have investigated the performance and genetic safety of both counterparts in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and compared gene transfer efficiency and assessed the genotoxic potential of ICLVs and IDLVs based on their integration frequency and insertional profile in the human genome. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mediated by IDLVs (IDLV-eGFP) demonstrated efficient transgene expression in VSMCs. IDLV gene transfer of Nogo-B mediated efficient overexpression of Nogo-B in VSMCs, leading to phenotypic effects on VSMC migration and proliferation, similar to its ICLV version and unlike its eGFP control and uninfected VSMCs. Large-scale integration site analyses in VSMCs indicated that IDLV-mediated gene transfer gave rise to a very low frequency of genomic integration compared to ICLVs, revealing a close-to-random genomic distribution in VSMCs. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of IDLVs for safe and efficient vascular gene transfer. PMID:22931362

  18. [Progress of φC31 integrase system in site-specific integration].

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing-Wen

    2011-06-01

    Integrase of phage fC31 catalyses the homologous recombination between Streptomyces attachment site attB and the phage attachment site attP. Meanwhile, this integrase can mediate integration of attB-containing donor plasmids into the pseudo attP sites in eukaryotic genomes by a site-specific manner and resulting long-term and robust expression of integrated genes. Nowadays, fC31 integrase system is becoming a potential tool for genome modification, gene therapy and transgenic research. Recent progress of fC31 integrase system in integration mode in mammalian genomes, efficiency improvement and researches concerned on transgenic safety were summarized in this review.

  19. Computer tools in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design (CADD) methodologies have made great advances and contributed significantly to the discovery and/or optimization of many clinically used drugs in recent years. CADD tools have likewise been applied to the discovery of inhibitors of HIV-I integrase, a difficult and worthwhile target for the development of efficient anti-HIV drugs. This article reviews the application of CADD tools, including pharmacophore search, quantitative structure–activity relationships, model building of integrase complexed with viral DNA and quantum-chemical studies in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors. Different structurally diverse integrase inhibitors have been identified by, or with significant help from, various CADD tools. PMID:21426160

  20. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification.

  1. Revealing of photon-number splitting attack on quantum key distribution system by photon-number resolving devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidash, A. A.; Egorov, V. I.; Gleim, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum cryptography allows distributing secure keys between two users so that any performed eavesdropping attempt would be immediately discovered. However, in practice an eavesdropper can obtain key information from multi-photon states when attenuated laser radiation is used as a source of quantum states. In order to prevent actions of an eavesdropper, it is generally suggested to implement special cryptographic protocols, like decoy states or SARG04. In this paper, we describe an alternative method based on monitoring photon number statistics after detection. We provide a useful rule of thumb to estimate approximate order of difference of expected distribution and distribution in case of attack. Formula for calculating a minimum value of total pulses or time-gaps to resolve attack is shown. Also formulas for actual fraction of raw key known to Eve were derived. This method can therefore be used with any system and even combining with mentioned special protocols.

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF Site of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase Identified by Fragment Screening and Structure Based Design

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S.; Rhodes, David I.; Vandegraaff, Nick; Le, Giang; Smith, Jessica A.; Clark, Lisa J.; Jones, Eric D.; Coates, Jonathan A. V.; Thienthong, Neeranat; Newman, Janet; Dolezal, Olan; Mulder, Roger; Ryan, John H.; Savage, G. Paul; Francis, Craig L.; Deadman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme. PMID:22808106

  3. Correlation of Recombinant Integrase Activity and Functional Preintegration Complex Formation during Acute Infection by Replication-Defective Integrase Mutant Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies characterized two types of replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase mutants: class I, which are specifically blocked at the integration step, and class II, which harbor additional virion production and/or reverse transcription defects. Class I mutant enzymes supported little if any metal ion-dependent 3′-processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro, whereas class II enzymes displayed partial or full catalytic function in studies with simplified assay designs, suggesting that defective interaction(s) with heterologous integrase binding proteins might underlie the class II mutant viral phenotype. To address this hypothesis, class I and II mutant enzymes were interrogated under expanded sets of in vitro conditions. The majority failed to catalyze the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA, highlighting defective integrase function as the root cause of most class II in addition to all class I mutant virus infection defects. One mutant protein, K264E, in contrast, could support the wild-type level of concerted integration activity. After accounting for its inherent reverse transcription defect, HIV-1K264E moreover formed preintegration complexes that supported the efficient integration of endogenous viral DNA in vitro and normal levels and sequences of 2-long terminal repeat-containing circle junctions during acute infection. K264E integrase furthermore efficiently interacted in vitro with two heterologous binding partners, LEDGF/p75 and reverse transcriptase. Our results underscore the physiological relevance of concerted integration assays for tests of integrase mutant function and suggest that the K264E mutation disrupts an interaction with an intranuclear integrase binding partner that is important for HIV-1 integration. PMID:22278243

  4. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  5. Dynamic pharmacophore model optimization: identification of novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jinxia; Sanchez, Tino; Neamati, Nouri; Briggs, James M

    2006-03-01

    We extended the previously described dynamic pharmacophore model studies of HIV-1 integrase (IN) by considering more key residues in the active site, including Mg2+. First, we applied a Monte Carlo sampling method to map the complementary features of the IN binding surface. Two types of dynamic pharmacophore models were generated. One considers Mg2+ as part of the IN and therefore as an excluded volume, and the other treats Mg2+ as a positively charged feature, representing a new type of pharmacophore model aimed to identify compounds potentially preventing Mg2+ binding. Second, we validated the models with 385 known active (IC50 < 20 microM) and 235 (IC50 > 100 microM) inactive IN inhibitors. Third, we used the derived models to screen our small molecule database. Twenty-two structurally novel compounds were tested in an in vitro assay specific for IN, and two of them showed IC50 < or = 10 microM for strand transfer reaction.

  6. Diketoacid – Genre HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Containing Enantiomeric Arylamide Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    Using our recently disclosed 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-one and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione integrase inhibitors, we report differential effects on inhibitory potency induced by introduction of an α-chiral center into a key aryl substitutent. We show that introduction of the chiral center is uniformly deleterious to binding, with the (R)-enantiomer being more deleterious than the (S)-enantiomer. A greater enantiomeric difference in potency is shown by inhibitors that have restricted rotation of the aryl ring, with the larger difference being due to poorer potency of the (R)-enantiomer rather than higher potency of the (S)-enantiomer. The potency difference for enantiomers based on the isoindoline-1,3-dione ring system is less than for those derived from the isoindol-1-one ring system. Our findings provide useful information that should aid in understanding molecular binding interactions of DKA – derived IN inhibitors. PMID:19527935

  7. Binding mode prediction of biologically active compounds from plant Salvia Miltiorrhiza as integrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Lugsanangarm, Kiattisak; Kokpol, Sirirat; Abd-Elazem, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN), an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication, has been targeted in antiretroviral drug therapy. The emergence of HIV-1 variants clinically resistant to antiretroviral agents has lead to the development of alternative IN inhibitors. In the present work, binding modes of a high potent IN inhibitor, M522 and M532, within the catalytic binding site of wild type (WT) IN were determined using molecular docking calculation. Both M522 and M532 displayed similar modes of binding within the IN putative binding pocket and exhibited favorable interactions with the catalytic Mg2+ ions, the nearby amino acids and viral DNA through metal-ligand chelation, hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions. Furthermore, the modes of action of these two compounds against the mutated Y212R, N224H and S217H PFV IN were also predicted. Although the replacement of amino acid could somehow disturb inhibitor binding mode, almost key interactions which detected in the WT complexes were fairly conserved. Detailed information could highlight the application of M522 and M532 as candidate IN inhibitors for drug development against drug resistant strains. PMID:23750093

  8. An integrase of endogenous retrovirus is involved in maternal mitochondrial DNA inheritance of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Omagari, Katsuhisa; Masuda, Jun-Ichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2008-02-01

    The mechanism of maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance in animals can be said to be the selective elimination of sperm mtDNA via the elimination factor of the egg and a sperm mitochondria-specific factor. In 2005, we clarified that t-tpis (Spag1 isoform 1) is a mitochondria-specific translocator and the sperm factor, and furthermore estimated that the elimination factors of the egg are the divalent cation-dependent endonuclease and s-tpis (Spag1 isoform 2 and isoform 3) as the elimination system-specific chaperone [K. Hayashida, K. Omagari, J. Masuda, H. Hazama, Y. Kadokawa, K. Ohba, S. Kohno, The sperm mitochondria-specific translocator has a key role in maternal mitochondrial inheritance, Cell Biol. Int. 29 (2005) 472-481]. This time, using a recombinant Spag1 isoform 1 protein, a pull-down assay of ovary cytosol was performed and the elimination factors searched for. Surprisingly, an endogenous retroviral integrase fragment (Eri15) was identified using mass spectrometry of the electrophoresis band of the pull-down protein. Eri15 was detected as a complex of approximately 500kDa with Spag1 isoform 2 or isoform 3 in native PAGE of the ovary cytosol. This strongly suggested that Eri15 is selectively transported into the sperm mitochondria matrix by Spag1 isoform 2 and 3 via Spag1 isoform 1 and that sperm mtDNA is destroyed, thus causing the establishment of maternal mtDNA inheritance.

  9. Biochemical and virological analysis of the 18-residue C-terminal tail of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohd J; Monel, Blandine; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Helland, Dag E; Engelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background The 18 residue tail abutting the SH3 fold that comprises the heart of the C-terminal domain is the only part of HIV-1 integrase yet to be visualized by structural biology. To ascertain the role of the tail region in integrase function and HIV-1 replication, a set of deletion mutants that successively lacked three amino acids was constructed and analyzed in a variety of biochemical and virus infection assays. HIV-1/2 chimers, which harbored the analogous 23-mer HIV-2 tail in place of the HIV-1 sequence, were also studied. Because integrase mutations can affect steps in the replication cycle other than integration, defective mutant viruses were tested for integrase protein content and reverse transcription in addition to integration. The F185K core domain mutation, which increases integrase protein solubility, was furthermore analyzed in a subset of mutants. Results Purified proteins were assessed for in vitro levels of 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities whereas HIV-1 infectivity was measured using luciferase reporter viruses. Deletions lacking up to 9 amino acids (1-285, 1-282, and 1-279) displayed near wild-type activities in vitro and during infection. Further deletion yielded two viruses, HIV-11-276 and HIV-11-273, that displayed approximately two and 5-fold infectivity defects, respectively, due to reduced integrase function. Deletion mutant HIV-11-270 and the HIV-1/2 chimera were non-infectious and displayed approximately 3 to 4-fold reverse transcription in addition to severe integration defects. Removal of four additional residues, which encompassed the C-terminal β strand of the SH3 fold, further compromised integrase incorporation into virions and reverse transcription. Conclusion HIV-11-270, HIV-11-266, and the HIV-1/2 chimera were typed as class II mutant viruses due to their pleiotropic replication defects. We speculate that residues 271-273 might play a role in mediating the known integrase-reverse transcriptase interaction, as

  10. Production of transgenic cattle highly expressing human serum albumin in milk by phiC31 integrase-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Lan, Hui; Shao, Minghao; Yu, Yuan; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic cattle expressing high levels of recombinant human serum albumin (HSA) in their milk may as an alternative source for commercial production. Our objective was to produce transgenic cattle highly expressing HSA in milk by using phiC31 integrase system and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The mammary-specific expression plasmid pIACH(-), containing the attB recognition site for phiC31 integrase, were co-transfected with integrase expression plasmid pCMVInt into bovine fetal fibroblast cells (BFFs). PhiC31 integrase-mediated integrations in genome of BFFs were screened by nested inverse PCR. After analysis of sequence of the PCR products, 46.0% (23/50) of the both attB-genome junction sites (attL and attR) were confirmed, and four pseudo attP sites were identified. The integration rates in BF3, BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were 4.0% (2/50), 6.0% (3/50), 16.0% (8/50) and 20.0% (10/50), respectively. BF3 is located in the bovine chromosome 3 collagen alpha-3 (VI) chain isomer 2 gene, while the other three sites are located in the non-coding region. The transgenic cell lines from BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were used as donors for SCNT. Two calves from transgenic cells BF19 were born, one died within a few hours after birth, and another calf survived healthy. PCR and Southern blot analysis revealed integration of the transgene in the genome of cloned calves. The nested reverse PCR confirmed that the integration site in cloned calves was identical to the donor cells. The western blotting assessment indicated that recombinant HSA was expressed in the milk of transgenic cattle and the expression level was about 4-8 mg/mL. The present study demonstrated that phiC31 integrase system was an efficient and safety gene delivery tool for producing HSA transgenic cattle. The production of recombinant HSA in the milk of cattle may provide a large-scale and cost-effective resource.

  11. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A; van der Linden, Giel T J; Schaminée, Joop H J; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species.

  12. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Linden, Giel T. J.; Schaminée, Joop H. J.; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species. PMID:25422416

  13. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A; van der Linden, Giel T J; Schaminée, Joop H J; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species. PMID:25422416

  14. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  15. Evaluation of the functional involvement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase in nuclear import of viral cDNA during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tamako; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Zhou, Xin; Nara, Nobuo; Ohashi, Takashi; Kannagi, Mari; Masuda, Takao

    2004-11-01

    Nuclear import of viral cDNA is a critical step for establishing the proviral state of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The contribution of HIV-1 integrase (IN) to the nuclear import of viral cDNA is controversial, partly due to a lack of identification of its bona fide nuclear localization signal. In this study, to address this putative function of HIV-1 IN, the effects of mutations at key residues for viral cDNA recognition (PYNP at positions 142 to 145, K156, K159, and K160) were evaluated in the context of viral replication. During acute infection, some mutations (N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA) severely reduced viral gene expression to less than 1% the wild-type (WT) level. None of the mutations affected the synthesis of viral cDNA. Meanwhile, the levels of integrated viral cDNA produced by N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutants were severely reduced to less than 1% the WT level. Quantitative PCR analysis of viral cDNA in nuclei and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that these mutations significantly reduced the level of viral cDNA accumulation in nuclei. Further analysis revealed that IN proteins carrying the N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutations showed severely reduced binding to viral cDNA but kept their karyophilic properties. Taken together, these results indicate that mutations that reduced the binding of IN to viral cDNA resulted in severe impairment of virus infectivity, most likely by affecting the nuclear import of viral cDNA that proceeds integration. These results suggest that HIV-1 IN may be one of the critical constituents for the efficient nuclear import of viral cDNA.

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts Reveals a Disease Extracellular Matrix Signature and Key Molecular Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Maria Angels; Jou, Cristina; Puigdelloses, Montserrat; Ortez, Carlos I.; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduardo; Colomer, Jaume; Nascimento, Andrés; Kalko, Susana G.; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background Collagen VI related myopathies encompass a range of phenotypes with involvement of skeletal muscle, skin and other connective tissues. They represent a severe and relatively common form of congenital disease for which there is no treatment. Collagen VI in skeletal muscle and skin is produced by fibroblasts. Aims & Methods In order to gain insight into the consequences of collagen VI mutations and identify key disease pathways we performed global gene expression analysis of dermal fibroblasts from patients with Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with and without vitamin C treatment. The expression data were integrated using a range of systems biology tools. Results were validated by real-time PCR, western blotting and functional assays. Findings We found significant changes in the expression levels of almost 600 genes between collagen VI deficient and control fibroblasts. Highly regulated genes included extracellular matrix components and surface receptors, including integrins, indicating a shift in the interaction between the cell and its environment. This was accompanied by a significant increase in fibroblasts adhesion to laminin. The observed changes in gene expression profiling may be under the control of two miRNAs, miR-30c and miR-181a, which we found elevated in tissue and serum from patients and which could represent novel biomarkers for muscular dystrophy. Finally, the response to vitamin C of collagen VI mutated fibroblasts significantly differed from healthy fibroblasts. Vitamin C treatment was able to revert the expression of some key genes to levels found in control cells raising the possibility of a beneficial effect of vitamin C as a modulator of some of the pathological aspects of collagen VI related diseases. PMID:26670220

  17. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Kuei -Han; Liao, Ben -Yang; Chang, Hao -Wei; Huang, Shiao -Wei; Chang, Ting -Yan; Yang, Cheng -Yu; Wang, Yu -Bin; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk; Wu, Yu -Wei; Tang, Sen -Lin; et al

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted othermore » carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.« less

  18. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kuei -Han; Liao, Ben -Yang; Chang, Hao -Wei; Huang, Shiao -Wei; Chang, Ting -Yan; Yang, Cheng -Yu; Wang, Yu -Bin; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk; Wu, Yu -Wei; Tang, Sen -Lin; Yu, Hon -Tsen

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted other carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.

  19. Differential proteomic analysis of midguts from Nosema ceranae-infected honeybees reveals manipulation of key host functions.

    PubMed

    Vidau, Cyril; Panek, Johan; Texier, Catherine; Biron, David G; Belzunces, Luc P; Le Gall, Morgane; Broussard, Cédric; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2014-09-01

    Many invasive pathogens effectively bypass the insect defenses to ensure the completion of their life cycle. Among those, an invasive microsporidian species, Nosema ceranae, can cause nosemosis in honeybees. N. ceranae was first described in the Asian honeybee Apis cerana and is suspected to be involved in Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) declines worldwide. The midgut of honeybees is the first barrier against N. ceranae attacks. To bring proteomics data on honeybee/N. ceranae crosstalk and more precisely to decipher the worker honeybee midgut response after an oral inoculation of N. ceranae (10days post-infection), we used 2D-DIGE (2-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis) combined with mass spectrometry. Forty-five protein spots produced by the infected worker honeybee group were shown to be differentially expressed when compared to the uninfected group; 14 were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. N. ceranae mainly caused a modulation of proteins involved in three key host biological functions: (i) energy production, (ii) innate immunity (reactive oxygen stress) and (iii) protein regulation. The modulation of these host biological functions suggests that N. ceranae creates a zone of "metabolic habitat modification" in the honeybee midgut favoring its development by enhancing availability of nutrients and reducing the worker honeybee defense.

  20. Abnormal gene expression profile reveals the common key signatures associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H J; Sun, Z Q; Qian, W Q; Sheng, L

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the common gene signatures of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), and to expand the respective protein-protein interaction networks associated with CCRCC regulation. For the latter, we utilized multiple gene expression data sets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with which we could analyze the aberrant gene expression patterns at the transcriptome level that distinguish cancer from normal samples. We obtained the GSE781 and GSE6344 clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression datasets from GEO, which contained a total of 37 cancer and 37 normal samples. Subsequent R language analysis allowed identification of the differentially expressed genes. The genes that exhibited significant up or downregulation in cancers were entered into the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery to perform analysis of gene functional annotations, resulting in the generation of two protein-protein interaction networks that included the most significantly up or downregulated genes in CCRCC. These allowed us to identify the key factor genes, which could potentially be utilized to separate cancer versus normal samples. The differentially regulated genes are also highly likely to be functionally important regulatory factors in renal cell carcinoma: cell functions showing enrichment of these genes include amine biosynthetic and vitamin metabolic processes, ion binding, extracellular transport function, and regulation of biosynthesis. Together, the results from our study offer further reason to pursue diagnosis and therapy of CCRCC at the molecular level. PMID:25867368

  1. Direct versus limited-step reconstitution reveals key features of an RNA hairpin-stabilized paused transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, Scotty; Ha, Kook Sun; Landick, Robert; Palangat, Murali

    2007-06-29

    We have identified minimal nucleic acid scaffolds capable of reconstituting hairpin-stabilized paused transcription complexes when incubated with RNAP either directly or in a limited step reconstitution assay. Direct reconstitution was achieved using a 29-nucleotide (nt) RNA whose 3'-proximal 9-10 nt pair to template DNA within an 11-nt noncomplementary bubble of a 39-bp duplex DNA; the 5'-proximal 18 nt of RNA forms the his pause RNA hairpin. Limited-step reconstitution was achieved on the same DNAs using a 27-nt RNA that can be 3'-labeled during reconstitution and then extended 2 nt past the pause site to assay transcriptional pausing. Paused complexes formed by either method recapitulated key features of a promoter-initiated, hairpin-stabilized paused complex, including a slow rate of pause escape, resistance to transcript cleavage and pyrophosphorolysis, and enhancement of pausing by the elongation factor NusA. These findings establish that RNA upstream from the pause hairpin and pyrophosphate are not essential for pausing and for NusA action. Reconstitution of the his paused transcription complex provides a valuable tool for future studies of protein-nucleic interactions involved in transcriptional pausing. PMID:17502377

  2. The Proteomic Landscape of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Clock Reveals Large-Scale Coordination of Key Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Mehta, Neel; Patel, Abhilasha; Zhang, Peng; Ning, Zhibin; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) acts as the central clock to coordinate circadian oscillations in mammalian behavior, physiology and gene expression. Despite our knowledge of the circadian transcriptome of the SCN, how it impacts genome-wide protein expression is not well understood. Here, we interrogated the murine SCN proteome across the circadian cycle using SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry. Of the 2112 proteins that were accurately quantified, 20% (421 proteins) displayed a time-of-day-dependent expression profile. Within this time-of-day proteome, 11% (48 proteins) were further defined as circadian based on a sinusoidal expression pattern with a ∼24 h period. Nine circadianly expressed proteins exhibited 24 h rhythms at the transcript level, with an average time lag that exceeded 8 h. A substantial proportion of the time-of-day proteome exhibited abrupt fluctuations at the anticipated light-to-dark and dark-to-light transitions, and was enriched for proteins involved in several key biological pathways, most notably, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Additionally, predicted targets of miR-133ab were enriched in specific hierarchical clusters and were inversely correlated with miR133ab expression in the SCN. These insights into the proteomic landscape of the SCN will facilitate a more integrative understanding of cellular control within the SCN clock. PMID:25330117

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Wilms’ Tumor 1-Controlled Gene Expression in Podocytes Reveals Key Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Martin; Ettou, Sandrine; Jung, Youngsook L.; Lenz, Maximilian O.; Taglienti, Mary E.; Park, Peter J.; Schermer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms’ tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) is key to podocyte development and viability; however, WT1 transcriptional networks in podocytes remain elusive. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the genome-wide WT1 transcriptional network in podocytes in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIPseq) and RNA sequencing techniques. Our data show a specific role for WT1 in regulating the podocyte-specific transcriptome through binding to both promoters and enhancers of target genes. Furthermore, we inferred a podocyte transcription factor network consisting of WT1, LMX1B, TCF21, Fox-class and TEAD family transcription factors, and MAFB that uses tissue-specific enhancers to control podocyte gene expression. In addition to previously described WT1-dependent target genes, ChIPseq identified novel WT1-dependent signaling systems. These targets included components of the Hippo signaling system, underscoring the power of genome-wide transcriptional-network analyses. Together, our data elucidate a comprehensive gene regulatory network in podocytes suggesting that WT1 gene regulatory function and podocyte cell-type specification can best be understood in the context of transcription factor-regulatory element network interplay. PMID:25636411

  4. The genetic potential for key biogeochemical processes in Arctic frost flowers and young sea ice revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jeff S; Berthiaume, Chris T; Armbrust, E Virginia; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Newly formed sea ice is a vast and biogeochemically active environment. Recently, we reported an unusual microbial community dominated by members of the Rhizobiales in frost flowers at the surface of Arctic young sea ice based on the presence of 16S gene sequences related to these strains. Here, we use metagenomic analysis of two samples, from a field of frost flowers and the underlying young sea ice, to explore the metabolic potential of this surface ice community. The analysis links genes for key biogeochemical processes to the Rhizobiales, including dimethylsulfide uptake, betaine glycine turnover, and halocarbon production. Nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes characteristic of terrestrial root-nodulating Rhizobiales were generally lacking from these metagenomes. Non-Rhizobiales clades at the ice surface had genes that would enable additional biogeochemical processes, including mercury reduction and dimethylsulfoniopropionate catabolism. Although the ultimate source of the observed microbial community is not known, considerations of the possible role of eolian deposition or transport with particles entrained during ice formation favor a suspended particle source for this microbial community.

  5. Conditional independence mapping of DIGE data reveals PDIA3 protein species as key nodes associated with muscle aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kenyani, Jenna; Gray, Donna; Guadagnin, Eleonora; Jarman, Ian H.; Cobley, James N.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Lisboa, Paulo J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Profiling of protein species is important because gene polymorphisms, splice variations and post-translational modifications may combine and give rise to multiple protein species that have different effects on cellular function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is one of the most robust methods for differential analysis of protein species, but bioinformatic interrogation is challenging because the consequences of changes in the abundance of individual protein species on cell function are unknown and cannot be predicted. We conducted DIGE of soleus muscle from male and female rats artificially selected as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively). In total 696 protein species were resolved and LC–MS/MS identified proteins in 337 spots. Forty protein species were differentially (P < 0.05, FDR < 10%) expressed between HCR and LCR and conditional independence mapping found distinct networks within these data, which brought insight beyond that achieved by functional annotation. Protein disulphide isomerase A3 emerged as a key node segregating with differences in aerobic capacity and unsupervised bibliometric analysis highlighted further links to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which were confirmed by western blotting. Thus, conditional independence mapping is a useful technique for interrogating DIGE data that is capable of highlighting latent features. PMID:24769234

  6. Integration and excision by the large serine recombinase phiRv1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Lori A; Hancox, Maria I; Hatfull, Graham F

    2005-03-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis prophage-like element phiRv1 encodes a site-specific recombination system utilizing an integrase of the serine recombinase family. Recombination occurs between a putative attP site and the host chromosome, but is unusual in that the attB site lies within a redundant repetitive element (REP13E12) of which there are seven copies in the M. tuberculosis genome; four of these elements contain attB sites suitable for phiRv1 integration in vivo. Although the mechanism of directional control of large serine integrases is poorly understood, a recombination directionality factor (RDF) has been identified that is required for phiRv1 integrase-mediated excisive recombination in vivo. Here we describe defined in vitro recombination reactions for both phiRv1 integrase-mediated integration and excision and show that the phiRv1 RDF is not only required for excision but inhibits integrative recombination; neither reaction requires DNA supercoiling, host factors, or high-energy cofactors. Integration, excision and excise-mediated inhibition of integration require simple substrates sites, indicating that the control of directionality does not involve the manipulation of higher-order protein-DNA architectures as described for the tyrosine integrases.

  7. Transcription profile of soybean-root-knot nematode interaction reveals a key role of phythormones in the resistance reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root-knot nematodes (RKN– Meloidogyne genus) present extensive challenges to soybean crop. The soybean line (PI 595099) is known to be resistant against specific strains and races of nematode species, thus its differential gene expression analysis can lead to a comprehensive gene expression profiling in the incompatible soybean-RKN interaction. Even though many disease resistance genes have been studied, little has been reported about phytohormone crosstalk on modulation of ROS signaling during soybean-RKN interaction. Results Using 454 technology to explore the common aspects of resistance reaction during both parasitism and resistance phases it was verified that hormone, carbohydrate metabolism and stress related genes were consistently expressed at high levels in infected roots as compared to mock control. Most noteworthy genes include those encoding glycosyltransferases, peroxidases, auxin-responsive proteins and gibberellin-regulated genes. Our data analysis suggests the key role of glycosyltransferases, auxins and components of gibberellin signal transduction, biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in the resistance reaction and their participation in jasmonate signaling and redox homeostasis in mediating aspects of plant growth and responses to biotic stress. Conclusions Based on this study we suggest a reasonable model regarding to the complex mechanisms of crosstalk between plant hormones, mainly gibberellins and auxins, which can be crucial to modulate the levels of ROS in the resistance reaction to nematode invasion. The model also includes recent findings concerning to the participation of DELLA-like proteins and ROS signaling controlling plant immune or stress responses. Furthermore, this study provides a dataset of potential candidate genes involved in both nematode parasitism and resistance, which can be tested further for their role in this biological process using functional genomics approaches. PMID:23663436

  8. Quantitative Circadian Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Reveals Extensive Clock Control of Key Components in Physiological, Metabolic, and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mani Kant; Nomura, Yuko; Wang, Lei; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock provides adaptive advantages to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. The phosphorylation events that regulate circadian-dependent signaling and the processes which post-translationally respond to clock-gated signals are largely unknown. To better elucidate post-translational events tied to the circadian system we carried out a survey of circadian-regulated protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis seedlings. A large-scale mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach employing TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment techniques identified and quantified 1586 phosphopeptides on 1080 protein groups. A total of 102 phosphopeptides displayed significant changes in abundance, enabling the identification of specific patterns of response to circadian rhythms. Our approach was sensitive enough to quantitate oscillations in the phosphorylation of low abundance clock proteins (early flowering4; ELF4 and pseudoresponse regulator3; PRR3) as well as other transcription factors and kinases. During constant light, extensive cyclic changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators, implicating direct or indirect regulation by the circadian system. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, stress and phytohormones-mediated responses. We validated our analysis using the elf4-211 allele, in which an S45L transition removes the phosphorylation herein identified. We show that removal of this phosphorylatable site diminishes interaction with early flowering3 (ELF3), a key partner in a tripartite evening complex required for circadian cycling. elf4-211 lengthens period, which increases with increasing temperature, relative to the wild type, resulting in a more stable temperature compensation of circadian period over a wider temperature range.

  9. Quantitative Circadian Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Reveals Extensive Clock Control of Key Components in Physiological, Metabolic, and Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani Kant; Nomura, Yuko; Wang, Lei; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock provides adaptive advantages to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. The phosphorylation events that regulate circadian-dependent signaling and the processes which post-translationally respond to clock-gated signals are largely unknown. To better elucidate post-translational events tied to the circadian system we carried out a survey of circadian-regulated protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis seedlings. A large-scale mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach employing TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment techniques identified and quantified 1586 phosphopeptides on 1080 protein groups. A total of 102 phosphopeptides displayed significant changes in abundance, enabling the identification of specific patterns of response to circadian rhythms. Our approach was sensitive enough to quantitate oscillations in the phosphorylation of low abundance clock proteins (EARLY FLOWERING4; ELF4 and PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR3; PRR3) as well as other transcription factors and kinases. During constant light, extensive cyclic changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators, implicating direct or indirect regulation by the circadian system. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, stress and phytohormones-mediated responses. We validated our analysis using the elf4–211 allele, in which an S45L transition removes the phosphorylation herein identified. We show that removal of this phosphorylatable site diminishes interaction with EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3), a key partner in a tripartite evening complex required for circadian cycling. elf4–211 lengthens period, which increases with increasing temperature, relative to the wild type, resulting in a more stable temperature compensation of circadian period over a wider temperature range. PMID:26091701

  10. Transient gene expression mediated by integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seung Shin; Dan, Kazuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Chatani, Emi; Mineno, Junichi; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2008-04-18

    Nonintegrating retroviral vectors were produced from a Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vector system by introducing a point mutation into the integrase (IN) gene of the packaging plasmid. The efficacy of IN-defective retroviral vectors was measured through the transient expression of ZsGreen or luciferase in human cell lines. The IN-defective retroviral vectors could transduce target cells efficiently, but their gene expression was transient and lower than that seen with the integrating vectors. IN-defective retroviral vector gene expression decreased to background levels in fewer than 10 days. Southern blot analysis of transduced K562 cells confirmed the loss of a detectable vector sequence by 15 days. The residual integration activity of the IN-defective vector was 1000- to 10,000-fold lower than that of the integrating vector. These results demonstrate that the IN-defective retroviral vectors can provide a useful tool for efficient transient gene expression targeting of primary hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid cells.

  11. Phage-encoded Serine Integrases and Other Large Serine Recombinases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-08-01

    The large serine recombinases (LSRs) are a family of enzymes, encoded in temperate phage genomes or on mobile elements, that precisely cut and recombine DNA in a highly controllable and predictable way. In phage integration, the LSRs act at specific sites, the attP site in the phage and the attB site in the host chromosome, where cleavage and strand exchange leads to the integrated prophage flanked by the recombinant sites attL and attR. The prophage can excise by recombination between attL and attR but this requires a phage-encoded accessory protein, the recombination directionality factor (RDF). Although the LSRs can bind specifically to all the recombination sites, only specific integrase-bound sites can pair in a synaptic complex prior to strand exchange. Recent structural information has led to a breakthrough in our understanding of the mechanism of the LSRs, notably how the LSRs bind to their substrates and how LSRs display this site-selectivity. We also understand that the RDFs exercise control over the LSRs by protein-protein interactions. Other recent work with the LSRs have contributed to our understanding of how all serine recombinases undergo strand exchange subunit rotation, facilitated by surfaces that resemble a molecular bearing.

  12. Zinc folds the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase, promotes multimerization, and enhances catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ronglan; Jenkins, Timothy M.; Craigie, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase contains a pair of His and Cys residues (the HHCC motif) that are conserved among retroviral integrases. Although His and Cys residues are often involved in binding zinc, the HHCC motif does not correspond to any recognized class of zinc binding domain. We have investigated the binding of zinc to HIV-1 integrase protein and find that it binds zinc with a stoichiometry of one zinc per integrase monomer. Analysis of zinc binding to deletion derivatives of integrase locates the binding site to the N-terminal domain. Integrase with a mutation in the HHCC motif does not bind zinc, consistent with coordination of zinc by these residues. The isolated N-terminal domain is disordered in the absence of zinc but, in the presence of zinc, it adopts a secondary structure with a high alpha helical content. Integrase bound by zinc tetramerizes more readily than the apoenzyme and is also more active than the apoenzyme in in vitro integration assays. We conclude that binding of zinc to the HHCC motif stabilizes the folded state of the N-terminal domain of integrase and bound zinc is required for optimal enzymatic activity. PMID:8942990

  13. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of l-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Zhu, Yan-Ying; Su, Ji-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis l-alanine dehydrogenase (l-MtAlaDH) plays an important role in catalyzing l-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of l-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and the anisotropy network model (ANM). The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding domain (NBD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of l-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of l-MtAlaDH. PMID:26690143

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Sexually Dimorphic Chinese White Wax Scale Insects Reveals Key Differences in Developmental Programs and Transcription Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pu; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Wei-Wei; Feng, Ying; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, represents one of the most dramatic examples of sexual dimorphism in any insect species. In this study, we showed that although E. pela males display complete metamorphosis similar to holometabolous insects, the species forms the sister group to Acyrthosiphon pisum and cluster with hemimetabolous insects. The gene expression profile and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses revealed that the two sexes engaged in distinct developmental programs. In particular, female development appeared to prioritize the expression of genes related to cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and to anatomical structure formation in nymphs. By contrast, male nymphal development is characterized by the significant down-regulation of genes involved in chitin, the respiratory system, and neurons. The wing and appendage morphogenesis, anatomical and tissue structure morphogenesis programs activated after male nymphal development. Transcription factors (that convey juvenile hormone or ecdysone signals, and Hox genes) and DNA methyltransferase were also differentially expressed between females and males. These results may indicate the roles that these differentially expressed genes play in regulating sexual dimorphism through orchestrating complex genetic programs. This differential expression was particularly prominent for processes linked to female development and wing development in males. PMID:25634031

  15. Genome-wide Functional Analysis of Plasmodium Protein Phosphatases Reveals Key Regulators of Parasite Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Guttery, David S.; Poulin, Benoit; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Wall, Richard J.; Ferguson, David J.P.; Brady, Declan; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Whipple, Sarah; Straschil, Ursula; Wright, Megan H.; Mohamed, Alyaa M.A.H.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Arold, Stefan T.; Tate, Edward W.; Holder, Anthony A.; Wickstead, Bill; Pain, Arnab; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible protein phosphorylation regulated by kinases and phosphatases controls many cellular processes. Although essential functions for the malaria parasite kinome have been reported, the roles of most protein phosphatases (PPs) during Plasmodium development are unknown. We report a functional analysis of the Plasmodium berghei protein phosphatome, which exhibits high conservation with the P. falciparum phosphatome and comprises 30 predicted PPs with differential and distinct expression patterns during various stages of the life cycle. Gene disruption analysis of P. berghei PPs reveals that half of the genes are likely essential for asexual blood stage development, whereas six are required for sexual development/sporogony in mosquitoes. Phenotypic screening coupled with transcriptome sequencing unveiled morphological changes and altered gene expression in deletion mutants of two N-myristoylated PPs. These findings provide systematic functional analyses of PPs in Plasmodium, identify how phosphatases regulate parasite development and differentiation, and can inform the identification of drug targets for malaria. PMID:25011111

  16. Transcriptome analysis of sexually dimorphic Chinese white wax scale insects reveals key differences in developmental programs and transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pu; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Wei-Wei; Feng, Ying; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-30

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, represents one of the most dramatic examples of sexual dimorphism in any insect species. In this study, we showed that although E. pela males display complete metamorphosis similar to holometabolous insects, the species forms the sister group to Acyrthosiphon pisum and cluster with hemimetabolous insects. The gene expression profile and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses revealed that the two sexes engaged in distinct developmental programs. In particular, female development appeared to prioritize the expression of genes related to cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and to anatomical structure formation in nymphs. By contrast, male nymphal development is characterized by the significant down-regulation of genes involved in chitin, the respiratory system, and neurons. The wing and appendage morphogenesis, anatomical and tissue structure morphogenesis programs activated after male nymphal development. Transcription factors (that convey juvenile hormone or ecdysone signals, and Hox genes) and DNA methyltransferase were also differentially expressed between females and males. These results may indicate the roles that these differentially expressed genes play in regulating sexual dimorphism through orchestrating complex genetic programs. This differential expression was particularly prominent for processes linked to female development and wing development in males.

  17. Key metabolic pathways involved in xenobiotic biotransformation and stress responses revealed by transcriptomics of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea brasiliana.

    PubMed

    Lüchmann, Karim H; Clark, Melody S; Bainy, Afonso C D; Gilbert, Jack A; Craft, John A; Chipman, J Kevin; Thorne, Michael A S; Mattos, Jacó J; Siebert, Marília N; Schroeder, Declan C

    2015-09-01

    The Brazilian oyster Crassostrea brasiliana was challenged to three common environmental contaminants: phenanthrene, diesel fuel water-accommodated fraction (WAF) and domestic sewage. Total RNA was extracted from the gill and digestive gland, and cDNA libraries were sequenced using the 454 FLX platform. The assembled transcriptome resulted in ̃20,000 contigs, which were annotated to produce the first de novo transcriptome for C. brasiliana. Sequences were screened to identify genes potentially involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and associated antioxidant defence mechanisms. These gene families included those of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450), 70kDa heat shock, antioxidants, such as glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and also multi-drug resistance proteins. Analysis showed that the massive expansion of the CYP450 and HSP70 family due to gene duplication identified in the Crassostrea gigas genome also occurred in C. brasiliana, suggesting these processes form the base of the Crassostrea lineage. Preliminary expression analyses revealed several candidates biomarker genes that were up-regulated during each of the three treatments, suggesting the potential for environmental monitoring. PMID:26186662

  18. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Fetal Skin Reveals Key Genes Related to Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in Cashmere Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hailong; Zeng, Jie; Ma, Sen; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Guangxian; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere goat skin contains two types of hair follicles (HF): primary hair follicles (PHF) and secondary hair follicles (SHF). Although multiple genetic determinants associated with HF formation have been identified, the molecules that determine the independent morphogenesis of HF in cashmere goats remain elusive. The growth and development of SHF directly influence the quantity and quality of cashmere production. Here, we report the transcriptome profiling analysis of nine skin samples from cashmere goats using 60- and 120-day-old embryos (E60 and E120, respectively), as well as newborns (NB), through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). HF morphological changes indicated that PHF were initiated at E60, with maturation from E120, while differentiation of SHF was identified at E120 until formation of cashmere occurred after birth (NB). The RNA-sequencing analysis generated over 20.6 million clean reads from each mRNA library. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in E60 vs. E120, E120 vs. NB, and E60 vs. NB were 1,024, 0 and 1,801, respectively, indicating that no significant differences were found at transcriptomic levels between E120 and NB. Key genes including B4GALT4, TNC, a-integrin, and FGFR1, were up-regulated and expressed in HF initiation from E60 to E120, while regulatory genes such as GPRC5D, PAD3, HOXC13, PRR9, VSIG8, LRRC15, LHX2, MSX-2, and FOXN1 were up-regulated and expressed in HF keratinisation and hair shaft differentiation from E120 and NB to E60. Several genes belonging to the KRT and KRTAP gene families were detected throughout the three HF developmental stages. The transcriptional trajectory analyses of all DEGs indicated that immune privilege, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and growth factor receptors all played dominant roles in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface and HF formation. We found that the Wnt, transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch family members

  19. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Fetal Skin Reveals Key Genes Related to Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in Cashmere Goats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ye; Wang, Xiaolong; Yan, Hailong; Zeng, Jie; Ma, Sen; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Guangxian; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere goat skin contains two types of hair follicles (HF): primary hair follicles (PHF) and secondary hair follicles (SHF). Although multiple genetic determinants associated with HF formation have been identified, the molecules that determine the independent morphogenesis of HF in cashmere goats remain elusive. The growth and development of SHF directly influence the quantity and quality of cashmere production. Here, we report the transcriptome profiling analysis of nine skin samples from cashmere goats using 60- and 120-day-old embryos (E60 and E120, respectively), as well as newborns (NB), through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). HF morphological changes indicated that PHF were initiated at E60, with maturation from E120, while differentiation of SHF was identified at E120 until formation of cashmere occurred after birth (NB). The RNA-sequencing analysis generated over 20.6 million clean reads from each mRNA library. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in E60 vs. E120, E120 vs. NB, and E60 vs. NB were 1,024, 0 and 1,801, respectively, indicating that no significant differences were found at transcriptomic levels between E120 and NB. Key genes including B4GALT4, TNC, a-integrin, and FGFR1, were up-regulated and expressed in HF initiation from E60 to E120, while regulatory genes such as GPRC5D, PAD3, HOXC13, PRR9, VSIG8, LRRC15, LHX2, MSX-2, and FOXN1 were up-regulated and expressed in HF keratinisation and hair shaft differentiation from E120 and NB to E60. Several genes belonging to the KRT and KRTAP gene families were detected throughout the three HF developmental stages. The transcriptional trajectory analyses of all DEGs indicated that immune privilege, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and growth factor receptors all played dominant roles in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface and HF formation. We found that the Wnt, transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch family members

  20. Genomic and protein expression analysis reveals Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) as a key biomarker in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek MA; Russell, Roslin; Albarakati, Nada; Maloney, David J; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Rueda, Oscar M; Moseley, Paul; Mohan, Vivek; Sun, Hongmao; Abbotts, Rachel; Mukherjee, Abhik; Agarwal, Devika; Illuzzi, Jennifer L.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Wilson, David M; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    FEN1 has key roles in Okazaki fragment maturation during replication, long patch base excision repair, rescue of stalled replication forks, maintenance of telomere stability and apoptosis. FEN1 may be dysregulated in breast and ovarian cancers and have clinicopathological significance in patients. We comprehensively investigated FEN1 mRNA expression in multiple cohorts of breast cancer [training set (128), test set (249), external validation (1952)]. FEN1 protein expression was evaluated in 568 oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers, 894 ER positive breast cancers and 156 ovarian epithelial cancers. FEN1 mRNA overexpression was highly significantly associated with high grade (p=4.89 × 10−57), high mitotic index (p=5.25 × 10−28), pleomorphism (p=6.31 × 10−19), ER negative (p=9.02 × 10−35), PR negative (p=9.24 × 10−24), triple negative phenotype (p=6.67 × 10−21), PAM50.Her2 (p=5.19 × 10−13), PAM50.Basal (p=2.7 × 10−41), PAM50.LumB (p=1.56 × 10−26), integrative molecular cluster 1 (intClust.1) (p=7.47 × 10−12), intClust.5 (p=4.05 × 10−12) and intClust. 10 (p=7.59 × 10−38) breast cancers. FEN1 mRNA overexpression is associated with poor breast cancer specific survival in univariate (p= 4.4 × 10−16) and multivariate analysis (p= 9.19 × 10−7). At the protein level, in ER positive tumours, FEN1 overexpression remains significantly linked to high grade, high mitotic index and pleomorphism (ps<0.01). In ER negative tumours, high FEN1 is significantly associated with pleomorphism, tumour type, lymphovascular invasion, triple negative phenotype, EGFR and HER2 expression (ps<0.05). In ER positive as well as in ER negative tumours, FEN1 protein overexpression is associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis (ps<0.01). In ovarian epithelial cancers, similarly, FEN1 overexpression is associated with high grade, high stage and poor survival (ps<0.05). We conclude that FEN1 is a promising biomarker in breast

  1. Genomic and protein expression analysis reveals flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) as a key biomarker in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Russell, Roslin; Albarakati, Nada; Maloney, David J; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Rueda, Oscar M; Moseley, Paul; Mohan, Vivek; Sun, Hongmao; Abbotts, Rachel; Mukherjee, Abhik; Agarwal, Devika; Illuzzi, Jennifer L; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Wilson, David M; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-10-01

    FEN1 has key roles in Okazaki fragment maturation during replication, long patch base excision repair, rescue of stalled replication forks, maintenance of telomere stability and apoptosis. FEN1 may be dysregulated in breast and ovarian cancers and have clinicopathological significance in patients. We comprehensively investigated FEN1 mRNA expression in multiple cohorts of breast cancer [training set (128), test set (249), external validation (1952)]. FEN1 protein expression was evaluated in 568 oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers, 894 ER positive breast cancers and 156 ovarian epithelial cancers. FEN1 mRNA overexpression was highly significantly associated with high grade (p = 4.89 × 10(-57)), high mitotic index (p = 5.25 × 10(-28)), pleomorphism (p = 6.31 × 10(-19)), ER negative (p = 9.02 × 10(-35)), PR negative (p = 9.24 × 10(-24)), triple negative phenotype (p = 6.67 × 10(-21)), PAM50.Her2 (p = 5.19 × 10(-13)), PAM50. Basal (p = 2.7 × 10(-41)), PAM50.LumB (p = 1.56 × 10(-26)), integrative molecular cluster 1 (intClust.1) (p = 7.47 × 10(-12)), intClust.5 (p = 4.05 × 10(-12)) and intClust. 10 (p = 7.59 × 10(-38)) breast cancers. FEN1 mRNA overexpression is associated with poor breast cancer specific survival in univariate (p = 4.4 × 10(-16)) and multivariate analysis (p = 9.19 × 10(-7)). At the protein level, in ER positive tumours, FEN1 overexpression remains significantly linked to high grade, high mitotic index and pleomorphism (ps < 0.01). In ER negative tumours, high FEN1 is significantly associated with pleomorphism, tumour type, lymphovascular invasion, triple negative phenotype, EGFR and HER2 expression (ps < 0.05). In ER positive as well as in ER negative tumours, FEN1 protein overexpression is associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis (ps < 0.01). In ovarian epithelial cancers, similarly, FEN1 overexpression is associated with high grade, high stage and poor survival (ps < 0.05). We conclude that FEN1

  2. Pattern identification and characterization reveal permutations of organs as a key genetically controlled property of post-meristematic phyllotaxis.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Yann; Refahi, Yassin; Besnard, Fabrice; Farcot, Etienne; Godin, Christophe; Vernoux, Teva

    2013-12-01

    In vascular plants, the arrangement of organs around the stem generates geometric patterns called phyllotaxis. In the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, as in the majority of species, single organs are initiated successively at a divergence angle from the previous organ close to the canonical angle of 137.5°, producing a Fibonacci spiral. Given that little is known about the robustness of these geometric arrangements, we undertook to characterize phyllotaxis by measuring divergence angles between organs along the stems of wild-type and specific mutant plants with obvious defects in phyllotaxis. Sequences of measured divergence angles exhibit segments of non-canonical angles in both genotypes, albeit to a far greater extent in the mutant. We thus designed a pipeline of methods for analyzing these perturbations. The latent structure models used in this pipeline combine a non-observable model representing perturbation patterns (either a variable-order Markov chain or a combinatorial model) with von Mises distributions representing divergence angle uncertainty. We show that the segments of non-canonical angles in both wild-type and mutant plants can be explained by permutations in the order of insertion along the stem of two or three consecutive organs. The number of successive organs between two permutations reveals specific patterns that depend on the nature of the preceding permutation (2- or 3-permutation). We also highlight significant individual deviations from 137.5° in the level of baseline segments and a marked relationship between permutation of organs and defects in the elongation of the internodes between these organs. These results demonstrate that permutations are an intrinsic property of spiral phyllotaxis and that their occurrence is genetically regulated.

  3. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  4. Pattern identification and characterization reveal permutations of organs as a key genetically controlled property of post-meristematic phyllotaxis.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Yann; Refahi, Yassin; Besnard, Fabrice; Farcot, Etienne; Godin, Christophe; Vernoux, Teva

    2013-12-01

    In vascular plants, the arrangement of organs around the stem generates geometric patterns called phyllotaxis. In the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, as in the majority of species, single organs are initiated successively at a divergence angle from the previous organ close to the canonical angle of 137.5°, producing a Fibonacci spiral. Given that little is known about the robustness of these geometric arrangements, we undertook to characterize phyllotaxis by measuring divergence angles between organs along the stems of wild-type and specific mutant plants with obvious defects in phyllotaxis. Sequences of measured divergence angles exhibit segments of non-canonical angles in both genotypes, albeit to a far greater extent in the mutant. We thus designed a pipeline of methods for analyzing these perturbations. The latent structure models used in this pipeline combine a non-observable model representing perturbation patterns (either a variable-order Markov chain or a combinatorial model) with von Mises distributions representing divergence angle uncertainty. We show that the segments of non-canonical angles in both wild-type and mutant plants can be explained by permutations in the order of insertion along the stem of two or three consecutive organs. The number of successive organs between two permutations reveals specific patterns that depend on the nature of the preceding permutation (2- or 3-permutation). We also highlight significant individual deviations from 137.5° in the level of baseline segments and a marked relationship between permutation of organs and defects in the elongation of the internodes between these organs. These results demonstrate that permutations are an intrinsic property of spiral phyllotaxis and that their occurrence is genetically regulated. PMID:23948553

  5. Germline Deletion of Pantothenate Kinases 1 and 2 Reveals the Key Roles for CoA in Postnatal Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rehg, Jerold E.; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) phosphorylates pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and controls the overall rate of coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. Pank1 gene deletion in mice results in a metabolic phenotype where fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis are impaired in the fasted state, leading to mild hypoglycemia. Inactivating mutations in the human PANK2 gene lead to childhood neurodegeneration, but Pank2 gene inactivation in mice does not elicit a phenotype indicative of the neuromuscular symptoms or brain iron accumulation that accompany the human disease. Pank1/Pank2 double knockout (dKO) mice were derived to determine if the mild phenotypes of the single knockout mice are due to the ability of the two isoforms to compensate for each other in CoA biosynthesis. Postnatal development was severely affected in the dKO mice. The dKO pups developed progressively severe hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia by postnatal day 10 leading to death by day 17. Hyperketonemia arose from impaired whole-body ketone utilization illustrating the requirement for CoA in energy generation from ketones. dKO pups had reduced CoA and decreased fatty acid oxidation coupled with triglyceride accumulation in liver. dKO hepatocytes could not maintain the NADH levels compared to wild-type hepatocytes. These results revealed an important link between CoA and NADH levels, which was reflected by deficiencies in hepatic oleate synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The data indicate that PanK1 and PanK2 can compensate for each other to supply tissue CoA, but PanK1 is more important to CoA levels in liver whereas PanK2 contributes more to CoA synthesis in the brain. PMID:22815849

  6. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-04-19

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma.Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines.We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK.Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%.Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression.Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants.In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  7. Identification of discrete functional domains of HIV-1 integrase and their organization within an active multimeric complex.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Bushman, F D; Craigie, R

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase protein possesses the 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities that are required to integrate HIV DNA into a host chromosome. The N-, C-terminal and core domains of integrase are necessary for both activities in vitro. We find that certain pairs of mutant integrase proteins, which are inactive when each protein is assayed alone, can support near wild type levels of activity when both proteins are present together in the reaction mixture. This complementation implies that HIV-1 integrase functions as a multimer and has enabled us to probe the organization of the functional domains within active mixed multimers. We have identified a minimal set of functional integrase domains that are sufficient for 3' processing and DNA strand transfer and find that some domains are contributed in trans by separate monomers within the functional complex. Images PMID:8344264

  8. The transcriptional programme of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reveals a key role for tryptophan metabolism in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    tryptophan or indole. Conclusions Biofilm growth of S. Typhimurium causes distinct changes in gene and protein expression. Our results show that aromatic amino acids make an important contribution to biofilm formation and reveal a link between SPI2 expression and surface-associated growth in S. Typhimurium. PMID:20003355

  9. Using ΦC31 integrase to mediate insertion of DNA in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, You E; Allen, Bryan G; Weeks, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    The two most common methods used to generate transgenic Xenopus embryos, restriction enzyme-mediated insertion, and I-SceI meganuclease take advantage of relatively common but spatially unpredictable double-stranded breaks in sperm, egg, or early embryo genomes. These methods also tend to insert multimeric copies of the transgene. An alternative is to use bacteriophage- or transposon-derived integrase or recombinase to mediate more site-specific insertion of the transgene. The use of phiC31 integrase requires a defined sequence for insertion and is compatible with insertion of a single copy of the transgene. We describe the protocol we use to facilitate phiC31 integrase transgene insertion including the use of insulator sequences to reduce position effect disruption of transgene activity. PMID:22956091

  10. PhiC31 integrase induces efficient site-specific recombination in the Capra hircus genome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haiyan; Ma, Qingwen; Lu, Yao; Wang, Juan; Hu, Wei; Gong, Zhijuan; Cai, Linlin; Huang, Ying; Huang, Shu-Zhen; Zeng, Fanyi

    2014-08-01

    Streptomyces phage φC31 integrase induces efficient site-specific recombination capable of integrating exogenous genes at pseudo attP sites in human, mouse, rat, rabbit, sheep, Drosophila, and bovine genomes. However, the φC31-mediated recombination between attB and the corresponding pseudo attP sites has not been investigated in Capra hircus. Here, we identified eight pseudo attP sites located in the intron or intergenic regions of the C. hircus genome, and demonstrated different levels of foreign gene expression after φC31 integrase-mediated integration. These pseudo attP sites share similar sequences with each other and with pseudo attP sites in other mammalian genomes, and these are associated with a neighboring consensus motif found in other genomes. The application of the φC31 integrase system in C. hircus provides a new option for genetic engineering of this economically important goat species.

  11. A possible way that φC31 integrase regulates the recombination direction.

    PubMed

    Liu, T A; Fang, Y X; Yin, H; Jing, Z Z

    2015-01-26

    φC31 integrase encoded by Streptomyces phage can mediate site-specific recombination between phage and host genomes. The recombination direction is generally considered to be accurately regulated, but the regulatory mechanisms involved are still unclear. Recently, some hyperactive mutants of φC31 integrase that can bypass the regulatory steps have been isolated and extensively studied. A putative coiled-coil region is found to play a critical role in controlling recombination direction. Further analysis led us to the speculation that at least two regions in the N-terminal domain of φC31 integrase are involved in the tetrameric interfaces and that the putative coiled coil interacts with one of the regions to regulate the recombination direction.

  12. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part I. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee

    2007-03-23

    We have identified oleuropein (Ole) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) as a unique class of HIV-1 inhibitors from olive leaf extracts effective against viral fusion and integration. We used molecular docking simulation to study the interactions of Ole and HT with viral targets. We find that Ole and HT bind to the conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the HIV-gp41 fusion domain by hydrogen bonds with Q577 and hydrophobic interactions with I573, G572, and L568 on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide N36, interfering with formation of the gp41 fusion-active core. To test and confirm modeling predications, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 fusion complex formation using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on HIV-1 fusion core formation with EC{sub 50}s of 66-58 nM, with no detectable toxicity. Our findings on effects of HIV-1 integrase are reported in the subsequent article.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: epitope mapping and differential effects on integrase activities in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, B M; Haugan, I R; Berg, K; Olsen, L; Brown, P O; Helland, D E

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome, an essential step in retroviral replication. As a tool to study the structure and function of this enzyme, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against HIV-1 IN were produced. Epitope mapping demonstrated that the 17 MAbs obtained could be divided into seven different groups, and the selection of MAbs representing these groups were tested for their effect on in vitro activities of IN. Four groups of MAbs recognized epitopes within the region of amino acids (aa) 1 to 16, 17 to 38, or 42 to 55 in and around the conserved HHCC motif near the N terminus of IN. MAbs binding to these epitopes inhibited end processing and DNA joining and either stimulated or had little effect on disintegration and reintegration activities of IN. Two MAbs binding to epitopes within the region of aa 56 to 102 in the central core or aa 186 to 250 in the C-terminal half of the protein showed only minor effects on the in vitro activities of IN. Three Mabs which recognized on epitope within the region of aa262 to 271 of HIV-1 IN cross-reacted with HIV-2 IN. MAbs binding to this epitope clearly inhibited end processing and DNA joining and stimulated or had little effect on disintegration. In contrast to the N-terminal-specific MAbs, these C-terminal-specific MAbs abolished reintegration activity of IN. PMID:8627677

  14. A method for producing transgenic cells using a multi-integrase system on a human artificial chromosome vector.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeyuki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Yuji; Nanba, Eiji; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    The production of cells capable of expressing gene(s) of interest is important for a variety of applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, including gene therapy and animal transgenesis. The ability to insert transgenes at a precise location in the genome, using site-specific recombinases such as Cre, FLP, and ΦC31, has major benefits for the efficiency of transgenesis. Recent work on integrases from ΦC31, R4, TP901-1 and Bxb1 phages demonstrated that these recombinases catalyze site-specific recombination in mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the activities of integrases on site-specific recombination and gene expression in mammalian cells. We designed a human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector containing five recombination sites (ΦC31 attP, R4 attP, TP901-1 attP, Bxb1 attP and FRT; multi-integrase HAC vector) and de novo mammalian codon-optimized integrases. The multi-integrase HAC vector has several functions, including gene integration in a precise locus and avoiding genomic position effects; therefore, it was used as a platform to investigate integrase activities. Integrases carried out site-specific recombination at frequencies ranging from 39.3-96.8%. Additionally, we observed homogenous gene expression in 77.3-87.5% of colonies obtained using the multi-integrase HAC vector. This vector is also transferable to another cell line, and is capable of accepting genes of interest in this environment. These data suggest that integrases have high DNA recombination efficiencies in mammalian cells. The multi-integrase HAC vector enables us to produce transgene-expressing cells efficiently and create platform cell lines for gene expression. PMID:21390305

  15. TG1 integrase-based system for site-specific gene integration into bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Tetsurou; Kokuzawa, Takaaki; Kihara, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Hirano, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2013-05-01

    Serine-type phage integrases catalyze unidirectional site-specific recombination between the attachment sites, attP and attB, in the phage and host bacterial genomes, respectively; these integrases and DNA target sites function efficiently when transferred into heterologous cells. We previously developed an in vivo site-specific genomic integration system based on actinophage TG1 integrase that introduces ∼2-kbp DNA into an att site inserted into a heterologous Escherichia coli genome. Here, we analyzed the TG1 integrase-mediated integrations of att site-containing ∼10-kbp DNA into the corresponding att site pre-inserted into various genomic locations; moreover, we developed a system that introduces ∼10-kbp DNA into the genome with an efficiency of ∼10(4) transformants/μg DNA. Integrations of attB-containing DNA into an attP-containing genome were more efficient than integrations of attP-containing DNA into an attB-containing genome, and integrations targeting attP inserted near the replication origin, oriC, and the E. coli "centromere" analogue, migS, were more efficient than those targeting attP within other regions of the genome. Because the genomic region proximal to the oriC and migS sites is located at the extreme poles of the cell during chromosomal segregation, the oriC-migS region may be more exposed to the cytosol than are other regions of the E. coli chromosome. Thus, accessibility of pre-inserted attP to attB-containing incoming DNA may be crucial for the integration efficiency by serine-type integrases in heterologous cells. These results may be beneficial to the development of serine-type integrases-based genomic integration systems for various bacterial species.

  16. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle.

  17. The mechanism of ϕC31 integrase directionality: experimental analysis and computational modelling

    PubMed Central

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Zhao, Jia; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Smith, Margaret C. M.; Stark, W. Marshall; Colloms, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    Serine integrases, DNA site-specific recombinases used by bacteriophages for integration and excision of their DNA to and from their host genomes, are increasingly being used as tools for programmed rearrangements of DNA molecules for biotechnology and synthetic biology. A useful feature of serine integrases is the simple regulation and unidirectionality of their reactions. Recombination between the phage attP and host attB sites is promoted by the serine integrase alone, giving recombinant attL and attR sites, whereas the ‘reverse’ reaction (between attL and attR) requires an additional protein, the recombination directionality factor (RDF). Here, we present new experimental data on the kinetics and regulation of recombination reactions mediated by ϕC31 integrase and its RDF, and use these data as the basis for a mathematical model of the reactions. The model accounts for the unidirectionality of the attP × attB and attL × attR reactions by hypothesizing the formation of structurally distinct, kinetically stable integrase–DNA product complexes, dependent on the presence or absence of RDF. The model accounts for all the available experimental data, and predicts how mutations of the proteins or alterations of reaction conditions might increase the conversion efficiency of recombination. PMID:27387286

  18. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  19. Site-specific deletion and rearrangement of integron insert genes catalyzed by the integron DNA integrase.

    PubMed

    Collis, C M; Hall, R M

    1992-03-01

    Deletion of individual antibiotic resistance genes found within the variable region of integrons is demonstrated. Evidence for gene duplications and rearrangements resulting from the insertion of gene units at new locations is also presented. Deletion, duplication, and rearrangement occur only in the presence of the integron-encoded DNA integrase. These events are precise and involve loss or gain of one or more complete insert units or gene cassettes. This confirms the recent definition of gene cassettes as consisting of the gene coding sequences, all except the last 7 bases of the 59-base element found at the 3' end of the gene, and the core site located 5' to the gene (Hall et al., Mol. Microbiol. 5:1941-1959, 1991) and demonstrates that individual gene cassettes are functional units which can be independently mobilized. Both deletions and duplications can be generated by integrase-mediated cointegrate formation followed by integrase-mediated resolution involving a different pair of sites. However, deletion occurs 10 times more frequently than duplication, and we propose that the majority of deletion events are likely to involve integrase-dependent excision of the gene unit to generate a circular gene cassette. The implications of these findings in understanding the evolution of integrons and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial populations is discussed.

  20. Discovery of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: pharmacophore mapping, virtual screening, molecular docking, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hardik; Patel, Paresh; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    HIV-1 integrase enzyme plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and responsible for integration of virus into human genome. Here, both computational and synthetic approaches were used to design and synthesize newer HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Pharmacophore mapping was performed on 20 chemically diverse molecules using DISCOtech, and refinement was carried out using GASP. Ten pharmacophore models were generated, and model 2, containing four features including two donor sites, one acceptor atom, and one hydrophobic region, was considered the best model as it has the highest fitness score. It was used as a query in NCI and Maybridge databases. Molecules having more than 99% Q(fit) value were used to design 30 molecules bearing pteridine ring and were docked on co-crystal structure of HIV-1 integrase enzyme. Among these, six molecules, showing good docking score compared with the reference standards, were synthesized by conventional as well as microwave-assisted methods. All compounds were characterized by physical and spectral data and evaluated for in vitro anti-HIV activity against the replication of HIV-1 (IIIB) in MT-4 cells. The used approach of molecular docking and anti-HIV activity data of designed molecules will provide significant insights to discover novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors. PMID:23957390

  1. Cobalamin inhibition of HIV-1 integrase and integration of HIV-1 DNA into cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Shugars, D C; Sherman, P A; Sauls, D L; Fyfe, J A

    1998-05-19

    Our prior studies showed that certain cobalamins inhibit productive HIV-1 infection of primary cultures of blood lymphocytes and monocytes. We demonstrate here that this antiviral activity may be mediated by an inhibition of HIV-1 integrase, an enzyme required for productive infection. Purified recombinant HIV-1 integrase activity was inhibited in vitro by hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl), methylcobalamin (Me-Cbl), adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl), and dicyanocobinamide (CN2-Cbi) with IC50 values of approximately 17, 17, 17, and 4 microM, respectively. The agents inhibited HIV-1 infection of cultured monocytes (IC50 values for OH-Cbl, Me-Cbl, Ado-Cbl, and CN2-Cbi of 6, 7, 4, and 1 microM, respectively) and of cultured lymphocytes (IC50 values of 60, 50, 60, and 11 microM, respectively). Experiments using cultured monocytes or lymphocytes demonstrated that OH-Cbl inhibited integration of HIV-1 DNA into cellular DNA. Thus, cobalamins and cobinamides represent novel inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase. These or related agents may be useful as anti-viral treatments that target HIV-1 integrase. PMID:9610370

  2. From dihydroxypyrimidine carboxylic acids to carboxamide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: SAR around the amide moiety.

    PubMed

    Petrocchi, Alessia; Koch, Uwe; Matassa, Victor G; Pacini, Barbara; Stillmock, Kara A; Summa, Vincenzo

    2007-01-15

    4,5-Dihyroxypyrimidine carboxamides, which evolved from a related series of HCV NS5b polymerase inhibitors, have been optimized to provide selective HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitors. Extensive SAR around the benzylamide moiety led to the identification of the p-fluorobenzylamide as optimal in the enzymatic assay.

  3. Gated rotation mechanism of site-specific recombination by ϕC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Olorunniji, Femi J; Buck, Dorothy E; Colloms, Sean D; McEwan, Andrew R; Smith, Margaret C M; Stark, W Marshall; Rosser, Susan J

    2012-11-27

    Integrases, such as that of the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage ϕC31, promote site-specific recombination between DNA sequences in the bacteriophage and bacterial genomes to integrate or excise the phage DNA. ϕC31 integrase belongs to the serine recombinase family, a large group of structurally related enzymes with diverse biological functions. It has been proposed that serine integrases use a "subunit rotation" mechanism to exchange DNA strands after double-strand DNA cleavage at the two recombining att sites, and that many rounds of subunit rotation can occur before the strands are religated. We have analyzed the mechanism of ϕC31 integrase-mediated recombination in a topologically constrained experimental system using hybrid "phes" recombination sites, each of which comprises a ϕC31 att site positioned adjacent to a regulatory sequence recognized by Tn3 resolvase. The topologies of reaction products from circular substrates containing two phes sites support a right-handed subunit rotation mechanism for catalysis of both integrative and excisive recombination. Strand exchange usually terminates after a single round of 180° rotation. However, multiple processive "360° rotation" rounds of strand exchange can be observed, if the recombining sites have nonidentical base pairs at their centers. We propose that a regulatory "gating" mechanism normally blocks multiple rounds of strand exchange and triggers product release after a single round.

  4. Multiple effects of mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase on viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Englund, G; Orenstein, J M; Martin, M A; Craigie, R

    1995-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome into a chromosome of an infected cell is a pivotal step in virus replication. Integration requires the activity of the virus-encoded integrase, which enters the cell as a component of the virion. Results of numerous mutagenesis studies have identified amino acid residues and protein domains of HIV-1 integrase critical for in vitro activity, but only a few of these mutants have been studied for their effects on HIV replication. We have introduced site-directed changes into an infectious DNA clone of HIV-1 and show that integrase mutations can affect virus replication at a variety of steps. We identified mutations that altered virion morphology, levels of particle-associated integrase and reverse transcriptase, and viral DNA synthesis. One replication-defective mutant virus which had normal morphology and protein composition displayed increased levels of circular viral DNA following infection of a T-cell line. This virus also had a significant titer in a CD4-positive indicator cell assay, which requires the viral Tat protein. Although unintegrated viral DNA can serve as a template for Tat expression in infected indicator cells, this level of expression is insufficient to support a spreading viral infection in CD4-positive lymphocytes. PMID:7535863

  5. Reversion of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase mutant at a second site restores enzyme function and virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, B; Carlini, F; Verani, P; Engelman, A

    1996-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the retroviral RNA genome into the host cell genome is essential for viral replication. The virion-associated integrase protein, encoded by the 3' end of the viral pol gene, is required for integration. Stable virus-producing T-cell lines were established for replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 carrying single amino acid substitutions at conserved residues in the catalytic domain of integrase. Phenotypically reverted virus was detected 12 weeks after transfection with the integrase mutant carrying the P-109-->S mutation (P109S). Unlike the defective P109S virus, the revertant virus (designated P109SR) grew in CD4+ SupT1 cells. In addition to the Ser substitution at Pro-109, P109SR had a second substitution of Ala for Thr at position 125 in integrase. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to show that the P109S T125A genotype was responsible for the P109SR replication phenotype. The T125A substitution also rescued the in vitro enzyme activities of recombinant P109S integrase protein. P109S integrase did not display detectable 3' processing or DNA strand transfer activity, although 5 to 10% of wild-type disintegration activity was detected. P109S T125A integrase displayed nearly wild-type levels of 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities, confirming that T125A is a second-site intragenic suppressor of P109S. P109S integrase ran as a large aggregate on a size exclusion column, whereas wild-type integrase ran as a monomer and P109S T125A integrase ran as a mixed population. Pro-109 and Thr-125 are not immediately adjacent in the crystal structure of the integrase catalytic domain. We suggest that the T125A substitution restores integrase function by stabilizing a structural alteration(s) induced by the P109S mutation. PMID:8970947

  6. Bacteriophage φC31 Integrase Mediated Transgenesis in Xenopus laevis for Protein Expression at Endogenous Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bryan G.; Weeks, Daniel L.

    Bacteriophage φC31 inserts its genome into that of its host bacterium via the integrase enzyme which catalyzes recombination between a phage attachment site (attP) and a bacterial attachment site (attB). Integrase requires no accessory factors, has a high efficiency of recombination, and does not need perfect sequence fidelity for recognition and recombination between these attachment sites. These imperfect attachment sites, or pseudo-attachment sites, are present in many organisms and have been used to insert transgenes in a variety of species. Here we describe the φC31 integrase approach to make transgenic Xenopus laevis embryos.

  7. Theoretical study on the HIV-1 integrase inhibitor 1-(5-chloroindol-3-yl)-3-hydroxy-3-(2 H-tetrazol-5-yl)-propenone (5CITEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Pianwanit, Somsak; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Kokpol, Sirirat; Wolschann, Peter

    2007-11-01

    1-(5-Chloroindol-3-yl)-3-hydroxy-3-(2 H-tetrazol-5-yl)-propenone (5CITEP) is an inhibitor of the HIV-1 integrase (IN). Theoretical studies were performed on the interaction of this inhibitor with surrounding amino acids. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted to identify the protonation state of HIV-1 integrase (IN), in particular, residues Lys156 and Lys159 and 5CITEP inhibitor. The results indicate that the both lysine residues are in protonated forms while 5CITEP is in de-protonated form. The binding energy of 5CITEP and its six surrounding amino acids, i.e., Thr66, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, Lys156, and Lys159 is -41.33 kcal/mol. In addition, conformation analysis of 5CITEP was carried out to determine conformational minima of this compound. The calculations reveal that the lowest energy conformation of 5CITEP is close to that of X-ray conformation, as evidenced by energy difference of 1.5 kcal/mol only.

  8. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-06-18

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  9. Optimization of Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31 integrase system to prevent post integrative gene silencing in pulmonary type II cells.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Manish Kumar; Geiger, Johannes; Imker, Rabea; Uzgun, Senta; Kormann, Michael; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Maucksch, Christof; Rudolph, Carsten

    2009-12-31

    phi C31 integrase has emerged as a potent tool for achieving long-term gene expression in different tissues. The present study aimed at optimizing elements of phi C31 integrase system for alveolar type II cells. Luciferase and beta-galactosidase activities were measured at different time points post transfection. 5-Aza-2'deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) were used to inhibit DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) respectively. In A549 cells, expression of the integrase using a CMV promoter resulted in highest integrase activity, whereas in MLE12 cells, both CAG and CMV promoter were equally effective. Effect of polyA site was observed only in A549 cells, where replacement of SV40 polyA by bovine growth hormone (BGH) polyA site resulted in an enhancement of integrase activity. Addition of a C-terminal SV40 nuclear localization signal (NLS) did not result in any significant increase in integrase activity. Long-term expression studies with AZA and TSA, provided evidence for post-integrative gene silencing. In MLE12 cells, both DNA methylases and HDACs played a significant role in silencing, whereas in A549 cells, it could be attributed majorly to HDAC activity. Donor plasmids comprising cellular promoters ubiquitin B (UBB), ubiquitin C (UCC) and elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) in an improved backbone prevented post-integrative gene silencing. In contrast to A549 and MLE12 cells, no silencing could be observed in human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B. Donor plasmid coding for murine erythropoietin under the EF1 alpha promoter when combined with phi C31 integrase resulted in higher long-term erythropoietin expression and subsequently higher hematocrit levels in mice after intravenous delivery to the lungs. These results provide evidence for cell specific post integrative gene silencing with C31 integrase and demonstrate the pivotal role of donor plasmid in long-term expression attained with this system.

  10. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  11. von Hippel–Lindau binding protein 1-mediated degradation of integrase affects HIV-1 gene expression at a postintegration step

    PubMed Central

    Mousnier, Aurélie; Kubat, Nicole; Massias-Simon, Aurélie; Ségéral, Emmanuel; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Emiliani, Stéphane; Dargemont, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase, the viral enzyme responsible for provirus integration into the host genome, can be actively degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Here, we identify von Hippel–Lindau binding protein 1(VBP1), a subunit of the prefoldin chaperone, as an integrase cellular binding protein that bridges interaction between integrase and the cullin2 (Cul2)-based von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) ubiquitin ligase. We demonstrate that VBP1 and Cul2/VHL are required for proper HIV-1 expression at a step between integrase-dependent proviral integration into the host genome and transcription of viral genes. Using both an siRNA approach and Cul2/VHL mutant cells, we show that VBP1 and the Cul2/VHL ligase cooperate in the efficient polyubiquitylation of integrase and its subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Results presented here support a role for integrase degradation by the prefoldin–VHL–proteasome pathway in the integration–transcription transition of the viral replication cycle. PMID:17698809

  12. Distribution and Redistribution of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein in Immature, Mature, and Integrase-Inhibited Virions: a Role for Integrase in Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Juan; Jurado, Kellie A.; Cheng, Naiqian; Ly, Ngoc L.; Fuchs, James R.; Gorelick, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During virion maturation, HIV-1 capsid protein assembles into a conical core containing the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex, thought to be composed mainly of the viral RNA and nucleocapsid protein (NC). After infection, the viral RNA is reverse transcribed into double-stranded DNA, which is then incorporated into host chromosomes by integrase (IN) catalysis. Certain IN mutations (class II) and antiviral drugs (allosteric IN inhibitors [ALLINIs]) adversely affect maturation, resulting in virions that contain “eccentric condensates,” electron-dense aggregates located outside seemingly empty capsids. Here we demonstrate that in addition to this mislocalization of electron density, a class II IN mutation and ALLINIs each increase the fraction of virions with malformed capsids (from ∼12% to ∼53%). Eccentric condensates have a high NC content, as demonstrated by “tomo-bubblegram” imaging, a novel labeling technique that exploits the susceptibility of NC to radiation damage. Tomo-bubblegrams also localized NC inside wild-type cores and lining the spherical Gag shell in immature virions. We conclude that eccentric condensates represent nonpackaged vRNPs and that either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of IN can impair vRNP incorporation into mature cores. Supplying IN in trans as part of a Vpr-IN fusion protein partially restored the formation of conical cores with internal electron density and the infectivity of a class II IN deletion mutant virus. Moreover, the ability of ALLINIs to induce eccentric condensate formation required both IN and viral RNA. Based on these observations, we propose a role for IN in initiating core morphogenesis and vRNP incorporation into the mature core during HIV-1 maturation. IMPORTANCE Maturation, a process essential for HIV-1 infectivity, involves core assembly, whereby the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP, composed of vRNA and nucleocapsid protein [NC]) is packaged into a conical capsid. Allosteric integrase

  13. Prevalent Polymorphisms in Wild-Type HIV-1 Integrase Are Unlikely To Engender Drug Resistance to Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572)

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samiul; Madsen, Heather; Horton, Joseph; DeAnda, Felix; Martin-Carpenter, Louise; Sato, Akihiko; Cuffe, Robert; Chen, Shuguang; Underwood, Mark; Nichols, Garrett

    2013-01-01

    The majority of HIV-1 integrase amino acid sites are highly conserved, suggesting that most are necessary to carry out the critical structural and functional roles of integrase. We analyzed the 34 most variable sites in integrase (>10% variability) and showed that prevalent polymorphic amino acids at these positions did not affect susceptibility to the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572), as demonstrated both in vitro (in site-directed mutagenesis studies) and in vivo (in a phase IIa study of dolutegravir monotherapy in HIV-infected individuals). Ongoing clinical trials will provide additional data on the virologic activity of dolutegravir across subject viruses with and without prevalent polymorphic substitutions. PMID:23295935

  14. In-vivo quantitative proteomics reveals a key contribution of post-transcriptional mechanisms to the circadian regulation of liver metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robles, Maria S; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators that drive the rhythmic expression of a broad array of genes, orchestrating metabolism and physiology. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms play essential roles in modulating temporal gene expression for proper circadian function, particularly for the molecular mechanism of the clock. Due to technical limitations in large-scale, quantitative protein measurements, it remains unresolved to what extent the circadian clock regulates metabolism by driving rhythms of protein abundance. Therefore, we aimed to identify global circadian oscillations of the proteome in the mouse liver by applying in vivo SILAC mouse technology in combination with state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the 3000 proteins accurately quantified across two consecutive cycles, 6% showed circadian oscillations with a defined phase of expression. Interestingly, daily rhythms of one fifth of the liver proteins were not accompanied by changes at the transcript level. The oscillations of almost half of the cycling proteome were delayed by more than six hours with respect to the corresponding, rhythmic mRNA. Strikingly we observed that the length of the time lag between mRNA and protein cycles varies across the day. Our analysis revealed a high temporal coordination in the abundance of proteins involved in the same metabolic process, such as xenobiotic detoxification. Apart from liver specific metabolic pathways, we identified many other essential cellular processes in which protein levels are under circadian control, for instance vesicle trafficking and protein folding. Our large-scale proteomic analysis reveals thus that circadian post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms play a key role in the temporal orchestration of liver metabolism and physiology.

  15. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  16. Design and discovery of 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoguang; Debnath, Bikash; Yu, Shenghui; Sanchez, Tino Wilson; Christ, Frauke; Liu, Yang; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri; Zhao, Guisen

    2014-10-01

    Raltegravir (RAL) is a first clinically approved integrase (IN) inhibitor for the treatment of HIV but rapid mutation of the virus has led to chemo-resistant strains. Therefore, there is a medical need to develop new IN inhibitors to overcome drug resistance. At present, several IN inhibitors are in different phases of clinical trials and few have been discontinued due to toxicity and lack of efficacy. The development of potent second-generation IN inhibitors with improved safety profiles is key for selecting new clinical candidates. In this article, we report the design and synthesis of potent 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide analogues as second-generation IN inhibitors. These compounds satisfy two structural requirements known for potent inhibition of HIV-1 IN catalysis: a metal chelating moiety and a hydrophobic functionality necessary for selectivity against the strand transfer reaction. Most of the new compounds described herein are potent and selective for the strand transfer reaction and show antiviral activity in cell-based assays. Furthermore, this class of compounds are drug-like and suitable for further optimization and preclinical studies.

  17. Orientation of a key glutamine residue in the BLUF domain from AppA revealed by mutagenesis, spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Unno, Masashi; Masuda, Shinji; Ono, Taka-aki; Yamauchi, Seigo

    2006-05-01

    The flavin-adenine-dinucleotide-binding BLUF domain constitutes a new class of blue-light receptors, and the N-terminal domain of AppA is a representative of this family. A crystal structure of the BLUF domain from AppA suggested that a conserved Gln63 forms a hydrogen bond with the flavin N5 atom. Upon light excitation, this residue is proposed to undergo a approximately 180 degrees rotation that leads to a rearrangement of a hydrogen bonding network. However, crystallographic studies on the other BLUF proteins claimed an opposite orientation for the glutamine residue. In this communication, we have revealed the presence of a Gln63-to-N5 hydrogen bond in the dark state of AppA by a combined approach of mutagenesis, spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations. The present finding supports the view that the reorientation of the Gln63 side chain is a key event in the signaling state formation of BLUF proteins.

  18. Population Genetics of Two Key Mosquito Vectors of Rift Valley Fever Virus Reveals New Insights into the Changing Disease Outbreak Patterns in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Tchouassi, David P.; Bastos, Armanda D. S.; Sole, Catherine L.; Diallo, Mawlouth; Lutomiah, Joel; Mutisya, James; Mulwa, Francis; Borgemeister, Christian; Sang, Rosemary; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks in Kenya have increased in frequency and range to include northeastern Kenya where viruses are increasingly being isolated from known (Aedes mcintoshi) and newly-associated (Ae. ochraceus) vectors. The factors contributing to these changing outbreak patterns are unclear and the population genetic structure of key vectors and/or specific virus-vector associations, in particular, are under-studied. By conducting mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analyses on >220 Kenyan specimens of Ae. mcintoshi and Ae. ochraceus, we uncovered high levels of vector complexity which may partly explain the disease outbreak pattern. Results indicate that Ae. mcintoshi consists of a species complex with one of the member species being unique to the newly-established RVF outbreak-prone northeastern region of Kenya, whereas Ae. ochraceus is a homogeneous population that appears to be undergoing expansion. Characterization of specimens from a RVF-prone site in Senegal, where Ae. ochraceus is a primary vector, revealed direct genetic links between the two Ae. ochraceus populations from both countries. Our data strongly suggest that unlike Ae. mcintoshi, Ae. ochraceus appears to be a relatively recent, single 'introduction' into Kenya. These results, together with increasing isolations from this vector, indicate that Ae. ochraceus will likely be of greater epidemiological importance in future RVF outbreaks in Kenya. Furthermore, the overall vector complexity calls into question the feasibility of mosquito population control approaches reliant on genetic modification. PMID:25474018

  19. DNA stable-isotope probing of oil sands tailings pond enrichment cultures reveals different key players for toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laban, Nidal Abu; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Oil sands tailings ponds are anaerobic repositories of fluid wastes produced by extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Diverse indigenous microbiota biodegrade hydrocarbons (including toluene) in situ, producing methane, carbon dioxide and/or hydrogen sulfide, depending on electron acceptor availability. Stable-isotope probing of cultures enriched from tailings associated specific taxa and functional genes to (13)C6- and (12)C7-toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Total DNA was subjected to isopycnic ultracentrifugation followed by gradient fraction analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and construction of 16S rRNA, benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) gene clone libraries. T-RFLP analysis plus sequencing and in silico digestion of cloned taxonomic and functional genes revealed that Clostridiales, particularly Desulfosporosinus (136 bp T-RF) contained bssA genes and were key toluene degraders during methanogenesis dominated by Methanosaeta. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae (157 bp T-RF) became dominant under sulfidogenic conditions, likely because the Desulfosporosinus T-RF 136 apparently lacks dsrB and therefore, unlike its close relatives, is presumed incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We infer incomplete oxidation of toluene by Desulfosporosinus in syntrophic association with Methanosaeta under methanogenic conditions, and complete toluene oxidation by Desulfobulbaceae during sulfate reduction. PMID:25873466

  20. DNA stable-isotope probing of oil sands tailings pond enrichment cultures reveals different key players for toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laban, Nidal Abu; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Oil sands tailings ponds are anaerobic repositories of fluid wastes produced by extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Diverse indigenous microbiota biodegrade hydrocarbons (including toluene) in situ, producing methane, carbon dioxide and/or hydrogen sulfide, depending on electron acceptor availability. Stable-isotope probing of cultures enriched from tailings associated specific taxa and functional genes to (13)C6- and (12)C7-toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Total DNA was subjected to isopycnic ultracentrifugation followed by gradient fraction analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and construction of 16S rRNA, benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) gene clone libraries. T-RFLP analysis plus sequencing and in silico digestion of cloned taxonomic and functional genes revealed that Clostridiales, particularly Desulfosporosinus (136 bp T-RF) contained bssA genes and were key toluene degraders during methanogenesis dominated by Methanosaeta. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae (157 bp T-RF) became dominant under sulfidogenic conditions, likely because the Desulfosporosinus T-RF 136 apparently lacks dsrB and therefore, unlike its close relatives, is presumed incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We infer incomplete oxidation of toluene by Desulfosporosinus in syntrophic association with Methanosaeta under methanogenic conditions, and complete toluene oxidation by Desulfobulbaceae during sulfate reduction.

  1. RNA interference targeting CYP76AH1 in hairy roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza reveals its key role in the biosynthetic pathway of tanshinones.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Ma, Xiao-Hui; Meng, Fan-Yun; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Guo, Juan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2016-08-19

    Plant cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are well known as the largest family of enzymes that contribute to both primary metabolism and the chemical diversity of plant secondary metabolites. It is important to elucidate the in vivo role of CYPs in secondary metabolism, in order to apply them in the production of valuable metabolites in medicinal plants via metabolic engineering. CYP76AH1 has been suggested to catalyze the conversion of the carbon skeleton miltiradiene into the intermediate ferruginol, which is involved in the biosynthesis of tanshinones, the chief bioactive ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza. However, its role in planta remains to be elucidated. In this work, we constructed a CYP76AH1 RNAi system for hairy roots. Metabolic analysis of RNAi-AH1 hairy root lines showed a significantly increased accumulation of miltiradiene compared to the control lines. At the same time, the concentration of ferruginol decreased revealing the in vivo catalytic activity of CYP76AH1. The content of tanshinones decreased significantly after silencing of CYP76AH1, which verified its key role in the biosynthesis of tanshinones, and indicated that it could be used as a target for metabolic engineering. PMID:27291148

  2. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  3. phiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in barley.

    PubMed

    Kapusi, Eszter; Kempe, Katja; Rubtsova, Myroslava; Kumlehn, Jochen; Gils, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase was tested for its feasibility in excising transgenes from the barley genome through site-specific recombination. We produced transgenic barley plants expressing an active phiC31 integrase and crossed them with transgenic barley plants carrying a target locus for recombination. The target sequence involves a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is flanked by the attB and attP recognition sites for the phiC31 integrase. This sequence disruptively separates a gusA coding sequence from an upstream rice actin promoter. We succeeded in producing site-specific recombination events in the hybrid progeny of 11 independent barley plants carrying the above target sequence after crossing with plants carrying a phiC31 expression cassette. Some of the hybrids displayed fully executed recombination. Excision of the GFP gene fostered activation of the gusA gene, as visualized in tissue of hybrid plants by histochemical staining. The recombinant loci were detected in progeny of selfed F(1), even in individuals lacking the phiC31 transgene, which provides evidence of stability and generative transmission of the recombination events. In several plants that displayed incomplete recombination, extrachromosomal excision circles were identified. Besides the technical advance achieved in this study, the generated phiC31 integrase-expressing barley plants provide foundational stock material for use in future approaches to barley genetic improvement, such as the production of marker-free transgenic plants or switching transgene activity.

  4. Identification of the LEDGF/p75 binding site in HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Katrien; Voet, Arnout; De Maeyer, Marc; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Emiliani, Stéphane; Benarous, Richard; Desender, Linda; Debyser, Zeger; Christ, Frauke

    2007-02-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 is an important cellular co-factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication. We originally identified LEDGF/p75 as a binding partner of integrase (IN) in human cells. The interaction has been mapped to the integrase-binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF/p75 located in the C-terminal part. We have subsequently shown that IN carrying the Q168A mutation remains enzymatically active but is impaired for interaction with LEDGF/p75. To map the integrase/LEDGF interface in more detail, we have now identified and characterized two regions within the enzyme involved in the interaction with LEDGF/p75. The first region centers around residues W131 and W132 while the second extends from I161 up to E170. For the different IN mutants the interaction with LEDGF/p75 and the enzymatic activities were determined. IN(W131A), IN(I161A), IN(R166A), IN(Q168A) and IN(E170A) are impaired for interaction with LEDGF/p75, but retain 3' processing and strand transfer activities. Due to impaired integration, an HIV-1 strain containing the W131A mutation in IN displays reduced replication capacity, whereas virus carrying IN(Q168A) is replication defective. Comparison of the wild-type IN-LEDGF/p75 co-crystal structure with that of the modelled structure of the IN(Q168A) and IN(W131A) mutant integrases corroborated our experimental data.

  5. Preclinical Profile of BI 224436, a Novel HIV-1 Non-Catalytic-Site Integrase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Amad, Ma'an; Bailey, Murray D.; Bethell, Richard; Bös, Michael; Bonneau, Pierre; Cordingley, Michael; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Edwards, Paul; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Garneau, Michel; Jakalian, Araz; Kawai, Stephen; Lamorte, Louie; LaPlante, Steven; Luo, Laibin; Mason, Steve; Poupart, Marc-André; Rioux, Nathalie; Schroeder, Patricia; Simoneau, Bruno; Tremblay, Sonia; Tsantrizos, Youla; Witvrouw, Myriam; Yoakim, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    BI 224436 is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with effective antiviral activity that acts through a mechanism that is distinct from that of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). This 3-quinolineacetic acid derivative series was identified using an enzymatic integrase long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA 3′-processing assay. A combination of medicinal chemistry, parallel synthesis, and structure-guided drug design led to the identification of BI 224436 as a candidate for preclinical profiling. It has antiviral 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of <15 nM against different HIV-1 laboratory strains and cellular cytotoxicity of >90 μM. BI 224436 also has a low, ∼2.1-fold decrease in antiviral potency in the presence of 50% human serum and, by virtue of a steep dose-response curve slope, exhibits serum-shifted EC95 values ranging between 22 and 75 nM. Passage of virus in the presence of inhibitor selected for either A128T, A128N, or L102F primary resistance substitutions, all mapping to a conserved allosteric pocket on the catalytic core of integrase. BI 224436 also retains full antiviral activity against recombinant viruses encoding INSTI resistance substitutions N155S, Q148H, and E92Q. In drug combination studies performed in cellular antiviral assays, BI 224436 displays an additive effect in combination with most approved antiretrovirals, including INSTIs. BI 224436 has drug-like in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties, including Caco-2 cell permeability, solubility, and low cytochrome P450 inhibition. It exhibited excellent pharmacokinetic profiles in rat (clearance as a percentage of hepatic flow [CL], 0.7%; bioavailability [F], 54%), monkey (CL, 23%; F, 82%), and dog (CL, 8%; F, 81%). Based on the excellent biological and pharmacokinetic profile, BI 224436 was advanced into phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:24663024

  6. The systemic effects of sclerostin overexpression using ΦC31 integrase in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Park, Bo Mi; Kang, Myengmo; Nam, HeeJin; Kim, Eun Jin; Bae, ChuHyun; Lim, Sung Kil

    2016-04-01

    Sclerostin, encoded by the Sost gene, is mainly produced by osteocytes in bone and antagonizes the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is a requisite for bone formation. Currently, human anti-sclerostin antibodies are being tested in phase III clinical trials. In addition, serum sclerostin levels are reported to be associated with bone mineral density and fracture risk in normal individuals; however, the correlation between serum sclerostin and bone mass remains controversial. To study the effects of the continuous exposure of exogenous sclerostin on bone, a ΦC31 integrase system, which has the characteristics of site-specificity and efficiency, was applied for the delivery of the Sost gene in this study. We injected Sost-attB plasmid with or without ΦC31 integrase plasmid into the mouse tail vein using a hydrodynamic-based method. The site-specific integration of the Sost gene into the mouse genome was confirmed by examining a pseudo-attP site on the hepatic genomic DNA. Sclerostin was expressed in the hepatocytes, secreted into the blood flow, and maintained at high concentrations in the mice with both Sost-attB plasmid and ΦC31 integrase plasmid injections, which was observed by serial measurement. Moreover, the mice with long-term high levels of serum sclerostin showed trabecular bone loss on micro-CT analysis. Peripheral B cell populations were not affected. Our results suggested that sclerostin could be expressed in the liver and sustained successfully at high levels in the blood by using the ΦC31 integrase system, leading to trabecular bone loss. These findings may help to further ascertain the effects of sclerostin introduced exogenously on the skeleton.

  7. Structural Properties of HIV Integrase. Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, K.; Diamond, T; Hwang, Y; Bushman, F; Van Duyne, G

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the catalytic component of the preintegration complex, a large nucleoprotein assembly critical for the integration of the retroviral genome into a host chromosome. Although partial crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus IN alone and its complex with the integrase binding domain of the host factor PSIP1/lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 are available, many questions remain regarding the properties and structures of LEDGF-bound IN oligomers. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, multiangle light scattering, and small angle x-ray scattering, we have established the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and molecular shapes of IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes in solution. Analyses of intact IN tetramers bound to two different LEDGF truncations allow for placement of the integrase binding domain by difference analysis. Modeling of the small angle x-ray scattering envelopes using existing structural data suggests domain arrangements in the IN oligomers that support and extend existing biochemical data for IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes and lend new insights into the quaternary structure of LEDGF-bound IN tetramers. These IN oligomers may be involved in stages of the viral life cycle other than integration, including assembly, budding, and early replication.

  8. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways.

  9. Efficient site-specific integration in Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Nkrumah, Louis J; Muhle, Rebecca A; Moura, Pedro A; Ghosh, Pallavi; Hatfull, Graham F; Jacobs, William R; Fidock, David A

    2010-01-01

    Here we report an efficient, site-specific system of genetic integration into Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite chromosomes. This is mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase, which catalyzes recombination between an incoming attP and a chromosomal attB site. We developed P. falciparum lines with the attB site integrated into the glutaredoxin-like cg6 gene. Transfection of these attB+ lines with a dual-plasmid system, expressing a transgene on an attP-containing plasmid together with a drug resistance gene and the integrase on a separate plasmid, produced recombinant parasites within 2 to 4 weeks that were genetically uniform for single-copy plasmid integration. Integrase-mediated recombination resulted in proper targeting of parasite proteins to intra-erythrocytic compartments, including the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle. Recombinant attB × attP parasites were genetically stable in the absence of drug and were phenotypically homogeneous. This system can be exploited for rapid genetic integration and complementation analyses at any stage of the P. falciparum life cycle, and it illustrates the utility of Bxb1-based integrative recombination for genetic studies of intracellular eukaryotic organisms. PMID:16862136

  10. Dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxamides as novel potent and selective HIV integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Paola; Di Francesco, M Emilia; Gardelli, Cristina; Harper, Steven; Muraglia, Ester; Nizi, Emanuela; Orvieto, Federica; Petrocchi, Alessia; Poma, Marco; Rowley, Michael; Scarpelli, Rita; Laufer, Ralph; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Monteagudo, Edith; Bonelli, Fabio; Hazuda, Daria; Stillmock, Kara A; Summa, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integrase, one of the three constitutive viral enzymes required for replication, is a rational target for chemotherapeutic intervention in the treatment of AIDS that has also recently been confirmed in the clinical setting. We report here on the design and synthesis of N-benzyl-5,6-dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxamides as a class of agents which exhibits potent inhibition of the HIV-integrase-catalyzed strand transfer process. In the current study, structural modifications on these molecules were made in order to examine effects on HIV-integrase inhibitory potencies. One of the most interesting compounds for this series is 2-[1-(dimethylamino)-1-methylethyl]-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5,6-dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxamide 38, with a CIC95 of 78 nM in the cell-based assay in the presence of serum proteins. The compound has favorable pharmacokinetic properties in preclinical species (rats, dogs, and monkeys) and shows no liabilities in several counterscreening assays, highlighting its potential as a clinically useful antiviral agent.

  11. Consensus HIV-1 subtype A integrase and its raltegravir-resistant variants: design and characterization of the enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, Olga; Krotova, Olga; Agapkina, Julia; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina; Korolev, Sergey; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Viklund, Alecia; Lukashov, Vladimir; Magnani, Mauro; Medstrand, Patrik; Karpov, Vadim; Gottikh, Marina; Isaguliants, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Model studies of the subtype B and non-subtype B integrases are still required to compare their susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs, evaluate the significance of resistance mutations and identify the impact of natural polymorphisms on the level of enzymatic reactivity. We have therefore designed the consensus integrase of the HIV-1 subtype A strain circulating in the former Soviet Union territory (FSU-A) and two of its variants with mutations of resistance to the strand transfer inhibitor raltegravir. Their genes were synthesized, and expressed in E coli; corresponding His-tagged proteins were purified using the affinity chromatography. The enzymatic properties of the consensus integrases and their sensitivity to raltegravir were examined in a series of standard in vitro reactions and compared to the properties of the integrase of HIV-1 subtype B strain HXB2. The consensus enzyme demonstrated similar DNA-binding properties, but was significantly more active than HXB-2 integrase in the reactions of DNA cleavage and integration. All integrases were equally susceptible to inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir, indicating that the sporadic polymorphisms inherent to the HXB-2 enzyme have little effect on its susceptibility to drugs. Insensitivity of the mutated enzymes to the inhibitors of strand transfer occurred at a cost of a 30-90% loss of the efficacies of both 3'-processing and strand transfer. This is the first study to describe the enzymatic properties of the consensus integrase of HIV-1 clade A and the effects of the resistance mutations when the complex actions of sporadic sequence polymorphisms are excluded. PMID:24594066

  12. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Young Hwan; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

  13. Four-tiered {pi} interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive {pi} electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished {pi} interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the {pi} interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this {pi}-{pi} interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  14. Anti-HIV-1 protease- and HIV-1 integrase activities of Thai medicinal plants known as Hua-Khao-Yen.

    PubMed

    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Itharat, Arunporn; Rattanasuwan, Pranee

    2006-04-21

    Ethanolic- and water extracts from five species of Thai medicinal plants known as Hua-Khao-Yen were tested for their inhibitory effects against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) and HIV-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN). The result revealed that the ethanolic (EtOH) extract of Smilax corbularia exhibited anti-HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 1.9 microg/ml, followed by the water extract of Dioscorea birmanica (IC50 = 4.5 microg/ml), the EtOH extract of Dioscorea birmanica (IC50 = 4.7 microg/ml), the water extract of Smilax corbularia (IC50 = 5.4 microg/ml), the EtOH extract of Smilax glabra (IC50 = 6.7 microg/ml) and the water extract of Smilax glabra (IC50 = 8.5 microg/ml). The extracts of Pygmaeopremna herbacea and Dioscorea membranacea were apparently inactive (IC50 > 100 microg/ml). Interestingly, only the EtOH extract of Dioscorea membranacea showed appreciable activity (IC50 = 48 microg/ml) against HIV-1 PR, while the other extracts possessed mild activity. This result strongly supported the basis for the use of Smilax corbularia and Dioscorea membranacea for AIDS treatment by Thai traditional doctors. PMID:16406414

  15. Functional genomics of fuzzless-lintless mutant of Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. MCU5 reveal key genes and pathways involved in cotton fibre initiation and elongation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    fl mutant revealed key genes and pathways involved at various stages of fibre development. Our data implicated the significant role of mitochondria mediated energy metabolism during fibre elongation process. The delayed expression of genes involved in phytohormone signalling and stress responsive TFs in the fl mutant suggests the need for a coordinated expression of regulatory mechanisms in fibre cell initiation and differentiation. PMID:23151214

  16. The crystal structure of necrosis- and ethylene-inducing protein 2 from the causal agent of cacao's Witches' Broom disease reveals key elements for its activity.

    PubMed

    Zaparoli, Gustavo; Barsottini, Mario Ramos de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Dyszy, Fabio; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Barau, Joan Grande; Garcia, Odalys; Costa-Filho, Antonio José; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes

    2011-11-15

    The necrosis- and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (NEP1)-like proteins (NLPs) are proteins secreted from bacteria, fungi and oomycetes, triggering immune responses and cell death in dicotyledonous plants. Genomic-scale studies of Moniliophthora perniciosa, the fungus that causes the Witches' Broom disease in cacao, which is a serious economic concern for South and Central American crops, have identified five members of this family (termed MpNEP1-5). Here, we show by RNA-seq that MpNEP2 is virtually the only NLP expressed during the fungus infection. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction results revealed that MpNEP2 has an expression pattern that positively correlates with the necrotic symptoms, with MpNEP2 reaching its highest level of expression at the advanced necrotic stage. To improve our understanding of MpNEP2's molecular mechanism of action, we determined the crystallographic structure of MpNEP2 at 1.8 Å resolution, unveiling some key structural features. The implications of a cation coordination found in the crystal structure were explored, and we show that MpNEP2, in contrast to another previously described member of the NLP family, NLP(Pya) from Pythium aphanidermatum, does not depend on an ion to accomplish its necrosis- and electrolyte leakage-promoting activities. Results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed the importance of a negatively charged cavity and an unforeseen hydrophobic β-hairpin loop for MpNEP2 activity, thus offering a platform for compound design with implications for disease control. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence assays with MpNEP2 performed in the presence of lipid vesicles of different compositions showed no sign of interaction between the protein and the lipids, implying that MpNEP2 likely requires other anchoring elements from the membrane to promote cytolysis or send death signals.

  17. Structure of adenovirus type 21 knob in complex with CD46 reveals key differences in receptor contacts among species B adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cupelli, Karolina; Müller, Steffen; Persson, B David; Jost, Marco; Arnberg, Niklas; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-04-01

    The complement regulation protein CD46 is the primary attachment receptor for most species B adenoviruses (Ads). However, significant variability exists in sequence and structure among species B Ads in the CD46-binding regions, correlating with differences in affinity. Here, we report a structure-function analysis of the interaction of the species B Ad21 knob with the two N-terminal repeats SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46, CD46-D2. We have determined the structures of the Ad21 knob in its unliganded form as well as in complex with CD46-D2, and we compare the interactions with those observed for the Ad11 knob-CD46-D2 complex. Surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrate that the affinity of Ad21 knobs for CD46-D2 is 22-fold lower than that of the Ad11 knob. The superposition of the Ad21 and Ad11 knob structures in complex with CD46-D2 reveals a substantially different binding mode, providing an explanation for the weaker binding affinity of the Ad21 knob for its receptor. A critical difference in both complex structures is that a key interaction point, the DG loop, protrudes more in the Ad21 knob than in the Ad11 knob. Therefore, the protruding DG loop does not allow CD46-D2 to approach the core of the Ad21 knob as closely as in the Ad11 knob-CD46-D2 complex. In addition, the engagement of CD46-D2 induces a conformational change in the DG loop in the Ad21 knob but not in the Ad11 knob. Our results contribute to a more profound understanding of the CD46-binding mechanism of species B Ads and have relevance for the design of more efficient gene delivery vectors.

  18. Transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq reveals AP-1 pathway as key regulator that green tea may rely on to inhibit lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Hui; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Tichelaar, Jay W; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a promising chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Multiple signaling events have been reported, however, the relative importance of these mechanisms in mediating the chemopreventive function of green tea is unclear. In the present study, to examine the involvement of AP-1 in green tea polyphenols induced tumor inhibition, human NSCLC cell line H1299 and mouse SPON 10 cells were identified as AP-1 dependent, as these two lines exhibit high constitutive AP-1 activity, and when TAM67 expression was induced with doxycycline, cell growth was inhibited and correlated with suppressed AP-1 activity. RNA-seq was used to determine the global transcriptional effects of AP-1 inhibition and also uncover the possible involvement of AP-1 in tea polyphenols induced chemoprevention. TAM67 mediated changes in gene expression were identified, and within down-regulated genes, AP-1 was identified as a key transcription regulator. RNA-seq analysis revealed that Polyphenon E-treated cells shared 293 commonly down-regulated genes within TAM67 expressing H1299 cells, and by analysis of limited Chip-seq data, over 10% of the down-regulated genes contain a direct AP-1 binding site, indicating that Polyphenon E elicits chemopreventive activity by regulating AP-1 target genes. Conditional TAM67 expressing transgenic mice and NSCLC cell lines were used to further confirm that the chemopreventive activity of green tea is AP-1 dependent. Polyphenon E lost its chempreventive function both in vitro and in vivo when AP-1 was inhibited, indicating that AP-1 inhibition is a major pathway through which green tea exhibits chemopreventive effects.

  19. Key role of the wetting layer in revealing the hidden path of Ge/Si(001) Stranski-Krastanow growth onset

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, Moritz; Grydlik, Martyna; Lichtenberger, Herbert; Hrauda, Nina; Fromherz, Thomas; Schaeffler, Friedrich; Bauer, Guenther; Montalenti, Francesco; Vastola, Guglielmo; Miglio, Leo; Beck, Matthew J.

    2009-11-15

    The commonly accepted Stranski-Krastanow model, according to which island formation occurs on top of a wetting layer (WL) of a certain thickness, predicts for the morphological evolution an increasing island aspect ratio with volume. We report on an apparent violation of this thermodynamic understanding of island growth with deposition. In order to investigate the actual onset of three-dimensional islanding and the critical WL thickness in the Ge/Si(001) system, a key issue is controlling the Ge deposition with extremely high resolution [0.025 monolayer (ML)]. Atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence measurements on samples covering the deposition range 1.75-6.1 ML, taken along a Ge deposition gradient on 4 in. Si substrates and at different growth temperatures (T{sub g}), surprisingly reveal that for T{sub g}>675 deg. C steeper multifaceted domes apparently nucleate prior to shallow (105)-faceted pyramids, in a narrow commonly overlooked deposition range. The puzzling experimental findings are explained by a quantitative modeling of the total energy with deposition. We accurately matched ab initio calculations of layer and surface energies to finite-element method simulations of the elastic energy in islands, in order to compare the thermodynamic stability of different island shapes with respect to an increasing WL thickness. Close agreement between modeling and experiments is found, pointing out that the sizeable progressive lowering of the surface energy in the first few MLs of the WL reverts the common understanding of the SK growth onset. Strong similarities between islanding in SiGe and III/V systems are highlighted.

  20. Fundamental studies and development of nickel-catalyzed trifluoromethylthiolation of aryl chlorides: active catalytic species and key roles of ligand and traceless MeCN additive revealed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoyin; Kalvet, Indrek; Englert, Ulli; Schoenebeck, Franziska

    2015-04-01

    A catalytic protocol to convert aryl and heteroaryl chlorides to the corresponding trifluoromethyl sulfides is reported herein. It relies on a relatively inexpensive Ni(cod)2/dppf (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene; dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene) catalyst system and the readily accessible coupling reagent (Me4N)SCF3. Our computational and experimental mechanistic data are consistent with a Ni(0)/Ni(II) cycle and inconsistent with Ni(I) as the reactive species. The relevant intermediates were prepared, characterized by X-ray crystallography, and tested for their catalytic competence. This revealed that a monomeric tricoordinate Ni(I) complex is favored for dppf and Cl whose role was unambiguously assigned as being an off-cycle catalyst deactivation product. Only bidentate ligands with wide bite angles (e.g., dppf) are effective. These bulky ligands render the catalyst resting state as [(P-P)Ni(cod)]. The latter is more reactive than Ni(P-P)2, which was found to be the resting state for ligands with smaller bite angles and suffers from an initial high-energy dissociation of one ligand prior to oxidative addition, rendering the system unreactive. The key to effective catalysis is hence the presence of a labile auxiliary ligand in the catalyst resting state. For more challenging substrates, high conversions were achieved via the employment of MeCN as a traceless additive. Mechanistic data suggest that its beneficial role lies in decreasing the energetic span, therefore accelerating product formation. Finally, the methodology has been applied to synthetic targets of pharmaceutical relevance. PMID:25790253

  1. Discovery of raltegravir, a potent, selective orally bioavailable HIV-integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-AIDS infection.

    PubMed

    Summa, Vincenzo; Petrocchi, Alessia; Bonelli, Fabio; Crescenzi, Benedetta; Donghi, Monica; Ferrara, Marco; Fiore, Fabrizio; Gardelli, Cristina; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Hazuda, Daria J; Jones, Philip; Kinzel, Olaf; Laufer, Ralph; Monteagudo, Edith; Muraglia, Ester; Nizi, Emanuela; Orvieto, Federica; Pace, Paola; Pescatore, Giovanna; Scarpelli, Rita; Stillmock, Kara; Witmer, Marc V; Rowley, Michael

    2008-09-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integrase is one of the three virally encoded enzymes required for replication and therefore a rational target for chemotherapeutic intervention in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We report here the discovery of Raltegravir, the first HIV-integrase inhibitor approved by FDA for the treatment of HIV infection. It derives from the evolution of 5,6-dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxamides and N-methyl-4-hydroxypyrimidinone-carboxamides, which exhibited potent inhibition of the HIV-integrase catalyzed strand transfer process. Structural modifications on these molecules were made in order to maximize potency as HIV-integrase inhibitors against the wild type virus, a selection of mutants, and optimize the selectivity, pharmacokinetic, and metabolic profiles in preclinical species. The good profile of Raltegravir has enabled its progression toward the end of phase III clinical trials for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and culminated with the FDA approval as the first HIV-integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  2. Control of directionality in Streptomyces phage φBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Binyan; Dai, Ruixue; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Streptomyces phage φBT1 integrates its genome into the attB site of the host chromosome with the attP site to generate attL and attR. The φBT1 integrase belongs to the large serine recombinase subfamily which directly binds to target sites to initiate double strand breakage and exchange. A recombination directionality factor (RDF) is commonly required for switching integration to excision. Here we report the characterization of the RDF protein for φBT1 recombination. The RDF, is a phage-encoded gp3 gene product (28 KDa), which allows efficient active excision between attL and attR, and inhibits integration between attB and attP; Gp3 can also catalyze topological relaxation with the integrase of supercoiled plasmids containing a single excision site. Further study showed that Gp3 could form a dimer and interact with the integrase whether it bound to the substrate or not. The synapse formation of attL or attR alone with integrase and Gp3 showed that synapsis did not discriminate between the two sites, indicating that complementarity of central dinucleotides is the sole determinant of outcome in correct excision synapses. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo evidence support that the RDFs of φBT1 and φC31 were fully exchangeable, despite the low amino acid sequence identity of the two integrases.

  3. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions.

  4. Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) exhibits significantly slower dissociation than raltegravir and elvitegravir from wild-type and integrase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 integrase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Kendra E; Wang, Ruolan; Deanda, Felix; Johns, Brian A; Weaver, Kurt; Shen, Yingnian; Tomberlin, Ginger H; Carter, H Luke; Broderick, Timothy; Sigethy, Scott; Seki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R

    2011-10-01

    The integrase inhibitor (INI) dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) has significant activity against HIV-1 isolates with raltegravir (RAL)- and elvitegravir (ELV)-associated resistance mutations. As an initial step in characterizing the different resistance profiles of DTG, RAL, and ELV, we determined the dissociation rates of these INIs with integrase (IN)-DNA complexes containing a broad panel of IN proteins, including IN substitutions corresponding to signature RAL and ELV resistance mutations. DTG dissociates slowly from a wild-type IN-DNA complex at 37°C with an off-rate of 2.7 × 10(-6) s(-1) and a dissociative half-life (t(1/2)) of 71 h, significantly longer than the half-lives for RAL (8.8 h) and ELV (2.7 h). Prolonged binding (t(1/2), at least 5 h) was observed for DTG with IN-DNA complexes containing E92, Y143, Q148, and N155 substitutions. The addition of a second substitution to either Q148 or N155 typically resulted in an increase in the off-rate compared to that with the single substitution. For all of the IN substitutions tested, the off-rate of DTG from IN-DNA complexes was significantly slower (from 5 to 40 times slower) than the off-rate of RAL or ELV. These data are consistent with the potential for DTG to have a higher genetic barrier to resistance, provide evidence that the INI off-rate may be an important component of the mechanism of INI resistance, and suggest that the slow dissociation of DTG may contribute to its distinctive resistance profile.

  5. Treating chemical diversity in QSAR analysis: modeling diverse HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using 4D fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Manisha; Hopfinger, A J

    2007-01-01

    A set of 213 compounds across 12 structurally diverse classes of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors was used to develop and evaluate a combined clustering and QSAR modeling methodology to construct significant, reliable, and robust models for structurally diverse data sets. The trial-descriptor pool for both clustering- and QSAR-model building consisted of 4D fingerprints and classic QSAR descriptors. Clustering was carried out using a combination of the partitioning around medoids method and divisive hierarchical clustering. QSAR models were constructed for members of each cluster by linear-regression fitting and model optimization using the genetic function approximation. The 12 structurally diverse classes of integrase inhbitors were partitioned into five clusters from which corresponding QSAR models, overwhelmingly composed of 4D fingerprint descriptors, were constructed. Analysis of the five QSAR models suggests that three models correspond to structurally diverse inhibitors that likely bind at a common site on integrase characterized by a common inhibitor hydrogen-bond donor, but involving somewhat different alignments and/or poses for the inhibitors of each of the three clusters. The particular alignments for the inhibitors of each of the three QSAR models involve specific distributions of nonpolar groups over the inhibitors. The two other clusters, one for coumarins and the other for depsides and depsidones, lead to QSAR models with less-defined pharmacophores, likely representing an inhibitor binding to a site(s) different from that of the other nine classes of inhibitors. Overall, the clustering and QSAR methodology employed in this study suggests that it can meaningfully partition structurally diverse compounds expressing a common endpoint in such a manner that leads to statistically significant and pharmacologically insightful composite QSAR models. PMID:17661457

  6. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways. PMID:27417934

  7. Effects of etravirine on the pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor S/GSK1265744.

    PubMed

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigational integrase inhibitor in phase 2 studies. Healthy subjects received 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 alone once daily for 10 days (period 1) and in combination with 200 mg of ETR twice daily for 14 days (period 2). Serial plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected on day 10 during period 1 and on day 14 during period 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Etravirine had no effects on S/GSK1265744 geometric mean ratios of the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosing interval (1.01; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.956 to 1.06), of the maximum observed plasma concentration (1.04; 90% CI, 0.987 to 1.09), or of the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (0.999; 90% CI, 0.942 to 1.06). Etravirine pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters observed following coadministration with S/GSK1265744 were in the range of historical values reported for ETR alone in healthy subjects. These results indicate that 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 for 10 days as monotherapy followed by an additional 14 days in combination with ETR was well tolerated in healthy subjects and that no dose adjustment of S/GSK1265744 is required when it is coadministered with ETR. PMID:23114768

  8. Effects of Etravirine on the Pharmacokinetics of the Integrase Inhibitor S/GSK1265744

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigational integrase inhibitor in phase 2 studies. Healthy subjects received 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 alone once daily for 10 days (period 1) and in combination with 200 mg of ETR twice daily for 14 days (period 2). Serial plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected on day 10 during period 1 and on day 14 during period 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Etravirine had no effects on S/GSK1265744 geometric mean ratios of the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosing interval (1.01; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.956 to 1.06), of the maximum observed plasma concentration (1.04; 90% CI, 0.987 to 1.09), or of the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (0.999; 90% CI, 0.942 to 1.06). Etravirine pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters observed following coadministration with S/GSK1265744 were in the range of historical values reported for ETR alone in healthy subjects. These results indicate that 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 for 10 days as monotherapy followed by an additional 14 days in combination with ETR was well tolerated in healthy subjects and that no dose adjustment of S/GSK1265744 is required when it is coadministered with ETR. PMID:23114768

  9. Electronic transitions of neutral and anionic quinolinone HIV-1 integrase inhibitor: Joint theory/experiment investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandurm, Pierre; Cauvin, Christine; Wouters, Johan; Perpète, Eric A.; Jacquemin, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In this joint experimental and theoretical study, the solution-state conformation of [6-bromo-1-(4-fluorophenylmethyl)-4(1 H)-quinolinon-3-yl)]-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-butenoïc acid (QDKA), a potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitor, is investigated by using UV-visible spectroscopy and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory. The neutral, mono-anionic and di-anionic species have been identified and their spectral characteristics rationalized. The possibility of forming enol tautomers and keto structures is assessed.

  10. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an Inhibitor Scaffold of HIV Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Sham, Yuk Y.; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold. PMID:21381765

  11. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an inhibitor scaffold of HIV integrase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Sham, Yuk Y; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-04-14

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling, and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Key Flavonoid 3'-Hydroxylase and Flavonoid 3',5'-Hydroxylase Genes in Affecting the Ratio of Dihydroxylated to Trihydroxylated Catechins in Camellia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Liyuan; Zhang, Chengcai; Wu, Liyun; Li, Hailin; Zhang, Fen; Cheng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of dihydroxylated to trihydroxylated catechins (RDTC) is an important indicator of tea quality and biochemical marker for the study of genetic diversity. It is reported to be under genetic control but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) are key enzymes involved in the formation of dihydroxylated and trihydroxylated catechins. The transcriptome and HPLC analysis of tea samples from Longjing43 and Zhonghuang2 under control and shading treatment were performed to assess the F3'H and F3'5'H genes that might affect RDTC. A total of 74.7 million reads of mRNA seq (2×101bp) data were generated. After de novo assembly, 109,909 unigenes were obtained, and 39,982 of them were annotated using 7 public databases. Four key F3'H and F3'5'H genes (including CsF3'5'H1, CsF3'H1, CsF3'H2 and CsF3'H3) were identified to be closely correlated with RDTC. Shading treatment had little effect on RDTC, which was attributed to the stable expression of these key F3'H and F3'5'H genes. The correlation of the coexpression of four key genes and RDTC was further confirmed among 13 tea varieties by real time PCR and HPLC analysis. The coexpression of three F3'H genes and a F3'5'H gene may play a key role in affecting RDTC in Camellia sinensis. The current results may establish valuable foundation for further research about the mechanism controlling catechin composition in tea.

  13. Design and synthesis of bicyclic pyrimidinones as potent and orally bioavailable HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Muraglia, Ester; Kinzel, Olaf; Gardelli, Cristina; Crescenzi, Benedetta; Donghi, Monica; Ferrara, Marco; Nizi, Emanuela; Orvieto, Federica; Pescatore, Giovanna; Laufer, Ralph; Gonzalez-Paz, Odalys; Di Marco, Annalise; Fiore, Fabrizio; Monteagudo, Edith; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Felock, Peter J; Rowley, Michael; Summa, Vincenzo

    2008-02-28

    HIV integrase is one of the three enzymes encoded by HIV genome and is essential for viral replication, but integrase inhibitors as marketed drugs have just very recently started to emerge. In this study, we show the evolution from the N-methylpyrimidinone structure to bicyclic pyrimidinones. Introduction of a suitably substituted amino moiety modulated the physical-chemical properties of the molecules and conferred nanomolar activity in the inhibition of spread of HIV-1 infection in cell culture. An extensive SAR study led to sulfamide (R)- 22b, which inhibited the strand transfer with an IC50 of 7 nM and HIV infection in MT4 cells with a CIC95 of 44 nM, and ketoamide (S)- 28c that inhibited strand transfer with an IC50 of 12 nM and the HIV infection in MT4 cells with a CIC95 of 13 nM and exhibited a good pharmacokinetic profile when dosed orally to preclinical species.

  14. HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: design, synthesis and molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; De Grazia, Sara; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on a new series of benzylindole derivatives with various substituents at the benzene-fused ring, suggested by our 3D pharmacophore model developed for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs). All synthesized compounds proved to be active in the nanomolar range (6-35 nM) on the strand-transfer step (ST). In particular, derivative 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5,7-dimethoxy-1H-indol-3-yl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid (8e), presenting the highest best-fit value on pharmacophore model, showed a potency comparable to that of clinical INSTIs GS 9137 (1) and MK-0518 (2). The binding mode of our molecules has been investigated using the recently published crystal structure of the complex of full-length integrase from the prototype foamy virus in complex with its cognate DNA (PFV-IN/DNA). The results highlighted the ability of derivative 8e to assume the same binding mode of MK-0518 and GS 9137.

  15. Characterization of the minimal DNA-binding domain of the HIV integrase protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lutzke, R A; Vink, C; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) protein mediates an essential step in the retroviral lifecycle, the integration of viral DNA into human DNA. A DNA-binding domain of HIV IN has previously been identified in the C-terminal part of the protein. We tested truncated proteins of the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN for DNA binding activity in two different assays: UV-crosslinking and southwestern blot analysis. We found that a polypeptide fragment of 50 amino acids (IN220-270) is sufficient for DNA binding. In contrast to full-length IN protein, this domain is soluble under low salt conditions. DNA binding of IN220-270 to both viral DNA and non-specific DNA occurs in an ion-independent fashion. Point mutations were introduced in 10 different amino acid residues of the DNA-binding domain of HIV-2 IN. Mutation of basic amino acid K264 results in strong reduction of DNA binding and of integrase activity. Images PMID:7937137

  16. Activities of the feline immunodeficiency virus integrase protein produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; van der Linden, K H; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    Retroviral DNA integration requires the activity of at least one viral protein, the integrase (IN) protein. We cloned and expressed the integrase gene of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in Escherichia coli as a fusion to the malE gene and purified the IN fusion protein by affinity chromatography. The protein is active in site-specific cleavage of the viral DNA ends, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration. FIV IN has a relaxed viral DNA substrate requirement: it cleaves and integrates FIV DNA termini, human immunodeficiency virus DNA ends, and Moloney murine leukemia virus DNA ends with high efficiencies. In the cleavage reaction, IN exposes a specific phosphodiester bond near the viral DNA end to nucleophilic attack. In vitro, either H2O, glycerol, or the 3' OH group of the viral DNA terminus can serve as nucleophile in this reaction. We found that FIV IN preferentially uses the 3' OH ends of the viral DNA as nucleophile, whereas HIV IN protein preferentially uses H2O and glycerol as nucleophiles. Images PMID:8107210

  17. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process.

  18. Early onset of autoimmune disease by the retroviral integrase inhibitor raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Beck-Engeser, Gabriele B; Eilat, Dan; Harrer, Thomas; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Raltegravir is a recently, Food and Drug Administration-approved, small-molecule drug that inhibits retroviral integrase, thereby preventing HIV DNA from inserting itself into the human genome. We report here that the activity profile of raltegravir on the replication of murine leukemia virus is similar to that for HIV, and that the drug specifically affects autoimmune disease in mice, in which endogenous retroelements are suspected to play a role. While NZW and BALB/c mice, which do not succumb to autoimmune disease, are not affected by raltegravir, lupus-prone (NZBxNZW) F(1) mice die of glomerulonephritis more than a month earlier than untreated mice. Raltegravir-treated NZB mice, which share the H-2 haplotype with BALB/c mice, but which are predisposed to autoimmune hemolytic anemia, develop auto-antibodies to their red blood cells >3 months earlier than untreated mice of the same strain. Because nonautoimmune mice are not affected by raltegravir, we consider off-target effects unlikely and attribute the exacerbation of autoimmunity to the inhibition of retroviral integrase. PMID:19923437

  19. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process. PMID:26116177

  20. Site-specific transformation of Drosophila via phiC31 integrase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Jack R; Lee, Anne M; Wu, C-ting

    2006-06-01

    Position effects can complicate transgene analyses. This is especially true when comparing transgenes that have inserted randomly into different genomic positions and are therefore subject to varying position effects. Here, we introduce a method for the precise targeting of transgenic constructs to predetermined genomic sites in Drosophila using the C31 integrase system in conjunction with recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We demonstrate the feasibility of this system using two donor cassettes, one carrying the yellow gene and the other carrying GFP. At all four genomic sites tested, we observed exchange of donor cassettes with an integrated target cassette carrying the mini-white gene. Furthermore, because RMCE-mediated integration of the donor cassette is necessarily accompanied by loss of the target cassette, we were able to identify integrants simply by the loss of mini-white eye color. Importantly, this feature of the technology will permit integration of unmarked constructs into Drosophila, even those lacking functional genes. Thus, C31 integrase-mediated RMCE should greatly facilitate transgene analysis as well as permit new experimental designs. PMID:16547094

  1. GC/MS-based metabolomic studies reveal key roles of glycine in regulating silk synthesis in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanmei; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinjie; Xiong, Ying; Xu, Guowang; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic profiling of silkworm, especially the factors that affect silk synthesis at the metabolic level, is little known. Herein, metabolomic method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to identify key metabolic changes in silk synthesis deficient silkworms. Forty-six differential metabolites were identified in Nd group with the defect of silk synthesis. Significant changes in the levels of glycine and uric acid (up-regulation), carbohydrates and free fatty acids (down-regulation) were observed. The further metabolomics of silk synthesis deficient silkworms by decreasing silk proteins synthesis using knocking out fibroin heavy chain gene or extirpating silk glands operation showed that the changes of the metabolites were almost consistent with those of the Nd group. Furthermore, the increased silk yields by supplying more glycine or its related metabolite confirmed that glycine is a key metabolite to regulate silk synthesis. These findings provide important insights into the regulation between metabolic profiling and silk synthesis.

  2. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Rasaee, Mohammad J.

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Expression profiles of key phenylpropanoid genes during Vanilla planifolia pod development reveal a positive correlation between PAL gene expression and vanillin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Palama, Tony Lionel; Bory, Séverine; Lécolier, Aurélie; Noirot, Michel; Joët, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In Vanilla planifolia pods, development of flavor precursors is dependent on the phenylpropanoid pathway. The distinctive vanilla aroma is produced by numerous phenolic compounds of which vanillin is the most important. Because of the economic importance of vanilla, vanillin biosynthetic pathways have been extensively studied but agreement has not yet been reached on the processes leading to its accumulation. In order to explore the transcriptional control exerted on these pathways, five key phenylpropanoid genes expressed during pod development were identified and their mRNA accumulation profiles were evaluated during pod development and maturation using quantitative real-time PCR. As a prerequisite for expression analysis using qRT-PCR, five potential reference genes were tested, and two genes encoding Actin and EF1 were shown to be the most stable reference genes for accurate normalization during pod development. For the first time, genes encoding a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (VpPAL1) and a cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (VpC4H1) were identified in vanilla pods and studied during maturation. Among phenylpropanoid genes, differential regulation was observed from 3 to 8 months after pollination. VpPAL1 was gradually up-regulated, reaching the maximum expression level at maturity. In contrast, genes encoding 4HBS, C4H, OMT2 and OMT3 did not show significant increase in expression levels after the fourth month post-pollination. Expression profiling of these key phenylpropanoid genes is also discussed in light of accumulation patterns for key phenolic compounds. Interestingly, VpPAL1 gene expression was shown to be positively correlated to maturation and vanillin accumulation.

  4. Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella.

    PubMed

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-05-01

    African bovids are a famous example of a taxonomic group in which the correlated evolution of body size, feeding mode, gregariousness, and social organization in relation to the preferred habitat type has been investigated. A continuum has been described ranging from small-bodied, sedentary, solitary or socially monogamous, forest- or bush-dwelling, browsing species that seek shelter from predation in dense vegetation, to large-bodied, migratory, highly gregarious, grazing taxa inhabiting open savannahs and relying on flight or group-defense behaviors when facing predators. Here, we examined a geographically widespread clade within the Bovidae (the genus Gazella) that shows minimal interspecific variation in body size and asked if we could still uncover correlated changes of key ecological and behavioral traits during repeated transitions from open-land to mountain-dwelling. Our study used a multi-locus phylogeny (based on sequence variation of Cytb and six nuclear intron markers) of all extant members of the genus Gazella to infer evolutionary patterns of key ecological and behavioral traits and to estimate ancestral character states using Bayesian inference. At the base of the Gazella-phylogeny, open plains were inferred as the most likely habitat type, and three independent transitions toward mountain-dwelling were uncovered. Those shifts coincided with shifts from migratory to sedentary lifestyles. Character estimation for group size was largely congruent with movement patterns in that species forming large groups tended to be migratory, while small group size was correlated with a sedentary lifestyle. Evolutionary patterns of two other conspicuous traits (twinning ability vs. exclusive singleton births and hornless vs. horned females) did not follow this trend in the Gazella-phylogeny. Furthermore, we inferred the genus Gazella to have emerged in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (10-3Mya), and estimating ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal

  5. Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella.

    PubMed

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-05-01

    African bovids are a famous example of a taxonomic group in which the correlated evolution of body size, feeding mode, gregariousness, and social organization in relation to the preferred habitat type has been investigated. A continuum has been described ranging from small-bodied, sedentary, solitary or socially monogamous, forest- or bush-dwelling, browsing species that seek shelter from predation in dense vegetation, to large-bodied, migratory, highly gregarious, grazing taxa inhabiting open savannahs and relying on flight or group-defense behaviors when facing predators. Here, we examined a geographically widespread clade within the Bovidae (the genus Gazella) that shows minimal interspecific variation in body size and asked if we could still uncover correlated changes of key ecological and behavioral traits during repeated transitions from open-land to mountain-dwelling. Our study used a multi-locus phylogeny (based on sequence variation of Cytb and six nuclear intron markers) of all extant members of the genus Gazella to infer evolutionary patterns of key ecological and behavioral traits and to estimate ancestral character states using Bayesian inference. At the base of the Gazella-phylogeny, open plains were inferred as the most likely habitat type, and three independent transitions toward mountain-dwelling were uncovered. Those shifts coincided with shifts from migratory to sedentary lifestyles. Character estimation for group size was largely congruent with movement patterns in that species forming large groups tended to be migratory, while small group size was correlated with a sedentary lifestyle. Evolutionary patterns of two other conspicuous traits (twinning ability vs. exclusive singleton births and hornless vs. horned females) did not follow this trend in the Gazella-phylogeny. Furthermore, we inferred the genus Gazella to have emerged in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (10-3Mya), and estimating ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal

  6. Site-specific bacterial chromosome engineering: ΦC31 integrase mediated cassette exchange (IMCE).

    PubMed

    Heil, John R; Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2012-03-16

    The bacterial chromosome may be used to stably maintain foreign DNA in the mega-base range. Integration into the chromosome circumvents issues such as plasmid replication, plasmid stability, plasmid incompatibility, and plasmid copy number variance. This method uses the site-specific integrase from the Streptomyces phage (Φ) C31. The ΦC31 integrase catalyzes a direct recombination between two specific DNA sites: attB and attP (34 and 39 bp, respectively). This recombination is stable and does not revert. A "landing pad" (LP) sequence consisting of a spectinomycin-resistance gene, aadA (SpR), and the E. coli ß-glucuronidase gene (uidA) flanked by attP sites has been integrated into the chromosomes of Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens in an intergenic region, the ampC locus, and the tetA locus, respectively. S. meliloti is used in this protocol. Mobilizable donor vectors containing attB sites flanking a stuffer red fluorescent protein (rfp) gene and an antibiotic resistance gene have also been constructed. In this example the gentamicin resistant plasmid pJH110 is used. The rfp gene may be replaced with a desired construct using SphI and PstI. Alternatively a synthetic construct flanked by attB sites may be sub-cloned into a mobilizable vector such as pK19mob. The expression of the ΦC31 integrase gene (cloned from pHS62) is driven by the lac promoter, on a mobilizable broad host range plasmid pRK7813. A tetraparental mating protocol is used to transfer the donor cassette into the LP strain thereby replacing the markers in the LP sequence with the donor cassette. These cells are trans-integrants. Trans-integrants are formed with a typical efficiency of 0.5%. Trans-integrants are typically found within the first 500-1,000 colonies screened by antibiotic sensitivity or blue-white screening using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-glucuronic acid (X-gluc). This protocol contains the mating and selection procedures for

  7. Therapy-Emergent Drug Resistance to Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors in HIV-1 Patients: A Subgroup Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongren; Huang, Xiaojun; Qin, Zhen; Deng, Zhaomin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are a novel class of anti-HIV agents that show high activity in inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Currently, licensed INSTIs include raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG); these drugs have played a critical role in AIDS therapy, serving as additional weapons in the arsenal for treating patients infected with HIV-1. To date, long-term data regarding clinical experience with INSTI use and the emergence of resistance remain scarce. However, the literature is likely now sufficiently comprehensive to warrant a meta-analysis of resistance to INSTIs. Methods Our team implemented a manuscript retrieval protocol using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) via the Web of Science, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We screened the literature based on inclusion and exclusion criteria and then performed a quality analysis and evaluation using RevMan software, Stata software, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). We also performed a subgroup analysis. Finally, we calculated resistance rates and risk ratios (RRs) for the three types of drugs. Results We identified 26 references via the database search. A meta-analysis of the RAL data revealed that the resistance rate was 3.9% (95% CI = 2.9%-4.9%) for the selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the RAL resistance rate reached 40.9% (95% CI = 8.8%-72.9%) for the selected observational studies (OBSs). The rates of resistance to RAL that were associated with HIV subtypes A, B, and C as well as with more complex subtypes were 0.1% (95% CI = -0.7%-0.9%), 2.5% (95% CI = 0.5%-4.5%), 4.6% (95% CI = 2.7%-6.6%) and 2.2% (95% CI = 0.7%-3.7%), respectively. The rates of resistance to EVG and DTG were 1.2% (95% CI = 0.2%-2.2%) and 0.1% (95% CI = -0.2%-0.5%), respectively. Furthermore, we found that the RRs for antiviral resistance were 0.414 (95% CI = 0.210–0

  8. Efficient Gap Repair Catalyzed In Vitro by an Intrinsic DNA Polymerase Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Acel, Andrea; Udashkin, Brian E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Faust, Emmanuel A.

    1998-01-01

    Cleavage and DNA joining reactions, carried out by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase, are necessary to effect the covalent insertion of HIV-1 DNA into the host genome. For the integration of HIV-1 DNA into the cellular genome to be completed, short gaps flanking the integrated proviral DNA must be repaired. It has been widely assumed that host cell DNA repair enzymes are involved. Here we report that HIV-1 integrase multimers possess an intrinsic DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. The activity was characterized by its dependence on Mg2+, resistance to N-ethylmaleimide, and inhibition by 3′-azido-2′,3′-dideoxythymidine-5′-triphosphate, coumermycin A1, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. The enzyme efficiently utilized poly(dA)-oligo(dT) or self-annealing oligonucleotides as a template primer but displayed relatively low activity with gapped calf thymus DNA and no activity with poly(dA) or poly(rA)-oligo(dT). A monoclonal antibody binding specifically to an epitope comprised of amino acids 264 to 273 near the C terminus of HIV-1 integrase severely inhibited the DNA polymerase activity. A deletion of 50 amino acids at the C terminus of integrase drastically altered the gel filtration properties of the DNA polymerase, although the level of activity was unaffected by this mutation. The DNA polymerase efficiently extended a hairpin DNA primer up to 19 nucleotides on a T20 DNA template, although addition of the last nucleotide occurred infrequently or not at all. The ability of integrase to repair gaps in DNA was also investigated. We designed a series of gapped molecules containing a single-stranded region flanked by a duplex U5 viral arm on one side and by a duplex nonviral arm on the other side. Molecules varied structurally depending on the size of the gap (one, two, five, or seven nucleotides), their content of T’s or C’s in the single-stranded region, whether the CA dinucleotide in the viral arm had been replaced with a nonviral

  9. A systematic High-Content Screening microscopy approach reveals key roles for Rab33b, OATL1 and Myo6 in nanoparticle trafficking in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Panarella, Angela; Bexiga, Mariana G.; Galea, George; O’ Neill, Elaine D.; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Simpson, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles are promising tools for imaging and drug delivery; however the molecular details of cellular internalization and trafficking await full characterization. Current knowledge suggests that following endocytosis most nanoparticles pass from endosomes to lysosomes. In order to design effective drug delivery strategies that can use the endocytic pathway, or by-pass lysosomal accumulation, a comprehensive understanding of nanoparticle uptake and trafficking mechanisms is therefore fundamental. Here we describe and apply an RNA interference-based high-content screening microscopy strategy to assess the intracellular trafficking of fluorescently-labeled polystyrene nanoparticles in HeLa cells. We screened a total of 408 genes involved in cytoskeleton and membrane function, revealing roles for myosin VI, Rab33b and OATL1 in this process. This work provides the first systematic large-scale quantitative assessment of the proteins responsible for nanoparticle trafficking in cells, paving the way for subsequent genome-wide studies. PMID:27374232

  10. A Comprehensive Mutational Analysis of the Arabidopsis Resistance Protein RPW8.2 Reveals Key Amino Acids for Defense Activation and Protein Targeting[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Zhang, Yi; Wen, Yingqiang; Berkey, Robert; Ma, Xianfeng; Pan, Zhiyong; Bendigeri, Dipti; King, Harlan; Zhang, Qiong; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana RESISTANCE TO POWDERY MILDEW8.2 (RPW8.2) protein is specifically targeted to the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM) encasing the haustorium, or fungal feeding structure, where RPW8.2 activates broad-spectrum resistance against powdery mildew pathogens. How RPW8.2 activates defenses at a precise subcellular locale is not known. Here, we report a comprehensive mutational analysis in which more than 100 RPW8.2 mutants were functionally evaluated for their defense and trafficking properties. We show that three amino acid residues (i.e., threonine-64, valine-68, and aspartic acid-116) are critical for RPW8.2-mediated cell death and resistance to powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum UCSC1). Also, we reveal that two arginine (R)– or lysine (K)–enriched short motifs (i.e., R/K-R/K-x-R/K) make up the likely core EHM-targeting signals, which, together with the N-terminal transmembrane domain, define a minimal sequence of 60 amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for EHM localization. In addition, some RPW8.2 mutants localize to the nucleus and/or to a potentially novel membrane that wraps around plastids or plastid-derived stromules. Results from this study not only reveal critical amino acid elements in RPW8.2 that enable haustorium-targeted trafficking and defense, but also provide evidence for the existence of a specific, EHM-oriented membrane trafficking pathway in leaf epidermal cells invaded by powdery mildew. PMID:24151293

  11. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Maize mosaic rhabdovirus-infected gut tissues of Peregrinus maidis reveals the presence of key components of insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, A E; Rotenberg, D; Aritua, V; Hogenhout, S A

    2011-04-01

    The corn planthopper, Peregrinus maidis, causes direct feeding damage to plants and transmits Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV) in a persistent-propagative manner. MMV must cross several insect tissue layers for successful transmission to occur, and the gut serves as an important barrier for rhabdovirus transmission. In order to facilitate the identification of proteins that may interact with MMV either by facilitating acquisition or responding to virus infection, we generated and analysed the gut transcriptome of P. maidis. From two normalized cDNA libraries, we generated a P. maidis gut transcriptome composed of 20,771 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Assembly of the sequences yielded 1860 contigs and 14,032 singletons, and biological roles were assigned to 5793 (36%). Comparison of P. maidis ESTs with other insect amino acid sequences revealed that P. maidis shares greatest sequence similarity with another hemipteran, the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. We identified 202 P. maidis transcripts with putative homology to proteins associated with insect innate immunity, including those implicated in the Toll, Imd, JAK/STAT, Jnk and the small-interfering RNA-mediated pathways. Sequence comparisons between our P. maidis gut EST collection and the currently available National Center for Biotechnology Information EST database collection for Ni. lugens revealed that a pathogen recognition receptor in the Imd pathway, peptidoglycan recognition protein-long class (PGRP-LC), is present in these two members of the family Delphacidae; however, these recognition receptors are lacking in the model hemipteran Acyrthosiphon pisum. In addition, we identified sequences in the P. maidis gut transcriptome that share significant amino acid sequence similarities with the rhabdovirus receptor molecule, acetylcholine receptor (AChR), found in other hosts. This EST analysis sheds new light on immune response pathways in hemipteran guts that will be useful for further dissecting innate

  12. A molecular mechanism for the origin of a key evolutionary innovation, the bird beak and palate, revealed by an integrative approach to major transitions in vertebrate history.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Morris, Zachary S; Sefton, Elizabeth M; Tok, Atalay; Tokita, Masayoshi; Namkoong, Bumjin; Camacho, Jasmin; Burnham, David A; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2015-07-01

    The avian beak is a key evolutionary innovation whose flexibility has permitted birds to diversify into a range of disparate ecological niches. We approached the problem of the mechanism behind this innovation using an approach bridging paleontology, comparative anatomy, and experimental developmental biology. First, we used fossil and extant data to show the beak is distinctive in consisting of fused premaxillae that are geometrically distinct from those of ancestral archosaurs. To elucidate underlying developmental mechanisms, we examined candidate gene expression domains in the embryonic face: the earlier frontonasal ectodermal zone (FEZ) and the later midfacial WNT-responsive region, in birds and several reptiles. This permitted the identification of an autapomorphic median gene expression region in Aves. To test the mechanism, we used inhibitors of both pathways to replicate in chicken the ancestral amniote expression. Altering the FEZ altered later WNT responsiveness to the ancestral pattern. Skeletal phenotypes from both types of experiments had premaxillae that clustered geometrically with ancestral fossil forms instead of beaked birds. The palatal region was also altered to a more ancestral phenotype. This is consistent with the fossil record and with the tight functional association of avian premaxillae and palate in forming a kinetic beak.

  13. Selection and Counterselection of Hia Expression Reveals a Key Role for Phase-Variable Expression of Hia in Infection Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Winter, Linda E.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Barenkamp, Stephen J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Hia is a major adhesin of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and has long been investigated as a vaccine candidate. Here we show that Hia phase variation is controlled by changes in the length of a polythymidine tract located in the hia promoter. Studies of an invasive clinical isolate (strain R2866) show that strains expressing high Hia levels are more efficiently killed by opsonophagocytosis. An opsonophagocytic assay was used to select for a subpopulation of variants that expressed a low level of Hia, which facilitated their escape from killing by anti-Hia antisera. Conversely, a subpopulation of variants expressing a high level of Hia was selected for during passaging through Chang cells. In both cases, phase variation of Hia expression corresponded directly with discrete modal changes in polythymidine tract length. In the chinchilla model of NTHi infection, we observed consistent selection for high Hia expression upon nasopharyngeal colonization, confirming the key role of phase-variable expression of Hia within a specific niche in vivo. PMID:25712964

  14. Long-acting integrase inhibitor protects macaques from intrarectal simian/human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Chasity D; Spreen, William R; Mohri, Hiroshi; Moss, Lee; Ford, Susan; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Bohm, Rudolf P; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Markowitz, Martin; Ho, David D

    2014-03-01

    GSK1265744 (GSK744) is an integrase strand-transfer inhibitor that has been formulated as a long-acting (LA) injectable suitable for monthly to quarterly clinical administration. GSK744 LA was administered at two time points 4 weeks apart beginning 1 week before virus administration, and macaques were challenged weekly for 8 weeks. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all animals against repeated low-dose challenges. In a second experiment, macaques were given GSK744 LA 1 week before virus administration and challenged repeatedly until infection occurred. Protection decreased over time and correlated with the plasma drug levels. With a quarterly dosing schedule in humans, our results suggest that GSK744 LA could potentially decrease adherence problems associated with daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

  15. Raltegravir, elvitegravir, and metoogravir: the birth of "me-too" HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Odde, Srinivas; Ramkumar, Kavya; Neamati, Nouri

    2009-01-01

    Merck's MK-0518, known as raltegravir, has recently become the first FDA-approved HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor and has since risen to blockbuster drug status. Much research has in turn been conducted over the last few years aimed at recreating but optimizing the compound's interactions with the protein. Resulting me-too drugs have shown favorable pharmacokinetic properties and appear drug-like but, as expected, most have a highly similar interaction with IN to that of raltegravir. We propose that, based upon conclusions drawn from our docking studies illustrated herein, most of these me-too MK-0518 analogues may experience a low success rate against raltegravir-resistant HIV strains. As HIV has a very high mutational competence, the development of drugs with new mechanisms of inhibitory action and/or new active substituents may be a more successful route to take in the development of second- and third-generation IN inhibitors. PMID:19265512

  16. Altering murine leukemia virus integration through disruption of the integrase and BET protein family interaction.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Sriram; Swapna, G V T; Malani, Nirav; Aramini, James M; Schneider, William M; Plumb, Matthew R; Ghanem, Mustafa; Larue, Ross C; Sharma, Amit; Studamire, Barbara; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Bushman, Frederic D; Montelione, Gaetano T; Roth, Monica J

    2014-05-01

    We report alterations to the murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase (IN) protein that successfully result in decreasing its integration frequency at transcription start sites and CpG islands, thereby reducing the potential for insertional activation. The host bromo and extraterminal (BET) proteins Brd2, 3 and 4 interact with the MLV IN protein primarily through the BET protein ET domain. Using solution NMR, protein interaction studies, and next generation sequencing, we show that the C-terminal tail peptide region of MLV IN is important for the interaction with BET proteins and that disruption of this interaction through truncation mutations affects the global targeting profile of MLV vectors. The use of the unstructured tails of gammaretroviral INs to direct association with complexes at active promoters parallels that used by histones and RNA polymerase II. Viruses bearing MLV IN C-terminal truncations can provide new avenues to improve the safety profile of gammaretroviral vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:24623816

  17. Altering murine leukemia virus integration through disruption of the integrase and BET protein family interaction

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Sriram; Swapna, G.V.T.; Malani, Nirav; Aramini, James M.; Schneider, William M.; Plumb, Matthew R.; Ghanem, Mustafa; Larue, Ross C.; Sharma, Amit; Studamire, Barbara; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Bushman, Frederic D.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Roth, Monica J.

    2014-01-01

    We report alterations to the murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase (IN) protein that successfully result in decreasing its integration frequency at transcription start sites and CpG islands, thereby reducing the potential for insertional activation. The host bromo and extraterminal (BET) proteins Brd2, 3 and 4 interact with the MLV IN protein primarily through the BET protein ET domain. Using solution NMR, protein interaction studies, and next generation sequencing, we show that the C-terminal tail peptide region of MLV IN is important for the interaction with BET proteins and that disruption of this interaction through truncation mutations affects the global targeting profile of MLV vectors. The use of the unstructured tails of gammaretroviral INs to direct association with complexes at active promoters parallels that used by histones and RNA polymerase II. Viruses bearing MLV IN C-terminal truncations can provide new avenues to improve the safety profile of gammaretroviral vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:24623816

  18. Novel quinolinonyl diketo acid derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: design, synthesis, and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Roux, Alessandra; Miele, Gaetano; Crucitti, Giuliana Cuzzucoli; Iacovo, Alberto; Rosi, Federica; Lavecchia, Antonio; Marinelli, Luciana; Di Giovanni, Carmen; Novellino, Ettore; Palmisano, Lucia; Andreotti, Mauro; Amici, Roberta; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2008-08-14

    Novel quinolinonyl diketo acids were designed to obtain integrase (IN) inhibitors selectively active against the strand transfer (ST) step of the HIV integration process. Those new compounds are characterized by a single aryl diketo acid (DKA) chain in comparison to 4, a bifunctional diketo acid reported by our group as an anti-IN agent highly potent against both the 3'-processing and ST steps. Compound 6d was the most potent derivative in IN enzyme assays, while 6i showed the highest potency against HIV-1 in acutely infected cells. The selective inhibition of ST suggested the newly designed monofunctional DKAs bind the IN-DNA acceptor site without affecting the DNA donor site.

  19. Investigating the role of metal chelation in HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Sinisi, Valentina; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-12-22

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) has been validated as an attractive target for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Several studies have confirmed that the metal binding function is a crucial feature in many of the reported IN inhibitors. To provide new insights on the metal chelating mechanism of IN inhibitors, we prepared a series of metal complexes of two ligands (HL1 and HL2), designed as representative models of the clinically used compounds raltegravir and elvitegravir. Potentiometric measurements were conducted for HL2 in the presence of Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) in order to delineate a metal speciation model. We also determined the X-ray structures of both of the ligands and of three representative metal complexes. Our results support the hypothesis that several selective strand transfer inhibitors preferentially chelate one cation in solution and that the metal complexes can interact with the active site of the enzyme.

  20. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2012-12-15

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck's raltegravir and Gilead's elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5-positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant.

  1. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (<300 Da) screened using primarily biophysical assays. FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs. PMID:26324045

  2. In Situ Analysis of Metabolic Characteristics Reveals the Key Yeast in the Spontaneous and Solid-State Fermentation Process of Chinese Light-Style Liquor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yu; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The in situ metabolic characteristics of the yeasts involved in spontaneous fermentation process of Chinese light-style liquor are poorly understood. The covariation between metabolic profiles and yeast communities in Chinese light-style liquor was modeled using the partial least square (PLS) regression method. The diversity of yeast species was evaluated by sequence analysis of the 26S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1/D2 domains of cultivable yeasts, and the volatile compounds in fermented grains were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). Eight yeast species and 58 volatile compounds were identified, respectively. The modulation of 16 of these volatile compounds was associated with variations in the yeast population (goodness of prediction [Q2] > 20%). The results showed that Pichia anomala was responsible for the characteristic aroma of Chinese liquor, through the regulation of several important volatile compounds, such as ethyl lactate, octanoic acid, and ethyl tetradecanoate. Correspondingly, almost all of the compounds associated with P. anomala were detected in a pure culture of this yeast. In contrast to the PLS regression results, however, ethyl lactate and ethyl isobutyrate were not detected in the same pure culture, which indicated that some metabolites could be generated by P. anomala only when it existed in a community with other yeast species. Furthermore, different yeast communities provided different volatile patterns in the fermented grains, which resulted in distinct flavor profiles in the resulting liquors. This study could help identify the key yeast species involved in spontaneous fermentation and provide a deeper understanding of the role of individual yeast species in the community. PMID:24727269

  3. Brain activity mapping in Mecp2 mutant mice reveals functional deficits in forebrain circuits, including key nodes in the default mode network, that are reversed with ketamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kron, Miriam; Howell, C James; Adams, Ian T; Ransbottom, Michael; Christian, Diana; Ogier, Michael; Katz, David M

    2012-10-01

    Excitatory-inhibitory imbalance has been identified within specific brain microcircuits in models of Rett syndrome (RTT) and other autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, macrocircuit dysfunction across the RTT brain as a whole has not been defined. To approach this issue, we mapped expression of the activity-dependent, immediate-early gene product Fos in the brains of wild-type (Wt) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2)-null (Null) mice, a model of RTT, before and after the appearance of overt symptoms (3 and 6 weeks of age, respectively). At 6 weeks, Null mice exhibit significantly less Fos labeling than Wt in limbic cortices and subcortical structures, including key nodes in the default mode network. In contrast, Null mice exhibit significantly more Fos labeling than Wt in the hindbrain, most notably in cardiorespiratory regions of the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS). Using nTS as a model, whole-cell recordings demonstrated that increased Fos expression in Nulls at 6 weeks of age is associated with synaptic hyperexcitability, including increased frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs and increased amplitude of evoked EPSCs in Nulls. No such effect of genotype on Fos or synaptic function was seen at 3 weeks. In the mutant forebrain, reduced Fos expression, as well as abnormal sensorimotor function, were reversed by the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In light of recent findings that the default mode network is hypoactive in autism, our data raise the possibility that hypofunction within this meta-circuit is a shared feature of RTT and other ASDs and is reversible. PMID:23035095

  4. Mutational Analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteriophytochrome Reveals Key Amino Acids Necessary for the Photochromicity and Proton Exchange Cycle of Phytochromes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; von Stetten, David; Günther, Mina; Murgida, Daniel H.; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Walker, Joseph M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of phytochromes (Phy) to act as photointerconvertible light switches in plants and microorganisms depends on key interactions between the bilin chromophore and the apoprotein that promote bilin attachment and photointerconversion between the spectrally distinct red light-absorbing Pr conformer and far red light-absorbing Pfr conformer. Using structurally guided site-directed mutagenesis combined with several spectroscopic methods, we examined the roles of conserved amino acids within the bilin-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome with respect to chromophore ligation and Pr/Pfr photoconversion. Incorporation of biliverdin IXα (BV), its structure in the Pr state, and its ability to photoisomerize to the first photocycle intermediate are insensitive to most single mutations, implying that these properties are robust with respect to small structural/electrostatic alterations in the binding pocket. In contrast, photoconversion to Pfr is highly sensitive to the chromophore environment. Many of the variants form spectrally bleached Meta-type intermediates in red light that do not relax to Pfr. Particularly important are Asp-207 and His-260, which are invariant within the Phy superfamily and participate in a unique hydrogen bond matrix involving the A, B, and C pyrrole ring nitrogens of BV and their associated pyrrole water. Resonance Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that substitutions of these residues disrupt the Pr to Pfr protonation cycle of BV with the chromophore locked in a deprotonated Meta-Rc-like photoconversion intermediate after red light irradiation. Collectively, the data show that a number of contacts contribute to the unique photochromicity of Phy-type photoreceptors. These include residues that fix the bilin in the pocket, coordinate the pyrrole water, and possibly promote the proton exchange cycle during photoconversion. PMID:18192276

  5. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  6. Functional Characterization of the GATA Transcription Factors GNC and CGA1 Reveals Their Key Role in Chloroplast Development, Growth, and Division in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Zubo, Yan O.; Tapken, Wiebke; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lavanway, Ann M.; Howard, Louisa; Pilon, Marinus; Kieber, Joseph J.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts develop from proplastids in a process that requires the interplay of nuclear and chloroplast genomes, but key steps in this developmental process have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that the nucleus-localized transcription factors GATA NITRATE-INDUCIBLE CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA1 (CGA1) regulate chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GNC and CGA1 are highly expressed in green tissues, and the phytohormone cytokinin regulates their expression. A gnc cga1 mutant exhibits a reduction in overall chlorophyll levels as well as in chloroplast size in the hypocotyl. Ectopic overexpression of either GNC or CGA1 promotes chloroplast biogenesis in hypocotyl cortex and root pericycle cells, based on increases in the number and size of the chloroplasts, and also results in expanded zones of chloroplast production into the epidermis of hypocotyls and cotyledons and into the cortex of roots. Ectopic overexpression also promotes the development of etioplasts from proplastids in dark-grown seedlings, subsequently enhancing the deetiolation process. Inducible expression of GNC demonstrates that GNC-mediated chloroplast biogenesis can be regulated postembryonically, notably so for chloroplast production in cotyledon epidermal cells. Analysis of the gnc cga1 loss-of-function and overexpression lines supports a role for these transcription factors in regulating the effects of cytokinin on chloroplast division. These data support a model in which GNC and CGA1 serve as two of the master transcriptional regulators of chloroplast biogenesis, acting downstream of cytokinin and mediating the development of chloroplasts from proplastids and enhancing chloroplast growth and division in specific tissues. PMID:22811435

  7. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  8. Quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis reveals a key role of insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) tyrosine kinase in human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals that T3SS, Tfp, and xanthan gum are key factors in initial stages of Citrus sinensis infection by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Facincani, Agda P; Moreira, Leandro M; Soares, Márcia R; Ferreira, Cristiano B; Ferreira, Rafael M; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferro, Jesus A; Gozzo, Fabio C; de Oliveira, Julio C F

    2014-03-01

    The bacteria Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus canker. The disease symptoms are characterized by localized host cell hyperplasia followed by tissue necrosis at the infected area. An arsenal of bacterial pathogenicity- and virulence-related proteins is expressed to ensure a successful infection process. At the post-genomic stage of Xac, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the proteins that are displayed differentially over time when the pathogen attacks the host plant. Protein extracts were prepared from infectious Xac grown in inducing medium (XAM1) for 24 h or from host citrus plants for 3 or 5 days after infection, detached times to evaluate the adaptation and virulence of the pathogen. The protein extracts were proteolyzed, and the peptides derived from tryptic digestion were investigated using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Changes in the protein expression profile were compared with the Xac genome and the proteome recently described under non-infectious conditions. An analysis of the proteome of Xac under infectious conditions revealed proteins directly involved in virulence such as the type III secretion system (T3SS) and effector proteins (T3SS-e), the type IV pilus (Tfp), and xanthan gum biosynthesis. Moreover, four new mutants related to proteins detected in the proteome and with different functions exhibited reduced virulence relative to the wild-type proteins. The results of the proteome analysis of infectious Xac define the processes of adaptation to the host and demonstrate the induction of the virulence factors of Xac involved in plant-pathogen interactions.

  10. RNA-Seq Reveals Dynamic Changes of Gene Expression in Key Stages of Intestine Regeneration in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Yang, Hongsheng; Chen, Muyan; Ma, Deyou; Lin, Chenggang

    2013-01-01

    Background Sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea; Echinodermata) have the capacity to regenerate lost tissues and organs. Although the histological and cytological aspects of intestine regeneration have been extensively studied, little is known of the genetic mechanisms involved. There has, however, been a renewed effort to develop a database of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) in Apostichopus japonicus, an economically-important species that occurs in China. This is important for studies on genetic breeding, molecular markers and special physiological phenomena. We have also constructed a library of ESTs obtained from the regenerative body wall and intestine of A. japonicus. The database has increased to ∼30000 ESTs. Results We used RNA-Seq to determine gene expression profiles associated with intestinal regeneration in A. japonicus at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post evisceration (dpe). This was compared to profiles obtained from a normally-functioning intestine. Approximately 5 million (M) reads were sequenced in every library. Over 2400 up-regulated genes (>10%) and over 1000 down-regulated genes (∼5%) were observed at 3 and 7dpe (log2Ratio≥1, FDR≤0.001). Specific “Go terms” revealed that the DEGs (Differentially Expressed Genes) performed an important function at every regeneration stage. Besides some expected pathways (for example, Ribosome and Spliceosome pathway term), the “Notch signaling pathway,” the “ECM-receptor interaction” and the “Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction” were significantly enriched. We also investigated the expression profiles of developmental genes, ECM-associated genes and Cytoskeletal genes. Twenty of the most important differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were verified by Real-time PCR, which resulted in a trend concordance of almost 100% between the two techniques. Conclusion Our studies demonstrated dynamic changes in global gene expression during intestine regeneration and presented a series of candidate genes and

  11. Real-time monitoring of disintegration activity of catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase using molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-wei; Zhao, Ming-ming; He, Hong-qiu; Guo, Shun-xing

    2013-09-15

    HIV-1 integrase, an essential enzyme for retroviral replication, is a validated target for anti-HIV therapy development. The catalytic core domain of integrase (IN-CCD) is capable of catalyzing disintegration reaction. In this work, a hairpin-shaped disintegration substrate was designed and validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; a molecular beacon-based assay was developed for disintegration reaction of IN-CCD. Results showed that the disintegration substrate could be recognized and catalyzed by IN-CCD, and the disintegration reaction can be monitored according to the increase of fluorescent signal. The assay can be applied to real-time detection of disintegration with advantages of simplicity, high sensitivity, and excellent specificity.

  12. Examination of halogen substituent effects on HIV-1 integrase inhibitors derived from 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-ones and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-diones

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Vu, B. Christie; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    Using 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-one and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione based HIV-1 integrase inhibitors as display platforms, we undertook a thorough examination of the effects of modifying the halogen substituents on a key benzyl ring that is hypothesized to bind in a hydrophobic pocket of the integrase•DNA complex. Data from this study suggest that in general dihalo – substituted analogues have higher potency than monohalo – substituted compounds, but that further addition of halogens is not beneficial. PMID:19364649

  13. HIV-2 Integrase Polymorphisms and Longitudinal Genotypic Analysis of HIV-2 Infected Patients Failing a Raltegravir-Containing Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Cavaco-Silva, Joana; Abecasis, Ana; Miranda, Ana Cláudia; Poças, José; Narciso, Jorge; Águas, Maria João; Maltez, Fernando; Almeida, Isabel; Germano, Isabel; Diniz, António; Gonçalves, Maria de Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Cunha, Celso; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the HIV-2 integrase gene polymorphisms and the pathways to resistance of HIV-2 patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen, we studied 63 integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI)-naïve patients, and 10 heavily pretreated patients exhibiting virological failure while receiving a salvage raltegravir-containing regimen. All patients were infected by HIV-2 group A. 61.4% of the integrase residues were conserved, including the catalytic motif residues. No INSTI-major resistance mutations were detected in the virus population from naïve patients, but two amino acids that are secondary resistance mutations to INSTIs in HIV-1 were observed. The 10 raltegravir-experienced patients exhibited resistance mutations via three main genetic pathways: N155H, Q148R, and eventually E92Q - T97A. The 155 pathway was preferentially used (7/10 patients). Other mutations associated to raltegravir resistance in HIV-1 were also observed in our HIV-2 population (V151I and D232N), along with several novel mutations previously unreported. Data retrieved from this study should help build a more robust HIV-2-specific algorithm for the genotypic interpretation of raltegravir resistance, and contribute to improve the clinical monitoring of HIV-2-infected patients. PMID:24681625

  14. Secondary mutations in viruses resistant to HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that restore viral infectivity and replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Koichiro; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Masanori; Miki, Shigeru; Noshi, Takeshi; Seki, Takahiro; Kanamori-Koyama, Mikiko; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward P; Johns, Brian A; Foster, Scott A; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2009-02-01

    Passage of HIV-1 in the presence of integrase inhibitors (INIs) generates resistant viruses that have mutations in the integrase region. Integrase-resistant mutations Q148K and Q148R were identified as primary mutations with the passage of HIV-1 IIIB in the presence of INIs S-1360 or S/GSK-364735, respectively. Secondary amino acid substitutions E138K or G140S were observed when passage with INI was continued. The role of these mutations was investigated with molecular clones. Relative to Q148K alone, Q148K/E138K had 2- and >6-fold increases in resistance to S-1360 and S/GSK-364735, respectively, and the double mutant had slightly better infectivity and replication kinetics. In contrast, Q148K/G140S and Q148R/E138K had nearly equivalent or slightly reduced fold resistance to the INI compared with their respective Q148 primary mutants, and had increases in infectivity and replication kinetics. Recovery of these surrogates of viral fitness coincided with the recovery of integration efficiency of viral DNA into the host cell chromosome for these double mutants. These data show that recovery of viral integration efficiency can be an important factor for the emergence and maintenance of INI-resistant mutations.

  15. Identification of conserved amino acid residues critical for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase function in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1992-01-01

    We have probed the structural organization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase protein by limited proteolysis and the functional organization by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acid residues. A central region of the protein was relatively resistant to proteolysis. Proteins with altered amino acids in this region, or in the N-terminal part of the protein that includes a putative zinc-binding motif, were purified and assayed for 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities in vitro. In general, these mutations had parallel effects on 3' processing and DNA strand transfer, suggesting that integrase may utilize a single active site for both reactions. The only proteins that were completely inactive in all three assays contained mutations at conserved amino acids in the central region, suggesting that this part of the protein may be involved in catalysis. In contrast, none of the mutations in the N-terminal region resulted in a protein that was inactive in all three assays, suggesting that this part of integrase may not be essential for catalysis. The disintegration reaction was particularly insensitive to these amino acid substitutions, indicating that some function that is important for 3' processing and DNA strand transfer may be dispensable for disintegration. Images PMID:1404595

  16. Characterization of the relationship between integrase, excisionase and antirepressor activities associated with a superinfecting Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, P. C. M.; Rigden, D. J.; Saunders, J. R.; McCarthy, A. J.; Allison, H. E.

    2011-01-01

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli emerged as new food borne pathogens in the early 1980s, primarily driven by the dispersal of Shiga toxin-encoding lambdoid bacteriophages. At least some of these Stx phages display superinfection phenotypes, which differ significantly from lambda phage itself, driving through in situ recombination further phage evolution, increasing host range and potentially increasing the host's pathogenic profile. Here, increasing levels of Stx phage Φ24B integrase expression in multiple lysogen cultures are demonstrated along with apparently negligible repression of integrase expression by the cognate CI repressor. The Φ24B int transcription start site and promoter region were identified and found to differ from in silico predictions. The unidirectional activity of this integrase was determined in an in situ, inducible tri-partite reaction. This indicated that Φ24B must encode a novel directionality factor that is controlling excision events during prophage induction. This excisionase was subsequently identified and characterized through complementation experiments. In addition, the previous proposal that a putative antirepressor was responsible for the lack of immunity to superinfection through inactivation of CI has been revisited and a new hypothesis involving the role of this protein in promoting efficient induction of the Φ24B prophage is proposed. PMID:21062824

  17. A targeted DNA substrate mechanism for the inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by inhibitors with antiretroviral activity.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Farah F; Hobaika, Zeina; Abdel-Azeim, Safwat; Zargarian, Loussinée; Maroun, Richard G; Fermandjian, Serge

    2016-04-01

    We recently reported that viral DNA could be the primary target of raltegravir (RAL), an efficient anti-HIV-1 drug, which acts by inhibiting integrase. To elucidate this mechanism, we conducted a comparative analysis of RAL and TB11, a diketoacid abandoned as an anti-HIV-1 drug for its weak efficiency and marked toxicity, and tested the effects of the catalytic cofactor Mg(2+) (5 mm) on drug-binding properties. We used circular dichroism and fluorescence to determine drug affinities for viral DNA long terminal repeats (LTRs) and peptides derived from the integrase active site and DNA retardation assays to assess drug intercalation into DNA base pairs. We found that RAL bound more tightly to LTR ends than did TB11 (a diketo acid bearing an azido group) and that Mg(2+) significantly increased the affinity of both RAL and TB11. We also observed a good relationship between drug binding with processed LTR and strand transfer inhibition. This unusual type of inhibition was caused by Mg(2+)-assisted binding of drugs to DNA substrate, rather than to enzyme. Notably, while RAL bound exclusively to the cleavable/cleaved site, TB11 further intercalated into DNA base pairs and interacted with the integrase-derived peptides. These unwanted binding sites explain the weaker bioavailability and higher toxicity of TB11 compared with the more effective RAL. PMID:27239438

  18. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  19. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1-50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  20. The Microbiota and Abundance of the Class 1 Integron-Integrase Gene in Tropical Sewage Treatment Plant Influent and Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Magna C.; Ávila, Marcelo P.; Reis, Mariana P.; Costa, Patrícia S.; Nardi, Regina M. D.; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are assumed to efficiently remove organic pollutants from sewage in sewage treatment plants, where antibiotic-resistance genes can move between species via mobile genetic elements known as integrons. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed bacterial diversity and class 1 integron abundance in tropical sewage. Here, we describe the extant microbiota, using V6 tag sequencing, and quantify the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) in raw sewage (RS) and activated sludge (AS). The analysis of 1,174,486 quality-filtered reads obtained from RS and AS samples revealed complex and distinct bacterial diversity in these samples. The RS sample, with 3,074 operational taxonomic units, exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices. Among the 25 phyla, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes represented 85% (AS) and 92% (RS) of all reads. Increased relative abundance of Micrococcales, Myxococcales, and Sphingobacteriales and reduced pathogen abundance were noted in AS. At the genus level, differences were observed for the dominant genera Simplicispira and Diaphorobacter (AS) as well as for Enhydrobacter (RS). The activated sludge process decreased (55%) the amount of bacteria harboring the intI1 gene in the RS sample. Altogether, our results emphasize the importance of biological treatment for diminishing pathogenic bacteria and those bearing the intI1 gene that arrive at a sewage treatment plant. PMID:26115093

  1. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1-50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1.

  2. [Construction of the oocyte-specific expressing phiC31 integrase vector pZP3-INT and its expression in mouse oocytes].

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan-Yu; Gong, Xiu-Li; Guo, Xin-Bing; Ma, Qing-Wen; Zeng, Yi-Tao

    2009-06-01

    Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase is a site-specific recombinase, which can catalyze site-specific, unidirectional recombination between the attP site and attB site. To explore whether it can be used to mediate the recombination of specific gene in oocytes, GV-stage oocytes were collected from 3-week-old Kunming White mice by puncturing antral follocles with a sharp needle, and micro-injected with oocyte-specific expressing phiC31 integrase vector pZP3-INT and site -specific recombination detection vector pBCPB+. phiC31 integrase mRNA were detected by RT-PCR and the recombination of pBCPB+ was evaluated by PCR in mouse oocytes at 48 h after injection. Both can get corresponding bands. These results indicated that the expression of phiC31 integrase can be driven by ZP3 promoter efficiently and phiC31 integrase can mediate the site-specific recombination between attP site and attB site in mouse GV-stage oocytes. It could be a powerful tool for the study of recombination of specific gene in mouse oocytes and would provide an alternative way for the mouse oocyte genome manipulation.

  3. Cellular cofactors of lentiviral integrase: from target validation to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Taltynov, Oliver; Desimmie, Belete A; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN), an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2) has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs).

  4. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women. PMID:25589631

  5. Structural Basis for the Recognition Between HIV-1 Integrase and Transcriptional Coactivator p75

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov,P.; Ambrosio, A.; Rahman, S.; Ellenberger, T.; Engelman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an essential retroviral enzyme, and human transcriptional coactivator p75, which is also referred to as lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF), is the dominant cellular binding partner of HIV-1 IN. Here, we report the crystal structure of the dimeric catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN complexed to the IN-binding domain of LEDGF. Previously identified LEDGF hotspot residues anchor the protein to both monomers at the IN dimer interface. The principal structural features of IN that are recognized by the host factor are the backbone conformation of residues 168-171 from one monomer and a hydrophobic patch that is primarily comprised of {alpha}-helices 1 and 3 of the second IN monomer. Inspection of diverse retroviral primary and secondary sequence elements helps to explain the apparent lentiviral tropism of the LEDGF-IN interaction. Because the lethal phenotypes of HIV-1 mutant viruses unable to interact with LEDGF indicate that IN function is highly sensitive to perturbations of the structure around the LEDGF-binding site, we propose that small molecule inhibitors of the protein-protein interaction might similarly disrupt HIV-1 replication.

  6. rDNA-directed integration by an HIV-1 integrase--I-PpoI fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Turkki, Vesa; Ahlroth, Mervi K; Timonen, Oskari; Airenne, Kari J; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-03-01

    Integrating viral vectors are efficient gene transfer tools, but their integration patterns have been associated with genotoxicity and oncogenicity. The recent development of highly specific designer nucleases has enabled target DNA modification and site-specific gene insertion at desired genomic loci. However, a lack of consensus exists regarding a perfect genomic safe harbour (GSH) that would allow transgenes to be stably and reliably expressed without adversely affecting endogenous gene structure and function. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) has many advantages as a GSH, but efficient means to target integration to this locus are currently lacking. We tested whether lentivirus vector integration can be directed to rDNA by using fusion proteins consisting of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) and the homing endonuclease I-PpoI, which has natural cleavage sites in the rDNA. A point mutation (N119A) was introduced into I-PpoI to abolish unwanted DNA cleavage by the endonuclease. The vector-incorporated IN-I-PpoIN119A fusion protein targeted integration into rDNA significantly more than unmodified lentivirus vectors, with an efficiency of 2.7%. Our findings show that IN-fusion proteins can be used to modify the integration pattern of lentivirus vectors, and to package site-specific DNA-recognizing proteins into vectors to obtain safer transgene integration.

  7. Initial Characterization of Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors for Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanoun, Naima; Gayral, Marion; Pointreau, Adeline; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority (85%) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are discovered at too of a late stage to allow curative surgery. In addition, PDAC is highly resistant to conventional methods of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which only offer a marginal clinical benefit. Consequently, the prognosis of this cancer is devastating, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. In this dismal context, we recently demonstrated that PDAC gene therapy using nonviral vectors is safe and feasible, with early signs of efficacy in selected patients. Our next step is to transfer to the clinic HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) that outshine other therapeutic vectors to treat experimental models of PDAC. However, a primary safety issue presented by LVs that may delay their use in patients is the risk of oncogenesis after vector integration in the host's cell DNA. Thus, we developed a novel anticancerous approach based on integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) and demonstrated that IDLVs can be successfully engineered to transiently deliver therapeutic genes to inhibit pancreatic cancer cells proliferation. This work stems for the use of therapeutic IDLVs for the management of PDAC, in forthcoming early phase gene therapy clinical trial for this disease with no cure. PMID:26731312

  8. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  9. Design of inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase core domain using virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Regon, Preetom; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The integrase (IN) enzyme of HIV interacts with several cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Thus, it represents an appropriate target for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We performed virtual screening of database compounds and designed analogues using Elvitegravir (EVG) as a standard compound. The 378 screened compounds were retrieved from ZINC, ChemSpider, PubChem, and ChemBank Chemical Databases based on chemical similarity and literature searches related to the structure of EVG. The Physiochemical properties, Bioactivity, Toxicity and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Molecules (ADME) of these compounds were predicted and docking Experiments were conducted using Molegro Virtual Docker software. The docking and ADME suggested very significant results in regard to EVG. The MolDock and Rerank scores were used to analyze the results. The compounds ZINC26507991 (-84.22), Analogue 9 (-68.49), ZINC20731658 (-66.79), ZINC00210363 (-43.44) showed better binding orientation with IN receptor model with respect to EVG (182.52). The ZINC26507991 has showed significant ADME result. PMID:24616558

  10. Structural and sequencing analysis of local target DNA recognition by MLV integrase

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Sriram; Rossi, Paolo; Malani, Nirav; Schneider, William M.; Chandar, Ashwin; Bushman, Frederic D.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Roth, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Target-site selection by retroviral integrase (IN) proteins profoundly affects viral pathogenesis. We describe the solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the Moloney murine leukemia virus IN (M-MLV) C-terminal domain (CTD) and a structural homology model of the catalytic core domain (CCD). In solution, the isolated MLV IN CTD adopts an SH3 domain fold flanked by a C-terminal unstructured tail. We generated a concordant MLV IN CCD structural model using SWISS-MODEL, MMM-tree and I-TASSER. Using the X-ray crystal structure of the prototype foamy virus IN target capture complex together with our MLV domain structures, residues within the CCD α2 helical region and the CTD β1-β2 loop were predicted to bind target DNA. The role of these residues was analyzed in vivo through point mutants and motif interchanges. Viable viruses with substitutions at the IN CCD α2 helical region and the CTD β1-β2 loop were tested for effects on integration target site selection. Next-generation sequencing and analysis of integration target sequences indicate that the CCD α2 helical region, in particular P187, interacts with the sequences distal to the scissile bonds whereas the CTD β1-β2 loop binds to residues proximal to it. These findings validate our structural model and disclose IN-DNA interactions relevant to target site selection. PMID:25969444

  11. Structural and sequencing analysis of local target DNA recognition by MLV integrase.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Sriram; Rossi, Paolo; Malani, Nirav; Schneider, William M; Chandar, Ashwin; Bushman, Frederic D; Montelione, Gaetano T; Roth, Monica J

    2015-06-23

    Target-site selection by retroviral integrase (IN) proteins profoundly affects viral pathogenesis. We describe the solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the Moloney murine leukemia virus IN (M-MLV) C-terminal domain (CTD) and a structural homology model of the catalytic core domain (CCD). In solution, the isolated MLV IN CTD adopts an SH3 domain fold flanked by a C-terminal unstructured tail. We generated a concordant MLV IN CCD structural model using SWISS-MODEL, MMM-tree and I-TASSER. Using the X-ray crystal structure of the prototype foamy virus IN target capture complex together with our MLV domain structures, residues within the CCD α2 helical region and the CTD β1-β2 loop were predicted to bind target DNA. The role of these residues was analyzed in vivo through point mutants and motif interchanges. Viable viruses with substitutions at the IN CCD α2 helical region and the CTD β1-β2 loop were tested for effects on integration target site selection. Next-generation sequencing and analysis of integration target sequences indicate that the CCD α2 helical region, in particular P187, interacts with the sequences distal to the scissile bonds whereas the CTD β1-β2 loop binds to residues proximal to it. These findings validate our structural model and disclose IN-DNA interactions relevant to target site selection. PMID:25969444

  12. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles.

  13. Identifying and Characterizing a Functional HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase-binding Site on Integrase*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Januszyk, Kurt; Phillips, Martin L.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Zhang, Min; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.; Chow, Samson A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) from human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) exerts pleiotropic effects in the viral replication cycle. Besides integration, IN mutations can impact nuclear import, viral maturation, and reverse transcription. IN and reverse transcriptase (RT) interact in vitro, and the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) is both necessary and sufficient for binding RT. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify a putative RT-binding surface on the IN CTD, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain kinetic parameters and the binding affinity for the IN-RT interaction. An IN K258A substitution that disrupts reverse transcription in infected cells is located at the putative RT-binding surface, and we found that this substitution substantially weakens IN CTD-RT interactions. We also identified two additional IN amino acid substitutions located at the putative RT-binding surface (W243E and V250E) that significantly impair viral replication in tissue culture. These results strengthen the notion that IN-RT interactions are biologically relevant during HIV-1 replication and also provide insights into this interaction at the molecular level. PMID:19150986

  14. Design of inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase core domain using virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Regon, Preetom; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The integrase (IN) enzyme of HIV interacts with several cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Thus, it represents an appropriate target for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We performed virtual screening of database compounds and designed analogues using Elvitegravir (EVG) as a standard compound. The 378 screened compounds were retrieved from ZINC, ChemSpider, PubChem, and ChemBank Chemical Databases based on chemical similarity and literature searches related to the structure of EVG. The Physiochemical properties, Bioactivity, Toxicity and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Molecules (ADME) of these compounds were predicted and docking Experiments were conducted using Molegro Virtual Docker software. The docking and ADME suggested very significant results in regard to EVG. The MolDock and Rerank scores were used to analyze the results. The compounds ZINC26507991 (-84.22), Analogue 9 (-68.49), ZINC20731658 (-66.79), ZINC00210363 (-43.44) showed better binding orientation with IN receptor model with respect to EVG (182.52). The ZINC26507991 has showed significant ADME result.

  15. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent. PMID:26519797

  16. An update on integrase inhibitors: new opportunities for a personalized therapy? The NEXTaim Project.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Massimo; Marcotullio, Simone; Puro, Vincenzo; De Carli, Gabriella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Nozza, Silvia; Gori, Andrea; Rusconi, Stefano; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Clementi, Massimo; Perno, Carlo Federico; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Castagna, Antonella; De Luca, Andrea; Galli, Massimo; Giacomelli, Andrea; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Mussini, Cristina; Di Biagio, Antonio; Puoti, Massimo; Bruno, Raffaele; Zuccaro, Valentina; Antinori, Andrea; Cinque, Paola; Croce, Davide; Restelli, Umberto; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the development of antiretroviral agents to control HIV replication, HIV infection has turned from a fatal disease into a treatable chronic infection. The present work collects the opinions of several experts on the efficacy and safety of recently approved second generation of integrase inhibitors and, in particular, on the role of this new class of drugs in antiretroviral therapy. The availability of new therapeutic options represents an opportunity to ameliorate the efficacy of cART in controlling HIV replication also within viral reservoirs. The personalization of the treatment driven mainly by the management of comorbidities, HIV-HCV co-infections and aging, will be easier with antiretroviral drugs without drug-drug interactions and with a better toxicity and tolerability profile. Future assessment of economic impact for the introduction of new innovative drugs in the field of antiretroviral therapy will likely need some degree of adjustment of the evaluation criteria of costs and benefit which are currently based almost exclusively on morbidity and mortality.

  17. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:26296914

  18. Diarylsulfones, a novel class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Neamati, N; Mazumder, A; Zhao, H; Sunder, S; Burke, T R; Schultz, R J; Pommier, Y

    1997-01-01

    A majority of reported human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors are polyhydroxylated aromatic compounds containing two phenyl rings separated by aliphatic or aromatic linkers. Most inhibitors possessing a catechol moiety exhibit considerable toxicity in cellular assays. In an effort to identify nonhydroxylated analogs, a series of aromatic sulfones were tested for their ability to inhibit the 3' processing and strand transfer steps that are necessary for HIV replication. Several aromatic sulfones have previously been shown to have moderate activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in cellular assays; however, their inhibitory potencies against IN have not been explored. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of a series of sulfones and sulfonamides against IN was determined. Among 52 diaryl sulfones tested, 4 were determined to be highly potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.8 to 10 micrograms/ml), 5 had good potencies (IC50, 11 to 50 micrograms/ml), 10 showed moderate potencies (IC50, 51 to 100 micrograms/ml), and 33 were inactive (IC50, > 100 micrograms/ml) against IN. All of the active compounds exhibited similar potencies against HIV-2 IN. Sulfa drugs, used extensively in treating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in AIDs patients, were also examined. Among 19 sulfonamides tested, sulfasalazine (IC50, 50 micrograms/ml) was the most potent. We conclude that potent inhibitors of IN can be designed based on the results presented in this study. PMID:9021196

  19. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent.

  20. Mechanism of action of the HIV-1 integrase inhibitory peptide LEDGF 361-370.

    PubMed

    Hayouka, Zvi; Levin, Aviad; Maes, Michal; Hadas, Eran; Shalev, Deborah E; Volsky, David J; Loyter, Abraham; Friedler, Assaf

    2010-04-01

    The HIV-1 integrase protein (IN) mediates integration of the viral cDNA into the host genome and is a target for anti-HIV drugs. We have recently described a peptide derived from residues 361-370 of the IN cellular partner protein LEDGF/p75, which inhibited IN catalytic activity in vitro and HIV-1 replication in cells. Here we performed a comprehensive study of the LEDGF 361-370 mechanism of action in vitro, in cells and in vivo. Alanine scan, fluorescence anisotropy binding studies, homology modeling and NMR studies demonstrated that all residues in LEDGF 361-370 contribute to IN binding and inhibition. Kinetic studies in cells showed that LEDGF 361-370 specifically inhibited integration of viral cDNA. Thus, the full peptide was chosen for in vivo studies, in which it inhibited the production of HIV-1 RNA in mouse model. We conclude that the full LEDGF 361-370 peptide is a potent HIV-1 inhibitor and may be used for further development as an anti-HIV lead compound.

  1. Using the class 1 integron-integrase gene as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution.

    PubMed

    Gillings, Michael R; Gaze, William H; Pruden, Amy; Smalla, Kornelia; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-06-01

    Around all human activity, there are zones of pollution with pesticides, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and the microorganisms associated with human waste streams and agriculture. This diversity of pollutants, whose concentration varies spatially and temporally, is a major challenge for monitoring. Here, we suggest that the relative abundance of the clinical class 1 integron-integrase gene, intI1, is a good proxy for pollution because: (1) intI1 is linked to genes conferring resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and heavy metals; (2) it is found in a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria; (3) its abundance can change rapidly because its host cells can have rapid generation times and it can move between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer; and (4) a single DNA sequence variant of intI1 is now found on a wide diversity of xenogenetic elements, these being complex mosaic DNA elements fixed through the agency of human selection. Here we review the literature examining the relationship between anthropogenic impacts and the abundance of intI1, and outline an approach by which intI1 could serve as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution.

  2. Using the class 1 integron-integrase gene as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution

    PubMed Central

    Gillings, Michael R; Gaze, William H; Pruden, Amy; Smalla, Kornelia; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Around all human activity, there are zones of pollution with pesticides, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and the microorganisms associated with human waste streams and agriculture. This diversity of pollutants, whose concentration varies spatially and temporally, is a major challenge for monitoring. Here, we suggest that the relative abundance of the clinical class 1 integron-integrase gene, intI1, is a good proxy for pollution because: (1) intI1 is linked to genes conferring resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and heavy metals; (2) it is found in a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria; (3) its abundance can change rapidly because its host cells can have rapid generation times and it can move between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer; and (4) a single DNA sequence variant of intI1 is now found on a wide diversity of xenogenetic elements, these being complex mosaic DNA elements fixed through the agency of human selection. Here we review the literature examining the relationship between anthropogenic impacts and the abundance of intI1, and outline an approach by which intI1 could serve as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution. PMID:25500508

  3. Blind prediction of HIV integrase binding from the SAMPL4 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, David L.; Liu, Shuai; Lim, Nathan M.; Wymer, Karisa L.; Perryman, Alexander L.; Forli, Stefano; Deng, Nanjie; Su, Justin; Branson, Kim; Olson, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we give an overview of the protein-ligand binding portion of the SAMPL4 challenge, which focused on predicting binding of HIV integrase inhibitors in the catalytic core domain. The challenge encompassed three components – a small “virtual screening” challenge, a binding mode prediction component, and a small affinity prediction component. Here, we give summary results and statistics concerning the performance of all submissions at each of these challenges. Virtual screening was particularly challenging here in part because, in contrast to more typical virtual screening test sets, the inactive compounds were tested because they were thought to be likely binders, so only the very top predictions performed significantly better than random. Pose prediction was also quite challenging, in part because inhibitors in the set bind to three different sites, so even identifying the correct binding site was challenging. Still, the best methods managed low RMSD predictions in many cases. Here, we give an overview of results, highlight some features of methods which worked particularly well, and refer the interested reader to papers in this issue which describe specific submissions for additional details. PMID:24595873

  4. Metabolism, Excretion, and Mass Balance of the HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Stephen; Moss, Lee; Wagner, David; Borland, Julie; Song, Ivy; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Min, Sherene S.; Goljer, Igor; Culp, Amanda; Piscitelli, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of dolutegravir, an unboosted, once-daily human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitor, were studied in healthy male subjects following single oral administration of [14C]dolutegravir at a dose of 20 mg (80 μCi). Dolutegravir was well tolerated, and absorption of dolutegravir from the suspension formulation was rapid (median time to peak concentration, 0.5 h), declining in a biphasic fashion. Dolutegravir and the radioactivity had similar terminal plasma half-lives (t1/2) (15.6 versus 15.7 h), indicating metabolism was formation rate limited with no long-lived metabolites. Only minimal association with blood cellular components was noted with systemic radioactivity. Recovery was essentially complete (mean, 95.6%), with 64.0% and 31.6% of the dose recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged dolutegravir was the predominant circulating radioactive component in plasma and was consistent with minimal presystemic clearance. Dolutegravir was extensively metabolized. An inactive ether glucuronide, formed primarily via UGT1A1, was the principal biotransformation product at 18.9% of the dose excreted in urine and the principal metabolite in plasma. Two minor biotransformation pathways were oxidation by CYP3A4 (7.9% of the dose) and an oxidative defluorination and glutathione substitution (1.8% of the dose). No disproportionate human metabolites were observed. PMID:23669385

  5. Oligomerization within virions and subcellular localization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Petit, C; Schwartz, O; Mammano, F

    1999-06-01

    Previous biochemical and genetic evidence indicated that the functional form of retroviral integrase protein (IN) is a multimer. A direct demonstration of IN oligomerization during the infectious cycle was, however, missing, due to the absence of a sensitive detection method. We describe here the generation of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral clones carrying IN protein tagged with highly antigenic epitopes. In this setting, we could readily visualize IN both in producer cells and in viral particles. More interestingly, we detected IN oligomers, the formation of which was dependent on disulfide bridges and took place inside virions. Additionally, expression of a tagged HIV-1 IN in the absence of other viral components resulted in almost exclusive nuclear accumulation of the protein. Mutation of a conserved cysteine in the proposed dimer interface determined the loss of viral infectivity, associated with a reduction of IN oligomer formation and the redistribution of the mutated protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Epitope tagging of HIV-1 IN expressed alone or in the context of a replication-competent viral clone provides powerful tools to validate debated issues on the implication of this enzyme in different steps of the viral cycle.

  6. N-(4-Fluorobenzyl)-3-hydroxy-9,9-dimethyl-4-oxo-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-4H-pyrazino[1,2-a]pyrimidine-2-carboxamides a novel class of potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Petrocchi, Alessia; Jones, Philip; Rowley, Michael; Fiore, Fabrizio; Summa, Vincenzo

    2009-08-01

    A novel class of tetrahydro-pyrazinopyrimidine-2-carboxamides have been identified as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Optimization of the initial lead culminated in the discovery of a series of compounds with high potency on the enzyme and an antiviral cell-based activity equivalent to that showed by Raltegravir, the first in class HIV-1 integrase inhibitor.

  7. Natural Stilbenoids Isolated from Grapevine Exhibiting Inhibitory Effects against HIV-1 Integrase and Eukaryote MOS1 Transposase In Vitro Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chaignepain, Stéphane; Subra, Frederic; Munir, Soundasse; Delelis, Olivier; Lesbats, Paul; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Merillon, Jean-Michel; Auge-Gouillou, Corinne; Parissi, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Polynucleotidyl transferases are enzymes involved in several DNA mobility mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Some of them such as retroviral integrases are crucial for pathogenous processes and are therefore good candidates for therapeutic approaches. To identify new therapeutic compounds and new tools for investigating the common functional features of these proteins, we addressed the inhibition properties of natural stilbenoids deriving from resveratrol on two models: the HIV-1 integrase and the eukaryote MOS-1 transposase. Two resveratrol dimers, leachianol F and G, were isolated for the first time in Vitis along with fourteen known stilbenoids: E-resveratrol, E-piceid, E-pterostilbene, E-piceatannol, (+)-E-ε-viniferin, E-ε-viniferinglucoside, E-scirpusin A, quadragularin A, ampelopsin A, pallidol, E-miyabenol C, E-vitisin B, hopeaphenol, and isohopeaphenol and were purified from stalks of Vitis vinifera (Vitaceae), and moracin M from stem bark of Milliciaexelsa (Moraceae). These compounds were tested in in vitro and in vivo assays reproducing the activity of both enzymes. Several molecules presented significant inhibition on both systems. Some of the molecules were found to be active against both proteins while others were specific for one of the two models. Comparison of the differential effects of the molecules suggested that the compounds could target specific intermediate nucleocomplexes of the reactions. Additionally E-pterostilbene was found active on the early lentiviral replication steps in lentiviruses transduced cells. Consequently, in addition to representing new original lead compounds for further modelling of new active agents against HIV-1 integrase, these molecules could be good tools for identifying such reaction intermediates in DNA mobility processes. PMID:24312275

  8. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  9. A hypothetical mechanism for HIV-1 integrase catalytic action: DFT modelling of a bio-mimetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Fernando; Bottoni, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco; Garavelli, Marco; Keserü, György; Náray-Szabó, Gábor

    2002-08-01

    Density functional theory computations for a realistic model of the HIV-1 integrase active-site/substrate complex support a single-step reaction for the hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds, which involves a highly structured S N2-like transition state. Mediation by a stable penta-coordinated intermediate (i.e., the long time postulated dianionic phosphorane) seems lacking. These results call for an energetically favoured divalent cation requiring process coupled to a highly cooperative mechanism, which reduces the activation energy and directs the selectivity for (3 ')O-P bond hydrolysis.

  10. Integrase inhibitor (INI) genotypic resistance in treatment-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients infected with diverse HIV-1 clades

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tomas; Dunn, David T.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; De Mendoza, Carmen; Garcia, Frederico; Smit, Erasmus; Fearnhill, Esther; Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence and patterns of genotypic integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance in relation to HIV-1 clade. Methods The cohort comprised 533 INI-naive subjects and 255 raltegravir recipients with viraemia who underwent integrase sequencing in routine care across Europe, including 134/533 (25.1%) and 46/255 (18.0%), respectively, with non-B clades (A, C, D, F, G, CRF01, CRF02, other CRFs, complex). Results No major INI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) occurred in INI-naive subjects. Among raltegravir recipients with viraemia (median 3523 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL), 113/255 (44.3%) had one or more major INI RAMs, most commonly N155H (45/255, 17.6%), Q148H/R/K + G140S/A (35/255, 13.7%) and Y143R/C/H (12/255, 4.7%). In addition, four (1.6%) raltegravir recipients showed novel mutations at recognized resistance sites (E92A, S147I, N155D, N155Q) and novel mutations at other integrase positions that were statistically associated with raltegravir exposure (K159Q/R, I161L/M/T/V, E170A/G). Comparing subtype B with non-B clades, Q148H/R/K occurred in 42/209 (20.1%) versus 2/46 (4.3%) subjects (P = 0.009) and G140S/A occurred in 36/209 (17.2%) versus 1/46 (2.2%) subjects (P = 0.005). Intermediate- to high-level cross-resistance to twice-daily dolutegravir was predicted in 40/255 (15.7%) subjects, more commonly in subtype B versus non-B clades (39/209, 18.7% versus 1/46, 2.2%; P = 0.003). A glycine (G) to serine (S) substitution at integrase position 140 required one nucleotide change in subtype B and two nucleotide changes in all non-B clades. Conclusions No major INI resistance mutations occurred in INI-naive subjects. Reduced occurrence of Q148H/R/K + G140S/A was seen in non-B clades versus subtype B, and was explained by the higher genetic barrier to the G140S mutation observed in all non-B clades analysed. PMID:26311843

  11. Metal-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by 5CITEP inhibitor: A theoretical QM/MM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Josenaide P.; Araújo Silva, José Rogério; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio N.

    2013-09-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a potential target for developing drugs against AIDS. In this letter, QM/MM approach was used to study the inhibition of IN by 5CITEP inhibitor in presence of divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+). In addition, the main interactions occurring in 5CITEP-IN complex and the influence of divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in enzymatic inhibition were investigated using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)/MM. The results suggest that the Asp64, Asp116 and four crystal water molecules plays a crucial role in cation (Mg2+ or Mn2+) coordination sphere.

  12. HIV Virions as Nanoscopic Test Tubes for Probing Oligomerization of the Integrase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Employing viruses as nanoscopic lipid-enveloped test tubes allows the miniaturization of protein–protein interaction (PPI) assays while preserving the physiological environment necessary for particular biological processes. Applied to the study of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), viral biology and pathology can also be investigated in novel ways, both in vitro as well as in infected cells. In this work we report on an experimental strategy that makes use of engineered HIV-1 viral particles, to allow for probing PPIs of the HIV-1 integrase (IN) inside viruses with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorescent proteins (FP). We show that infectious fluorescently labeled viruses can be obtained and that the quantity of labels can be accurately measured and controlled inside individual viral particles. We demonstrate, with proper control experiments, the formation of IN oligomers in single viral particles and inside viral complexes in infected cells. Finally, we show a clear effect on IN oligomerization of small molecule inhibitors of interactions of IN with its natural human cofactor LEDGF/p75, corroborating that IN oligomer enhancing drugs are active already at the level of the virus and strongly suggesting the presence of a dynamic, enhanceable equilibrium between the IN dimer and tetramer in viral particles. Although applied to the HIV-1 IN enzyme, our methodology for utilizing HIV virions as nanoscopic test tubes for probing PPIs is generic, i.e., other PPIs targeted into the HIV-1, or PPIs targeted into other viruses, can potentially be studied with a similar strategy. PMID:24654558

  13. Prevalence of Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors (INSTI) Resistance Mutations in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Han; Cheng, Chien-Lin; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Su, Yi-Ching; Su, Li-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Fang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy containing an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) plus two NRTIs has become the recommended treatment for antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in the updated guidelines. We aimed to determine the prevalence of INSTI-related mutations in Taiwan. Genotypic resistance assays were performed on plasma from ARV-naïve patients (N = 948), ARV-experienced but INSTI-naive patients (N = 359), and raltegravir-experienced patients (N = 63) from 2006 to 2015. Major INSTI mutations were defined according to the IAS-USA list and other substitutions with a Stanford HIVdb score ≧ 10 to at least one INSTI were defined as minor mutations. Of 1307 HIV-1 samples from patients never exposed to INSTIs, the overall prevalence of major resistance mutations to INSTIs was 0.9% (n = 12), with an increase to 1.2% in 2013. Of these 12 sequences, 11 harboured Q148H/K/R, one Y143R, and none N155H. Of 30 sequences (47.6%) with INSTI-resistant mutations from raltegravir-experienced patients, 17 harboured Q148H/K/R, 8 N155H, and 6 Y143C/R. Other than these major mutations, the prevalence of minor mutations were 5.3% and 38.1%, respectively, in ARV-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients. The overall prevalence of INSTI mutations remains low in Taiwan. Surveillance of INSTI resistance is warranted due to circulation of polymorphisms contributing to INSTI resistance and expected increasing use of INSTIs. PMID:27779200

  14. Characterization of the integrase of NBU1, a Bacteroides mobilizable transposon.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Salyers, Abigail A; Gardner, Jeffrey F

    2006-08-01

    NBU1 is a Bacteroides mobilizable transposon (MTn) that is integrated within the host chromosome and requires CTnDOT functions for its excision and transfer into a new host. The NBU1 integrase IntN1 has been classified as a tyrosine recombinase based on the presence of conserved residues. We created alanine mutants of the residues R291, K314, H393, R396, H419 and the conserved substitution Y429F and tested them for integration efficiency. The results suggest that these residues in IntN1 are important for integration, and Y429 could be the catalytic nucleophile. We employed suicide substrates and partially purified IntN1 to determine the positions of IntN1 cleavage within the 14 bp common core region that is identical in both NBU1 att sites. We show that IntN1 makes 7 bp staggered cuts on the top and bottom strands. From previous mutational analysis of the att sites, we show that two specific mutations near the site of bottom strand cleavage within this 7 bp region increased integration, and mutations of the two bases near top strand cleavage site had no effect on integration. These results indicate that IntN1 lacks the strict requirement for homology between the recombining sites seen with other tyrosine recombinases. We also show that phosphorothioate substitutions at the cleavage site and 1 bp downstream inhibited cleavage by IntN1. This differs from other studied tyrosine recombinases where inhibition occurs by substitutions at the cleavage site only.

  15. Coevolutionary Analysis Identifies Protein–Protein Interaction Sites between HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Arachchilage, Madara Hetti; Piontkivska, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome and integration of newly synthesized pro-viral DNA into the host genome. This is mediated by the viral proteins reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN). The formation and stabilization of the pre-integration complex (PIC), which is an essential step for reverse transcription, nuclear import, chromatin targeting, and subsequent integration, involves direct and indirect modes of interaction between RT and IN proteins. While epitope-based treatments targeting IN–viral DNA and IN–RT complexes appear to be a promising combination for an anti-HIV treatment, the mechanisms of IN-RT interactions within the PIC are not well understood due to the transient nature of the protein complex and the intrinsic flexibility of its components. Here, we identify potentially interacting regions between the IN and RT proteins within the PIC through the coevolutionary analysis of amino acid sequences of the two proteins. Our results show that specific regions in the two proteins have strong coevolutionary signatures, suggesting that these regions either experience direct and prolonged interactions between them that require high affinity and/or specificity or that the regions are involved in interactions mediated by dynamic conformational changes and, hence, may involve both direct and indirect interactions. Other regions were found to exhibit weak, but positive correlations, implying interactions that are likely transient and/or have low affinity. We identified a series of specific regions of potential interactions between the IN and RT proteins (e.g., specific peptide regions within the C-terminal domain of IN were identified as potentially interacting with the Connection domain of RT). Coevolutionary analysis can serve as an important step in predicting potential interactions, thus informing experimental studies. These studies can be integrated with structural data

  16. Structure-based mutagenesis of the catalytic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Liu, Y; Chen, H; Farzan, M; Dyda, F

    1997-01-01

    Two different crystal structures of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) catalytic domain were analyzed for interactions at the enzyme active site. Gln-62 and Glu-92 interact with active-site residue Asp-64, and Lys-136 interacts with active-site residue Asp-116 across a dimer interface. Conservative and nonconservative substitutions were introduced at these positions to probe the roles of these interactions in HIV-1 integration. Purified mutant proteins were assayed for in vitro 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities, and HIV-1 mutants were assayed for virion protein composition, reverse transcription, and infectivities in human cell lines. Each of the mutant IN proteins displayed wild-type disintegration activity, indicating that none of the interactions is essential for catalysis. Mutants carrying Gln or Ala for Glu-92 displayed wild-type activities, but substituting Lys for Glu-92 reduced in vitro 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities 5- to 10-fold and yielded a replication-defective IN active-site mutant viral phenotype. Substituting Glu for Gln-62 reduced in vitro 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities 5- to 10-fold without grossly affecting viral replication kinetics, suggesting that HIV-1 can replicate in T-cell lines with less than the wild-type level of IN activity. The relationship between IN solubility and HIV-1 replication was also investigated. We previously showed that substituting Lys for Phe-185 dramatically increased the solubility of recombinant IN but caused an HIV-1 particle assembly defect. Mutants carrying His at this position displayed increased solubility and wild-type replication kinetics, showing that increased IN solubility per se is not detrimental to virus growth. PMID:9094622

  17. In vitro DNA tethering of HIV-1 integrase by the transcriptional coactivator LEDGF/p75.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Melissa; Hendrix, Jelle; Busschots, Katrien; Boons, Eline; Deleersnijder, Angélique; Gerard, Melanie; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2011-07-29

    Although LEDGF/p75 is believed to act as a cellular cofactor of lentiviral integration by tethering integrase (IN) to chromatin, there is no good in vitro model to analyze this functionality. We designed an AlphaScreen assay to study how LEDGF/p75 modulates the interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IN with DNA. IN bound with similar affinity to DNA mimicking the long terminal repeat or to random DNA. While LEDGF/p75 bound DNA strongly, a mutant of LEDGF/p75 with compromised nuclear localization signal (NLS)/AT hook interacted weakly, and the LEDGF/p75 PWWP domain did not interact, corroborating previous reports on the role of NLS and AT hooks in charge-dependent DNA binding. LEDGF/p75 stimulated IN binding to DNA 10-fold to 30-fold. Stimulation of IN-DNA binding required a direct interaction between IN and the C-terminus of LEDGF/p75. Addition of either the C-terminus of LEDGF/p75 (amino acids 325-530) or LEDGF/p75 mutated in the NLS/AT hooks interfered with IN binding to DNA. Our results are consistent with an in vitro model of LEDGF/p75-mediated tethering of IN to DNA. The inhibition of IN-DNA interaction by the LEDGF/p75 C-terminus may provide a novel strategy for the inhibition of HIV IN activity and may explain the potent inhibition of HIV replication observed after the overexpression of C-terminal fragments in cell culture.

  18. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  19. Sip, an integrase protein with excision, circularization and integration activities, defines a new family of mobile Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Carles; Tormo, Ma Angeles; Cucarella, Carme; Trotonda, Pilar; Foster, Timothy J; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2003-07-01

    We report the complete sequence of Staphylococcal pathogenicity island bovine 2 (SaPIbov2), encoding the biofilm-associated protein Bap. SaPIbov2 contains 24 open reading frames, including sip, which encodes a functional staphylococcal integrase protein. SaPIbov2 is bordered by 18 bp direct repeats. The integration site into the chromosome lies at the 3' end of a gene encoding GMP synthase. SaPIbov2 has extensive similarity to previously described pathogenicity islands of Staphylococcus aureus. The principal difference is that toxin genes present in the other pathogenicity islands are exchanged for a transposon-like element that carries the bap gene and genes encoding an ABC transporter and a transposase. Also, SaPIbov2 can be excised to form a circular element and can integrate site-specifically and RecA-independently at a chromosomal att site in a Sip-dependent manner. This was demonstrated both in S. aureus and with plasmid substrates ectopically in Escherichia coli. Thus, SaPIbov2 encodes a functional recombinase of the integrase family that promotes element excision and insertion/integration. In addition, we demonstrated that the presence of SaPIbov2 facilitated the persistence of S. aureus in an intramammary gland infection model. Finally, different bovine isolates of S. aureus were found to carry islands related to SaPIbov2, suggesting the existence of a family of related pathogenicity islands.

  20. Sequence-based design and discovery of peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase: insight into the binding mode of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Yuan; Zawahir, Zahrah; Song, Lai-Dong; Long, Ya-Qiu; Neamati, Nouri

    2006-07-27

    Integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome is an essential step in the HIV life cycle. This process is mediated by integrase (IN), a 32 kDa viral enzyme that has no mammalian counterpart, rendering it an attractive target for antiviral drug design. Herein, we present a novel approach toward elucidating "hot spots" of protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions of IN through the design of peptides that encompass conserved amino acids and residues known to be important for enzymatic activity. We designed small peptides (7-17 residues) containing at least one amino acid residue that is important for IN catalytic activities (3'-processing and strand transfer) or viral replication. All these peptides were synthesized on solid phase by fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry and evaluated for their inhibition of IN catalytic activities. Such specific sites of interest (i.e., protein-DNA or protein-drug interactions) could potentially be used as drug targets. This novel "sequence walk" strategy across the entire 288 residues of IN has allowed the identification of two peptides NL-6 and NL-9 with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.7 and 56 microM for strand transfer activity, respectively. Amino acid substitution analysis on these peptides revealed essential residues for activity, and the rational truncation of NL-6 produced a novel hexapeptide (peptide NL6-5) with inhibitory potency equal to that of the parent dodecapeptide (peptide NL-6). More significantly, the retroinverso analogue of NL-6 (peptide RDNL-6) in which the direction of the sequence is reversed and the chirality of each amino acid residue is inverted displayed improved inhibitory potency against 3'-processing of HIV-1 IN by 6-fold relative to the parent NL-6, serving as a metabolically stable derivative for further in vitro and in vivo analyses.

  1. Ty1 Integrase Interacts with RNA Polymerase III-specific Subcomplexes to Promote Insertion of Ty1 Elements Upstream of Polymerase (Pol) III-transcribed Genes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephanie; Ma, Lina; Chan, Patrick H W; Hu, Hui-Lan; Mayor, Thibault; Chen, Hung-Ta; Measday, Vivien

    2016-03-18

    Retrotransposons are eukaryotic mobile genetic elements that transpose by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate and are derived from retroviruses. The Ty1 retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ty1/Copia superfamily, which is present in every eukaryotic genome. Insertion of Ty1 elements into the S. cerevisiae genome, which occurs upstream of genes transcribed by RNA Pol III, requires the Ty1 element-encoded integrase (IN) protein. Here, we report that Ty1-IN interacts in vivo and in vitro with RNA Pol III-specific subunits to mediate insertion of Ty1 elements upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. Purification of Ty1-IN from yeast cells followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis identified an enrichment of peptides corresponding to the Rpc82/34/31 and Rpc53/37 Pol III-specific subcomplexes. GFP-Trap purification of multiple GFP-tagged RNA Pol III subunits from yeast extracts revealed that the majority of Pol III subunits co-purify with Ty1-IN but not two other complexes required for Pol III transcription, transcription initiation factors (TF) IIIB and IIIC. In vitro binding studies with bacterially purified RNA Pol III proteins demonstrate that Rpc31, Rpc34, and Rpc53 interact directly with Ty1-IN. Deletion of the N-terminal 280 amino acids of Rpc53 abrogates insertion of Ty1 elements upstream of the hot spot SUF16 tRNA locus and abolishes the interaction of Ty1-IN with Rpc37. The Rpc53/37 complex therefore has an important role in targeting Ty1-IN to insert Ty1 elements upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. PMID:26797132

  2. Fragment-Based Design of Ligands Targeting a Novel Site on the Integrase Enzyme of Human Immunodeficiency Virus;#8197;1

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Deadman, John J.; Rhodes, David I.; Parker, Michael W.; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-08-17

    Fragment-based screening has been used to identify a novel ligand binding site on HIV-1 integrase. Crystal structures of fragments bound at this site (shown) have been used to design elaborated second-generation compounds that bind with higher affinity and good ligand efficiency.

  3. Cross-resistance profile determination of two second-generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using a panel of recombinant viruses derived from raltegravir-treated clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Van Wesenbeeck, L; Rondelez, E; Feyaerts, M; Verheyen, A; Van der Borght, K; Smits, V; Cleybergh, C; De Wolf, H; Van Baelen, K; Stuyver, L J

    2011-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL) is currently used for the treatment of both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. Elvitegravir (EVG) is in late phases of clinical development. Since significant cross-resistance between RAL and EVG is observed, there is a need for second-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) with a higher genetic barrier and limited cross-resistance to RAL/EVG. A panel of HIV-1 integrase recombinants, derived from plasma samples from raltegravir-treated patients (baseline and follow-up samples), were used to study the cross-resistance profile of two second-generation integrase inhibitors, MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with Q148H/R mutations had elevated fold change values with all compounds tested. Although samples with the Y143R/C mutation had reduced susceptibility to RAL, they remained susceptible to MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with the N155H mutation had no reduced susceptibility to compound G. In conclusion, our results allowed ranking of the INIs on the basis of the antiviral activities using recombinant virus stocks from RAL-treated patient viruses. The order according to decreasing susceptibility is compound G, MK-2048, and EVG.

  4. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  5. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between rilpivirine and integrase inhibitors dolutegravir and GSK1265744.

    PubMed

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated oral coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744. Healthy subjects received DTG (50 mg every 24 h for 5 days) or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h for 12 days) in period 1 followed by a washout, RPV (25 mg every 24 h for 11 or 12 days) in period 2, immediately followed by RPV (25 mg every 24 h) plus DTG (50 mg every 24 h) for 5 days or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h) for 12 days in period 3. Steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis of data collected on the last day of each period. The combinations of RPV and DTG (n = 16) and of RPV and GSK1265744 (n = 11) were well tolerated; no grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs) or AE-related discontinuations were observed. The 90% confidence intervals for the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosage interval [AUC0-τ] and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) geometric mean ratios were within 0.8 to 1.25. Following administration of DTG + RPV, DTG and RPV Cτ increased by 22% and 21%, respectively. Following administration of GSK1265744 + RPV, RPV Cτ decreased 8%. DTG and GSK1265744 can be administered with RPV without dosage adjustment for either agent. These results support coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744 as either oral or long-acting depot injection regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01467531.).

  6. Lack of Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Rilpivirine and Integrase Inhibitors Dolutegravir and GSK1265744

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta

    2013-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated oral coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744. Healthy subjects received DTG (50 mg every 24 h for 5 days) or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h for 12 days) in period 1 followed by a washout, RPV (25 mg every 24 h for 11 or 12 days) in period 2, immediately followed by RPV (25 mg every 24 h) plus DTG (50 mg every 24 h) for 5 days or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h) for 12 days in period 3. Steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis of data collected on the last day of each period. The combinations of RPV and DTG (n = 16) and of RPV and GSK1265744 (n = 11) were well tolerated; no grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs) or AE-related discontinuations were observed. The 90% confidence intervals for the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosage interval [AUC0–τ] and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) geometric mean ratios were within 0.8 to 1.25. Following administration of DTG + RPV, DTG and RPV Cτ increased by 22% and 21%, respectively. Following administration of GSK1265744 + RPV, RPV Cτ decreased 8%. DTG and GSK1265744 can be administered with RPV without dosage adjustment for either agent. These results support coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744 as either oral or long-acting depot injection regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01467531.) PMID:23979733

  7. Clinical Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and Drug-Interaction Profile of the Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Mackenzie L.; Hadzic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Dolutegravir is a second generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) currently under review by the US FDA for marketing approval. Dolutegravir’s in vitro, protein adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) for wild-type virus is 0.064 μg/ml, and it retains in vitro anti-HIV 1 activity across a broad range of viral phenotypes known to confer resistance to the currently marketed INSTIs, raltegravir and elvitegravir. Dolutegravir has a half-life (t½) of 13 to 14 hours and maintains concentrations over the in vitro, protein adjusted IC90 for more than 30 hours following a single dose. Additionally, dolutegravir has comparatively low intersubject variability compared to raltegravir and elvitegravir. A plasma exposure-response relationship has been well described, with antiviral activity strongly correlating to trough concentration (Ctrough) values. Phase III trials have assessed the antiviral activity of dolutegravir compared with efavirenz and raltegravir in antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve patients and found dolutegravir to achieve more rapid and sustained virologic suppression in both instances. Additionally, studies of dolutegravir activity in patients with known INSTI-resistant mutations have been favorable, indicating that dolutegravir retains activity in a variety of INSTI resistant phenotypes. Much like currently marketed INSTIs, dolutegravir is very well tolerated. Because dolutegravir inhibits the renal transporter, organic cation transporter (OCT) 2, reduced tubular secretion of creatinine leads to non-progressive increases in serum creatinine. These serum creatinine increases have not been associated with decreased glomerular filtration rate or progressive renal impairment. Dolutegravir’s major and minor metabolic pathways are UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 and cytochrome (CYP)3A4, respectively, and it neither induces nor inhibits CYP isozymes. Thus dolutegravir has a modest drug interaction profile. However, antacids significantly

  8. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between rilpivirine and integrase inhibitors dolutegravir and GSK1265744.

    PubMed

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated oral coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744. Healthy subjects received DTG (50 mg every 24 h for 5 days) or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h for 12 days) in period 1 followed by a washout, RPV (25 mg every 24 h for 11 or 12 days) in period 2, immediately followed by RPV (25 mg every 24 h) plus DTG (50 mg every 24 h) for 5 days or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h) for 12 days in period 3. Steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis of data collected on the last day of each period. The combinations of RPV and DTG (n = 16) and of RPV and GSK1265744 (n = 11) were well tolerated; no grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs) or AE-related discontinuations were observed. The 90% confidence intervals for the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosage interval [AUC0-τ] and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) geometric mean ratios were within 0.8 to 1.25. Following administration of DTG + RPV, DTG and RPV Cτ increased by 22% and 21%, respectively. Following administration of GSK1265744 + RPV, RPV Cτ decreased 8%. DTG and GSK1265744 can be administered with RPV without dosage adjustment for either agent. These results support coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744 as either oral or long-acting depot injection regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01467531.). PMID:23979733

  9. The Hepatitis B Virus Ribonuclease H Is Sensitive to Inhibitors of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Ribonuclease H and Integrase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tavis, John E.; Totten, Michael; Cao, Feng; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Aurora, Rajeev; Meyers, Marvin J.; Jacobsen, E. Jon; Parniak, Michael A.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleos(t)ide analog therapy blocks DNA synthesis by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) reverse transcriptase and can control the infection, but treatment is life-long and has high costs and unpredictable long-term side effects. The profound suppression of HBV by the nucleos(t)ide analogs and their ability to cure some patients indicates that they can push HBV to the brink of extinction. Consequently, more patients could be cured by suppressing HBV replication further using a new drug in combination with the nucleos(t)ide analogs. The HBV ribonuclease H (RNAseH) is a logical drug target because it is the second of only two viral enzymes that are essential for viral replication, but it has not been exploited, primarily because it is very difficult to produce active enzyme. To address this difficulty, we expressed HBV genotype D and H RNAseHs in E. coli and enriched the enzymes by nickel-affinity chromatography. HBV RNAseH activity in the enriched lysates was characterized in preparation for drug screening. Twenty-one candidate HBV RNAseH inhibitors were identified using chemical structure-activity analyses based on inhibitors of the HIV RNAseH and integrase. Twelve anti-RNAseH and anti-integrase compounds inhibited the HBV RNAseH at 10 µM, the best compounds had low micromolar IC50 values against the RNAseH, and one compound inhibited HBV replication in tissue culture at 10 µM. Recombinant HBV genotype D RNAseH was more sensitive to inhibition than genotype H. This study demonstrates that recombinant HBV RNAseH suitable for low-throughput antiviral drug screening has been produced. The high percentage of compounds developed against the HIV RNAseH and integrase that were active against the HBV RNAseH indicates that the extensive drug design efforts against these HIV enzymes can guide anti-HBV RNAseH drug discovery. Finally, differential inhibition of HBV genotype D and H RNAseHs indicates that viral genetic variability will be a factor during drug development. PMID

  10. The hepatitis B virus ribonuclease H is sensitive to inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus ribonuclease H and integrase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tavis, John E; Cheng, Xiaohong; Hu, Yuan; Totten, Michael; Cao, Feng; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Aurora, Rajeev; Meyers, Marvin J; Jacobsen, E Jon; Parniak, Michael A; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2013-01-01

    Nucleos(t)ide analog therapy blocks DNA synthesis by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) reverse transcriptase and can control the infection, but treatment is life-long and has high costs and unpredictable long-term side effects. The profound suppression of HBV by the nucleos(t)ide analogs and their ability to cure some patients indicates that they can push HBV to the brink of extinction. Consequently, more patients could be cured by suppressing HBV replication further using a new drug in combination with the nucleos(t)ide analogs. The HBV ribonuclease H (RNAseH) is a logical drug target because it is the second of only two viral enzymes that are essential for viral replication, but it has not been exploited, primarily because it is very difficult to produce active enzyme. To address this difficulty, we expressed HBV genotype D and H RNAseHs in E. coli and enriched the enzymes by nickel-affinity chromatography. HBV RNAseH activity in the enriched lysates was characterized in preparation for drug screening. Twenty-one candidate HBV RNAseH inhibitors were identified using chemical structure-activity analyses based on inhibitors of the HIV RNAseH and integrase. Twelve anti-RNAseH and anti-integrase compounds inhibited the HBV RNAseH at 10 µM, the best compounds had low micromolar IC(50) values against the RNAseH, and one compound inhibited HBV replication in tissue culture at 10 µM. Recombinant HBV genotype D RNAseH was more sensitive to inhibition than genotype H. This study demonstrates that recombinant HBV RNAseH suitable for low-throughput antiviral drug screening has been produced. The high percentage of compounds developed against the HIV RNAseH and integrase that were active against the HBV RNAseH indicates that the extensive drug design efforts against these HIV enzymes can guide anti-HBV RNAseH drug discovery. Finally, differential inhibition of HBV genotype D and H RNAseHs indicates that viral genetic variability will be a factor during drug development. PMID

  11. Identification of small peptides inhibiting the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction through targeting the cellular co-factor.

    PubMed

    Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Christ, Frauke; Voet, Arnout; Sharma, Ajendra; Singh, Brajendra Kumar; Zhang, Kam Y J; Lescrinier, Eveline; De Maeyer, Marc; Debyser, Zeger; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome is one of the essential steps in the HIV replication cycle. This process is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase (IN) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a crucial cellular co-factor of integration that acts by tethering IN to the cellular chromatin. Recently, circular peptides were identified that bind to the C-terminal domain of IN and disrupt the interaction with LEDGF/p75. Starting from the circular peptides, we identified a short peptidic sequence able to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction at low μM concentration through its binding to the IN binding site of LEDGF/p75. This discovery can lead to the synthesis of peptidomimetics with high anti-HIV activity targeting the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75 and not the viral protein IN.

  12. Targeting of the Yeast Ty5 Retrotransposon to Silent Chromatin Is Mediated by Interactions between Integrase and Sir4p†

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weiwu; Gai, Xiaowu; Zhu, Yunxia; Zappulla, David C.; Sternglanz, Rolf; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2001-01-01

    The Ty5 retrotransposons of Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrate preferentially into regions of silent chromatin at the telomeres and silent mating loci (HMR and HML). We define a Ty5-encoded targeting domain that spans 6 amino acid residues near the C terminus of integrase (LXSSXP). The targeting domain establishes silent chromatin when it is tethered to a weakened HMR-E silencer, and it disrupts telomeric silencing when it is overexpressed. As determined by both yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays, the targeting domain interacts with the C terminus of Sir4p, a structural component of silent chromatin. This interaction is abrogated by mutations in the targeting domain that disrupt integration into silent chromatin, suggesting that recognition of Sir4p by the targeting domain is the primary determinant in Ty5 target specificity. PMID:11533248

  13. Testing of Cis-Regulatory Elements by Targeted Transgene Integration in Zebrafish Using PhiC31 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Hadzhiev, Yavor; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Balciunas, Darius; Müller, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present several strategies for testing the function of cis-regulatory elements using the PhiC31 integrase system. Firstly, we present two different strategies to analyze the activity of candidate enhancer elements. Targeted integration of candidate enhancers into the same genomic location circumvents the variability-associated random integration and position effects. This method is suitable for testing of candidate enhancers identified through computational or other analyses a priori. Secondly, we present methodology for targeted integration of BACs into the same genomic location(s). By using additional reporters integrated into a BAC, this enables experimental testing whether cis-regulatory elements are functional in the sequence inserted in the BAC. PMID:27464802

  14. TALEN Knockout of the PSIP1 Gene in Human Cells: Analyses of HIV-1 Replication and Allosteric Integrase Inhibitor Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, James H.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 utilizes the cellular protein LEDGF/p75 as a chromosome docking and integration cofactor. The LEDGF/p75 gene, PSIP1, is a potential therapeutic target because, like CCR5, depletion of LEDGF/p75 is tolerated well by human CD4+ T cells, and knockout mice have normal immune systems. RNA interference (RNAi) has been useful for studying LEDGF/p75, but the potent cofactor activity of small protein residua can be confounding. Here, in human cells with utility for HIV research (293T and Jurkat), we used transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to completely eradicate all LEDGF/p75 expression. We performed two kinds of PSIP1 knockouts: whole-gene deletion and deletion of the integrase binding domain (IBD)-encoding exons. HIV-1 integration was inhibited, and spreading viral replication was severely impaired in PSIP1−/− Jurkat cells infected at high multiplicity. Furthermore, frameshifting the gene in the first coding exon with a single TALEN pair yielded trace LEDGF/p75 levels that were virologically active, affirming the cofactor's potency and the value of definitive gene or IBD exon segment deletion. Some recent studies have suggested that LEDGF/p75 may participate in HIV-1 assembly. However, we determined that assembly of infectious viral particles is normal in PSIP1−/− cells. The potency of an allosteric integrase inhibitor, ALLINI-2, for rendering produced virions noninfectious was also unaffected by total eradication of cellular LEDGF/p75. We conclude that HIV-1 particle assembly and the main ALLINI mechanism are LEDGF/p75 independent. The block to HIV-1 propagation in PSIP1−/− human CD4+ T cells raises the possibility of gene targeting PSIP1 combinatorially with CCR5 for HIV-1 cure. IMPORTANCE LEDGF/p75 dependence is universally conserved in the retroviral genus Lentivirus. Once inside the nucleus, lentiviral preintegration complexes are thought to attach to the chromosome when integrase binds to LEDGF/p75. This tethering

  15. Antiviral Characteristics of GSK1265744, an HIV Integrase Inhibitor Dosed Orally or by Long-Acting Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Suyama-Kagitani, Akemi; Kawauchi-Miki, Shinobu; Taishi, Teruhiko; Kawasuji, Takashi; Johns, Brian A.; Underwood, Mark R.; Garvey, Edward P.; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    GSK1265744 is a new HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) engineered to deliver efficient antiviral activity with a once-daily, low-milligram dose that does not require a pharmacokinetic booster. The in vitro antiviral profile and mechanism of action of GSK1265744 were established through integrase enzyme assays, resistance passage experiments, and cellular assays with site-directed molecular (SDM) HIV clones resistant to other classes of anti-HIV-1 agents and earlier INSTIs. GSK1265744 inhibited HIV replication with low or subnanomolar efficacy and with a selectivity index of at least 22,000 under the same culture conditions. The protein-adjusted half-maximal inhibitory concentration (PA-EC50) extrapolated to 100% human serum was 102 nM. When the virus was passaged in the presence of GSK1265744, highly resistant mutants with more than a 10-fold change (FC) in EC50 relative to that of the wild-type were not observed for up to 112 days of culture. GSK1265744 demonstrated activity against SDM clones containing the raltegravir (RAL)-resistant Y143R, Q148K, N155H, and G140S/Q148H signature variants (FC less than 6.1), while these mutants had a high FC in the EC50 for RAL (11 to >130). Either additive or synergistic effects were observed when GSK1265744 was tested in combination with representative anti-HIV agents, and no antagonistic effects were seen. These findings demonstrate that, similar to dolutegravir, GSK1265744 is differentiated as a new INSTI, having a markedly distinct resistance profile compared with earlier INSTIs, RAL, and elvitegravir (EVG). The collective data set supports further clinical development of GSK1265744. PMID:25367908

  16. A rat brain mRNA encoding a transcriptional activator homologous to the DNA binding domain of retroviral integrases.

    PubMed Central

    Duilio, A; Zambrano, N; Mogavero, A R; Ammendola, R; Cimino, F; Russo, T

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a rat cDNA, named FE65, hybridizing to an mRNA of about 2,300 nucleotides present in rat brain, undetectable in rat liver and very poorly represented in other tissues. An mRNA of the same size is present in human neuroblastoma cells and is absent from other human cell lines. The FE65 cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a polypeptide of 499 amino acids in which 143 residues can be aligned with the DNA binding domain of the integrases encoded by mammalian immunodeficiency viruses. The remaining part of the FE65 ORF is not homologous with the correspondent regions of the integrases; the first 206 residues of the FE65 ORF show numerous negative charges and a short sequence not dispensable for the function of the transactivating acidic domain of the jun family transcriptional factors. A plasmid which expresses FE65 amino acids 1-232 fused to the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain was co-transfected with a plasmid containing five GAL4 binding sites upstream of a minimal Adenovirus promoter controlling the expression of the CAT gene. This experiment showed that the fused protein GAL4-FE65 is able to obtain a 30-40 fold increase of the CAT gene expression compared to the expression observed in the presence of the GAL4 DNA binding domain alone. Two types of FE65 mRNA are present in rat brain, differing only for six nucleotides. We demonstrate that this is the consequence of a neuron-specific alternative splicing of a six-nucleotide miniexon, which is also present in the human genome, in an intron/exon context very similar to that of the rat FE65 gene. Images PMID:1923810

  17. Pharmacovirological impact of an integrase inhibitor on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cDNA species in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Allespach, Ina; Oberbremer, Lena; Golden, Pamela L; Foster, Scott A; Johns, Brian A; Weatherhead, Jason G; Novick, Steven J; Chiswell, Karen E; Garvey, Edward P; Keppler, Oliver T

    2009-08-01

    Clinical trials of the first approved integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, have demonstrated a drop in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA loads of infected patients that was unexpectedly more rapid than that with a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and apparently dose independent. These clinical outcomes are not understood. In tissue culture, although their inhibition of integration is well documented, the effects of INIs on levels of unintegrated HIV-1 cDNAs have been variable. Furthermore, there has been no report to date on an INI's effect on these episomal species in vivo. Here, we show that prophylactic treatment of transgenic rats with the strand transfer INI GSK501015 reduced levels of viral integrants in the spleen by up to 99.7%. Episomal two-long-terminal-repeat (LTR) circles accumulated up to sevenfold in this secondary lymphoid organ, and this inversely correlated with the impact on the proviral burden. Contrasting raltegravir's dose-ranging study with HIV patients, titration of GSK501015 in HIV-infected animals demonstrated dependence of the INI's antiviral effect on its serum concentration. Furthermore, the in vivo 50% effective concentration calculated from these data best matched GSK501015's in vitro potency when serum protein binding was accounted for. Collectively, this study demonstrates a titratable, antipodal impact of an INI on integrated and episomal HIV-1 cDNAs in vivo. Based on these findings and known biological characteristics of viral episomes, we discuss how integrase inhibition may result in additional indirect antiviral effects that contribute to more rapid HIV-1 decay in HIV/AIDS patients.

  18. Pseudo attP sites in favor of transgene integration and expression in cultured porcine cells identified by Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanzhen; Liu, Ximei; Zhang, Long; Shao, Changwei; Ma, Zhuo; Hua, Zaidong; Zhang, Liping; Li, Li; Hua, Wenjun; Xiao, Hongwei; Wei, Qingxin; Zheng, Xinmin

    2013-09-08

    Phage PhiC31 integrase integrates attB-containing plasmid into pseudo attP site in eukaryotic genomes in a unidirectional site-specific manner and maintains robust transgene expression. Few studies, however, explore its potential in livestock. This study aims to discover the molecular basis of PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in pig cells. We show that PhiC31 integrase can mediate site-specific transgene integration into the genome of pig kidney PK15 cells. Intramolecular recombination in pig PK15 cell line occurred at maximum frequency of 82% with transiently transfected attB- and attP-containing plasmids. An optimal molar ratio of pCMV-Int to pEGFP-N1-attB at 5:1 was observed for maximum number of cell clones under drug selection. Four candidate pseudo attP sites were identified by TAIL-PCR from those cell clones with single-copy transgene integration. Two of them gave rise to higher integration frequency occurred at 33%. 5' and 3' junction PCR showed that transgene integration mediated by PhiC31 integrase was mono-allelic. Micro- deletion and insertion were observed by sequencing the integration border, indicating that double strand break was induced by the recombination. We then constructed rescue reporter plasmids by ABI-REC cloning of the four pseudo attP sites into pBCPB + plasmid. Transfection of these rescue plasmids and pCMV-Int resulted in expected intramolecular recombination between attB and pseudo attP sites. This proved that the endogenous pseudo attP sites were functional substrates for PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination. Two pseudo attP sites maintained robust extracellular and intracellular EGFP expression. Alamar blue assay showed that transgene integration into these specific sites had little effect on cell proliferation. This is the first report to document the potential use of PhiC31 integrase to mediate site-specific recombination in pig cells. Our work established an ideal model to study the position

  19. 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine carboxamides and N-alkyl-5-hydroxypyrimidinone carboxamides are potent, selective HIV integrase inhibitors with good pharmacokinetic profiles in preclinical species.

    PubMed

    Summa, Vincenzo; Petrocchi, Alessia; Matassa, Victor G; Gardelli, Cristina; Muraglia, Ester; Rowley, Michael; Paz, Odalys Gonzalez; Laufer, Ralph; Monteagudo, Edith; Pace, Paola

    2006-11-16

    The dihydroxypyrimidine carboxamide 4a was discovered as a potent and selective HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor. The optimization of physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetic profiles, and potency led to the identification of 13 in the dihydroxypyrimidine series and 18 in the N-methylpyrimidinone series having low nanomolar activity in the cellular HIV spread assay in the presence of 50% normal human serum and very good pharmacokinetics in preclinical species.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of substituted 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters as potential anti-cancer agents and HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Edkins, Adrienne L; Isaacs, Michelle; Mnkandhla, Dumisani; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-08-01

    Encouraging selectivity and low micromolar activity against HeLa cervical carcinoma (IC50⩾3.0μM) and the aggressive MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast carcinoma (IC50⩾9.6μM) cell lines has been exhibited by a number of readily accessible 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters. The potential of the ligands as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors has also been examined. PMID:27317645

  1. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  2. Targeted gene integration using the combination of a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein and phiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Higuchi, Yuriko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-09-30

    PhiC31 integrase-based vectors can integrate therapeutic genes selectively into attP or pseudo-attP sites in genomes, but considerable numbers of pseudo-attP sites in human genomes exist inside endogenous gene-coding regions. To avoid endogenous gene disruptions, we aimed to enhance the integration site-specificity of the phiC31 integrase-based vector using a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein containing Gal4 and LexA DNA-binding motifs. The dual DNA-binding protein was designed to tether the UAS-containing donor vector to the target sequence, the LexA operator, and restrict integration to sites close to the LexA operator. To analyze the site-specificity in chromosomal integration, a human cell line having LexA operators on the genome was established, and the cell line was transfected with donor vectors expressing the DNA-binding protein and the phiC31 integrase expression vector (helper vector). Quantitative PCR indicated that integration around the LexA operator was 26-fold higher with the UAS-containing donor vector than with the control. Sequence analysis confirmed that the integration occurred around the LexA operator. The dual DNA-binding protein-based targeted integration strategy developed herein would allow safer and more reliable genetic manipulations for various applications, including gene and cell therapies.

  3. Use of a Novel Integrase-Deficient Lentivirus for Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy With Survivin Promoter-Driven Diphtheria Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baoshun; Gao, Anding; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Hongyu; Shen, Haifeng; Hu, Qiong; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Meng; Lan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Kuancan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As an immunotoxin, diphtheria toxin has been widely used in gene therapy and gene function assays for its roles in protein synthesis inhibition, and the aim of our study is to set up a nonintegrating lentiviral system for specific expression of diphtheria toxin A (DTA) used in cancer gene therapy. Here, we established a lentiviral system that could coordinately express fluorescent protein and DTA driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, which is convenient for us to precisely trace the expression of DTA and monitor the process of lentivirus packaging. To achieve safer cancer therapy, we replaced the CMV promoter with the Survivin promoter, a specific promoter that is dramatically activated in cancer tissues and cells, but not in normal tissues and cells, and that will impose greater therapeutic potential because a significant expression difference occurred between these 2 groups. Meanwhile, we obtained integrase-deficient lentivirus (IDLV) after packaging with the integrase mutant, which expresses defective integrase RRK262263264AAH, to minimize the side effects that derived from the insertional mutagenesis of the host genome. Our results suggest that the IDLV system that we generated possesses therapeutic potential in cancers in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26252309

  4. Self-transmissibility of the integrative and conjugative element ICEPm1 between clinical isolates requires a functional integrase, relaxase, and type IV secretion system.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Erika L; Antczak, Samantha M; Mobley, Harry L T

    2011-08-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), which are chromosomal mobile elements, can conjugatively transfer between bacteria. Recently, we identified a genomic island of Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI), that possesses all the properties consistent with an ICE. This element, designated ICEPm1, is highly conserved in other causative agents of UTI, suggesting its mobility. We demonstrate that ICEPm1 can actively excise from the chromosome in a clonal population of bacteria and that this excision is integrase dependent. Although in P. mirabilis HI4320, ICEPm1 is annotated as integrated into the phenylalanine tRNA gene pheV, we show that ICEPm1 can integrate into either pheV or pheU. We determined that ICEPm1 transfers at a frequency of 1.35 × 10(-5) transconjugants/donor to ICEPm1-deficient P. mirabilis using plate mating assays with clinical isolates. Insertional inactivation of a putative integrase gene on ICEPm1 decreased transfer frequencies of ICEPm1 to below the limit of detection. Mutation of the relaxase of ICEPm1 also eliminates transfer and demonstrates that this element is indeed self-transmissible and not transferred in trans, as are some mobilizable genomic islands. Together, these findings clearly demonstrate that ICEPm1 can actively excise from the chromosome in an integrase-dependent manner, dynamically integrate into both phenylalanine tRNA genes, and transfer into clinical strains using its own conjugation machinery. PMID:21665966

  5. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  6. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA. PMID:21857987

  7. Pharmacokinetics and safety of S/GSK1349572, a next-generation HIV integrase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Fujiwara, Tamio; Piscitelli, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    S/GSK1349572 is a novel integrase inhibitor with potent in vitro anti-HIV activity, an in vitro resistance profile different from those of other integrase inhibitors, and favorable preclinical safety and pharmacokinetics (PK). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled single-dose and multiple-dose, dose escalation studies evaluated the PK, safety, and tolerability of S/GSK1349572 for healthy subjects. In the single-dose study, two cohorts of 10 subjects each (8 active, 2 receiving placebo) received suspension doses of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg in an alternating panel design. In the multiple-dose study, three cohorts of 10 subjects each (8 active, 2 receiving placebo) received suspension doses of 10, 25, and 50 mg once daily for 10 days. A cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substudy with midazolam was conducted with the 25-mg dose. Laboratory testing, vital signs, electrocardiograms (ECGs), and PK sampling were performed at regular intervals. S/GSK1349572 was well tolerated. Most adverse events (AEs) were mild, with a few moderate AEs reported. Headache was the most common AE. No clinically significant laboratory trends or ECG changes were noted. PK was linear over the dosage range studied. The steady-state geometric mean area under the concentration-time curve over a dosing interval (AUC(0-tau)) and maximum concentration of the drug in plasma (C(max)) ranged from 16.7 microg.h/ml (coefficient of variation [CV], 15%) and 1.5 microg/ml (CV, 24%) at a 10-mg dose to 76.8 microg.h/ml (CV, 19%) and 6.2 microg/ml (CV, 15%) at a 50-mg dose, respectively. The geometric mean steady-state concentration at the end of the dosing interval (C(tau)) with a 50-mg dose was 1.6 microg/ml, approximately 25-fold higher than the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration (0.064 microg/ml). The half-life was approximately 15 h. S/GSK1349572 had no impact on midazolam exposure, indicating that it does not modulate CYP3A activity. The PK profile suggests that once-daily, low milligram

  8. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-05-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization.

  9. Identification of Novel Mutations Responsible for Resistance to MK-2048, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Magen, Tamara; Sloan, Richard D.; Donahue, Daniel A.; Kuhl, Björn D.; Zabeida, Alexandra; Xu, Hongtao; Oliveira, Maureen; Hazuda, Daria J.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    MK-2048 represents a prototype second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) developed with the goal of retaining activity against viruses containing mutations associated with resistance to first-generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). Here, we report the identification of mutations (G118R and E138K) which confer resistance to MK-2048 and not to RAL or EVG. These mutations were selected in vitro and confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis. G118R, which appeared first in cell culture, conferred low levels of resistance to MK-2048. G118R also reduced viral replication capacity to approximately 1% that of the isogenic wild-type (wt) virus. The subsequent selection of E138K partially restored replication capacity to ≈13% of wt levels and increased resistance to MK-2048 to ≈8-fold. Viruses containing G118R and E138K remained largely susceptible to both RAL and EVG, suggesting a unique interaction between this second-generation INSTI and the enzyme may be defined by these residues as a potential basis for the increased intrinsic affinity and longer “off” rate of MK-2048. In silico structural analysis suggests that the introduction of a positively charged arginine at position 118, near the catalytic amino acid 116, might decrease Mg2+ binding, compromising enzyme function and thus leading to the significant reduction in both integration and viral replication capacity observed with these mutations. PMID:20610719

  10. Development and validation of a cell-based assay system to assess human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase multimerization.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomofumi; Campbell, Joseph R; Moore, Amber R; Otsu, Sachiko; Aikawa, Haruo; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    Multimerization of HIV-1 integrase (IN) subunits is required for the concerted integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA into the host genome. Thus, the disruption of IN multimerization represents a new avenue for intervening HIV-1 infection. Here, we generated a cell-based assay system to assess IN multimerization using a newly constructed bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC-IN) system. BiFC-IN proteins were efficient in emitting fluorescence, and amino acid (AA) substitutions associated with IN multimerization attenuated fluorescence, suggesting that the BiFC-IN system may be useful for evaluating the profile of IN multimerization. A recently reported non-catalytic site IN inhibitor (NCINI), which allosterically induces IN over-multimerization/aggregation, significantly increased fluorescence in the BiFC-IN system. An IN's substitution, A128T, associated with viral resistance to NCINIs, decreased the NCINI-induced increase of fluorescence, suggesting that A128T reduces the potential for IN over-multimerization. Moreover, E11K and F181T substitutions known to inhibit IN tetramerization also reduced the NCINI-induced fluorescence increase, suggesting that NCINI-induced IN over-multimerization was more likely to occur from tetramer subunits than from dimer subunits. The present study demonstrates that our cell-based BiFC-IN system may be useful in elucidating the profile of IN multimerization, and also help evaluate and identify novel compounds that disrupt IN multimerization in living cells.

  11. Synthesis and anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase activity of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid flavon-3-yl esters.

    PubMed

    Desideri, N; Sestili, I; Stein, M L; Tramontano, E; Corrias, S; La Colla, P

    1998-11-01

    A series of new hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid flavon-3-yl esters were synthesized in order to obtain compounds targeting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 integrase (IN). The esters were tested for anti-IN and anti-reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in enzyme assays and for anti-HIV-1, anti-proliferative and anti-topoisomerase activity in cell-based assays. In enzyme assays, the two gallic acid flavon-3-yl esters showed a notable IN inhibition (IC50 values were 8.3 and 9.1 microM, respectively), while the two caffeic acid flavon-3-yl esters exhibited a modest activity (IC50 75 and 60 microM, respectively). Replacement of hydroxyl groups resulted in loss of potency. Caffeic acid 3',4'-dichloroflavon-3-yl ester also inhibited the RT activity whereas it was not active on human topoisomerases. It therefore represents an interesting example of a compound specifically targeting more than one step of the virus replication cycle.

  12. Implications of integrase inhibitors for HIV-infected transplantation recipients: raltegravir and dolutegravir (S/GSK 1349572).

    PubMed

    Waki, Kayo; Sugawara, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    In the modern era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), reluctance to perform transplantation (Tx) in HIV-infected individuals is no longer justified. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs), the current first line regimens of HAART, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 family (CYP3A4). Most NNRTIs induce CYP3A4, whereas PIs inhibit it. Calcinuerin inhibitors (CNIs), which are mandatory for Tx, need the same enzyme complex for their clearance. Therefore, a significant drug-drug interaction (DDI) is encountered between current HAART and CNIs. This results in extreme difficulty in adjusting the optimal dose of CNIs, for which the therapeutic range is narrow. Of interest, integrase inhibitors (INIs) - novel, potent anti-HIV drugs - are mainly metabolized by uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 and do not induce or inhibit CYP3A4. DDI is presumably absent when NNTRIs or PIs are replaced by INIs. Raltegravir (RAL), a first generation INI, has been introduced into kidney and liver Tx. There is increasing evidence that rejection is well controlled without renal impairment due to CNI over-exposure while persistent, robust suppression of HIV is achieved. Global phase III clinical trials of dolutegravir (DTG), a second generation INI, are currently in progress. In vitro data has suggested that DTG may be less prone to resistance than RAL (referred to as having a higher genetic barrier). The time has come to extensively discuss the implications of INIs in Tx for HIV positive patients.

  13. Integrase-independent HIV-1 infection is augmented under conditions of DNA damage and produces a viral reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Ebina, Hirotaka Kanemura, Yuka; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Urata, Kozue; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2012-05-25

    HIV-1 possesses a viral protein, integrase (IN), which is necessary for its efficient integration in target cells. However, it has been reported that an IN-defective HIV strain is still capable of integration. Here, we assessed the ability of wild type (WT) HIV-1 to establish infection in the presence of IN inhibitors. We observed a low, yet clear infection of inhibitor-incubated cells infected with WT HIV which was identical to cells infected with IN-deficient HIV, D64A. Furthermore, the IN-independent integration could be enhanced by the pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents suggesting that integration is mediated by a DNA repair system. Moreover, significantly faster viral replication kinetics with augmented viral DNA integration was observed after infection in irradiated cells treated with IN inhibitor compared to nonirradiated cells. Altogether, our results suggest that HIV DNA has integration potential in the presence of an IN inhibitor and may serve as a virus reservoir.

  14. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  15. Actinophage R4 integrase-based site-specific chromosomal integration of non-replicative closed circular DNA.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takamasa; Nishizawa, Akito; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Asayama, Munehiko; Shirai, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    The actinophage R4 integrase (Sre)-based molecular genetic engineering system was developed for the chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A cloned DNA fragment containing two attP sites, green fluorescent protein (gfp) as a first transgene, and an antibiotic resistance gene as a selection marker was self-ligated to generate non-replicative closed circular DNA (nrccDNA) for integration. nrccDNA was introduced into attB-inserted E. coli cells harboring the plasmid expressing Sre by electroporation. The expressed Sre catalyzed site-specific integration between one of the two attP sites on nrccDNA and the attB site on the E. coli chromosome. The integration frequency was affected by the chromosomal location of the target site. A second nrccDNA containing two attB sites, lacZα encoding the alpha fragment of β-galactosidase as a transgene, and another antibiotic resistance gene was integrated into the residual attP site on the gfp-integrated E. coli chromosome via one of the two attB sites according to reiterating site-specific recombination. The integrants clearly exhibited β-galactosidase activity and green fluorescence, suggesting the simultaneous expression of multiple recombinant proteins in E. coli. The results of the present study showed that a step-by-step integration procedure using nrccDNA achieved the chromosomal integration of multiple genes. PMID:26870903

  16. The bacteroides NBU1 integrase performs a homology-independent strand exchange to form a holliday junction intermediate.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Segall, Anca; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2007-10-26

    The Bacteroides mobilizable transposon NBU1 uses an integrase (IntN1) that is a tyrosine recombinase for its integration and excision from the host chromosome. Previously we showed that IntN1 makes 7-bp staggered cuts within the NBU1 att sites, and certain mismatches within the crossover region of the attN1 site (G(-2)C attN1) or the chromosomal target site (C(-3)G attBT1-1) enhanced the in vivo integration efficiency. Here we describe an in vitro integration system for NBU1. We used nicked substrates and a Holliday junction trapping peptide to show that NBU1 integration proceeds via formation of a Holliday junction intermediate that is formed by exchange of bottom strands. Some mismatches next to the first strand exchange site (in reactions with C(-3)G attBT1-1 or G(-2)C attN1 with their wild-type partner site) not only allowed formation of the Holliday junction intermediate but also increased the rate of recombinant formation. The second strand exchange appears to be homology-dependent. IntN1 is the only tyrosine recombinase known to catalyze a reaction that is more efficient in the presence of mismatches and where the first strand exchange is homology-independent. The possible mechanisms by which the mismatches stimulate recombination are discussed.

  17. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  18. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance. PMID:24278679

  19. Linear indices of the "molecular pseudograph's atom adjacency matrix": definition, significance-interpretation, and application to QSAR analysis of flavone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani

    2004-01-01

    process of a set of flavone derivatives inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase. Quantitative models found are significant from a statistical point of view (R of 0.965, 0.902, and 0.927, respectively) and permit a clear interpretation of the studied properties in terms of the structural features of molecules. A LOO cross-validation procedure revealed that the regression models had a fairly good predictability (q2 of 0.679, 0.543, and 0.721, respectively). The comparison with other approaches reveals good behavior of the method proposed. The approach described in this paper appears to be an excellent alternative or guides for discovery and optimization of new lead compounds.

  20. The role of manganese in promoting multimerization and assembly of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase as a catalytically active complex on immobilized long terminal repeat substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, A L; Felock, P J; Hastings, J C; Blau, C U; Hazuda, D J

    1996-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral genome into the genome of the host cell is an essential step in the replication of all retroviruses. Integration requires two discrete biochemical reactions; specific processing of each viral long terminal repeat terminus or donor substrate, and a DNA strand transfer step wherein the processed donor substrate is joined to a nonspecific target DNA. Both reactions are catalyzed by a virally encoded enzyme, integrase. A microtiter assay for the strand transfer activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase which uses an immobilized oligonucleotide as the donor substrate was previously published (D. J. Hazuda, J. C. Hastings, A. L. Wolfe, and E. A. Emini, Nucleic Acids Res. 22;1121-1122, 1994). We now describe a series of modifications to the method which facilitate study of both the nature and the dynamics of the interaction between integrase and the donor DNA. The enzyme which binds to the immobilized donor is shown to be sufficient to catalyze strand transfer with target DNA substrates added subsequent to assembly; in the absence of the target substrate, the complex was retained on the donor in an enzymatically competent state. Assembly required high concentrations of divalent cation, with optimal activity achieved at 25 mM MnCl2. In contrast, preassembled complexes catalyzed strand transfer equally efficiently in either 1 or 25 mM MnCl2, indicating mechanistically distinct functions for the divalent cation in assembly and catalysis, respectively. Prior incubation of the enzyme in 25 mM MnCl2 was shown to promote the multimerization of integrase in the absence of a DNA substrate and alleviate the requirement for high concentrations of divalent cation during assembly. The superphysiological requirement for MnCl2 may, therefore, reflect an insufficiency for functional self-assembly in vitro. Subunits were observed to exchange during the assembly reaction, suggesting that multimerization can occur either before or

  1. Mutational analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1-4L in humanized mammary glands reveals key residues involved in lumen formation: stimulation by Thr-457 and inhibition by Ser-461.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxia; Chen, Charng-Jui; Shively, John E

    2009-04-15

    CEACAM1 (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein involved in cell-cell adhesion, undergoes extensive alternative splicing, resulting in isoforms with 1-4 Ig-like extracellular domains (ECDs) with either long or short cytoplasmic tails. We have previously shown that CEACAM1-4L (4 ECDs with a long cytoplasmic domain) formed glands with lumena in humanized mammary mouse fat pads in NOD/SCID mice. In order to identify the key residues of CEACAM1-4L that play essential roles in lumen formation, we introduced phosphorylation mimic (e.g., Thr-457 or Ser-461 to Asp) or null mutations (Thr-457 or Ser-461 to Ala) into the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1-4L and tested them in both the in vivo mouse model and in vitro Matrigel model of mammary morphogenesis. MCF7 cells stably expressing CEACAM1-4L with the single mutation T457D or the double mutant T457D+S461D, but not the null mutants induced central lumen formation in 3D Matrigel and in humanized mammary fat pads. However, the single phosphorylation mimic mutation S461D, but not the null mutation blocked lumen formation in both models, suggesting that S461 has inhibitory function in glandular lumen formation. Compared to our results for the -4S isoform (Chen et al., J. Biol. Chem, 282: 5749-5760, 2008), the T457A null mutation blocks lumen formation for the -4L but not for the -4S isoform. This difference is likely due to the fact that phosphorylation of S459 (absent in the -4L isoform) positively compensates for loss of T457 in the -4S isoform, while S461 (absent in the -4S isoform) negatively regulates lumen formation in the -4L isoform. Thus, phosphorylation of these key residues may exert a fine control over the role of the -4L isoform (compared to the -4S isoform) in lumen formation.

  2. Antiviral activity of dolutegravir in subjects with failure on an integrase inhibitor-based regimen: week 24 phase 3 results from VIKING-3

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, G; Mills, A; Grossberg, R; Lazzarin, A; Maggiolo, F; Molina, J; Pialoux, G; Wright, D; Ait-Khaled, M; Huang, J; Vavro, C; Wynne, B; Yeo, J

    2012-01-01

    Background VIKING-3 aimed to examine efficacy and safety of dolutegravir (DTG) 50 mg twice daily in patients with resistance to multiple ARV classes, including integrase inhibitors (INI). Methods RAL and/or EVG-resistant (current or historical) adult subjects with screening plasma HIV-1 RNA ≥500 c/mL and resistance to ≥2 other ART classes received open-label DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without RAL/EVG). At Day 8 the background regimen was optimised and DTG continued. Activity of the optimized background regimen (OBR) was determined by Monogram Net Assessment. Primary endpoints were antiviral efficacy at Day 8 and Week 24. Results 183 subjects enrolled, 124 with INI-resistance at screening and 59 with historical (but no screening) resistance. Population was advanced: at BL, median CD4 140, prior ART 13 yrs, 56% CDC Class C; 79% had >2 NRTI, 75% >1 NNRTI, and 70% >2 PI resistance-associated mutations, and 61% had non-R5 HIV detected. Of the 114 subjects who had the opportunity to complete 24 weeks on study before data cutoff, 72 (63%) had <50 c/mL RNA at Week 24 (SNAPSHOT algorithm). Mean HIV RNA declined by 1.4 log10 c/mL (95% CI: 1.3, 1.5; p < 0.001) at Day 8; response differed by genotype pathway (Table). Primary INI mutations at BL N Mean HIV RNA (log 10) Change from BL (SD) at Day 8 %>1 log HIV RNA decline of <50 c/mL at Day 8 TOTAL 183 −1.4 (0.61) 82% T66 1 −1.9 100% Y143 28 −1.7 (0.42) 96% N155 33 −1.4 (0.51) 82% Q148 + ≤1 secondary mutation# 32 −1.1 (0.51) 69% Q148 + ≥2 secondary mutations# 20 −1.0 (0.81) 48% ≥2 primary mutations 8 −1.4 (0.76) 75% No primary mutations 60 −1.6 (0.55) 95% # Key secondary mutations comprised G140_ACS, L741, E138_AKT. In subjects with Q148 pathway mutations, virologic response decreased with increasing number of secondary mutations. Background overall susceptibility score (OSS) was not associated with Wk 24 response: % <50 c/mL were 83%, 63%, 59% and 69% for OSS 0, 1, 2 and >2

  3. Structural and Functional Analyses of the Second-Generation Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572)S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephen; Smith, Steven J.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Jaxa-Chamiec, Albert; Pommier, Yves; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    Raltegravir (RAL) and related HIV-1 integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) efficiently block viral replication in vitro and suppress viremia in patients. These small molecules bind to the IN active site, causing it to disengage from the deoxyadenosine at the 3′ end of viral DNA. The emergence of viral strains that are highly resistant to RAL underscores the pressing need to develop INSTIs with improved resistance profiles. Herein, we show that the candidate second-generation drug dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572) effectively inhibits a panel of HIV-1 IN variants resistant to first-generation INSTIs. To elucidate the structural basis for the increased potency of DTG against RAL-resistant INs, we determined crystal structures of wild-type and mutant prototype foamy virus intasomes bound to this compound. The overall IN binding mode of DTG is strikingly similar to that of the tricyclic hydroxypyrrole MK-2048. Both second-generation INSTIs occupy almost the same physical space within the IN active site and make contacts with the β4–α2 loop of the catalytic core domain. The extended linker region connecting the metal chelating core and the halobenzyl group of DTG allows it to enter farther into the pocket vacated by the displaced viral DNA base and to make more intimate contacts with viral DNA, compared with those made by RAL and other INSTIs. In addition, our structures suggest that DTG has the ability to subtly readjust its position and conformation in response to structural changes in the active sites of RAL-resistant INs. PMID:21719464

  4. Identification of multiple integration sites for Stx-phage Phi24B in the Escherichia coli genome, description of a novel integrase and evidence for a functional anti-repressor.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Paul C M; Gossage, Sharon M; Smith, Darren L; Saunders, Jon R; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2007-12-01

    The key virulence factor in Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli is the expression of Shiga toxin (Stx), which is conferred by Stx-encoding temperate lambdoid phages (Stx-phages). It had been assumed that Stx-phages would behave similarly to lambda phage. However, contrary to the lambda superinfection immunity model, it has been demonstrated that double lysogens can be produced with the Stx-phage Phi24(B). Here, the Phi24(B) integrase gene is identified, and the preferred site of integration defined. Although an E. coli int gene was identified close to the Phi24(B) integration site, it was shown not to be involved in the phage integration event. An additional six potential integration sites were identified in the E. coli genome, and three of these were confirmed experimentally. Two of the other potential sites lie within genes predicted to be essential to E. coli and are therefore unlikely to support phage integration. A Phi24(B) gene, possessing similarity to the well-characterized P22 ant gene, was identified. RT-PCR was used to demonstrate that ant is transcribed in a Phi24(B) E. coli lysogen, and expression of an anti-repressor is the likely explanation for the absence of immunity to superinfection. Demonstration of the ability of Phi24(B) to form multiple lysogens has two potentially serious impacts. First, multiple integrated prophages will drive the evolution of bacterial pathogens as novel Stx-phages emerge following intracellular mutation/recombination events. Second, multiple copies of the stx gene may lead to an increase in toxin production and consequently increased virulence.

  5. Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Reveals Key Differences between Brachiaria decumbens and B. brizantha, Two Similar Pastures with Different Toxicities.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Hussain, Syeda M; Pecio, Łukasz; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Herling, Valdo R; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Several species of Brachiaria (Poaceae) currently cover extensive grazing areas in Brazil, providing valuable source of feed for a large cattle population. However, numerous cases of toxicity outbreaks in livestock have raised concerns on safety of using these plants, especially B. decumbens. In this study, chemometric analysis of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-QTOF-MS) data has for the first time uncovered qualitative and quantitative differences between metabolomes of toxic B. decumbens and nontoxic B. brizantha. The steroidal saponin protoneodioscin was established as the main biomarker for B. decumbens when compared to B. brizantha, and therefore the key explanation for their phytochemical differentiation. Quantification of protodioscin in both plants showed no significant differences; consequently, the idea that this compound is solely responsible for toxicity outbreaks must be discarded. Instead, we propose that the added occurrence of its stereoisomer, protoneodioscin, in B. decumbens, can be considered as the probable cause of these events. Interestingly, the greatest concentrations of saponins for both species were reached during winter (B. decumbens = 53.6 ± 5.1 mg·g(-1) dry weight (D.W.); B. brizantha = 25.0 ± 1.9 mg·g(-1) D.W.) and spring (B. decumbens = 49.4 ± 5.0 mg·g(-1) D.W.; B. brizantha = 27.9 ± 1.4 mg·g(-1) D.W.), although in the case of B. decumbens these values do not vary significantly among seasons.

  6. Comparative Study of Early Cold-Regulated Proteins by Two-Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis Reveals a Key Role for Phospholipase Dα1 in Mediating Cold Acclimation Signaling Pathway in Rice.

    PubMed

    Huo, Chenmin; Zhang, Baowen; Wang, Hui; Wang, Fawei; Liu, Meng; Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Wenhua; Deng, Zhiping; Sun, Daye; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-04-01

    To understand the early signaling steps that regulate cold responses in rice, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE)(1)was used to study early cold-regulated proteins in rice seedlings. Using mass spectrometry, 32 spots, which represent 26 unique proteins that showed an altered expression level within 5 min of cold treatment were identified. Among these proteins, Western blot analyses confirmed that the cellular phospholipase D α1 (OsPLDα1) protein level was increased as early as 1 min after cold treatment. Genetic studies showed that reducing the expression ofOsPLDα1makes rice plants more sensitive to chilling stress as well as cold acclimation increased freezing tolerance. Correspondingly, cold-regulated proteomic changes and the expression of the cold-responsive C repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding 1 (OsDREB1) family of transcription factors were inhibited in thepldα1mutant. We also found that the expression ofOsPLDα1is directly regulated by OsDREB1A. This transcriptional regulation ofOsPLDα1could provide positive feedback regulation of the cold signal transduction pathway in rice. OsPLDα1 hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine to produce the signal molecule phosphatidic acid (PA). By lipid-overlay assay, we demonstrated that the rice cold signaling proteins, MAP kinase 6 (OsMPK6) and OsSIZ1, bind directly to PA. Taken together, our results suggest that OsPLDα1 plays a key role in transducing cold signaling in rice by producing PA and regulatingOsDREB1s' expression by OsMPK6, OsSIZ1, and possibly other PA-binding proteins. PMID:26747563

  7. Adaptation of Maize to Temperate Climates: Mid-Density Genome-Wide Association Genetics and Diversity Patterns Reveal Key Genomic Regions, with a Major Contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Bertin, Pascal; Madur, Delphine; Combes, Valérie; Dumas, Fabrice; Brunel, Dominique; Laborde, Jacques; Charcosset, Alain; Nicolas, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT) gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide range of

  8. Short communication: analysis of the integrase gene from HIV type 1-positive patients living in a rural area of West Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Montagna, Claudia; Falasca, Francesca; Bucci, Mauro; Russo, Gianluca; Lichtner, Miriam; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Vullo, Vincenzo; Pistello, Mauro; Antonelli, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Major mutations associated with HIV-I integrase inhibitors (INI) resistance are rare in INI-naive patients. However, polymorphisms at positions that may influence the genetic barrier and/or drive the selection of specific INI resistance pathways are common in HIV non-B subtypes. The aim was to evaluate the presence of natural polymorphisms and/or INI resistance mutations in HIV-1 non-B subtype samples obtained from INI-naive patients living in rural west Cameroon. Thirty-three HIV-1 non-B samples were obtained from INI-naive African women and, as controls, 15 samples of HIV-1 subtype B were obtained from antiretroviral-naive Italian patients. The integrase gene was amplified and sequenced using Trugene Core Reagents. Several amino acid positions in B and non-B subtypes were found to be polymorphic. Interestingly, two patients infected with the CRF02_AG subtype had the resistance mutations N155H and E157Q/E and 12% of African samples had an amino acid substitution at position 143. Silent mutations leading to a higher increment of genetic barriers were detected at 140 and 151 positions in non B-subtypes. Although most polymorphisms may have little effect on INI susceptibility, the IN gene variations found in the present study should be taken into consideration as they may facilitate or delay the emergence of variants fully resistant to INIs.

  9. Design of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain as well as its interaction with LEDGF/p75: a scaffold hopping approach using salicylate and catechol groups.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Al-Safi, Rasha I; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shabaik, Yumna; Debnath, Bikash; Sanchez, Tino W; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2011-08-15

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral drug design. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands the discovery of novel inhibitors that are structurally as well mechanistically different. Herein, we describe the design and discovery of novel IN inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain as well as its interaction with LEDGF/p75, which is essential for the HIV-1 integration as an IN cofactor. By merging the pharmacophores of salicylate and catechol, the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide (5a) was identified as a new scaffold to inhibit the strand transfer reaction efficiently. Further structural modifications on the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide scaffold revealed that the heteroaromatic functionality attached on the carboxamide portion and the piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl substituted at the phenyl ring are beneficial for the activity, resulting in a low micromolar IN inhibitor (5p, IC(50)=5 μM) with more than 40-fold selectivity for the strand transfer over the 3'-processing reaction. More significantly, this active scaffold remarkably inhibited the interaction between IN and LEDGF/p75 cofactor. The prototype example, N-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2,3-dihydroxy-5-(piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl) benzamide (5u) inhibited the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction with an IC(50) value of 8 μM. Using molecular modeling, the mechanism of action was hypothesized to involve the chelation of the divalent metal ions inside the IN active site. Furthermore, the inhibitor of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction was properly bound to the LEDGF/p75 binding site on IN. This work provides a new and efficient approach to evolve novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors from rational integration and optimization of previously reported inhibitors.

  10. Design of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Targeting the Catalytic Domain as Well as Its Interaction with LEDGF/p75: A Scaffold Hopping Approach Using Salicylate and Catechol Groups

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Al-Safi, Rasha I.; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shabaik, Yumna; Debnath, Bikash; Sanchez, Tino W.; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral agents. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands new structure and new mechanism IN inhibitors. Herein, we describe the design and discovery of novel IN inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain as well as its interaction with LEDGF/p75, which is essential for the HIV-1 integration as an IN cofactor. By merging the pharmacophores of salicylate and catechol, the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide (5a) was identified as a new scaffold to inhibit the strand transfer reaction efficiently. Further structural modifications on the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide scaffold revealed that the heteroaromatic functionality attached on the carboxamide portion and the piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl substituted at the phenyl ring are beneficial for the activity, resulting in a low micromolar IN inhibitor (5p, IC50 = 5 μM) with more than 40-fold selectivity for the strand transfer over the 3′-processing reaction. More significantly, this active scaffold remarkably inhibited the interaction between IN and LEDGF/p75 cofactor. The prototype example, N-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2,3-dihydroxy-5-(piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl) benzamide (5u) inhibited the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction with an IC50 value of 8 μM. Based on the molecular modeling, the mechanism of action was hypothesized to involve the chelation of the divalent metal ions inside the IN active site. And the inhibitor of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction was properly bound to the LEDGF/p75 binding site in IN protein. This work provided a new and efficient approach to evolve novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors from rational integration and optimization of previously reported inhibitors. PMID:21778063

  11. Chemical trapping of ternary complexes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase, divalent metal, and DNA substrates containing an abasic site. Implications for the role of lysine 136 in DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, A; Neamati, N; Pilon, A A; Sunder, S; Pommier, Y

    1996-11-01

    We report a novel assay for monitoring the DNA binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and the effect of cofactors and inhibitors. The assay uses depurinated oligonucleotides that can form a Schiff base between the aldehydic abasic site and a nearby enzyme lysine epsilon-amino group which can subsequently be trapped by reduction with sodium borohydride. Chemically depurinated duplex substrates representing the U5 end of the HIV-1 DNA were initially used. We next substituted an enzymatically generated abasic site for each of 10 nucleotides normally present in a 21-mer duplex oligonucleotide representing the U5 end of the HIV-1 DNA. Using HIV-1, HIV-2, or simian immunodeficiency virus integrases, the amount of covalent enzyme-DNA complex trapped decreased as the abasic site was moved away from the conserved CA dinucleotide. The enzyme-DNA complexes formed in the presence of manganese were not reversed by subsequent addition of EDTA, indicating that the divalent metal required for integrase catalysis is tightly bound in a ternary enzyme-metal-DNA complex. Both the N- and C-terminal domains of integrase contributed to efficient DNA binding, and mutation of Lys-136 significantly reduced Schiff base formation, implicating this residue in viral DNA binding.

  12. Natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 CRF01_AE integrase coding region in ARV-naïve individuals in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam: an ANRS AC12 working group study.

    PubMed

    Nouhin, Janin; Donchai, Tawee; Hoang, Khanh Thu Huynh; Ken, Sreymom; Kamkorn, Jiraporn; Tran, Ton; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Lien, Truong Xuan; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The HIV integrase enzyme is essential for the HIV life cycle as it mediates integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA into the infected cell's genome. Recently, the development of drugs capable of inhibiting integrase has provided major new options for HIV-infected, treatment-experienced patients with multidrug resistant virus, as well treatment-naïve patients. More than 40 amino acid substitutions within integrase have been described as associated mostly with resistance of HIV B-subtypes to currently available integrase inhibitors (INIs). We have analyzed the natural polymorphisms of the integrase coding region in 87 antiretroviral-naïve subjects (32 from Cambodia, 37 from Thailand and 18 from Vietnam) infected with CRF01_AE virus, the predominant HIV-1 strain circulating in Southeast Asia. The 864bp integrase coding region was sequenced using the ANRS consensus sequencing technique from plasma samples, and amino acid results were interpreted for drug resistance according to the ANRS (Updated July 2009, version 18) and Stanford algorithms (Version November 6, 2009). Alignment of the 87 amino acid sequences against the 2004 Los Alamos HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence showed that overall, 119 of 288 (41.3%) amino acid positions presented at least one polymorphism each. Substitutions found in >60% of study subjects occurred at: K14, A21, V31, S39, I72, T112, T124, T125, G134, I135, K136, D167, V201, L234 and S283. Also, new amino acid substitutions of as yet unknown significance were identified: E152K/H, S153F/L, N155I and E157G. None of the known integrase resistance mutations were observed, except E157Q found in one Cambodian subject (1.1%, CI 95% 0.02-6.3%). The clinical impact of this substitution on resistance of B and nonB-viruses to the licensed INI raltegravir is unclear. If this substitution is confirmed to compromise the virologic response to raltegravir, further studies will be needed to better assess the prevalence of this substitution among CRF01_AE virus.

  13. Dual inhibition of HIV-1 replication by integrase-LEDGF allosteric inhibitors is predominant at the post-integration stage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) is the main cellular cofactor of HIV-1 integrase (IN). It acts as a tethering factor for IN, and targets the integration of HIV in actively transcribed gene regions of chromatin. A recently developed class of IN allosteric inhibitors can inhibit the LEDGF-IN interaction. Results We describe a new series of IN-LEDGF allosteric inhibitors, the most active of which is Mut101. We determined the crystal structure of Mut101 in complex with IN and showed that the compound binds to the LEDGF-binding pocket, promoting conformational changes of IN which explain at the atomic level the allosteric effect of the IN/LEDGF interaction inhibitor on IN functions. In vitro, Mut101 inhibited both IN-LEDGF interaction and IN strand transfer activity while enhancing IN-IN interaction. Time of addition experiments indicated that Mut101 behaved as an integration inhibitor. Mut101 was fully active on HIV-1 mutants resistant to INSTIs and other classes of anti-HIV drugs, indicative that this compound has a new mode of action. However, we found that Mut101 also displayed a more potent antiretroviral activity at a post-integration step. Infectivity of viral particles produced in presence of Mut101 was severely decreased. This latter effect also required the binding of the compound to the LEDGF-binding pocket. Conclusion Mut101 has dual anti-HIV-1 activity, at integration and post-integration steps of the viral replication cycle, by binding to a unique target on IN (the LEDGF-binding pocket). The post-integration block of HIV-1 replication in virus-producer cells is the mechanism by which Mut101 is most active as an antiretroviral. To explain this difference between Mut101 antiretroviral activity at integration and post-integration stages, we propose the following model: LEDGF is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein that is absent in the cytoplasm. Therefore, LEDGF can outcompete compound binding to IN in the nucleus of target cells lowering its antiretroviral

  14. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  15. Public Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  16. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (p<0.001 in both cases), explaining 67.04% of the abundance and 42.95% of the proportion variations in the grassland soil. Both cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate proved to be considerable sources of ARGs, especially sul1, as well as integron-integrases. Sul1, intI1 and intI2 levels in grassland soil were elevated in response to each organic fertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were

  17. Discovery of the principal specific transcription factors of Apicomplexa and their implication for the evolution of the AP2-integrase DNA binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S.; Babu, M. Madan; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.

    2005-01-01

    The comparative genomics of apicomplexans, such as the malarial parasite Plasmodium, the cattle parasite Theileria and the emerging human parasite Cryptosporidium, have suggested an unexpected paucity of specific transcription factors (TFs) with DNA binding domains that are closely related to those found in the major families of TFs from other eukaryotes. This apparent lack of specific TFs is paradoxical, given that the apicomplexans show a complex developmental cycle in one or more hosts and a reproducible pattern of differential gene expression in course of this cycle. Using sensitive sequence profile searches, we show that the apicomplexans possess a lineage-specific expansion of a novel family of proteins with a version of the AP2 (Apetala2)-integrase DNA binding domain, which is present in numerous plant TFs. About 20–27 members of this apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) family are encoded in different apicomplexan genomes, with each protein containing one to four copies of the AP2 DNA binding domain. Using gene expression data from Plasmodium falciparum, we show that guilds of ApiAP2 genes are expressed in different stages of intraerythrocytic development. By analogy to the plant AP2 proteins and based on the expression patterns, we predict that the ApiAP2 proteins are likely to function as previously unknown specific TFs in the apicomplexans and regulate the progression of their developmental cycle. In addition to the ApiAP2 family, we also identified two other novel families of AP2 DNA binding domains in bacteria and transposons. Using structure similarity searches, we also identified divergent versions of the AP2-integrase DNA binding domain fold in the DNA binding region of the PI-SceI homing endonuclease and the C-terminal domain of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-like modules of eukaryotes. Integrating these findings, we present a reconstruction of the evolutionary scenario of the AP2-integrase DNA binding domain fold, which suggests that it underwent

  18. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (p<0.001 in both cases), explaining 67.04% of the abundance and 42.95% of the proportion variations in the grassland soil. Both cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate proved to be considerable sources of ARGs, especially sul1, as well as integron-integrases. Sul1, intI1 and intI2 levels in grassland soil were elevated in response to each organic fertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were

  19. NASA's Chandra Reveals Origin of Key Cosmic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    WASHINGTON -- New findings from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have provided a major advance in understanding a type of supernova critical for studying the dark energy that astronomers think pervades the universe. The results show mergers of two dense stellar remnants are the likely cause of many of the supernovae that have been used to measure the accelerated expansion of the universe. These supernovae, called Type Ia, serve as cosmic mile markers to measure expansion of the universe because they can be seen at large distances, and they follow a reliable pattern of brightness. However, until now, scientists have been unsure what actually causes the explosions. "These are such critical objects in understanding the universe," said Marat Gilfanov of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Germany and lead author of the study that appears in the Feb. 18 edition of the journal Nature. "It was a major embarrassment that we did not know how they worked. Now we are beginning to understand what lights the fuse of these explosions." Most scientists agree a Type Ia supernova occurs when a white dwarf star -- a collapsed remnant of an elderly star -- exceeds its weight limit, becomes unstable and explodes. Scientists have identified two main possibilities for pushing the white dwarf over the edge: two white dwarfs merging or accretion, a process in which the white dwarf pulls material from a sun-like companion star until it exceeds its weight limit. "Our results suggest the supernovae in the galaxies we studied almost all come from two white dwarfs merging," said co-author Akos Bogdan, also of Max Planck. "This is probably not what many astronomers would expect." The difference between these two scenarios may have implications for how these supernovae can be used as "standard candles" -- objects of a known brightness -- to track vast cosmic distances. Because white dwarfs can come in a range of masses, the merger of two could result in explosions that vary somewhat in brightness. Because these two scenarios would generate different amounts of X-ray emission, Gilfanov and Bogdan used Chandra to observe five nearby elliptical galaxies and the central region of the Andromeda galaxy. A Type 1a supernova caused by accreting material produces significant X- ray emission prior to the explosion. A supernova from a merger of two white dwarfs, on the other hand, would create significantly less X-ray emission than the accretion scenario. The scientists found the observed X-ray emission was a factor of 30 to 50 times smaller than expected from the accretion scenario, effectively ruling it out. This implies that white dwarf mergers dominate in these galaxies. An open question remains whether these white dwarf mergers are the primary catalyst for Type Ia supernovae in spiral galaxies. Further studies are required to know if supernovae in spiral galaxies are caused by mergers or a mixture of the two processes. Another intriguing consequence of this result is that a pair of white dwarfs is relatively hard to spot, even with the best telescopes. "To many astrophysicists, the merger scenario seemed to be less likely because too few double-white-dwarf systems appeared to exist," said Gilfanov. "Now this path to supernovae will have to be investigated in more detail." In addition to the X-rays observed with Chandra, other data critical for this result came from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based, infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey. The infrared brightness of the galaxies allowed the team to estimate how many supernovae should occur. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. More information, including images and other multimedia, can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  20. Keys to Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Up ahead, a foreboding wooden door showing wear from passage of earlier travelers is spotted. As the old porch light emits a pale yellow glow, a key ring emerges from deep inside the coat pocket. Searching for just the right key, the voyager settles on one that also shows age. As the key enters its receptacle and begins to turn, a clicking noise…

  1. Work Keys USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Keys USA, 1998

    1998-01-01

    "Work Keys" is a comprehensive program for assessing and teaching workplace skills. This serial "special issue" features 18 first-hand reports on Work Keys projects in action in states across North America. They show how the Work Keys is helping businesses and educators solve the challenge of building a world-class work force. The reports are as…

  2. Azaindole N-methyl hydroxamic acids as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors-II. The impact of physicochemical properties on ADME and PK.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Steven P; Plewe, Michael B; Johnson, Ted W; Butler, Scott L; Dalvie, Deepak; DeLisle, Dorothy; Dress, Klaus R; Hu, Qiyue; Huang, Buwen; Kuehler, Jon E; Kuki, Atsuo; Liu, Wen; Peng, Qinghai; Smith, Graham L; Solowiej, Jim; Tran, Khanh T; Wang, Hai; Yang, Anle; Yin, Chunfeng; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Junhu; Zhu, Huichun

    2010-12-15

    HIV-1 integrase is one of three enzymes encoded by the HIV genome and is essential for viral replication, and HIV-1 IN inhibitors have emerged as a new promising class of therapeutics. Recently, we reported the discovery of azaindole hydroxamic acids that were potent inhibitors of the HIV-1 IN enzyme. N-Methyl hydroxamic acids were stable against oxidative metabolism, however were cleared rapidly through phase 2 glucuronidation pathways. We were able to introduce polar groups at the β-position of the azaindole core thereby altering physical properties by lowering calculated log D values (c Log D) which resulted in attenuated clearance rates in human hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic data in dog for representative compounds demonstrated moderate oral bioavailability and reasonable half-lives. These ends were accomplished without a large negative impact on enzymatic and antiviral activity, thus suggesting opportunities to alter clearance parameters in future series.

  3. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker.

  4. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-03-04

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces.

  5. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces. PMID:25737113

  6. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea.

  7. Construction of transformed, cultured silkworm cells and transgenic silkworm using the site-specific integrase system from phage φC31.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yajuan; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2014-10-01

    The Streptomyces bacteriophage, φC31, uses a site-specific integrase enzyme to perform efficient recombination. The recombination system uses specific sequences to integrate exogenous DNA from the phage into a host. The sequences are known as the attP site in the phage and the attB site in the host. The system can be used as a genetic manipulation tool. In this study it has been applied to the transformation of cultured BmN cells and the construction of transgenic Bombyx mori individuals. A plasmid, pSK-attB/Pie1-EGFP/Zeo-PASV40, containing a cassette designed to express a egfp-zeocin fusion gene, was co-transfected into cultured BmN cells with a helper plasmid, pSK-Pie1/NLS-Int/NSL. Expression of the egfp-zeocin fusion gene was driven by an ie-1 promoter, downstream of a φC31 attB site. The helper plasmid encoded the φC31 integrase enzyme, which was flanked by two nuclear localization signals. Expression of the egfp-zeocin fusion gene could be observed in transformed cells. The two plasmids were also transferred into silkworm eggs to obtain transgenic silkworms. Successful integration of the fusion gene was indicated by the detection of green fluorescence, which was emitted by the silkworms. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the attB site had been cut, to allow recombination between the attB and endogenous pseudo attP sites in the cultured silkworm cells and silkworm individuals.

  8. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  9. Effect of Ethanol on the Metabolic Characteristics of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Elvitegravir and Elvitegravir/Cobicistat with CYP3A: An Analysis Using a Newly Developed LC-MS/MS Method.

    PubMed

    Midde, Narasimha M; Rahman, Mohammad A; Rathi, Chetan; Li, Junhao; Meibohm, Bernd; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG), an integrase inhibitor for the treatment HIV infection, is increasingly becoming the part of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen. EVG is mainly metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Previously, we have shown that ethanol alters ART-CYP3A4 interactions with protease inhibitors thereby altering their metabolisms. However, as EVG is a fairly new class of drug, its kinetic characteristics and the effect of ethanol on EVG-CYPP3A4 interaction is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized EVG and cobicistat (COBI)-boosted EVG metabolism in human microsomes followed by ethanol-EVG, ethanol-COBI-EVG interaction with CYP3A. First, we developed and validated a simple, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of EVG in the human liver microsomes. The lower limit of quantification for the drug was at 0.003 μM (1.34 ng/ml). Extraction yield, matrix effects, drug stability, and calibration curves for the proposed method were validated according to the FDA guidelines. Time dependent kinetics data showed that 20mM ethanol decreases the apparent half-life of EVG degradation by ~50% compared to EVG alone. Our substrate kinetic results revealed that ethanol mildly decreases the catalytic efficiency for EVG metabolism. Inhibition studies demonstrated that EVG inhibits CYP3A4, and 20 mM ethanol causes a decrease in the IC50 of EVG. However, in the presence of COBI we were unable to determine these parameters effectively because COBI, being a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, blocked the EVG/ethanol-CYP3A4 interactions. Docking studies predicted a shift of EVG or COBI binding to the active site of CYP3A4 in the presence of ethanol. Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol interacts with microsomal CYP3A and alters EVG-CYP3A4 interaction thereby altering EVG metabolism and inhibition of CYP3A4 by EVG. This finding has clinical significance because alcohol use is

  10. Effect of Ethanol on the Metabolic Characteristics of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Elvitegravir and Elvitegravir/Cobicistat with CYP3A: An Analysis Using a Newly Developed LC-MS/MS Method.

    PubMed

    Midde, Narasimha M; Rahman, Mohammad A; Rathi, Chetan; Li, Junhao; Meibohm, Bernd; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG), an integrase inhibitor for the treatment HIV infection, is increasingly becoming the part of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen. EVG is mainly metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Previously, we have shown that ethanol alters ART-CYP3A4 interactions with protease inhibitors thereby altering their metabolisms. However, as EVG is a fairly new class of drug, its kinetic characteristics and the effect of ethanol on EVG-CYPP3A4 interaction is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized EVG and cobicistat (COBI)-boosted EVG metabolism in human microsomes followed by ethanol-EVG, ethanol-COBI-EVG interaction with CYP3A. First, we developed and validated a simple, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of EVG in the human liver microsomes. The lower limit of quantification for the drug was at 0.003 μM (1.34 ng/ml). Extraction yield, matrix effects, drug stability, and calibration curves for the proposed method were validated according to the FDA guidelines. Time dependent kinetics data showed that 20mM ethanol decreases the apparent half-life of EVG degradation by ~50% compared to EVG alone. Our substrate kinetic results revealed that ethanol mildly decreases the catalytic efficiency for EVG metabolism. Inhibition studies demonstrated that EVG inhibits CYP3A4, and 20 mM ethanol causes a decrease in the IC50 of EVG. However, in the presence of COBI we were unable to determine these parameters effectively because COBI, being a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, blocked the EVG/ethanol-CYP3A4 interactions. Docking studies predicted a shift of EVG or COBI binding to the active site of CYP3A4 in the presence of ethanol. Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol interacts with microsomal CYP3A and alters EVG-CYP3A4 interaction thereby altering EVG metabolism and inhibition of CYP3A4 by EVG. This finding has clinical significance because alcohol use is

  11. An Alternative to Keys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hagan, James

    1977-01-01

    For the secondary school, the author discourages the use of dichotomous keys in favor of a punch-card system. The system is readily constructed by students for use in plant and animal classification. (CP)

  12. Public Key FPGA Software

    SciTech Connect

    Hymel, Ross

    2013-07-25

    The Public Key (PK) FPGA software performs asymmetric authentication using the 163-bit Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) on an embedded FPGA platform. A digital signature is created on user-supplied data, and communication with a host system is performed via a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus. Software includes all components necessary for signing, including custom random number generator for key creation and SHA-256 for data hashing.

  13. Mediated semiquantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawec, Walter O.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we design a quantum key distribution protocol, allowing two limited semiquantum or "classical" users to establish a shared secret key with the help of a fully quantum server. A semiquantum user can prepare and measure qubits only in the computational basis and so must rely on this quantum server to produce qubits in alternative bases and also to perform alternative measurements. However, we assume that the server is untrusted and we prove the unconditional security of our protocol even in the worst case: when this quantum server is an all-powerful adversary. We also compute a lower bound of the key rate of our protocol, in the asymptotic scenario, as a function of the observed error rate in the channel, allowing us to compute the maximally tolerated error of our protocol. Our results show that a semiquantum protocol may hold similar security to a fully quantum one.

  14. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  15. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  16. Design and discovery of flavonoid-based HIV-1 integrase inhibitors targeting both the active site and the interaction with LEDGF/p75.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Wen; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Serrao, Erik; Chen, Huan; Sanchez, Tino W; Yang, Liu-Meng; Neamati, Nouri; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Wang, Hui; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-06-15

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for the viral replication. Currently, three IN inhibitors have been approved for treating HIV-1 infection. All three drugs selectively inhibit the strand transfer reaction by chelating a divalent metal ion in the enzyme active site. Flavonoids are a well-known class of natural products endowed with versatile biological activities. Their β-ketoenol or catechol structures can serve as a metal chelation motif and be exploited for the design of novel IN inhibitors. Using the metal chelation as a common pharmacophore, we introduced appropriate hydrophobic moieties into the flavonol core to design natural product-based novel IN inhibitors. We developed selective and efficient syntheses to generate a series of mono 3/5/7/3'/4'-substituted flavonoid derivatives. Most of these new compounds showed excellent HIV-1 IN inhibitory activity in enzyme-based assays and protected against HIV-1 infection in cell-based assays. The 7-morpholino substituted 7c showed effective antiviral activity (EC50=0.826 μg/mL) and high therapeutic index (TI>242). More significantly, these hydroxyflavones block the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction with low- to sub-micromolar IC50 values and represent a novel scaffold to design new generation of drugs simultaneously targeting the catalytic site as well as protein-protein interaction domains.

  17. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni2+ Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads

    PubMed Central

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM. PMID:27633629

  18. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni(2+) Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads.

    PubMed

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM. PMID:27633629

  19. Establishment of an improved high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR for identification of genomic integration sites mediated by phiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zaiwei; Ma, Haiyan; Qu, Lijuan; Xie, Fei; Ma, Qingwen; Ren, Zhaorui

    2012-03-01

    Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase is widely used to mediate the integration of exogenous genes into host genomes for gene therapy and genomic modification, as it autonomously performs efficient, unidirectional, site-specific integration into pseudo attP sites of the host genome. Although pseudo attP sites are rarely found within exons, it is necessary to map their precise locations to avoid the risk of insertion mutagenesis. High-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (hiTAIL-PCR) is a technique that has been developed to recover genomic sequences that flank insertion tags. We have found, however, that this technique is poorly efficient, as it amplifies many non-specific targets and frequently does not generate sufficient product for downstream analysis. Therefore, we have modified the hiTAIL-PCR procedure and re-designed the random primers. As a result, both the amount and specificity of the reaction product were enhanced for each integration site. Restriction analysis of known sequences within the integrated vector, which co-amplified with the flanking genomic sequences, validated 90% of these bands for sequencing. In contrast, only 30% of the bands produced by previous hiTAIL-PCR could be validated. Compared with the original hiTAIL-PCR, our improved hiTAIL-PCR procedure identified phiC31 integration sites more accurately and efficiently.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus SarA is a Regulatory Protein Responsive to Redox and pH that can Support Bacteriophage Lambda Integrase-Mediated Excision/Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, David F.; Higginbotham, Robin H.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Segall1, Anca M.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Hurlburt, Barry K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide array of virulence factors and causes a correspondingly diverse array of infections. Production of these virulence factors is under the control of a complex network of global regulatory elements, one of which is sarA. sarA encodes a DNA-binding protein that is considered to function as a transcription factor capable of acting as either a repressor or an activator. Using competitive ELISA assays, we demonstrate that SarA is present at approximately 50,000 copies per cell, which is not characteristic of classical transcription factors. We also demonstrate that SarA is present at all stages of growth in vitro and is capable of binding DNA with high affinity but that its binding affinity and pattern of shifted complexes in electrophoretic mobility shift assays is responsive to the redox state. We also show that SarA binds to the bacteriophage lambda (λ) attachment site, attL, producing SarA-DNA complexes similar to intasomes, which consist of bacteriophage lambda integrase, E. coli integration host factor and attL DNA. In addition, SarA stimulates intramolecular excision recombination in the absence of λ excisionase, a DNA-binding accessory protein. Taken together, these data suggest that SarA may function as an architectural accessory protein. PMID:19919677

  1. A Novel Assay for Screening Inhibitors Targeting HIV Integrase LEDGF/p75 Interaction Based on Ni(2+) Coated Magnetic Agarose Beads.

    PubMed

    Dawei, Zhang; Hongqiu, He; Mengmeng, Liu; Zhixia, Meng; Shunxing, Guo

    2016-09-16

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an essential role in viral replication and thus serves as an important target for chemotherapeutic intervention against HIV-1 infection. However, the current three clinical IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir share the same inhibitory mechanism, resulting in a common clinical resistance profile which have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment. Therefore, it is important to develop small molecule inhibitors that impair IN function with distinct mechanisms of action. In this work, a magnetic-beads based biochemical assay targeting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 was developed for identification of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Furthermore, a library containing 1000 US. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs currently used for human medication was screened to identify inhibitors targeting the PPI. The assay was proved to be quite robust and with the novel assay we successfully identified dexlansoprazole (IC50 of 4.8 μM), a FDA-approved proton pump inhibitor, as a potential inhibitor for the PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, which bound to the LEDGF/p75 partner with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 330 nM ± 2.6 nM.

  2. From ligand to complexes. Part 2. Remarks on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibition by beta-diketo acid metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Alessia; Biemmi, Mariano; Carcelli, Mauro; Carta, Fabrizio; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Rogolino, Dominga; Sechi, Mario; Sippel, Martin; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Sanchez, Tino W; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-11-27

    Previously, we synthesized a series of beta-diketo acid metal complexes as novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors (J. Med. Chem. 2006, 46, 4248-4260). Herein, a further extension of this study is reported. First, detailed docking studies were performed in order to investigate the mode of binding in the active site of the free ligands and of their metal complexes. Second, a series of potentiometric measurements were conducted for two diketo acids chosen as model ligands, with Mn(2+) and Ca(2+), in order to outline a speciation model. Third, we designed and synthesized a new set of complexes with different stoichiometries and tested them in an in vitro assay specific for IN. Finally, we obtained the first X-ray structure of a metal complex with HIV-1 IN inhibition activity. Analysis of these results supports the hypothesis that the diketo acids could act as complexes and form complexes with the metal ions on the active site of the enzyme.

  3. N-Substituted Quinolinonyl Diketo Acid Derivatives as HIV Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors and Their Activity against RNase H Function of Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Pescatori, Luca; Métifiot, Mathieu; Chung, Suhman; Masoaka, Takashi; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Messore, Antonella; Pupo, Giovanni; Madia, Valentina Noemi; Saccoliti, Francesco; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Cosconati, Sandro; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto

    2015-06-11

    Bifunctional quinolinonyl DKA derivatives were first described as nonselective inhibitors of 3'-processing (3'-P) and strand transfer (ST) functions of HIV-1 integrase (IN), while 7-aminosubstituted quinolinonyl derivatives were proven IN strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) that also displayed activity against ribonuclease H (RNase H). In this study, we describe the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new quinolinonyl diketo acid (DKA) derivatives characterized by variously substituted alkylating groups on the nitrogen atom of the quinolinone ring. Removal of the second DKA branch of bifunctional DKAs, and the amino group in position 7 of quinolinone ring combined with a fine-tuning of the substituents on the benzyl group in position 1 of the quinolinone, increased selectivity for IN ST activity. In vitro, the most potent compound was 11j (IC50 = 10 nM), while the most active compounds against HIV infected cells were ester derivatives 10j and 10l. In general, the activity against RNase H was negligible, with only a few compounds active at concentrations higher than 10 μM. The binding mode of the most potent IN inhibitor 11j within the IN catalytic core domain (CCD) is described as well as its binding mode within the RNase H catalytic site to rationalize its selectivity. PMID:25961960

  4. Comparative Genomic Integration Profiling of Sleeping Beauty Transposons Mobilized With High Efficacy From Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors in Primary Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moldt, Brian; Miskey, Csaba; Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Bak, Rasmus O; Sharma, Nynne; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Chen, Wei; Ivics, Zoltán; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2011-01-01

    It has been previously shown that integrase-defective HIV-1-based gene vectors can serve, with moderate efficiency, as substrate for DNA transposition by a transiently expressed Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase. Here, we describe the enhanced gene transfer properties of a HIV-1/SB hybrid vector that allows efficient DNA transposition, facilitated by the hyperactive SB100X transposase, from vector DNA intermediates in primary human cells. Potent transposase-dependent integration of genetic cargo carried by the hybrid HIV-1/SB vector (up to 160-fold above background) is reported in human cell lines as well as in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The efficiency of transgene integration in context of the newly developed hybrid vector is comparable with that of conventional lentiviral vectors (LVs). Integration profiles of integrating HIV-1-derived vectors and SB transposons mobilized from LVs are investigated by deep sequencing of a large number of integration sites. A significant bias of lentiviral integrations in genes is reported, confirming that biological properties of the viral integration machinery facilitate preferred insertion into actively transcribed genomic regions. In sharp contrast, lentiviral insertions catalyzed by the SB100X transposase are far more random with respect to genes. Based on these properties, HIV-1/SB vectors may become valuable tools for genetic engineering and therapeutic gene transfer. PMID:21468003

  5. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  6. Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays

    PubMed Central

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5 kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like β propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the

  7. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship and comparative molecular field analysis studies within a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Uiaran de Oliveira; Souza, Alessandra Mendonça Teles de; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Brito, Monique Araújo de; Bello, Murilo Lamim; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel

    2013-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a public health problem worldwide caused by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment with antiretroviral drugs is the best option for viral suppression, reducing morbidity and mortality. However, viral resistance in HIV-1 therapy has been reported. HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for effective viral replication and an attractive target for the development of new inhibitors. In the study reported here, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (2D/3D-QSAR) studies, applying hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) methods, respectively, were performed on a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The best HQSAR model (q (2) = 0.802, r (2) = 0.972) was obtained using atoms, bonds, and connectivity as the fragment distinction, a fragment size of 2-5 atoms, hologram length of 61 bins, and six components. The best CoMFA model (q (2) = 0.748, r (2) = 0.974) was obtained with alignment of all atoms of the tricyclic phthalimide moiety (alignment II). The HQSAR contribution map identified that the carbonyl-hydroxy-aromatic nitrogen motif made a positive contribution to the activity of the compounds. Furthermore, CoMFA contour maps suggested that bulky groups in meta and para positions in the phenyl ring would increase the biological activity of this class. The conclusions of this work may lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 IN inhibition and contribute to the design of new and more potent derivatives.

  8. Hologram quantitative structure–activity relationship and comparative molecular field analysis studies within a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Magalhães, Uiaran; de Souza, Alessandra Mendonça Teles; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; de Brito, Monique Araújo; Bello, Murilo Lamim; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel

    2013-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a public health problem worldwide caused by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment with antiretroviral drugs is the best option for viral suppression, reducing morbidity and mortality. However, viral resistance in HIV-1 therapy has been reported. HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for effective viral replication and an attractive target for the development of new inhibitors. In the study reported here, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship (2D/3D-QSAR) studies, applying hologram quantitative structure–activity relationship (HQSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) methods, respectively, were performed on a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.802, r2 = 0.972) was obtained using atoms, bonds, and connectivity as the fragment distinction, a fragment size of 2–5 atoms, hologram length of 61 bins, and six components. The best CoMFA model (q2 = 0.748, r2 = 0.974) was obtained with alignment of all atoms of the tricyclic phthalimide moiety (alignment II). The HQSAR contribution map identified that the carbonyl-hydroxy-aromatic nitrogen motif made a positive contribution to the activity of the compounds. Furthermore, CoMFA contour maps suggested that bulky groups in meta and para positions in the phenyl ring would increase the biological activity of this class. The conclusions of this work may lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 IN inhibition and contribute to the design of new and more potent derivatives. PMID:24039405

  9. Rapid activity prediction of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: harnessing docking energetic components for empirical scoring by chemometric and artificial neural network approaches.

    PubMed

    Thangsunan, Patcharapong; Kittiwachana, Sila; Meepowpan, Puttinan; Kungwan, Nawee; Prangkio, Panchika; Hannongbua, Supa; Suree, Nuttee

    2016-06-01

    Improving performance of scoring functions for drug docking simulations is a challenging task in the modern discovery pipeline. Among various ways to enhance the efficiency of scoring function, tuning of energetic component approach is an attractive option that provides better predictions. Herein we present the first development of rapid and simple tuning models for predicting and scoring inhibitory activity of investigated ligands docked into catalytic core domain structures of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. We developed the models using all energetic terms obtained from flexible ligand-rigid receptor dockings by AutoDock4, followed by a data analysis using either partial least squares (PLS) or self-organizing maps (SOMs). The models were established using 66 and 64 ligands of mercaptobenzenesulfonamides for the PLS-based and the SOMs-based inhibitory activity predictions, respectively. The models were then evaluated for their predictability quality using closely related test compounds, as well as five different unrelated inhibitor test sets. Weighting constants for each energy term were also optimized, thus customizing the scoring function for this specific target protein. Root-mean-square error (RMSE) values between the predicted and the experimental inhibitory activities were determined to be <1 (i.e. within a magnitude of a single log scale of actual IC50 values). Hence, we propose that, as a pre-functional assay screening step, AutoDock4 docking in combination with these subsequent rapid weighted energy tuning methods via PLS and SOMs analyses is a viable approach to predict the potential inhibitory activity and to discriminate among small drug-like molecules to target a specific protein of interest.

  10. In vitro investigations into the roles of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the disposition and drug interactions of dolutegravir, a HIV integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Reese, Melinda J; Savina, Paul M; Generaux, Grant T; Tracey, Helen; Humphreys, Joan E; Kanaoka, Eri; Webster, Lindsey O; Harmon, Kelly A; Clarke, James D; Polli, Joseph W

    2013-02-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) is a potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with a distinct resistance profile and a once-daily dose regimen that does not require pharmacokinetic boosting. This work investigated the in vitro drug transport and metabolism of DTG and assessed the potential for clinical drug-drug interactions. DTG is a substrate for the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Its high intrinsic membrane permeability limits the impact these transporters have on DTG's intestinal absorption. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 is the main enzyme responsible for the metabolism of DTG in vivo, with cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 being a notable pathway and UGT1A3 and UGT1A9 being only minor pathways. DTG demonstrated little or no inhibition (IC(50) values > 30 μM) in vitro of the transporters Pgp, BCRP, multidrug resistance protein 2, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1/3, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, or the drug metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 3A4, UGT1A1, or 2B7. Further, DTG did not induce CYP1A2, 2B6, or 3A4 mRNA in vitro using human hepatocytes. DTG does inhibit the renal OCT2 (IC(50) = 1.9 μM) transporter, which provides a mechanistic basis for the mild increases in serum creatinine observed in clinical studies. These in vitro studies demonstrate a low propensity for DTG to be a perpetrator of clinical drug interactions and provide a basis for predicting when other drugs could result in a drug interaction with DTG. PMID:23132334

  11. Rapid activity prediction of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: harnessing docking energetic components for empirical scoring by chemometric and artificial neural network approaches.

    PubMed

    Thangsunan, Patcharapong; Kittiwachana, Sila; Meepowpan, Puttinan; Kungwan, Nawee; Prangkio, Panchika; Hannongbua, Supa; Suree, Nuttee

    2016-06-01

    Improving performance of scoring functions for drug docking simulations is a challenging task in the modern discovery pipeline. Among various ways to enhance the efficiency of scoring function, tuning of energetic component approach is an attractive option that provides better predictions. Herein we present the first development of rapid and simple tuning models for predicting and scoring inhibitory activity of investigated ligands docked into catalytic core domain structures of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. We developed the models using all energetic terms obtained from flexible ligand-rigid receptor dockings by AutoDock4, followed by a data analysis using either partial least squares (PLS) or self-organizing maps (SOMs). The models were established using 66 and 64 ligands of mercaptobenzenesulfonamides for the PLS-based and the SOMs-based inhibitory activity predictions, respectively. The models were then evaluated for their predictability quality using closely related test compounds, as well as five different unrelated inhibitor test sets. Weighting constants for each energy term were also optimized, thus customizing the scoring function for this specific target protein. Root-mean-square error (RMSE) values between the predicted and the experimental inhibitory activities were determined to be <1 (i.e. within a magnitude of a single log scale of actual IC50 values). Hence, we propose that, as a pre-functional assay screening step, AutoDock4 docking in combination with these subsequent rapid weighted energy tuning methods via PLS and SOMs analyses is a viable approach to predict the potential inhibitory activity and to discriminate among small drug-like molecules to target a specific protein of interest. PMID:27314501

  12. Development of pharmacophore similarity-based quantitative activity hypothesis and its applicability domain: applied on a diverse data-set of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Mehta, Vijay P; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative pharmacophore hypothesis combines the 3D spatial arrangement of pharmacophore features with biological activities of the ligand data-set and predicts the activities of geometrically and/or pharmacophoric similar ligands. Most pharmacophore discovery programs face difficulties in conformational flexibility, molecular alignment, pharmacophore features sampling, and feature selection to score models if the data-set constitutes diverse ligands. Towards this focus, we describe a ligand-based computational procedure to introduce flexibility in aligning the small molecules and generating a pharmacophore hypothesis without geometrical constraints to define pharmacophore space, enriched with chemical features necessary to elucidate common pharmacophore hypotheses (CPHs). Maximal common substructure (MCS)-based alignment method was adopted to guide the alignment of carbon molecules, deciphered the MCS atom connectivity to cluster molecules in bins and subsequently, calculated the pharmacophore similarity matrix with the bin-specific reference molecules. After alignment, the carbon molecules were enriched with original atoms in their respective positions and conventional pharmacophore features were perceived. Distance-based pharmacophoric descriptors were enumerated by computing the interdistance between perceived features and MCS-aligned 'centroid' position. The descriptor set and biological activities were used to develop support vector machine models to predict the activities of the external test set. Finally, fitness score was estimated based on pharmacophore similarity with its bin-specific reference molecules to recognize the best and poor alignments and, also with each reference molecule to predict outliers of the quantitative hypothesis model. We applied this procedure to a diverse data-set of 40 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and discussed its effectiveness with the reported CPH model.

  13. Improving the use of ranking in virtual screening against HIV-1 integrase with triangular numbers and including ligand profiling with antitargets.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Maran, Uko

    2014-11-24

    A delicate balance exists between a drug molecule's toxicity and its activity. Indeed, efficacy, toxicity, and side effect problems are a common cause for the termination of drug candidate compounds and development projects. To address this, an antitarget interaction profile is built and combined with virtual screening and cross docking for new inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase, in order to consider possible off-target interactions as early as possible in a drug or hit discovery program. New ranking techniques using triangular numbers improve ranking information on the compounds and recovery of known inhibitors into the top compounds using different docking programs. This improved ranking arises from using consensus of ranks between docking programs and ligand efficiencies to derive a new rank, instead of using absolute score values, or average of ranks. The triangular number rerank also allowed the objective combination of results from several protein targets or screen conditions and several programs. Triangular number reranking conserves more information than other reranking methods such as average of scores or averages of ranks. In addition, the use of triangular numbers for reranking makes possible the use of thresholds with a justified leeway based on the number of available known inhibitors, so that the majority of the compounds above the threshold in ranks compare to the compounds that have known experimentally determined biological activity. The battery of anti- or off-targets can be tailored to specific molecular or drug design challenges. In silico filters can thus be deployed in successive stages, for prefiltering, activity profiling, and for further analysis and triaging of libraries of compounds. PMID:25303089

  14. Neurological Response to cART vs. cART plus Integrase Inhibitor and CCR5 Antagonist Initiated during Acute HIV

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Spudich, Serena S.; Sailasuta, Napapon; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Fletcher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene D. M. B.; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Allen, Isabel E.; Adams, Collin L.; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Slike, Bonnie M.; Hellmuth, Joanna M.; Kim, Jerome H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central nervous system (CNS) outcomes in participants treated during acute HIV infection with standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) vs. cART plus integrase inhibitor and CCR5 antagonist (cART+). Design 24-week randomized open-label prospective evaluation. Method Participants were evaluated then randomized to initiate cART (efavirenz, tenofovir, and either emtricitabine or lamivudine) vs. cART+ (cART plus raltegravir and maraviroc) during acute HIV and re-evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. We examined plasma and CSF cytokines, HIV RNA levels, neurological and neuropsychological findings, and brain MRS across groups and compared to healthy controls. Results At baseline, 62 participants were in Fiebig stages I-V. Randomized groups were similar for mean age (27 vs. 25, p = 0.137), gender (each 94% male), plasma log10 HIV RNA (5.4 vs. 5.6, p = 0.382), CSF log10 HIV RNA (2.35 vs. 3.31, p = 0.561), and estimated duration of HIV (18 vs. 17 days, p = 0.546). Randomized arms did not differ at 24 weeks by any CNS outcome. Combining arms, all measures concurrent with antiretroviral treatment improved, for example, neuropsychological testing (mean NPZ-4 of -0.408 vs. 0.245, p<0.001) and inflammatory markers by MRS (e.g. mean frontal white matter (FWM) choline of 2.92 vs. 2.84, p = 0.045) at baseline and week 24, respectively. Plasma neopterin (p<0.001) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (p = 0.007) remained elevated in participants compared to controls but no statistically significant differences were seen in CSF cytokines compared to controls, despite individual variability among the HIV-infected group. Conclusions A 24-week course of cART+ improved CNS related outcomes, but was not associated with measurable differences compared to standard cART. PMID:26555069

  15. Urinary eicosanoid metabolites in HIV-infected women with central obesity switching to raltegravir: an analysis from the women, integrase, and fat accumulation trial.

    PubMed

    Hulgan, Todd; Boger, M Sean; Liao, Diana H; McComsey, Grace A; Wanke, Christine A; Mangili, Alexandra; Walmsley, Sharon L; McCreath, Heather; Milne, Ginger L; Sanchez, Stephanie C; Currier, Judith S; Lake, Jordan E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of HIV infection. Eicosanoids reflect inflammation, oxidant stress, and vascular health and vary by sex and metabolic parameters. Raltegravir (RAL) is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor that may have limited metabolic effects. We assessed urinary F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), prostaglandin E2 (PGE-M), prostacyclin (PGI-M), and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) in HIV-infected women switching to RAL-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven women (RAL = 17; PI/NNRTI = 20) with a median age of 43 years and BMI 32 kg/m(2) completed week 24. TxB2 increased in the RAL versus PI/NNRTI arm (+0.09 versus -0.02; P = 0.06). Baseline PGI-M was lower in the RAL arm (P = 0.005); no other between-arm cross-sectional differences were observed. In the PI/NNRTI arm, 24-week visceral adipose tissue change correlated with PGI-M (rho = 0.45; P = 0.04) and TxB2 (rho = 0.44; P = 0.005) changes, with a trend seen for PGE-M (rho = 0.41; P = 0.07). In an adjusted model, age ≥ 50 years (N = 8) was associated with increased PGE-M (P = 0.04). In this randomized trial, a switch to RAL did not significantly affect urinary eicosanoids over 24 weeks. In women continuing PI/NNRTI, increased visceral adipose tissue correlated with increased PGI-M and PGE-M. Older age (≥ 50) was associated with increased PGE-M. Relationships between aging, adiposity, ART, and eicosanoids during HIV-infection require further study.

  16. Nanofluids Research: Key Issues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanofluids are a new class of fluids engineered by dispersing nanometer-size structures (particles, fibers, tubes, droplets) in base fluids. The very essence of nanofluids research and development is to enhance fluid macroscopic and megascale properties such as thermal conductivity through manipulating microscopic physics (structures, properties and activities). Therefore, the success of nanofluid technology depends very much on how well we can address issues like effective means of microscale manipulation, interplays among physics at different scales and optimization of microscale physics for the optimal megascale properties. In this work, we take heat-conduction nanofluids as examples to review methodologies available to effectively tackle these key but difficult problems and identify the future research needs as well. The reviewed techniques include nanofluids synthesis through liquid-phase chemical reactions in continuous-flow microfluidic microreactors, scaling-up by the volume averaging and constructal design with the constructal theory. The identified areas of future research contain microfluidic nanofluids, thermal waves and constructal nanofluids. PMID:20676214

  17. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  18. Key Concepts in Informatics: Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szlávi, Péter; Zsakó, László

    2014-01-01

    "The system of key concepts contains the most important key concepts related to the development tasks of knowledge areas and their vertical hierarchy as well as the links of basic key concepts of different knowledge areas." (Vass 2011) One of the most important of these concepts is the algorithm. In everyday life, when learning or…

  19. Characterization of DNA Binding Property of the HIV-1 Host Factor and Tumor Suppressor Protein Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5)

    PubMed Central

    Das, Supratik; Thangamuniyandi, Muruganandan; Dasgupta, Saumya; Chongdar, Nipa; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Basu, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5) is a component of the hSWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The INI1 gene is either deleted or mutated in rhabdoid cancers like ATRT (Atypical terratoid and rhabdoid tumor). INI1 is also a host factor for HIV-1 replication. INI1 binds DNA non-specifically. However, the mechanism of DNA binding and its biological role are unknown. From agarose gel retardation assay (AGRA), Ni-NTA pull-down and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies we show that amino acids 105–183 of INI1 comprise the minimal DNA binding domain (DBD). The INI1 DBD is absent in plants and in yeast SNF5. It is present in Caenorhabditis elegans SNF5, Drosophila melanogaster homologue SNR1 and is a highly conserved domain in vertebrates. The DNA binding property of this domain in SNR1, that is only 58% identical to INI1/hSNF5, is conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies of INI1 DBD and INI1 DBD:DNA complexes at different concentrations show that the DBD exists as a monomer at low protein concentration and two molecules of monomer binds one molecule of DNA. At high protein concentration, it exists as a dimer and binds two DNA molecules. Furthermore, isothermal calorimetry (ITC) experiments demonstrate that the DBD monomer binds DNA with a stoichiometry (N) of ∼0.5 and Kd  = 0.94 µM whereas the DBD dimer binds two DNA molecules sequentially with K’d1 = 222 µM and K’d2 = 1.16 µM. Monomeric DBD binding to DNA is enthalpy driven (ΔH = –29.9 KJ/mole). Dimeric DBD binding to DNA is sequential with the first binding event driven by positive entropy (ΔH’1 = 115.7 KJ/mole, TΔS’1 = 136.8 KJ/mole) and the second binding event driven by negative enthalpy (ΔH’2 = –106.3 KJ/mole, TΔS’2 = –75.7 KJ/mole). Our model for INI1 DBD binding to DNA provides new insights into the mechanism of DNA binding by INI1. PMID:23861745

  20. Key management approach of multicast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Wang, Xi-lian; Zhang, Hong-ke; Zhang, Li-yong

    2002-09-01

    A key management approach of multicast is provided in this paper. It is based on the approach of assignment key to every group member through key center. In view of some management schemes where members join, leave or are deleted, key service center must distribute new key through unicast another time. The bigger amount of members the greater expenses will be spent. In this paper with member varying their upper key service center still distribute the new keythrough multicast and an ID is assigned to every member to identify their transmission message so as to implement data origin authentication. The essential principle of this approach is distributing a key generator for each member. For example a random number generator depending on certain algorithm can be distributed. And every member needs store a seed table. In this project key can automatically be renewed as time goes by or immediately renewed. Replace unicast by multicast to renew key decrease the spending. It is not only suitable for the key centralized management scheme with fewer members but also for the key separated management scheme with large group members and member frequently changed.

  1. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  2. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  3. Secure key storage and distribution

    DOEpatents

    Agrawal, Punit

    2015-06-02

    This disclosure describes a distributed, fault-tolerant security system that enables the secure storage and distribution of private keys. In one implementation, the security system includes a plurality of computing resources that independently store private keys provided by publishers and encrypted using a single security system public key. To protect against malicious activity, the security system private key necessary to decrypt the publication private keys is not stored at any of the computing resources. Rather portions, or shares of the security system private key are stored at each of the computing resources within the security system and multiple security systems must communicate and share partial decryptions in order to decrypt the stored private key.

  4. On the Security of a Simple Three-Party Key Exchange Protocol without Server's Public Keys

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Junghyun; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Park, Minkyu; Paik, Juryon; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    Authenticated key exchange protocols are of fundamental importance in securing communications and are now extensively deployed for use in various real-world network applications. In this work, we reveal major previously unpublished security vulnerabilities in the password-based authenticated three-party key exchange protocol according to Lee and Hwang (2010): (1) the Lee-Hwang protocol is susceptible to a man-in-the-middle attack and thus fails to achieve implicit key authentication; (2) the protocol cannot protect clients' passwords against an offline dictionary attack; and (3) the indistinguishability-based security of the protocol can be easily broken even in the presence of a passive adversary. We also propose an improved password-based authenticated three-party key exchange protocol that addresses the security vulnerabilities identified in the Lee-Hwang protocol. PMID:25258723

  5. On the security of a simple three-party key exchange protocol without server's public keys.

    PubMed

    Nam, Junghyun; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Park, Minkyu; Paik, Juryon; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    Authenticated key exchange protocols are of fundamental importance in securing communications and are now extensively deployed for use in various real-world network applications. In this work, we reveal major previously unpublished security vulnerabilities in the password-based authenticated three-party key exchange protocol according to Lee and Hwang (2010): (1) the Lee-Hwang protocol is susceptible to a man-in-the-middle attack and thus fails to achieve implicit key authentication; (2) the protocol cannot protect clients' passwords against an offline dictionary attack; and (3) the indistinguishability-based security of the protocol can be easily broken even in the presence of a passive adversary. We also propose an improved password-based authenticated three-party key exchange protocol that addresses the security vulnerabilities identified in the Lee-Hwang protocol. PMID:25258723

  6. Key points model for polar region currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Yao; Chen, Geng-Xiong; Du, Ai-Min; Wu, Ying-Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Xiao-Can

    2008-03-01

    The equivalent ionospheric electric currents in the polar region mainly consist of the DP1 and DP2 systems. The former involves a westward electrojet around midnight, while the later involves a two-cell system with foci on the morningside and eveningside, respectively. In space weather prediction and nowcasting, sophisticated models of the polar currents are needed, but concise and convenient models are also useful to predict or nowcast the principal characteristics of the current systems, such as intensity and position. In this paper, we propose a "key points model" for outlining the basic features of the polar region current system for different disturbance levels. The "key points model" (or KP model) includes six key points of the current system: the centers of two DP2 cells, the maximum densities of the eastward and westward electrojets, and the maximum densities of the northward and southward currents. Each of six key points is described by three parameters: intensity, local time, and latitude. The AE-dependences of the 18 parameters are deduced from the equivalent current systems for every 5 min during a 2-d period (18-19 March 1978). The KP model reveals systematic variations of the current systems. When AE increases, the currents and the current densities are simultaneously enhanced linearly, and most of the key points concentrate towards midnight. In addition, when AE increases, the key points K2 and K4 for the evening current cell move equatorward, while the key points K1 and K3 for morning cell move poleward.

  7. Potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase display a two-step, slow-binding inhibition mechanism which is absent in a drug-resistant T66I/M154I mutant.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Edward P; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gartland, Margaret J; Lang, Scott; Halsey, Wendy; Sathe, Ganesh; Carter, H Luke; Weaver, Kurt L

    2009-02-24

    Two-metal binding HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs) are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 in vitro and in patients. We report here for the first time the kinetics of inhibition of integrase-catalyzed strand transfer. First, the IC(50) values for each of six structurally distinct INIs decreased when a preincubation was included: S-1360 (1.3 microM vs 0.12 microM), L-731,988 (130 nM vs 9 nM), L-870,810 (130 nM vs 4 nM), raltegravir (300 nM vs 9 nM), elvitegravir (90 nM vs 6 nM), and GSK364735 (90 nM vs 6 nM). When reactions with these INIs were initiated with integrase, progress curve analyses indicated time-dependent inhibition, which could be fitted to a two-step mechanism of binding. Overall fitted K(i) values matched the IC(50) values measured with a preincubation: S-1360 (0.17 microM), L-731,988 (34 nM), L-870,810 (2.4 nM), raltegravir (10 nM), elvitegravir (4.0 nM), and GSK364735 (2.5 nM). To begin to understand the mechanism for this slow onset of inhibition and its possible impact on drug resistance, studies of resistance mutations were initiated. T66I/M154I exhibited little if any time-dependent inhibition by any of the six INIs, as measured by differences in potency upon preincubation or by progress curve analysis. These data demonstrate that slow binding is a signature of two-metal binding INIs, and that the second slow step is required for full potency. We discuss a possible structural explanation of the second slow step of inhibition and also the relationship between loss of time-dependent inhibition and drug resistance of this important new class of HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs.

  8. Identifying tier one key suppliers.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In today's global marketplace, businesses are becoming increasingly reliant on suppliers for the provision of key processes, activities, products and services in support of their strategic business goals. The result is that now, more than ever, the failure of a key supplier has potential to damage reputation, productivity, compliance and financial performance seriously. Yet despite this, there is no recognised standard or guidance for identifying a tier one key supplier base and, up to now, there has been little or no research on how to do so effectively. This paper outlines the key findings of a BCI-sponsored research project to investigate good practice in identifying tier one key suppliers, and suggests a scalable framework process model and risk matrix tool to help businesses effectively identify their tier one key supplier base. PMID:23615061

  9. Identifying tier one key suppliers.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In today's global marketplace, businesses are becoming increasingly reliant on suppliers for the provision of key processes, activities, products and services in support of their strategic business goals. The result is that now, more than ever, the failure of a key supplier has potential to damage reputation, productivity, compliance and financial performance seriously. Yet despite this, there is no recognised standard or guidance for identifying a tier one key supplier base and, up to now, there has been little or no research on how to do so effectively. This paper outlines the key findings of a BCI-sponsored research project to investigate good practice in identifying tier one key suppliers, and suggests a scalable framework process model and risk matrix tool to help businesses effectively identify their tier one key supplier base.

  10. Key Objectives Bank: Year 7. Key Stage 3: National Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    In each sub-section of the "Framework for Teaching English: Years 7, 8 and 9," certain key objectives are identified in boldface print. These objectives are key because they signify skills or understanding which are crucial to pupil's language development. They are challenging for the age group and are important markers of progress. This key…

  11. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived.

  12. Experimental single-strain mobilomics reveals events that shape pathogen emergence.

    PubMed

    Schoeniger, Joseph S; Hudson, Corey M; Bent, Zachary W; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P

    2016-08-19

    Virulence genes on mobile DNAs such as genomic islands (GIs) and plasmids promote bacterial pathogen emergence. Excision is an early step in GI mobilization, producing a circular GI and a deletion site in the chromosome; circular forms are also known for some bacterial insertion sequences (ISs). The recombinant sequence at the junctions of such circles and deletions can be detected sensitively in high-throughput sequencing data, using new computational methods that enable empirical discovery of mobile DNAs. For the rich mobilome of a hospital Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, circularization junctions (CJs) were detected for six GIs and seven IS types. Our methods revealed differential biology of multiple mobile DNAs, imprecision of integrases and transposases, and differential activity among identical IS copies for IS26, ISKpn18 and ISKpn21 Using the resistance of circular dsDNA molecules to exonuclease, internally calibrated with the native plasmids, showed that not all molecules bearing GI CJs were circular. Transpositions were also detected, revealing replicon preference (ISKpn18 prefers a conjugative IncA/C2 plasmid), local action (IS26), regional preferences, selection (against capsule synthesis) and IS polarity inversion. Efficient discovery and global characterization of numerous mobile elements per experiment improves accounting for the new gene combinations that arise in emerging pathogens. PMID:27378783

  13. Optimizing Requirements Decisions with KEYS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalali, Omid; Menzies, Tim; Feather, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Recent work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has allowed for external access to five of JPL's real-world requirements models, anonymized to conceal proprietary information, but retaining their computational nature. Experimentation with these models, reported herein, demonstrates a dramatic speedup in the computations performed on them. These models have a well defined goal: select mitigations that retire risks which, in turn, increases the number of attainable requirements. Such a non-linear optimization is a well-studied problem. However identification of not only (a) the optimal solution(s) but also (b) the key factors leading to them is less well studied. Our technique, called KEYS, shows a rapid way of simultaneously identifying the solutions and their key factors. KEYS improves on prior work by several orders of magnitude. Prior experiments with simulated annealing or treatment learning took tens of minutes to hours to terminate. KEYS runs much faster than that; e.g for one model, KEYS ran 13,000 times faster than treatment learning (40 minutes versus 0.18 seconds). Processing these JPL models is a non-linear optimization problem: the fewest mitigations must be selected while achieving the most requirements. Non-linear optimization is a well studied problem. With this paper, we challenge other members of the PROMISE community to improve on our results with other techniques.

  14. Finite-key security analysis for multilevel quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brádler, Kamil; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Fickler, Robert; Broadbent, Anne; Boyd, Robert

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed security analysis of a d-dimensional quantum key distribution protocol based on two and three mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) both in an asymptotic and finite-key-length scenario. The finite secret key rates (in bits per detected photon) are calculated as a function of the length of the sifted key by (i) generalizing the uncertainly relation-based insight from BB84 to any d-level 2-MUB QKD protocol and (ii) by adopting recent advances in the second-order asymptotics for finite block length quantum coding (for both d-level 2- and 3-MUB QKD protocols). Since the finite and asymptotic secret key rates increase with d and the number of MUBs (together with the tolerable threshold) such QKD schemes could in principle offer an important advantage over BB84. We discuss the possibility of an experimental realization of the 3-MUB QKD protocol with the orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom of photons.

  15. Security of Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) is the most advanced application of Quantum Information Science. It allows extending secret keys over some distances in such a way that the security of the resulting key material can be guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. In contrast to presently used encryption techniques, the security of QKD can be proven in terms of information-theoretic measures. The resulting key can then be used for many tasks, including exchanging secret messages. QKD has been developed in the language of abstract two-level systems, the qubits. They cannot be easily implemented in optical signals. It took some time to bring the protocols and theory of QKD to the point where they fit to the realities of fiber-optical or free-space applications, including lossy channels. Today, QKD schemes can be implemented reliably using standard off-the-shelf components. Information theoretic security is a theoretical concept. Naturally, it is impossible to demonstrate directly that a given experimental set-up indeed creates a secret key. What one can do is to show that the experiment can give data within a certain parameters regime, such as error rate and loss rate, for which a security proof exists. I will discuss what parameter regime gives provable secure key and which parameter regime cannot lead to secret key. It is desirable to prove `unconditional security,' as it is termed in the world of classical cryptography: no assumption is made about the attacks of an eavesdropper on the quantum channel. However, one has to assume that the signal structure and the measurement device are correctly described by the adopted model and that no eavesdropper can intrude the sender or receiver unit. In this talk I will briefly introduce the concept of QKD and optical implementations. Especially I will discuss security aspects of modern approaches of QKD schemes that allow us to increase the covered distance and the achievable rate.

  16. Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2005-10-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties to communicate in absolute security based on the fundamental laws of physics. Up till now, it is widely believed that unconditionally secure QKD based on standard Bennett-Brassard (BB84) protocol is limited in both key generation rate and distance because of imperfect devices. Here, we solve these two problems directly by presenting new protocols that are feasible with only current technology. Surprisingly, our new protocols can make fiber-based QKD unconditionally secure at distances over 100km (for some experiments, such as GYS) and increase the key generation rate from O(η2) in prior art to O(η) where η is the overall transmittance. Our method is to develop the decoy state idea (first proposed by W.-Y. Hwang in "Quantum Key Distribution with High Loss: Toward Global Secure Communication", Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 057901 (2003)) and consider simple extensions of the BB84 protocol. This part of work is published in "Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution", . We present a general theory of the decoy state protocol and propose a decoy method based on only one signal state and two decoy states. We perform optimization on the choice of intensities of the signal state and the two decoy states. Our result shows that a decoy state protocol with only two types of decoy states--a vacuum and a weak decoy state--asymptotically approaches the theoretical limit of the most general type of decoy state protocols (with an infinite number of decoy states). We also present a one-decoy-state protocol as a special case of Vacuum+Weak decoy method. Moreover, we provide estimations on the effects of statistical fluctuations and suggest that, even for long distance (larger than 100km) QKD, our two-decoy-state protocol can be implemented with only a few hours of experimental data. In conclusion, decoy state quantum key distribution is highly practical. This part of work is

  17. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lu, Hongyou; Fino-Chen, Cecilia

    2012-05-01

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). The Group has published seven editions to date of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  18. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lu, Hongyou; Fino-Chen, Cecilia

    2012-01-15

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). In 2008 the Group published the Seventh Edition of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  19. Florida Everglades and Keys, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Though much of southern Florida is covered by clouds, the Florida Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire Florida Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.

  20. Key Issues in Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Capstick; et. Al.

    2000-12-01

    A group of fifty physicists met in Duck, NC, Nov. 6-9 to discuss the current status and future goals of hadronic physics. The main purpose of the meeting was to define the field by identifying its key issues, challenges, and opportunities. The conclusions, incorporating considerable input from the community at large, are presented in this white paper.

  1. Key Skills Influencing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Tonya; Gruenert, Steve

    2009-01-01

    A predictive, non-experimental, cross-sectional design (Johnson, 2001) was used to conduct a study to determine if elementary administrators' key counseling skills and select demographics predicted state-level student performance indicators in their respective schools. A secondary purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable on-line…

  2. Ten Keys to the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Successful web portals help users stay informed, in touch, and up to speed. They are also a telling window into the efficiency of one's institution. To develop a cutting-edge portal takes planning, communication, and research. In this article, the author presents and discusses 10 keys to portal success: (1) make critical info visible; (2) make the…

  3. Key Issues in Infant Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkner, Frank, Ed.

    This pamphlet summarizes the proceedings of a conference on infant mortality sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Participants were 25 people engaged in various disciplines (physicians, nurses, social workers, sociologists, statisticians and others) who discussed key issues on the basis of their own knowledge…

  4. School Leadership: Some Key Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Highlights some key ideas and several perspectives on leadership, including: situational leadership; a leadership framework suggested by T.E. Deal and L.G. Bolman; leadership of the chief executive/leading professional; moral leadership; and curricular leadership. Identifies leadership by its contribution to outcomes and its influence on…

  5. Metrics for Key Punch Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of key punch operator students, this instructional package is one of three for the business and office occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational terminology,…

  6. Key for Trees of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coder, Kim D.; Wray, Paul H.

    This key is designed to help identify the most common trees found in Iowa. It is based on vegetative characteristics such as leaves, fruits, and bark and is illustrated with black and white line drawings. Since vegetative characteristics vary due to climate, age, soil fertility, and other conditions, the numerical sizes listed, such as length and…

  7. Key Skills and Competencies. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on key skills and competencies and human resource development (HRD). "Career Related Competencies" (Marinka A.C.T. Kuijpers) reports findings from surveys completed by Dutch employees who identified these issues: self-reflection is more important than career control; age and gender influence attitude toward…

  8. Key Reconciliation for High Performance Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Mateo, Jesus; Elkouss, David; Martin, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Key Distribution is carving its place among the tools used to secure communications. While a difficult technology, it enjoys benefits that set it apart from the rest, the most prominent is its provable security based on the laws of physics. QKD requires not only the mastering of signals at the quantum level, but also a classical processing to extract a secret-key from them. This postprocessing has been customarily studied in terms of the efficiency, a figure of merit that offers a biased view of the performance of real devices. Here we argue that it is the throughput the significant magnitude in practical QKD, specially in the case of high speed devices, where the differences are more marked, and give some examples contrasting the usual postprocessing schemes with new ones from modern coding theory. A good understanding of its implications is very important for the design of modern QKD devices. PMID:23546440

  9. Key Reconciliation for High Performance Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Mateo, Jesus; Elkouss, David; Martin, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Quantum Key Distribution is carving its place among the tools used to secure communications. While a difficult technology, it enjoys benefits that set it apart from the rest, the most prominent is its provable security based on the laws of physics. QKD requires not only the mastering of signals at the quantum level, but also a classical processing to extract a secret-key from them. This postprocessing has been customarily studied in terms of the efficiency, a figure of merit that offers a biased view of the performance of real devices. Here we argue that it is the throughput the significant magnitude in practical QKD, specially in the case of high speed devices, where the differences are more marked, and give some examples contrasting the usual postprocessing schemes with new ones from modern coding theory. A good understanding of its implications is very important for the design of modern QKD devices.

  10. Experimental realization of equiangular three-state quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Matteo; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Quantum key distribution using three states in equiangular configuration combines a security threshold comparable with the one of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol and a quantum bit error rate (QBER) estimation that does not need to reveal part of the key. We implement an entanglement-based version of the Renes 2004 protocol, using only passive optic elements in a linear scheme for the positive-operator valued measure (POVM), generating an asymptotic secure key rate of more than 10 kbit/s, with a mean QBER of 1.6%. We then demonstrate its security in the case of finite key and evaluate the key rate for both collective and general attacks.

  11. Experimental realization of equiangular three-state quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Schiavon, Matteo; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Quantum key distribution using three states in equiangular configuration combines a security threshold comparable with the one of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol and a quantum bit error rate (QBER) estimation that does not need to reveal part of the key. We implement an entanglement-based version of the Renes 2004 protocol, using only passive optic elements in a linear scheme for the positive-operator valued measure (POVM), generating an asymptotic secure key rate of more than 10 kbit/s, with a mean QBER of 1.6%. We then demonstrate its security in the case of finite key and evaluate the key rate for both collective and general attacks. PMID:27465643

  12. Experimental realization of equiangular three-state quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Matteo; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-07-28

    Quantum key distribution using three states in equiangular configuration combines a security threshold comparable with the one of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol and a quantum bit error rate (QBER) estimation that does not need to reveal part of the key. We implement an entanglement-based version of the Renes 2004 protocol, using only passive optic elements in a linear scheme for the positive-operator valued measure (POVM), generating an asymptotic secure key rate of more than 10 kbit/s, with a mean QBER of 1.6%. We then demonstrate its security in the case of finite key and evaluate the key rate for both collective and general attacks.

  13. The Mind Revealed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barinaga, Marcia

    1990-01-01

    Described is the discovery that oscillations of electric potential at 40 hertz hold the key to how the brain assembles sense impressions into a single object. Potential implications from this research are discussed. (CW)

  14. Key drivers of airline loyalty

    PubMed Central

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty. PMID:27064618

  15. Detector decoy quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroder, Tobias; Curty, Marcos; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2009-04-01

    Photon number resolving detectors can enhance the performance of many practical quantum cryptographic setups. In this paper, we employ a simple method to estimate the statistics provided by such a photon number resolving detector using only a threshold detector together with a variable attenuator. This idea is similar in spirit to that of the decoy state technique, and is especially suited to those scenarios where only a few parameters of the photon number statistics of the incoming signals have to be estimated. As an illustration of the potential applicability of the method in quantum communication protocols, we use it to prove security of an entanglement-based quantum key distribution scheme with an untrusted source without the need for a squash model and by solely using this extra idea. In this sense, this detector decoy method can be seen as a different conceptual approach to adapt a single-photon security proof to its physical, full optical implementation. We show that in this scenario, the legitimate users can now even discard the double click events from the raw key data without compromising the security of the scheme, and we present simulations on the performance of the BB84 and the 6-state quantum key distribution protocols.

  16. Physiological adaptations of key oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C W Ian; Naylor, Kathryn; Phansopa, Chatchawal; Frey, Andrew M; Farmilo, Thomas; Stafford, Graham P

    2014-01-01

    Oral colonising bacteria are highly adapted to the various environmental niches harboured within the mouth, whether that means while contributing to one of the major oral diseases of caries, pulp infections, or gingival/periodontal disease or as part of a commensal lifestyle. Key to these infections is the ability to adhere to surfaces via a range of specialised adhesins targeted at both salivary and epithelial proteins, their glycans and to form biofilm. They must also resist the various physical stressors they are subjected to, including pH and oxidative stress. Possibly most strikingly, they have developed the ability to harvest both nutrient sources provided by the diet and those derived from the host, such as protein and surface glycans. We have attempted to review recent developments that have revealed much about the molecular mechanisms at work in shaping the physiology of oral bacteria and how we might use this information to design and implement new treatment strategies.

  17. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C

    2008-08-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent's observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent's actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  18. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  19. Key Strengths of an Innovative Volunteer Training Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellick, Angelika; Bournot-Trites, Monique; Reeder, Ken; Scales, Andrew; Smith, Mark; Zappa-Hollman, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The study involved 14 volunteer facilitators, four UBC staff members, and the researcher as participant; the data collected were observation notes, questionnaires, results from focus groups, and interviews. The study revealed that the key strengths of the training workshop lay in its approach to training, its focus on confidence and capacity…

  20. The LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    2016-06-01

    We highlight results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Supernova Key Project -- a 3 year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of approximately 500 low-redshift SNe. LCOGT is a robotic network of elevent one and two meter telescopes spaced around the globe. We are involved in a variety of surveys, including the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, LaSilla Quest, PESSTO, and KMTNet. Recent results include analysis of large samples of core-collaspe SNe, the largest sample of SNe Ibn, evidence of the progenitors of SNe Ia from companion shocking, and new findings about superluminious SNe.

  1. Key paediatric messages from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Barben, Jürg; Bohlin, Kajsa; Everard, Mark L.; Hall, Graham; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle; Priftis, Kostas N.; Rusconi, Franca; Midulla, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) maintained its high profile at the 2015 ERS International Congress in Amsterdam. There were symposia on preschool wheeze, respiratory sounds and cystic fibrosis; an educational skills workshop on paediatric respiratory resuscitation; a hot topic session on risk factors and early origins of respiratory diseases; a meet the expert session on paediatric lung function test reference values; and the annual paediatric grand round. In this report the Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly's Groups highlight the key messages from the abstracts presented at the Congress. PMID:27730186

  2. Key Obama officials leave administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is one of the latest members of the Obama administration to announce that he is leaving his position near the start of President Obama's second term in office. Salazar, who has served as interior secretary since January 2009, intends to leave the department by the end of March, the department noted on 16 January. Salazar joins a number of other key officials who are planning to leave the administration. They include Environmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa Jackson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator Jane Lubchenco, and U.S. Geological Survey director Marcia McNutt.

  3. Public/private key certification authority and key distribution. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.P.; Christensen, M.J.; Sturtevant, A.P.; Johnston, W.E.

    1995-09-25

    Traditional encryption, which protects messages from prying eyes, has been used for many decades. The present concepts of encryption are built from that heritage. Utilization of modern software-based encryption techniques implies much more than simply converting files to an unreadable form. Ubiquitous use of computers and advances in encryption technology coupled with the use of wide-area networking completely changed the reasons for utilizing encryption technology. The technology demands a new and extensive infrastructure to support these functions. Full understanding of these functions, their utility and value, and the need for an infrastructure, takes extensive exposure to the new paradigm. This paper addresses issues surrounding the establishment and operation of a key management system (i.e., certification authority) that is essential to the successful implementation and wide-spread use of encryption.

  4. The LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; Lcogt Supernova Key Project

    2015-01-01

    I present first results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) Supernova Key Project. LCOGT is a network of 11 robotic one and two meter telescopes spaced around the globe with imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. The supernova key project is a 3 year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of at least 450 supernovae. About half are expected to be core-collapse supernovae, and half thermonuclear. We will start light curves and spectroscopy within hours of discovery, and focus on those SNe caught soon after explosion. The goals are fivefold: (1) observe supernovae soon after explosion to search for signs of their progenitors, (2) obtain a large homogeneous sample of supernovae for next generation cosmological studies, (3) obtain a large sample of supernovae for statistical studies comparing groups that are split into different populations, (4) obtain some of the first large samples of the recently discovered classes of rare and exotic explosions, (5) obtain the optical light curves and spectroscopy in support of studies at other wavelengths and using other facilities including UV observations, IR imaging and spectroscopy, host galaxy studies, high resolution spectroscopy, and late-time spectroscopy with large telescopes.

  5. Economic perspectives on key issues

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.; Thomas, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book is about the contribution that economics can make to the understanding of some of today's key issues. The twelve topics discussed are representative of a very wide range of concerns. The first three chapters (on nuclear deterrence, the Palestinian problem, and sanctions against South Africa) are all issues associated with international relations. Later chapters consider the environment, poverty, technology, and the role of government. Family, crime, comprehensive education and youth unemployment issues are also addressed. All of the topics included illustrate issues which are of concern to many different societies. However, it is important to examine these issues in specific contexts rather than to rely on a purely general treatment using stylised facts. In a number of chapters the issues are therefore presented in the context of the UK and sometimes particular case studies are discussed.

  6. Astrocytes: Key Regulators of Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes are crucial regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses in the injured central nervous system. Depending on timing and context, astrocyte activity may exacerbate inflammatory reactions and tissue damage, or promote immunosuppression and tissue repair. Recent literature has unveiled key factors and intracellular signaling pathways that govern astrocyte behavior during neuroinflammation. Here we have re-visited in vivo studies on astrocyte signaling in neuroinflammatory models focusing on evidences obtained from the analysis of transgenic mice where distinct genes involved in ligand binding, transcriptional regulation and cell communication have been manipulated in astrocytes. The integration of in vivo observations with in vitro data clarifies precise signaling steps, highlights the crosstalk among pathways and identifies shared effector mechanisms in neuroinflammation.

  7. Key aspects of coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-04-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better.

  8. Key Aspects of Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-04-01

    We highlight ten key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite buildup of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behavior responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require a coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized 3D MHD simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better.

  9. Tools For Installing Keys On A Stud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodoak, Robert D.

    1995-01-01

    Two tools designed to be used together to drive long locking keys axially to install them on stud. Tools are: supporter holding keys in correct relative alignment and driver having multiple prongs, each of which fits into one of holes in supporter. Tools prevent bending and breaking of keys during installation, and make possible to install all keys simultaneously, in one motion.

  10. SLAR image interpretation keys for geographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coiner, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    A means for side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) imagery to become a more widely used data source in geoscience and agriculture is suggested by providing interpretation keys as an easily implemented interpretation model. Interpretation problems faced by the researcher wishing to employ SLAR are specifically described, and the use of various types of image interpretation keys to overcome these problems is suggested. With examples drawn from agriculture and vegetation mapping, direct and associate dichotomous image interpretation keys are discussed and methods of constructing keys are outlined. Initial testing of the keys, key-based automated decision rules, and the role of the keys in an information system for agriculture are developed.

  11. A novel key management scheme using biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yan; Yang, Kai; Du, Yingzi; Orr, Scott; Zou, Xukai

    2010-04-01

    Key management is one of the most important issues in cryptographic systems. Several important challenges in such a context are represented by secure and efficient key generation, key distribution, as well as key revocation. Addressing such challenges requires a comprehensive solution which is robust, secure and efficient. Compared to traditional key management schemes, key management using biometrics requires the presence of the user, which can reduce fraud and protect the key better. In this paper, we propose a novel key management scheme using iris based biometrics. Our newly proposed scheme outperforms traditional key management schemes as well as some existing key-binding biometric schemes in terms of security, diversity and/or efficiency.

  12. Investigating arsenic susceptibility from a genetic perspective in Drosophila reveals a key role for glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Jorge G Muñiz; Opoka, Robert; Kane, Daniel; Cartwright, Iain L

    2009-02-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water can lead to a variety of serious pathological outcomes. However, differential responsiveness within human populations suggests that interindividual genetic variation plays an important role. We are using Drosophila to study toxic metal response pathways because of unrivalled access to varied genetic approaches and significant demonstrable overlap with many aspects of mammalian physiology and disease phenotypes. Genetic analysis (via chromosomal segregation and microsatellite marker-based recombination) of various wild-type strains exhibiting relative susceptibility or tolerance to the lethal toxic effects of arsenite identified a limited X-chromosomal region (16D-F) able to confer a differential response phenotype. Using an FRT-based recombination approach, we created lines harboring small, overlapping deficiencies within this region and found that relative arsenite sensitivity arose when the dose of the glutathione synthetase (GS) gene (located at 16F1) was reduced by half. Knockdown of GS expression by RNA interference (RNAi) in cultured S2 cells led to enhanced arsenite sensitivity, while GS RNAi applied to intact organisms dramatically reduced the concentration of food-borne arsenite compatible with successful growth and development. Our analyses, initially guided by observations on naturally occurring variants, provide genetic proof that an optimally functioning two-step glutathione (GSH) biosynthetic pathway is required in vivo for a robust defense against arsenite; the enzymatic implications of this are discussed in the context of GSH supply and demand under arsenite-induced stress. Given an identical pathway for human GSH biosynthesis, we suggest that polymorphisms in GSH biosynthetic genes may be an important contributor to differential arsenic sensitivity and exposure risk in human populations.

  13. Global transcriptome analysis reveals circadian regulation of key pathways in plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Michael F; Maloof, Julin N; Straume, Marty; Kay, Steve A; Harmer, Stacey L

    2008-01-01

    Background As nonmotile organisms, plants must rapidly adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions, including those caused by daily light/dark cycles. One important mechanism for anticipating and preparing for such predictable changes is the circadian clock. Nearly all organisms have circadian oscillators that, when they are in phase with the Earth's rotation, provide a competitive advantage. In order to understand how circadian clocks benefit plants, it is necessary to identify the pathways and processes that are clock controlled. Results We have integrated information from multiple circadian microarray experiments performed on Arabidopsis thaliana in order to better estimate the fraction of the plant transcriptome that is circadian regulated. Analyzing the promoters of clock-controlled genes, we identified circadian clock regulatory elements correlated with phase-specific transcript accumulation. We have also identified several physiological pathways enriched for clock-regulated changes in transcript abundance, suggesting they may be modulated by the circadian clock. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that transcript abundance of roughly one-third of expressed A. thaliana genes is circadian regulated. We found four promoter elements, enriched in the promoters of genes with four discrete phases, which may contribute to the time-of-day specific changes in the transcript abundance of these genes. Clock-regulated genes are over-represented among all of the classical plant hormone and multiple stress response pathways, suggesting that all of these pathways are influenced by the circadian clock. Further exploration of the links between the clock and these pathways will lead to a better understanding of how the circadian clock affects plant growth and leads to improved fitness. PMID:18710561

  14. Mutations in GDF5 Reveal a Key Residue Mediating BMP Inhibition by NOGGIN

    PubMed Central

    König, Jana; Reissner, Carsten; Stricker, Sigmar; Kuss, Pia; Haupt, Julia; Renninger, Stephanie; Nickel, Joachim; Sebald, Walter; Groppe, Jay C.; Plöger, Frank; Pohl, Jens; Schmidt-von Kegler, Mareen; Walther, Maria; Gassner, Ingmar; Rusu, Cristina; Janecke, Andreas R.; Dathe, Katarina; Mundlos, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Signaling output of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is determined by two sets of opposing interactions, one with heterotetrameric complexes of cell surface receptors, the other with secreted antagonists that act as ligand traps. We identified two mutations (N445K,T) in patients with multiple synostosis syndrome (SYM1) in the BMP–related ligand GDF5. Functional studies of both mutants in chicken micromass culture demonstrated a gain of function caused by a resistance to the BMP–inhibitor NOGGIN and an altered signaling effect. Residue N445, situated within overlapping receptor and antagonist interfaces, is highly conserved among the BMP family with the exception of BMP9 and BMP10, in which it is substituted with lysine. Like the mutant GDF5, both BMPs are insensitive to NOGGIN and show a high chondrogenic activity. Ectopic expression of BMP9 or the GDF5 mutants resulted in massive induction of cartilage in an in vivo chick model presumably by bypassing the feedback inhibition imposed by endogenous NOGGIN. Swapping residues at the mutation site alone was not sufficient to render Bmp9 NOG-sensitive; however, successive introduction of two additional substitutions imparted high to total sensitivity on customized variants of Bmp9. In conclusion, we show a new mechanism for abnormal joint development that interferes with a naturally occurring regulatory mechanism of BMP signaling. PMID:19956691

  15. Arabidopsis Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Key Roles of Melatonin in Plant Defense Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weeda, Sarah; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Xiaolei; Ndip, Grace; Guo, Yangdong; Buck, Gregory A.; Fu, Conggui; Ren, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous molecule and exists across kingdoms including plant species. Studies on melatonin in plants have mainly focused on its physiological influence on growth and development, and on its biosynthesis. Much less attention has been drawn to its affect on genome-wide gene expression. To comprehensively investigate the role(s) of melatonin at the genomics level, we utilized mRNA-seq technology to analyze Arabidopsis plants subjected to a 16-hour 100 pM (low) and 1 mM (high) melatonin treatment. The expression profiles were analyzed to identify differentially expressed genes. 100 pM melatonin treatment significantly affected the expression of only 81 genes with 51 down-regulated and 30 up-regulated. However, 1 mM melatonin significantly altered 1308 genes with 566 up-regulated and 742 down-regulated. Not all genes altered by low melatonin were affected by high melatonin, indicating different roles of melatonin in regulation of plant growth and development under low and high concentrations. Furthermore, a large number of genes altered by melatonin were involved in plant stress defense. Transcript levels for many stress receptors, kinases, and stress-associated calcium signals were up-regulated. The majority of transcription factors identified were also involved in plant stress defense. Additionally, most identified genes in ABA, ET, SA and JA pathways were up-regulated, while genes pertaining to auxin responses and signaling, peroxidases, and those associated with cell wall synthesis and modifications were mostly down-regulated. Our results indicate critical roles of melatonin in plant defense against various environmental stresses, and provide a framework for functional analysis of genes in melatonin-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:24682084

  16. Systems Biology Strategy Reveals PKCδ is Key for Sensitizing TRAIL-Resistant Human Fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Tabata, Sho; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells are highly variable and largely resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recently, the use of the tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced treatment is gaining momentum due to TRAIL’s ability to specifically target cancers with limited effect on normal cells. Nevertheless, several malignant cancer types still remain non-sensitive to TRAIL. Previously, we developed a dynamic computational model, based on perturbation-response differential equations approach, and predicted protein kinase C (PKC) as the most effective target, with over 95% capacity to kill human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) in TRAIL stimulation (1). Here, to validate the model prediction, which has significant implications for cancer treatment, we conducted experiments on two TRAIL-resistant cancer cell lines (HT1080 and HT29). Using PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, we demonstrated that cell viability is significantly impaired with over 95% death of both cancer types, in consistency with our previous model. Next, we measured caspase-3, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), p38, and JNK activations in HT1080, and confirmed cell death occurs through apoptosis with significant increment in caspase-3 and PARP activations. Finally, to identify a crucial PKC isoform, from 10 known members, we analyzed each isoform mRNA expressions in HT1080 cells and shortlisted the highest 4 for further siRNA knock-down (KD) experiments. From these KDs, PKCδ produced the most cancer cell death in conjunction with TRAIL. Overall, our approach combining model predictions with experimental validation holds promise for systems biology based cancer therapy. PMID:25601862

  17. Advances in ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry reveal key insights into amyloid assembly☆

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L.A.; Radford, S.E.; Ashcroft, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacing ion mobility spectrometry to mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) has enabled mass spectrometric analyses to extend into an extra dimension, providing unrivalled separation and structural characterization of lowly populated species in heterogeneous mixtures. One biological system that has benefitted significantly from such advances is that of amyloid formation. Using IMS–MS, progress has been made into identifying transiently populated monomeric and oligomeric species for a number of different amyloid systems and has led to an enhanced understanding of the mechanism by which small molecules modulate amyloid formation. This review highlights recent advances in this field, which have been accelerated by the commercial availability of IMS–MS instruments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mass spectrometry in structural biology. PMID:23063533

  18. Defining Hsp70 Subnetworks in Dengue Virus Replication Reveals Key Vulnerability in Flavivirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Taguwa, Shuhei; Maringer, Kevin; Li, Xiaokai; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Rauch, Jennifer N; Gestwicki, Jason E; Andino, Raul; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Frydman, Judith

    2015-11-19

    Viral protein homeostasis depends entirely on the machinery of the infected cell. Accordingly, viruses can illuminate the interplay between cellular proteostasis components and their distinct substrates. Here, we define how the Hsp70 chaperone network mediates the dengue virus life cycle. Cytosolic Hsp70 isoforms are required at distinct steps of the viral cycle, including entry, RNA replication, and virion biogenesis. Hsp70 function at each step is specified by nine distinct DNAJ cofactors. Of these, DnaJB11 relocalizes to virus-induced replication complexes to promote RNA synthesis, while DnaJB6 associates with capsid protein and facilitates virion biogenesis. Importantly, an allosteric Hsp70 inhibitor, JG40, potently blocks infection of different dengue serotypes in human primary blood cells without eliciting viral resistance or exerting toxicity to the host cells. JG40 also blocks replication of other medically-important flaviviruses including yellow fever, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Thus, targeting host Hsp70 subnetworks provides a path for broad-spectrum antivirals. PMID:26582131

  19. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-05-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies.

  20. Arabidopsis transcriptome analysis reveals key roles of melatonin in plant defense systems.

    PubMed

    Weeda, Sarah; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Xiaolei; Ndip, Grace; Guo, Yangdong; Buck, Gregory A; Fu, Conggui; Ren, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous molecule and exists across kingdoms including plant species. Studies on melatonin in plants have mainly focused