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Sample records for integrase reveals key

  1. Unmasking the ancestral activity of integron integrases reveals a smooth evolutionary transition during functional innovation

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; Loot, Celine; Parissi, Vincent; Nivina, Aleksandra; Bouchier, Christiane; Mazel, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine (Y)-recombinases have evolved to deliver mechanistically different reactions on a variety of substrates, but these evolutionary transitions are poorly understood. Among them, integron integrases are hybrid systems recombining single- and double-stranded DNA partners. These reactions are asymmetric and need a replicative resolution pathway, an exception to the canonical second strand exchange model of Y-recombinases. Integron integrases possess a specific domain for this specialized pathway. Here we show that despite this, integrases are still capable of efficiently operating the ancestral second strand exchange in symmetrical reactions between double-stranded substrates. During these reactions, both strands are reactive and Holliday junction resolution can follow either pathway. A novel deep-sequencing approach allows mapping of the crossover point for the second strand exchange. The persistence of the ancestral activity in integrases illustrates their robustness and shows that innovation towards new recombination substrates and resolution pathways was a smooth evolutionary process. PMID:26961432

  2. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for β-retroviral intasome function

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA (vDNA) into host target (tDNA), which is an essential step in the lifecycle of all retroviruses1. Prior structural characterization of IN-vDNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV) revealed a functional IN tetramer2–5, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera will employ tetrameric IN6–9. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallography, we determine here an unexpected octameric IN architecture for the β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) intasome. The structure is composed of two core IN dimers, which interact with the vDNA ends and structurally mimic the PFV IN tetramer, and two flanking IN dimers that engage the core structure via their IN C-terminal domains (CTDs). Contrary to the belief that tetrameric IN components are sufficient to catalyze integration, the flanking IN dimers were necessary for MMTV IN activity. The IN octamer solves a conundrum for the β- as well as α-retroviruses by providing critical CTDs to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis due to evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain (CCD)-CTD linker regions. The octameric architecture of the MMTV intasome provides a new paradigm for the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  3. Making serine integrases work for us.

    PubMed

    Stark, W Marshall

    2017-06-06

    DNA site-specific recombinases are enzymes (often associated with mobile DNA elements) that catalyse breaking and rejoining of DNA strands at specific points, thereby bringing about precise genetic rearrangements. Serine integrases are a group of recombinases derived from bacteriophages. Their unusual properties, including directionality of recombination and simple site requirements, are leading to their development as efficient, versatile tools for applications in experimental biology, biotechnology, synthetic biology and gene therapy. This article summarizes our current knowledge of serine integrase structure and mechanism, then outlines key factors that affect the performance of these phage recombination systems. Recently published studies, that have expanded the repertoire of available systems and reveal system-specific characteristics, will help us to choose the best integrases for envisaged applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Retroviral Integrase Structure and DNA Recombination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Due to the importance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase as a drug target, the biochemistry and structural aspects of retroviral DNA integration have been the focus of intensive research during the past three decades. The retroviral integrase enzyme acts on the linear double-stranded viral DNA product of reverse transcription. Integrase cleaves specific phosphodiester bonds near the viral DNA ends during the 3′ processing reaction. The enzyme then uses the resulting viral DNA 3′-OH groups during strand transfer to cut chromosomal target DNA, which simultaneously joins both viral DNA ends to target DNA 5′-phosphates. Both reactions proceed via direct transesterification of scissile phosphodiester bonds by attacking nucleophiles: a water molecule for 3′ processing, and the viral DNA 3′-OH for strand transfer. X-ray crystal structures of prototype foamy virus integrase-DNA complexes revealed the architectures of the key nucleoprotein complexes that form sequentially during the integration process and explained the roles of active site metal ions in catalysis. X-ray crystallography furthermore elucidated the mechanism of action of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors, which are currently used to treat AIDS patients, and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of viral drug resistance. PMID:25705574

  5. Identification of key structural determinants of the IntI1 integron integrase that influence attC × attI1 recombination efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Demarre, Gaëlle; Frumerie, Clara; Gopaul, Deshmukh N.; Mazel, Didier

    2007-01-01

    The integron platform codes for an integrase (IntI) from the tyrosine family of recombinases that mediates recombination between a proximal double-strand recombination site, attI and a single-strand target recombination site, attC. The attI site is only recognized by its cognate integrase, while the various tested attCs sites are recombined by several different IntI integrases. We have developed a genetic system to enrich and select mutants of IntI1 that provide a higher yield of recombination in order to identify key protein structural elements important for attC × attI1 recombination. We isolated mutants with higher activity on wild type and mutant attC sites. Interestingly, three out of four characterized IntI1 mutants selected on different substrates are mutants of the conserved aspartic acid in position 161. The IntI1 model we made based on the VchIntIA 3D structure suggests that substitution at this position, which plays a central role in multimer assembly, can increase or decrease the stability of the complex and accordingly influence the rate of attI × attC recombination versus attC × attC. These results suggest that there is a balance between the specificity of the protein and the protein/protein interactions in the recombination synapse. PMID:17884913

  6. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Brandon L; Larue, Ross C; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P

    2016-02-23

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein-protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins.

  7. Biochemical Characterization of Novel Retroviral Integrase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Naraharisetty, Hema; Li, Xiang; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase is an essential retroviral enzyme, catalyzing the stable integration of reverse transcribed DNA into cellular DNA. Several aspects of the integration mechanism, including the length of host DNA sequence duplication flanking the integrated provirus, which can be from 4 to 6 bp, and the nucleotide preferences at the site of integration, are thought to cluster among the different retroviral genera. To date only the spumavirus prototype foamy virus integrase has provided diffractable crystals of integrase-DNA complexes, revealing unprecedented details on the molecular mechanisms of DNA integration. Here, we characterize five previously unstudied integrase proteins, including those derived from the alpharetrovirus lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV), betaretroviruses Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), epsilonretrovirus walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV), and gammaretrovirus reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (Rev-A) to identify potential novel structural biology candidates. Integrase expressed in bacterial cells was analyzed for solubility, stability during purification, and, once purified, 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro. We show that while we were unable to extract or purify accountable amounts of WDSV, JRSV, or LPDV integrase, purified MMTV and Rev-A integrase each preferentially support the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA. The sequencing of concerted Rev-A integration products indicates high fidelity cleavage of target DNA strands separated by 5 bp during integration, which contrasts with the 4 bp duplication generated by a separate gammaretrovirus, the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). By comparing Rev-A in vitro integration sites to those generated by MLV in cells, we concordantly conclude that the spacing of target DNA cleavage is more evolutionarily flexible than are the target DNA base contacts made by integrase during integration. Given their

  8. Use of a hexasubstituted benzene scaffold in the development of multivalent HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tupchiangmai, Wipa; Choksakulporn, Saowanaporn; Tewtrakul, Supinya; Pianwanit, Somsak; Sritana-anant, Yongsak

    2014-01-01

    The highly directional hexasubstituted benzene moiety was used as the central scaffold to create new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase inhibitors through the attachment of multiple active groups. A series of potential inhibitors having substituted polyhydroxylated mono, bis and tris-cinnamoyl derivatives connected on the scaffold were prepared through Claisen-Schmidt condensations with substituted benzaldehydes, followed by partial demethylation to uncover the active phenolic groups required for the interactions with the integrase enzyme active sites. Using a multiplate integration assay method, four compounds carrying at least two sets of interacting moieties were found to be relatively potent integrase inhibitors with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. The results confirmed that multiple polyhydroxylated groups were required on the platform in order to effectively interact with the enzyme. The results from molecular docking studies consistently complemented the experimental results and revealed the nature of the potential key binding interactions responsible for the apparent activity of the active compounds.

  9. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2012-02-07

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly.

  10. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly. PMID:21454648

  11. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  12. N-terminal Half of Transportin SR2 Interacts with HIV Integrase.

    PubMed

    Tsirkone, Vicky G; Blokken, Jolien; De Wit, Flore; Breemans, Jolien; De Houwer, Stéphanie; Debyser, Zeger; Christ, Frauke; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2017-03-29

    The karyopherin transportin SR2 (TRN-SR2, TNPO3) is responsible for shuttling specific cargoes such as serine/arginine-rich splicing factors from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. This protein plays a key role in HIV infection by facilitating the nuclear import of the pre-integration complex (PIC) which contains the viral DNA as well as several cellular and HIV proteins including the integrase. The process of nuclear import is considered to be the bottleneck of the viral replication cycle and therefore represents a promising target for anti-HIV drug design. Previous studies have demonstrated that the direct interaction between TRN-SR2 and HIV integrase predominantly involves the catalytic core domain (CCD) and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the latter. We aimed at providing a detailed molecular view of this interaction through a biochemical characterization of the respective protein complex. Size-exclusion chromatography was used to characterize the interaction of TRN-SR2 with a truncated variant of HIV-1 integrase including both the CCD and CTD. These experiments indicate that one TRN-SR2 molecule can specifically bind one CCD-CTD dimer. Next, the regions of the solenoid-like TRN-SR2 molecule that are involved in the interaction with integrase were identified using AlphaScreen binding assays, revealing that the integrase interacts with the N-terminal half of TRN-SR2 principally through the HEAT repeats 4, 10 and 11. Combining these results with small-angle X-ray scattering data for the complex of TRN-SR2 with truncated integrase we propose a molecular model of the complex. We speculate that nuclear import of the PIC may proceed concurrently with the normal nuclear transport.

  13. Treatment with integrase inhibitor suggests a new interpretation of HIV RNA decay curves that reveals a subset of cells with slow integration

    DOE PAGES

    Cardozo, Erwing Fabian; Andrade, Adriana; Mellors, John W.; ...

    2017-07-05

    The kinetics of HIV-1 decay under treatment depends on the class of antiretrovirals used. Mathematical models are useful to interpret the different profiles, providing quantitative information about the kinetics of virus replication and the cell populations contributing to viral decay. We modeled proviral integration in short- and long-lived infected cells to compare viral kinetics under treatment with and without the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL). We fitted the model to data obtained from participants treated with RAL-containing regimes or with a four-drug regimen of protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Our model explains the existence and quantifies the three phases of HIV-1more » RNA decay in RAL-based regimens vs. the two phases observed in therapies without RAL. Our findings indicate that HIV-1 infection is mostly sustained by short-lived infected cells with fast integration and a short viral production period, and by long-lived infected cells with slow integration but an equally short viral production period. We propose that these cells represent activated and resting infected CD4+ T-cells, respectively, and estimate that infection of resting cells represent ~4% of productive reverse transcription events in chronic infection. RAL reveals the kinetics of proviral integration, showing that in short-lived cells the pre-integration population has a half-life of ~7 hours, whereas in long-lived cells this half-life is ~6 weeks. We also show that the efficacy of RAL can be estimated by the difference in viral load at the start of the second phase in protocols with and without RAL. Altogether, we provide a mechanistic model of viral infection that parsimoniously explains the kinetics of viral load decline under multiple classes of antiretrovirals.« less

  14. Treatment with integrase inhibitor suggests a new interpretation of HIV RNA decay curves that reveals a subset of cells with slow integration

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, E. Fabian; Mellors, John W.

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of HIV-1 decay under treatment depends on the class of antiretrovirals used. Mathematical models are useful to interpret the different profiles, providing quantitative information about the kinetics of virus replication and the cell populations contributing to viral decay. We modeled proviral integration in short- and long-lived infected cells to compare viral kinetics under treatment with and without the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL). We fitted the model to data obtained from participants treated with RAL-containing regimes or with a four-drug regimen of protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Our model explains the existence and quantifies the three phases of HIV-1 RNA decay in RAL-based regimens vs. the two phases observed in therapies without RAL. Our findings indicate that HIV-1 infection is mostly sustained by short-lived infected cells with fast integration and a short viral production period, and by long-lived infected cells with slow integration but an equally short viral production period. We propose that these cells represent activated and resting infected CD4+ T-cells, respectively, and estimate that infection of resting cells represent ~4% of productive reverse transcription events in chronic infection. RAL reveals the kinetics of proviral integration, showing that in short-lived cells the pre-integration population has a half-life of ~7 hours, whereas in long-lived cells this half-life is ~6 weeks. We also show that the efficacy of RAL can be estimated by the difference in viral load at the start of the second phase in protocols with and without RAL. Overall, we provide a mechanistic model of viral infection that parsimoniously explains the kinetics of viral load decline under multiple classes of antiretrovirals. PMID:28678879

  15. Modeling, analysis, and validation of a novel HIV integrase structure provide insights into the binding modes of potent integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Tsiang, M; Yu, F; Hung, M; Jones, G S; Zeynalzadegan, A; Qi, X; Jin, H; Kim, C U; Swaminathan, S; Chen, J M

    2008-07-11

    It has been shown that L-731988, a potent integrase inhibitor, targets a conformation of the integrase enzyme formed when complexed to viral DNA, with the 3'-end dinucleotide already cleaved. It has also been shown that diketo acid inhibitors bind to the strand transfer complex of integrase and are competitive with the host target DNA. However, published X-ray structures of HIV integrase do not include the DNA; thus, there is a need to develop a model representing the strand transfer complex. In this study, we have constructed an active-site model of the HIV-1 integrase complexed with viral DNA using the crystal structure of DNA-bound transposase and have identified a binding mode for inhibitors. This proposed binding mechanism for integrase inhibitors involves interaction with a specific Mg(2+) in the active site, accentuated by a hydrophobic interaction in a cavity formed by a flexible loop upon DNA binding. We further validated the integrase active-site model by selectively mutating key residues predicted to play an important role in the binding of inhibitors. Thus, we have a binding model that is applicable to a wide range of potent integrase inhibitors and is consistent with the available resistant mutation data.

  16. Retroviral Integrase Proteins and HIV-1 DNA Integration*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lavanya; Engelman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integrases catalyze two reactions, 3′-processing of viral DNA ends, followed by integration of the processed ends into chromosomal DNA. X-ray crystal structures of integrase-DNA complexes from prototype foamy virus, a member of the Spumavirus genus of Retroviridae, have revealed the structural basis of integration and how clinically relevant integrase strand transfer inhibitors work. Underscoring the translational potential of targeting virus-host interactions, small molecules that bind at the host factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75-binding site on HIV-1 integrase promote dimerization and inhibit integrase-viral DNA assembly and catalysis. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of HIV-1 DNA integration, as well as future research directions. PMID:23043109

  17. Notable Difference in anti-HIV Activity of Integrase Inhibitors as a Consequence of Geometric and Enantiomeric Configurations

    PubMed Central

    Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Nishonov, Malik; Nair, Vasu

    2013-01-01

    While some examples are known of integrase inhibitors that exhibit potent anti-HIV activity, there are very few cases reported of integrase inhibitors that show significant differences in anti-HIV activity that result from distinctions in cis-and trans-configurations as well as enantiomeric stereostructure. We describe here the design and synthesis of two enantiomeric trans-hydroxycyclopentyl carboxamides which exhibit notable difference in anti-HIV activity. This difference is explained through their binding interactions within the active site of the HIV-1 integrase intasome. The more active enantiomer 3 (EC50 25 nM) was relatively stable in human liver microsomes. Kinetic data revealed that its impact on key cytochrome P450 isozymes, as either an inhibitor or an activator, was minor, suggesting a favorable CYP profile. PMID:23746474

  18. Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Neda; Radak, Djordje; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and “driver genes.” We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies “key” genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs. PMID:23977067

  19. Phage integrases: biology and applications.

    PubMed

    Groth, Amy C; Calos, Michele P

    2004-01-16

    Phage integrases are enzymes that mediate unidirectional site-specific recombination between two DNA recognition sequences, the phage attachment site, attP, and the bacterial attachment site, attB. Integrases may be grouped into two major families, the tyrosine recombinases and the serine recombinases, based on their mode of catalysis. Tyrosine family integrases, such as lambda integrase, utilize a catalytic tyrosine to mediate strand cleavage, tend to recognize longer attP sequences, and require other proteins encoded by the phage or the host bacteria. Phage integrases from the serine family are larger, use a catalytic serine for strand cleavage, recognize shorter attP sequences, and do not require host cofactors. Phage integrases mediate efficient site-specific recombination between two different sequences that are relatively short, yet long enough to be specific on a genomic scale. These properties give phage integrases growing importance for the genetic manipulation of living eukaryotic cells, especially those with large genomes such as mammals and most plants, for which there are few tools for precise manipulation of the genome. Integrases of the serine family have been shown to work efficiently in mammalian cells, mediating efficient integration at introduced att sites or native sequences that have partial identity to att sites. This reaction has applications in areas such as gene therapy, construction of transgenic organisms, and manipulation of cell lines. Directed evolution can be used to increase further the affinity of an integrase for a particular native sequence, opening up additional applications for genomic modification.

  20. New Applications for Phage Integrases

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C.M.; Colloms, Sean; Rosser, Susan; Stark, Marshall; Smith, Margaret C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the last 25 years, bacteriophage integrases have rapidly risen to prominence as genetic tools for a wide range of applications from basic cloning to genome engineering. Serine integrases such as that from ϕC31 and its relatives have found an especially wide range of applications within diverse micro-organisms right through to multi-cellular eukaryotes. Here, we review the mechanisms of the two major families of integrases, the tyrosine and serine integrases, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type as they are applied in genome engineering and synthetic biology. In particular, we focus on the new areas of metabolic pathway construction and optimization, biocomputing, heterologous expression and multiplexed assembly techniques. Integrases are versatile and efficient tools that can be used in conjunction with the various extant molecular biology tools to streamline the synthetic biology production line. PMID:24857859

  1. HIV-1 Group O Integrase Displays Lower Enzymatic Efficiency and Higher Susceptibility to Raltegravir than HIV-1 Group M Subtype B Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Depatureaux, Agnès; Quashie, Peter K.; Mesplède, Thibault; Han, Yingshan; Koubi, Hannah; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 group O (HIV-O) is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase coding region. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on enzyme function and susceptibility to integrase inhibitors. Accordingly, we cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 group O clades A and B, an HIV-O divergent strain, and HIV-1 group M (HIV-M, subtype B), used as a reference. To assess enzymatic function of HIV-O integrase, we carried out strand transfer and 3′ processing assays with various concentrations of substrate (DNA target and long terminal repeats [LTR], respectively) and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of various concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki) and 50% effective concentration (EC50) values were calculated for HIV-O integrases and HIV-O viruses, respectively, and compared with those of HIV-M. The results showed that HIV-O integrase displayed lower activity in strand transfer assays than did HIV-M enzyme, whereas 3′ processing activities were similar to those of HIV-M. HIV-O integrases were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL) in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. Molecular modeling suggests that two key polymorphic residues that are close to the integrase catalytic site, 74I and 153A, may play a role in these differences. PMID:25224008

  2. HIV-1 group O integrase displays lower enzymatic efficiency and higher susceptibility to raltegravir than HIV-1 group M subtype B integrase.

    PubMed

    Depatureaux, Agnès; Quashie, Peter K; Mesplède, Thibault; Han, Yingshan; Koubi, Hannah; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    HIV-1 group O (HIV-O) is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase coding region. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on enzyme function and susceptibility to integrase inhibitors. Accordingly, we cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 group O clades A and B, an HIV-O divergent strain, and HIV-1 group M (HIV-M, subtype B), used as a reference. To assess enzymatic function of HIV-O integrase, we carried out strand transfer and 3' processing assays with various concentrations of substrate (DNA target and long terminal repeats [LTR], respectively) and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of various concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki) and 50% effective concentration (EC50) values were calculated for HIV-O integrases and HIV-O viruses, respectively, and compared with those of HIV-M. The results showed that HIV-O integrase displayed lower activity in strand transfer assays than did HIV-M enzyme, whereas 3' processing activities were similar to those of HIV-M. HIV-O integrases were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL) in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. Molecular modeling suggests that two key polymorphic residues that are close to the integrase catalytic site, 74I and 153A, may play a role in these differences. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Comparing SessionStateReveal and EphemeralKeyReveal for Diffie-Hellman Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaoglu, Berkant

    Both the "eCK" model, by LaMacchia, Lauter and Mityagin, and the "CK01" model, by Canetti and Krawczyk, address the effect of leaking session specific ephemeral data on the security of key establishment schemes. The CK01-adversary is given a SessionStateReveal query to learn session-specific private data defined by the protocol specification, whereas the eCK-adversary is equipped with an EphemeralKeyReveal query to access all ephemeral private input required to carry session computations. SessionStateReveal cannot be issued against the test session; by contrast EphemeralKeyReveal can be used against the test session under certain conditions. On the other hand, it is not obvious how EphemeralKeyReveal compares to SessionStateReveal. Thus it is natural to ask which model is more useful and practically relevant.

  4. Prophage Integrase Typing Is a Useful Indicator of Genomic Diversity in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Colavecchio, Anna; D'Souza, Yasmin; Tompkins, Elizabeth; Jeukens, Julie; Freschi, Luca; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Bekal, Sadjia; Tamber, Sandeep; Levesque, Roger C; Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial species that is a major cause of illness in humans and food-producing animals. S. enterica exhibits considerable inter-serovar diversity, as evidenced by the large number of host adapted serovars that have been identified. The development of methods to assess genome diversity in S. enterica will help to further define the limits of diversity in this foodborne pathogen. Thus, we evaluated a PCR assay, which targets prophage integrase genes, as a rapid method to investigate S. enterica genome diversity. To evaluate the PCR prophage integrase assay, 49 isolates of S. enterica were selected, including 19 clinical isolates from clonal serovars (Enteritidis and Heidelberg) that commonly cause human illness, and 30 isolates from food-associated Salmonella serovars that rarely cause human illness. The number of integrase genes identified by the PCR assay was compared to the number of integrase genes within intact prophages identified by whole genome sequencing and phage finding program PHASTER. The PCR assay identified a total of 147 prophage integrase genes within the 49 S. enterica genomes (79 integrase genes in the food-associated Salmonella isolates, 50 integrase genes in S. Enteritidis, and 18 integrase genes in S. Heidelberg). In comparison, whole genome sequencing and PHASTER identified a total of 75 prophage integrase genes within 102 intact prophages in the 49 S. enterica genomes (44 integrase genes in the food-associated Salmonella isolates, 21 integrase genes in S. Enteritidis, and 9 integrase genes in S. Heidelberg). Collectively, both the PCR assay and PHASTER identified the presence of a large diversity of prophage integrase genes in the food-associated isolates compared to the clinical isolates, thus indicating a high degree of diversity in the food-associated isolates, and confirming the clonal nature of S. Enteritidis and S. Heidelberg. Moreover, PHASTER revealed a diversity of 29 different types of prophages and 23

  5. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3′-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme–DNA interactions in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3′-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and −1 bases, which flank the 3′-processing site, play a critical role for 3′-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3′-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3′-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the −1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3′-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3′-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  6. Diversity of phage integrases in Enterobacteriaceae: development of markers for environmental analysis of temperate phages.

    PubMed

    Balding, Claire; Bromley, Stephen A; Pickup, Roger W; Saunders, Jon R

    2005-10-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in aquatic systems. Temperate bacteriophages have enormous influences on microbial diversity, genetic exchange and bacterial population dynamics. However, development of molecular tools for their detection in the environment has been problematic. The integrase gene is used here as a molecular marker to analyse the diversity of temperate bacteriophages in a population of freshwater bacteria. Interrogation of the GenBank database revealed 32 non-cryptic enteric phage integrase sequences, leading to the development of a suite of 11 degenerate primer sets specific to the extant sequences elucidated. Application of these primer sets to enterobacterial isolates recovered from a freshwater pond and the temperate phages induced from them revealed a number of diverse integrase genes, including novel integrase-like sequences not represented in the databases. This highlights the potential of utilizing the integrase gene family as a marker for phage diversity.

  7. Mutagenesis of lysines 156 and 159 in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (IN) reveals differential interactions between these residues and different IN inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Crosby, David C; Lei, Xiangyang; Gibbs, Charles G; Reinecke, Manfred G; Robinson, W Edward

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type I integrase (IN) active site, and viral DNA-binding residues K156 and K159 are predicted to interact both with strand transfer-selective IN inhibitors (STI), e.g. L-731,988, Elvitegravir (EVG), and the FDA-approved IN inhibitor, Raltegravir (RGV), and strand transfer non-selective inhibitors, e.g. dicaffeoyltartaric acids (DCTAs), e.g. L-chicoric acid (L-CA). To test posited roles for these two lysine residues in inhibitor action we assayed the potency of L-CA and several STI against a panel of K156 and K159 mutants. Mutagenesis of K156 conferred resistance to L-CA and mutagenesis of either K156 or K159 conferred resistance to STI indicating that the cationic charge at these two viral DNA-binding residues is important for inhibitor potency. IN K156N, a reported polymorphism associated with resistance to RGV, conferred resistance to L-CA and STI as well. To investigate the apparent preference L-CA exhibits for interactions with K156, we assayed the potency of several hybrid inhibitors containing combinations of DCTA and STI pharmacophores against recombinant IN K156A or K159A. Although K156A conferred resistance to diketo acid-branched bis-catechol hybrid inhibitors, neither K156A nor K159A conferred resistance to their monocatechol counterparts, suggesting that bis-catechol moieties direct DCTAs toward K156. In contrast, STI were more promiscuous in their interaction with K156 and K159. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that DCTAs interact with IN in a manner different than that of STI and suggest that DCTAs are an attractive candidate chemotype for development into drugs potent against STI-resistant IN.

  8. Sequential Deletion of the Integrase (Gag-Pol) Carboxyl Terminus Reveals Distinct Phenotypic Classes of Defective HIV-1 ▿ † §

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Kevin D.; Topper, Michael B.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A requisite step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the insertion of the viral genome into that of the host cell, a process catalyzed by the 288-amino-acid (32-kDa) viral integrase (IN). IN recognizes and cleaves the ends of reverse-transcribed viral DNA and directs its insertion into the chromosomal DNA of the target cell. IN function, however, is not limited to integration, as the protein is required for other aspects of viral replication, including assembly, virion maturation, and reverse transcription. Previous studies demonstrated that IN is comprised of three domains: the N-terminal domain (NTD), catalytic core domain (CCD), and C-terminal domain (CTD). Whereas the CCD is mainly responsible for providing the structural framework for catalysis, the roles of the other two domains remain enigmatic. This study aimed to elucidate the primary and subsidiary roles that the CTD has in protein function. To this end, we generated and tested a nested set of IN C-terminal deletion mutants in measurable assays of virologic function. We discovered that removal of up to 15 residues (IN 273) resulted in incremental diminution of enzymatic function and infectivity and that removal of the next three residues resulted in a loss of infectivity. However, replication competency was surprisingly reestablished with one further truncation, corresponding to IN 269 and coinciding with partial restoration of integration activity, but it was lost permanently for all truncations extending N terminal to this position. Our analyses of these replication-competent and -incompetent truncation mutants suggest potential roles for the IN CTD in precursor protein processing, reverse transcription, integration, and IN multimerization. PMID:21367893

  9. Prospective strategies for targeting HIV-1 integrase function

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Integration is a key step in the HIV-1 life cycle in which the ends of linear viral DNA are covalently joined with host chromosomal DNA. Integrase is the highly conserved and essential viral protein that performs two catalytically related reactions that ultimately lead to the insertion of the viral genome into that of the host cell. The only chemotherapeutic agents against integrase currently available for HIV-1 infected individuals are those that interrupt strand transfer, the second step of catalysis. Accordingly, this article outlines possible future strategies targeting the first catalytic step, 3′ processing, as well as other nonenzymatic, yet indispensible, functions thought to be coordinated by integrase. Importantly, the interruption of irremediable recombination between viral and host DNAs represents the last step after viral entry at which an otherwise irreversible infection can be prevented. PMID:21359091

  10. Interactions of Host Proteins with the Murine Leukemia Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Studamire, Barbara; Goff, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral infections cause a variety of cancers in animals and a number of diverse diseases in humans such as leukemia and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Productive and efficient proviral integration is critical for retroviral function and is the key step in establishing a stable and productive infection, as well as the mechanism by which host genes are activated in leukemogenesis. Host factors are widely anticipated to be involved in all stages of the retroviral life cycle, and the identification of integrase interacting factors has the potential to increase our understanding of mechanisms by which the incoming virus might appropriate cellular proteins to target and capture host DNA sequences. Identification of MoMLV integrase interacting host factors may be key to designing efficient and benign retroviral-based gene therapy vectors; key to understanding the basic mechanism of integration; and key in designing efficient integrase inhibitors. In this review, we discuss current progress in the field of MoMLV integrase interacting proteins and possible roles for these proteins in integration. PMID:21637732

  11. Integrase and integration: biochemical activities of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Delelis, Olivier; Carayon, Kevin; Saïb, Ali; Deprez, Eric; Mouscadet, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Integration of retroviral DNA is an obligatory step of retrovirus replication because proviral DNA is the template for productive infection. Integrase, a retroviral enzyme, catalyses integration. The process of integration can be divided into two sequential reactions. The first one, named 3'-processing, corresponds to a specific endonucleolytic reaction which prepares the viral DNA extremities to be competent for the subsequent covalent insertion, named strand transfer, into the host cell genome by a trans-esterification reaction. Recently, a novel specific activity of the full length integrase was reported, in vitro, by our group for two retroviral integrases (HIV-1 and PFV-1). This activity of internal cleavage occurs at a specific palindromic sequence mimicking the LTR-LTR junction described into the 2-LTR circles which are peculiar viral DNA forms found during viral infection. Moreover, recent studies demonstrated the existence of a weak palindromic consensus found at the integration sites. Taken together, these data underline the propensity of retroviral integrases for binding symmetrical sequences and give perspectives for targeting specific sequences used for gene therapy. PMID:19091057

  12. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  13. Polarization-basis tracking scheme for quantum key distribution using revealed sifted key bits.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu-Yang; Chen, Wei; Chen, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Ya-Ping; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2017-03-15

    The calibration of the polarization basis between the transmitter and receiver is an important task in quantum key distribution. A continuously working polarization-basis tracking scheme (PBTS) will effectively promote the efficiency of the system and reduce the potential security risk when switching between the transmission and calibration modes. Here, we proposed a single-photon level continuously working PBTS using only sifted key bits revealed during an error correction procedure, without introducing additional reference light or interrupting the transmission of quantum signals. We applied the scheme to a polarization-encoding BB84 QKD system in a 50 km fiber channel, and obtained an average quantum bit error rate (QBER) of 2.32% and a standard derivation of 0.87% during 24 h of continuous operation. The stable and relatively low QBER validates the effectiveness of the scheme.

  14. Integrative analyses reveal biological pathways and key genes in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Dou, J; Zhang, L; Xie, X; Ye, L; Yang, C; Wen, L; Shen, C; Zhu, C; Zhao, S; Zhu, Z; Liang, B; Wang, Z; Li, H; Fan, X; Liu, S; Yin, X; Zheng, X; Sun, L; Yang, S; Cui, Y; Zhou, F; Zhang, X

    2017-05-25

    Psoriasis is a complex disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors with abnormal gene expression in lesional skin. However, no studies are available on genome-scale gene expression of psoriatic lesions in the Chinese population. In addition, systematic studies on the biological pathways, pathogenicity and interaction networks of psoriasis-related genes with abnormal expression profiles require further investigation. To further explore the associated pathways in psoriasis by functional analysis and to identify the key genes by gene pathogenicity analysis. We performed RNA sequencing on 60 skin biopsy samples from psoriasis patients and healthy controls to identify the primary differentially expressed genes in psoriatic lesional skin. We retrieved all reported psoriasis-associated genes and performed integrative analyses covering gene expression profiling, pathway analysis, gene pathogenicities and protein-protein interaction networks. We found that internal and external stimuli may activate immuno-inflammatory responses to promote the development of psoriasis. Pathways associated with infectious diseases and cancers were identified by functional and pathway analyses. The gene pathogenicity analysis revealed five key genes in psoriasis, including PPARD, GATA3, TIMP3, WNT5A and PTTG1. Our analyses showed that genes contributed to the pathogenesis of psoriasis by activating risk pathways with components abnormality in expression. We identified five potentially pathogenic genes for psoriasis that may serve as important biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. RETROVIRAL INTEGRASE: THEN AND NOW

    PubMed Central

    Andrake, Mark D.; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    The retroviral integrases are virally encoded, specialized recombinases that catalyze the insertion of viral DNA into the host cell’s DNA, a process that is essential for virus propagation. We have learned a great deal since the existence of an integrated form of retroviral DNA (the provirus) was first proposed by Howard Temin in 1964. Initial studies focused on the genetics and biochemistry of avian and murine virus DNA integration, but the pace of discovery increased substantially with advances in technology, and an influx of investigators focused on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We begin with a brief account of the scientific landscape in which some of the earliest discoveries were made, and summarize research that led to our current understanding of the biochemistry of integration. A more detailed account of recent analyses of integrase structure follows, as they have provided valuable insights into enzyme function and raised important new questions. PMID:26958915

  16. Clostridium clariflavum: Key Cellulosome Players Are Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Lior; Morag, Ely; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium clariflavum is an anaerobic, cellulosome-forming thermophile, containing in its genome genes for a large number of cellulosomal enzyme and a complex scaffoldin system. Previously, we described the major cohesin-dockerin interactions of the cellulosome components, and on this basis a model of diverse cellulosome assemblies was derived. In this work, we cultivated C. clariflavum on cellobiose-, microcrystalline cellulose-, and switchgrass-containing media and isolated cell-free cellulosome complexes from each culture. Gel filtration separation of the cellulosome samples revealed two major fractions, which were analyzed by label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in order to identify the key players of the cellulosome assemblies therein. From the 13 scaffoldins present in the C. clariflavum genome, 11 were identified, and a variety of enzymes from different glycoside hydrolase and carbohydrate esterase families were identified, including the glycoside hydrolase families GH48, GH9, GH5, GH30, GH11, and GH10. The expression level of the cellulosomal proteins varied as a function of the carbon source used for cultivation of the bacterium. In addition, the catalytic activity of each cellulosome was examined on different cellulosic substrates, xylan and switchgrass. The cellulosome isolated from the microcrystalline cellulose-containing medium was the most active of all the cellulosomes that were tested. The results suggest that the expression of the cellulosome proteins is regulated by the type of substrate in the growth medium. Moreover, both cell-free and cell-bound cellulosome complexes were produced which together may degrade the substrate in a synergistic manner. These observations are compatible with our previously published model of cellulosome assemblies in this bacterium. PMID:25991683

  17. Pharmacology of HIV Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jessica L; Greener, Benjamin N; Kashuba, Angela DM

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this paper is to review recent and relevant pharmacology data for three HIV integrase inhibitors: raltegravir (marketed), dolutegravir and elvitegravir (both in Phase III drug development). Recent Findings Data from January 2011 to April 2012 were evaluated. These data better characterized integrase inhibitor pharmacokinetics, assessed dosing regimens and investigated previously undescribed drug-drug interactions. Due to formulation challenges, raltegravir inter- and intra-patient pharmacokinetic variability is high. Twice daily 400mg dosing has been shown to be clinically superior to 800mg once daily dosing. A pediatric formulation of raltegravir with less variable pharmacokinetics and greater bioavailability was FDA approved in December 2011. Cobicistat-boosted elvitegravir, and the second generation integrase inhibitor dolutegravir, have lower pharmacokinetic variability and are dosed once daily. Dolutegravir drug interactions are similar to raltegravir, while boosted elvitegravir participates in additional CYP3A mediated interactions. Summary Raltegravir’s potent antiretroviral activity has resulted in widespread use in both treatment naïve and experienced patients. Dolutegravir and cobicistat-boosted elvitegravir have some pharmacokinetic advantages. Pharmacokinetic data in special populations (pregnancy, pediatrics) to optimize dosing are still required. PMID:22789987

  18. In vivo and in vitro characterization of site-specific recombination of actinophage R4 integrase.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takamasa; Hosaka, Yayoi; Yan-Zhuo, Yang; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Asayama, Munehiko; Takahashi, Hideo; Shirai, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The site-specific integrase of actinophage R4 belongs to the serine recombinase family. During the lysogenization process, it catalyzes site-specific recombination between the phage genome and the chromosome of Streptomyces parvulus 2297. An in vivo assay using Escherichia coli cells revealed that the minimum lengths of the recombination sites attB and attP are 50-bp and 49-bp, respectively, for efficient intramolecular recombination. The in vitro assay using overproduced R4 integrases as a hexahistidine (His(6))-glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-R4 integrase fusion protein, showed that the purified protein preparation retains the site-specific recombination activity which catalyzes the site-specific recombination between attP and attB in the intermolecular reaction. It also revealed that the inverted repeat within attP is essential for efficient in vitro intermolecular recombination. In addition, a gel shift assay showed that His(6)-GST-R4 integrase bound to the 50-bp attB and 49-bp attP specifically. Moreover, based on a detailed comparison analysis of amino acid sequences of serine integrases, we found the DNA binding region that is conserved in the serine recombinase containing the large C-terminal domain. Based on the results presented on this report, attachment sites needed in vitro and in vivo for site-specific recombination by the R4 integrase have been defined more precisely. This knowledge is useful for developing new genetic manipulation tools in the future.

  19. Metabolic profiling reveals key metabolic features of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Gareth; Platzer, Alexander; Weikert, Cornelia; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Johannsen, Manfred; Krause, Hans; Jung, Klaus; Miller, Kurt; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Weikert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that metabolic changes play a pivotal role in the biology of cancer and in particular renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, a global metabolite profiling approach was applied to characterize the metabolite pool of RCC and normal renal tissue. Advanced decision tree models were applied to characterize the metabolic signature of RCC and to explore features of metastasized tumours. The findings were validated in a second independent dataset. Vitamin E derivates and metabolites of glucose, fatty acid, and inositol phosphate metabolism determined the metabolic profile of RCC. α-tocopherol, hippuric acid, myoinositol, fructose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate contributed most to the tumour/normal discrimination and all showed pronounced concentration changes in RCC. The identified metabolic profile was characterized by a low recognition error of only 5% for tumour versus normal samples. Data on metastasized tumours suggested a key role for metabolic pathways involving arachidonic acid, free fatty acids, proline, uracil and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results illustrate the potential of mass spectroscopy based metabolomics in conjunction with sophisticated data analysis methods to uncover the metabolic phenotype of cancer. Differentially regulated metabolites, such as vitamin E compounds, hippuric acid and myoinositol, provide leads for the characterization of novel pathways in RCC.

  20. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  1. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  2. Mutations Located outside the Integrase Gene Can Confer Resistance to HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malet, Isabelle; Subra, Frédéric; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Descamps, Diane; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Delelis, Olivier

    2017-09-26

    Resistance to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir is often due to well-identified mutations in the integrase gene. However, the situation is less clear for patients who fail dolutegravir treatment. Furthermore, most in vitro experiments to select resistance to dolutegravir have resulted in few mutations of the integrase gene. We performed an in vitro dolutegravir resistance selection experiment by using a breakthrough method. First, MT4 cells were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Lai. After integration into the host cell genome, cells were washed to remove unbound virus and 500 nM dolutegravir was added to the cell medium. This high concentration of the drug was maintained throughout selection. At day 80, we detected a virus highly resistant to dolutegravir, raltegravir, and elvitegravir that remained susceptible to zidovudine. Sequencing of the virus showed no mutations in the integrase gene but highlighted the emergence of five mutations, all located in the nef region, of which four were clustered in the 3' polypurine tract (PPT). Mutations selected in vitro by dolutegravir, located outside the integrase gene, can confer a high level of resistance to all integrase inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 can use an alternative mechanism to develop resistance to integrase inhibitors by selecting mutations in the 3' PPT region. Further studies are required to determine to what extent these mutations may explain virological failure during integrase inhibitor therapy.IMPORTANCE Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are increasingly used both as first-line drugs and in rescue therapy because of their low toxicity and high efficacy in both treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients. Until now, resistance mutations selected by INSTI exposure have either been described in patients or selected in vitro and involve the integrase gene. Most mutations selected by raltegravir, elvitegravir, or dolutegravir exposure

  3. Simian Virus 40-Based Replication of Catalytically Inactive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase Mutants in Nonpermissive T Cells and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Richard; Nakajima, Noriko; Hofmann, Wolfgang; Benkirane, Monsef; Teh-Jeang, Kuan; Sodroski, Joseph; Engelman, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Integrase function is required for retroviral replication in most instances. Although certain permissive T-cell lines support human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in the absence of functional integrase, most cell lines and primary human cells are nonpermissive for integrase mutant growth. Since unintegrated retroviral DNA is lost from cells following cell division, we investigated whether incorporating a functional origin of DNA replication into integrase mutant HIV-1 might overcome the block to efficient gene expression and replication in nonpermissive T-cell lines and primary cells. Whereas the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) origin (oriP) did little to augment expression from an integrase mutant reporter virus in EBV nuclear antigen 1-expressing cells, simian virus 40 (SV40) oriT dramatically enhanced integrase mutant infectivity in T-antigen (Tag)-expressing cells. Incorporating oriT into the nef position of a full-length, integrase-defective virus strain yielded efficient replication in Tag-expressing nonpermissive Jurkat T cells without reversion to an integration-competent genotype. Adding Tag to integrase mutant-oriT viruses yielded 11.3-kb SV40-HIV chimeras that replicated in Jurkat cells and primary monocyte-derived macrophages. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses of Jurkat cell infections revealed that amplified copies of unintegrated DNA likely contributed to SV40-HIV integrase mutant replication. SV40-based HIV-1 integrase mutant replication in otherwise nonpermissive cells suggests alternative approaches to standard integrase-mediated retroviral gene transfer strategies. PMID:14694097

  4. Allosteric Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kushol; Brady, Troy; Dyer, Benjamin M.; Malani, Nirav; Hwang, Young; Male, Frances; Nolte, Robert T.; Wang, Liping; Velthuisen, Emile; Jeffrey, Jerry; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the presence of antiviral agents results in evolution of drug-resistant variants, motivating the search for additional drug classes. Here we report studies of GSK1264, which was identified as a compound that disrupts the interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and the cellular factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. GSK1264 displayed potent antiviral activity and was found to bind at the site occupied by LEDGF/p75 on IN by x-ray crystallography. Assays of HIV replication in the presence of GSK1264 showed only modest inhibition of the early infection steps and little effect on integration targeting, which is guided by the LEDGF/p75·IN interaction. In contrast, inhibition of late replication steps was more potent. Particle production was normal, but particles showed reduced infectivity. GSK1264 promoted aggregation of IN and preformed LEDGF/p75·IN complexes, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition. LEDGF/p75 was not displaced from IN during aggregation, indicating trapping of LEDGF/p75 in aggregates. Aggregation assays with truncated IN variants revealed that a construct with catalytic and C-terminal domains of IN only formed an open polymer associated with efficient drug-induced aggregation. These data suggest that the allosteric inhibitors of IN are promising antiviral agents and provide new information on their mechanism of action. PMID:24904063

  5. Integrase residues that determine nucleotide preferences at sites of HIV-1 integration: implications for the mechanism of target DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Li, Xiang; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan; Maertens, Goedele N.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses favor target-DNA (tDNA) distortion and particular bases at sites of integration, but the mechanism underlying HIV-1 selectivity is unknown. Crystal structures revealed a network of prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrase residues that distort tDNA: Ala188 and Arg329 interact with tDNA bases, while Arg362 contacts the phosphodiester backbone. HIV-1 integrase residues Ser119, Arg231, and Lys258 were identified here as analogs of PFV integrase residues Ala188, Arg329 and Arg362, respectively. Thirteen integrase mutations were analyzed for effects on integrase activity in vitro and during virus infection, yielding a total of 1610 unique HIV-1 integration sites. Purine (R)/pyrimidine (Y) dinucleotide sequence analysis revealed HIV-1 prefers the tDNA signature (0)RYXRY(4), which accordingly favors overlapping flexible dinucleotides at the center of the integration site. Consistent with roles for Arg231 and Lys258 in sequence specific and non-specific binding, respectively, the R231E mutation altered integration site nucleotide preferences while K258E had no effect. S119A and S119T integrase mutations significantly altered base preferences at positions −3 and 7 from the site of viral DNA joining. The S119A preference moreover mimicked wild-type PFV selectivity at these positions. We conclude that HIV-1 IN residue Ser119 and PFV IN residue Ala188 contact analogous tDNA bases to effect virus integration. PMID:24520116

  6. Different Pathways Leading to Integrase Inhibitors Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Eloïse; Deprez, Eric; Delelis, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), such as raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir, or dolutegravir (DTG), are efficient antiretroviral agents used in HIV treatment in order to inhibit retroviral integration. By contrast to RAL treatments leading to well-identified mutation resistance pathways at the integrase level, recent clinical studies report several cases of patients failing DTG treatment without clearly identified resistance mutation in the integrase gene raising questions for the mechanism behind the resistance. These compounds, by impairing the integration of HIV-1 viral DNA into the host DNA, lead to an accumulation of unintegrated circular viral DNA forms. This viral DNA could be at the origin of the INSTI resistance by two different ways. The first one, sustained by a recent report, involves 2-long terminal repeat circles integration and the second one involves expression of accumulated unintegrated viral DNA leading to a basal production of viral particles maintaining the viral information. PMID:28123383

  7. Preliminary study on the DNA-binding properties of phage ΦC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihui; Fang, Yuxiang; Wang, Rencheng; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Jinzhong

    2011-09-15

    ΦC31 integrase is a member of the large serine subfamily and is required for the recombination of the phage genome into the host chromosome, either to establish or exit from the lysogenic state. This enzyme can also mediate site-specific integration in mammalian cells in a cofactor-independent manner and has been considered as a potentially powerful tool for gene therapy. It has previously been reported that DAXX interacts with ΦC31 integrase and markedly inhibits its integration efficiency, and the 451RFGK454 tetramer of ΦC31 integrase has been identified as the interacting motif. Here, we report that both the deletion of the tetramer or the replacement of Arg with His greatly reduced the recombination activity of the ΦC31 integrase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further demonstrated that the DNA-binding ability and binding specificity of the two mutants were dramatically reduced. Bioinformatic analysis indicated a probable helix-turn-helix-like DNA-binding motif between residues 415-525, a region that contains the tetramer motif. However, neither truncated Int(415-525) nor Int(△415-525) alone could bind to the attB target sequence. Results of a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay indicated that Int(415-525) did not fold correctly into a helix-turn-helix-like structure, which may be one of the reasons for its lack of DNA-binding ability. Thus, the identification and confirmation of four key amino acids in the DNA-binding specificity and recombination activity of ΦC31 integrase provide information about the domain structure and function of the large C-terminal region and suggest important implications for the more efficient use of integrase in gene transfer and gene therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Analysis on bioactivity of HIV-1 integrase by ELISA method].

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei-Hong; Huang, Jian-Song; Zhan, Jin-Biao

    2007-03-01

    To develop an ELISA-based method for analyzing biologic activities of HIV-1 integrase and for high throughput screening of integrase inhibitors. After expression, renaturation and purification of integrase, the bioactivity of integrase and the inhibition of luffin-a were evaluated with an in vitro assay based on biotin-avidin EILSA and chemiluminescent substrates. (1) The specific activity of the purified integrase was 54.92 units/mg of protein. (2)IC(50) (concentration causing 50% inhibition of integrase) of luffin-a was (0.63 +/- 0.026) micromol/L. The non-radioactive assay can be used for analysis of bioactivities and high throughput screening of inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

  9. The Stringent Response Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Dissemination by Regulating Integron Integrase Expression in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Strugeon, Emilie; Tilloy, Valentin; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Class 1 integrons are genetic systems that enable bacteria to capture and express gene cassettes. These integrons, when isolated in clinical contexts, most often carry antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. They play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. The key element of integrons is the integrase, which allows gene cassettes to be acquired and shuffled. Planktonic culture experiments have shown that integrase expression is regulated by the bacterial SOS response. In natural settings, however, bacteria generally live in biofilms, which are characterized by strong antibiotic resilience and by increased expression of stress-related genes. Here, we report that under biofilm conditions, the stringent response, which is induced upon starvation, (i) increases basal integrase and SOS regulon gene expression via induction of the SOS response and (ii) exerts biofilm-specific regulation of the integrase via the Lon protease. This indicates that biofilm environments favor integron-mediated acquisition of antibiotic resistance and other adaptive functions encoded by gene cassettes. PMID:27531906

  10. HIV-1 integrase modulates the interaction of the HIV-1 cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Astiazaran, Paulina; Bueno, Murilo Td; Morales, Elisa; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Garcia-Rivera, Jose A; Llano, Manuel

    2011-04-21

    Chromatin binding plays a central role in the molecular mechanism of LEDGF/p75 in HIV-1 DNA integration. Conflicting results have been reported in regards to the relevance of the LEDGF/p75 chromatin binding element PWWP domain in its HIV-1 cofactor activity. Here we present evidence that re-expression of a LEDGF/p75 mutant lacking the PWWP domain (ΔPWWP) rescued HIV-1 infection in cells verified to express background levels of endogenous LEDGF/p75 that do not support efficient HIV-1 infection. The HIV-1 cofactor activity of LEDGF/p75 ΔPWWP was similar to that of LEDGF/p75 wild type (WT). A possible molecular explanation for the nonessential role of PWWP domain in the HIV-1 cofactor activity of LEDGF/p75 comes from the fact that coexpression of HIV-1 integrase significantly restored the impaired chromatin binding activity of LEDGF/p75 ΔPWWP. However, integrase failed to promote chromatin binding of a non-chromatin bound LEDGF/p75 mutant that lacks both the PWWP domain and the AT hook motifs (ΔPWWP/AT) and that exhibits negligible HIV-1 cofactor activity. The effect of integrase on the chromatin binding of LEDGF/p75 requires the direct interaction of these two proteins. An HIV-1 integrase mutant, unable to interact with LEDGF/p75, failed to enhance chromatin binding, whereas integrase wild type did not increase the chromatin binding strength of a LEDGF/p75 mutant lacking the integrase binding domain (ΔIBD). Our data reveal that the PWWP domain of LEDGF/p75 is not essential for its HIV-1 cofactor activity, possibly due to an integrase-mediated increase of the chromatin binding strength of this LEDGF/p75 mutant.

  11. Crystal Structures of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Picomolar Inhibitors Reveal Key Interactions for Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Kathleen M.; Bollini, Mariela; Mislak, Andrea C.; Cisneros, José A.; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Jorgensen, William L.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures at 2.9 Å resolution are reported for complexes of catechol diethers 1 and 2 with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The results help elucidate the structural origins of the extreme antiviral activity of the compounds. The possibility of halogen bonding between the inhibitors and Pro95 is addressed. Structural analysis reveals key interactions with conserved residues P95 and W229 of importance for design of inhibitors with high potency and favorable resistance profiles. PMID:23163887

  12. Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Lead to Premature Degradation of the Viral RNA Genome and Integrase in Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Madison, Michaela K; Lawson, Dana Q; Elliott, Jennifer; Ozantürk, Ayşe Naz; Koneru, Pratibha C; Townsend, Dana; Errando, Manel; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Kutluay, Sebla B

    2017-09-01

    Recent evidence indicates that inhibition of HIV-1 integrase (IN) binding to the viral RNA genome by allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) or through mutations within IN yields aberrant particles in which the viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs) are eccentrically localized outside the capsid lattice. These particles are noninfectious and are blocked at an early reverse transcription stage in target cells. However, the basis of this reverse transcription defect is unknown. Here, we show that the viral RNA genome and IN from ALLINI-treated virions are prematurely degraded in target cells, whereas reverse transcriptase remains active and stably associated with the capsid lattice. The aberrantly shaped cores in ALLINI-treated particles can efficiently saturate and be degraded by a restricting TRIM5 protein, indicating that they are still composed of capsid proteins arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Notably, the fates of viral core components follow a similar pattern in cells infected with eccentric particles generated by mutations within IN that inhibit its binding to the viral RNA genome. We propose that IN-RNA interactions allow packaging of both the viral RNA genome and IN within the protective capsid lattice to ensure subsequent reverse transcription and productive infection in target cells. Conversely, disruption of these interactions by ALLINIs or mutations in IN leads to premature degradation of both the viral RNA genome and IN, as well as the spatial separation of reverse transcriptase from the viral genome during early steps of infection.IMPORTANCE Recent evidence indicates that HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays a key role during particle maturation by binding to the viral RNA genome. Inhibition of IN-RNA interactions yields aberrant particles with the viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs) eccentrically localized outside the conical capsid lattice. Although these particles contain all of the components necessary for reverse transcription, they are blocked

  13. Discovery of 2-Pyridinone Aminals: A Prodrug Strategy to Advance a Second Generation of HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Izzat T; Walji, Abbas M; Klein, Daniel; Sanders, John M; Powell, David A; Abeywickrema, Pravien; Barbe, Guillaume; Bennet, Amrith; Childers, Karla; Christensen, Melodie; Clas, Sophie Dorothee; Dubost, David; Embrey, Mark; Grobler, Jay; Hafey, Michael J; Hartingh, Timothy J; Hazuda, Daria J; Kuethe, Jeffrey T; McCabe Dunn, Jamie; Miller, Michael D; Moore, Keith P; Nolting, Andrew; Pajkovic, Natasa; Patel, Sangita; Peng, Zuihui; Rada, Vanessa; Rearden, Paul; Schreier, John D; Sisko, John; Steele, Thomas G; Truchon, Jean-François; Wai, John; Xu, Min; Coleman, Paul J

    2015-10-22

    The search for new molecular constructs that resemble the critical two-metal binding pharmacophore required for HIV integrase strand transfer inhibition represents a vibrant area of research within drug discovery. Here we present the discovery of a new class of HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitors based on the 2-pyridinone core of MK-0536. These efforts led to the identification of two lead compounds with excellent antiviral activity and preclinical pharmacokinetic profiles to support a once-daily human dose prediction. Dose escalating PK studies in dog revealed significant issues with limited oral absorption and required an innovative prodrug strategy to enhance the high-dose plasma exposures of the parent molecules.

  14. Valuing snorkeling visits to the Florida Keys with stated and revealed preference models.

    PubMed

    Park, Timothy; Bowker, J M; Leeworthy, Vernon R

    2002-07-01

    Coastal coral reefs, especially in the Florida Keys, are declining at a disturbing rate. Marine ecologists and reef scientists have emphasized the importance of establishing nonmarket values of coral reefs to assess the cost effectiveness of coral reef management and remediation programs. The purpose of this paper is to develop a travel cost-contingent valuation model of demand for trips to the Florida Keys focusing on willingness to pay (WTP) to preserve the current water quality and health of the coral reefs. The stated and revealed preference models allow the marginal valuation of recreationists to adjust depending on current and planned trip commitments in valuing nonmarginal policy changes in recreational opportunities. The integrated model incorporates key factors for establishing baseline amenity values for tourist dive sites, including perceptions of reef quality and dive conditions, the role of substitute sites, and the quality and availability of tourist facilities and recreation opportunities. The travel cost and WTP model differ in identifying critical variables and provide insight into the adjustment of trip decisions across alternative destination sites and the valuation of trips. In contrast to the travel cost model, a measure of the availability of substitute sites and total recreation activities does not have a significant impact on WTP valuations reported by snorkelers. Snorkelers engage in a relatively focused set of activities, suggesting that these recreationists may not shift expenditures to other sites or other recreation activities in the Florida Keys when confronted with increased access costs for the snorkeling experience.

  15. Comparison of Newly Assembled Full Length HIV-1 Integrase With Prototype Foamy Virus Integrase: Structure-Function Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug design against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase through its mechanistic study is of great interest in the area in biological research. The main obstacle in this area is the absence of the full-length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase to be used as a model. A complete structure, similar to HIV-1 of a prototype foamy virus integrase in complex with DNA, including all conservative residues, is available and has been extensively used in recent investigations. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether the above model is precisely representative of HIV-1 integrase. This would critically determine the success of any designed drug using the model in deactivation of integrase and AIDS treatment. Materials and Methods Primarily, a new structure for HIV-1 was constructed, using a crystal structure of prototype foamy virus as the starting structure. The constructed structure of HIV-1 integrase was simultaneously simulated with a prototype foamy virus integrase on a separate occasion. Results Our results indicate that the HIV-1 system behaves differently from the prototype foamy virus in terms of folding, hydration, hydrophobicity of binding site and stability. Conclusions Based on our findings, we can conclude that HIV-1 integrase is vastly different from the prototype foamy virus integrase and does not resemble it, and the modeling output of the prototype foamy virus simulations could not be simply generalized to HIV-1 integrase. Therefore, our HIV-1 model seems to be more representative and more useful for future research. PMID:27540450

  16. Detection of drug resistance-associated mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase derived from drug-naive individuals in Surabaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kotaki, Tomohiro; Khairunisa, Siti Qamariyah; Sukartiningrum, Septhia Dwi; Witaningrum, Adiana Mutamsari; Rusli, Musofa; Diansyah, M Noor; Arfijanto, M Vitanata; Rahayu, Retno Pudji; Nasronudin; Kameoka, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes serious health problems in Indonesia, information in regard to drug resistance is limited. We performed a genotypic study on HIV-1 integrase derived from drug-naive individuals in Surabaya, Indonesia. Sequencing analysis revealed that no primary mutations associated with drug resistance to integrase inhibitors were detected; however, secondary mutations, V72I, L74I/M, V165I, V201I, I203M, and S230N, were detected in more than 5% of samples. In addition, V201I was conserved among all samples. Most integrase genes were classified into CRF01_AE genes. Interestingly, 40% of the CRF01_AE genes had an unusual insertion in the C-terminus of integrase. These mutations and insertions were considered natural polymorphisms since these mutations coincided with previous reports, and integrase inhibitors have not been used in Indonesia. Our results indicated that further studies may be required to assess the impact of these mutations on integrase inhibitors prior to their introduction into Indonesia.

  17. Evolved Streptavidin Mutants Reveal Key Role of Loop Residue in High-affinity Binding

    SciTech Connect

    M Magalhaes; C Melo Czekster; R Guan; V Malashkevich; S Almo; M Levy

    2011-12-31

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing contact which keeps this loop open and accessible in the absence of ligand. When this mutation was introduced into the wild-type protein, destabilization of the opened loop conferred a {approx}10-fold decrease in both the on-rate and off-rate for the ligand biotin-4-fluoroscein. A similar effect was observed when this mutation was added to a monomeric form of this protein. Our results provide key insight into the role of the streptavidin flexible loop in ligand binding and maintaining high affinity interactions.

  18. Novel Key Metabolites Reveal Further Branching of the Roquefortine/Meleagrin Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Marco I.; Ali, Hazrat; Lankhorst, Peter P.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Vreeken, Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic profiling and structural elucidation of novel secondary metabolites obtained from derived deletion strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum were used to reassign various previously ascribed synthetase genes of the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway to their corresponding products. Next to the structural characterization of roquefortine F and neoxaline, which are for the first time reported for P. chrysogenum, we identified the novel metabolite roquefortine L, including its degradation products, harboring remarkable chemical structures. Their biosynthesis is discussed, questioning the exclusive role of glandicoline A as key intermediate in the pathway. The results reveal that further enzymes of this pathway are rather unspecific and catalyze more than one reaction, leading to excessive branching in the pathway with meleagrin and neoxaline as end products of two branches. PMID:24225953

  19. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of Central European mitochondrial genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Adler, Christina J.; Roth, Christina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Karimnia, Sarah; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Meller, Harald; Ganslmeier, Robert; Friederich, Susanne; Dresely, Veit; Nicklisch, Nicole; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Sirocko, Frank; Reich, David; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.

    2014-01-01

    The processes which shaped modern European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation remain unclear. The initial peopling by Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers ~42kyrs ago and the immigration of Neolithic farmers into Europe ~8kyrs ago appear to have played important roles, but do not explain present-day mtDNA diversity. We generated mtDNA profiles of 364 individuals from prehistoric cultures in Central Europe to perform a chronological study, spanning the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age (5,500–1,550 cal BC). We use this transect through time to identify four marked shifts in genetic composition during the Neolithic period, revealing a key role for Late Neolithic cultures in shaping modern Central European genetic diversity. PMID:24115443

  20. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of central European mitochondrial genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Adler, Christina J; Roth, Christina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Karimnia, Sarah; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Meller, Harald; Ganslmeier, Robert; Friederich, Susanne; Dresely, Veit; Nicklisch, Nicole; Pickrell, Joseph K; Sirocko, Frank; Reich, David; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W

    2013-10-11

    The processes that shaped modern European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation remain unclear. The initial peopling by Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers ~42,000 years ago and the immigration of Neolithic farmers into Europe ~8000 years ago appear to have played important roles but do not explain present-day mtDNA diversity. We generated mtDNA profiles of 364 individuals from prehistoric cultures in Central Europe to perform a chronological study, spanning the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age (5500 to 1550 calibrated years before the common era). We used this transect through time to identify four marked shifts in genetic composition during the Neolithic period, revealing a key role for Late Neolithic cultures in shaping modern Central European genetic diversity.

  1. Novel key metabolites reveal further branching of the roquefortine/meleagrin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ries, Marco I; Ali, Hazrat; Lankhorst, Peter P; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M; Vreeken, Rob J

    2013-12-27

    Metabolic profiling and structural elucidation of novel secondary metabolites obtained from derived deletion strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum were used to reassign various previously ascribed synthetase genes of the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway to their corresponding products. Next to the structural characterization of roquefortine F and neoxaline, which are for the first time reported for P. chrysogenum, we identified the novel metabolite roquefortine L, including its degradation products, harboring remarkable chemical structures. Their biosynthesis is discussed, questioning the exclusive role of glandicoline A as key intermediate in the pathway. The results reveal that further enzymes of this pathway are rather unspecific and catalyze more than one reaction, leading to excessive branching in the pathway with meleagrin and neoxaline as end products of two branches.

  2. Systematic Prioritization and Integrative Analysis of Copy Number Variations in Schizophrenia Reveal Key Schizophrenia Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  3. Systematic prioritization and integrative analysis of copy number variations in schizophrenia reveal key schizophrenia susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  4. Quantitative proteomics reveals that peroxidases play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mudassar Nawaz; Sakata, Katsumi; Hiraga, Susumu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-12-05

    Soybean is an important legume crop that exhibits markedly reduced growth and yields under flooding conditions. To unravel the mechanisms involved in recovery after flooding in soybean root, gel-free proteomic analysis was performed. Morphological analysis revealed that growth suppression was more severe with increased flooding duration. Out of a total of 1645 and 1707 identified proteins, 73 and 21 proteins were changed significantly during the recovery stage following 2 and 4 days flooding, respectively. Based on the proteomic, clustering, and in silico protein-protein interaction analyses, six key enzymes were analyzed at the mRNA level. Lipoxygenase 1, which was increased at the protein level during the recovery period, was steadily down-regulated at the mRNA level. The peroxidase superfamily protein continuously increased in abundance during the course of recovery and was up-regulated at the mRNA level. HAD acid phosphatase was decreased at the protein level and down-regulated at the transcript level, while isoflavone reductase and an unknown protein were increased at both the protein and mRNA levels. Consistent with these findings, the enzymatic activity of peroxidase was decreased under flooding stress but increased significantly during the recovery sage. These results suggest that peroxidases might play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots through the scavenging of toxic radicals.

  5. Discovery and analysis of inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency integrase.

    PubMed

    Hazuda, D; Felock, P J; Hastings, J C; Pramanik, B; Wolfe, A L

    1997-05-01

    An essential step in the replication of retroviruses is the integration of a DNA copy of the viral genome into the genome of the host cell. Integration encompasses a series of ordered endonucleolytic and DNA strand transfer reactions catalyzed by the viral enzyme, integrase. The requirement for integrase activity in the propagation of HIV-1 in cell culture defines the enzyme as a potential target for chemotherapeutic intervention. We have therefore developed a non-radioisotopic microtiter plate assay which can be used to identify novel inhibitors of integrase from random chemical screens and for the bioassay driven isolation of inhibitors from natural products. This assay uncouples various steps in the reaction pathway and therefore can be exploited to characterize inhibitors. In this monograph we describe a series of modifications to the method which facilitate such mechanistic studies using as an example a series of previously described integrase inhibitors.

  6. Genetic and Ultrastructural Analysis Reveals the Key Players and Initial Steps of Bacterial Magnetosome Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kolinko, Isabel; Uebe, René; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria contain well-ordered nanocrystals for magnetic navigation and have recently emerged as the most sophisticated model system to study the formation of membrane bounded organelles in prokaryotes. Magnetosome biosynthesis is thought to begin with the formation of a dedicated compartment, the magnetosome membrane (MM), in which the biosynthesis of a magnetic mineral is strictly controlled. While the biomineralization of magnetosomes and their subsequent assembly into linear chains recently have become increasingly well studied, the molecular mechanisms and early stages involved in MM formation remained poorly understood. In the Alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, approximately 30 genes were found to control magnetosome biosynthesis. By cryo-electron tomography of several key mutant strains we identified the gene complement controlling MM formation in this model organism. Whereas the putative magnetosomal iron transporter MamB was most crucial for the process and caused the most severe MM phenotype upon elimination, MamM, MamQ and MamL were also required for the formation of wild-type-like MMs. A subset of seven genes (mamLQBIEMO) combined within a synthetic operon was sufficient to restore the formation of intracellular membranes in the absence of other genes from the key mamAB operon. Tracking of de novo magnetosome membrane formation by genetic induction revealed that magnetosomes originate from unspecific cytoplasmic membrane locations before alignment into coherent chains. Our results indicate that no single factor alone is essential for MM formation, which instead is orchestrated by the cumulative action of several magnetosome proteins. PMID:27286560

  7. Multi-Omics Reveals that Lead Exposure Disturbs Gut Microbiome Development, Key Metabolites, and Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Chi, Liang; Mahbub, Ridwan; Bian, Xiaoming; Tu, Pengcheng; Ru, Hongyu; Lu, Kun

    2017-03-16

    Lead exposure remains a global public health issue, and the recent Flint water crisis has renewed public concern about lead toxicity. The toxicity of lead has been well established in a variety of systems and organs. The gut microbiome has been shown to be highly involved in many critical physiological processes, including food digestion, immune system development, and metabolic homeostasis. However, despite the key role of the gut microbiome in human health, the functional impact of lead exposure on the gut microbiome has not been studied. The aim of this study is to define gut microbiome toxicity induced by lead exposure in C57BL/6 mice using multiomics approaches, including 16S rRNA sequencing, whole genome metagenomics sequencing, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics. 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that lead exposure altered the gut microbiome trajectory and phylogenetic diversity. Metagenomics sequencing and metabolomics profiling showed that numerous metabolic pathways, including vitamin E, bile acids, nitrogen metabolism, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and the defense/detoxification mechanism, were significantly disturbed by lead exposure. These perturbed molecules and pathways may have important implications for lead toxicity in the host. Taken together, these results demonstrated that lead exposure not only altered the gut microbiome community structures/diversity but also greatly affected metabolic functions, leading to gut microbiome toxicity.

  8. Many-objective optimization and visual analytics reveal key trade-offs for London's water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Evgenii S.; Huskova, Ivana; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.; Harou, Julien J.; Lambert, Chris; Reed, Patrick M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we link a water resource management simulator to multi-objective search to reveal the key trade-offs inherent in planning a real-world water resource system. We consider new supplies and demand management (conservation) options while seeking to elucidate the trade-offs between the best portfolios of schemes to satisfy projected water demands. Alternative system designs are evaluated using performance measures that minimize capital and operating costs and energy use while maximizing resilience, engineering and environmental metrics, subject to supply reliability constraints. Our analysis shows many-objective evolutionary optimization coupled with state-of-the art visual analytics can help planners discover more diverse water supply system designs and better understand their inherent trade-offs. The approach is used to explore future water supply options for the Thames water resource system (including London's water supply). New supply options include a new reservoir, water transfers, artificial recharge, wastewater reuse and brackish groundwater desalination. Demand management options include leakage reduction, compulsory metering and seasonal tariffs. The Thames system's Pareto approximate portfolios cluster into distinct groups of water supply options; for example implementing a pipe refurbishment program leads to higher capital costs but greater reliability. This study highlights that traditional least-cost reliability constrained design of water supply systems masks asset combinations whose benefits only become apparent when more planning objectives are considered.

  9. A pangenomic analysis of the Nannochloropsis organellar genomes reveals novel genetic variations in key metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae in the genus Nannochloropsis are photosynthetic marine Eustigmatophytes of significant interest to the bioenergy and aquaculture sectors due to their ability to efficiently accumulate biomass and lipids for utilization in renewable transportation fuels, aquaculture feed, and other useful bioproducts. To better understand the genetic complement that drives the metabolic processes of these organisms, we present the assembly and comparative pangenomic analysis of the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes from Nannochloropsis salina CCMP1776. Results The chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of N. salina are 98.4% and 97% identical to their counterparts in Nannochloropsis gaditana. Comparison of the Nannochloropsis pangenome to other algae within and outside of the same phyla revealed regions of significant genetic divergence in key genes that encode proteins needed for regulation of branched chain amino synthesis (acetohydroxyacid synthase), carbon fixation (RuBisCO activase), energy conservation (ATP synthase), protein synthesis and homeostasis (Clp protease, ribosome). Conclusions Many organellar gene modifications in Nannochloropsis are unique and deviate from conserved orthologs found across the tree of life. Implementation of secondary and tertiary structure prediction was crucial to functionally characterize many proteins and therefore should be implemented in automated annotation pipelines. The exceptional similarity of the N. salina and N. gaditana organellar genomes suggests that N. gaditana be reclassified as a strain of N. salina. PMID:24646409

  10. Uneven Genetic Robustness of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Hughes, Joseph; Wilson, Sam J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic robustness (tolerance of mutation) may be a naturally selected property in some viruses, because it should enhance adaptability. Robustness should be especially beneficial to viruses like HIV-1 that exhibit high mutation rates and exist in immunologically hostile environments. Surprisingly, however, the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) exhibits extreme fragility. To determine whether fragility is a general property of HIV-1 proteins, we created a large library of random, single-amino-acid mutants in HIV-1 integrase (IN), covering >40% of amino acid positions. Despite similar degrees of sequence variation in naturally occurring IN and CA sequences, we found that HIV-1 IN was significantly more robust than CA, with random nonsilent IN mutations only half as likely to cause lethal defects. Interestingly, IN and CA were similar in that a subset of mutations with high in vitro fitness were rare in natural populations. IN mutations of this type were more likely to occur in the buried interior of the modeled HIV-1 intasome, suggesting that even very subtle fitness effects suppress variation in natural HIV-1 populations. Lethal mutations, in particular those that perturbed particle production, proteolytic processing, and particle-associated IN levels, were strikingly localized at specific IN subunit interfaces. This observation strongly suggests that binding interactions between particular IN subunits regulate proteolysis during HIV-1 virion morphogenesis. Overall, use of the IN mutant library in conjunction with structural models demonstrates the overall robustness of IN and highlights particular regions of vulnerability that may be targeted in therapeutic interventions. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 integrase (IN) protein is responsible for the integration of the viral genome into the host cell chromosome. To measure the capacity of IN to maintain function in the face of mutation, and to probe structure/function relationships, we created a library of random single

  11. Proteome analysis of pear reveals key genes associated with fruit development and quality.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia Ming; Huang, Xiao San; Li, Lie Ting; Zheng, Dan Man; Xue, Cheng; Zhang, Shao Ling; Wu, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Comparative and association analyses of the proteome and transcriptome for pear fruit development were conducted for the first time in this study. Pear fruit development involves complex physiological and biochemical processes, but there is still little knowledge available at proteomic and transcriptomic levels, which would be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of fruit development and quality in pear. In our study, three important stages, including early development (S4-22), middle development (S6-27), and near ripening (S8-30), were investigated in 'Dangshansuli' by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology, identifying a total of 1,810 proteins during pear fruit development. The association analysis of proteins and transcript expression revealed 1,724, 1,722, and 1,718 associated proteins identified in stages S4-22, S6-27, and S8-30, respectively. A total of 237, 318, and 425 unique proteins were identified as differentially expressed during S4-22 vs S6-27, S6-27 vs S8-30, S4-22 vs S8-30, respectively, and the corresponding correlation coefficients of the overall differentially expressed proteins and transcripts data were 0.6336, 0.4113, and 0.7049. The phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway, which is related to lignin formation of pear fruit, was identified as a significantly enriched pathway during early stages of fruit development. Finally, a total of 35 important differentially expressed proteins related to fruit quality were identified, including three proteins related to sugar formation, seven proteins related to aroma synthesis, and sixteen proteins related to the formation of lignin. In addition, qRT-PCR verification provided further evidence to support differentially expressed gene selection. This study is the first to reveal protein and associated mRNA variations in pear during fruit development and quality conformation, and identify key genes and proteins helpful for future functional genomics

  12. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-15

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time — with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24–72 h). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress was measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 was experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation. - Highlights: • Low dose ionizing radiation altered homeostasis in 3D skin tissue model. • Global gene/protein/metabolite data integrated using complementary statistical approaches • Time and location-specific change in matrix regulation

  13. Gene expression profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer reveals key genes and pathways associated with chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Luo, S C

    2016-01-22

    The aim of this study is to analyze gene expression data to identify key genes and pathways associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to improve clinical treatment strategies. The gene expression data set was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included 12 chemotherapy-resistant EOC samples and 16 chemotherapy-sensitive EOC samples. A differential analysis was performed to screen out differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A functional enrichment analysis was conducted for the DEGs using the database for annotation, visualization, and integration discovery. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed with information from the human protein reference database. Pathway-pathway interactions were determined with a test based on the hypergeometric distribution. A total of 1564 DEGs were identified in chemotherapy-sensitive EOC, including 654 upregulated genes and 910 downregulated genes. The top three upregulated genes were HIST1H3G, AKT3, and RTN3, while the top three downregulated genes were NBLA00301, TRIM62, and EPHA5. A Gene Ontology enrichment analysis showed that cell adhesion, biological adhesion, and intracellular signaling cascades were significantly enriched in the DEGs. A KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the calcium, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and B cell receptor signaling pathways were significantly over-represented in the DEGs. A PPI network containing 101 interactions was acquired. The top three hub genes were RAC1, CAV1, and BCL2. Five modules were identified from the PPI network. Taken together, these findings could advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying intrinsic chemotherapy resistance in EOC.

  14. Data Integration Reveals Key Homeostatic Mechanisms Following Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time - with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24 – 72 hr). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress were measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 were experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation.

  15. Probing chelation motifs in HIV integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpita; DeSoto, Jamie; Fullagar, Jessica L.; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Rostami, Shahrzad; Richman, Douglas D.; Pommier, Yves; Cohen, Seth M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of HIV integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors were synthesized to evaluate the role of the metal-binding group (MBG) in this class of metalloenzyme inhibitors. A total of 21 different raltegravir-chelator derivative (RCD) compounds were prepared that differed only in the nature of the MBG. These IN strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) were evaluated in vitro in cell-free enzyme activity assays, and the in vitro results were further validated in cell culture experiments. All of the active compounds showed selective inhibition of the strand-transfer reaction over 3′-processing, suggesting a common mode of action with raltegravir. The results of the in vitro activity suggest that the nature of the MBG donor atoms, the overall MBG structure, and the specific arrangement of the MBG donor atom triad are essential for obtaining maximal HIV-1 IN inhibition. At least two compounds (RCD-4, RCD-5) containing a hydroxypyrone MBG were found to display superior strand-transfer inhibition when compared to an abbreviated analogue of raltegravir (RCD-1). By isolating and examining the role of the MBG in a series of INSTIs, we have identified a scaffold (hydroxypyrones) that may provide access to a unique class of HIV-1 IN inhibitors, and may help overcome rising raltegravir resistance. PMID:22308350

  16. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tyleckova, Jirina; Valekova, Ivona; Zizkova, Martina; Rakocyova, Michaela; Marsala, Silvia; Marsala, Martin; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-30

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived committed neural precursors are an important source of cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases including spinal cord injury. There remains an urgency to identify markers for monitoring of neural progenitor specificity, estimation of neural fate and follow-up correlation with therapeutic effect in preclinical studies using animal disease models. Cell surface capture technology was used to uncover the cell surface exposed N-glycoproteome of neural precursor cells upon neuronal differentiation as well as post-mitotic mature hNT neurons. The data presented depict an extensive study of surfaceome during neuronal differentiation, confirming glycosylation at a particular predicted site of many of the identified proteins. Quantitative changes detected in cell surface protein levels reveal a set of proteins that highlight the complexity of the neuronal differentiation process. Several of these proteins including the cell adhesion molecules ICAM1, CHL1, and astrotactin1 as well as LAMP1 were validated by SRM. Combination of immunofluorescence staining of ICAM1 and flow cytometry indicated a possible direction for future scrutiny of such proteins as targets for enrichment of the neuronal subpopulation from mixed cultures after differentiation of neural precursor cells. These surface proteins hold an important key for development of safe strategies in cell-replacement therapies of neuronal disorders. Neural stem and/or precursor cells have a great potential for cell-replacement therapies of neuronal diseases. Availability of well characterised and expandable neural cell lineage specific populations is critical for addressing such a challenge. In our study we identified and relatively quantified several hundred surface N-glycoproteins in the course of neuronal differentiation. We further confirmed the abundant changes for several cell adhesion proteins by SRM and outlined a strategy for utilisation of such N-glycoproteins in antibody based cell

  17. Styrylquinolines, Integrase Inhibitors Acting Prior to Integration: a New Mechanism of Action for Anti-Integrase Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bonnenfant, Sabine; Thomas, Claire Marie; Vita, Claudio; Subra, Frédéric; Deprez, Eric; Zouhiri, Fatima; Desmaële, Didier; d'Angelo, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean François; Leh, Hervé

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that styrylquinolines (SQLs) are integrase inhibitors in vitro. They compete with the long terminal repeat substrate for integrase. Here, we describe the cellular mode of action of these molecules. We show that SQLs do not interfere with virus entry. In fact, concentrations of up to 20 times the 50% inhibitory concentration did not inhibit cell-to-cell fusion or affect the interaction between GP120 and CD4 in vitro. Moreover, the pseudotype of the retrovirus envelope did not affect drug activity. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR experiments showed that SQLs do not inhibit the entry of the genomic RNA. In contrast, the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells with SQLs reduced the amount of the late cDNA, suggesting for the first time that integrase targeting molecules may affect the accumulation of DNA during reverse transcription. The cellular target of SQLs was confirmed by the appearance of mutations in the integrase gene when viruses were grown in the presence of increasing concentrations of SQLs. Finally, these mutations led to SQL-resistant viruses when introduced into the wild-type sequence. In contrast, SQLs were fully active against reverse transcriptase inhibitor- and diketo acid-resistant viruses, positioning SQLs as a second group of anti-integrase compounds. PMID:15140970

  18. Valuing snorkeling visits to the Florida Keys with stated and revealed preference models

    Treesearch

    Timothy Park; J. Michael Bowker; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    2002-01-01

    Coastal coral reefs, especially in the Florida Keys, are declining at a disturbing rate. Marine ecologists and reef scientists have emphasized the importance of establishing nonmarket values of coral reefs to assess the cost effectiveness of coral reef management and remediation programs. The purpose of this paper is to develop a travel cost--contingent valuation model...

  19. The role of lysine 186 in HIV-1 integrase multimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoux, Lionel; Sebastian, Sarah; Muesing, Mark A.; Luban, Jeremy . E-mail: luban@irb.unisi.ch

    2007-07-20

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes biochemical reactions required for viral cDNA insertion into host cell chromosomal DNA, an essential step in the HIV-1 replication cycle. In one of these reactions, the two ends of the linear viral cDNA are believed to be simultaneously ligated to chromosomal DNA by a tetrameric form of IN. The structure of the full-length IN tetramer is not known but a model consisting of the N-terminal domain and the catalytic core revealed basic residues 186 to 188 at the interface between the two IN dimers. We found that alteration of these residues, in particular changing IN lysine residue 186 to glutamate (K186Q), impairs IN oligomerization in the yeast two-hybrid system and decreases oligomeric forms of IN within virions. When expressed independently of other viral proteins in human cells, IN-K186Q did not concentrate in the nucleus as did wild-type IN. Co-expression of wild-type IN restored the multimerization defects of IN-K186Q, in both the two-hybrid system and in virions, and also rescued the nuclear targeting defects. Virions bearing IN-K186Q were not infectious in a single cycle of replication but when mixed virions containing two different IN mutants were produced, IN-K186Q was capable of complementing the catalytically inactive mutant IN-D116A. Our biochemical and functional data support the crystallographic model in which IN residue K186 lies at the interface between IN dimers and suggest that tetramerization is important, not only for concerted integration, but also for IN nuclear targeting.

  20. Metabolomic analysis reveals that carnitines are key regulatory metabolites in phase transition of the locusts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Wu, Zeming; Wang, Xianhui; Yang, Pengcheng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang; Kang, Le

    2012-02-28

    Phenotypic plasticity occurs prevalently and plays a vital role in adaptive evolution. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the expression of alternate phenotypes remain unknown. Here, a density-dependent phase polyphenism of Locusta migratoria was used as the study model to identify key signaling molecules regulating the expression of phenotypic plasticity. Metabolomic analysis, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showed that solitarious and gregarious locusts have distinct metabolic profiles in hemolymph. A total of 319 metabolites, many of which are involved in lipid metabolism, differed significantly in concentration between the phases. In addition, the time course of changes in the metabolic profiles of locust hemolymph that accompany phase transition was analyzed. Carnitine and its acyl derivatives, which are involved in the lipid β-oxidation process, were identified as key differential metabolites that display robust correlation with the time courses of phase transition. RNAi silencing of two key enzymes from the carnitine system, carnitine acetyltransferase and palmitoyltransferase, resulted in a behavioral transition from the gregarious to solitarious phase and the corresponding changes of metabolic profiles. In contrast, the injection of exogenous acetylcarnitine promoted the acquisition of gregarious behavior in solitarious locusts. These results suggest that carnitines mediate locust phase transition possibly through modulating lipid metabolism and influencing the nervous system of the locusts.

  1. Multiobjective triclustering of time-series transcriptome data reveals key genes of biological processes.

    PubMed

    Bhar, Anirban; Haubrock, Martin; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban; Wingender, Edgar

    2015-06-26

    Exploratory analysis of multi-dimensional high-throughput datasets, such as microarray gene expression time series, may be instrumental in understanding the genetic programs underlying numerous biological processes. In such datasets, variations in the gene expression profiles are usually observed across replicates and time points. Thus mining the temporal expression patterns in such multi-dimensional datasets may not only provide insights into the key biological processes governing organs to grow and develop but also facilitate the understanding of the underlying complex gene regulatory circuits. In this work we have developed an evolutionary multi-objective optimization for our previously introduced triclustering algorithm δ-TRIMAX. Its aim is to make optimal use of δ-TRIMAX in extracting groups of co-expressed genes from time series gene expression data, or from any 3D gene expression dataset, by adding the powerful capabilities of an evolutionary algorithm to retrieve overlapping triclusters. We have compared the performance of our newly developed algorithm, EMOA- δ-TRIMAX, with that of other existing triclustering approaches using four artificial dataset and three real-life datasets. Moreover, we have analyzed the results of our algorithm on one of these real-life datasets monitoring the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into mature cardiomyocytes. For each group of co-expressed genes belonging to one tricluster, we identified key genes by computing their membership values within the tricluster. It turned out that to a very high percentage, these key genes were significantly enriched in Gene Ontology categories or KEGG pathways that fitted very well to the biological context of cardiomyocytes differentiation. EMOA- δ-TRIMAX has proven instrumental in identifying groups of genes in transcriptomic data sets that represent the functional categories constituting the biological process under study. The executable file can be found

  2. [Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) play crucial roles in the life cycle of HIV-1, which are also key targets in the area of anti-HIV drug research. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the most employed drugs used to treat AIDS patients and HIV-infected people, while one of the integrase inhibitors has already been approved by US FDA to appear on the market. Great achievement has been made in the research on both, separately. Recently, much more attention of medicinal chemistry researchers has been attracted to the strategies of multi-target drugs. Compounds with excellent potency against both HIV RT and IN, evidently defined as dual inhibitors targeting both enzymes, have been obtained through considerable significant exploration, which can be classified into two categories according to different strategies. Combinatorial chemistry approach together with high throughput screening methods and multi-target-based virtual screening strategy have been useful tools for identifying selective anti-HIV compounds for long times; Rational drug design based on pharmacophore combination has also led to remarkable results. In this paper, latest progress of both categories in the discovery and structural modification will be covered, with a view to contribute to the career of anti-HIV research.

  3. Systems analysis of eleven rodent disease models reveals an inflammatome signature and key drivers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ming; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Xia; Zhu, Jun; Stepaniants, Serguei; Zhang, Chunsheng; Meng, Qingying; Peters, Mette; He, Yudong; Ni, Chester; Slipetz, Deborah; Crackower, Michael A; Houshyar, Hani; Tan, Christopher M; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; O'Neill, Gary; Jane Luo, Mingjuan; Thieringer, Rolf; Yuan, Jeffrey; Chiu, Chi-Sung; Yee Lum, Pek; Lamb, John; Boie, Yves; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Schadt, Eric E; Dai, Hongyue; Roberts, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Common inflammatome gene signatures as well as disease-specific signatures were identified by analyzing 12 expression profiling data sets derived from 9 different tissues isolated from 11 rodent inflammatory disease models. The inflammatome signature significantly overlaps with known drug targets and co-expressed gene modules linked to metabolic disorders and cancer. A large proportion of genes in this signature are tightly connected in tissue-specific Bayesian networks (BNs) built from multiple independent mouse and human cohorts. Both the inflammatome signature and the corresponding consensus BNs are highly enriched for immune response-related genes supported as causal for adiposity, adipokine, diabetes, aortic lesion, bone, muscle, and cholesterol traits, suggesting the causal nature of the inflammatome for a variety of diseases. Integration of this inflammatome signature with the BNs uncovered 151 key drivers that appeared to be more biologically important than the non-drivers in terms of their impact on disease phenotypes. The identification of this inflammatome signature, its network architecture, and key drivers not only highlights the shared etiology but also pinpoints potential targets for intervention of various common diseases. PMID:22806142

  4. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Key Proteins and Phosphoproteins upon Seed Germination of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kun; Zhen, Shoumin; Cheng, Zhiwei; Cao, Hui; Ge, Pei; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the oldest cultivated crops and the second most important food crop in the world. Seed germination is the key developmental process in plant growth and development, and poor germination directly affects plant growth and subsequent grain yield. In this study, we performed the first dynamic proteome analysis of wheat seed germination using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomic approach. A total of 166 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 73 unique proteins were identified, which are mainly involved in storage, stress/defense/detoxification, carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell metabolism, and transcription/translation/transposition. The identified DEPs and their dynamic expression profiles generally correspond to three distinct seed germination phases after imbibition: storage degradation, physiological processes/morphogenesis, and photosynthesis. Some key DEPs involved in storage substance degradation and plant defense mechanisms, such as globulin 3, sucrose synthase type I, serpin, beta-amylase, and plastid ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) small subunit, were found to be phosphorylated during seed germination. Particularly, the phosphorylation site Ser355 was found to be located in the enzyme active region of beta-amylase, which promotes substrate binding. Phosphorylated modification of several proteins could promote storage substance degradation and environmental stress defense during seed germination. The central metabolic pathways involved in wheat seed germination are proposed herein, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cereal seed germination. PMID:26635843

  5. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Key Proteins and Phosphoproteins upon Seed Germination of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Dong, Kun; Zhen, Shoumin; Cheng, Zhiwei; Cao, Hui; Ge, Pei; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the oldest cultivated crops and the second most important food crop in the world. Seed germination is the key developmental process in plant growth and development, and poor germination directly affects plant growth and subsequent grain yield. In this study, we performed the first dynamic proteome analysis of wheat seed germination using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomic approach. A total of 166 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 73 unique proteins were identified, which are mainly involved in storage, stress/defense/detoxification, carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell metabolism, and transcription/translation/transposition. The identified DEPs and their dynamic expression profiles generally correspond to three distinct seed germination phases after imbibition: storage degradation, physiological processes/morphogenesis, and photosynthesis. Some key DEPs involved in storage substance degradation and plant defense mechanisms, such as globulin 3, sucrose synthase type I, serpin, beta-amylase, and plastid ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) small subunit, were found to be phosphorylated during seed germination. Particularly, the phosphorylation site Ser(355) was found to be located in the enzyme active region of beta-amylase, which promotes substrate binding. Phosphorylated modification of several proteins could promote storage substance degradation and environmental stress defense during seed germination. The central metabolic pathways involved in wheat seed germination are proposed herein, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cereal seed germination.

  6. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry by the inhibitor.

  7. Metaproteomic Analysis of a Chemosynthetic Hydrothermal Vent Community Reveals Insights into Key-Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, I.; Stokke, R.; Lanzen, A.; Pedersen, R.; Øvreås, L.; Urich, T.

    2010-12-01

    In 2005 researchers at the Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, Norway, discovered two active vent fields at the southwestern Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. The fields harbours both low-temperature iron deposits and high-temperature white smoker vents. Distinct microbial mats were abundantly present and located in close vicinity to the hydrothermal vent sites. Characteristics of the mat environment were steep physical and chemical gradients with temperatures ranging from 10°C in the top layer to 90°C at 10 cm bsf and high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methane. The work presented here focus on the In situ community activities, and is part of an integrated strategy combining metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics to in-depth characterise these newly discovered hydrothermal vent communities. Extracted proteins were separated via SDS-PAGE. Peptides extracted after In-gel tryptic digest was injected into an Ultimate 3000 nanoLC system connected to a linear quadropole ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap XL) mass spectrometer equipped with a nanoelectrospray ion source. A custom database of open reading frames (ORFs) from the combined metatranscriptome and metagenome datasets was implemented and searched against using Mascot 2.2; the IRMa tool box [1] was used in peptide validation. Validated ORFs were subjected to a Blastp search against Refseq with an E-value cut-off of 0.001. A total of 1097 proteins with ≥ 2 peptides were identified of which 921 gave a hit against Refseq, containing 519 unique proteins. Key enzymes of the sulfur oxidation pathway (sox) were found, which were taxonomically affiliated to Epsilonproteobacteria. In addition, this group actively expressed hydrogenases and membrane proteins involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chains. Enzymes of dissimilatory sulfate-reduction (APS-reductase, AprAB and DsrA2) were found with closest hit to members of the Deltaproteobacteria. These findings indicate an

  8. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menggen; Liu, Lewis Z

    2010-06-10

    Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Enriched background of transcription abundance and enhanced expressions of ethanol-tolerance genes

  9. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis reveals key genes involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Giulietti, Matteo; Occhipinti, Giulia; Principato, Giovanni; Piva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy. Up till now, the patient's prognosis remains poor which, among others, is due to the paucity of reliable early diagnostic biomarkers. In the past, candidate diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets have been delineated from genes that were found to be differentially expressed in normal versus tumour samples. Recently, new systems biology approaches have been developed to analyse gene expression data, which may yield new biomarkers. As of yet, the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) tool has not been applied to PDAC microarray-based gene expression data. PDAC microarray-based gene expression datasets, listed in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, were analysed. After pre-processing of the data, we built two final datasets, Normal and PDAC, encompassing 104 and 129 patient samples, respectively. Next, we constructed a weighted gene co-expression network and identified modules of co-expressed genes distinguishing normal from disease conditions. Functional annotations of the genes in these modules were carried out to highlight PDAC-associated molecular pathways and common regulatory mechanisms. Finally, overall survival analyses were carried out to assess the suitability of the genes identified as prognostic biomarkers. Using WGCNA, we identified several key genes that may play important roles in PDAC. These genes are mainly related to either endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrion or membrane functions, exhibit transferase or hydrolase activities and are involved in biological processes such as lipid metabolism or transmembrane transport. As a validation of the applied method, we found that some of the identified key genes (CEACAM1, MCU, VDAC1, CYCS, C15ORF52, TMEM51, LARP1 and ERLIN2) have previously been reported by others as potential PDAC biomarkers. Using overall survival analyses, we found that several of the newly identified genes may serve as biomarkers to

  10. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. Results A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Conclusion Enriched background of transcription abundance and enhanced expressions of

  11. Expanding the diversity of oenococcal bacteriophages: insights into a novel group based on the integrase sequence.

    PubMed

    Jaomanjaka, Fety; Ballestra, Patricia; Dols-lafargue, Marguerite; Le Marrec, Claire

    2013-09-02

    Temperate bacteriophages are a contributor of the genetic diversity in the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni. We used a classification scheme for oenococcal prophages based on integrase gene polymorphism, to analyze a collection of Oenococcus strains mostly isolated in the area of Bordeaux, which represented the major lineages identified through MLST schemes in the species. Genome sequences of oenococcal prophages were clustered into four integrase groups (A to D) which were related to the chromosomal integration site. The prevalence of each group was determined and we could show that members of the intB- and intC-prophage groups were rare in our panel of strains. Our study focused on the so far uncharacterized members of the intD-group. Various intD viruses could be easily isolated from wine samples, while intD lysogens could be induced to produce phages active against two permissive O. oeni isolates. These data support the role of this prophage group in the biology of O. oeni. Global alignment of three relevant intD-prophages revealed significant conservation and highlighted a number of unique ORFs that may contribute to phage and lysogen fitness. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel family of integrases associated with prophages and genomic islands integrated within the tRNA-dihydrouridine synthase A (dusA) gene

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Daniel N.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic islands play a key role in prokaryotic genome plasticity. Genomic islands integrate into chromosomal loci such as transfer RNA genes and protein coding genes, whilst retaining various cargo genes that potentially bestow novel functions on the host organism. A gene encoding a putative integrase was identified at a single site within the 5′ end of the dusA gene in the genomes of over 200 bacteria. This integrase was discovered to be a component of numerous genomic islands, which appear to share a target site within the dusA gene. dusA encodes the tRNA-dihydrouridine synthase A enzyme, which catalyses the post-transcriptional reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine in tRNA. Genomic islands encoding homologous dusA-associated integrases were found at a much lower frequency within the related dusB and dusC genes, and non-dus genes. Excision of these dusA-associated islands from the chromosome as circularized intermediates was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Analysis of the dusA-associated islands indicated that they were highly diverse, with the integrase gene representing the only universal common feature. PMID:25883135

  13. Comparative human and rat neurospheres reveal species differences in chemical effects on neurodevelopmental key events.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Jenny; Gassmann, Kathrin; Masjosthusmann, Stefan; DeBoer, Denise; Bendt, Farina; Giersiefer, Susanne; Fritsche, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The developing brain is highly vulnerable to the adverse effects of chemicals, resulting in neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. Currently, animal experiments in the rat are the gold standard for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing; however, these guideline studies are insufficient in terms of animal use, time and costs and bear the issue of species extrapolation. Therefore, the necessity for alternative methods that predict DNT of chemicals faster, cheaper and with a high predictivity for humans is internationally agreed on. In this respect, we developed an in vitro model for DNT key event screening, which is based on primary human and rat neural progenitor cells grown as neurospheres. They are able to mimic basic processes of early fetal brain development and enable an investigation of species differences between humans and rodents in corresponding cellular models. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent human and rat neurospheres were able to correctly predict the DNT potential of a well-characterized training set of nine chemicals by investigating effects on progenitor cell proliferation, migration and neuronal differentiation in parallel to cell viability, and to compare these chemical responses between human and rat neurospheres. We demonstrate that (1) by correlating these human and rat in vitro results to existing in vivo data, human and rat neurospheres classified most compounds correctly and thus may serve as a valuable component of a modular DNT testing strategy and (2) human and rat neurospheres differed in their sensitivity to most chemicals, reflecting toxicodynamic species differences of chemicals.

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Key Genes Related to Betalain Biosynthesis in Pulp Coloration of Hylocereus polyrhizus.

    PubMed

    Qingzhu, Hua; Chengjie, Chen; Zhe, Chen; Pengkun, Chen; Yuewen, Ma; Jingyu, Wu; Jian, Zheng; Guibing, Hu; Jietang, Zhao; Yonghua, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Betalains have high nutritional value and bioactivities. Red pulp pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only fruit containing abundant betalains for consumer. However, no information is available about genes involved in betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus. Herein, two cDNA libraries of pitaya pulps with two different coloration stages (white and red pulp stages) of Guanhuahong (H. polyrhizus) were constructed. A total of about 12 Gb raw RNA-Seq data was generated and was de novo assembled into 122,677 transcripts with an average length of 1183 bp and an N50 value of 2008. Approximately 99.99% of all transcripts were annotated based on seven public databases. A total of 8871 transcripts were significantly regulated. Thirty-three candidate transcripts related to betalain biosynthesis were obtained from the transcriptome data. Transcripts encoding enzymes involved in betalain biosynthesis were analyzed using RT-qPCR at the whole pulp coloration stages of H. polyrhizus (7-1) and H. undatus (132-4). Nine key transcripts of betalain biosynthesis were identified. They were assigned to four kinds of genes in betalain biosynthetic pathway, including tyrosinase, 4, 5-DOPA dioxygenase extradiol, cytochrome P450 and glucosyltransferase. Ultimately, a preliminary betalain biosynthetic pathway for pitaya was proposed based on betalain analyses, gene expression profiles and published documents.

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Key Genes Related to Betalain Biosynthesis in Pulp Coloration of Hylocereus polyrhizus

    PubMed Central

    Qingzhu, Hua; Chengjie, Chen; Zhe, Chen; Pengkun, Chen; Yuewen, Ma; Jingyu, Wu; Jian, Zheng; Guibing, Hu; Jietang, Zhao; Yonghua, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Betalains have high nutritional value and bioactivities. Red pulp pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only fruit containing abundant betalains for consumer. However, no information is available about genes involved in betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus. Herein, two cDNA libraries of pitaya pulps with two different coloration stages (white and red pulp stages) of Guanhuahong (H. polyrhizus) were constructed. A total of about 12 Gb raw RNA-Seq data was generated and was de novo assembled into 122,677 transcripts with an average length of 1183 bp and an N50 value of 2008. Approximately 99.99% of all transcripts were annotated based on seven public databases. A total of 8871 transcripts were significantly regulated. Thirty-three candidate transcripts related to betalain biosynthesis were obtained from the transcriptome data. Transcripts encoding enzymes involved in betalain biosynthesis were analyzed using RT-qPCR at the whole pulp coloration stages of H. polyrhizus (7-1) and H. undatus (132-4). Nine key transcripts of betalain biosynthesis were identified. They were assigned to four kinds of genes in betalain biosynthetic pathway, including tyrosinase, 4, 5-DOPA dioxygenase extradiol, cytochrome P450 and glucosyltransferase. Ultimately, a preliminary betalain biosynthetic pathway for pitaya was proposed based on betalain analyses, gene expression profiles and published documents. PMID:26779215

  16. Proteomic analysis reveals heat shock protein 70 has a key role in polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    JAK-STAT signaling through the JAK2V617F mutation is central to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). However, other events could precede the JAK2 mutation. The aim of this study is to analyze the phenotypic divergence between polycytemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocytemia (ET) to find novel therapeutics targets by a proteomic and functional approach to identify alternative routes to JAK2 activation. Through 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry of granulocyte protein from 20 MPN samples, showed differential expression of HSP70 in PV and ET besides other 60 proteins. Immunohistochemistry of 46 MPN bone marrow samples confirmed HSP70 expression. The median of positive granulocytes was 80% in PV (SD 35%) vs. 23% in ET (SD 34.25%). In an ex vivo model KNK437 was used as an inhibition model assay of HSP70, showed dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and burst formation unit erythroid (BFU-E) in PV and ET, increased apoptosis in the erythroid lineage, and decreased pJAK2 signaling, as well as a specific siRNA for HSP70. These data suggest a key role for HSP70 in proliferation and survival of the erythroid lineage in PV, and may represent a potential therapeutic target in MPN, especially in PV. PMID:24252366

  17. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Witman, George B.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F.; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Spalding, Martin H.; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T.; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Ferris, Patrick; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A.; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V.; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M.; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C.; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M. Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M.; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T.; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y. Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the ∼120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  18. Development of a Fluorinated Class-I HDAC Radiotracer Reveals Key Chemical Determinants of Brain Penetrance.

    PubMed

    Strebl, Martin G; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A; Placzek, Michael S; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Neelamegam, Ramesh; Hooker, Jacob M

    2016-05-18

    Despite major efforts, our knowledge about many brain diseases remains remarkably limited. Epigenetic dysregulation has been one of the few leads toward identifying the causes and potential treatments of psychiatric disease over the past decade. A new positron emission tomography radiotracer, [(11)C]Martinostat, has enabled the study of histone deacetylase in living human subjects. A unique property of [(11)C]Martinostat is its profound brain penetrance, a feature that is challenging to engineer intentionally. In order to understand determining factors for the high brain-uptake of Martinostat, a series of compounds was evaluated in rodents and nonhuman primates. The study revealed the major structural contributors to brain uptake, as well as a more clinically relevant fluorinated HDAC radiotracer with comparable behavior to Martinostat, yet longer half-life.

  19. Structure of the CRISPR Interference Complex CSM Reveals Key Similarities with Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Rouillon, Christophe; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Jing; Politis, Argyris; Beilsten-Edmands, Victoria; Cannone, Giuseppe; Graham, Shirley; Robinson, Carol V.; Spagnolo, Laura; White, Malcolm F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) system is an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. Interference complexes encoded by CRISPR-associated (cas) genes utilize small RNAs for homology-directed detection and subsequent degradation of invading genetic elements, and they have been classified into three main types (I–III). Type III complexes share the Cas10 subunit but are subclassifed as type IIIA (CSM) and type IIIB (CMR), depending on their specificity for DNA or RNA targets, respectively. The role of CSM in limiting the spread of conjugative plasmids in Staphylococcus epidermidis was first described in 2008. Here, we report a detailed investigation of the composition and structure of the CSM complex from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, using a combination of electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and deep sequencing. This reveals a three-dimensional model for the CSM complex that includes a helical component strikingly reminiscent of the backbone structure of the type I (Cascade) family. PMID:24119402

  20. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  1. Genomes of cryptic chimpanzee Plasmodium species reveal key evolutionary events leading to human malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Plenderleith, Lindsey J.; Liu, Weimin; Loy, Dorothy E.; Learn, Gerald H.; Li, Yingying; Shaw, Katharina S.; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Speede, Sheri; Shaw, George M.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Brisson, Dustin; Rayner, Julian C.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2016-01-01

    African apes harbour at least six Plasmodium species of the subgenus Laverania, one of which gave rise to human Plasmodium falciparum. Here we use a selective amplification strategy to sequence the genome of chimpanzee parasites classified as Plasmodium reichenowi and Plasmodium gaboni based on the subgenomic fragments. Genome-wide analyses show that these parasites indeed represent distinct species, with no evidence of cross-species mating. Both P. reichenowi and P. gaboni are 10-fold more diverse than P. falciparum, indicating a very recent origin of the human parasite. We also find a remarkable Laverania-specific expansion of a multigene family involved in erythrocyte remodelling, and show that a short region on chromosome 4, which encodes two essential invasion genes, was horizontally transferred into a recent P. falciparum ancestor. Our results validate the selective amplification strategy for characterizing cryptic pathogen species, and reveal evolutionary events that likely predisposed the precursor of P. falciparum to colonize humans. PMID:27002652

  2. Genomes of cryptic chimpanzee Plasmodium species reveal key evolutionary events leading to human malaria.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Sesh A; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Liu, Weimin; Loy, Dorothy E; Learn, Gerald H; Li, Yingying; Shaw, Katharina S; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Speede, Sheri; Shaw, George M; Bushman, Frederic D; Brisson, Dustin; Rayner, Julian C; Sharp, Paul M; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2016-03-22

    African apes harbour at least six Plasmodium species of the subgenus Laverania, one of which gave rise to human Plasmodium falciparum. Here we use a selective amplification strategy to sequence the genome of chimpanzee parasites classified as Plasmodium reichenowi and Plasmodium gaboni based on the subgenomic fragments. Genome-wide analyses show that these parasites indeed represent distinct species, with no evidence of cross-species mating. Both P. reichenowi and P. gaboni are 10-fold more diverse than P. falciparum, indicating a very recent origin of the human parasite. We also find a remarkable Laverania-specific expansion of a multigene family involved in erythrocyte remodelling, and show that a short region on chromosome 4, which encodes two essential invasion genes, was horizontally transferred into a recent P. falciparum ancestor. Our results validate the selective amplification strategy for characterizing cryptic pathogen species, and reveal evolutionary events that likely predisposed the precursor of P. falciparum to colonize humans.

  3. Microarray analysis reveals key genes and pathways in Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    He, Yue-E; Qiu, Hui-Xian; Jiang, Jian-Bing; Wu, Rong-Zhou; Xiang, Ru-Lian; Zhang, Yuan-Hai

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify key genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) using bioinformatics methods. The GSE26125 microarray dataset, which includes cardiovascular tissue samples derived from 16 children with TOF and five healthy age‑matched control infants, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differential expression analysis was performed between TOF and control samples to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using Student's t‑test, and the R/limma package, with a log2 fold‑change of >2 and a false discovery rate of <0.01 set as thresholds. The biological functions of DEGs were analyzed using the ToppGene database. The ReactomeFIViz application was used to construct functional interaction (FI) networks, and the genes in each module were subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. The iRegulon plugin was used to identify transcription factors predicted to regulate the DEGs in the FI network, and the gene‑transcription factor pairs were then visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 878 DEGs were identified, including 848 upregulated genes and 30 downregulated genes. The gene FI network contained seven function modules, which were all comprised of upregulated genes. Genes enriched in Module 1 were enriched in the following three neurological disorder‑associated signaling pathways: Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Genes in Modules 0, 3 and 5 were dominantly enriched in pathways associated with ribosomes and protein translation. The Xbox binding protein 1 transcription factor was demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of genes encoding the subunits of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomes, as well as genes involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, dysfunction of genes involved in signaling pathways associated with neurodegenerative disorders, ribosome function and protein translation may contribute to the pathogenesis

  4. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  5. Low-Temperature Biodiesel Research Reveals Potential Key to Successful Blend Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now, issues with cold weather performance have prevented biodiesel blends from being widely adopted. Some biodiesel blends have exhibited unexplained low-temperature performance problems even at blend levels as low as 2% by volume. The most common low-temperature performance issue is vehicle stalling caused by fuel filter clogging, which prevents fuel from reaching the engine. Research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reveals the properties responsible for these problems, clearing a path for the development of solutions and expanded use of energy-conserving and low-emissions alternative fuel. NREL researchers set out to study the unpredictable nature of biodiesel crystallization, the condition that impedes the flow of fuel in cold weather. Their research revealed for the first time that saturated monoglyceride impurities common to the biodiesel manufacturing process create crystals that can cause fuel filter clogging and other problems when cooling at slow rates. Biodiesel low-temperature operational problems are commonly referred to as 'precipitates above the cloud point (CP).' NREL's Advanced Biofuels team spiked distilled soy and animal fat-derived B100, as well as B20, B10, and B5 biodiesel blends with three saturated monoglycerides (SMGs) at concentration levels comparable to those of real-world fuels. Above a threshold or eutectic concentration, the SMGs (monomyristin, monopalmitin, and monostearin) were shown to significantly raise the biodiesel CP, and had an even greater impact on the final melting temperature. Researchers discovered that upon cooling, monoglyceride initially precipitates as a metastable crystal, but it transforms over time or upon slight heating into a more stable crystal with a much lower solubility and

  6. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  7. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance. PMID:26582089

  8. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks' robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  9. A study revealing the key aroma compounds of steamed bread made by Chinese traditional sourdough*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-hua; Wu, Tao; Sadiq, Faizan A.; Yang, Huan-yi; Liu, Tong-jie; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing

    2016-01-01

    Aroma of Chinese steamed bread (CSB) is one of the important parameters that determines the overall quality attributes and consumer acceptance. However, the aroma profile of CSB still remains poorly understood, mainly because of relying on only a single method for aroma extraction in previous studies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the volatile aroma compounds of five different samples of CSB using three different aroma extraction methods, namely solid-phase microextraction (SPME), simultaneous distillation–extraction (SDE), and purge and trap (P&T). All samples showed a unique aroma profile, which could be attributed to their unique microbial consortia. (E)-2-Nonenal and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal were the most prevalent aromatic compounds revealed by SDE, which have not been reported previously, while ethanol and acetic acid proved to be the most dominant compounds by both SPME and P&T. Our approach of combining three different aroma extraction methods provided better insights into the aroma profile of CSB, which had remained largely unknown in previous studies. PMID:27704748

  10. A study revealing the key aroma compounds of steamed bread made by Chinese traditional sourdough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Hua; Wu, Tao; Sadiq, Faizan A; Yang, Huan-Yi; Liu, Tong-Jie; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-Qing

    Aroma of Chinese steamed bread (CSB) is one of the important parameters that determines the overall quality attributes and consumer acceptance. However, the aroma profile of CSB still remains poorly understood, mainly because of relying on only a single method for aroma extraction in previous studies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the volatile aroma compounds of five different samples of CSB using three different aroma extraction methods, namely solid-phase microextraction (SPME), simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE), and purge and trap (P&T). All samples showed a unique aroma profile, which could be attributed to their unique microbial consortia. (E)-2-Nonenal and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal were the most prevalent aromatic compounds revealed by SDE, which have not been reported previously, while ethanol and acetic acid proved to be the most dominant compounds by both SPME and P&T. Our approach of combining three different aroma extraction methods provided better insights into the aroma profile of CSB, which had remained largely unknown in previous studies.

  11. Automatic generation of predictive dynamic models reveals nuclear phosphorylation as the key Msn2 control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sunnåker, Mikael; Zamora-Sillero, Elias; Dechant, Reinhard; Ludwig, Christina; Busetto, Alberto Giovanni; Wagner, Andreas; Stelling, Joerg

    2013-05-28

    Predictive dynamical models are critical for the analysis of complex biological systems. However, methods to systematically develop and discriminate among systems biology models are still lacking. We describe a computational method that incorporates all hypothetical mechanisms about the architecture of a biological system into a single model and automatically generates a set of simpler models compatible with observational data. As a proof of principle, we analyzed the dynamic control of the transcription factor Msn2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, specifically the short-term mechanisms mediating the cells' recovery after release from starvation stress. Our method determined that 12 of 192 possible models were compatible with available Msn2 localization data. Iterations between model predictions and rationally designed phosphoproteomics and imaging experiments identified a single-circuit topology with a relative probability of 99% among the 192 models. Model analysis revealed that the coupling of dynamic phenomena in Msn2 phosphorylation and transport could lead to efficient stress response signaling by establishing a rate-of-change sensor. Similar principles could apply to mammalian stress response pathways. Systematic construction of dynamic models may yield detailed insight into nonobvious molecular mechanisms.

  12. Novel personalized pathway-based metabolomics models reveal key metabolic pathways for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijia; Chong, Nicole; Lewis, Nathan E; Jia, Wei; Xie, Guoxiang; Garmire, Lana X

    2016-03-31

    More accurate diagnostic methods are pressingly needed to diagnose breast cancer, the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. Blood-based metabolomics is a promising diagnostic method for breast cancer. However, many metabolic biomarkers are difficult to replicate among studies. We propose that higher-order functional representation of metabolomics data, such as pathway-based metabolomic features, can be used as robust biomarkers for breast cancer. Towards this, we have developed a new computational method that uses personalized pathway dysregulation scores for disease diagnosis. We applied this method to predict breast cancer occurrence, in combination with correlation feature selection (CFS) and classification methods. The resulting all-stage and early-stage diagnosis models are highly accurate in two sets of testing blood samples, with average AUCs (Area Under the Curve, a receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.968 and 0.934, sensitivities of 0.946 and 0.954, and specificities of 0.934 and 0.918. These two metabolomics-based pathway models are further validated by RNA-Seq-based TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) breast cancer data, with AUCs of 0.995 and 0.993. Moreover, important metabolic pathways, such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and the alanine, aspartate, and glutamate pathway, are revealed as critical biological pathways for early diagnosis of breast cancer. We have successfully developed a new type of pathway-based model to study metabolomics data for disease diagnosis. Applying this method to blood-based breast cancer metabolomics data, we have discovered crucial metabolic pathway signatures for breast cancer diagnosis, especially early diagnosis. Further, this modeling approach may be generalized to other omics data types for disease diagnosis.

  13. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  14. Long-term monitoring reveals carbon–nitrogen metabolism key to microcystin production in eutrophic lakes

    PubMed Central

    Beversdorf, Lucas J.; Miller, Todd R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental drivers contributing to cyanobacterial dominance in aquatic systems have been extensively studied. However, understanding of toxic vs. non-toxic cyanobacterial population dynamics and the mechanisms regulating cyanotoxin production remain elusive, both physiologically and ecologically. One reason is the disconnect between laboratory and field-based studies. Here, we combined 3 years of temporal data, including microcystin (MC) concentrations, 16 years of long-term ecological research, and 10 years of molecular data to investigate the potential factors leading to the selection of toxic Microcystis and MC production. Our analysis revealed that nitrogen (N) speciation and inorganic carbon (C) availability might be important drivers of Microcystis population dynamics and that an imbalance in cellular C: N ratios may trigger MC production. More specifically, precipitous declines in ammonium concentrations lead to a transitional period of N stress, even in the presence of high nitrate concentrations, that we call the “toxic phase.” Following the toxic phase, temperature and cyanobacterial abundance remained elevated but MC concentrations drastically declined. Increases in ammonium due to lake turnover may have led to down regulation of MC synthesis or a shift in the community from toxic to non-toxic species. While total phosphorus (P) to total N ratios were relatively low over the time-series, MC concentrations were highest when total N to total P ratios were also highest. Similarly, high C: N ratios were also strongly correlated to the toxic phase. We propose a metabolic model that corroborates molecular studies and reflects our ecological observations that C and N metabolism may regulate MC production physiologically and ecologically. In particular, we hypothesize that an imbalance between 2-oxoglutarate and ammonium in the cell regulates MC synthesis in the environment. PMID:26029192

  15. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongbin; Wang, Qilei; Zhang, Long; Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize.

  16. From complex to simple: myogenesis in an aplacophoran mollusk reveals key traits in aculiferan evolution.

    PubMed

    Scherholz, Maik; Redl, Emanuel; Wollesen, Tim; Todt, Christiane; Wanninger, Andreas

    2015-09-18

    Recent studies suggest a bifurcation at the base of Mollusca, resulting in the primarily single-shelled Conchifera (Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Scaphopoda, Monoplacophora, Cephalopoda) and the spicule-bearing Aculifera (Polyplacophora, Neomeniomorpha, Chaetodermomorpha). A recent study revealed a complex larval musculature exclusively shared by Neomeniomorpha and Polyplacophora, supporting a close relationship of both taxa. However, the ontogenetic transition from the complex larval to the simple adult neomeniomorph musculature, which mainly consists of a three-layered body-wall musculature and serially iterated dorsoventral muscles, remains unknown. To close this gap in knowledge, we studied remodeling of the larval musculature during metamorphosis in the neomeniomorph Wirenia argentea. A comparative analysis with a novel data set of a polyplacophoran, Leptochiton asellus, allows us to infer the morphology of the last common ancestor of Aculifera and the evolution of its subclades therefrom. The complex larval musculature of Wirenia argentea persists through metamorphosis and becomes modified to form two of the three muscle layers of the adult body wall. The innermost longitudinal layer of the three-layered body wall musculature is generated by transformation and expansion of distinct larval longitudinal muscle bundles. The larval ventrolateral muscle strands are remodeled and eventually become the most ventral part of the adult longitudinal layer of the body wall musculature. The paired larval enrolling muscle forms the lateral parts and the former rectus muscle is destined to become the most dorsal part of the longitudinal layer of the body wall musculature. The transient ventromedian muscle is lost during postmetamorphic development. Postmetamorphic remodeling in W. argentea supports the hypothesis of a complex myoanatomy rather than a three-layered body wall musculature at the base of Aculifera, and thus argues against homology of the body wall musculature of adult

  17. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  18. Synthesis and HIV-1 integrase inhibition activity of some N-arylindoles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Liu, Wu-Qing; Fan, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yang; Yang, Liu-Meng; Lv, Lei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2008-05-01

    Eight simple N-arylindoles were designed, synthesized and evaluated as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase inhibitors in vitro for the first time. Among these compounds, 3b, 3e and 3g demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 integrase activity. Especially 3b showed the highest anti-HIV-1 integrase activity with EC50 value of 7.88 microg/ml and TI value of 24.61. Meantime, some structure-activity relationships were also observed and will provide a new lead for design and discovery of more potent N-arylindoles as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  19. Inhibition of the integrase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 by anti-HIV plant proteins MAP30 and GAP31.

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Huang, S; Huang, P L; Huang, P L; Bourinbaiar, A S; Chen, H C; Kung, H F

    1995-01-01

    MAP30 (Momordica anti-HIV protein of 30 kDa) and GAP31 (Gelonium anti-HIV protein of 31 kDa) are anti-HIV plant proteins that we have identified, purified, and cloned from the medicinal plants Momordica charantia and Gelonium multiflorum. These antiviral agents are capable of inhibiting infection of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) in T lymphocytes and monocytes as well as replication of the virus in already-infected cells. They are not toxic to normal uninfected cells because they are unable to enter healthy cells. MAP30 and GAP31 also possess an N-glycosidase activity on 28S ribosomal RNA and a topological activity on plasmid and viral DNAs including HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTRs). LTRs are essential sites for integration of viral DNA into the host genome by viral integrase. We therefore investigated the effect of MAP30 and GAP31 on HIV-1 integrase. We report that both of these antiviral agents exhibit dose-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 integrase. Inhibition was observed in all of the three specific reactions catalyzed by the integrase, namely, 3' processing (specific cleavage of the dinucleotide GT from the viral substrate), strand transfer (integration), and "disintegration" (the reversal of strand transfer). Inhibition was studied by using oligonucleotide substrates with sequences corresponding to the U3 and U5 regions of HIV LTR. In the presence of 20 ng of viral substrate, 50 ng of target substrate, and 4 microM integrase, total inhibition was achieved at equimolar concentrations of the integrase and the antiviral proteins, with EC50 values of about 1 microM. Integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome is a vital step in the replicative cycle of retroviruses, including the AIDS virus. The inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by MAP30 and GAP31 suggests that impediment of viral DNA integration may play a key role in the anti-HIV activity of these plant proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568024

  20. Developing a dynamic pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Carlson, H A; Masukawa, K M; Rubins, K; Bushman, F D; Jorgensen, W L; Lins, R D; Briggs, J M; McCammon, J A

    2000-06-01

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of "dynamic" pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a "static" pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  1. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Heather A.; Masukawa, Keven M.; Rubins, Kathleen; Bushman, Frederic; Jorgensen, William L.; Lins, Roberto; Briggs, James; Mccammon, Andy

    2000-05-11

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  2. HIV‑1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    On the cover: Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry by the inhibitor. Cover design by Joseph Myer

  3. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  4. Development of a phenotypic susceptibility assay for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heger, Eva; Theis, Alexandra Andrée; Remmel, Klaus; Walter, Hauke; Pironti, Alejandro; Knops, Elena; Di Cristanziano, Veronica; Jensen, Björn; Esser, Stefan; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine

    2016-12-01

    Phenotypic resistance analysis is an indispensable method for determination of HIV-1 resistance and cross-resistance to novel drug compounds. Since integrase inhibitors are essential components of recent antiretroviral combination therapies, phenotypic resistance data, in conjunction with the corresponding genotypes, are needed for improving rules-based and data-driven tools for resistance prediction, such as HIV-Grade and geno2pheno[integrase]. For generation of phenotypic resistance data to recent integrase inhibitors, a recombinant phenotypic integrase susceptibility assay was established. For validation purposes, the phenotypic resistance to raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir of nine subtype-B virus strains, isolated from integrase inhibitor-naïve and raltegravir-treated patients was determined. Genotypic resistance analysis identified four virus strains harbouring RAL resistance-associated mutations. Phenotypic resistance analysis was performed as follows. The HIV-1 integrase genes were cloned into a modified pNL4-3 vector and transfected into 293T cells for the generation of recombinant virus. The integrase-inhibitor susceptibility of the recombinant viruses was determined via an indicator cell line. While raltegravir resistance profiles presented a high cross-resistance to elvitegravir, dolutegravir maintained in-vitro activity in spite of the Y143R and N155H mutations, confirming the strong activity of dolutegravir against raltegravir-resistant viruses. Solely a Q148H+G140S variant presented reduced susceptibility to dolutegravir. In conclusion, our phenotypic susceptibility assay permits resistance analysis of the integrase gene of patient-derived viruses for integrase inhibitors by replication-competent recombinants. Thus, this assay can be used to analyze phenotypic drug resistance of integrase inhibitors in vitro. It provides the possibility to determine the impact of newly appearing mutational patterns to drug resistance of recent integrase

  5. Host Protein Ku70 Binds and Protects HIV-1 Integrase from Proteasomal Degradation and Is Required for HIV Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingfeng; Ao, Zhujun; Wang, Binchen; Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Yao, Xiaojian

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a key viral enzymatic protein acting in several viral replication steps, including integration. IN has been shown to be an unstable protein degraded by the N-end rule pathway through the host ubiquitin-proteasome machinery. However, it is still not fully understood how this viral protein is protected from the host ubiquitin-proteasome system within cells during HIV replication. In the present study, we provide evidence that the host protein Ku70 interacts with HIV-1 IN and protects it from the Lys48-linked polyubiquitination proteasomal pathway. Moreover, Ku70 is able to down-regulate the overall protein polyubiquitination level within the host cells and to specifically deubiquitinate IN through their interaction. Mutagenic studies revealed that the C terminus of IN (residues 230–288) is required for IN binding to the N-terminal part of Ku70 (Ku70(1–430)), and their interaction is independent of Ku70/80 heterodimerization. Finally, knockdown of Ku70 expression in both virus-producing and target CD4+ T cells significantly disrupted HIV-1 replication and rendered two-long terminal repeat circles and integration undetectable, indicating that Ku70 is required for both the early and the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Interestingly, Ku70 was incorporated into the progeny virus in an IN-dependent way. We proposed that Ku70 may interact with IN during viral assembly and accompany HIV-1 IN upon entry into the new target cells, acting to 1) protect IN from the host defense system and 2) assist IN integration activity. Overall, this report provides another example of how HIV-1 hijacks host cellular machinery to protect the virus itself and to facilitate its replication. PMID:21454661

  6. Pedigree-based analysis of derivation of genome segments of an elite rice reveals key regions during its breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Degui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Zechuan; Chen, Haodong; Wang, Chongrong; Li, Hong; Yu, Renbo; Zhang, Fengyun; Zhen, Gang; Yi, Junliang; Li, Kanghuo; Liu, Yaoguang; Terzaghi, William; Tang, Xiaoyan; He, Hang; Zhou, Shaochuan; Deng, Xing Wang

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of genome variations with high-throughput assays have improved our understanding of genetic basis of crop domestication and identified the selected genome regions, but little is known about that of modern breeding, which has limited the usefulness of massive elite cultivars in further breeding. Here we deploy pedigree-based analysis of an elite rice, Huanghuazhan, to exploit key genome regions during its breeding. The cultivars in the pedigree were resequenced with 7.6× depth on average, and 2.1 million high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were obtained. Tracing the derivation of genome blocks with pedigree and information on SNPs revealed the chromosomal recombination during breeding, which showed that 26.22% of Huanghuazhan genome are strictly conserved key regions. These major effect regions were further supported by a QTL mapping of 260 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of Huanghuazhan and a very dissimilar cultivar, Shuanggui 36, and by the genome profile of eight cultivars and 36 elite lines derived from Huanghuazhan. Hitting these regions with the cloned genes revealed they include numbers of key genes, which were then applied to demonstrate how Huanghuazhan were bred after 30 years of effort and to dissect the deficiency of artificial selection. We concluded the regions are helpful to the further breeding based on this pedigree and performing breeding by design. Our study provides genetic dissection of modern rice breeding and sheds new light on how to perform genomewide breeding by design. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs.

  8. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Ealy, Julie B.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu; Katzman, Michael

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  9. Design, synthesis and biological activity of aromatic diketone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Li, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhanyang; Liu, Gengxin; He, Xianzhuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chengchu

    2015-01-01

    A series of aromatic diketone derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors and evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit the strand transfer process of HIV-1 integrase. The results indicate that (Z)-1-(3-acetyl-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(substituted)phenylprop-2-en-1-one (5a-5d) can moderately inhibit HIV-1 integrase. The cyclization and condensation products (6a-6c and 7e-7f) of compounds 5a-5d show poor inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase. The molecular docking results indicate that the different types of compounds act on HIV-1 integrase in different ways, and these results can explain the differences in the inhibitory activities.

  10. Striking Plasticity of CRISPR-Cas9 and Key Role of Non-target DNA, as Revealed by Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system recently emerged as a transformative genome-editing technology that is innovating basic bioscience and applied medicine and biotechnology. The endonuclease Cas9 associates with a guide RNA to match and cleave complementary sequences in double stranded DNA, forming an RNA:DNA hybrid and a displaced non-target DNA strand. Although extensive structural studies are ongoing, the conformational dynamics of Cas9 and its interplay with the nucleic acids during association and DNA cleavage are largely unclear. Here, by employing multi-microsecond time scale molecular dynamics, we reveal the conformational plasticity of Cas9 and identify key determinants that allow its large-scale conformational changes during nucleic acid binding and processing. We show how the “closure” of the protein, which accompanies nucleic acid binding, fundamentally relies on highly coupled and specific motions of the protein domains, collectively initiating the prominent conformational changes needed for nucleic acid association. We further reveal a key role of the non-target DNA during the process of activation of the nuclease HNH domain, showing how the nontarget DNA positioning triggers local conformational changes that favor the formation of a catalytically competent Cas9. Finally, a remarkable conformational plasticity is identified as an intrinsic property of the HNH domain, constituting a necessary element that allows for the HNH repositioning. These novel findings constitute a reference for future experimental studies aimed at a full characterization of the dynamic features of the CRISPR-Cas9 system, and—more importantly—call for novel structure engineering efforts that are of fundamental importance for the rational design of new genome-engineering applications. PMID:27800559

  11. The key microorganisms for anaerobic degradation of pentachlorophenol in paddy soil as revealed by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hui; Liu, Chengshuai; Li, Fangbai; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Manjia; Hu, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a common residual persistent pesticide in paddy soil and has resulted in harmful effect on soil ecosystem. The anaerobic microbial transformation of PCP, therefore, has been received much attentions, especially the functional microbial communities for the reductive transformation. However, the key functional microorganisms for PCP mineralization in the paddy soil still remain unknown. In this work, DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) was applied to explore the key microorganisms responsible for PCP mineralization in paddy soil. The SIP results indicated that the dominant bacteria responsible for PCP biodegradation belonged to the genus Dechloromonas of the class β-Proteobacteria. In addition, the increased production of (13)CH4 and (13)CO2 indicated that the addition of lactate enhanced the rate of biodegradation and mineralization of PCP. Two archaea classified as the genera of Methanosaeta and Methanocella of class Methanobacteria were enriched in the heavy fraction when with lactate, whereas no archaea was detected in the absence of lactate. These findings provide direct evidence for the species of bacteria and archaea responsible for anaerobic PCP or its breakdown products mineralization and reveal a new insight into the microorganisms linked with PCP degradation in paddy soil.

  12. Chicoric acid analogues as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Neamati, N; Zhao, H; Kiryu, Y; Turpin, J A; Aberham, C; Strebel, K; Kohn, K; Witvrouw, M; Pannecouque, C; Debyser, Z; De Clercq, E; Rice, W G; Pommier, Y; Burke, T R

    1999-04-22

    The present study was undertaken to examine structural features of L-chicoric acid (3) which are important for potency against purified HIV-1 integrase and for reported cytoprotective effects in cell-based systems. Through a progressive series of analogues, it was shown that enantiomeric D-chicoric acid (4) retains inhibitory potency against purified integrase equal to its L-counterpart and further that removal of either one or both carboxylic functionalities results in essentially no loss of inhibitory potency. Additionally, while two caffeoyl moieties are required, attachment of caffeoyl groups to the central linking structure can be achieved via amide or mixed amide/ester linkages. More remarkable is the finding that blockage of the catechol functionality through conversion to tetraacetate esters results in almost no loss of potency, contingent on the presence of at least one carboxyl group on the central linker. Taken as a whole, the work has resulted in the identification of new integrase inhibitors which may be regarded as bis-caffeoyl derivatives of glycidic acid and amino acids such as serine and beta-aminoalanine. The present study also examined the reported ability of chicoric acid to exert cytoprotective effects in HIV-infected cells. It was demonstrated in target and cell-based assays that the chicoric acids do not significantly inhibit other targets associated with HIV-1 replication, including reverse transcription, protease function, NCp7 zinc finger function, or replication of virus from latently infected cells. In CEM cells, for both the parent chicoric acid and selected analogues, antiviral activity was observable under specific assay conditions and with high dependence on the multiplicity of viral infection. However, against HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected MT-4 cells, the chicoric acids and their tetraacetylated esters exhibited antiviral activity (50% effective concentration (EC50) ranging from 1.7 to 20 microM and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50

  13. Tolerability of integrase inhibitors in a real-life setting.

    PubMed

    Peñafiel, Judit; de Lazzari, Elisa; Padilla, Mireia; Rojas, Jhon; Gonzalez-Cordon, Ana; Blanco, Jose L; Blanch, Jordi; Marcos, Maria A; Lonca, Montserrat; Martinez-Rebollar, Maria; Laguno, Montserrat; Tricas, Amparo; Rodriguez, Ana; Mallolas, Josep; Gatell, Jose M; Martinez, Esteban

    2017-06-01

    Integrase inhibitors have shown better tolerability than other drugs in clinical trials, but some post-marketing data have suggested potential differences among them. We compared rates and reasons for discontinuation of raltegravir-, elvitegravir- and dolutegravir-based regimens in a large cohort of HIV-infected patients. Retrospective analysis of a prospectively followed cohort including all antiretroviral-naive and all virologically suppressed antiretroviral-experienced patients prescribed a first regimen containing raltegravir, elvitegravir or dolutegravir with at least one follow-up visit. Major outcomes were early discontinuation (≤1 year) due to any reason and more specifically due to toxicity. Incidence was calculated as number of episodes per 1000 person-years. Risk factors for discontinuation were assessed by multivariate Cox models. Early discontinuations due to any reason were 271 (raltegravir), 168 (elvitegravir) and 264 (dolutegravir) per 1000 patient-years ( P  =   0.0821). Early discontinuations due to toxicity were 76 (raltegravir), 103 (elvitegravir) and 81 (dolutegravir) per 1000 patient-years ( P  =   0.6792). Overall, the most common toxicities leading to discontinuation were neuropsychiatric, osteomuscular or digestive. Most frequent neuropsychiatric manifestations reported at discontinuation were insomnia, dizziness, headache and anxiety irrespective of the integrase inhibitor. Among discontinuations due to toxicity, neuropsychiatric effects were more common with dolutegravir than with raltegravir or elvitegravir ( P  =   0.0046). Age (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.07, P  =   0.0007) was the only independent risk factor for early discontinuation due to toxicity. Discontinuations due to any reason tended to be less common with elvitegravir, but discontinuations due to toxicity did not differ among integrase inhibitors. Neuropsychiatric toxicity leading to drug discontinuation was more frequent with dolutegravir.

  14. Regulation, Integrase-Dependent Excision, and Horizontal Transfer of Genomic Islands in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Lautner, Monika; Schunder, Eva; Herrmann, Vroni

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative freshwater agent which multiplies in specialized nutrient-rich vacuoles of amoebae. When replicating in human alveolar macrophages, Legionella can cause Legionnaires' disease. Recently, we identified a new type of conjugation/type IVA secretion system (T4ASS) in L. pneumophila Corby (named trb-tra). Analogous versions of trb-tra are localized on the genomic islands Trb-1 and Trb-2. Both can exist as an episomal circular form, and Trb-1 can be transferred horizontally to other Legionella strains by conjugation. In our current work, we discovered the importance of a site-specific integrase (Int-1, lpc2818) for the excision and conjugation process of Trb-1. Furthermore, we identified the genes lvrRABC (lpc2813 to lpc2816) to be involved in the regulation of Trb-1 excision. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time that a Legionella genomic island (LGI) of L. pneumophila Corby (LpcGI-2) encodes a functional type IV secretion system. The island can be transferred horizontally by conjugation and is integrated site specifically into the genome of the transconjugants. LpcGI-2 generates three different episomal forms. The predominant episomal form, form A, is generated integrase dependently (Lpc1833) and transferred by conjugation in a pilT-dependent manner. Therefore, the genomic islands Trb-1 and LpcGI-2 should be classified as integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Coculture studies of L. pneumophila wild-type and mutant strains revealed that the int-1 and lvrRABC genes (located on Trb-1) as well as lpc1833 and pilT (located on LpcGI-2) do not influence the in vivo fitness of L. pneumophila in Acanthamoeba castellanii. PMID:23354744

  15. Influence of Drug Resistance Mutations on the Activity of HIV-1 Subtypes A and B Integrases: a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shadrina, O. A.; Zatsepin, T. S.; Agapkina, Yu. Yu.; Isaguliants, M. G.; Gottikh, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) DNA into the genome of an infected cell is one of the key steps in the viral replication cycle. The viral enzyme integrase (IN), which catalyzes the integration, is an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. However, the HIV-1 therapy often results in the IN gene mutations inducing viral resistance to integration inhibitors. To assess the impact of drug resistance mutations on the activity of IN of HIV-1 subtype A strain FSU-A, which is dominant in Russia, variants of the consensus IN of this subtype containing the primary resistance mutations G118R and Q148K and secondary compensatory substitutions E138K and G140S were prepared and characterized. Comparative study of these enzymes with the corresponding mutants of IN of HIV-1 subtype B strains HXB-2 was performed. The mutation Q148K almost equally reduced the activity of integrases of both subtypes. Its negative effect was partially compensated by the secondary mutations E138K and G140S. Primary substitution G118R had different influence on the activity of proteins of the subtypes A and B, and the compensatory effect of the secondary substitution E138K also depended on the viral subtype. Comparison of the mutants resistance to the known strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a new inhibitor XZ-259 (a dihydro-1H-isoindol derivative), showed that integrases of both subtypes with the Q148K mutation were insensitive to raltegravir and elvitegravir but were effectively inhibited by XZ-259. The substitution G118R slightly reduced the efficiency of IN inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir and caused no resistance to XZ_259. PMID:25927004

  16. Structural Basis for Inhibitor-Induced Aggregation of HIV Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Hwang, Young; Eilers, Grant; McDanal, Charlene; Wang, Ping; Temelkoff, David

    2016-01-01

    The allosteric inhibitors of integrase (termed ALLINIs) interfere with HIV replication by binding to the viral-encoded integrase (IN) protein. Surprisingly, ALLINIs interfere not with DNA integration but with viral particle assembly late during HIV replication. To investigate the ALLINI inhibitory mechanism, we crystallized full-length HIV-1 IN bound to the ALLINI GSK1264 and determined the structure of the complex at 4.4 Å resolution. The structure shows GSK1264 buried between the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) and the catalytic core domain. In the crystal lattice, the interacting domains are contributed by two different dimers so that IN forms an open polymer mediated by inhibitor-bridged contacts; the N-terminal domains do not participate and are structurally disordered. Engineered amino acid substitutions at the inhibitor interface blocked ALLINI-induced multimerization. HIV escape mutants with reduced sensitivity to ALLINIs commonly altered amino acids at or near the inhibitor-bound interface, and these substitutions also diminished IN multimerization. We propose that ALLINIs inhibit particle assembly by stimulating inappropriate polymerization of IN via interactions between the catalytic core domain and the CTD and that understanding the interface involved offers new routes to inhibitor optimization. PMID:27935939

  17. Structure-Guided Optimization of HIV Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Smith, Steven J; Maskell, Daniel P; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pye, Valerie E; Fesen, Katherine; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Cherepanov, Peter; Hughes, Stephen H; Burke, Terrence R

    2017-09-14

    Integrase mutations can reduce the effectiveness of the first-generation FDA-approved integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). The second-generation agent, dolutegravir (DTG), has enjoyed considerable clinical success; however, resistance-causing mutations that diminish the efficacy of DTG have appeared. Our current findings support and extend the substrate envelope concept that broadly effective INSTIs can be designed by filling the envelope defined by the DNA substrates. Previously, we explored 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxamides as an INSTI scaffold, making a limited set of derivatives, and concluded that broadly effective INSTIs can be developed using this scaffold. Herein, we report an extended investigation of 6-substituents as well the first examples of 7-substituted analogues of this scaffold. While 7-substituents are not well-tolerated, we have identified novel substituents at the 6-position that are highly effective, with the best compound (6p) retaining better efficacy against a broad panel of known INSTI resistant mutants than any analogues we have previously described.

  18. MicroRNA Expression Analysis: Clinical Advantage of Propranolol Reveals Key MicroRNAs in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenliang; Yang, Lei; Shan, Hongli; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Rui; Su, Zhe; Du, Zhimin

    2011-01-01

    Background As playing important roles in gene regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs) are believed as indispensable involvers in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction (MI) that causes significant morbidity and mortality. Working on a hypothesis that modulation of only some key members in the miRNA superfamily could benefit ischemic heart, we proposed a microarray based network biology approach to identify them with the recognized clinical effect of propranolol as a prompt. Methods A long-term MI model of rat was established in this study. The microarray technology was applied to determine the global miRNA expression change intervened by propranolol. Multiple network analyses were sequentially applied to evaluate the regulatory capacity, efficiency and emphasis of the miRNAs which dysexpression in MI were significantly reversed by propranolol. Results Microarray data analysis indicated that long-term propranolol administration caused 18 of the 31 dysregulated miRNAs in MI undergoing reversed expression, implying that intentional modulation of miRNA expression might show favorable effects for ischemic heart. Our network analysis identified that, among these miRNAs, the prime players in MI were miR-1, miR-29b and miR-98. Further finding revealed that miR-1 focused on regulation of myocyte growth, yet miR-29b and miR-98 stressed on fibrosis and inflammation, respectively. Conclusion Our study illustrates how a combination of microarray technology and functional protein network analysis can be used to identify disease-related key miRNAs. PMID:21386882

  19. The activity of the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir against HIV-1 variants isolated from raltegravir-treated adults.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Mark R; Johns, Brian A; Sato, Akihiko; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2012-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572) is an integrase inhibitor with low nanomolar potency. Susceptibility to dolutegravir and raltegravir was determined for raltegravir-resistant clinical isolates. Genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility to integrase inhibitors was examined using 39 clinical isolate samples obtained from 18 adults who had exhibited incomplete viral suppression on a raltegravir-based regimen. Of 39 samples evaluated, 30 had genotypic and phenotypic resistance to raltegravir. All samples lacking raltegravir resistance retained complete susceptibility to dolutegravir. Of the 30 samples with genotypic evidence of raltegravir resistance, the median level of phenotypic resistance to raltegravir was high (median fold change in inhibitory concentration at 50%, >81; range, 3.7 to >87), while the level of resistance to dolutegravir was close to that of wild-type variants (median fold change, 1.5; range, 0.9-19.0). Longitudinal samples from 5 subjects collected during long-term failure of raltegravir revealed time-dependent general decreases in phenotypic susceptibility to raltegravir, with minimal changes in phenotypic susceptibility to dolutegravir. The median fold change to dolutegravir for isolates containing changes at G140S + Q148H, G140S + Q148R, T97A + Y143R, and N155H (thus including raltegravir signature resistance codons) were 3.75, 13.3, 1.05, and 1.37, respectively. Dolutegravir retained in vitro activity against clinical isolates obtained from subjects who failed raltegravir-based therapy at near wild-type levels for variants containing the Y143 and N155 resistance mutations. Isolates with Q148 plus additional integrase mutations possessed a broader range of and more reduced susceptibility to dolutegravir.

  20. The Activity of the Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir Against HIV-1 Variants Isolated From Raltegravir-Treated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Mark R.; Johns, Brian A.; Sato, Akihiko; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2013-01-01

    Background Dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572) is an integrase inhibitor with low nanomolar potency. Susceptibility to dolutegravir and raltegravir was determined for raltegravir-resistant clinical isolates. Methods Genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility to integrase inhibitors was examined using 39 clinical isolate samples obtained from 18 adults who had exhibited incomplete viral suppression on a raltegravir-based regimen. Results Of 39 samples evaluated, 30 had genotypic and phenotypic resistance to raltegravir. All samples lacking raltegravir resistance retained complete susceptibility to dolutegravir. Of the 30 samples with genotypic evidence of raltegravir resistance, the median level of phenotypic resistance to raltegravir was high (median fold change in inhibitory concentration at 50%, >81; range, 3.7 to >87) while the level of resistance to dolutegravir was close to that of wild-type variants (median fold change, 1.5; range, 0.9–19.0). Longitudinal samples from 5 subjects collected during long-term failure of raltegravir revealed time-dependent general decreases in phenotypic susceptibility to raltegravir, with minimal changes in phenotypic susceptibility to dolutegravir. The median fold change to dolutegravir for isolates containing changes at G140S + Q148H; G140S + Q148R; T97A + Y143R; and N155H (thus including raltegravir signature resistance codons) were 3.75, 13.3, 1.05, and 1.37, respectively. Conclusions Dolutegravir retained in vitro activity against clinical isolates obtained from subjects who failed raltegravir-based therapy at near wild-type levels for variants containing the Y143 and N155 resistance mutations. Isolates with Q148 plus additional integrase mutations possessed a broader range of and more reduced susceptibility to dolutegravir. PMID:22878423

  1. Absence of primary integrase resistance mutations in HIV type 1-infected patients in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Héctor R; Garzaro, Domingo; Fabbro, Rona; Martinez, Nahir; Ossenkop, John; Torres, Jaime R; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Pujol, Flor H

    2010-08-01

    The preexistence of mutations to integrase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected Venezuelan patients was evaluated. The integrase region of the HIV-1 genome was amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced in 57 isolates from both naive (n = 24) and treated patients who received protease and/or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (PI and RTI, n = 33), but were never exposed to integrase inhibitors. Only one primary integrase resistance mutation, not conferring drug resistance by itself, was found among these patients, although several minor viral mutations, equally distributed among naive and PI- and RTI-treated patients, were also found. In the limited number of samples, no relation was found among the presence of resistance mutations to PI or RTI and the presence of minor mutations to integrase. The absence of resistance to integrase inhibitors may be related to the recent introduction of these drugs in our country. The availability of in-house assays allows for a more comprehensive surveillance of drug resistance to integrase inhibitors in Venezuela.

  2. The prototype foamy virus protease is active independently of the integrase domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, contradictory results on foamy virus protease activity were published. While our own results indicated that protease activity is regulated by the viral RNA, others suggested that the integrase is involved in the regulation of the protease. Results To solve this discrepancy we performed additional experiments showing that the protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) exhibits protease activity in vitro and in vivo, which is independent of the integrase domain. In contrast, Pol incorporation, and therefore PR activity in the viral context, is dependent on the integrase domain. To further analyse the regulation of the protease, we incorporated Pol in viruses by expressing a GagPol fusion protein, which supported near wild-type like infectivity. A GagPR-RT fusion, lacking the integrase domain, also resulted in wild-type like Gag processing, indicating that the integrase is dispensable for viral Gag maturation. Furthermore, we demonstrate with a trans-complementation assays that the PR in the context of the PR-RT protein supports in trans both, viral maturation and infectivity. Conclusion We provide evidence that the FV integrase is required for Pol encapsidation and that the FV PR activity is integrase independent. We show that an active PR can be encapsidated in trans as a GagPR-RT fusion protein. PMID:22574974

  3. Bovine Lactoferrampin, Human Lactoferricin, and Lactoferrin 1-11 Inhibit Nuclear Translocation of HIV Integrase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Winston Yan; Wong, Jack Ho; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Cheung, Randy Chifai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate fragments derived from human and bovine lactoferrins for ability to inhibit nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. It was shown that human lactoferricin, human lactoferrin 1-11, and bovine lactoferrampin reduced nuclear distribution of HIV-1 integrase. Bovine lactoferrampin could inhibit both the activity and nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. Human lactoferrampin, bovine lactoferricin, and bovine lactoferrin 1-11 had no effect on HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation. Human lactoferrampin which inhibited the activity of integrase did not prevent its nuclear translocation. Human lactoferricin and lactoferrin 1-11 did not inhibit HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation despite their ability to attenuate the enzyme activity. The discrepancy between the findings on reduction of HIV-1 activity and inhibition of nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase was due to the different mechanisms involved. A similar reasoning can also be applied to the different inhibitory potencies of the milk peptides on different HIV enzymes, i.e., nuclear translocation.

  4. Effect of HIV-1 Subtype C integrase mutations implied using molecular modeling and docking data.

    PubMed

    Sachithanandham, Jaiprasath; Konda Reddy, Karnati; Solomon, King; David, Shoba; Kumar Singh, Sanjeev; Vadhini Ramalingam, Veena; Alexander Pulimood, Susanne; Cherian Abraham, Ooriyapadickal; Rupali, Pricilla; Sridharan, Gopalan; Kannangai, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The degree of sequence variation in HIV-1 integrase genes among infected patients and their impact on clinical response to Anti retroviral therapy (ART) is of interest. Therefore, we collected plasma samples from 161 HIV-1 infected individuals for subsequent integrase gene amplification (1087 bp). Thus, 102 complete integrase gene sequences identified as HIV-1 subtype-C was assembled. This sequence data was further used for sequence analysis and multiple sequence alignment (MSA) to assess position specific frequency of mutations within pol gene among infected individuals. We also used biophysical geometric optimization technique based molecular modeling and docking (Schrodinger suite) methods to infer differential function caused by position specific sequence mutations towards improved inhibitor selection. We thus identified accessory mutations (usually reduce susceptibility) leading to the resistance of some known integrase inhibitors in 14% of sequences in this data set. The Stanford HIV-1 drug resistance database provided complementary information on integrase resistance mutations to deduce molecular basis for such observation. Modeling and docking analysis show reduced binding by mutants for known compounds. The predicted binding values further reduced for models with combination of mutations among subtype C clinical strains. Thus, the molecular basis implied for the consequence of mutations in different variants of integrase genes of HIV-1 subtype C clinical strains from South India is reported. This data finds utility in the design, modification and development of a representative yet an improved inhibitor for HIV-1 integrase.

  5. Genome Alignment Spanning Major Poaceae Lineages Reveals Heterogeneous Evolutionary Rates and Alters Inferred Dates for Key Evolutionary Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiyin; Wang, Jingpeng; Jin, Dianchuan; Guo, Hui; Lee, Tae-Ho; Liu, Tao; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-06-01

    Multiple comparisons among genomes can clarify their evolution, speciation, and functional innovations. To date, the genome sequences of eight grasses representing the most economically important Poaceae (grass) clades have been published, and their genomic-level comparison is an essential foundation for evolutionary, functional, and translational research. Using a formal and conservative approach, we aligned these genomes. Direct comparison of paralogous gene pairs all duplicated simultaneously reveal striking variation in evolutionary rates among whole genomes, with nucleotide substitution slowest in rice and up to 48% faster in other grasses, adding a new dimension to the value of rice as a grass model. We reconstructed ancestral genome contents for major evolutionary nodes, potentially contributing to understanding the divergence and speciation of grasses. Recent fossil evidence suggests revisions of the estimated dates of key evolutionary events, implying that the pan-grass polyploidization occurred ∼96 million years ago and could not be related to the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction as previously inferred. Adjusted dating to reflect both updated fossil evidence and lineage-specific evolutionary rates suggested that maize subgenome divergence and maize-sorghum divergence were virtually simultaneous, a coincidence that would be explained if polyploidization directly contributed to speciation. This work lays a solid foundation for Poaceae translational genomics. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Deep sequencing of Lotus corniculatus L. reveals key enzymes and potential transcription factors related to the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hua, Wenping; Wang, Jian; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Xu, Ziqin; Wang, Zhezhi

    2013-04-01

    Lotus corniculatus L. is used worldwide as a forage crop due to its abundance of secondary metabolites and its ability to grow in severe environments. Although the entire genome of L. corniculatus var. japonicus R. is being sequenced, the differences in morphology and production of secondary metabolites between these two related species have led us to investigate this variability at the genetic level, in particular the differences in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our goal is to use the resulting information to develop more valuable forage crops and medicinal materials. Here, we conducted Illumina/Solexa sequencing to profile the transcriptome of L. corniculatus. We produced 26,492,952 short reads that corresponded to 2.38 gigabytes of total nucleotides. These reads were then assembled into 45,698 unigenes, of which a large number associated with secondary metabolism were annotated. In addition, we identified 2,998 unigenes based on homology with L. japonicus transcription factors (TFs) and grouped them into 55 families. Meanwhile, a comparison of four tag-based digital gene expression libraries, built from the flowers, pods, leaves, and roots, revealed distinct patterns of spatial expression of candidate unigenes in flavonoid biosynthesis. Based on these results, we identified many key enzymes from L. corniculatus which were different from reference genes of L. japonicus, and five TFs that are potential enhancers in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results provide initial genetics resources that will be valuable in efforts to manipulate the flavonoid metabolic pathway in plants.

  7. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals key proteins affecting muscle growth and lipid deposition in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiu; Shang, Peng; Li, Qinggang; Wang, Liyuan; Chamba, Yangzom; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Changxin

    2017-01-01

    Growth rate and meat quality, two economically important traits in pigs, are controlled by multiple genes and biological pathways. In the present study, we performed a proteomic analysis of longissimus dorsi muscle from six-month-old pigs from two Chinese native mini-type breeds (TP and DSP) and two introduced western breeds (YY and LL) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). In total, 4,815 peptides corresponding to 969 proteins were detected. Comparison of expression patterns between TP-DSP and YY-LL revealed 288 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), of which 169 were up-regulated and 119 were down-regulated. Functional annotation suggested that 28 DEPs were related to muscle growth and 15 to lipid deposition. Protein interaction network predictions indicated that differences in muscle growth and muscle fibre between TP-DSP and YY-LL groups were regulated by ALDOC, ENO3, PGK1, PGK2, TNNT1, TNNT3, TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, MYL3, MYH4, and TNNC2, whereas differences in lipid deposition ability were regulated by LPL, APOA1, APOC3, ACADM, FABP3, ACADVL, ACAA2, ACAT1, HADH, and PECI. Twelve DEPs were analysed using parallel reaction monitoring to confirm the reliability of the iTRAQ analysis. Our findings provide new insights into key proteins involved in muscle growth and lipid deposition in the pig. PMID:28436483

  8. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals key proteins affecting muscle growth and lipid deposition in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixiu; Shang, Peng; Li, Qinggang; Wang, Liyuan; Chamba, Yangzom; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Changxin

    2017-04-24

    Growth rate and meat quality, two economically important traits in pigs, are controlled by multiple genes and biological pathways. In the present study, we performed a proteomic analysis of longissimus dorsi muscle from six-month-old pigs from two Chinese native mini-type breeds (TP and DSP) and two introduced western breeds (YY and LL) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). In total, 4,815 peptides corresponding to 969 proteins were detected. Comparison of expression patterns between TP-DSP and YY-LL revealed 288 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), of which 169 were up-regulated and 119 were down-regulated. Functional annotation suggested that 28 DEPs were related to muscle growth and 15 to lipid deposition. Protein interaction network predictions indicated that differences in muscle growth and muscle fibre between TP-DSP and YY-LL groups were regulated by ALDOC, ENO3, PGK1, PGK2, TNNT1, TNNT3, TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, MYL3, MYH4, and TNNC2, whereas differences in lipid deposition ability were regulated by LPL, APOA1, APOC3, ACADM, FABP3, ACADVL, ACAA2, ACAT1, HADH, and PECI. Twelve DEPs were analysed using parallel reaction monitoring to confirm the reliability of the iTRAQ analysis. Our findings provide new insights into key proteins involved in muscle growth and lipid deposition in the pig.

  9. Analysis of replication profiles reveals key role of RFC-Ctf18 in yeast replication stress response.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Laure; Thomas, Aubin; Pantesco, Véronique; De Vos, John; Pasero, Philippe; Lengronne, Armelle

    2010-11-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity relies on surveillance mechanisms that detect and signal arrested replication forks. Although evidence from budding yeast indicates that the DNA replication checkpoint (DRC) is primarily activated by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), studies in higher eukaryotes have implicated primer ends in this process. To identify factors that signal primed ssDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have screened a collection of checkpoint mutants for their ability to activate the DRC, using the repression of late origins as readout for checkpoint activity. This quantitative analysis reveals that neither RFC(Rad24) and the 9-1-1 clamp nor the alternative clamp loader RFC(Elg1) is required to signal paused forks. In contrast, we found that RFC(Ctf18) is essential for the Mrc1-dependent activation of Rad53 and for the maintenance of paused forks. These data identify RFC(Ctf18) as a key DRC mediator, potentially bridging Mrc1 and primed ssDNA to signal paused forks.

  10. HIV Integrase Inhibitors with Nucleobase Scaffolds: Discovery of a Highly Potent anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vasu; Chi, Guochen; Ptak, Roger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-01-01

    HIV integrase is essential for HIV replication. However, there are currently no integrase inhibitors in clinical use for AIDS. We have discovered a conceptually new β-diketo acid that is a powerful inhibitor of both the 3′-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 integrase. The in vitro anti-HIV data of this inhibitor were remarkable as exemplified by its highly potent antiviral therapeutic efficacy against HIVTEKI and HIV-1NL4-3 replication in PBMC (TI >4,000 and >10,000, respectively). PMID:16420027

  11. Discovery of a Potent HIV Integrase Inhibitor That Leads to a Prodrug with Significant anti-HIV Activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide research efforts in drug discovery involving HIV integrase have produced only one compound, raltegravir, that has been approved for clinical use in HIV/AIDS. As resistance, toxicity, and drug–drug interactions are recurring issues with all classes of anti-HIV drugs, the discovery of novel integrase inhibitors remains a significant scientific challenge. We have designed a lead HIV-1 strand transfer (ST) inhibitor (IC50 70 nM), strategically assembled on a pyridinone scaffold. A focused structure–activity investigation of this parent compound led to a significantly more potent ST inhibitor, 2 (IC50 6 ± 3 nM). Compound 2 exhibits good stability in pooled human liver microsomes. It also displays a notably favorable profile with respect to key human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes and human UDP glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs). The prodrug of inhibitor 2, i.e., compound 10, was found to possess remarkable anti-HIV-1 activity in cell culture (EC50 9 ± 4 nM, CC50 135 ± 7 μM, therapeutic index = 15 000). PMID:22328963

  12. Comparative transcriptomics analysis reveals difference of key gene expression between banana and plantain in response to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiao-Song; Gao, Jie; He, Wei-Di; Dou, Tong-Xin; Ding, Li-Jie; Wu, Jun-Hua; Li, Chun-Yu; Peng, Xin-Xiang; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2015-06-10

    Banana and plantain (Musa spp.) comprise an important part of diets for millions of people around the globe. Low temperature is one of the key environmental stresses which greatly affects the global banana production. To understand the molecular mechanism of the cold-tolerance in plantain we used RNA-Seq based comparative transcriptomics analyses for both cold-sensitive banana and cold-tolerant plantain subjected to the cold stress for 0, 3 and 6 h. The cold-response genes at early stage are identified and grouped in both species by GO analysis. The results show that 10 and 68 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are identified for 3 and 6 h of cold stress respectively in plantain, while 40 and 238 DEGs are identified respectively in banana. GO classification analyses show that the majority of DEGs identified in both banana and plantain belong to 11 categories including regulation of transcription, response to stress signal transduction, etc. A similar profile for 28 DEGs was found in both banana and plantain for 6 h of cold stress, suggesting both share some common adaptation processes in response to cold stress. There are 17 DEGs found uniquely in cold-tolerance plantain, which were involved in signal transduction, abiotic stress, copper ion equilibrium, photosynthesis and photorespiration, sugar stimulation, protein modifications etc. Twelve early responsive genes including ICE1 and MYBS3 were selected and further assessed and confirmed by qPCR in the extended time course experiments (0, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h), which revealed significant expression difference of key genes in response to cold stress, especially ICE1 and MYBS3 between cold-sensitive banana and cold-tolerant plantain. We found that the cold-tolerance pathway appears selectively activated by regulation of ICE1 and MYBS3 expression in plantain under different stages of cold stress. We conclude that the rapid activation and selective induction of ICE1 and MYBS3 cold tolerance pathways in plantain, along

  13. Structure of the Trehalose-6-phosphate Phosphatase from Brugia malayi Reveals Key Design Principles for Anthelmintic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farelli, Jeremiah D.; Galvin, Brendan D.; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E.; Causey, Thomas B.; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible. PMID:24992307

  14. Representing Microbial Dormancy in Soil Decomposition Models Improves Model Performance and Reveals Key Ecosystem Controls on Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhuang, Q.; Wang, G.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change and subsequent responses of plant and microbial communities and nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and strategy may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to microbial physiology and community changes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. In this study, we developed an explicit microbial-enzyme decomposition model and examined model performance with and without representation of dormancy at six temperate forest sites with observed soil efflux ranged from 4 to 10 years across different forest types. We then extrapolated the model to all temperate forests in the Northern Hemisphere (25-50°N) to investigate spatial controls on microbial and soil C dynamics. Both models captured the observed soil heterotrophic respiration (RH), yet no-dormancy model consistently exhibited large seasonal amplitude and overestimation in microbial biomass. Spatially, the total RH from temperate forests based on dormancy model amounts to 6.88PgC/yr, and 7.99PgC/yr based on no-dormancy model. However, no-dormancy model notably overestimated the ratio of microbial biomass to SOC. Spatial correlation analysis revealed key controls of soil C:N ratio on the active proportion of microbial biomass, whereas local dormancy is primarily controlled by soil moisture and temperature, indicating scale-dependent environmental and biotic controls on microbial and SOC dynamics. These developments should provide essential support to modeling future soil carbon dynamics and enhance the avenue for collaboration between empirical soil experiment and modeling in the sense that more microbial physiological measurements are needed to better constrain and evaluate the models.

  15. Transcriptome Phase Distribution Analysis Reveals Diurnal Regulated Biological Processes and Key Pathways in Rice Flag Leaves and Seedling Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Xing, Zhuo; Yang, Wenqiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Han; Gong, Xiaojie; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Zhenhai; Hu, Xingming; Wang, Dong; Qian, Qian; Wang, Tai; Su, Zhen; Xue, Yongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Plant diurnal oscillation is a 24-hour period based variation. The correlation between diurnal genes and biological pathways was widely revealed by microarray analysis in different species. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the major food staple for about half of the world's population. The rice flag leaf is essential in providing photosynthates to the grain filling. However, there is still no comprehensive view about the diurnal transcriptome for rice leaves. In this study, we applied rice microarray to monitor the rhythmically expressed genes in rice seedling and flag leaves. We developed a new computational analysis approach and identified 6,266 (10.96%) diurnal probe sets in seedling leaves, 13,773 (24.08%) diurnal probe sets in flag leaves. About 65% of overall transcription factors were identified as flag leaf preferred. In seedling leaves, the peak of phase distribution was from 2:00am to 4:00am, whereas in flag leaves, the peak was from 8:00pm to 2:00am. The diurnal phase distribution analysis of gene ontology (GO) and cis-element enrichment indicated that, some important processes were waken by the light, such as photosynthesis and abiotic stimulus, while some genes related to the nuclear and ribosome involved processes were active mostly during the switch time of light to dark. The starch and sucrose metabolism pathway genes also showed diurnal phase. We conducted comparison analysis between Arabidopsis and rice leaf transcriptome throughout the diurnal cycle. In summary, our analysis approach is feasible for relatively unbiased identification of diurnal transcripts, efficiently detecting some special periodic patterns with non-sinusoidal periodic patterns. Compared to the rice flag leaves, the gene transcription levels of seedling leaves were relatively limited to the diurnal rhythm. Our comprehensive microarray analysis of seedling and flag leaves of rice provided an overview of the rice diurnal transcriptome and indicated some diurnal regulated biological

  16. Transcriptome analysis of tomato flower pedicel tissues reveals abscission zone-specific modulation of key meristem activity genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Danmei; Li, Aili; Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission.

  17. Transcriptome phase distribution analysis reveals diurnal regulated biological processes and key pathways in rice flag leaves and seedling leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenying; Yang, Rendong; Li, Meina; Xing, Zhuo; Yang, Wenqiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Han; Gong, Xiaojie; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Zhenhai; Hu, Xingming; Wang, Dong; Qian, Qian; Wang, Tai; Su, Zhen; Xue, Yongbiao

    2011-03-02

    Plant diurnal oscillation is a 24-hour period based variation. The correlation between diurnal genes and biological pathways was widely revealed by microarray analysis in different species. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the major food staple for about half of the world's population. The rice flag leaf is essential in providing photosynthates to the grain filling. However, there is still no comprehensive view about the diurnal transcriptome for rice leaves. In this study, we applied rice microarray to monitor the rhythmically expressed genes in rice seedling and flag leaves. We developed a new computational analysis approach and identified 6,266 (10.96%) diurnal probe sets in seedling leaves, 13,773 (24.08%) diurnal probe sets in flag leaves. About 65% of overall transcription factors were identified as flag leaf preferred. In seedling leaves, the peak of phase distribution was from 2:00am to 4:00am, whereas in flag leaves, the peak was from 8:00pm to 2:00am. The diurnal phase distribution analysis of gene ontology (GO) and cis-element enrichment indicated that, some important processes were waken by the light, such as photosynthesis and abiotic stimulus, while some genes related to the nuclear and ribosome involved processes were active mostly during the switch time of light to dark. The starch and sucrose metabolism pathway genes also showed diurnal phase. We conducted comparison analysis between Arabidopsis and rice leaf transcriptome throughout the diurnal cycle. In summary, our analysis approach is feasible for relatively unbiased identification of diurnal transcripts, efficiently detecting some special periodic patterns with non-sinusoidal periodic patterns. Compared to the rice flag leaves, the gene transcription levels of seedling leaves were relatively limited to the diurnal rhythm. Our comprehensive microarray analysis of seedling and flag leaves of rice provided an overview of the rice diurnal transcriptome and indicated some diurnal regulated biological

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant of Elvitegravir-resistance HIV-1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Cheng, Xiaolin; Wei, Dongqing; Xu, Qin

    2014-11-06

    Although Elvitegravir (EVG) is a newly developed antiretrovirals drug to treat the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), drug resistance has already been found in clinic, such as E92Q/N155H and Q148H/G140S. Several structural investigations have already been reported to reveal the molecular mechanism of the drug resistance. As full length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase is still unsolved, we use in this paper the crystal structure of the full length prototype foamy virus (PFV) in complex with virus DNA and inhibitor Elvitegravir as a template to construct the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant system of HIV-1 integrase. Molecular dynamic simulations was used to revel the binding mode and the drug resistance of the EVG ligand in E92Q/N155H. Several important interactions were discovered between the mutated residues and the residues in the active site of the E92Q/N155H double mutant pattern, and cross correlation and clustering methods were used for detailed analysis. The results from the MD simulation studies will be used to guide the experimental efforts of developing novel inhibitors against drug-resistant HIV integrase mutants.

  19. Interrogating HIV integrase for compounds that bind- a SAMPL challenge

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Dolezal, Olan; Newman, Janet; Mobley, David; Deadman, John J

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous gains and novel methods are often developed when people are challenged to do something new or difficult. This process is enhanced when people compete against each other-this can be seen in sport as well as in science and technology (e.g. the space race). The SAMPL challenges, like the CASP challenges, aim to challenge modellers and software developers to develop new ways of looking at molecular interactions so the community as a whole can progress in the accurate prediction of these interactions. In order for this challenge to occur, data must be supplied so the prospective test can be done. We have supplied unpublished data related to a drug discovery program run several years ago on HIV integrase for the SAMPL4 challenge. This paper describes the methods used to obtain these data and the chemistry involved. PMID:24532034

  20. Interrogating HIV integrase for compounds that bind- a SAMPL challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Thomas S.; Dolezal, Olan; Newman, Janet; Mobley, David; Deadman, John J.

    2014-04-01

    Tremendous gains and novel methods are often developed when people are challenged to do something new or difficult. This process is enhanced when people compete against each other-this can be seen in sport as well as in science and technology (e.g. the space race). The SAMPL challenges, like the CASP challenges, aim to challenge modellers and software developers to develop new ways of looking at molecular interactions so the community as a whole can progress in the accurate prediction of these interactions. In order for this challenge to occur, data must be supplied so the prospective test can be done. We have supplied unpublished data related to a drug discovery program run several years ago on HIV integrase for the SAMPL4 challenge. This paper describes the methods used to obtain these data and the chemistry involved.

  1. Design of second generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jinxia; Dayam, Raveendra; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Neamati, Nouri

    2007-01-01

    The prospect of HIV-1 integrase (IN) as a therapeutically viable retroviral drug target is on the verge of realization. The observed preclinical and clinical performance of beta-diketo containing and naphthyridine carboxamide compounds provides direct proof for the clinical application of IN inhibition. These validated lead compounds are useful in the design and development of second generation IN inhibitors. The results from preclinical and clinical studies on the first generation IN inhibitors reiterate a demand for novel second generation inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. Pharmacophore-based drug design techniques facilitate the discovery of novel compounds on the basis of validated lead compounds specific for a drug target. In this article we have comprehensively reviewed the application of pharmacophore-based drug design methods in the field of IN inhibitor discovery.

  2. Insight into the ERVK Integrase – Propensity for DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Samantha; Turnbull, Matthew; Hebert, Sherry; Douville, Renée N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses create permanently integrated proviruses that exist in the host genome. Retroviral genomes encode for functionally conserved gag, pro, pol, and env regions, as well as integrase (IN), which is required for retroviral integration. IN mediates viral genome insertion through 3′ end processing of the viral DNA and the strand transfer reaction. This process requires the formation of a pre-integration complex, comprised of IN, viral DNA, and cellular proteins. Viral insertion causes DNA damage, leading to the requirement of host DNA repair mechanisms. Therefore, a failure of DNA repair pathways may result in genomic instability and potentially cause host cell death. Considering the numerous human diseases associated with genomic instability, the endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) IN should be considered as a putative contributor to DNA damage in human cells. Future research and drug discovery should focus on ERVK IN activity and its role in human conditions, such as neurological disease and cancers. PMID:27990140

  3. Computer tools in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design (CADD) methodologies have made great advances and contributed significantly to the discovery and/or optimization of many clinically used drugs in recent years. CADD tools have likewise been applied to the discovery of inhibitors of HIV-I integrase, a difficult and worthwhile target for the development of efficient anti-HIV drugs. This article reviews the application of CADD tools, including pharmacophore search, quantitative structure–activity relationships, model building of integrase complexed with viral DNA and quantum-chemical studies in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors. Different structurally diverse integrase inhibitors have been identified by, or with significant help from, various CADD tools. PMID:21426160

  4. Design of a series of bicyclic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Part 2: azoles: effective metal chelators.

    PubMed

    Le, Giang; Vandegraaff, Nick; Rhodes, David I; Jones, Eric D; Coates, Jonathan A V; Thienthong, Neeranat; Winfield, Lisa J; Lu, Long; Li, Xinming; Yu, Changjiang; Feng, Xiao; Deadman, John J

    2010-10-01

    Synthesis of a diverse set of azoles and their utilizations as an amide isostere in the design of HIV integrase inhibitors is described. The Letter identified thiazole, oxazole, and imidazole as the most promising heterocycles. Initial SAR studies indicated that these novel series of integrase inhibitors are amenable to lead optimization. Several compounds with low nanomolar inhibitory potency are reported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure-Guided Optimization of HIV Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Integrase mutations can reduce the effectiveness of the first-generation FDA-approved integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). The second-generation agent, dolutegravir (DTG), has enjoyed considerable clinical success; however, resistance-causing mutations that diminish the efficacy of DTG have appeared. Our current findings support and extend the substrate envelope concept that broadly effective INSTIs can be designed by filling the envelope defined by the DNA substrates.

  6. A novel integrase targeting agent to explore the future prospective of HIV eradication: dolutegravir.

    PubMed

    Narang, Bawneet K; Grewal, Gurpreet K; Roy, Subhajit; Bariwal, Jitender; Gupta, Manish K; Rawal, Ravindra K

    2014-01-01

    Out of the 15 discrete proteins encoding the total amount of genetic information in the chromosomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1; three perform the vital enzymatic functions i.e. a reverse transcription, an integration, and proteolysis. The HIV integrase is the new validated drug target against AIDS amongst all essential enzymes due to the lack of the human homologue. In last few years quite, a few but potent inhibitors inhibiting HIV-1 integrase have been recognized and hence have gained a state-of-the-art for treating the infection caused by HIV-1. The greater understanding of HIV-integrase biological structure has further lead to continuous efforts for the proposal of novel inhibitors targeting diverse steps in the progression of integration with the primary goal to overcome resistance due to the rapid occurrence of integrase mutations in the treated patients. This review is focused on various aspects of the recently approved HIV integrase inhibitor "dolutegravir", its efficacy, safety profiles with the clinical data and molecular modeling studies highlighting its importance over the already approved HIV-integrase inhibitors.

  7. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN-DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5'-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors.

  8. The dynamics of interconverting D- and E-forms of the HIV-1 integrase N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Balasubramanian; Muthukumaran, Rajagopalan; Amutha, Ramaswamy

    2014-11-01

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 integrase adopts two inter-converting forms (D- and E-) due to their specific coordination of a Zn(2+) ion by an HHCC motif. Mutational studies on NTD have suggested the importance of conformational transition in regulating the functions of tetramers and dimers of HIV-1 integrase. This study explores the stability and dynamics of native NTD forms and the conformational transition between D- and E-forms using molecular dynamics simulations elucidating their role in regulation of viral and host DNA integration. Simulation of native forms of NTD revealed stable dynamics. Transition studies between D- and E-forms using conventional molecular dynamics simulations for 50 ns partially revealed conformational change towards the target during D- to -E simulation (the extension of α1-helix), which failed in the E- to -D simulation. This could be attributed to the existence of the D-form (-1,945.907 kCal/mol) in higher energy than the E-form (-2,002.383 kCal/mol). The conformational transition pathway between these two states was explored using targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the targeted molecular dynamics trajectories revealed conformations closer to the experimentally-reported intermediate form of an NTD during the transition phase. The role of Met22 in stabilizing the E-form was studied by simulating the E-form with Met22Ala mutation, revealing a highly dynamic α1-helix as compared to the native form. The present study reveals the significant role of the Zn(2+) ion-coordinated HHCC motif and its interaction with Met22 as the basis for understanding the biological implications of D- and E-forms of the NTD in regulating integration reaction.

  9. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  10. Biologically-validated HIV integrase inhibitors with nucleobase scaffolds: structure, synthesis, chemical biology, molecular modeling, and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Uchil, Vinod; Chi, Guochen; Dams, Iwona; Cox, Arthur; Seo, Byung

    2007-01-01

    Integrase, an enzyme of the pol gene of HIV, is a significant viral target for the discovery of anti-HIV agents. In this presentation, we report on the continuation of our work on the discovery of diketo acids, constructed on nucleobase scaffolds, that are inhibitors of HIV integrase. An example of our synthetic approach to inhibitors with purine nucleobase scaffolds is given. Comparison is made between integrase inhibition data arising from compounds with pyrimidine versus purine nucleobase scaffold. Antiviral results are cited.

  11. A docking study of L-chicoric acid with HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Healy, Eamonn F; Sanders, Jonathan; King, Peter J; Robinson, W Edward

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) is the enzyme responsible for integrating the viral DNA into the host genome, and is essential to the replication of the virus. L-Chicoric acid (L-CA) is a bidentate catechol that has been identified as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 IN. Using the new Autodock 4.0 free-energy function we have obtained a L-CA binding mode that explains its observed potency and is consistent with available experimental data. Because of the alpha,beta-unsaturated ester functionality of the side arms of L-CA we first performed an extensive conformational analysis of L-CA using semiempirical and ab initio calculations. As a result we have identified two distinct L-CA binding modes, one for the s-cis/s-cis and another for the s-cis/s-trans isomers. The most stable conformer was found to be the structure with the alpha,beta-unsaturated ester in the s-cis conformation for both arms of L-CA. This conformer also gave the top-ranked docking solution. Analysis of the interactions with key IN residues, combined with results using a L-CA tetraacetylated derivative and a Q148A IN mutant, correlate well with the experimental data.

  12. Diketoacid-genre HIV-1 integrase inhibitors containing enantiomeric arylamide functionality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2009-07-15

    Using our recently disclosed 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-one and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione integrase inhibitors, we report differential effects on inhibitory potency induced by introduction of an alpha-chiral center into a key aryl substituent. We show that introduction of the chiral center is uniformly deleterious to binding, with the (R)-enantiomer being more deleterious than the (S)-enantiomer. A greater enantiomeric difference in potency is shown by inhibitors that have restricted rotation of the aryl ring, with the larger difference being due to poorer potency of the (R)-enantiomer rather than higher potency of the (S)-enantiomer. The potency difference for enantiomers based on the isoindoline-1,3-dione ring system is less than for those derived from the isoindol-1-one ring system. Our findings provide useful information that should aid in understanding molecular binding interactions of DKA-derived IN inhibitors.

  13. Secondary Integrase Resistance Mutations Found in HIV-1 Minority Quasispecies in Integrase Therapy-Naive Patients Have Little or No Effect on Susceptibility to Integrase Inhibitors▿

    PubMed Central

    Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Van Baelen, Kurt; Armenia, Daniele; Trignetti, Maria; Rondelez, Evelien; Fabeni, Lavinia; Scopelliti, Fernanda; Pollicita, Michela; Van Wesenbeeck, Liesbeth; Van Eygen, Veerle; Dori, Luca; Sarmati, Loredana; Aquaro, Stefano; Palamara, Guido; Andreoni, Massimo; Stuyver, Lieven J.; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the presence of integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI) resistance mutations in HIV-1 quasispecies present in InSTI-naïve patients and to evaluate their in vitro effects on phenotypic susceptibility to InSTIs and their replication capacities. The RT-RNase H-IN region was PCR amplified from plasma viral RNA obtained from 49 HIV-1 subtype B-infected patients (21 drug naïve and 28 failing highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART] not containing InSTIs) and recombined with an HXB2-based backbone with RT and IN deleted. Recombinant viruses were tested against raltegravir and elvitegravir and for replication capacity. Three-hundred forty-four recombinant viruses from 49 patients were successfully analyzed both phenotypically and genotypically. The majority of clones were not phenotypically resistant to InSTIs: 0/344 clones showed raltegravir resistance, and only 3 (0.87%) showed low-level elvitegravir resistance. No primary resistance mutations for raltegravir and elvitegravir were found as major or minor species. The majority of secondary mutations were also absent or rarely present. Secondary mutations, such as T97A and G140S, found rarely and only as minority quasispecies, were present in the elvitegravir-resistant clones. A novel mutation, E92G, although rarely found in minority quasispecies, showed elvitegravir resistance. Preexisting genotypic and phenotypic raltegravir resistance was extremely rare in InSTI-naïve patients and confined to only a restricted minority of secondary variants. Overall, these results, together with others based on population and ultradeep sequencing, suggest that at this point IN genotyping in all patients before raltegravir treatment may not be cost-effective and should not be recommended until evidence of transmitted drug resistance to InSTIs or the clinical relevance of IN minor variants/polymorphisms is determined. PMID:20479206

  14. The HIV-1 integrase E157Q polymorphism per se does not alter susceptibility to raltegravir and dolutegravir in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saladini, Francesco; Giannini, Alessia; Boccuto, Adele; Tiezzi, Diletta; Vicenti, Ilaria; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2017-08-21

    : The HIV-1 integrase E157Q natural polymorphism has been reported to cause one case of raltegravir (RAL) and dolutegravir (DTG) failure. We constructed six recombinant viruses containing integrase from HIV-1 isolates found to harbour E157Q as the only integrase strand inhibitor (INSTI) resistance-related mutation. Phenotypic analysis showed that E157Q results in minimal changes in RAL and DTG susceptibility. Together with data retrieved from the Stanford HIV database, our results indicate that E157Q is not a relevant INSTI resistance mutation per se. The previously reported case of E157Q based resistance must have resulted from combined as yet unidentified integrase polymorphisms.

  15. Biochemical and virological analysis of the 18-residue C-terminal tail of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohd J; Monel, Blandine; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Helland, Dag E; Engelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background The 18 residue tail abutting the SH3 fold that comprises the heart of the C-terminal domain is the only part of HIV-1 integrase yet to be visualized by structural biology. To ascertain the role of the tail region in integrase function and HIV-1 replication, a set of deletion mutants that successively lacked three amino acids was constructed and analyzed in a variety of biochemical and virus infection assays. HIV-1/2 chimers, which harbored the analogous 23-mer HIV-2 tail in place of the HIV-1 sequence, were also studied. Because integrase mutations can affect steps in the replication cycle other than integration, defective mutant viruses were tested for integrase protein content and reverse transcription in addition to integration. The F185K core domain mutation, which increases integrase protein solubility, was furthermore analyzed in a subset of mutants. Results Purified proteins were assessed for in vitro levels of 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities whereas HIV-1 infectivity was measured using luciferase reporter viruses. Deletions lacking up to 9 amino acids (1-285, 1-282, and 1-279) displayed near wild-type activities in vitro and during infection. Further deletion yielded two viruses, HIV-11-276 and HIV-11-273, that displayed approximately two and 5-fold infectivity defects, respectively, due to reduced integrase function. Deletion mutant HIV-11-270 and the HIV-1/2 chimera were non-infectious and displayed approximately 3 to 4-fold reverse transcription in addition to severe integration defects. Removal of four additional residues, which encompassed the C-terminal β strand of the SH3 fold, further compromised integrase incorporation into virions and reverse transcription. Conclusion HIV-11-270, HIV-11-266, and the HIV-1/2 chimera were typed as class II mutant viruses due to their pleiotropic replication defects. We speculate that residues 271-273 might play a role in mediating the known integrase-reverse transcriptase interaction, as

  16. A cooperative and specific DNA-binding mode of HIV-1 integrase depends on the nature of the metallic cofactor and involves the zinc-containing N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Kevin; Leh, Hervé; Henry, Etienne; Simon, Françoise; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Deprez, Eric

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase catalyzes the insertion of the viral genome into chromosomal DNA. We characterized the structural determinants of the 3′-processing reaction specificity—the first reaction of the integration process—at the DNA-binding level. We found that the integrase N-terminal domain, containing a pseudo zinc-finger motif, plays a key role, at least indirectly, in the formation of specific integrase–DNA contacts. This motif mediates a cooperative DNA binding of integrase that occurs only with the cognate/viral DNA sequence and the physiologically relevant Mg2+ cofactor. The DNA-binding was essentially non-cooperative with Mn2+ or using non-specific/random sequences, regardless of the metallic cofactor. 2,2′-Dithiobisbenzamide-1 induced zinc ejection from integrase by covalently targeting the zinc-finger motif, and significantly decreased the Hill coefficient of the Mg2+-mediated integrase–DNA interaction, without affecting the overall affinity. Concomitantly, 2,2′-dithiobisbenzamide-1 severely impaired 3′-processing (IC50 = 11–15 nM), suggesting that zinc ejection primarily perturbs the nature of the active integrase oligomer. A less specific and weaker catalytic effect of 2,2′-dithiobisbenzamide-1 is mediated by Cys 56 in the catalytic core and, notably, accounts for the weaker inhibition of the non-cooperative Mn2+-dependent 3′-processing. Our data show that the cooperative DNA-binding mode is strongly related to the sequence-specific DNA-binding, and depends on the simultaneous presence of the Mg2+ cofactor and the zinc effector. PMID:20164093

  17. Revealing of photon-number splitting attack on quantum key distribution system by photon-number resolving devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidash, A. A.; Egorov, V. I.; Gleim, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum cryptography allows distributing secure keys between two users so that any performed eavesdropping attempt would be immediately discovered. However, in practice an eavesdropper can obtain key information from multi-photon states when attenuated laser radiation is used as a source of quantum states. In order to prevent actions of an eavesdropper, it is generally suggested to implement special cryptographic protocols, like decoy states or SARG04. In this paper, we describe an alternative method based on monitoring photon number statistics after detection. We provide a useful rule of thumb to estimate approximate order of difference of expected distribution and distribution in case of attack. Formula for calculating a minimum value of total pulses or time-gaps to resolve attack is shown. Also formulas for actual fraction of raw key known to Eve were derived. This method can therefore be used with any system and even combining with mentioned special protocols.

  18. Production of transgenic cattle highly expressing human serum albumin in milk by phiC31 integrase-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Lan, Hui; Shao, Minghao; Yu, Yuan; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic cattle expressing high levels of recombinant human serum albumin (HSA) in their milk may as an alternative source for commercial production. Our objective was to produce transgenic cattle highly expressing HSA in milk by using phiC31 integrase system and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The mammary-specific expression plasmid pIACH(-), containing the attB recognition site for phiC31 integrase, were co-transfected with integrase expression plasmid pCMVInt into bovine fetal fibroblast cells (BFFs). PhiC31 integrase-mediated integrations in genome of BFFs were screened by nested inverse PCR. After analysis of sequence of the PCR products, 46.0% (23/50) of the both attB-genome junction sites (attL and attR) were confirmed, and four pseudo attP sites were identified. The integration rates in BF3, BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were 4.0% (2/50), 6.0% (3/50), 16.0% (8/50) and 20.0% (10/50), respectively. BF3 is located in the bovine chromosome 3 collagen alpha-3 (VI) chain isomer 2 gene, while the other three sites are located in the non-coding region. The transgenic cell lines from BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were used as donors for SCNT. Two calves from transgenic cells BF19 were born, one died within a few hours after birth, and another calf survived healthy. PCR and Southern blot analysis revealed integration of the transgene in the genome of cloned calves. The nested reverse PCR confirmed that the integration site in cloned calves was identical to the donor cells. The western blotting assessment indicated that recombinant HSA was expressed in the milk of transgenic cattle and the expression level was about 4-8 mg/mL. The present study demonstrated that phiC31 integrase system was an efficient and safety gene delivery tool for producing HSA transgenic cattle. The production of recombinant HSA in the milk of cattle may provide a large-scale and cost-effective resource.

  19. A C-terminal "Tail" Region in the Rous Sarcoma Virus Integrase Provides High Plasticity of Functional Integrase Oligomerization during Intasome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Shi, Ke; Aihara, Hideki; Grandgenett, Duane P

    2017-03-24

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) inserts the viral cDNA into the host DNA genome. Atomic structures of five different retrovirus INs complexed with their respective viral DNA or branched viral/target DNA substrates have indicated these intasomes are composed of IN subunits ranging from tetramers, to octamers, or to hexadecamers. IN precursors are monomers, dimers, or tetramers in solution. But how intasome assembly is controlled remains unclear. Therefore, we sought to unravel the functional mechanisms in different intasomes. We produced kinetically stabilized Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) intasomes with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strand transfer inhibitors that interact simultaneously with IN and viral DNA within intasomes. We examined the ability of RSV IN dimers to assemble two viral DNA molecules into intasomes containing IN tetramers in contrast to one possessing IN octamers. We observed that the last 18 residues of the C terminus ("tail" region) of IN (residues 1-286) determined whether an IN tetramer or octamer assembled with viral DNA. A series of truncations of the tail region indicated that these 18 residues are critical for the assembly of an intasome containing IN octamers but not for an intasome containing IN tetramers. The C-terminally truncated IN (residues 1-269) produced an intasome that contained tetramers but failed to produce an intasome with octamers. Both intasomes have similar catalytic activities. The results suggest a high degree of plasticity for functional multimerization and reveal a critical role of the C-terminal tail region of IN in higher order oligomerization of intasomes, potentially informing future strategies to prevent retroviral integration.

  20. Dolutegravir Interactions with HIV-1 Integrase-DNA: Structural Rationale for Drug Resistance and Dissociation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    DeAnda, Felix; Hightower, Kendra E.; Nolte, Robert T.; Hattori, Kazunari; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kawasuji, Takashi; Underwood, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Signature HIV-1 integrase mutations associated with clinical raltegravir resistance involve 1 of 3 primary genetic pathways, Y143C/R, Q148H/K/R and N155H, the latter 2 of which confer cross-resistance to elvitegravir. In accord with clinical findings, in vitro drug resistance profiling studies with wild-type and site-directed integrase mutant viruses have shown significant fold increases in raltegravir and elvitegravir resistance for the specified viral mutants relative to wild-type HIV-1. Dolutegravir, in contrast, has demonstrated clinical efficacy in subjects failing raltegravir therapy due to integrase mutations at Y143, Q148 or N155, which is consistent with its distinct in vitro resistance profile as dolutegravir’s antiviral activity against these viral mutants is equivalent to its activity against wild-type HIV-1. Kinetic studies of inhibitor dissociation from wild-type and mutant integrase-viral DNA complexes have shown that dolutegravir also has a distinct off-rate profile with dissociative half-lives substantially longer than those of raltegravir and elvitegravir, suggesting that dolutegravir’s prolonged binding may be an important contributing factor to its distinct resistance profile. To provide a structural rationale for these observations, we constructed several molecular models of wild-type and clinically relevant mutant HIV-1 integrase enzymes in complex with viral DNA and dolutegravir, raltegravir or elvitegravir. Here, we discuss our structural models and the posited effects that the integrase mutations and the structural and electronic properties of the integrase inhibitors may have on the catalytic pocket and inhibitor binding and, consequently, on antiviral potency in vitro and in the clinic. PMID:24146996

  1. The Preserved HTH-Docking Cleft of HIV-1 Integrase Is Functionally Critical.

    PubMed

    Galilee, Meytal; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Griner, Sarah L; Uysal, Serdar; Baumgärtel, Viola; Lamb, Don C; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Kotler, Moshe; Stroud, Robert M; Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2016-11-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes viral DNA integration into the host genome and facilitates multifunctional steps including virus particle maturation. Competency of IN to form multimeric assemblies is functionally critical, presenting an approach for anti-HIV strategies. Multimerization of IN depends on interactions between the distinct subunit domains and among the flanking protomers. Here, we elucidate an overlooked docking cleft of IN core domain that anchors the N-terminal helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif in a highly preserved and functionally critical configuration. Crystallographic structure of IN core domain in complex with Fab specifically targeting this cleft reveals a steric overlap that would inhibit HTH-docking, C-terminal domain contacts, DNA binding, and subsequent multimerization. While Fab inhibits in vitro IN integration activity, in vivo it abolishes virus particle production by specifically associating with preprocessed IN within Gag-Pol and interfering with early cytosolic Gag/Gag-Pol assemblies. The HTH-docking cleft may offer a fresh hotspot for future anti-HIV intervention strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The γ Dor stars as revealed by Kepler: A key to reveal deep-layer rotation in A and F stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Ouazzani, R.-M.; Antoci, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Murphy, S. J.

    2017-09-01

    The γ Dor pulsating stars present high-order gravity modes, which make them important targets in the intermediate-and low-mass main-sequence region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Whilst we have only access to rotation in the envelope of the Sun, the g modes of γ Dor stars can in principle deliver us constraints on the inner layers. With the puzzling discovery of unexpectedly low rotation rates in the core of red giants, the γ Dor stars appear now as unique targets to explore internal angular momentum transport in the progenitors of red giants. Yet, the γ Dor pulsations remain hard to detect from the ground for their periods are close to 1 day. While the CoRoT space mission first revealed intriguing frequency spectra, the almost uninterrupted 4-year photometry from the Kepler mission eventually shed a new light on them. It revealed regularities in the spectra, expected to bear signature of physical processes, including rotation, in the shear layers close to the convective core. We present here the first results of our effort to derive exploitable seismic diagnosis for mid- to fast rotators among γ Dor stars. We confirm their potential to explore the rotation history of this early phase of stellar evolution.

  3. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Key Regulatory Elements Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ranjbar, Bijan; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; M. Khan, Faiz; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances in multi-omics data generation and integration approaches help elucidate genetic features of complex biological traits and diseases such as prostate cancer. Due to its heterogeneity, the identification of key functional components involved in the regulation and progression of prostate cancer is a methodological challenge. In this study, we identified key regulatory interactions responsible for primary to metastasis transitions in prostate cancer using network inference approaches by integrating patient derived transcriptomic and miRomics data into gene/miRNA/transcription factor regulatory networks. One such network was derived for each of the clinical states of prostate cancer based on differentially expressed and significantly correlated gene, miRNA and TF pairs from the patient data. We identified key elements of each network using a network analysis approach and validated our results using patient survival analysis. We observed that HOXD10, BCL2 and PGR are the most important factors affected in primary prostate samples, whereas, in the metastatic state, STAT3, JUN and JUNB are playing a central role. Benefiting integrative networks our analysis suggests that some of these molecules were targeted by several overexpressed miRNAs which may have a major effect on the dysregulation of these molecules. For example, in the metastatic tumors five miRNAs (miR-671-5p, miR-665, miR-663, miR-512-3p and miR-371-5p) are mainly responsible for the dysregulation of STAT3 and hence can provide an opportunity for early detection of metastasis and development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Our findings deliver new details on key functional components in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:28005952

  4. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Key Regulatory Elements Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ranjbar, Bijan; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; M Khan, Faiz; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Gupta, Shailendra K

    2016-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances in multi-omics data generation and integration approaches help elucidate genetic features of complex biological traits and diseases such as prostate cancer. Due to its heterogeneity, the identification of key functional components involved in the regulation and progression of prostate cancer is a methodological challenge. In this study, we identified key regulatory interactions responsible for primary to metastasis transitions in prostate cancer using network inference approaches by integrating patient derived transcriptomic and miRomics data into gene/miRNA/transcription factor regulatory networks. One such network was derived for each of the clinical states of prostate cancer based on differentially expressed and significantly correlated gene, miRNA and TF pairs from the patient data. We identified key elements of each network using a network analysis approach and validated our results using patient survival analysis. We observed that HOXD10, BCL2 and PGR are the most important factors affected in primary prostate samples, whereas, in the metastatic state, STAT3, JUN and JUNB are playing a central role. Benefiting integrative networks our analysis suggests that some of these molecules were targeted by several overexpressed miRNAs which may have a major effect on the dysregulation of these molecules. For example, in the metastatic tumors five miRNAs (miR-671-5p, miR-665, miR-663, miR-512-3p and miR-371-5p) are mainly responsible for the dysregulation of STAT3 and hence can provide an opportunity for early detection of metastasis and development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Our findings deliver new details on key functional components in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for the development of alternative therapeutic approaches.

  5. Nucleic acid amplification of HIV-1 integrase sequence subtypes CRF01_AE and B for development of HIV anti-integrase drug resistance genotyping assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlar, F. R.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    To anticipate the potential use of anti-integrase drugs in Indonesia for treatment of HIV-1 infection, the development of a drug resistance genotyping assay for anti-integrase is crucial in identifying the genetic drug resistance profile of Indonesian HIV-1 strains. This experiment aimed to amplify a target region in the integrase gene of Indonesian HIV-1 subtypes CRF01_AE and B that contain genetic mutations known to confer resistance to anti-integrase drug. Eleven archived plasma samples from individuals living with HIV-1 were obtained from the Virology and Cancer Pathobiology Research Center for Health Service (VCPRC FKUI-RSCM) laboratory. One of the plasma samples contained HIV-1 subtype B, and the remaining plasma samples contained subtype CRF01_AE. The target regions for all samples were amplified through RT-PCR, with an annealing temperature of 55 °C, using the primer pair AE_POL 4086F and AE_POL 5232R that were designed by VCPRC FKUI-RSCM. The results of this experiment show that 18.2% (2/11) of the samples were successfully amplified using the one-step RT-PCR. While the primer pair was effective in amplifying the target region in the integrase gene sequence for subtype B (100%; 1/1), it had a low efficacy (10%, 1/10) for subtype CRF01_AE. In conclusion, the primer pair can be used to amplify the target region in Indonesian HIV-1 strain subtypes CRF01_AE and B. However, optimization of the PCR condition and an increased number of samples would help to determine an accurate representation of the efficacy of the primer pair.

  6. Dynamic Oligomerization of Integrase Orchestrates HIV Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    Borrenberghs, Doortje; Dirix, Lieve; De Wit, Flore; Rocha, Susana; Blokken, Jolien; De Houwer, Stéphanie; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Hofkens, Johan; Hendrix, Jelle; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear entry is a selective, dynamic process granting the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) access to the chromatin. Classical analysis of nuclear entry of heterogeneous viral particles only yields averaged information. We now have employed single-virus fluorescence methods to follow the fate of single viral pre-integration complexes (PICs) during infection by visualizing HIV-1 integrase (IN). Nuclear entry is associated with a reduction in the number of IN molecules in the complexes while the interaction with LEDGF/p75 enhances IN oligomerization in the nucleus. Addition of LEDGINs, small molecule inhibitors of the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction, during virus production, prematurely stabilizes a higher-order IN multimeric state, resulting in stable IN multimers resistant to a reduction in IN content and defective for nuclear entry. This suggests that a stringent size restriction determines nuclear pore entry. Taken together, this work demonstrates the power of single-virus imaging providing crucial insights in HIV replication and enabling mechanism-of-action studies. PMID:27830755

  7. Retroviral integrase protein and intasome nucleoprotein complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Grawenhoff, Julia; Engelman, Alan N

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through the integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cellular genome, a process that is mediated by the viral integrase (IN) protein. IN catalyzes two distinct chemical reactions: 3’-processing, whereby the viral DNA is recessed by a di- or trinucleotide at its 3’-ends, and strand transfer, in which the processed viral DNA ends are inserted into host chromosomal DNA. Although IN has been studied as a recombinant protein since the 1980s, detailed structural understanding of its catalytic functions awaited high resolution structures of functional IN-DNA complexes or intasomes, initially obtained in 2010 for the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV). Since then, two additional retroviral intasome structures, from the α-retrovirus Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), have emerged. Here, we briefly review the history of IN structural biology prior to the intasome era, and then compare the intasome structures of PFV, MMTV and RSV in detail. Whereas the PFV intasome is characterized by a tetrameric assembly of IN around the viral DNA ends, the newer structures harbor octameric IN assemblies. Although the higher order architectures of MMTV and RSV intasomes differ from that of the PFV intasome, they possess remarkably similar intasomal core structures. Thus, retroviral integration machineries have adapted evolutionarily to utilize disparate IN elements to construct convergent intasome core structures for catalytic function. PMID:28289517

  8. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  9. Interactions between Integrase Inhibitors and human Arginase 1.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Lucia; Pizzoferrato, Michela; Miscioscia, Fabiola Teresa; Topai, Alessandra; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2017-04-11

    The neuro-pathogenic mechanism(s) underlying HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders are mostly unknown. HIV-infected macrophages and microglial cells play a crucial role and the metabolic fate of L-arginine may be highly relevant for microglia activation. In this context Arginase (ARG), which uses L-arginine as substrate, can be on the same time a target and source of oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present study, we investigated whether Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors (INSTIs) share with the other antiretroviral drugs the ability to inhibit ARG activity. We used the previously validated cell model, namely the human microglia cell line (CHME-5), as well as the computational chemistry approach. Furthermore, here we characterized the activity of purified human ARG in a cell-free in vitro system, and investigated the effects of INSTIs in this newly validated model. Overall evidence shows that Dolutegravir, Raltegravir and Elvitegravir inhibit ARG activity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of Phe187 as a crucial dimerization determinant facilitates crystallization of a monomeric retroviral integrase core domain.

    PubMed

    Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2014-10-07

    Retroviral DNA integration into the host genome is mediated by nucleoprotein assemblies containing tetramers of viral integrase (IN). Whereas the fully active form of IN comprises a dimer of dimers, the molecular basis of IN multimerization has not been fully characterized. IN has consistently been crystallized in an analogous dimeric form in all crystallographic structures and experimental evidence as to the level of similarity between IN monomeric and dimeric conformations is missing because of the lack of IN monomeric structures. Here we identify Phe187 as a critical dimerization determinant of IN from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus that causes AIDS in the natural host, and report, in addition to a canonical dimeric structure of the FIV IN core-domain, a monomeric structure revealing the preservation of the backbone structure between the two multimeric forms and suggest a role for Phe187 in "hinging" the flexible IN dimer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. N-3 Hydroxylation of Pyrimidine-2,4-diones Yields Dual Inhibitors of HIV Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new molecular scaffold featuring an N-hydroxyimide functionality and capable of inhibiting both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was rationally designed based on 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). The design involves a minimal 3-N hydroxylation of the pyrimidine ring of HEPT compound to yield a chelating triad which, along with the existing benzyl group, appeared to satisfy major structural requirements for IN binding. In the mean time, this chemical modification did not severely compromise the compound’s ability to inhibit RT. A preliminary structure−activity relationship (SAR) study reveals that this N-3 OH is essential for IN inhibition and that the benzyl group on N-1 side chain is more important for IN binding than the one on C-6. PMID:21499541

  12. Intermolecular disintegration and intramolecular strand transfer activities of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, A; Engelman, A; Craigie, R; Fesen, M; Pommier, Y

    1994-01-01

    We report the activities of HIV integrase protein on a novel DNA substrate, consisting of a pair of gapped duplex molecules. Integrase catalyzed an intermolecular disintegration reaction that requires positioning of a pair of the gapped duplexes in a configuration that resembles the intgration intermediate. However, the major reaction resulted from an intramolecular reaction involving a single gapped duplex, giving rise to a hairpin. Surprisingly, a deletion mutant of integrase that lacks both the amino and carboxyl terminal regions still catalyzed the intermolecular disintegration reaction, but supported only a very low level of the intramolecular reaction. The central core region of integrase is therefore sufficient to both bind the gapped duplex DNA and juxtapose a pair of such molecules through protein-protein interactions. We suggest that the branched DNA structures of the previously reported disintegration substrate, and the intermolecular disintegration substrate described here, assist in stabilizing protein-protein interactions that otherwise require the amino and carboxy terminal regions of integrase. Images PMID:8152908

  13. Untargeted metabolomics analysis reveals key pathways responsible for the synergistic killing of colistin and doripenem combination against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz Mahamad; Creek, Darren J.; Nation, Roger L.; Forrest, Alan; Tsuji, Brian T.; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Combination therapy is deployed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, as it can rapidly develop resistance to current antibiotics. This is the first study to investigate the synergistic effect of colistin/doripenem combination on the metabolome of A. baumannii. The metabolite levels were measured using LC-MS following treatment with colistin (2 mg/L) or doripenem (25 mg/L) alone, and their combination at 15 min, 1 hr and 4 hr (n = 4). Colistin caused early (15 min and 1 hr) disruption of the bacterial outer membrane and cell wall, as demonstrated by perturbation of glycerophospholipids and fatty acids. Concentrations of peptidoglycan biosynthesis metabolites decreased at 4 hr by doripenem alone, reflecting its mechanism of action. The combination induced significant changes to more key metabolic pathways relative to either monotherapy. Down-regulation of cell wall biosynthesis (via D-sedoheptulose 7-phosphate) and nucleotide metabolism (via D-ribose 5-phosphate) was associated with perturbations in the pentose phosphate pathway induced initially by colistin (15 min and 1 hr) and later by doripenem (4 hr). We discovered that the combination synergistically killed A. baumannii via time-dependent inhibition of different key metabolic pathways. Our study highlights the significant potential of systems pharmacology in elucidating the mechanism of synergy and optimizing antibiotic pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. PMID:28358014

  14. Co-expression network analysis of toxin-antitoxin loci in Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals key modulators of cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amita; Venkataraman, Balaji; Vasudevan, Madavan; Gopinath Bankar, Kiran

    2017-07-19

    Research on toxin-antitoxin loci (TA loci) is gaining impetus due to their ubiquitous presence in bacterial genomes and their observed roles in stress survival, persistence and drug tolerance. The present study investigates the expression profile of all the seventy-nine TA loci found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacterium was subjected to multiple stress conditions to identify key players of cellular stress response and elucidate a TA-coexpression network. This study provides direct experimental evidence for transcriptional activation of each of the seventy-nine TA loci following mycobacterial exposure to growth-limiting environments clearly establishing TA loci as stress-responsive modules in M. tuberculosis. TA locus activation was found to be stress-specific with multiple loci activated in a duration-based response to a particular stress. Conditions resulting in arrest of cellular translation led to greater up-regulation of TA genes suggesting that TA loci have a primary role in arresting translation in the cell. Our study identifed higBA2 and vapBC46 as key loci that were activated in all the conditions tested. Besides, relBE1, higBA3, vapBC35, vapBC22 and higBA1 were also upregulated in multpile stresses. Certain TA modules exhibited co-activation across multiple conditions suggestive of a common regulatory mechanism.

  15. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Pashley, Clare L.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2016-01-01

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70 % identical in sequence and share 88 % sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH 2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3 M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  16. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Linden, Giel T. J.; Schaminée, Joop H. J.; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species. PMID:25422416

  17. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A; van der Linden, Giel T J; Schaminée, Joop H J; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-12-09

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species.

  18. Discovery of a small-molecule HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-binding site | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The lowest energy-binding conformation of an inhibitor bound to the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase core domain. The yellow region represents a unique allosteric binding site identified by affinity labeling and mass spectrometry and validated through mutagenesis. This site can provide a potential platform for the rational design of inhibitors selective for disruption of integrase multimerization.

  19. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN–DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5′-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  20. Ebola virus infection kinetics in chimeric mice reveal a key role of T cells as barriers for virus dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Wozniak, David M.; Pallasch, Elisa; Wurr, Stephanie; Bockholt, Sabrina; Gómez-Medina, Sergio; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P.; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Günther, Stephan; Krasemann, Susanne; Idoyaga, Juliana; Oestereich, Lisa; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes severe systemic disease in humans and non-human primates characterized by high levels of viremia and virus titers in peripheral organs. The natural portals of virus entry are the mucosal surfaces and the skin where macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are primary EBOV targets. Due to the migratory properties of DCs, EBOV infection of these cells has been proposed as a necessary step for virus dissemination via draining lymph nodes and blood. Here we utilize chimeric mice with competent hematopoietic-driven immunity, to show that EBOV primarily infects CD11b+ DCs in non-lymphoid and lymphoid tissues, but spares the main cross-presenting CD103+ DC subset. Furthermore, depletion of CD8 and CD4 T cells resulted in loss of early control of virus replication, viremia and fatal Ebola virus disease (EVD). Thus, our findings point out at T cell function as a key determinant of EVD progress and outcome. PMID:28256637

  1. Network theory inspired analysis of time-resolved expression data reveals key players guiding P. patens stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Bao, Jie; Hanke, Sebastian T; Hiss, Manuel; Tiko, Theodhor; Rensing, Stefan A

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems.

  2. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuei-Han; Liao, Ben-Yang; Chang, Hao-Wei; Huang, Shiao-Wei; Chang, Ting-Yan; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk; Wu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Sen-Lin; Yu, Hon-Tsen

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted other carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. Our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.

  3. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics of anaerobic and aerobic yeast cultures reveals post-transcriptional regulation of key cellular processes.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Marco J L; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; van Breukelen, Bas; Knijnenburg, Theo A; de Hulster, Erik A F; Reinders, Marcel J T; Pronk, Jack T; Heck, Albert J R; Slijper, Monique

    2007-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unique among yeasts in its ability to grow rapidly in the complete absence of oxygen. S. cerevisiae is therefore an ideal eukaryotic model to study physiological adaptation to anaerobiosis. Recent transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of genes that are transcriptionally regulated by oxygen availability but the relevance of this cellular response has not been systematically investigated at the key control level of the proteome. Therefore, the proteomic response of S. cerevisiae to anaerobiosis was investigated using metabolic stable-isotope labelling in aerobic and anaerobic glucose-limited chemostat cultures, followed by relative quantification of protein expression. Using independent replicate cultures and stringent statistical filtering, a robust dataset of 474 quantified proteins was generated, of which 249 showed differential expression levels. While some of these changes were consistent with previous transcriptome studies, many of the responses of S. cerevisiae to oxygen availability were, to our knowledge, previously unreported. Comparison of transcriptomes and proteomes from identical cultivations yielded strong evidence for post-transcriptional regulation of key cellular processes, including glycolysis, amino-acyl-tRNA synthesis, purine nucleotide synthesis and amino acid biosynthesis. The use of chemostat cultures provided well-controlled and reproducible culture conditions, which are essential for generating robust datasets at different cellular information levels. Integration of transcriptome and proteome data led to new insights into the physiology of anaerobically growing yeast that would not have been apparent from differential analyses at either the mRNA or protein level alone, thus illustrating the power of multi-level studies in yeast systems biology.

  4. Expression profiling reveals Spot 42 small RNA as a key regulator in the central metabolism of Aliivibrio salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spot 42 was discovered in Escherichia coli nearly 40 years ago as an abundant, small and unstable RNA. Its biological role has remained obscure until recently, and is today implicated in having broader roles in the central and secondary metabolism. Spot 42 is encoded by the spf gene. The gene is ubiquitous in the Vibrionaceae family of gamma-proteobacteria. One member of this family, Aliivibrio salmonicida, causes cold-water vibriosis in farmed Atlantic salmon. Its genome encodes Spot 42 with 84% identity to E. coli Spot 42. Results We generated a A. salmonicida spf deletion mutant. We then used microarray and Northern blot analyses to monitor global effects on the transcriptome in order to provide insights into the biological roles of Spot 42 in this bacterium. In the presence of glucose, we found a surprisingly large number of ≥ 2X differentially expressed genes, and several major cellular processes were affected. A gene encoding a pirin-like protein showed an on/off expression pattern in the presence/absence of Spot 42, which suggests that Spot 42 plays a key regulatory role in the central metabolism by regulating the switch between fermentation and respiration. Interestingly, we discovered an sRNA named VSsrna24, which is encoded immediately downstream of spf. This new sRNA has an expression pattern opposite to that of Spot 42, and its expression is repressed by glucose. Conclusions We hypothesize that Spot 42 plays a key role in the central metabolism, in part by regulating the pyruvat dehydrogenase enzyme complex via pirin. PMID:22272603

  5. A novel microfluidic assay reveals a key role for protein kinase C δ in regulating human neutrophil-endothelium interaction.

    PubMed

    Soroush, Fariborz; Zhang, Ting; King, Devon J; Tang, Yuan; Deosarkar, Sudhir; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2016-11-01

    A key step in neutrophil-mediated tissue damage is the migration of activated neutrophils across the vascular endothelium. Previously, we identified protein kinase C δ as a critical regulator of neutrophil migration in sepsis but did not identify specific steps in migration. In this study, we used our novel biomimetic microfluidic assay to delineate systematically the mechanism by which protein kinase C δ regulates individual steps in human neutrophil-endothelial interaction during inflammation. The biomimetic microfluidic assay includes a network of vascular channels, produced from in vivo images connected to a tissue compartment through a porous barrier. HUVECs cultured in vascular channels formed a complete lumen under physiologic shear flow. HUVECs were pretreated with TNF-α ± a protein kinase C δ inhibitor, and the tissue compartment was filled with a chemoattractant (fMLP or IL-8). Under physiologic shear flow, the role of protein kinase C δ on spatial and temporal neutrophil adherence/migration was quantified. Protein kinase C δ inhibition significantly reduced neutrophil adhesion in response to fMLP and IL-8 only under low shear rate and near bifurcations. Protein kinase C δ inhibition also decreased adherence to nonactivated HUVECs in response to fMLP or IL-8. Protein kinase C δ inhibition reduced neutrophil migration into the tissue compartment in response to fMLP and to a lesser degree, to IL-8. Antibody-coated microparticles demonstrated that protein kinase C δ inhibition down-regulated E-selectin and ICAM-1 but not VCAM-1 expression. With the use of a physiologically relevant in vitro model system, we demonstrate that protein kinase C δ plays an important role in the regulation of neutrophil adherence/migration during inflammation and identifies key steps regulated by protein kinase C δ in neutrophil-endothelial interactions.

  6. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kuei -Han; Liao, Ben -Yang; Chang, Hao -Wei; Huang, Shiao -Wei; Chang, Ting -Yan; Yang, Cheng -Yu; Wang, Yu -Bin; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk; Wu, Yu -Wei; Tang, Sen -Lin; Yu, Hon -Tsen

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted other carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.

  7. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Kuei -Han; Liao, Ben -Yang; Chang, Hao -Wei; ...

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted othermore » carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.« less

  8. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro model of production of antibodies; a new approach to reveal the presence of key bacteria in polymicrobial environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongcong; Nakka, Sravya; Mansouri, Sepahdar; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Nayeri, Tayeb; Nayeri, Fariba

    2016-09-09

    There is a rapid emergence of multiple resistant gram-negative bacteria due to overuse of antibiotics in the treatment of infections. Biofilms consist of polymicrobial communities that survive the host's defense system. The key bacteria in biofilms are slow growing and support an attachment and rapid growth of other microorganisms. Current antimicrobial strategies often fail due to poor diagnosis of key pathogens in biofilms. The study aims to develop anti-bacterial human antibodies in vitro from patients who had recently undergone a systemic infection by pathogenic bacteria and to use these antibodies as a tool for detecting bacteria in biofilms. Lymphocytes were separated from whole blood of patients (n = 10) and stimulated with heat-killed bacteria to produce antibodies in vitro. The specificity of antibodies in recognizing the bacteria against which they were directed was evaluated by surface plasmon resonance system (SPR) and electron microscopy. The ulcer secretions from patients with chronic and acute leg ulcers and healthy controls were analyzed by the SPR system and the results were compared with culture studies. The produced antibodies recognized bacteria with high sensitivity (SPR). The antibodies against Enterococcus fecalis bound specifically to the microorganism in a bacterial co-culture that was visualized by electron microscopy. In the present work, a method for producing specific antibodies against bacteria is introduced to recognize bacterial components in body fluids of patients suffering from pathogenic biofilms. This diagnostic technique may be most useful in clinical microbiology and in the choice of antibiotics in the treatment of serious infections.

  10. Identification of discrete functional domains of HIV-1 integrase and their organization within an active multimeric complex.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Bushman, F D; Craigie, R

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase protein possesses the 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities that are required to integrate HIV DNA into a host chromosome. The N-, C-terminal and core domains of integrase are necessary for both activities in vitro. We find that certain pairs of mutant integrase proteins, which are inactive when each protein is assayed alone, can support near wild type levels of activity when both proteins are present together in the reaction mixture. This complementation implies that HIV-1 integrase functions as a multimer and has enabled us to probe the organization of the functional domains within active mixed multimers. We have identified a minimal set of functional integrase domains that are sufficient for 3' processing and DNA strand transfer and find that some domains are contributed in trans by separate monomers within the functional complex. Images PMID:8344264

  11. Intramolecular integration assay validates integrase phi C31 and R4 potential in a variety of insect cells.

    PubMed

    Chompoosri, Jakkrawarn; Fraser, Tresa; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Komalamisra, Narumon; Siriyasatien, Padet; Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Fraser, Malcolm J

    2009-11-01

    Phage phi C31 and R4 integrases are site-specific and unidirectional serine recombinases. We have analyzed the ability of these integrases to mediate intramolecular integration between their attB and attP sites in 7 important insect cell lines as a means of predicting their relative mobility in the corresponding insect species. Both integrases exhibit significantly higher frequencies in Drosophila S2 cells than in the other insect cell lines examined, but do work well in all of the species tested. Our results, coupled with previous results of the activity of phi C31 integrase in D. melanogaster and Aedes aegypti, suggest the family of serine catalyzed integrases will be useful site-specific integration tools for functional genome analysis and genetic engineering in a wide range of insect species.

  12. Dicaffeoylquinic and Dicaffeoyltartaric Acids Are Selective Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Brenda; King, Peter J.; Wu, Bor Wen; Hostomsky, Zdenek; Reinecke, Manfred G.; Robinson, W. Edward

    1998-01-01

    Current pharmacological agents for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection include drugs targeted against HIV reverse transcriptase and HIV protease. An understudied therapeutic target is HIV integrase, an essential enzyme that mediates integration of the HIV genome into the host chromosome. The dicaffeoylquinic acids (DCQAs) and the dicaffeoyltartaric acids (DCTAs) have potent activity against HIV integrase in vitro and prevent HIV replication in tissue culture. However, their specificity against HIV integrase in cell culture has been questioned. Thus, the ability of the DCQAs and DCTAs to inhibit binding of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 to CD4 and their activities against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV RNase H were studied. The DCQAs and DCTAs inhibited HIV-1 integrase at concentrations between 150 and 840 nM. They inhibited HIV replication at concentrations between 2 and 12 μM. Their activity against reverse transcriptase ranged from 7 μM to greater than 100 μM. Concentrations that inhibited gp120 binding to CD4 exceeded 80 μM. None of the compounds blocked HIV-1 RNase H by 50% at concentrations exceeding 80 μM. Furthermore, when the effects of the DCTAs on reverse transcription in acutely infected cells were measured, they were found to have no activity. Therefore, the DCQAs and DCTAs exhibit >10- to >100-fold specificity for HIV integrase, and their activity against integrase in biochemical assays is consistent with their observed anti-HIV activity in tissue culture. Thus, the DCQAs and DCTAs are a potentially important class of HIV inhibitors that act at a site distinct from that of current HIV therapeutic agents. PMID:9449274

  13. Uncommon Pathways of Immune Escape Attenuate HIV-1 Integrase Replication Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Chopera, Denis R.; Olvera, Alex; Brumme, Chanson J.; Sela, Jennifer; Markle, Tristan J.; Martin, Eric; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Le, Anh Q.; McGovern, Rachel; Cheung, Peter K.; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Jessen, Heiko; Markowitz, Martin; Rosenberg, Eric; Frahm, Nicole; Sanchez, Jorge; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina; Harrigan, P. Richard; Heckerman, David; Brander, Christian; Walker, Bruce D.; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    An attenuation of the HIV-1 replication capacity (RC) has been observed for immune-mediated escape mutations in Gag restricted by protective HLA alleles. However, the extent to which escape mutations affect other viral proteins during natural infection is not well understood. We generated recombinant viruses encoding plasma HIV-1 RNA integrase sequences from antiretroviral-naïve individuals with early (n = 88) and chronic (n = 304) infections and measured the in vitro RC of each. In contrast to data from previous studies of Gag, we observed little evidence that host HLA allele expression was associated with integrase RC. A modest negative correlation was observed between the number of HLA-B-associated integrase polymorphisms and RC in chronic infection (R = −0.2; P = 0.003); however, this effect was not driven by mutations restricted by protective HLA alleles. Notably, the integrase variants S119R, G163E, and I220L, which represent uncommon polymorphisms associated with HLA-C*05, -A*33, and -B*52, respectively, correlated with lower RC (all q < 0.2). We identified a novel C*05-restricted epitope (HTDNGSNF114–121) that likely contributes to the selection of the S119R variant, the polymorphism most significantly associated with lower RC in patient sequences. An NL4-3 mutant encoding the S119R polymorphism displayed a ∼35%-reduced function that was rescued by a single compensatory mutation of A91E. Together, these data indicate that substantial HLA-driven attenuation of integrase is not a general phenomenon during HIV-1 adaptation to host immunity. However, uncommon polymorphisms selected by HLA alleles that are not conventionally regarded to be protective may be associated with impaired protein function. Vulnerable epitopes in integrase might therefore be considered for future vaccine strategies. PMID:22496233

  14. TG1 integrase-based system for site-specific gene integration into bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Tetsurou; Kokuzawa, Takaaki; Kihara, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Hirano, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2013-05-01

    Serine-type phage integrases catalyze unidirectional site-specific recombination between the attachment sites, attP and attB, in the phage and host bacterial genomes, respectively; these integrases and DNA target sites function efficiently when transferred into heterologous cells. We previously developed an in vivo site-specific genomic integration system based on actinophage TG1 integrase that introduces ∼2-kbp DNA into an att site inserted into a heterologous Escherichia coli genome. Here, we analyzed the TG1 integrase-mediated integrations of att site-containing ∼10-kbp DNA into the corresponding att site pre-inserted into various genomic locations; moreover, we developed a system that introduces ∼10-kbp DNA into the genome with an efficiency of ∼10(4) transformants/μg DNA. Integrations of attB-containing DNA into an attP-containing genome were more efficient than integrations of attP-containing DNA into an attB-containing genome, and integrations targeting attP inserted near the replication origin, oriC, and the E. coli "centromere" analogue, migS, were more efficient than those targeting attP within other regions of the genome. Because the genomic region proximal to the oriC and migS sites is located at the extreme poles of the cell during chromosomal segregation, the oriC-migS region may be more exposed to the cytosol than are other regions of the E. coli chromosome. Thus, accessibility of pre-inserted attP to attB-containing incoming DNA may be crucial for the integration efficiency by serine-type integrases in heterologous cells. These results may be beneficial to the development of serine-type integrases-based genomic integration systems for various bacterial species.

  15. Diketo acids derivatives as integrase inhibitors: the war against the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Góez, Yenny; Patiño, Pablo; Rugeles, Maria T

    2006-06-01

    Since the human immunodeficiency virus was identified as etiological agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, great advances have been accomplished in the therapeutic field leading to reduced morbidity and mortality among infected patients. However, the high mutation rate of the viral genome generates strains resistant to multiple drugs, pointing to the importance of finding new therapeutic targets. Among the HIV structural genes, the POL gene codes for three essential enzymes: reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase; nineteen of the twenty drugs currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat this viral infection, inhibit the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Although intense research has been carried out in this area during the last 10 years, HIV integrase inhibitors are not yet approved for clinical use; however the fact that presence of this enzyme is a sine qua non for a productive HIV life cycle joined to its unique properties makes it a promissory target for anti-HIV therapy. Many compounds have been claimed to inhibit integrase in vitro; however, few of them have proven to have antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity in cell systems. Diketoacid derivatives are the most promising integrase inhibitors so far reported. Initially discovered independently by Shionogi & Co. and the Merck Research Laboratories, these compounds are highly specific for the integrase with potent antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo, and low cytotoxicity in cell cultures. Some of these compounds have recently entered clinical trials. Due to the high relevance of integrase inhibitors, and specifically of diketoacid derivatives, we review the latest findings and patents in this important field of research.

  16. A method for producing transgenic cells using a multi-integrase system on a human artificial chromosome vector.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeyuki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Yuji; Nanba, Eiji; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2011-02-24

    The production of cells capable of expressing gene(s) of interest is important for a variety of applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, including gene therapy and animal transgenesis. The ability to insert transgenes at a precise location in the genome, using site-specific recombinases such as Cre, FLP, and ΦC31, has major benefits for the efficiency of transgenesis. Recent work on integrases from ΦC31, R4, TP901-1 and Bxb1 phages demonstrated that these recombinases catalyze site-specific recombination in mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the activities of integrases on site-specific recombination and gene expression in mammalian cells. We designed a human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector containing five recombination sites (ΦC31 attP, R4 attP, TP901-1 attP, Bxb1 attP and FRT; multi-integrase HAC vector) and de novo mammalian codon-optimized integrases. The multi-integrase HAC vector has several functions, including gene integration in a precise locus and avoiding genomic position effects; therefore, it was used as a platform to investigate integrase activities. Integrases carried out site-specific recombination at frequencies ranging from 39.3-96.8%. Additionally, we observed homogenous gene expression in 77.3-87.5% of colonies obtained using the multi-integrase HAC vector. This vector is also transferable to another cell line, and is capable of accepting genes of interest in this environment. These data suggest that integrases have high DNA recombination efficiencies in mammalian cells. The multi-integrase HAC vector enables us to produce transgene-expressing cells efficiently and create platform cell lines for gene expression.

  17. Conditional independence mapping of DIGE data reveals PDIA3 protein species as key nodes associated with muscle aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kenyani, Jenna; Gray, Donna; Guadagnin, Eleonora; Jarman, Ian H.; Cobley, James N.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Lisboa, Paulo J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Profiling of protein species is important because gene polymorphisms, splice variations and post-translational modifications may combine and give rise to multiple protein species that have different effects on cellular function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is one of the most robust methods for differential analysis of protein species, but bioinformatic interrogation is challenging because the consequences of changes in the abundance of individual protein species on cell function are unknown and cannot be predicted. We conducted DIGE of soleus muscle from male and female rats artificially selected as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively). In total 696 protein species were resolved and LC–MS/MS identified proteins in 337 spots. Forty protein species were differentially (P < 0.05, FDR < 10%) expressed between HCR and LCR and conditional independence mapping found distinct networks within these data, which brought insight beyond that achieved by functional annotation. Protein disulphide isomerase A3 emerged as a key node segregating with differences in aerobic capacity and unsupervised bibliometric analysis highlighted further links to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which were confirmed by western blotting. Thus, conditional independence mapping is a useful technique for interrogating DIGE data that is capable of highlighting latent features. PMID:24769234

  18. The genetic potential for key biogeochemical processes in Arctic frost flowers and young sea ice revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jeff S; Berthiaume, Chris T; Armbrust, E Virginia; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Newly formed sea ice is a vast and biogeochemically active environment. Recently, we reported an unusual microbial community dominated by members of the Rhizobiales in frost flowers at the surface of Arctic young sea ice based on the presence of 16S gene sequences related to these strains. Here, we use metagenomic analysis of two samples, from a field of frost flowers and the underlying young sea ice, to explore the metabolic potential of this surface ice community. The analysis links genes for key biogeochemical processes to the Rhizobiales, including dimethylsulfide uptake, betaine glycine turnover, and halocarbon production. Nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes characteristic of terrestrial root-nodulating Rhizobiales were generally lacking from these metagenomes. Non-Rhizobiales clades at the ice surface had genes that would enable additional biogeochemical processes, including mercury reduction and dimethylsulfoniopropionate catabolism. Although the ultimate source of the observed microbial community is not known, considerations of the possible role of eolian deposition or transport with particles entrained during ice formation favor a suspended particle source for this microbial community. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Poly(A) code analyses reveal key determinants for tissue-specific mRNA alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lingjie; Li, Yi; Xie, Xiaohui; Shi, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    mRNA alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a critical mechanism for post-transcriptional gene regulation and is often regulated in a tissue- and/or developmental stage-specific manner. An ultimate goal for the APA field has been to be able to computationally predict APA profiles under different physiological or pathological conditions. As a first step toward this goal, we have assembled a poly(A) code for predicting tissue-specific poly(A) sites (PASs). Based on a compendium of over 600 features that have known or potential roles in PAS selection, we have generated and refined a machine-learning algorithm using multiple high-throughput sequencing-based data sets of tissue-specific and constitutive PASs. This code can predict tissue-specific PASs with >85% accuracy. Importantly, by analyzing the prediction performance based on different RNA features, we found that PAS context, including the distance between alternative PASs and the relative position of a PAS within the gene, is a key feature for determining the susceptibility of a PAS to tissue-specific regulation. Our poly(A) code provides a useful tool for not only predicting tissue-specific APA regulation, but also for studying its underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:27095026

  20. The proteomic landscape of the suprachiasmatic nucleus clock reveals large-scale coordination of key biological processes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Mehta, Neel; Patel, Abhilasha; Zhang, Peng; Ning, Zhibin; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y L; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Figeys, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) acts as the central clock to coordinate circadian oscillations in mammalian behavior, physiology and gene expression. Despite our knowledge of the circadian transcriptome of the SCN, how it impacts genome-wide protein expression is not well understood. Here, we interrogated the murine SCN proteome across the circadian cycle using SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry. Of the 2112 proteins that were accurately quantified, 20% (421 proteins) displayed a time-of-day-dependent expression profile. Within this time-of-day proteome, 11% (48 proteins) were further defined as circadian based on a sinusoidal expression pattern with a ∼24 h period. Nine circadianly expressed proteins exhibited 24 h rhythms at the transcript level, with an average time lag that exceeded 8 h. A substantial proportion of the time-of-day proteome exhibited abrupt fluctuations at the anticipated light-to-dark and dark-to-light transitions, and was enriched for proteins involved in several key biological pathways, most notably, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Additionally, predicted targets of miR-133ab were enriched in specific hierarchical clusters and were inversely correlated with miR133ab expression in the SCN. These insights into the proteomic landscape of the SCN will facilitate a more integrative understanding of cellular control within the SCN clock.

  1. Neurospora crassa transcriptomics reveals oxidative stress and plasma membrane homeostasis biology genes as key targets in response to chitosan.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Moya, Federico; Kowbel, David; Nueda, Maria José; Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Glass, N Louise; Lopez-Llorca, Luis Vicente

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan is a natural polymer with antimicrobial activity. Chitosan causes plasma membrane permeabilization and induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Neurospora crassa. We have determined the transcriptional profile of N. crassa to chitosan and identified the main gene targets involved in the cellular response to this compound. Global network analyses showed membrane, transport and oxidoreductase activity as key nodes affected by chitosan. Activation of oxidative metabolism indicates the importance of ROS and cell energy together with plasma membrane homeostasis in N. crassa response to chitosan. Deletion strain analysis of chitosan susceptibility pointed NCU03639 encoding a class 3 lipase, involved in plasma membrane repair by lipid replacement, and NCU04537 a MFS monosaccharide transporter related to assimilation of simple sugars, as main gene targets of chitosan. NCU10521, a glutathione S-transferase-4 involved in the generation of reducing power for scavenging intracellular ROS is also a determinant chitosan gene target. Ca(2+) increased tolerance to chitosan in N. crassa. Growth of NCU10610 (fig 1 domain) and SYT1 (a synaptotagmin) deletion strains was significantly increased by Ca(2+) in the presence of chitosan. Both genes play a determinant role in N. crassa membrane homeostasis. Our results are of paramount importance for developing chitosan as an antifungal.

  2. High-Content Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals CCR3 as a Key Mediator of Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Wang, Huaishan; Sherbini, Omar; Ling-Lin Pai, Emily; Kang, Sung-Ung; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Yang, Jia; He, Wei; Wang, Hong; Eacker, Stephen M; Chi, Zhikai; Mao, Xiaobo; Xu, Jinchong; Jiang, Haisong; Andrabi, Shaida A; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by ischemic injury, trauma, or disease can lead to devastating consequences for the individual. With the goal of limiting neuronal loss, a number of cell death pathways have been studied, but there may be additional contributors to neuronal death that are yet unknown. To identify previously unknown cell death mediators, we performed a high-content genome-wide screening of short, interfering RNA (siRNA) with an siRNA library in murine neural stem cells after exposure to N-methyl-N-nitroso-N'-nitroguanidine (MNNG), which leads to DNA damage and cell death. Eighty genes were identified as key mediators for cell death. Among them, 14 are known cell death mediators and 66 have not previously been linked to cell death pathways. Using an integrated approach with functional and bioinformatics analysis, we provide possible molecular networks, interconnected pathways, and/or protein complexes that may participate in cell death. Of the 66 genes, we selected CCR3 for further evaluation and found that CCR3 is a mediator of neuronal injury. CCR3 inhibition or deletion protects murine cortical cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell death, and CCR3 deletion in mice provides protection from ischemia in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CCR3 is a previously unknown mediator of cell death. Future identification of the neural cell death network in which CCR3 participates will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neural cell death.

  3. Neurospora crassa transcriptomics reveals oxidative stress and plasma membrane homeostasis biology genes as key targets in response to chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Moya, Federico; Kowbel, David; Nueda, Ma Jose; Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Glass, N. Louise; Lopez-Llorca, Luis Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan is a natural polymer with antimicrobial activity. Chitosan causes plasma membrane permeabilization and induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Neurospora crassa. In this paper, we have determined the transcriptional profile of N. crassa to chitosan and identified the main gene targets involved in the cellular response to this compound. Global network analyses showed membrane, transport and oxidoreductase activity as key nodes affected by chitosan. Activation of oxidative metabolism indicates the importance of ROS and cell energy together with plasma membrane homeostasis in N. crassa response to chitosan. Deletion strain analysis of chitosan susceptibility pointed NCU03639 encoding a class 3 lipase, involved in plasma membrane repair by lipid replacement, and NCU04537 a MFS monosaccharide transporter related to assimilation of simple sugars, as main gene targets of chitosan. NCU10521, a glutathione S-transferase-4 involved in the generation of reducing power for scavenging intracellular ROS is also a determinant chitosan gene target. Ca2+ increased tolerance to chitosan in N. crassa. Growth of NCU10610 (fig 1 domain) and SYT1 (a synaptotagmin) deletion strains was significantly increased by Ca2+ in the presence of chitosan. Both genes play a determinant role in N. crassa membrane homeostasis. Finally, our results are of paramount importance for developing chitosan as an antifungal.

  4. Differential proteomic analysis of midguts from Nosema ceranae-infected honeybees reveals manipulation of key host functions.

    PubMed

    Vidau, Cyril; Panek, Johan; Texier, Catherine; Biron, David G; Belzunces, Luc P; Le Gall, Morgane; Broussard, Cédric; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2014-09-01

    Many invasive pathogens effectively bypass the insect defenses to ensure the completion of their life cycle. Among those, an invasive microsporidian species, Nosema ceranae, can cause nosemosis in honeybees. N. ceranae was first described in the Asian honeybee Apis cerana and is suspected to be involved in Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) declines worldwide. The midgut of honeybees is the first barrier against N. ceranae attacks. To bring proteomics data on honeybee/N. ceranae crosstalk and more precisely to decipher the worker honeybee midgut response after an oral inoculation of N. ceranae (10days post-infection), we used 2D-DIGE (2-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis) combined with mass spectrometry. Forty-five protein spots produced by the infected worker honeybee group were shown to be differentially expressed when compared to the uninfected group; 14 were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. N. ceranae mainly caused a modulation of proteins involved in three key host biological functions: (i) energy production, (ii) innate immunity (reactive oxygen stress) and (iii) protein regulation. The modulation of these host biological functions suggests that N. ceranae creates a zone of "metabolic habitat modification" in the honeybee midgut favoring its development by enhancing availability of nutrients and reducing the worker honeybee defense.

  5. Neurospora crassa transcriptomics reveals oxidative stress and plasma membrane homeostasis biology genes as key targets in response to chitosan

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Moya, Federico; Kowbel, David; Nueda, Ma Jose; ...

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan is a natural polymer with antimicrobial activity. Chitosan causes plasma membrane permeabilization and induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Neurospora crassa. In this paper, we have determined the transcriptional profile of N. crassa to chitosan and identified the main gene targets involved in the cellular response to this compound. Global network analyses showed membrane, transport and oxidoreductase activity as key nodes affected by chitosan. Activation of oxidative metabolism indicates the importance of ROS and cell energy together with plasma membrane homeostasis in N. crassa response to chitosan. Deletion strain analysis of chitosan susceptibility pointed NCU03639 encoding amore » class 3 lipase, involved in plasma membrane repair by lipid replacement, and NCU04537 a MFS monosaccharide transporter related to assimilation of simple sugars, as main gene targets of chitosan. NCU10521, a glutathione S-transferase-4 involved in the generation of reducing power for scavenging intracellular ROS is also a determinant chitosan gene target. Ca2+ increased tolerance to chitosan in N. crassa. Growth of NCU10610 (fig 1 domain) and SYT1 (a synaptotagmin) deletion strains was significantly increased by Ca2+ in the presence of chitosan. Both genes play a determinant role in N. crassa membrane homeostasis. Finally, our results are of paramount importance for developing chitosan as an antifungal.« less

  6. High-Content Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals CCR3 as a Key Mediator of Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaishan; Sherbini, Omar; Ling-lin Pai, Emily; Kwon, Ji-Sun; He, Wei; Wang, Hong; Chi, Zhikai; Xu, Jinchong; Jiang, Haisong; Andrabi, Shaida A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by ischemic injury, trauma, or disease can lead to devastating consequences for the individual. With the goal of limiting neuronal loss, a number of cell death pathways have been studied, but there may be additional contributors to neuronal death that are yet unknown. To identify previously unknown cell death mediators, we performed a high-content genome-wide screening of short, interfering RNA (siRNA) with an siRNA library in murine neural stem cells after exposure to N-methyl-N-nitroso-N′-nitroguanidine (MNNG), which leads to DNA damage and cell death. Eighty genes were identified as key mediators for cell death. Among them, 14 are known cell death mediators and 66 have not previously been linked to cell death pathways. Using an integrated approach with functional and bioinformatics analysis, we provide possible molecular networks, interconnected pathways, and/or protein complexes that may participate in cell death. Of the 66 genes, we selected CCR3 for further evaluation and found that CCR3 is a mediator of neuronal injury. CCR3 inhibition or deletion protects murine cortical cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation–induced cell death, and CCR3 deletion in mice provides protection from ischemia in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CCR3 is a previously unknown mediator of cell death. Future identification of the neural cell death network in which CCR3 participates will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neural cell death. PMID:27822494

  7. Microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) of small molecules as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Stefania; Grazia, Sara De; De Luca, Laura; Gitto, Rosaria; Faliti, Caterina Elisa; Debyzer, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-08-11

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In recent years our research group has been engaged in the stucture-function study of this enzyme and in the development of some three-dimensional pharmacophore models which have led to the identification of a large series of potent HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) bearing an indole core. To gain a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships (SARs), herein we report the design and microwave-assisted synthesis of a novel series of 1-H-benzylindole derivatives.

  8. Ethyl malonate amides: a diketo acid offspring fragment for HIV integrase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Serafin, Katarzyna; Mazur, Pawel; Bak, Andrzej; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2011-08-15

    While searching for new HIV integrase inhibitors we discovered that some ethyl malonate amides (EMA) are active against this enzyme. Surprisingly, the main function can only very rarely be found among the reported drug candidates. We synthesised a series of compounds in order to establish and analyse the structure-activity relationship. The similarity to the important classes of HIV integrase inhibitors as well as the synthetic availability of the different targets including this pharmacophore makes EMA compounds an interesting object of investigations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Approaches Estimate the Binding Energy of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors and Correlate with In Vitro Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barry C.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The design of novel integrase (IN) inhibitors has been aided by recent crystal structures revealing the binding mode of these compounds with a full-length prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN and synthetic viral DNA ends. Earlier docking studies relied on incomplete structures and did not include the contribution of the viral DNA to inhibitor binding. Using the structure of PFV IN as the starting point, we generated a model of the corresponding HIV-1 complex and developed a molecular dynamics (MD)-based approach that correlates with the in vitro activities of novel compounds. Four well-characterized compounds (raltegravir, elvitegravir, MK-0536, and dolutegravir) were used as a training set, and the data for their in vitro activity against the Y143R, N155H, and G140S/Q148H mutants were used in addition to the wild-type (WT) IN data. Three additional compounds were docked into the IN-DNA complex model and subjected to MD simulations. All three gave interaction potentials within 1 standard deviation of values estimated from the training set, and the most active compound was identified. Additional MD analysis of the raltegravir- and dolutegravir-bound complexes gave internal and interaction energy values that closely match the experimental binding energy of a compound related to raltegravir that has similar activity. These approaches can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the interactions of the inhibitors with the HIV-1 intasome and to identify promising scaffolds for novel integrase inhibitors, in particular, compounds that retain activity against a range of drug-resistant mutants, making it possible to streamline synthesis and testing. PMID:22037850

  10. YeATSAM analysis of the walnut and chickpea transcriptome reveals key genes undetected by current annotation tools

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transcriptome, a treasure trove of gene space information, remains severely under-used by current genome annotation methods.  Methods: Here, we present an annotation method in the YeATS suite (YeATSAM), based on information encoded by the transcriptome, that demonstrates artifacts of the assembler, which must be addressed to achieve proper annotation.  Results and Discussion: YeATSAM was applied to the transcriptome obtained from twenty walnut tissues and compared to MAKER-P annotation of the recently published walnut genome sequence (WGS). MAKER-P and YeATSAM both failed to annotate several hundred proteins found by the other. Although many of these unannotated proteins have repetitive sequences (possibly transposable elements), other crucial proteins were excluded by each method. An egg cell-secreted protein and a homer protein were undetected by YeATSAM, although these did not produce any transcripts. Importantly, MAKER-P failed to classify key photosynthesis-related proteins, which we show emanated from Trinity assembly artifacts potentially not handled by MAKER-P. Also, no proteins from the large berberine bridge enzyme (BBE) family were annotated by MAKER-P. BBE is implicated in biosynthesis of several alkaloids metabolites, like anti-microbial berberine. As further validation, YeATSAM identified ~1000 genes that are not annotated in the NCBI database by Gnomon. YeATSAM used a RNA-seq derived chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.) transcriptome assembled using Newbler v2.3.  Conclusions: Since the current version of YeATSAM does not have an ab initio module, we suggest a combined annotation scheme using both MAKER-P and YeATSAM to comprehensively and accurately annotate the WGS. PMID:28105312

  11. Gene expression profiling reveals key genes and pathways related to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruifeng; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhuang, Liwei

    2016-01-01

     Background. This study aims to identify key genes and pathways involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The dataset GSE48452 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, including 14 control liver samples, 27 healthy obese samples, 14 steatosis samples and 18 nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between controls and other samples were screened through LIMMA package. Then pathway enrichment analysis for DEGs was performed by using DAVID, and alterations of enriched pathways were determined. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed based on the PPI information from HPRD database, and then, networks were visualized through Cytoscape. Additionally, interactions between microRNAs (miRNAs) and pathways were analyzed via Fisher's exact test. A total of 505, 814 and 783 DEGs were identified for healthy obese, steatosis and NASH samples in comparison with controls, respectively. DEGs were enriched in ribosome (RPL36A, RPL14, etc.), ubiquitin mediated proteolysis (UBE2A, UBA7, etc.), focal adhesion (PRKCA, EGFR, CDC42, VEGFA, etc.), Fc?R-mediated phagocytosis (PRKCA, CDC42, etc.), and so on. The 27 enriched pathways gradually deviated from baseline (namely, controls) along with the changes of obese-steatosis-NASH. In PPI networks, PRKCA interacted with EGFR and CDC42. Besides, hsa-miR-330-3p and hsa-miR-126 modulated focal adhesion through targeting VEGFA and CDC42. The identified DEGs (PRKCA, EGFR, CDC42, VEGFA), disturbed pathways (ribosome, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, focal adhesion, Fc?R-mediated phagocytosis, etc.) and miRNAs (hsa-miR-330-3p, hsa-miR-126, etc.) might be closely related to NAFLD progression. These results might contribute to understanding NAFLD mechanism, conducting experimental researches, and designing clinical practices.

  12. Transcription profile of soybean-root-knot nematode interaction reveals a key role of phythormones in the resistance reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root-knot nematodes (RKN– Meloidogyne genus) present extensive challenges to soybean crop. The soybean line (PI 595099) is known to be resistant against specific strains and races of nematode species, thus its differential gene expression analysis can lead to a comprehensive gene expression profiling in the incompatible soybean-RKN interaction. Even though many disease resistance genes have been studied, little has been reported about phytohormone crosstalk on modulation of ROS signaling during soybean-RKN interaction. Results Using 454 technology to explore the common aspects of resistance reaction during both parasitism and resistance phases it was verified that hormone, carbohydrate metabolism and stress related genes were consistently expressed at high levels in infected roots as compared to mock control. Most noteworthy genes include those encoding glycosyltransferases, peroxidases, auxin-responsive proteins and gibberellin-regulated genes. Our data analysis suggests the key role of glycosyltransferases, auxins and components of gibberellin signal transduction, biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in the resistance reaction and their participation in jasmonate signaling and redox homeostasis in mediating aspects of plant growth and responses to biotic stress. Conclusions Based on this study we suggest a reasonable model regarding to the complex mechanisms of crosstalk between plant hormones, mainly gibberellins and auxins, which can be crucial to modulate the levels of ROS in the resistance reaction to nematode invasion. The model also includes recent findings concerning to the participation of DELLA-like proteins and ROS signaling controlling plant immune or stress responses. Furthermore, this study provides a dataset of potential candidate genes involved in both nematode parasitism and resistance, which can be tested further for their role in this biological process using functional genomics approaches. PMID:23663436

  13. Transcription profile of soybean-root-knot nematode interaction reveals a key role of phythormones in the resistance reaction.

    PubMed

    Beneventi, Magda Aparecida; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; de Sá, Maria Eugênia Lisei; Firmino, Alexandre Augusto Pereira; de Amorim, Regina Maria Santos; Albuquerque, Erika Valéria Saliba; da Silva, Maria Cristina Mattar; da Silva, Joseane Padilha; Campos, Magnólia de Araújo; Lopes, Marcus José Conceição; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Pappas, Georgios Joanis; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2013-05-10

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN- Meloidogyne genus) present extensive challenges to soybean crop. The soybean line (PI 595099) is known to be resistant against specific strains and races of nematode species, thus its differential gene expression analysis can lead to a comprehensive gene expression profiling in the incompatible soybean-RKN interaction. Even though many disease resistance genes have been studied, little has been reported about phytohormone crosstalk on modulation of ROS signaling during soybean-RKN interaction. Using 454 technology to explore the common aspects of resistance reaction during both parasitism and resistance phases it was verified that hormone, carbohydrate metabolism and stress related genes were consistently expressed at high levels in infected roots as compared to mock control. Most noteworthy genes include those encoding glycosyltransferases, peroxidases, auxin-responsive proteins and gibberellin-regulated genes. Our data analysis suggests the key role of glycosyltransferases, auxins and components of gibberellin signal transduction, biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in the resistance reaction and their participation in jasmonate signaling and redox homeostasis in mediating aspects of plant growth and responses to biotic stress. Based on this study we suggest a reasonable model regarding to the complex mechanisms of crosstalk between plant hormones, mainly gibberellins and auxins, which can be crucial to modulate the levels of ROS in the resistance reaction to nematode invasion. The model also includes recent findings concerning to the participation of DELLA-like proteins and ROS signaling controlling plant immune or stress responses. Furthermore, this study provides a dataset of potential candidate genes involved in both nematode parasitism and resistance, which can be tested further for their role in this biological process using functional genomics approaches.

  14. Quantitative Circadian Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Reveals Extensive Clock Control of Key Components in Physiological, Metabolic, and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mani Kant; Nomura, Yuko; Wang, Lei; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock provides adaptive advantages to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. The phosphorylation events that regulate circadian-dependent signaling and the processes which post-translationally respond to clock-gated signals are largely unknown. To better elucidate post-translational events tied to the circadian system we carried out a survey of circadian-regulated protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis seedlings. A large-scale mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach employing TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment techniques identified and quantified 1586 phosphopeptides on 1080 protein groups. A total of 102 phosphopeptides displayed significant changes in abundance, enabling the identification of specific patterns of response to circadian rhythms. Our approach was sensitive enough to quantitate oscillations in the phosphorylation of low abundance clock proteins (early flowering4; ELF4 and pseudoresponse regulator3; PRR3) as well as other transcription factors and kinases. During constant light, extensive cyclic changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators, implicating direct or indirect regulation by the circadian system. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, stress and phytohormones-mediated responses. We validated our analysis using the elf4-211 allele, in which an S45L transition removes the phosphorylation herein identified. We show that removal of this phosphorylatable site diminishes interaction with early flowering3 (ELF3), a key partner in a tripartite evening complex required for circadian cycling. elf4-211 lengthens period, which increases with increasing temperature, relative to the wild type, resulting in a more stable temperature compensation of circadian period over a wider temperature range.

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Key Pathways and Genes Associated with Cisplatin Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yani; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Tong; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jinhui; Dai, Penggao

    2017-01-01

    Acquired resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy frequently occurs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a distinct gene expression pattern is associated with acquired resistance to cisplatin in human lung adenocarcinoma. Whole-transcriptome sequencing was performed to compare the genome-wide gene expression patterns of the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cisplatin-resistant cell line A549/DDP with those of its progenitor cell line A549. A total of 1214 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, 656 of which were upregulated and 558 were downregulated. Functional annotation of the DEGs in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database revealed that most of the identified genes were enriched in the PI3K/AKT, mitogen-activated protein kinase, actin cytoskeleton regulation, and focal adhesion pathways in A549/DDP cells. These results support previous studies demonstrating that the pathways regulating cell proliferation and invasion confer resistance to chemotherapy. Furthermore, the results proved that cell adhesion and cytoskeleton regulation is associated with cisplatin resistance in human lung cancer. Our study provides new promising biomarkers for lung cancer prognosis and potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer treatment. PMID:28114404

  16. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Human Cardiac Stem Cells Reveals Key Features Essential for Their Function and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Vahdat, Sadaf; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Omrani, Gholamreza; Gholampour, Maziar; Sotoodehnejadnematalahi, Fattah; Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Gharechahi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy of heart diseases is emerging as one of the most promising known treatments in recent years. Transplantation of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) may be one of the best strategies to cure adult or pediatric heart diseases. As these patient-derived stem cells need to be isolated from small heart biopsies, it is important to select the best isolation method and CSC subpopulation with the best cardiogenic functionality. We employed three different protocols including c-KIT+ cell sorting, clonogenic expansion, and explants culture to isolate c-KIT+ cells, clonogenic expansion-derived cells (CEDCs), and cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), respectively. Evaluation of isolated CSC characteristics in vitro and after rat myocardial infarction (MI) model transplantation revealed that although c-KIT+ and CDCs had higher MI regenerative potential, CEDCs had more commitment into cardiomyocytes and needed lower passages that were essential to reach a definite cell count. Furthermore, genome-wide expression analysis showed that subsequent passages caused changes in characteristics of cells, downregulation of cell cycle-related genes, and upregulation of differentiation and carcinogenic genes, which might lead to senescence, commitment, and possible tumorigenicity of the cells. Because of different properties of CSC subpopulations, we suggest that appropriate CSCs subpopulation should be chosen based on their experimental or clinical use. PMID:25867933

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Sexually Dimorphic Chinese White Wax Scale Insects Reveals Key Differences in Developmental Programs and Transcription Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pu; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Wei-Wei; Feng, Ying; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, represents one of the most dramatic examples of sexual dimorphism in any insect species. In this study, we showed that although E. pela males display complete metamorphosis similar to holometabolous insects, the species forms the sister group to Acyrthosiphon pisum and cluster with hemimetabolous insects. The gene expression profile and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses revealed that the two sexes engaged in distinct developmental programs. In particular, female development appeared to prioritize the expression of genes related to cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and to anatomical structure formation in nymphs. By contrast, male nymphal development is characterized by the significant down-regulation of genes involved in chitin, the respiratory system, and neurons. The wing and appendage morphogenesis, anatomical and tissue structure morphogenesis programs activated after male nymphal development. Transcription factors (that convey juvenile hormone or ecdysone signals, and Hox genes) and DNA methyltransferase were also differentially expressed between females and males. These results may indicate the roles that these differentially expressed genes play in regulating sexual dimorphism through orchestrating complex genetic programs. This differential expression was particularly prominent for processes linked to female development and wing development in males. PMID:25634031

  18. Transcriptome analysis of sexually dimorphic Chinese white wax scale insects reveals key differences in developmental programs and transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pu; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Wei-Wei; Feng, Ying; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-30

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, represents one of the most dramatic examples of sexual dimorphism in any insect species. In this study, we showed that although E. pela males display complete metamorphosis similar to holometabolous insects, the species forms the sister group to Acyrthosiphon pisum and cluster with hemimetabolous insects. The gene expression profile and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses revealed that the two sexes engaged in distinct developmental programs. In particular, female development appeared to prioritize the expression of genes related to cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and to anatomical structure formation in nymphs. By contrast, male nymphal development is characterized by the significant down-regulation of genes involved in chitin, the respiratory system, and neurons. The wing and appendage morphogenesis, anatomical and tissue structure morphogenesis programs activated after male nymphal development. Transcription factors (that convey juvenile hormone or ecdysone signals, and Hox genes) and DNA methyltransferase were also differentially expressed between females and males. These results may indicate the roles that these differentially expressed genes play in regulating sexual dimorphism through orchestrating complex genetic programs. This differential expression was particularly prominent for processes linked to female development and wing development in males.

  19. Key metabolic pathways involved in xenobiotic biotransformation and stress responses revealed by transcriptomics of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea brasiliana.

    PubMed

    Lüchmann, Karim H; Clark, Melody S; Bainy, Afonso C D; Gilbert, Jack A; Craft, John A; Chipman, J Kevin; Thorne, Michael A S; Mattos, Jacó J; Siebert, Marília N; Schroeder, Declan C

    2015-09-01

    The Brazilian oyster Crassostrea brasiliana was challenged to three common environmental contaminants: phenanthrene, diesel fuel water-accommodated fraction (WAF) and domestic sewage. Total RNA was extracted from the gill and digestive gland, and cDNA libraries were sequenced using the 454 FLX platform. The assembled transcriptome resulted in ̃20,000 contigs, which were annotated to produce the first de novo transcriptome for C. brasiliana. Sequences were screened to identify genes potentially involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and associated antioxidant defence mechanisms. These gene families included those of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450), 70kDa heat shock, antioxidants, such as glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and also multi-drug resistance proteins. Analysis showed that the massive expansion of the CYP450 and HSP70 family due to gene duplication identified in the Crassostrea gigas genome also occurred in C. brasiliana, suggesting these processes form the base of the Crassostrea lineage. Preliminary expression analyses revealed several candidates biomarker genes that were up-regulated during each of the three treatments, suggesting the potential for environmental monitoring.

  20. Impact of resistance mutations on inhibitor binding to HIV-1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Buolamwini, John K.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Li, Aixiu; Xu, Qin; Cheng, Xiaolin; Wei, Dongqing

    2013-11-08

    Here, HIV-1 integrase (IN) is essential for HIV-1 replication, catalyzing two key reaction steps termed 3' processing and strand transfer. Therefore, IN has become an important target for antiviral drug discovery. However, mutants have emerged, such as E92Q/N155H and G140S/Q148H, which confer resistance to raltegravir (RAL), the first IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) approved by the FDA, and to the recently approved elvitegravir (EVG). To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand binding and drug resistance, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of homology models of the HIV-1 IN and four relevant mutants complexed with viral DNA and RAL. The results show that the structure and dynamics of the 140s loop, comprising residues 140 to 149, are strongly influenced by the IN mutations. In the simulation of the G140S/Q148H double mutant, we observe spontaneous dissociation of RAL from the active site, followed by an intrahelical swing-back of the 3' -OH group of nucleotide A17, consistent with the experimental observation that the G140S/Q148H mutant exhibits the highest resistance to RAL compared to other IN mutants. An important hydrogen bond between residues 145 and 148 is present in the wild-type IN but not in the G140S/Q148H mutant, accounting for the structural and dynamical differences of the 140s' loop and ultimately impairing RAL binding in the double mutant. End-point free energy calculations that broadly capture the experimentally known RAL binding profiles elucidate the contributions of the 140s' loop to RAL binding free energies and suggest possible approaches to overcoming drug resistance.

  1. Genomic and protein expression analysis reveals flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) as a key biomarker in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Russell, Roslin; Albarakati, Nada; Maloney, David J; Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Rueda, Oscar M; Moseley, Paul; Mohan, Vivek; Sun, Hongmao; Abbotts, Rachel; Mukherjee, Abhik; Agarwal, Devika; Illuzzi, Jennifer L; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Wilson, David M; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-10-01

    FEN1 has key roles in Okazaki fragment maturation during replication, long patch base excision repair, rescue of stalled replication forks, maintenance of telomere stability and apoptosis. FEN1 may be dysregulated in breast and ovarian cancers and have clinicopathological significance in patients. We comprehensively investigated FEN1 mRNA expression in multiple cohorts of breast cancer [training set (128), test set (249), external validation (1952)]. FEN1 protein expression was evaluated in 568 oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers, 894 ER positive breast cancers and 156 ovarian epithelial cancers. FEN1 mRNA overexpression was highly significantly associated with high grade (p = 4.89 × 10(-57)), high mitotic index (p = 5.25 × 10(-28)), pleomorphism (p = 6.31 × 10(-19)), ER negative (p = 9.02 × 10(-35)), PR negative (p = 9.24 × 10(-24)), triple negative phenotype (p = 6.67 × 10(-21)), PAM50.Her2 (p = 5.19 × 10(-13)), PAM50. Basal (p = 2.7 × 10(-41)), PAM50.LumB (p = 1.56 × 10(-26)), integrative molecular cluster 1 (intClust.1) (p = 7.47 × 10(-12)), intClust.5 (p = 4.05 × 10(-12)) and intClust. 10 (p = 7.59 × 10(-38)) breast cancers. FEN1 mRNA overexpression is associated with poor breast cancer specific survival in univariate (p = 4.4 × 10(-16)) and multivariate analysis (p = 9.19 × 10(-7)). At the protein level, in ER positive tumours, FEN1 overexpression remains significantly linked to high grade, high mitotic index and pleomorphism (ps < 0.01). In ER negative tumours, high FEN1 is significantly associated with pleomorphism, tumour type, lymphovascular invasion, triple negative phenotype, EGFR and HER2 expression (ps < 0.05). In ER positive as well as in ER negative tumours, FEN1 protein overexpression is associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis (ps < 0.01). In ovarian epithelial cancers, similarly, FEN1 overexpression is associated with high grade, high stage and poor survival (ps < 0.05). We conclude that FEN1

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Fetal Skin Reveals Key Genes Related to Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in Cashmere Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hailong; Zeng, Jie; Ma, Sen; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Guangxian; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere goat skin contains two types of hair follicles (HF): primary hair follicles (PHF) and secondary hair follicles (SHF). Although multiple genetic determinants associated with HF formation have been identified, the molecules that determine the independent morphogenesis of HF in cashmere goats remain elusive. The growth and development of SHF directly influence the quantity and quality of cashmere production. Here, we report the transcriptome profiling analysis of nine skin samples from cashmere goats using 60- and 120-day-old embryos (E60 and E120, respectively), as well as newborns (NB), through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). HF morphological changes indicated that PHF were initiated at E60, with maturation from E120, while differentiation of SHF was identified at E120 until formation of cashmere occurred after birth (NB). The RNA-sequencing analysis generated over 20.6 million clean reads from each mRNA library. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in E60 vs. E120, E120 vs. NB, and E60 vs. NB were 1,024, 0 and 1,801, respectively, indicating that no significant differences were found at transcriptomic levels between E120 and NB. Key genes including B4GALT4, TNC, a-integrin, and FGFR1, were up-regulated and expressed in HF initiation from E60 to E120, while regulatory genes such as GPRC5D, PAD3, HOXC13, PRR9, VSIG8, LRRC15, LHX2, MSX-2, and FOXN1 were up-regulated and expressed in HF keratinisation and hair shaft differentiation from E120 and NB to E60. Several genes belonging to the KRT and KRTAP gene families were detected throughout the three HF developmental stages. The transcriptional trajectory analyses of all DEGs indicated that immune privilege, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and growth factor receptors all played dominant roles in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface and HF formation. We found that the Wnt, transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch family members

  3. Critical Contribution of Tyr15 in the HIV-1 Integrase (IN) in Facilitating IN Assembly and Nonenzymatic Function through the IN Precursor Form with Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Tatsuro; Takeda, Eri; Tobiume, Minoru; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Yokoyama, Masaru; Huang, Yu-Lun; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Sato, Hironori; Kannagi, Mari; Masuda, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Nonenzymatic roles for HIV-1 integrase (IN) at steps prior to the enzymatic integration step have been reported. To obtain structural and functional insights into the nonenzymatic roles of IN, we performed genetic analyses of HIV-1 IN, focusing on a highly conserved Tyr15 in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which has previously been shown to regulate an equilibrium state between two NTD dimer conformations. Replacement of Tyr15 with alanine, histidine, or tryptophan prevented HIV-1 infection and caused severe impairment of reverse transcription without apparent defects in reverse transcriptase (RT) or in capsid disassembly kinetics after entry into cells. Cross-link analyses of recombinant IN proteins demonstrated that lethal mutations of Tyr15 severely impaired IN structure for assembly. Notably, replacement of Tyr15 with phenylalanine was tolerated for all IN functions, demonstrating that a benzene ring of the aromatic side chain is a key moiety for IN assembly and functions. Additional mutagenic analyses based on previously proposed tetramer models for IN assembly suggested a key role of Tyr15 in facilitating the hydrophobic interaction among IN subunits, together with other proximal residues within the subunit interface. A rescue experiment with a mutated HIV-1 with RT and IN deleted (ΔRT ΔIN) and IN and RT supplied in trans revealed that the nonenzymatic IN function might be exerted through the IN precursor conjugated with RT (RT-IN). Importantly, the lethal mutations of Tyr15 significantly reduced the RT-IN function and assembly. Taken together, Tyr15 seems to play a key role in facilitating the proper assembly of IN and RT on viral RNA through the RT-IN precursor form. Inhibitors of the IN enzymatic strand transfer function (INSTI) have been applied in combination antiretroviral therapies to treat HIV-1-infected patients. Recently, allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) that interact with HIV-1 IN residues, the locations of which are distinct from the catalytic

  4. A large-scale analysis of alternative splicing reveals a key role of QKI in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Fernando J; Pajares, María J; Martínez-Terroba, Elena; Ajona, Daniel; Morales, Xabier; Sharma, Ravi D; Pardo, Francisco J; Rouzaut, Ana; Rubio, Angel; Montuenga, Luis M; Pio, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Increasing interest has been devoted in recent years to the understanding of alternative splicing in cancer. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis to identify cancer-associated splice variants in non-small cell lung cancer. We discovered and validated novel differences in the splicing of genes known to be relevant to lung cancer biology, such as NFIB, ENAH or SPAG9. Gene enrichment analyses revealed an important contribution of alternative splicing to cancer-related molecular functions, especially those involved in cytoskeletal dynamics. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the altered genes found in our analysis were targets of the protein quaking (QKI), pointing to this factor as one of the most relevant regulators of alternative splicing in non-small cell lung cancer. We also found that ESYT2, one of the QKI targets, is involved in cytoskeletal organization. ESYT2-short variant inhibition in lung cancer cells resulted in a cortical distribution of actin whereas inhibition of the long variant caused an increase of endocytosis, suggesting that the cancer-associated splicing pattern of ESYT2 has a profound impact in the biology of cancer cells. Finally, we show that low nuclear QKI expression in non-small cell lung cancer is an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (HR = 2.47; 95% CI = 1.11-5.46, P = 0.026). In conclusion, we identified several splicing variants with functional relevance in lung cancer largely regulated by the splicing factor QKI, a tumor suppressor associated with prognosis in lung cancer.

  5. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  6. Germline deletion of pantothenate kinases 1 and 2 reveals the key roles for CoA in postnatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rehg, Jerold E; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) phosphorylates pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and controls the overall rate of coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. Pank1 gene deletion in mice results in a metabolic phenotype where fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis are impaired in the fasted state, leading to mild hypoglycemia. Inactivating mutations in the human PANK2 gene lead to childhood neurodegeneration, but Pank2 gene inactivation in mice does not elicit a phenotype indicative of the neuromuscular symptoms or brain iron accumulation that accompany the human disease. Pank1/Pank2 double knockout (dKO) mice were derived to determine if the mild phenotypes of the single knockout mice are due to the ability of the two isoforms to compensate for each other in CoA biosynthesis. Postnatal development was severely affected in the dKO mice. The dKO pups developed progressively severe hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia by postnatal day 10 leading to death by day 17. Hyperketonemia arose from impaired whole-body ketone utilization illustrating the requirement for CoA in energy generation from ketones. dKO pups had reduced CoA and decreased fatty acid oxidation coupled with triglyceride accumulation in liver. dKO hepatocytes could not maintain the NADH levels compared to wild-type hepatocytes. These results revealed an important link between CoA and NADH levels, which was reflected by deficiencies in hepatic oleate synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The data indicate that PanK1 and PanK2 can compensate for each other to supply tissue CoA, but PanK1 is more important to CoA levels in liver whereas PanK2 contributes more to CoA synthesis in the brain.

  7. Lack of impact of pre-existing T97A HIV-1 integrase mutation on integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance and treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Renee R.; Margot, Nicolas A.; Barnes, Tiffany L.; White, Kirsten L.; Callebaut, Christian; Miller, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    T97A is an HIV-1 integrase polymorphism associated with integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) resistance. Using pooled data from 16 clinical studies, we investigated the prevalence of T97A (pre-existing and emergent) and its impact on INSTI susceptibility and treatment response in INSTI-naive patients who enrolled on elvitegravir (EVG)- or raltegravir (RAL)-based regimens. Prior to INSTI-based therapy, primary INSTI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) were absent and T97A pre-existed infrequently (1.4%; 47 of 3367 integrase sequences); most often among non-B (5.3%) than B (0.9%) HIV-1 subtypes. During INSTI-based therapy, few patients experienced virologic failure with emergent INSTI RAMs (3%; 122 of 3881 patients), among whom T97A emerged infrequently in the presence (n = 6) or absence (n = 8) of primary INSTI RAMs. A comparison between pre-existing and emergent T97A patient populations (i.e., in the absence of primary INSTI RAMs) showed no significant differences in EVG or RAL susceptibility in vitro. Furthermore, among all T97A-containing viruses tested, only 38–44% exhibited reduced susceptibility to EVG and/or RAL (all of low magnitude; <11-fold), while all maintained susceptibility to dolutegravir. Of the patients with pre-existing T97A, 17 had available clinical follow-up: 16 achieved virologic suppression and 1 maintained T97A and INSTI sensitivity without further resistance development. Overall, T97A is an infrequent integrase polymorphism that is enriched among non-B HIV-1 subtypes and can confer low-level reduced susceptibility to EVG and/or RAL. However, detection of T97A does not affect response to INSTI-based therapy with EVG or RAL. These results suggest a very low risk of initiating INSTI-based therapy in patients with pre-existing T97A. PMID:28212411

  8. The transcriptional programme of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reveals a key role for tryptophan metabolism in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    tryptophan or indole. Conclusions Biofilm growth of S. Typhimurium causes distinct changes in gene and protein expression. Our results show that aromatic amino acids make an important contribution to biofilm formation and reveal a link between SPI2 expression and surface-associated growth in S. Typhimurium. PMID:20003355

  9. HIV integrase inhibitors: from diketoacids to heterocyclic templates: a history of HIV integrase medicinal chemistry at Merck West Point and Merck Rome (IRBM).

    PubMed

    Egbertson, Melissa S

    2007-01-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent upon the enzyme HIV integrase (IN), one of three essential enzymes encoded in the viral genome. HIV-1 IN catalyzes the insertion of the proviral DNA into the host genome (strand transfer). HIV-1 IN therefore presents an attractive chemotherapeutic target for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS that could provide patients and physicians with an additional option for treatment. Assays were developed to identify inhibitors of IN strand transfer. Diketoacid lead compounds were explored and developed into a variety of heterocyclic templates that are potent inhibitors of integrase strand transfer with suitable medicinal chemical properties for treating HIV infection and AIDS. The 1,6-naphthyridine L-870810 (Antiviral activity in cells IC(95) NHS = 102 nM, n=237), was shown to be efficacious in reducing viral RNA by 1.7 log units after doses of 400mg BID to HIV infected patients. Optimization of physical properties led to L-900564, an inhibitor of HIV IN that has excellent cell potency in the presence of protein (Antiviral activity in cells IC(95) NHS = 16 nM, n=15), excellent activity against mutants raised to HIV integrase inhibitors, and a very good pharmacokinetic profile.

  10. [Integrase inhibitors - new challenges for the treatment of HIV-1 infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Integrase inhibitors are a promising new group of antiretroviral drugs that suppress the integrase yielded by human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) via inhibiting the ,,integration" of the viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into the hosts' DNA genome. In 2007, raltegravir was the first integrase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infections in antiretroviral-pretreated (-experienced) and antiretroviral-naive patients. Recently, elvitegravir, as a fixed coformulation with cobicistat, tenofovir und emtricitabine, has been approved for the treatment of HIV-1-infected antiretroviral-naive patients. InAugust of 2013, dolutegravir, a third integrase inhibitor, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Adiministation (FDA) for the treatment of HIV-1 infections in adults and children aged 12 years and older. Raltegravir has to be applied twice daily without a boosting agent. Elvitegravir and dolutegravir are applied once daily in the presence of a booster (elvitegravir) or unboosted (dolutegravir). In contrast to raltegravir and elvitegravir, dolutegravir shows a high genetic barrier to resistance, and is also applicable for the treatment of several HIV-1 infections with raltegravir and elvitegravir-resistant HIV variants. During the last years, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir have been proven and established in the antiretroviral treatment of HIV-1 infections as effective, safe and well-tolerated agents. However, reliable statement forecasts of long-term toxicity of these substances can not yet be made.

  11. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice

    2015-07-13

    HIV integrase, encoded at the 3'-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of "no-return" in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibition data for the strand transfer (ST) step are compared with in vitro anti-HIV data. The review also examines the issue of the lack of correlation between the ST enzymology data and anti-HIV assay results. Because this disconnect appeared to be a problem associated with permeability, prodrugs of these inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Prodrugs dramatically improved the anti-HIV activity data. For example, for compound, 96, the anti-HIV activity (EC50) improved from 500 nM for this diketo acid to 9 nM for its prodrug 116. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the IC50 and IC90 ST enzymology data for 96 (6 nM and 97 nM, respectively) and the EC50 and EC90 anti-HIV data for its prodrug 116 (9 nM and 94 nM, respectively). Finally, it was confirmed that the prodrug 116 was rapidly hydrolyzed in cells to the active compound 96.

  12. Regulated gene insertion by steroid-induced PhiC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nynne; Moldt, Brian; Dalsgaard, Trine; Jensen, Thomas G; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2008-06-01

    Nonviral integration systems are widely used genetic tools in transgenesis and play increasingly important roles in strategies for therapeutic gene transfer. Methods to efficiently regulate the activity of transposases and site-specific recombinases have important implications for their spatiotemporal regulation in live transgenic animals as well as for studies of their applicability as safe vectors for genetic therapy. In this report, strategies for posttranslational induction of a variety of gene-inserting proteins are investigated. An engineered hormone-binding domain, derived from the human progesterone receptor, hPR891, and specifically recognized by the synthetic steroid mifepristone, is fused to the Sleeping Beauty, Frog Prince, piggyBac and Tol2 transposases as well as to the Flp and PhiC31 recombinases. By analyzing mifepristone-directed inducibility of gene insertion in cultured human cells, efficient posttranslational regulation of the Flp recombinase and the PhiC31 integrase is documented. In addition, fusion of the PhiC31 integrase with the ER(T2) modified estrogen receptor hormone-binding domain results in a protein, which is inducible by a factor of 22-fold and retains 75% of the activity of the wild-type protein. These inducible PhiC31 integrase systems are important new tools in transgenesis and in safety studies of the PhiC31 integrase for gene therapy applications.

  13. Development of an integrase-based ELISA for specific diagnosis of individuals infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegaran Tehrani, Zahra; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Soori, Shahrzad; Azizi, Mohammad; Khabiri, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    Currently, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) are the most common immunological diagnostic methods that are used as the screening tool in HIV detection. Among all three major genes of HIV, the products of gag and env are usually used in EIAs (ELISAs and rapid tests). Hence, the presence of cross reacting antibodies against these antigens leads to the appearance of repetitive false positive results in screening tests. Re-testing the primary reactive samples with EIAs using other HIV antigens can considerably reduce the rate of false positive results. The products of pol gene may act as an appropriate candidate in this context. Integrase is a conserved and immunogenic product of HIV, encoded by the pol gene. The aim of this research was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of an ELISA detecting integrase antibodies. Recombinant integrase was produced in Escherichia coli to develop the integrase-based ELISA. Assay performance was evaluated by HIV positive and negative sera and an HIV panel of BBI (PRB-601). The sensitivity and specificity of assay was determined as 96.7 [95% confidence interval: 91.3-98.9%] and 100% [95% CI: 96.1-100%], respectively. High specificity of this assay may suggest its possible use in the detection of HIV.

  14. Multiple effects of mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase on viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Englund, G; Orenstein, J M; Martin, M A; Craigie, R

    1995-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome into a chromosome of an infected cell is a pivotal step in virus replication. Integration requires the activity of the virus-encoded integrase, which enters the cell as a component of the virion. Results of numerous mutagenesis studies have identified amino acid residues and protein domains of HIV-1 integrase critical for in vitro activity, but only a few of these mutants have been studied for their effects on HIV replication. We have introduced site-directed changes into an infectious DNA clone of HIV-1 and show that integrase mutations can affect virus replication at a variety of steps. We identified mutations that altered virion morphology, levels of particle-associated integrase and reverse transcriptase, and viral DNA synthesis. One replication-defective mutant virus which had normal morphology and protein composition displayed increased levels of circular viral DNA following infection of a T-cell line. This virus also had a significant titer in a CD4-positive indicator cell assay, which requires the viral Tat protein. Although unintegrated viral DNA can serve as a template for Tat expression in infected indicator cells, this level of expression is insufficient to support a spreading viral infection in CD4-positive lymphocytes. PMID:7535863

  15. Site-specific deletion and rearrangement of integron insert genes catalyzed by the integron DNA integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Hall, R M

    1992-01-01

    Deletion of individual antibiotic resistance genes found within the variable region of integrons is demonstrated. Evidence for gene duplications and rearrangements resulting from the insertion of gene units at new locations is also presented. Deletion, duplication, and rearrangement occur only in the presence of the integron-encoded DNA integrase. These events are precise and involve loss or gain of one or more complete insert units or gene cassettes. This confirms the recent definition of gene cassettes as consisting of the gene coding sequences, all except the last 7 bases of the 59-base element found at the 3' end of the gene, and the core site located 5' to the gene (Hall et al., Mol. Microbiol. 5:1941-1959, 1991) and demonstrates that individual gene cassettes are functional units which can be independently mobilized. Both deletions and duplications can be generated by integrase-mediated cointegrate formation followed by integrase-mediated resolution involving a different pair of sites. However, deletion occurs 10 times more frequently than duplication, and we propose that the majority of deletion events are likely to involve integrase-dependent excision of the gene unit to generate a circular gene cassette. The implications of these findings in understanding the evolution of integrons and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial populations is discussed. Images PMID:1311297

  16. A simplified mathematical model of directional DNA site-specific recombination by serine integrases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Stark, W. Marshall; Colloms, Sean D.; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Serine integrases catalyse site-specific recombination to integrate and excise bacteriophage genomes into and out of their host's genome. These enzymes exhibit remarkable directionality; in the presence of the integrase alone, recombination between attP and attB DNA sites is efficient and irreversible, giving attL and attR products which do not recombine further. However, in the presence of the bacteriophage-encoded recombination directionality factor (RDF), integrase efficiently promotes recombination between attL and attR to re-form attP and attB. The DNA substrates and products of both reactions are approximately isoenergetic, and no cofactors (such as adenosine triphosphate) are required for recombination. The thermodynamic driving force for directionality of these reactions is thus enigmatic. Here, we present a minimal mathematical model which can explain the directionality and regulation of both ‘forward’ and ‘reverse’ reactions. In this model, the substrates of the ‘forbidden’ reactions (between attL and attR in the absence of RDF, attP and attB in the presence of RDF) are trapped as inactive protein–DNA complexes, ensuring that these ‘forbidden’ reactions are extremely slow. The model is in good agreement with the observed in vitro kinetics of recombination by ϕC31 integrase, and defines core features of the system necessary and sufficient for directionality. PMID:28077763

  17. Bacteriophage φC31 Integrase Mediated Transgenesis in Xenopus laevis for Protein Expression at Endogenous Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bryan G.; Weeks, Daniel L.

    Bacteriophage φC31 inserts its genome into that of its host bacterium via the integrase enzyme which catalyzes recombination between a phage attachment site (attP) and a bacterial attachment site (attB). Integrase requires no accessory factors, has a high efficiency of recombination, and does not need perfect sequence fidelity for recognition and recombination between these attachment sites. These imperfect attachment sites, or pseudo-attachment sites, are present in many organisms and have been used to insert transgenes in a variety of species. Here we describe the φC31 integrase approach to make transgenic Xenopus laevis embryos.

  18. Characterization of a Replication-Competent, Integrase-Defective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Simian Virus 40 Chimera as a Powerful Tool for the Discovery and Validation of HIV Integrase Inhibitors▿

    PubMed Central

    Daelemans, Dirk; Lu, Richard; De Clercq, Erik; Engelman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Integrase is actively studied as an antiviral target, but many inhibitors selected from biochemical screens fail to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication or primarily affect off-site targets. Here we develop and validate a replication-competent, simian virus 40-HIV integrase mutant chimera as a novel tool to classify the mechanism of action of potential integrase inhibitors. Whereas the mutant was more susceptible than the wild type to entry, reverse transcriptase, and protease inhibitors, it specifically resisted the action of integrase inhibitor L-870,810. We furthermore demonstrate inhibition of integration by GS-9137 and GS-9160 and off-site targeting by the 6-aminoquinolone antibiotic WM-5. PMID:17287285

  19. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  20. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A; Hurt, Christopher B; Eron, Joseph J; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug resistance and occur mainly

  1. Performance of Celera RUO integrase resistance assay across multiple HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Carole L; Viana, Raquel V; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Silva de Jesus, Carlos; Zeh, Clement; Halvas, Elias K; Mellors, John W

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 sequence variation is a major obstacle to developing molecular based assays for multiple subtypes. This study sought to independently assess performance characteristics of the ViroSeq™ HIV-1 Integrase RUO Genotyping Kit (Celera, US) for samples of multiple different HIV-1 subtypes. 264 samples were tested in the validation, 106 from integrase inhibitor naïve patients' sent for routine HIV-1 drug resistance testing after failing a 1st- or 2nd-line regimen, and 158 samples from an external virology quality assurance program (VQA). For the latter, 53 unique VQA samples were tested in two to five different laboratories to assess assay reproducibility. For all assays, viral RNA was extracted using the ViroSeq extraction module, reverse transcribed, and amplified in a one-step reaction. Four sequencing primers were used to span codons 1-288 of integrase. The Rega subtyping tool was used for subtype assignment. Integrase polymorphisms and mutations were determined as differences from the HXB2 sequence and by the Stanford database, respectively. Sequences obtained from the different laboratories were aligned and sequence homology determined. HIV-1 RNA in the 264 samples ranged from 3.15 to 6.74logcopies/ml. Successful amplification was obtained for 97% of samples (n=256). The 8 samples that failed to amplify were subtype D (n=3), subtype C (n=1), CRF01_AE (n=1), subtype A1 (n=2), and an unassigned subtype (n=1). Of the 256 that successfully amplified samples, 203 (79%) were successfully sequenced with bidirectional coverage. Of the 53 unsuccessful samples, 13 (5%) failed sequencing and 40 (16%) did not have full bidirectional sequence, as a result of failure of sequencing primers: Primer A (n=1); Primer B (n=18); Primer C (n=1); Primer D (n=7) or short sequences (n=16). For the 135 VQA samples (30 unique samples) that were assayed by different laboratories, homology of the sequences obtained ranged from 92.1% to 100%. However, Laboratory 2 detected more mixtures

  2. Prevalence of SOS-mediated control of integron integrase expression as an adaptive trait of chromosomal and mobile integrons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integrons are found in hundreds of environmental bacterial species, but are mainly known as the agents responsible for the capture and spread of antibiotic-resistance determinants between Gram-negative pathogens. The SOS response is a regulatory network under control of the repressor protein LexA targeted at addressing DNA damage, thus promoting genetic variation in times of stress. We recently reported a direct link between the SOS response and the expression of integron integrases in Vibrio cholerae and a plasmid-borne class 1 mobile integron. SOS regulation enhances cassette swapping and capture in stressful conditions, while freezing the integron in steady environments. We conducted a systematic study of available integron integrase promoter sequences to analyze the extent of this relationship across the Bacteria domain. Results Our results showed that LexA controls the expression of a large fraction of integron integrases by binding to Escherichia coli-like LexA binding sites. In addition, the results provide experimental validation of LexA control of the integrase gene for another Vibrio chromosomal integron and for a multiresistance plasmid harboring two integrons. There was a significant correlation between lack of LexA control and predicted inactivation of integrase genes, even though experimental evidence also indicates that LexA regulation may be lost to enhance expression of integron cassettes. Conclusions Ancestral-state reconstruction on an integron integrase phylogeny led us to conclude that the ancestral integron was already regulated by LexA. The data also indicated that SOS regulation has been actively preserved in mobile integrons and large chromosomal integrons, suggesting that unregulated integrase activity is selected against. Nonetheless, additional adaptations have probably arisen to cope with unregulated integrase activity. Identifying them may be fundamental in deciphering the uneven distribution of integrons in the Bacteria

  3. Resistance to HIV Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors Among Clinical Specimens in the United States, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Christopher B.; Sebastian, Joseph; Hicks, Charles B.; Eron, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Data on integrase inhibitor resistance come primarily from clinical trials and in vitro studies. We examined results of all clinically indicated integrase genotypic resistance tests (GRTs) performed at a US national referral lab from 2009 through 2012. Methods. Integrase sequences and demographic data were compiled with paired protease–reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) GRT results, when available. Analyses utilized the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database. “Major” integrase mutations included T66AIK, E92QV, F121Y, Y143CHR, S147G, Q148HKR, and N155H; multiple accessory mutations were also assessed. Results. Among 3294 sequences from 3012 patients, 471 patients had viruses with ≥1 raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance mutation (15.6%). Q148 and N155 pathways were equally represented (both n = 197); 84 had Y143 mutations. Q148 rarely occurred without accessory mutations (n = 3). Among 224 patients with serial integrase GRTs, 22 with baseline wild-type acquired a major mutation, after a median 224 days between tests (interquartile range, 148–335 days). Major mutations were observed to persist up to 462 days. Most (62%) had paired PR-RT results. Patients with integrase-resistant viruses were older and more likely to have PR-RT mutations (both P < .001). Among those with PR-RT data, 42 patients had 4-class resistance (2.3%). Sex, geographic region, and test year were not associated with integrase resistance. High-level dolutegravir resistance was predicted in 12% of patients with raltegravir- or elvitegravir-resistant viruses (2% of all patients). Conclusions. Approximately 1 in 6 US patients undergoing integrase GRT for clinical decision making harbors significant resistance, with Q148 and N155 pathways equally common. Dolutegravir is likely to have full or partial activity against most variants observed. PMID:24145878

  4. Ty3 integrase mutants defective in reverse transcription or 3'-end processing of extrachromosomal Ty3 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, J; Sandmeyer, S B

    1996-01-01

    Ty3, a retroviruslike element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes an integrase (IN) which is essential for position-specific transposition. The Ty3 integrase contains the highly conserved His-Xaa(3-7)-His-Xaa(23-32)-Cys-Xaa(2)-Cys and Asp, Asp-Xaa(35)-Glu [D,D(35)E] motifs found in retroviral integrases. Mutations were introduced into the coding region for the Ty3 integrase to determine the effects in vivo of changes in conserved residues of the putative catalytic triad D,D(35)E and the nonconserved carboxyl-terminal region. Ty3 viruslike particles were found to be associated with significant amounts of linear DNA of the approximate size expected for a full-length reverse transcription product and with plus-strand strong-stop DNA. The full-length, preintegrative DNA has at each 3' end 2 bp that are removed prior to or during integration. Such 3'-end processing has not been observed for other retroviruslike elements. A mutation at either D-225 or E-261 of the Ty3 integrase blocked transposition and prevented processing of the 3' ends of Ty3 DNA in vivo, suggesting that the D,D(35)E region is part of the catalytic domain of Ty3 IN. Carboxyl-terminal deletions of integrase caused a dramatic reduction in the amount of Ty3 DNA in vivo and a decrease in reverse transcriptase activity in vitro but did not affect the apparent size or amount of the 55-kDa reverse transcriptase in viruslike particles. The 115-kDa viruslike particle protein, previously shown to react with antibodies to Ty3 integrase, was shown to be a reverse transcriptase-IN fusion protein. These results are consistent with a role for the integrase domain either in proper folding of reverse transcriptase or as part of a heterodimeric reverse transcriptase molecule. PMID:8676501

  5. von Hippel–Lindau binding protein 1-mediated degradation of integrase affects HIV-1 gene expression at a postintegration step

    PubMed Central

    Mousnier, Aurélie; Kubat, Nicole; Massias-Simon, Aurélie; Ségéral, Emmanuel; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Emiliani, Stéphane; Dargemont, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase, the viral enzyme responsible for provirus integration into the host genome, can be actively degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Here, we identify von Hippel–Lindau binding protein 1(VBP1), a subunit of the prefoldin chaperone, as an integrase cellular binding protein that bridges interaction between integrase and the cullin2 (Cul2)-based von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) ubiquitin ligase. We demonstrate that VBP1 and Cul2/VHL are required for proper HIV-1 expression at a step between integrase-dependent proviral integration into the host genome and transcription of viral genes. Using both an siRNA approach and Cul2/VHL mutant cells, we show that VBP1 and the Cul2/VHL ligase cooperate in the efficient polyubiquitylation of integrase and its subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Results presented here support a role for integrase degradation by the prefoldin–VHL–proteasome pathway in the integration–transcription transition of the viral replication cycle. PMID:17698809

  6. Development of a G118R mutation in HIV-1 integrase following a switch to dolutegravir monotherapy leading to cross-resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Thomas, Réjean; Blanco, José Luis; Ibanescu, Ruxandra-Ilinca; Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Golubkov, Olga; Roger, Michel; Garcia, Federico; Martinez, Esteban; Wainberg, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Dolutegravir shows a high barrier to resistance with no previously reported cases of acquired integrase mutations during first-line therapy. In this study, rapid development of the G118R mutation arose following a switch from first-line elvitegravir/cobicistat/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine to dolutegravir monotherapy. The G118R mutation also arose in a treatment-experienced patient switched to dolutegravir monotherapy. The genetic basis for G118R selection and potential phenotypic outcome was ascertained. Genotypic analysis was performed on patients with virological failure (<1000 copies/mL) on dolutegravir-containing regimens. The Los Alamos database was queried for glycine codon 118 polymorphisms. Cell culture selections and phenotypic drug susceptibility assays assessed resistance via the G118R pathway. We report on two patients who developed viral failure while on dolutegravir monotherapy. Both patients had been on a current or previous regimen containing integrase inhibitors. Virological failure (<1000 copies/mL) emerged early within 2 months following the dolutegravir switch. The appearance of G118R in these two cases and subtype C and CRF02_AG in vitro selections were related to a rare GGA natural polymorphism at codon 118 (1.5% prevalence), facilitating a GGA to AGA transition. Cell culture selections were used to assess the in vitro progression of the G118R pathway leading to cross-resistance to all integrase inhibitors. Although resistance to dolutegravir is typically rare, genetic polymorphisms and monotherapy can facilitate the acquisition of G118R. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. IN VITRO EVOLUTION OF AN HIV INTEGRASE BINDING PROTEIN FROM A LIBRARY OF C-TERMINAL DOMAIN γS-CRYSTALLIN VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Issa S.; Verde, Shawn C.; Overstreet, Cathie M.; Robinson, W. Edward; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    A protein without natural binding functions was engineered to bind HIV-1 integrase. Phage display selections applied a library of variants based on the C-terminal domain of the eye lens protein human γS-crystallin. Multiple loop regions were altered to encode libraries with ≈3.6×1011 different variants. A crystallin variant, termed Integrase-Binding Protein-10 (IBP-10), inhibits integrase catalysis with nanomolar Ki values. IBP-10 interacts with the integrase C-terminal domain and inhibits integrase substrate affinity. This allosteric mechanism allows IBP-10 to inhibit drug resistant integrase variants. The results demonstrate the applicability of the crystallin scaffold for the discovery of binding partners and enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22858140

  8. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-06-18

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  9. Catechol-substituted L-chicoric acid analogues as HIV integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Yeol; Yoon, Kwon Joong; Lee, Yong Sup

    2003-12-15

    HIV integrase catalyzes the integration of HIV DNA copy into the host cell DNA, which is essential for the production of progeny viruses. L-Chicoric acid and dicaffeoylquinic acids, isolated from plants, are well known potent inhibitors of HIV integrase. The common structural features of these inhibitors are caffeic acid derivatives connected to tartaric acid or quinic acid through ester bonds. In the present study, we have synthesized and tested the inhibitory activities of a new type of HIV IN inhibitors, which has catechol groups in place of caffeoyl groups in the structure of L-chicoric acid. Upon substitution of catechol groups at succinic acid, pyrrole-dicarboxylic acid, maleimide or maleic anhydride, the inhibitory activities (IC(50)=3.8-23.6 microM) were retained or remarkably increased when compared to parent compound L-chicoric acid (IC(50)=13.7 microM).

  10. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  11. Structural basis for the potent inhibition of the HIV integrase-LEDGF/p75 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ribone, Sergio R; Quevedo, Mario A

    2017-08-01

    Integrase (IN) constitutes one of the key enzymes involved in the lifecycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the etiological agent of AIDS. The biological role of IN strongly depends on the recognition and binding of cellular cofactors belonging to the infected host cell. Thus, the inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between IN and cellular cofactors has been envisioned as a promising therapeutic target. In the present work we explore a structure-activity relationship for a set of 14 compounds reported as inhibitors of the PPI between IN and the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). Our results demonstrate that the possibility to adopt the bioactive conformation capable of interacting with the hotspots IN-LEDGF/p75 hotspots residues constitutes a critical feature to obtain a potent inhibition. A ligand efficiency (|Lig-Eff|) quantitative descriptor combining both interaction energetics and conformational requirements was developed and correlated with the reported biological activity. Our results contribute to the rational development of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors providing a solid quantitative structure-activity relationship aimed for the screening of new IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. phiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in barley.

    PubMed

    Kapusi, Eszter; Kempe, Katja; Rubtsova, Myroslava; Kumlehn, Jochen; Gils, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase was tested for its feasibility in excising transgenes from the barley genome through site-specific recombination. We produced transgenic barley plants expressing an active phiC31 integrase and crossed them with transgenic barley plants carrying a target locus for recombination. The target sequence involves a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is flanked by the attB and attP recognition sites for the phiC31 integrase. This sequence disruptively separates a gusA coding sequence from an upstream rice actin promoter. We succeeded in producing site-specific recombination events in the hybrid progeny of 11 independent barley plants carrying the above target sequence after crossing with plants carrying a phiC31 expression cassette. Some of the hybrids displayed fully executed recombination. Excision of the GFP gene fostered activation of the gusA gene, as visualized in tissue of hybrid plants by histochemical staining. The recombinant loci were detected in progeny of selfed F(1), even in individuals lacking the phiC31 transgene, which provides evidence of stability and generative transmission of the recombination events. In several plants that displayed incomplete recombination, extrachromosomal excision circles were identified. Besides the technical advance achieved in this study, the generated phiC31 integrase-expressing barley plants provide foundational stock material for use in future approaches to barley genetic improvement, such as the production of marker-free transgenic plants or switching transgene activity.

  13. Preclinical profile of BI 224436, a novel HIV-1 non-catalytic-site integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Craig; Amad, Ma'an; Bailey, Murray D; Bethell, Richard; Bös, Michael; Bonneau, Pierre; Cordingley, Michael; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Edwards, Paul; Fader, Lee D; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Garneau, Michel; Jakalian, Araz; Kawai, Stephen; Lamorte, Louie; LaPlante, Steven; Luo, Laibin; Mason, Steve; Poupart, Marc-André; Rioux, Nathalie; Schroeder, Patricia; Simoneau, Bruno; Tremblay, Sonia; Tsantrizos, Youla; Witvrouw, Myriam; Yoakim, Christiane

    2014-06-01

    BI 224436 is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with effective antiviral activity that acts through a mechanism that is distinct from that of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). This 3-quinolineacetic acid derivative series was identified using an enzymatic integrase long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA 3'-processing assay. A combination of medicinal chemistry, parallel synthesis, and structure-guided drug design led to the identification of BI 224436 as a candidate for preclinical profiling. It has antiviral 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of <15 nM against different HIV-1 laboratory strains and cellular cytotoxicity of >90 μM. BI 224436 also has a low, ∼2.1-fold decrease in antiviral potency in the presence of 50% human serum and, by virtue of a steep dose-response curve slope, exhibits serum-shifted EC95 values ranging between 22 and 75 nM. Passage of virus in the presence of inhibitor selected for either A128T, A128N, or L102F primary resistance substitutions, all mapping to a conserved allosteric pocket on the catalytic core of integrase. BI 224436 also retains full antiviral activity against recombinant viruses encoding INSTI resistance substitutions N155S, Q148H, and E92Q. In drug combination studies performed in cellular antiviral assays, BI 224436 displays an additive effect in combination with most approved antiretrovirals, including INSTIs. BI 224436 has drug-like in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties, including Caco-2 cell permeability, solubility, and low cytochrome P450 inhibition. It exhibited excellent pharmacokinetic profiles in rat (clearance as a percentage of hepatic flow [CL], 0.7%; bioavailability [F], 54%), monkey (CL, 23%; F, 82%), and dog (CL, 8%; F, 81%). Based on the excellent biological and pharmacokinetic profile, BI 224436 was advanced into phase 1 clinical trials.

  14. Efficacy and Tolerability of Integrase Inhibitors in Antiretroviral-Naive Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Abbraccio, Maurizio; Busto, Annunziata; De Marco, Mario; Figoni, Mario; Maddaloni, Adelaide; Abrescia, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral agents recently licensed for the treatment of both naive and experienced HIV-infected patients. They inhibit the catalytic activity of the HIV-encoded enzyme integrase and prevent the integration of the HIV genome into the host cell genome, so slowing the propagation of the infection. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors cause a rapid drop in viral load, exhibit very low drug interactions (except elvitegravir/cobicistat), and have low pill burden and convenient dosing frequency. Drugs in this class have been compared to others in antiretroviral-naive patients with efavirenz and with protease inhibitors. Final results of the STARTMRK trial highlighted the better virologic and immunologic performance of raltegravir over efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil co-formulation. Raltegravir was also superior to atazanavir/ritonavir and darunavir/ritonavir in the ACTG 5257 study for the combined virologic/tolerability endpoint. Elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir was non-inferior to efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir and to atazanavir/ritonavir plus emtricitabine/tenofovir in terms of confirmed virologic response in the GS-US-236-0102 and GS-US-236-0103 studies, respectively. Finally, dolutegravir showed non-inferiority compared to raltegravir in the SPRING-2 study and was superior to efavirenz and darunavir/ritonavir in the SINGLE and FLAMINGO trials, respectively. The aim of this review is to analyze the data on efficacy and safety of integrase strand transfer inhibitors in antiretroviral-naive HIV patients and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of drugs within this class.

  15. phiC31 Integrase-Mediated Site-Specific Recombination in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Rubtsova, Myroslava; Kumlehn, Jochen; Gils, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase was tested for its feasibility in excising transgenes from the barley genome through site-specific recombination. We produced transgenic barley plants expressing an active phiC31 integrase and crossed them with transgenic barley plants carrying a target locus for recombination. The target sequence involves a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is flanked by the attB and attP recognition sites for the phiC31 integrase. This sequence disruptively separates a gusA coding sequence from an upstream rice actin promoter. We succeeded in producing site-specific recombination events in the hybrid progeny of 11 independent barley plants carrying the above target sequence after crossing with plants carrying a phiC31 expression cassette. Some of the hybrids displayed fully executed recombination. Excision of the GFP gene fostered activation of the gusA gene, as visualized in tissue of hybrid plants by histochemical staining. The recombinant loci were detected in progeny of selfed F1, even in individuals lacking the phiC31 transgene, which provides evidence of stability and generative transmission of the recombination events. In several plants that displayed incomplete recombination, extrachromosomal excision circles were identified. Besides the technical advance achieved in this study, the generated phiC31 integrase-expressing barley plants provide foundational stock material for use in future approaches to barley genetic improvement, such as the production of marker-free transgenic plants or switching transgene activity. PMID:23024817

  16. Concise and Practical Asymmetric Synthesis of a Challenging Atropisomeric HIV Integrase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fandrick, Keith R; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Yongda; Tang, Wenjun; Gao, Joe; Rodriguez, Sonia; Patel, Nitinchandra D; Reeves, Diana C; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Sanyal, Sanjit; Gonnella, Nina; Qu, Bo; Haddad, Nizar; Lorenz, Jon C; Sidhu, Kanwar; Wang, June; Ma, Shengli; Grinberg, Nelu; Lee, Heewon; Tsantrizos, Youla; Poupart, Marc-André; Busacca, Carl A; Yee, Nathan K; Lu, Bruce Z; Senanayake, Chris H

    2015-06-08

    A practical and efficient synthesis of a complex chiral atropisomeric HIV integrase inhibitor has been accomplished. The combination of a copper-catalyzed acylation along with the implementation of the BI-DIME ligands for a ligand-controlled Suzuki cross-coupling and an unprecedented bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide-catalyzed tert-butylation renders the synthesis of this complex molecule robust, safe, and economical. Furthermore, the overall synthesis was conducted in an asymmetric and diastereoselective fashion with respect to the imbedded atropisomer.

  17. Intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Majerz-Maniecka, Katarzyna; Musiol, Robert; Nitek, Wojciech; Oleksyn, Barbara J; Mouscadet, Jean-Francois; Le Bret, Marc; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2006-02-15

    2-[(2,5-dichloro-4-nitro-phenylamino)-methoxy-methyl]-8-hydroxy-quinoline 1 and 2-methyl-quinoline-5,8-dione-5-oxime 2 were obtained as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Semiempirical theoretical calculations of energy preferred conformations were also carried out. The crystal structures of both compounds are stabilized via hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking interactions. The planarity of compound 1 is caused by intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  18. Changing the spatial pattern of TFL1 expression reveals its key role in the shoot meristem in controlling Arabidopsis flowering architecture

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Kim; Venail, Julien; Berbel, Ana; Domenech, Maria Jose; Money, Tracy; Conti, Lucio; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Madueno, Francisco; Bradley, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    Models for the control of above-ground plant architectures show how meristems can be programmed to be either shoots or flowers. Molecular, genetic, transgenic, and mathematical studies have greatly refined these models, suggesting that the phase of the shoot reflects different genes contributing to its repression of flowering, its vegetativeness (‘veg’), before activators promote flower development. Key elements of how the repressor of flowering and shoot meristem gene TFL1 acts have now been tested, by changing its spatiotemporal pattern. It is shown that TFL1 can act outside of its normal expression domain in leaf primordia or floral meristems to repress flower identity. These data show how the timing and spatial pattern of TFL1 expression affect overall plant architecture. This reveals that the underlying pattern of TFL1 interactors is complex and that they may be spatially more widespread than TFL1 itself, which is confined to shoots. However, the data show that while TFL1 and floral genes can both act and compete in the same meristem, it appears that the main shoot meristem is more sensitive to TFL1 rather than floral genes. This spatial analysis therefore reveals how a difference in response helps maintain the ‘veg’ state of the shoot meristem. PMID:26019254

  19. Changing the spatial pattern of TFL1 expression reveals its key role in the shoot meristem in controlling Arabidopsis flowering architecture.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Kim; Venail, Julien; Berbel, Ana; Domenech, Maria Jose; Money, Tracy; Conti, Lucio; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Madueno, Francisco; Bradley, Desmond

    2015-08-01

    Models for the control of above-ground plant architectures show how meristems can be programmed to be either shoots or flowers. Molecular, genetic, transgenic, and mathematical studies have greatly refined these models, suggesting that the phase of the shoot reflects different genes contributing to its repression of flowering, its vegetativeness ('veg'), before activators promote flower development. Key elements of how the repressor of flowering and shoot meristem gene TFL1 acts have now been tested, by changing its spatiotemporal pattern. It is shown that TFL1 can act outside of its normal expression domain in leaf primordia or floral meristems to repress flower identity. These data show how the timing and spatial pattern of TFL1 expression affect overall plant architecture. This reveals that the underlying pattern of TFL1 interactors is complex and that they may be spatially more widespread than TFL1 itself, which is confined to shoots. However, the data show that while TFL1 and floral genes can both act and compete in the same meristem, it appears that the main shoot meristem is more sensitive to TFL1 rather than floral genes. This spatial analysis therefore reveals how a difference in response helps maintain the 'veg' state of the shoot meristem. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Accuracy and efficiency define Bxb1 integrase as the best of fifteen candidate serine recombinases for the integration of DNA into the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phage-encoded serine integrases, such as φC31 integrase, are widely used for genome engineering. Fifteen such integrases have been described but their utility for genome engineering has not been compared in uniform assays. Results We have compared fifteen serine integrases for their utility for DNA manipulations in mammalian cells after first demonstrating that all were functional in E. coli. Chromosomal recombination reporters were used to show that seven integrases were active on chromosomally integrated DNA in human fibroblasts and mouse embryonic stem cells. Five of the remaining eight enzymes were active on extra-chromosomal substrates thereby demonstrating that the ability to mediate extra-chromosomal recombination is no guide to ability to mediate site-specific recombination on integrated DNA. All the integrases that were active on integrated DNA also promoted DNA integration reactions that were not mediated through conservative site-specific recombination or damaged the recombination sites but the extent of these aberrant reactions varied over at least an order of magnitude. Bxb1 integrase yielded approximately two-fold more recombinants and displayed about two fold less damage to the recombination sites than the next best recombinase; φC31 integrase. Conclusions We conclude that the Bxb1 and φC31 integrases are the reagents of choice for genome engineering in vertebrate cells and that DNA damage repair is a major limitation upon the utility of this class of site-specific recombinase. PMID:24139482

  1. The Promise of Dolutegravir: A Novel Second Generation Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harmanjit; Kaur, Mandeep; Kakkar, Ashish K; Kumar, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG), a novel integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI), is one of the newest addition to the arsenal of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapeutics. Dolutegravir is the first member of the class of second generation integrase strand transfer inhibitors aimed primarily to address the current unmet need for novel unboosted integrase inhibitors with convenient once-daily dosing and a superior resistance profile. During its clinical development, DTG has demonstrated noninferior or superior efficacy in both treatment-naive as well as treatmentexperienced individuals including those who have previously failed first generation INSTIs. Other potential advantages include a favorable safety profile, low propensity for drug-drug interactions, and prolonged serum half-life permitting once-daily administration in treatment-naive or treatment-experienced INSTI naive HIV patients. Twice-daily administration is recommended in individuals with established or suspected resistance to first-generation INSTIs. This review outlines the need for new HIV therapeutics and summarizes the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profile of dolutegravir.

  2. Postexposure protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV infection by topical integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Parikh, Urvi M; West, Rolieria; Taylor, Andrew; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis; Hazuda, Daria; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2014-03-12

    Coitally delivered microbicide gels containing antiretroviral drugs are important for HIV prevention. However, to date, microbicides have contained entry or reverse transcriptase inhibitors that block early steps in virus infection and thus need to be given as a preexposure dose that interferes with sexual practices and may limit compliance. Integrase inhibitors block late steps after virus infection and therefore are more suitable for post-coital dosing. We first determined the kinetics of strand transfer in vitro and confirmed that integration begins about 6 hours after infection. We then used a repeat-challenge macaque model to assess efficacy of vaginal gels containing integrase strand transfer inhibitors when applied before or after simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We showed that gel containing the strand transfer inhibitor L-870812 protected two of three macaques when applied 30 min before SHIV challenge. We next evaluated the efficacy of 1% raltegravir gel and demonstrated its ability to protect macaques when applied 3 hours after SHIV exposure (five of six protected; P < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Breakthrough infections showed no evidence of drug resistance in plasma or vaginal secretions despite continued gel dosing after infection. We documented rapid vaginal absorption reflecting a short pharmacological lag time and noted that vaginal, but not plasma, virus load was substantially reduced in the breakthrough infection after raltegravir gel treatment. We provide a proof of concept that topically applied integrase inhibitors protect against vaginal SHIV infection when administered shortly before or 3 hours after virus exposure.

  3. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways.

  4. Structural Properties of HIV Integrase. Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, K.; Diamond, T; Hwang, Y; Bushman, F; Van Duyne, G

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the catalytic component of the preintegration complex, a large nucleoprotein assembly critical for the integration of the retroviral genome into a host chromosome. Although partial crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus IN alone and its complex with the integrase binding domain of the host factor PSIP1/lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 are available, many questions remain regarding the properties and structures of LEDGF-bound IN oligomers. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, multiangle light scattering, and small angle x-ray scattering, we have established the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and molecular shapes of IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes in solution. Analyses of intact IN tetramers bound to two different LEDGF truncations allow for placement of the integrase binding domain by difference analysis. Modeling of the small angle x-ray scattering envelopes using existing structural data suggests domain arrangements in the IN oligomers that support and extend existing biochemical data for IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes and lend new insights into the quaternary structure of LEDGF-bound IN tetramers. These IN oligomers may be involved in stages of the viral life cycle other than integration, including assembly, budding, and early replication.

  5. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiwei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD) with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  6. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  7. Four-tiered pi interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive pi electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact pi electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact pi electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished pi interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the pi interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this pi-pi interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  8. Four-tiered {pi} interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive {pi} electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished {pi} interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the {pi} interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this {pi}-{pi} interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  9. Multi-gene phylogenetic analyses reveal species limits, phylogeographic patterns, and evolutionary histories of key morphological traits in Entoloma (Agaricales, Basidiomycota).

    PubMed

    Morgado, L N; Noordeloos, M E; Lamoureux, Y; Geml, J

    2013-12-01

    Species from Entoloma subg. Entoloma are commonly recorded from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres and, according to literature, most of them have at least Nearctic-Palearctic distributions. However, these records are based on morphological analysis, and studies relating morphology, molecular data and geographical distribution have not been reported. In this study, we used phylogenetic species recognition criteria through gene genealogical concordance (based on nuclear ITS, LSU, rpb2 and mitochondrial SSU) to answer specific questions considering species limits in Entoloma subg. Entoloma and their geographic distribution in Europe, North America and Australasia. The studied morphotaxa belong to sect. Entoloma, namely species like the notorious poisonous E. sinuatum (E. lividum auct.), E. prunuloides (type-species of sect. Entoloma), E. nitidum and the red-listed E. bloxamii. With a few exceptions, our results reveal strong phylogeographical partitions that were previously not known. For example, no collection from Australasia proved to be conspecific with the Northern Hemisphere specimens. Almost all North American collections represent distinct and sister taxa to the European ones. And even within Europe, new lineages were uncovered for the red-listed E. bloxamii, which were previously unknown due to a broad morphological species concept. Our results clearly demonstrate the power of the phylogenetic species concept to reveal evolutionary units, to redefine the morphological limits of the species addressed and to provide insights into the evolutionary history of key morphological characters for Entoloma systematics. New taxa are described, and new combinations are made, including E. fumosobrunneum, E. pseudoprunuloides, E. ochreoprunuloides and E. caesiolamellatum. Epitypes are selected for E. prunuloides and E. bloxamii. In addition, complete descriptions are given of some other taxa used in this study for which modern descriptions are lacking, viz. E

  10. Mitochondrial glutathione depletion reveals a novel role for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a key H2O2 emitting source under conditions of nutrient overload

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Once regarded as “byproducts” of aerobic metabolism, the production of superoxide/H2O2 is now understood to be a highly specialized and extensively regulated process responsible for exerting control over a vast number of thiol-containing proteins, collectively referred to as the redox-sensitive proteome. Although disruptions within this process, secondary to elevated peroxide exposure, have been linked to disease, delineation of the sources and mechanisms regulating increased peroxide burden remain poorly defined and as such difficult to target using pharmacotherapy. Here we identify the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) as a key source of H2O2 within skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions of depressed glutathione redox buffering integrity. Treatment of permeabilized myofibers with varying concentrations of the glutathione depleting agent 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) led to a dose-dependent increase in pyruvate-supported JH2O2 emission, with emission rates eventually rising to exceed those of all substrate combinations tested. This striking sensitivity to glutathione depletion was observed in permeabilized fibers prepared from multiple species and was specific to PDC. Physiological oxidation of the cellular glutathione pool following high fat feeding in rodents was found to elevate PDC JH2O2 emission, as well as increase the sensitivity of the complex to GSH depletion. These findings reveal PDC as a potential major site of H2O2 production that is extremely sensitive to mitochondrial glutathione redox status. PMID:24056031

  11. DNA stable-isotope probing of oil sands tailings pond enrichment cultures reveals different key players for toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laban, Nidal Abu; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Oil sands tailings ponds are anaerobic repositories of fluid wastes produced by extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Diverse indigenous microbiota biodegrade hydrocarbons (including toluene) in situ, producing methane, carbon dioxide and/or hydrogen sulfide, depending on electron acceptor availability. Stable-isotope probing of cultures enriched from tailings associated specific taxa and functional genes to (13)C6- and (12)C7-toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Total DNA was subjected to isopycnic ultracentrifugation followed by gradient fraction analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and construction of 16S rRNA, benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) gene clone libraries. T-RFLP analysis plus sequencing and in silico digestion of cloned taxonomic and functional genes revealed that Clostridiales, particularly Desulfosporosinus (136 bp T-RF) contained bssA genes and were key toluene degraders during methanogenesis dominated by Methanosaeta. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae (157 bp T-RF) became dominant under sulfidogenic conditions, likely because the Desulfosporosinus T-RF 136 apparently lacks dsrB and therefore, unlike its close relatives, is presumed incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We infer incomplete oxidation of toluene by Desulfosporosinus in syntrophic association with Methanosaeta under methanogenic conditions, and complete toluene oxidation by Desulfobulbaceae during sulfate reduction.

  12. Population Genetics of Two Key Mosquito Vectors of Rift Valley Fever Virus Reveals New Insights into the Changing Disease Outbreak Patterns in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Tchouassi, David P.; Bastos, Armanda D. S.; Sole, Catherine L.; Diallo, Mawlouth; Lutomiah, Joel; Mutisya, James; Mulwa, Francis; Borgemeister, Christian; Sang, Rosemary; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks in Kenya have increased in frequency and range to include northeastern Kenya where viruses are increasingly being isolated from known (Aedes mcintoshi) and newly-associated (Ae. ochraceus) vectors. The factors contributing to these changing outbreak patterns are unclear and the population genetic structure of key vectors and/or specific virus-vector associations, in particular, are under-studied. By conducting mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analyses on >220 Kenyan specimens of Ae. mcintoshi and Ae. ochraceus, we uncovered high levels of vector complexity which may partly explain the disease outbreak pattern. Results indicate that Ae. mcintoshi consists of a species complex with one of the member species being unique to the newly-established RVF outbreak-prone northeastern region of Kenya, whereas Ae. ochraceus is a homogeneous population that appears to be undergoing expansion. Characterization of specimens from a RVF-prone site in Senegal, where Ae. ochraceus is a primary vector, revealed direct genetic links between the two Ae. ochraceus populations from both countries. Our data strongly suggest that unlike Ae. mcintoshi, Ae. ochraceus appears to be a relatively recent, single 'introduction' into Kenya. These results, together with increasing isolations from this vector, indicate that Ae. ochraceus will likely be of greater epidemiological importance in future RVF outbreaks in Kenya. Furthermore, the overall vector complexity calls into question the feasibility of mosquito population control approaches reliant on genetic modification. PMID:25474018

  13. Dicaffeoyltartaric acid analogues inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and HIV-1 replication at nontoxic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Ryan A; King, Peter J; Victoria, Joseph G; McDougall, Brenda R; Ma, Guoxiang; Mao, Yingqun; Reinecke, Manfred G; Robinson, W Edward

    2002-08-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a major health problem worldwide. In this study, 17 analogues of L-chicoric acid, a potent inhibitor of HIV integrase, were studied. Of these analogues, five submicromolar inhibitors of integrase were discovered and 13 compounds with activity against integrase at less than 10 microM were identified. Six demonstrated greater than 10-fold selectivity for HIV replication over cellular toxicity. Ten analogues inhibited HIV replication at nontoxic concentrations. Alteration of the linkages between the two bis-catechol rings, including the use of amides, mixed amide esters, cholate, and alkyl bridges, was explored. Amides were as active as esters but were more toxic in tissue culture. Alkyl and cholate bridges were significantly less potent against HIV-1 integrase in vitro and were inactive against HIV-1 replication. Two amino acid derivates and one digalloylderivative of L-chicoric acid (L-CA) showed improved selectivity over L-CA against integration in cell culture. These data suggest that in addition to the bis-catechols and free carboxylic acid groups reported previously, polar linkages are important constituents for optimal activity against HIV-1 integrase and that new derivatives can be developed with increased specificity for integration over HIV entry in vivo.

  14. HIV Type 1 genetic diversity and naturally occurring polymorphisms in HIV type 1 Kenyan isolates: implications for integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nyamache, Anthony Kebira; Muigai, Anne W T; Nganga, Zipporah; Khamadi, Samoel A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the extent and predictors of polymorphisms potentially influencing susceptibility to HIV integrase inhibitors. HIV-1 genetic diversity and drug resistance are major challenges in patient management globally. To evaluate HIV genetic diversity and drug resistance-associated mutations within a Nairobi cohort, genetic analysis of the HIV-1 pol-integrase gene regions was performed on samples collected from 42 subjects and 113 Kenyan intergrase sequences deposited in the Los Alamos HIV database. From the partial pol-integrase sequences analyzed phylogenetically, it was shown that 26 (61.9%) were subtype A1, 9 (21.4%) were subtype D, 5 (11.9%) were subtype C, 1 (2.4%) was subtype A2 and 1 (2.4%) was subtype CRF. Integrase-associated mutations were found in 12 patients, and in all 113 sequences already deposited in GenBank. One sample from this study and five from previous Kenyan integrase sequences had mutations at T97A, which is associated with reduced susceptibility to raltegravir.

  15. Site-specific recombination system based on actinophage TG1 integrase for gene integration into bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Nobutaka; Muroi, Tetsurou; Kihara, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2011-03-01

    Phage integrases are enzymes that catalyze unidirectional site-specific recombination between the attachment sites of phage and host bacteria, attP and attB, respectively. We recently developed an in vivo intra-molecular site-specific recombination system based on actinophage TG1 serine-type integrase that efficiently acts between attP and attB on a single plasmid DNA in heterologous Escherichia coli cells. Here, we developed an in vivo inter-molecular site-specific recombination system that efficiently acted between the att site on exogenous non-replicative plasmid DNA and the corresponding att site on endogenous plasmid or genomic DNA in E. coli cells, and the recombination efficiencies increased by a factor of ~10(1-3) in cells expressing TG1 integrase over those without. Moreover, integration of attB-containing incoming plasmid DNA into attP-inserted E. coli genome was more efficient than that of the reverse substrate configuration. Together with our previous result that purified TG1 integrase functions efficiently without auxiliary host factors in vitro, these in vivo results indicate that TG1 integrase may be able to introduce attB-containing circular DNAs efficiently into attP-inserted genomes of many bacterial species in a site-specific and unidirectional manner. This system thus may be beneficial to genome engineering for a wide variety of bacterial species.

  16. Effect of DNA modifications on DNA processing by HIV-1 integrase and inhibitor binding: role of DNA backbone flexibility and an open catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Allison A; Sayer, Jane M; Yagi, Haruhiko; Patil, Sachindra S; Debart, Françoise; Maier, Martin A; Corey, David R; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Burke, Terrence R; Marquez, Victor E; Jerina, Donald M; Pommier, Yves

    2006-10-27

    Integration of the viral cDNA into host chromosomes is required for viral replication. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase catalyzes two sequential reactions, 3'-processing (3'-P) and strand transfer (ST). The first integrase inhibitors are undergoing clinical trial, but interactions of inhibitors with integrase and DNA are not well understood in the absence of a co-crystal structure. To increase our understanding of integrase interactions with DNA, we examined integrase catalysis with oligonucleotides containing DNA backbone, base, and groove modifications placed at unique positions surrounding the 3'-processing site. 3'-Processing was blocked with substrates containing constrained sugars and alpha-anomeric residues, suggesting that integrase requires flexibility of the phosphodiester backbone at the 3'-P site. Of several benzo[a]pyrene 7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide (BaP DE) adducts tested, only the adduct in the minor groove at the 3'-P site inhibited 3'-P, suggesting the importance of the minor groove contacts for 3'-P. ST occurred in the presence of bulky BaP DE DNA adducts attached to the end of the viral DNA suggesting opening of the active site for ST. Position-specific effects of these BaP DE DNA adducts were found for inhibition of integrase by diketo acids. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of DNA structure and specific contacts with the viral DNA processing site for inhibition by integrase inhibitors.

  17. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Young Hwan; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

  18. Key role of the wetting layer in revealing the hidden path of Ge/Si(001) Stranski-Krastanow growth onset

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, Moritz; Grydlik, Martyna; Lichtenberger, Herbert; Hrauda, Nina; Fromherz, Thomas; Schaeffler, Friedrich; Bauer, Guenther; Montalenti, Francesco; Vastola, Guglielmo; Miglio, Leo; Beck, Matthew J.

    2009-11-15

    The commonly accepted Stranski-Krastanow model, according to which island formation occurs on top of a wetting layer (WL) of a certain thickness, predicts for the morphological evolution an increasing island aspect ratio with volume. We report on an apparent violation of this thermodynamic understanding of island growth with deposition. In order to investigate the actual onset of three-dimensional islanding and the critical WL thickness in the Ge/Si(001) system, a key issue is controlling the Ge deposition with extremely high resolution [0.025 monolayer (ML)]. Atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence measurements on samples covering the deposition range 1.75-6.1 ML, taken along a Ge deposition gradient on 4 in. Si substrates and at different growth temperatures (T{sub g}), surprisingly reveal that for T{sub g}>675 deg. C steeper multifaceted domes apparently nucleate prior to shallow (105)-faceted pyramids, in a narrow commonly overlooked deposition range. The puzzling experimental findings are explained by a quantitative modeling of the total energy with deposition. We accurately matched ab initio calculations of layer and surface energies to finite-element method simulations of the elastic energy in islands, in order to compare the thermodynamic stability of different island shapes with respect to an increasing WL thickness. Close agreement between modeling and experiments is found, pointing out that the sizeable progressive lowering of the surface energy in the first few MLs of the WL reverts the common understanding of the SK growth onset. Strong similarities between islanding in SiGe and III/V systems are highlighted.

  19. Genetic ablation of N-linked glycosylation reveals two key folding pathways for R345W fibulin-3, a secreted protein associated with retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2015-01-01

    An R345W mutation in the N-glycoprotein, fibulin-3 (F3), results in inefficient F3 folding/secretion and higher intracellular F3 levels. Inheritance of this mutation causes the retinal dystrophy malattia leventinese. N-Linked glycosylation is a common cotranslational protein modification that can regulate protein folding efficiency and energetics. Therefore, we explored how N-glycosylation alters the protein homeostasis or proteostasis of wild-type (WT) and R345W F3 in ARPE-19 cells. Enzymatic and lectin binding assays confirmed that WT and R345W F3 are both primarily N-glycosylated at Asn249. Tunicamycin treatment selectively reduced R345W F3 secretion by 87% (vs. WT F3). Genetic elimination of F3 N-glycosylation (via an N249Q mutation) caused R345W F3 to aggregate intracellularly and adopt an altered secreted conformation. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein 78) and GRP94 (glucose-regulated protein 94), and the ER lectins calnexin and calreticulin were identified as F3 binding partners by immunoprecipitation. Significantly more N249Q and N249Q/R345W F3 interacted with GRP94, while substantially less N249Q and N249Q/R345W interacted with the ER lectins than their N-glycosylated counterparts. Inhibition of GRP94 ATPase activity reduced only N249Q/R345W F3 secretion (by 62%), demonstrating this variant’s unique reliance on GRP94 for secretion. These observations suggest that R345W F3, but not WT F3, requires N-glycosylation to acquire a stable, native-like structure.—Hulleman, J. D., Kelly, J. W. Genetic ablation of N-linked glycosylation reveals two key folding pathways for R345W fibulin-3, a secreted protein associated with retinal degeneration. PMID:25389134

  20. Mitochondrial glutathione depletion reveals a novel role for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a key H2O2-emitting source under conditions of nutrient overload.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Gilliam, Laura A A; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Neufer, P Darrell

    2013-12-01

    Once regarded as a "by-product" of aerobic metabolism, the production of superoxide/H2O2 is now understood to be a highly specialized and extensively regulated process responsible for exerting control over a vast number of thiol-containing proteins, collectively referred to as the redox-sensitive proteome. Although disruptions within this process, secondary to elevated peroxide exposure, have been linked to disease, the sources and mechanisms regulating increased peroxide burden remain poorly defined and as such are difficult to target using pharmacotherapy. Here we identify the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) as a key source of H2O2 within skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions of depressed glutathione redox buffering integrity. Treatment of permeabilized myofibers with varying concentrations of the glutathione-depleting agent 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene led to a dose-dependent increase in pyruvate-supported JH2O2 emission (the flux of H2O2 diffusing out of the mitochondrial matrix into the surrounding assay medium), with emission rates eventually rising to exceed those of all substrate combinations tested. This striking sensitivity to glutathione depletion was observed in permeabilized fibers prepared from multiple species and was specific to PDC. Physiological oxidation of the cellular glutathione pool after high-fat feeding in rodents was found to elevate PDC JH2O2 emission, as well as increasing the sensitivity of the complex to GSH depletion. These findings reveal PDC as a potential major site of H2O2 production that is extremely sensitive to mitochondrial glutathione redox status. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Structural plasticity of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase sFkpA is a key to its chaperone function as revealed by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Galius, Veniamin; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2006-10-03

    Intramolecular dynamics of periplasmic chaperone FkpA-deltaCT (sFkpA) and its complexes with partially structured substrates are studied by NMR in solution. The backbone amide 15N relaxation of sFkpA reveals flexibility in the relative orientation between the dimerization domain and two juxtaposed catalytic domains identified in the X-ray structure of sFkpA. This flexibility is attributed to the structural plasticity within the long alpha-helical arm (helix III) consisting of residues 84 and 91. Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) indicate an absence of fixed orientation between the sFkpA domains. The substrate binding surface of sFkpA is defined on the X-ray structure by mapping of chemical shift perturbations introduced by complexation of sFkpA with its corresponding protein substrates: partially folded RNase A S-protein and reduced carboxymethylated bovine alpha-lactalbumin (RCM-la). A comparison of 15N relaxation of apo-sFkpA and its complex with RNase A S-protein indicates an increased rigidity within the long alpha-helix III and decreased interdomain mobility of the complex. We speculate that these dynamic properties may play a key role in the chaperone activity of sFkpA, since ability to bind different substrates potentially requires structural adaptations of the chaperone protein. We show that binding of sFkpA to RNase A S-protein greatly reduces the population of aggregated oligomeric species of RNase A S-protein. Finally, a molecular model, the so-called "mother's arms" model, is proposed to illustrate the mechanism of chaperone activity by FkpA.

  2. Structural characterization of native autoinducing peptides and abiotic analogues reveals key features essential for activation and inhibition of an AgrC quorum sensing receptor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tal-Gan, Yftah; Ivancic, Monika; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Blackwell, Helen E

    2013-12-11

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that uses quorum sensing (QS) to control virulence. Its QS system is regulated by macrocyclic peptide signals (or autoinducing peptides (AIPs)) and their cognate transmembrane receptors (AgrCs). Four different specificity groups of S. aureus have been identified to date (groups I-IV), each of which uses a different AIP:AgrC pair. Non-native ligands capable of intercepting AIP:AgrC binding, and thereby QS, in S. aureus have attracted considerable interest as chemical tools to study QS pathways and as possible antivirulence strategies for the treatment of infection. We recently reported a set of analogues of the group-III AIP that are capable of strongly modulating the activity of all four AgrC receptors. Critical to the further development of such ligands is a detailed understanding of the structural features of both native AIPs and non-native analogues that are essential for activity. Herein, we report the first three-dimensional structural analysis of the known native AIP signals (AIPs-I-IV) and several AIP-III analogues with varied biological activities using NMR spectroscopy. Integration of these NMR studies with the known agonism and antagonism profiles of these peptides in AgrC-III revealed two key structural elements that control AIP-III (and non-native peptide) activity: (1) a tri-residue hydrophobic "knob" essential for both activation and inhibition and (2) a fourth anchor point on the exocyclic tail needed for receptor activation. These results provide strong structural support for a mechanism of AIP-mediated AgrC activation and inhibition in S. aureus , and should facilitate the design of new AgrC ligands with enhanced activities (as agonists or antagonists) and simplified chemical structures.

  3. The crystal structure of necrosis- and ethylene-inducing protein 2 from the causal agent of cacao's Witches' Broom disease reveals key elements for its activity.

    PubMed

    Zaparoli, Gustavo; Barsottini, Mario Ramos de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Dyszy, Fabio; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Barau, Joan Grande; Garcia, Odalys; Costa-Filho, Antonio José; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes

    2011-11-15

    The necrosis- and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (NEP1)-like proteins (NLPs) are proteins secreted from bacteria, fungi and oomycetes, triggering immune responses and cell death in dicotyledonous plants. Genomic-scale studies of Moniliophthora perniciosa, the fungus that causes the Witches' Broom disease in cacao, which is a serious economic concern for South and Central American crops, have identified five members of this family (termed MpNEP1-5). Here, we show by RNA-seq that MpNEP2 is virtually the only NLP expressed during the fungus infection. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction results revealed that MpNEP2 has an expression pattern that positively correlates with the necrotic symptoms, with MpNEP2 reaching its highest level of expression at the advanced necrotic stage. To improve our understanding of MpNEP2's molecular mechanism of action, we determined the crystallographic structure of MpNEP2 at 1.8 Å resolution, unveiling some key structural features. The implications of a cation coordination found in the crystal structure were explored, and we show that MpNEP2, in contrast to another previously described member of the NLP family, NLP(Pya) from Pythium aphanidermatum, does not depend on an ion to accomplish its necrosis- and electrolyte leakage-promoting activities. Results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed the importance of a negatively charged cavity and an unforeseen hydrophobic β-hairpin loop for MpNEP2 activity, thus offering a platform for compound design with implications for disease control. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence assays with MpNEP2 performed in the presence of lipid vesicles of different compositions showed no sign of interaction between the protein and the lipids, implying that MpNEP2 likely requires other anchoring elements from the membrane to promote cytolysis or send death signals.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq reveals AP-1 pathway as key regulator that green tea may rely on to inhibit lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Hui; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Tichelaar, Jay W; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a promising chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Multiple signaling events have been reported, however, the relative importance of these mechanisms in mediating the chemopreventive function of green tea is unclear. In the present study, to examine the involvement of AP-1 in green tea polyphenols induced tumor inhibition, human NSCLC cell line H1299 and mouse SPON 10 cells were identified as AP-1 dependent, as these two lines exhibit high constitutive AP-1 activity, and when TAM67 expression was induced with doxycycline, cell growth was inhibited and correlated with suppressed AP-1 activity. RNA-seq was used to determine the global transcriptional effects of AP-1 inhibition and also uncover the possible involvement of AP-1 in tea polyphenols induced chemoprevention. TAM67 mediated changes in gene expression were identified, and within down-regulated genes, AP-1 was identified as a key transcription regulator. RNA-seq analysis revealed that Polyphenon E-treated cells shared 293 commonly down-regulated genes within TAM67 expressing H1299 cells, and by analysis of limited Chip-seq data, over 10% of the down-regulated genes contain a direct AP-1 binding site, indicating that Polyphenon E elicits chemopreventive activity by regulating AP-1 target genes. Conditional TAM67 expressing transgenic mice and NSCLC cell lines were used to further confirm that the chemopreventive activity of green tea is AP-1 dependent. Polyphenon E lost its chempreventive function both in vitro and in vivo when AP-1 was inhibited, indicating that AP-1 inhibition is a major pathway through which green tea exhibits chemopreventive effects.

  5. Screening of potential pseudo att sites of Streptomyces phage ΦC31 integrase in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-peng; Chen, Lu-sheng; Jia, Cai-yan; Zhu, Huan-zhang; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Jiang

    2013-04-01

    ΦC31 integrase mediates site-specific recombination between two short sequences, attP and attB, in phage and bacterial genomes, which is a promising tool in gene regulation-based therapy since the zinc finger structure is probably the DNA recognizing domain that can further be engineered. The aim of this study was to screen potential pseudo att sites of ΦC31 integrase in the human genome, and evaluate the risks of its application in human gene therapy. TFBS (transcription factor binding sites) were found on the basis of reported pseudo att sites using multiple motif-finding tools, including AlignACE, BioProspector, Consensus, MEME, and Weeder. The human genome with the proposed motif was scanned to find the potential pseudo att sites of ΦC31 integrase. The possible recognition motif of ΦC31 integrase was identified, which was composed of two co-occurrence conserved elements that were reverse complement to each other flanking the core sequence TTG. In the human genome, a total of 27924 potential pseudo att sites of ΦC31 integrase were found, which were distributed in each human chromosome with high-risk specificity values in the chromosomes 16, 17, and 19. When the risks of the sites were evaluate more rigorously, 53 hits were discovered, and some of them were just the vital functional genes or regulatory regions, such as ACYP2, AKR1B1, DUSP4, etc. The results provide clues for more comprehensive evaluation of the risks of using ΦC31 integrase in human gene therapy and for drug discovery.

  6. 3D-QSAR and molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhija, Mahindra T.; Kulkarni, Vithal M.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) methods were applied on a series of inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase with respect to their inhibition of 3'-processing and 3'-end joining steps in vitro.The training set consisted of 27 compounds belonging to the class of thiazolothiazepines. The predictive ability of each model was evaluated using test set I consisting of four thiazolothiazepines and test set II comprised of seven compounds belonging to an entirely different structural class of coumarins. Maximum Common Substructure (MCS) based method was used to align the molecules and this was compared with other known methods of alignment. Two methods of 3D QSAR: comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were analyzed in terms of their predictive abilities. CoMSIA produced significantly better results for all correlations. The results indicate a strong correlation between the inhibitory activity of these compounds and the steric and electrostatic fields around them. CoMSIA models with considerable internal as well as external predictive ability were obtained. A poor correlation obtained with hydrophobic field indicates that the binding of thiazolothiazepines to HIV-1 integrase is mainly enthalpic in nature. Further the most active compound of the series was docked into the active site using the crystal structure of integrase. The binding site was formed by the amino acid residues 64-67, 116, 148, 151-152, 155-156, and 159. The comparison of coefficient contour maps with the steric and electrostatic properties of the receptor shows high level of compatibility.

  7. Effects of Etravirine on the Pharmacokinetics of the Integrase Inhibitor S/GSK1265744

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigational integrase inhibitor in phase 2 studies. Healthy subjects received 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 alone once daily for 10 days (period 1) and in combination with 200 mg of ETR twice daily for 14 days (period 2). Serial plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected on day 10 during period 1 and on day 14 during period 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Etravirine had no effects on S/GSK1265744 geometric mean ratios of the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosing interval (1.01; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.956 to 1.06), of the maximum observed plasma concentration (1.04; 90% CI, 0.987 to 1.09), or of the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (0.999; 90% CI, 0.942 to 1.06). Etravirine pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters observed following coadministration with S/GSK1265744 were in the range of historical values reported for ETR alone in healthy subjects. These results indicate that 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 for 10 days as monotherapy followed by an additional 14 days in combination with ETR was well tolerated in healthy subjects and that no dose adjustment of S/GSK1265744 is required when it is coadministered with ETR. PMID:23114768

  8. Dolutegravir, a second-generation integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, R Chris; Lockhart, Staci M; Miller, Misty M; Liedtke, Michelle D

    2014-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, safety, and efficacy of dolutegravir, an integrase strand-transfer inhibitor (INSTI), and to discuss its role in the treatment of HIV-1-infected patients. PubMed articles indexed through August 2013 were identified using the search terms S/GSK1349572, dolutegravir, and integrase inhibitor. Information was also identified from the package insert, cited publication references, professional meeting abstracts, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. English language articleswere selected for evaluation, with preference given to safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic studies conducted in HIV-1-infected patients. Dolutegravir is a new INSTI approved for combination treatment in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescent children. Four phase 3 studies provide the basis for current labeling in antiretroviral-naïve and antiretroviral-experienced adults. Results from these studies demonstrate that dolutegravir is noninferior in efficacy to raltegravir in antiretroviral-naïve patients and superior in antiretroviral-experienced patients. Superiority to efavirenz and darunavir/ritonavir was also demonstrated in antiretroviral-naïve patients. Dolutegravir is well tolerated, exhibits low potential for drug-drug interactions, and has a long serum half-life, allowing it to be administered once-daily in patients without preexisting INSTI resistance. Twice-daily administration is recommended in patients with known or suspected resistance mutations to first-generation INSTIs. Mild elevations in serum creatinine occur following dolutegravir initiation from inhibition of renal organic cation transporter 2 but do not reflect changes in glomerular filtration. Dolutegravir is the first second-generation INSTI and exhibits several advantages over current integrase inhibitors and other preferred antiretrovirals. Long-term efficacy and safety are needed to define dolutegravir's role in treatment.

  9. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an Inhibitor Scaffold of HIV Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Sham, Yuk Y.; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold. PMID:21381765

  10. Substrate mimicry—overcoming HIV-1 integrase resistance mutations | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    HIV integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are among the newest anti-AIDS drugs; however, mutant forms of IN can confer resistance. We developed noncytotoxic naphthyridine-containing INSTIs that retain low nanomolar IC50 values against HIV-1 variants harboring all of the major INSTI-resistant mutations. We found by analyzing crystal structures of inhibitors bound to the IN from the prototype foamy virus (PFV) that the most successful inhibitors show striking mimicry of the bound viral DNA prior to 3'-processing and the bound host DNA prior to strand transfer.

  11. Transmitted resistance to HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: right on schedule.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    Transmitted drug resistance (TDR), the primary acquisition of an HIV variant already resistant to antiretrovirals, affects approximately 15% of all new infections in the United States. Historically, from the time initial agents in the reverse transcriptase, protease and entry inhibitor classes were introduced, it took 3-5 years before the first case reports of TDR appeared. With the description of the first two cases of transmitted integrase stand-transfer inhibitor resistance, it is only a matter of time before the prevalence of TDR affecting this newest antiretroviral class reaches a level warranting baseline resistance testing for all patients entering care.

  12. Caffeoylglycolic and caffeoylamino acid derivatives, halfmers of L-chicoric acid, as new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Uk; Shin, Cha-Gyun; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Lee, Yong Sup

    2007-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of HIV DNA copy into the host cell DNA. L-Chicoric acid (1) has been found to be one of the most potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitor. Caffeoylglycolic and caffeoylamino acid derivatives' halfmeric structures of L-chicoric acid 2 were synthesized for the purpose of simplifying the structure of L-chicoric acid. Among synthesized, compounds 2c and 3f showed HIV-1 IN inhibitory activities with IC(50) values of 10.5 and 12.0 microM, respectively, comparable to that of parent compound L-chicoric acid (IC(50)=15.7 microM).

  13. The evaluation of statins as potential inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Angela T; Kriel, Frederik H; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Mosebi, Salerwe; Abrahams, Shaakira; Hewer, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Lovastatin was identified through virtual screening as a potential inhibitor of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. In an AlphaScreen assay, lovastatin inhibited the purified recombinant protein-protein interaction (IC50 = 1.97 ± 0.45 μm) more effectively than seven other tested statins. None of the eight statins, however, yielded antiviral activity in vitro, while only pravastatin lactone yielded detectable inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity (31.65% at 100 μm). A correlation between lipophilicity and increased cellular toxicity of the statins was observed.

  14. Dolutegravir versus raltegravir in antiretroviral-experienced, integrase-inhibitor-naive adults with HIV: week 48 results from the randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority SAILING study.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Pedro; Pozniak, Anton L; Mingrone, Horacio; Shuldyakov, Andrey; Brites, Carlos; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime F; Richmond, Gary; Buendia, Carlos Beltran; Fourie, Jan; Ramgopal, Moti; Hagins, Debbie; Felizarta, Franco; Madruga, Jose; Reuter, Tania; Newman, Tamara; Small, Catherine B; Lombaard, John; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Dorey, David; Underwood, Mark; Griffith, Sandy; Min, Sherene

    2013-08-24

    Dolutegravir (GSK1349572), a once-daily HIV integrase inhibitor, has shown potent antiviral response and a favourable safety profile. We evaluated safety, efficacy, and emergent resistance in antiretroviral-experienced, integrase-inhibitor-naive adults with HIV-1 with at least two-class drug resistance. ING111762 (SAILING) is a 48 week, phase 3, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, non-inferiority study that began in October, 2010. Eligible patients had two consecutive plasma HIV-1 RNA assessments of 400 copies per mL or higher (unless >1000 copies per mL at screening), resistance to two or more classes of antiretroviral drugs, and had one to two fully active drugs for background therapy. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to once-daily dolutegravir 50 mg or twice-daily raltegravir 400 mg, with investigator-selected background therapy. Matching placebo was given, and study sites were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL at week 48, evaluated in all participants randomly assigned to treatment groups who received at least one dose of study drug, excluding participants at one site with violations of good clinical practice. Non-inferiority was prespecified with a 12% margin; if non-inferiority was established, then superiority would be tested per a prespecified sequential testing procedure. A key prespecified secondary endpoint was the proportion of patients with treatment-emergent integrase-inhibitor resistance. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01231516. Analysis included 715 patients (354 dolutegravir; 361 raltegravir). At week 48, 251 (71%) patients on dolutegravir had HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL versus 230 (64%) patients on raltegravir (adjusted difference 7·4%, 95% CI 0·7 to 14·2); superiority of dolutegravir versus raltegravir was then concluded (p=0·03). Significantly fewer patients had virological failure with treatment

  15. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process.

  16. Identification of novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using shape-based screening, QSAR, and docking approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Here, shape-based screening and QSAR have been successfully implemented to identify the novel inhibitors for HIV-1 IN, and in silico validation is performed by docking studies. The 2D QSAR model of benzodithiazine derivatives was built using genetic function approximation (GFA) method with good internal (cross-validated r(2)  = 0.852) and external prediction (). Best docking pose of highly active molecule of the benzodithiazine derivatives was used as a template for shape-based screening of ZINC database. Toxicity prediction was also performed using Deductive Estimation of Risk from Existing Knowledge (DEREK) program to filter non-toxic molecules. Inhibitory activities of screened non-toxic molecules were predicted using derived QSAR models. Active, non-toxic screened molecules were also docked into the active site of HIV-1 IN using AutoDock and dock program. Some molecules docked similarly as highly active molecule of the benzodithiazine derivatives. These molecules also followed the same docking interactions in both the programs. Finally, four benzodithiazine derivatives were identified as novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors based on QSAR predictions and docking interactions. ADME properties of these molecules were also computed using Discovery Studio. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Virtual screening of the SAMPL4 blinded HIV integrase inhibitors dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Claire; Iorga, Bogdan I.

    2014-04-01

    Several combinations of docking software and scoring functions were evaluated for their ability to predict the binding of a dataset of potential HIV integrase inhibitors. We found that different docking software were appropriate for each one of the three binding sites considered (LEDGF, Y3 and fragment sites), and the most suitable two docking protocols, involving Glide SP and Gold ChemScore, were selected using a training set of compounds identified from the structural data available. These protocols could successfully predict respectively 20.0 and 23.6 % of the HIV integrase binders, all of them being present in the LEDGF site. When a different analysis of the results was carried out by removing all alternate isomers of binders from the set, our predictions were dramatically improved, with an overall ROC AUC of 0.73 and enrichment factor at 10 % of 2.89 for the prediction obtained using Gold ChemScore. This study highlighted the ability of the selected docking protocols to correctly position in most cases the ortho-alkoxy-carboxylate core functional group of the ligands in the corresponding binding site, but also their difficulties to correctly rank the docking poses.

  18. Latest advances in the efficacy, tolerability, and monotherapy of integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Lu, Hongzhou

    2017-01-01

    More than 30 drugs for antiretroviral therapy (ART), including integrase inhibitors (INIs), have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as of 2017. Integrase is the third essential enzyme in the cycle of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication. INIs can effectively inhibit the replication of HIV and HIV is less prone to develop resistance to INIs clinically. Previous studies based on 7 phase III clinic trials indicate that INIs have satisfactory efficacy and tolerability in patients infected with HIV. The latest advances in INIs indicate that: i) dolutegravir (DTG)-based regimens are more efficacious, tolerable, and safer forms of first-, second-, and third-Line ART; ii) current studies have indicated that DTG monotherapy fails both virologically and clinically; and iii) whether the most cost-effective treatment for DTG is to replace efavirenz (EFV) as a first-line ART, to replace protease inhibitors (PIs) in second-line ART, or to replace both as a monotherapy is unclear. Given these circumstances, further study of INIs in terms of drug interactions, dose reduction, drug convenience, and drug costs is warranted.

  19. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E.; Hoyte, Ashley C.; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. PMID:27517812

  20. HIV-1 protease and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory substances from Eclipta prostrata.

    PubMed

    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Subhadhirasakul, Sanan; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Karalai, Chatchanok

    2007-11-01

    The bioassay-guided fractionation for anti-HIV-1 integrase activity led to the isolation of six compounds from the whole plant extract of Eclipta prostrata extract. They were identified as 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl tiglate (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl agelate (2), 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl acetate (3), ecliptal (4), orobol (5) and wedelolactone (6). Of these, compound 6 showed the highest activity against HIV-1 integrase (IN) with an IC50 value of 4.0+/-0.2 microm, followed by compound 5 (IC50=8.1+/-0.5 microm), whereas the four terthiophene compounds (1-4) were inactive (IC50>100 microm). Regarding HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitory activity, compound 1 exhibited appreciable activity against HIV-1 PR with an IC50 of 58.3+/-0.8 microm, followed by compound 4 (IC50=83.3+/-1.6 microm) and compound 3 (IC50=93.7+/-0.8 microm), while compounds 2, 5 and 6 were inactive against HIV-1 PR (IC50>100 microm). This is the first report of anti-HIV-1 IN activities for wedelolactone (6), a coumarin derivative, and orobol (5), an isoflavone derivative. This study supports the use of E. prostrata in AIDS patients, which is in accord with its traditional use by Thai traditional doctors for curing blood related diseases. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Hoyte, Ashley C; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2016-11-10

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  2. A phage integrase directs efficient site-specific integration in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Amy C.; Olivares, Eric C.; Thyagarajan, Bhaskar; Calos, Michele P.

    2000-01-01

    The integrase from the Streptomyces phage φC31 carries out efficient recombination between the attP site in the phage genome and the attB site in the host bacterial chromosome. In this paper, we show that the enzyme also functions in human cells. A plasmid assay system was constructed that measured intramolecular integration of attP into attB. This assay was used to demonstrate that in the presence of the φC31 integrase, precise unidirectional integration occurs with an efficiency of 100% in Escherichia coli and >50% in human cells. This assay system was also used to define the minimal sizes of attB and attP at 34 bp and 39 bp, respectively. Furthermore, precise and efficient intermolecular integration of an incoming plasmid bearing attP into an established Epstein–Barr virus plasmid bearing attB was documented in human cells. This work is a demonstration of efficient, site-specific, unidirectional integration in mammalian cells. These observations form the basis for site-specific integration strategies potentially useful in a broad range of genetic engineering applications. PMID:10801973

  3. Rapid metabolic pathway assembly and modification using serine integrase site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Colloms, Sean D; Merrick, Christine A; Olorunniji, Femi J; Stark, W Marshall; Smith, Margaret C M; Osbourn, Anne; Keasling, Jay D; Rosser, Susan J

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology requires effective methods to assemble DNA parts into devices and to modify these devices once made. Here we demonstrate a convenient rapid procedure for DNA fragment assembly using site-specific recombination by C31 integrase. Using six orthogonal attP/attB recombination site pairs with different overlap sequences, we can assemble up to five DNA fragments in a defined order and insert them into a plasmid vector in a single recombination reaction. C31 integrase-mediated assembly is highly efficient, allowing production of large libraries suitable for combinatorial gene assembly strategies. The resultant assemblies contain arrays of DNA cassettes separated by recombination sites, which can be used to manipulate the assembly by further recombination. We illustrate the utility of these procedures to (i) assemble functional metabolic pathways containing three, four or five genes; (ii) optimize productivity of two model metabolic pathways by combinatorial assembly with randomization of gene order or ribosome binding site strength; and (iii) modify an assembled metabolic pathway by gene replacement or addition.

  4. Discovery and optimization of 2-pyridinone aminal integrase strand transfer inhibitors for the treatment of HIV.

    PubMed

    Schreier, John D; Embrey, Mark W; Raheem, Izzat T; Barbe, Guillaume; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Dubost, David; McCabe Dunn, Jamie; Grobler, Jay; Hartingh, Timothy J; Hazuda, Daria J; Klein, Daniel; Miller, Michael D; Moore, Keith P; Nguyen, Natalie; Pajkovic, Natasa; Powell, David A; Rada, Vanessa; Sanders, John M; Sisko, John; Steele, Thomas G; Wai, John; Walji, Abbas; Xu, Min; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-02-20

    HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitors (InSTIs) represent an important class of antiviral therapeutics with proven efficacy and excellent tolerability for the treatment of HIV infections. In 2007, Raltegravir became the first marketed strand transfer inhibitor pioneering the way to a first-line therapy for treatment-naïve patients. Challenges with this class of therapeutics remain, including frequency of the dosing regimen and the genetic barrier to resistance. To address these issues, research towards next-generation integrase inhibitors has focused on imparting potency against RAL-resistent mutants and improving pharmacokinetic profiles. Herein, we detail medicinal chemistry efforts on a novel class of 2-pyridinone aminal InSTIs, inpsired by MK-0536, which led to the discovery of important lead molecules for our program. Systematic optimization carried out at the amide and aminal positions on the periphery of the core provided the necessary balance of antiviral activity and physiochemical properties. These efforts led to a novel aminal lead compound with the desired virological profile and preclinical pharmacokinetic profile to support a once-daily human dose prediction.

  5. Simian immunodeficiency virus-Vpx for improving integrase defective lentiviral vector-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrase defective lentiviral vectors (IDLV) represent a promising delivery system for immunization purposes. Human dendritic cells (DC) are the main cell types mediating the immune response and are readily transduced by IDLV, allowing effective triggering of in vitro expansion of antigen-specific primed CD8+ T cells. However, IDLV expression in transduced DC is at lower levels than those of the integrase (IN) competent counterpart, thus requiring further improvement of IDLV for future use in the clinic. Results In this paper we show that the addition of simian immunodeficiency (SIV)-Vpx protein in the vector preparation greatly improves transduction of human and simian DC, but not of murine DC, thus increasing the ability of transduced DC to act as functional antigen presenting cells, in the absence of integrated vector sequences. Importantly, the presence of SIV-Vpx allows for using lower dose of input IDLV during in vitro transduction, thus further improving the IDLV safety profile. Conclusions These results have significant implications for the development of IDLV-based vaccines. PMID:22913641

  6. Use of Patient-Derived Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrases To Identify a Protein Residue That Affects Target Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Amy L.; Skinner, Lynn M.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Katzman, Michael

    2001-01-01

    To identify parts of retroviral integrase that interact with cellular DNA, we tested patient-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrases for alterations in the choice of nonviral target DNA sites. This strategy took advantage of the genetic diversity of HIV-1, which provided 75 integrase variants that differed by a small number of amino acids. Moreover, our hypothesis that biological pressures on the choice of nonviral sites would be minimal was validated when most of the proteins that catalyzed DNA joining exhibited altered target site preferences. Comparison of the sequences of proteins with the same preferences then guided mutagenesis of a laboratory integrase. The results showed that single amino acid substitutions at one particular residue yielded the same target site patterns as naturally occurring integrases that included these substitutions. Similar results were found with DNA joining reactions conducted with Mn2+ or with Mg2+ and were confirmed with a nonspecific alcoholysis assay. Other amino acid changes at this position also affected target site preferences. Thus, this novel approach has identified a residue in the central domain of HIV-1 integrase that interacts with or influences interactions with cellular DNA. The data also support a model in which integrase has distinct sites for viral and cellular DNA. PMID:11462051

  7. Cell-permeable stapled peptides based on HIV-1 integrase inhibitors derived from HIV-1 gene products.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Aikawa, Haruo; Ohashi, Nami; Urano, Emiko; Métifiot, Mathieu; Fujino, Masayuki; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Ozaki, Taro; Nozue, Ami; Narumi, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Chie; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Pommier, Yves; Yamamoto, Naoki; Komano, Jun A; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2013-10-18

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an enzyme which is indispensable for the stable infection of host cells because it catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the genome and thus is an attractive target for the development of anti-HIV agents. Earlier, we found Vpr-derived peptides with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IN. These Vpr-derived peptides are originally located in an α-helical region of the parent Vpr protein. Addition of an octa-arginyl group to the inhibitory peptides caused significant inhibition against HIV replication associated with an increase in cell permeability but also relatively high cytotoxicity. In the current study, stapled peptides, a new class of stabilized α-helical peptidomimetics were adopted to enhance the cell permeability of the above lead peptides. A series of stapled peptides, which have a hydrocarbon link formed by a ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis reaction between successive turns of α-helix, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for biological activity. In cell-based assays some of the stapled peptides showed potent anti-HIV activity comparable with that of the original octa-arginine-containing peptide (2) but with lower cytotoxicity. Fluorescent imaging experiments revealed that these stapled peptides are significantly cell permeable, and CD analysis showed they form α-helical structures, whereas the unstapled congeners form β-sheet structures. The application of this stapling strategy to Vpr-derived IN inhibitory peptides led to a remarkable increase in their potency in cells and a significant reduction of their cytotoxicity.

  8. Construction of transgenic Drosophila by using the site-specific integrase from phage phiC31.

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Amy C; Fish, Matthew; Nusse, Roel; Calos, Michele P

    2004-01-01

    The phiC31 integrase functions efficiently in vitro and in Escherichia coli, yeast, and mammalian cells, mediating unidirectional site-specific recombination between its attB and attP recognition sites. Here we show that this site-specific integration system also functions efficiently in Drosophila melanogaster in cultured cells and in embryos. Intramolecular recombination in S2 cells on transfected plasmid DNA carrying the attB and attP recognition sites occurred at a frequency of 47%. In addition, several endogenous pseudo attP sites were identified in the fly genome that were recognized by the integrase and used as substrates for integration in S2 cells. Two lines of Drosophila were created by integrating an attP site into the genome with a P element. phiC31 integrase injected into embryos as mRNA functioned to promote integration of an attB-containing plasmid into the attP site, resulting in up to 55% of fertile adults producing transgenic offspring. A total of 100% of these progeny carried a precise integration event at the genomic attP site. These experiments demonstrate the potential for precise genetic engineering of the Drosophila genome with the phiC31 integrase system and will likely benefit research in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:15126397

  9. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Rasaee, Mohammad J.

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Genome-wide manipulations of Drosophila melanogaster with transposons, Flp recombinase, and ΦC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Venken, Koen J T; Bellen, Hugo J

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements, the Flp recombinase, and the ΦC31 integrase are used in Drosophila melanogaster for numerous genome-wide manipulations. Often, their use is combined in a synergistic fashion to alter and engineer the fruit fly genome. Transposons are the foundation for all transgenic technologies in flies and hence almost all innovations in the fruit fly. They have been instrumental in the generation of genome-wide collections of insertions for gene disruption and manipulation. Many important transgenic strains of these collections are available from public repositories. The Flp protein is the most widely used recombinase to induce mitotic clones to study individual gene function. However, Flp has also been used to generate chromosome- and genome-wide collections of precise deletions, inversions, and duplications. Similarly, transposons that contain attP attachment sites for the ΦC31 integrase can be used for numerous applications. This integrase was incorporated into a transgenesis system that allows the integration of small to very large DNA fragments that can be easily manipulated through recombineering. This system allowed the creation of genomic DNA libraries for genome-wide gene manipulations and X chromosome duplications. Moreover, the attP sites are being used to create libraries of tens of thousands of RNAi constructs and tissue-specific GAL4 lines. This chapter focuses on genome-wide applications of transposons, Flp recombinase, and ΦC31 integrase that greatly facilitate experimental manipulation of Drosophila.

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Key Flavonoid 3'-Hydroxylase and Flavonoid 3',5'-Hydroxylase Genes in Affecting the Ratio of Dihydroxylated to Trihydroxylated Catechins in Camellia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Liyuan; Zhang, Chengcai; Wu, Liyun; Li, Hailin; Zhang, Fen; Cheng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of dihydroxylated to trihydroxylated catechins (RDTC) is an important indicator of tea quality and biochemical marker for the study of genetic diversity. It is reported to be under genetic control but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) are key enzymes involved in the formation of dihydroxylated and trihydroxylated catechins. The transcriptome and HPLC analysis of tea samples from Longjing43 and Zhonghuang2 under control and shading treatment were performed to assess the F3'H and F3'5'H genes that might affect RDTC. A total of 74.7 million reads of mRNA seq (2×101bp) data were generated. After de novo assembly, 109,909 unigenes were obtained, and 39,982 of them were annotated using 7 public databases. Four key F3'H and F3'5'H genes (including CsF3'5'H1, CsF3'H1, CsF3'H2 and CsF3'H3) were identified to be closely correlated with RDTC. Shading treatment had little effect on RDTC, which was attributed to the stable expression of these key F3'H and F3'5'H genes. The correlation of the coexpression of four key genes and RDTC was further confirmed among 13 tea varieties by real time PCR and HPLC analysis. The coexpression of three F3'H genes and a F3'5'H gene may play a key role in affecting RDTC in Camellia sinensis. The current results may establish valuable foundation for further research about the mechanism controlling catechin composition in tea.

  12. In vitro activity of dolutegravir against wild-type and integrase inhibitor-resistant HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Raugi, Dana N; Pan, Charlotte; Sow, Papa Salif; Seydi, Moussa; Mullins, James I; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S

    2015-02-05

    Dolutegravir recently became the third integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) approved for use in HIV-1-infected individuals. In contrast to the extensive dataset for HIV-1, in vitro studies and clinical reports of dolutegravir for HIV-2 are limited. To evaluate the potential role of dolutegravir in HIV-2 treatment, we compared the susceptibilities of wild-type and INSTI-resistant HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains to the drug using single-cycle assays, spreading infections of immortalized T cells, and site-directed mutagenesis. HIV-2 group A, HIV-2 group B, and HIV-1 isolates from INSTI-naïve individuals were comparably sensitive to dolutegravir in the single-cycle assay (mean EC50 values = 1.9, 2.6, and 1.3 nM, respectively). Integrase substitutions E92Q, Y143C, E92Q + Y143C, and Q148R conferred relatively low levels of resistance to dolutegravir in HIV-2ROD9 (2- to 6-fold), but Q148K, E92Q + N155H, T97A + N155H and G140S + Q148R resulted in moderate resistance (10- to 46-fold), and the combination of T97A + Y143C in HIV-2ROD9 conferred high-level resistance (>5000-fold). In contrast, HIV-1NL4-3 mutants E92Q + N155H, G140S + Q148R, and T97A + Y143C showed 2-fold, 4-fold, and no increase in EC50, respectively, relative to the parental strain. The resistance phenotypes for E92Q + N155H, and G140S + Q148R HIV-2ROD9 were also confirmed in spreading infections of CEM-ss cells. Our data support the use of dolutegravir in INSTI-naïve HIV-2 patients but suggest that, relative to HIV-1, a broader array of replacements in HIV-2 integrase may enable cross-resistance between dolutegravir and other INSTI. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of dolutegravir in HIV-2-infected individuals, including patients previously treated with raltegravir or elvitegravir.

  13. HIV Type 1 Integrase Natural Polymorphisms in Viral Variants Circulating in FSU Countries.

    PubMed

    Lapovok, Ilya; Laga, Vita; Kazennova, Elena; Bobkova, Marina

    2017-08-15

    Natural variability of integrase (IN) across HIV-1 variants may influence the emergence of resistant viruses. The most apparent explanation of these fact is the IN polymorphism and the associated differences in codon usage, which, in turn, influence the probability and the terms of DRMs acquisition. Possible mechanisms by which polymorphisms affect DRMs emergence remain disputed and should still be clarified because these substitutions may be associated with a reduced activity of some INSTIs and may impact on ART regimen choice depending of HIV-1 subtype. The aim of this work was to assess the prevalence of naturally occurring polymorphisms within the HIV-1 integrase gene, which might influence the susceptibility to INSTIs, among the patients from Russia and former USSR countries, according to HIV-1 subtypes. A study involved 506 HIV-1 IN sequences of INSTI-naive patients from Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Belarus, and Georgia. Among them, 194 sequences were newly obtained in this study and 312 were downloaded from Los-Alamos database. The proviral DNA was sequenced using an in-house PCR protocol designed on the basis of a well-conserved integrase region in order to detect all HIV-1 variants. The phylogenetic analyses based on IN population sequencing found subtype A6 being the most prevalent (259) (51.2%) in the collection studied, followed by subtype G (36) (7.1%), AG-recombinants (148) (29.3%), subtype B (50) (9.9%), and CRF03_AB (5) (1,0%). The major INSTI resistance-associated mutations (DRMs) were found only in two A6 samples. The prevalence of minor/accessory substitutions depended on HIV-1 variants, while the most notable findings were L74I in subtype A6 (93.1%) and E157Q in subtype B (44.0%). Most of minor DRMs and polymorphic substitutions were concentrated in the central catalytic domain of the IN molecule. Both the DDE triad and HHCC zinc binding motifs were fully conserved. The results of the study suggest a very low

  14. GC/MS-based metabolomic studies reveal key roles of glycine in regulating silk synthesis in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanmei; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinjie; Xiong, Ying; Xu, Guowang; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic profiling of silkworm, especially the factors that affect silk synthesis at the metabolic level, is little known. Herein, metabolomic method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to identify key metabolic changes in silk synthesis deficient silkworms. Forty-six differential metabolites were identified in Nd group with the defect of silk synthesis. Significant changes in the levels of glycine and uric acid (up-regulation), carbohydrates and free fatty acids (down-regulation) were observed. The further metabolomics of silk synthesis deficient silkworms by decreasing silk proteins synthesis using knocking out fibroin heavy chain gene or extirpating silk glands operation showed that the changes of the metabolites were almost consistent with those of the Nd group. Furthermore, the increased silk yields by supplying more glycine or its related metabolite confirmed that glycine is a key metabolite to regulate silk synthesis. These findings provide important insights into the regulation between metabolic profiling and silk synthesis.

  15. Addition of E138K to R263K in HIV integrase increases resistance to dolutegravir, but fails to restore activity of the HIV integrase enzyme and viral replication capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mesplède, Thibault; Osman, Nathan; Wares, Melissa; Quashie, Peter K.; Hassounah, Said; Anstett, Kaitlin; Han, Yingshan; Singhroy, Diane N.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The results of several clinical trials suggest that the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir may be less prone than other drugs to the emergence of HIV drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive patients. We have shown that the R263K mutation commonly emerged during tissue culture selection studies with dolutegravir and conferred low levels of resistance to this drug while simultaneously diminishing both HIV replication capacity and integrase enzymatic activity. E138K has been identified as a secondary mutation for dolutegravir in selection studies and has also been observed as a secondary mutation in the clinic for the integrase inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir. Methods We used biochemical cell-free strand-transfer assays and tissue culture assays to characterize the effects of the E138K/R263K combination of mutations on resistance to dolutegravir, integrase enzyme activity and HIV-1 replication capacity. Results We show here that the addition of the E138K substitution to R263K increased the resistance of HIV-1 to dolutegravir but failed to restore viral replication capacity, integrase strand-transfer activity and integration within cellular DNA. We also show that the addition of E138K to R263K did not increase the resistance to raltegravir or elvitegravir. The addition of the E138K substitution to R263K was also less detrimental to integrase strand-transfer activity and integration than a different secondary mutation at position H51Y that had also been selected in culture. Conclusions The E138K substitution failed to restore the defect in viral replication capacity that is associated with R263K, confirming previous selection studies that failed to identify compensatory mutation(s) for the latter primary mutation. This study suggests that the R263K resistance pathway may represent an evolutionary dead end for HIV in treatment-naive individuals who are treated with dolutegravir and will need to be confirmed by the long-term use of dolutegravir in

  16. Addition of E138K to R263K in HIV integrase increases resistance to dolutegravir, but fails to restore activity of the HIV integrase enzyme and viral replication capacity.

    PubMed

    Mesplède, Thibault; Osman, Nathan; Wares, Melissa; Quashie, Peter K; Hassounah, Said; Anstett, Kaitlin; Han, Yingshan; Singhroy, Diane N; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    The results of several clinical trials suggest that the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir may be less prone than other drugs to the emergence of HIV drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive patients. We have shown that the R263K mutation commonly emerged during tissue culture selection studies with dolutegravir and conferred low levels of resistance to this drug while simultaneously diminishing both HIV replication capacity and integrase enzymatic activity. E138K has been identified as a secondary mutation for dolutegravir in selection studies and has also been observed as a secondary mutation in the clinic for the integrase inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir. We used biochemical cell-free strand-transfer assays and tissue culture assays to characterize the effects of the E138K/R263K combination of mutations on resistance to dolutegravir, integrase enzyme activity and HIV-1 replication capacity. We show here that the addition of the E138K substitution to R263K increased the resistance of HIV-1 to dolutegravir but failed to restore viral replication capacity, integrase strand-transfer activity and integration within cellular DNA. We also show that the addition of E138K to R263K did not increase the resistance to raltegravir or elvitegravir. The addition of the E138K substitution to R263K was also less detrimental to integrase strand-transfer activity and integration than a different secondary mutation at position H51Y that had also been selected in culture. The E138K substitution failed to restore the defect in viral replication capacity that is associated with R263K, confirming previous selection studies that failed to identify compensatory mutation(s) for the latter primary mutation. This study suggests that the R263K resistance pathway may represent an evolutionary dead end for HIV in treatment-naive individuals who are treated with dolutegravir and will need to be confirmed by the long-term use of dolutegravir in the clinic. © The Author 2014. Published

  17. Newer tetracycline derivatives: synthesis, anti-HIV, antimycobacterial activities and inhibition of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Senchani, Geetha; Banerjee, Debjani

    2007-04-15

    A series of new tetracycline derivatives has been synthesized by reacting appropriate tetracyclines, formaldehyde and secondary amino (piperazino) function of fluoroquinolones using microwave irradiation with the yield ranging from 41 evaluated for its anti-HIV, antimycobacterial activities and HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme inhibition studies. Among the synthesized compounds, compound 10 was found to be the most promising compound active against HIV-1 replication with EC(50) of 5.2 microM and was nontoxic to the CEM cells until 200 microM, and MIC of 0.2 microg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with moderate inhibition of both 3'-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 IN.

  18. Raltegravir, elvitegravir, and metoogravir: the birth of "me-too" HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Odde, Srinivas; Ramkumar, Kavya; Neamati, Nouri

    2009-01-01

    Merck's MK-0518, known as raltegravir, has recently become the first FDA-approved HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor and has since risen to blockbuster drug status. Much research has in turn been conducted over the last few years aimed at recreating but optimizing the compound's interactions with the protein. Resulting me-too drugs have shown favorable pharmacokinetic properties and appear drug-like but, as expected, most have a highly similar interaction with IN to that of raltegravir. We propose that, based upon conclusions drawn from our docking studies illustrated herein, most of these me-too MK-0518 analogues may experience a low success rate against raltegravir-resistant HIV strains. As HIV has a very high mutational competence, the development of drugs with new mechanisms of inhibitory action and/or new active substituents may be a more successful route to take in the development of second- and third-generation IN inhibitors. PMID:19265512

  19. Progress in HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: A Review of their Chemical Structure Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahdi, Zahra; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme, one of the three main enzymes of HIV-1, catalyzed the insertion of the viral DNA into the genome of host cells. Because of the lack of its homologue in human cells and its essential role in HIV-1 replication, IN inhibition represents an attractive therapeutic target for HIV-1 treatment. Since identification of IN as a promising therapeutic target, a major progress has been made, which has facilitated and led to the approval of three drugs. This review focused on the structural features of the most important IN inhibitors and categorized them structurally in 10 scaffolds. We also briefly discussed the structural and functional properties of HIV-1 IN and binding modes of IN inhibitors. The SAR analysis of the known IN inhibitors provides some useful clues to the possible future discovery of novel IN inhibitors. PMID:28243261

  20. Design of cell-permeable stapled peptides as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Long, Ya-Qiu; Huang, Shao-Xu; Zawahir, Zahrah; Xu, Zhong-Liang; Li, Huiyuan; Sanchez, Tino W; Zhi, Ying; De Houwer, Stephanie; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-07-11

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host genome, involving several interactions with the viral and cellular proteins. We have previously identified peptide IN inhibitors derived from the α-helical regions along the dimeric interface of HIV-1 IN. Herein, we show that appropriate hydrocarbon stapling of these peptides to stabilize their helical structure remarkably improves the cell permeability, thus allowing inhibition of the HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Furthermore, the stabilized peptides inhibit the interaction of IN with the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75. Cellular uptake of the stapled peptide was confirmed in four different cell lines using a fluorescein-labeled analogue. Given their enhanced potency and cell permeability, these stapled peptides can serve as not only lead IN inhibitors but also prototypical biochemical probes or "nanoneedles" for the elucidation of HIV-1 IN dimerization and host cofactor interactions within their native cellular environment.

  1. Impairment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Integrase SUMOylation Correlates with an Early Replication Defect*

    PubMed Central

    Zamborlini, Alessia; Coiffic, Audrey; Beauclair, Guillaume; Delelis, Olivier; Paris, Joris; Koh, Yashuiro; Magne, Fabian; Giron, Marie-Lou; Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Deprez, Eric; Emiliani, Stephane; Engelman, Alan; de Thé, Hugues; Saïb, Ali

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) orchestrates the integration of the reverse transcribed viral cDNA into the host cell genome and participates also in other steps of HIV-1 replication. Cellular and viral factors assist IN in performing its multiple functions, and post-translational modifications contribute to modulate its activities. Here, we show that HIV-1 IN is modified by SUMO proteins and that phylogenetically conserved SUMOylation consensus motifs represent major SUMO acceptor sites. Viruses harboring SUMOylation site IN mutants displayed a replication defect that was mapped during the early stages of infection, before integration but after reverse transcription. Because SUMOylation-defective IN mutants retained WT catalytic activity, we hypothesize that SUMOylation might regulate the affinity of IN for co-factors, contributing to efficient HIV-1 replication. PMID:21454548

  2. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2012-01-01

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck’s raltegravir and Gilead’s elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5- positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  3. Successful Prevention of Transmission of Integrase Resistance in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Alexandra U; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger D; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Cavassini, Matthias; Battegay, Manuel; Hauser, Christoph; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-transmitted drug resistance (TDR) may increase with the increasing use of INSTIs. We analyzed the prevalence of INSTI TDR in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (2008-2014). In 1 of 1316 drug-naive samples (0.1%), a major INSTI TDR mutation was detected. Prevalence was stable, although INSTIs were increasingly used. We showed that this is in contrast to the introduction of previous drug classes, in which more treatment failures with resistant strains occurred and TDR was observed more rapidly. We demonstrated on a population-level that it is possible to avoid TDR to a new drug class for years. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A Method for Rapid Genetic Integration into Plasmodium falciparum Utilizing Mycobacteriophage Bxb1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Adjalley, Sophie H.; Lee, Marcus C.S.; Fidock, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has presented substantial challenges for research efforts aimed at better understanding the complex biology of this highly virulent organism. The development of methods to perform gene disruption, allelic replacement or transgene expression has provided important insights into the function of parasite genes. However, genomic integration studies have been hindered by low transfection and recombination efficiencies, and are complicated by the propensity of this parasite to maintain episomal replicating plasmids. We have developed a fast and efficient site-specific system of integrative recombination into the P. falciparum genome, which is catalyzed by the mycobacteriophage Bxb1 serine integrase. This system has the advantage of providing greater genetic and phenotypic homogeneity within transgenic lines as compared to earlier methods based on episomal replication of plasmids. Herein, we present this methodology. PMID:20676977

  5. Inhibition of Feline leukemia virus replication by the integrase inhibitor Raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Cattori, Valentino; Weibel, Beatrice; Lutz, Hans

    2011-08-26

    The oncogenic gammaretrovirus Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) has been the leading cause of death among domestic cats until the introduction of efficient diagnostics and vaccines in the late 1980s. So far, no efficient treatment for viremic animals is available. Hence, use of the FeLV model to evaluate antiretroviral therapies applied to HIV is a timely task. The efficacy of the integrase inhibitor Raltegravir, which is widely used for the treatment of HIV in humans, has been assessed in vitro for the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 strain. EC(50) values for FeLV-A inhibition in feline cell lines are in the range of that observed for HIV and xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related gammaretrovirus. Therefore, Raltegravir may be a potential therapeutical agent for felids with progressive FeLV infection.

  6. HIV/HCV-coinfection: which role can new antiretrovirals such as integrase inhibitors play?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    End-stage liver disease has become one of the most frequent causes of death in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. The role of new antiretrovirals in the progression of liver fibrosis has yet to be defined. However with significant toxicities and drug-to-drug interactions of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in combination with ribavirin, with drug to drug interaction of HIV protease inhibitors with HCV protease inhibitors and calcineurin-inhibitors, new antiretrovirals lacking these interactions represent attractive alternatives in the setting of anti-HCV therapy or post liver transplantation. In the following review we want to focus on the new class of HIV integrase inhibitors and discuss present data with regard to special issues of HIV and HCV co-infection. PMID:19959415

  7. Efficient ΦC31 integrase-mediated site-specific germline transformation of Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Pondeville, Emilie; Puchot, Nicolas; Meredith, Janet M; Lynd, Amy; Vernick, Kenneth D; Lycett, Gareth J; Eggleston, Paul; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2014-07-01

    Current transgenic methodology developed for mosquitoes has not been applied widely to the major malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, which has proved more difficult to genetically manipulate than other mosquito species and dipteran insects. In this protocol, we describe ΦC31-mediated site-specific integration of transgenes into the genome of A. gambiae. The ΦC31 system has many advantages over 'classical' transposon-mediated germline transformation systems, because it allows integration of large transgenes at specific, characterized genomic locations. Starting from a general protocol, we have optimized steps from embryo collection to co-injection of transgene-containing plasmid and in vitro-produced ΦC31 integrase mRNA. We also provide tips for screening transgenic larvae. The outlined procedure provides robust transformation in A. gambiae, resulting in homozygous transgenic lines in ∼2-3 months.

  8. Efficiency of Recombination Reactions Catalyzed by Class 1 Integron Integrase IntI1

    PubMed Central

    Collis, Christina M.; Recchia, Gavin D.; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Stokes, H. W.; Hall, Ruth M.

    2001-01-01

    The class 1 integron integrase, IntI1, recognizes two distinct types of recombination sites, attI sites, found in integrons, and members of the 59-be family, found in gene cassettes. The efficiencies of the integrative version of the three possible reactions, i.e., between two 59-be, between attI1 and a 59-be, or between two attI1 sites, were compared. Recombination events involving two attI1 sites were significantly less efficient than the reactions in which a 59-be participated, and the attI1 × 59-be reaction was generally preferred over the 59-be × 59-be reaction. Recombination of attI1 with secondary sites was less efficient than the 59-be × secondary site reaction. PMID:11274113

  9. Integrase-mediated spacer acquisition during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Lee, Amy S Y; Engelman, Alan; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-03-12

    Bacteria and archaea insert spacer sequences acquired from foreign DNAs into CRISPR loci to generate immunological memory. The Escherichia coli Cas1-Cas2 complex mediates spacer acquisition in vivo, but the molecular mechanism of this process is unknown. Here we show that the purified Cas1-Cas2 complex integrates oligonucleotide DNA substrates into acceptor DNA to yield products similar to those generated by retroviral integrases and transposases. Cas1 is the catalytic subunit and Cas2 substantially increases integration activity. Protospacer DNA with free 3'-OH ends and supercoiled target DNA are required, and integration occurs preferentially at the ends of CRISPR repeats and at sequences adjacent to cruciform structures abutting AT-rich regions, similar to the CRISPR leader sequence. Our results demonstrate the Cas1-Cas2 complex to be the minimal machinery that catalyses spacer DNA acquisition and explain the significance of CRISPR repeats in providing sequence and structural specificity for Cas1-Cas2-mediated adaptive immunity.

  10. Resistance to the anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 compound L-chicoric acid results from a single mutation at amino acid 140 of integrase.

    PubMed

    King, P J; Robinson, W E

    1998-10-01

    L-Chicoric acid is an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase in vitro and of HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. Following 3 months of selection in the presence of increasing concentrations of L-chicoric acid, HIV-1 was completely resistant to the compound. Introduction of the mutant integrase containing a single glycine-to-serine amino acid change at position 140 into the native, L-chicoric acid-sensitive virus demonstrated that this change was sufficient to confer resistance to L-chicoric acid. These results confirm through natural selection previous biochemical studies showing that L-chicoric acid inhibits integrase and that the drug is likely to interact at residues near the catalytic triad in the integrase active site.

  11. Usefulness of Integrase resistance testing in proviral HIV-1 DNA in patients with Raltegravir prior failure.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; Álvarez, Marta; Mérida, María Dolores; López, Josefa; Sánchez, José Antonio; Vinuesa, David; Martínez, María Ángeles; Hernández, José; García, Federico

    2016-05-13

    In our study, we have hypothesized that proviral DNA may show the history of mutations that emerged at previous failures to a Raltegravir containing regimen, in patients who are currently undetectable and candidates to simplification to a Dolutegravir containing regimen, in order to decide on once a day or twice a day dosing. We have performed a pilot, observational, retrospective, non interventional study, including 7 patients infected by HIV-1, all with a history of previous failure to a RAL containing regimen, that were successfully salvaged and had reached viral suppression. A genotypic viral Integrase region study was available for each patient at the moment of RAL failure. After an average (IQR) time of 48 months (29-53) Integrase resistance mutations in proviral DNA were studied. All the patients were infected by HIV-1 B subtypes, with a mean age of 55 (range 43 to 56), originating from Spain, and 4 were women. Median viral load (log) and CD4 count at the moment of the study on proviral DNA was of 1.3 log cp/ml (range 0-1.47) and 765.5 cells/μL (range; 436.75-1023.75). The median time (IQR) between previous failure to RAL and the study on proviral DNA was 48 (29-53) months. At Raltegravir failure, N155H was detected in four patients, and other secondary mutations were detected in five patients (71.4 %). In proviral DNA, N155H was detected by population sequencing in three patients (42.8 %), and UDS demonstrated a 9.77 % relative abundance of N155H in the remaining patient. Sanger sequencing correctly identified all the secondary mutations. This is a pilot study that demonstrates the possibility of properly identifying N155H and some secondary mutations 29-53 months after failure.

  12. Examining structural analogs of elvitegravir as potential inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kavita; Gupta, Saumya; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Sharma, Prashant K; Jayaswal, Amit

    2014-08-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem in many parts of the world. The human immunodeficiency virus-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) enzyme has been targeted in HIV patients for therapy. Several integrase inhibitors have been reported, but only elvitegravir (EVG), a new-generation drug, is clinically approved for HIV treatment. In the present work, we investigated two structural analogs of EVG as potential inhibitors of the target molecule, HIV-1 IN. The ligand binding site on HIV-1 IN was identified using Q-SiteFinder, and the HIV-1 IN protein was docked with ligand (EVG and/or analogs) using AutoDock 4. The results suggest that Lys173, Thr125, and His171 are involved in enzyme-substrate binding through hydrogen bonds. Single mutations carried out at Lys173, viz. Lys173Leu (polar > nonpolar) and Lys173Gln (polar > polar), in chain B using PyMOL showed the mutants to have lower binding energy when docked with analog 2, suggesting it to be more stable than analog 1. In conclusion, the mutant HIV-1 IN can bind EVG and its analogs. The physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters also show analog 2 to be a promising molecule that can be developed as an alternative to EVG to help overcome the problem of drug resistance by HIV to this inhibitor. Analog 2 may be used as an HIV-1 IN inhibitor with similar potential to that of EVG. Further validation through wet-lab studies, however, is required for future applications.

  13. Resistance mutations against dolutegravir in HIV integrase impair the emergence of resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Moïsi, Daniela; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-03-27

    Among 1222 antiretroviral-naive patients who received dolutegravir (DTG) as part of first-line therapy, none has developed resistance against this compound after 48-96 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, only four occurrences of virological failure with resistance mutations have been documented in previously drug-experienced patients who received DTG as a first time integrase inhibitor as a component of a second-line regimen. The R263K integrase resistance mutation was observed in two of these individuals who received suboptimal background regimens. We have previously selected mutations at position R263K, G118R, H51Y, and E138K as being associated with low-level resistance to DTG. Now, we sought to investigate the facility with which resistance on the part of R263K-containing viruses might develop. We tested the ability of DTG-resistant viruses containing either the R263K or G118R and/or H51Y mutations to develop further resistance against several reverse transcriptase inhibitors during in-vitro selection experiments. Our results show that DTG-resistant viruses are impaired in their ability to acquire further resistance to each of nevirapine and lamivudine as a consequence of their relative inability to develop resistance mutations associated with these two compounds. Our findings provide an explanation for the fact that no individual has yet progressed to virological failure with resistance mutations associated with dolutegravir in clinical trials in which patients received dolutegravir together with an optimized background regimen.

  14. A metal-induced conformational change and activation of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Asante-Appiah, E; Skalka, A M

    1997-06-27

    Retroviral integrases are composed of three independently folding domains whose organization relevant to one another is largely unknown. As an approach to understanding its structure, we have investigated the effect of the required metal cofactor(s), Mn2+ or Mg2+, on the conformation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that are specific for each of these three domains. Upon the addition of increasing concentrations of the divalent cations to immobilized HIV-1 IN in ELISA assays, binding of mAbs specific for either the C-terminal domain or for an epitope in the catalytic core domain was lost, whereas binding of an N terminus-specific mAb was unaffected. Size exclusion chromatography of a nonaggregating derivative of HIV-1 IN showed that the oligomeric state of the protein did not change under conditions in which recognition of the core and C terminus-specific mAbs was lost. Preincubation with Mn2+ increased the resistance of HIV-1 IN to proteolytic digestion and produced a digestion pattern that was significantly different from that observed with the apoprotein. A derivative that lacked the N-terminal domain, IN(50-288), exhibited the same metal-dependent changes observed with the full-length protein, whereas the isolated catalytic core domain IN(50-212) did not. From this we conclude that the metal-induced conformational change comprises a reorganization of the core and C-terminal domains. Preincubation with Mn2+ increased the specific activity of HIV-1 IN 5-fold. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by the conformation-sensitive C terminus-specific mAb, but this inhibition was reduced greatly if the enzyme was first preincubated with metal ions. Thus, it appears that apo-HIV-1 IN exists predominantly in an inactive conformation that is converted into a catalytically competent form upon the addition of metal ions.

  15. Functional Characteristics of a Highly Specific Integrase Encoded by an LTR-Retrotransposon

    PubMed Central

    Peyretaillade, Eric; Brasset, Emilie; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Background The retroviral Integrase protein catalyzes the insertion of linear viral DNA into host cell DNA. Although different retroviruses have been shown to target distinctive chromosomal regions, few of them display a site-specific integration. ZAM, a retroelement from Drosophila melanogaster very similar in structure and replication cycle to mammalian retroviruses is highly site-specific. Indeed, ZAM copies target the genomic 5′-CGCGCg-3′ consensus-sequences. To enlighten the determinants of this high integration specificity, we investigated the functional properties of its integrase protein denoted ZAM-IN. Principal Findings Here we show that ZAM-IN displays the property to nick DNA molecules in vitro. This endonuclease activity targets specific sequences that are present in a 388 bp fragment taken from the white locus and known to be a genomic ZAM integration site in vivo. Furthermore, ZAM-IN displays the unusual property to directly bind specific genomic DNA sequences. Two specific and independent sites are recognized within the 388 bp fragment of the white locus: the CGCGCg sequence and a closely apposed site different in sequence. Conclusion This study strongly argues that the intrinsic properties of ZAM-IN, ie its binding properties and its endonuclease activity, play an important part in ZAM integration specificity. Its ability to select two binding sites and to nick the DNA molecule reminds the strategy used by some site-specific recombination enzymes and forms the basis for site-specific integration strategies potentially useful in a broad range of genetic engineering applications. PMID:18784842

  16. Therapy-Emergent Drug Resistance to Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors in HIV-1 Patients: A Subgroup Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    You, Jiangzhou; Wang, Hongren; Huang, Xiaojun; Qin, Zhen; Deng, Zhaomin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are a novel class of anti-HIV agents that show high activity in inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Currently, licensed INSTIs include raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG); these drugs have played a critical role in AIDS therapy, serving as additional weapons in the arsenal for treating patients infected with HIV-1. To date, long-term data regarding clinical experience with INSTI use and the emergence of resistance remain scarce. However, the literature is likely now sufficiently comprehensive to warrant a meta-analysis of resistance to INSTIs. Our team implemented a manuscript retrieval protocol using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) via the Web of Science, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We screened the literature based on inclusion and exclusion criteria and then performed a quality analysis and evaluation using RevMan software, Stata software, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). We also performed a subgroup analysis. Finally, we calculated resistance rates and risk ratios (RRs) for the three types of drugs. We identified 26 references via the database search. A meta-analysis of the RAL data revealed that the resistance rate was 3.9% (95% CI = 2.9%-4.9%) for the selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the RAL resistance rate reached 40.9% (95% CI = 8.8%-72.9%) for the selected observational studies (OBSs). The rates of resistance to RAL that were associated with HIV subtypes A, B, and C as well as with more complex subtypes were 0.1% (95% CI = -0.7%-0.9%), 2.5% (95% CI = 0.5%-4.5%), 4.6% (95% CI = 2.7%-6.6%) and 2.2% (95% CI = 0.7%-3.7%), respectively. The rates of resistance to EVG and DTG were 1.2% (95% CI = 0.2%-2.2%) and 0.1% (95% CI = -0.2%-0.5%), respectively. Furthermore, we found that the RRs for antiviral resistance were 0.414 (95% CI = 0.210-0.816) between DTG and RAL and 0

  17. Structure-activity relationships: analogues of the dicaffeoylquinic and dicaffeoyltartaric acids as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase and replication.

    PubMed

    King, P J; Ma, G; Miao, W; Jia, Q; McDougall, B R; Reinecke, M G; Cornell, C; Kuan, J; Kim, T R; Robinson, W E

    1999-02-11

    The dicaffeoylquinic acids (DCQAs) and dicaffeoyltartaric acids (DCTAs) are potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase. They also inhibit HIV-1 replication at nontoxic concentrations. Since integrase is an excellent target for anti-HIV therapy, structure-activity relationships were employed to synthesize compounds with: (1) improved potency against HIV-1 integrase, (2) improved anti-HIV effect in tissue culture, and (3) increased selectivity as indicated by low cellular toxicity. Thirty-four analogues of the DCTAs and DCQAs were synthesized and tested for cell toxicity, anti-HIV activity, and inhibition of HIV-1 integrase. Seventeen of the 34 analogues had potent activity against HIV-1 integrase ranging from 0. 07 to >10 microM. Seventeen analogues that were synthesized or purchased had no inhibitory activity against integrase at concentrations of 25 microM. Of the biologically active analogues, 7 of the 17 inhibited HIV replication at nontoxic concentrations. The most potent compounds were D-chicoric acid, meso-chicoric acid, bis(3,4-dihydroxydihydrocinnamoyl)-L-tartaric acid, digalloyl-L-tartaric acid, bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-L-tartaric acid, dicaffeoylglyceric acid, and bis(3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetyl)-L-tartaric acid. Anti-HIV activity of the active compounds in tissue culture ranged from 35 to 0.66 microM. Structure-activity relationships demonstrated that biscatechol moieties were absolutely required for inhibition of integrase, while at least one free carboxyl group was required for anti-HIV activity. These data demonstrate that analogues of the DCTAs and the DCQAs can be synthesized which have improved activity against HIV integrase.

  18. In vivo and in vitro characterization of site-specific recombination of a novel serine integrase from the temperate phage EFC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Bohyun; Kim, Inki; Nam, Ja-Ae; Chang, Hyo-Ihl; Ha, Chang Hoon

    2016-04-22

    EFC-1 integrase is a site-specific recombinase that belongs to the large family of serine recombinase. In previously study, we isolated the temperate phage EFC-1, and characterized its genomic sequence. Within its genome, Orf28 was predicted encode a 464 amino acid of a putative integrase gene. In this study, EFC-1 integrase was characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro assay was performed using purified His-tag fusion integrase. Also, to identify which serine is involved in the catalytic domain, we used site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed by a recombination assay in vitro. In vivo assay involved PCR and confocal microscopy in HEK293 cells, and determined the minimal lengths of attP and attB sites. According to our results, the EFC-1 integrase-mediated recombination was site-specific and unidirectional system in vitro and in vivo. Serine 21 of EFC-1 integrase plays a major role in the catalytic domain, and minimal sizes of attB and attP was defined 48 and 54 bp. Our finding may help develop a useful tool for gene therapy and gene delivery system. - Highlights: • EFC-1 integrase-mediated recombination was site-specific and unidirectional system. • Serine 21 of EFC-1 integrase plays a major role in the catalytic domain. • The functional minimal sizes of attB and attP was defined 48 and 54 bp.

  19. Knockdown of stem cell regulator Oct4A in ovarian cancer reveals cellular reprogramming associated with key regulators of cytoskeleton-extracellular matrix remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Samardzija, Chantel; Greening, David W.; Escalona, Ruth; Chen, Maoshan; Bilandzic, Maree; Luwor, Rodney; Kannourakis, George; Findlay, Jock K.; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2017-01-01

    Oct4A is a master regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. It is a well-established marker for cancer stem cell (CSC) in malignancies. Recently, using a loss of function studies, we have demonstrated key roles for Oct4A in tumor cell survival, metastasis and chemoresistance in in vitro and in vivo models of ovarian cancer. In an effort to understand the regulatory role of Oct4A in tumor biology, we employed the use of an ovarian cancer shRNA Oct4A knockdown cell line (HEY Oct4A KD) and a global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis to investigate novel biological targets of Oct4A in HEY samples (cell lysates, secretomes and mouse tumor xenografts). Based on significant differential expression, pathway and protein network analyses, and comprehensive literature search we identified key proteins involved with biologically relevant functions of Oct4A in tumor biology. Across all preparations of HEY Oct4A KD samples significant alterations in protein networks associated with cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix (ECM), proliferation, adhesion, metabolism, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer stem cells (CSCs) and drug resistance was observed. This comprehensive proteomics study for the first time presents the Oct4A associated proteome and expands our understanding on the biological role of this stem cell regulator in carcinomas. PMID:28406185

  20. A non-invasive method for studying viral DNA delivery to bacteria reveals key requirements for phage SPP1 DNA entry in Bacillus subtilis cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sofia; Labarde, Audrey; Baptista, Catarina; Jakutytè, Lina; Tavares, Paulo; São-José, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriophages use most frequently a tail apparatus to create a channel across the entire bacterial cell envelope to transfer the viral genome to the host cell cytoplasm, initiating infection. Characterization of this critical step remains a major challenge due to the difficulty to monitor DNA entry in the bacterium and its requirements. In this work we developed a new method to study phage DNA entry that has the potential to be extended to many tailed phages. Its application to study genome delivery of bacteriophage SPP1 into Bacillus subtilis disclosed a key role of the host cell membrane potential in the DNA entry process. An energized B. subtilis membrane and a millimolar concentration of calcium ions are shown to be major requirements for SPP1 DNA entry following the irreversible binding of phage particles to the receptor YueB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella.

    PubMed

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-05-01

    African bovids are a famous example of a taxonomic group in which the correlated evolution of body size, feeding mode, gregariousness, and social organization in relation to the preferred habitat type has been investigated. A continuum has been described ranging from small-bodied, sedentary, solitary or socially monogamous, forest- or bush-dwelling, browsing species that seek shelter from predation in dense vegetation, to large-bodied, migratory, highly gregarious, grazing taxa inhabiting open savannahs and relying on flight or group-defense behaviors when facing predators. Here, we examined a geographically widespread clade within the Bovidae (the genus Gazella) that shows minimal interspecific variation in body size and asked if we could still uncover correlated changes of key ecological and behavioral traits during repeated transitions from open-land to mountain-dwelling. Our study used a multi-locus phylogeny (based on sequence variation of Cytb and six nuclear intron markers) of all extant members of the genus Gazella to infer evolutionary patterns of key ecological and behavioral traits and to estimate ancestral character states using Bayesian inference. At the base of the Gazella-phylogeny, open plains were inferred as the most likely habitat type, and three independent transitions toward mountain-dwelling were uncovered. Those shifts coincided with shifts from migratory to sedentary lifestyles. Character estimation for group size was largely congruent with movement patterns in that species forming large groups tended to be migratory, while small group size was correlated with a sedentary lifestyle. Evolutionary patterns of two other conspicuous traits (twinning ability vs. exclusive singleton births and hornless vs. horned females) did not follow this trend in the Gazella-phylogeny. Furthermore, we inferred the genus Gazella to have emerged in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (10-3Mya), and estimating ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal

  2. Conformational Motions and Functionally Key Residues for Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD-BtuF Revealed by Elastic Network Model with a Function-Related Internal Coordinate.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Li, Xing-Yuan; Hou, Yan-Xue; Wu, Yi-Dong; Zhu, Jian-Zhuo; An, Hai-Long

    2015-08-04

    BtuCD-BtuF from Escherichia coli is a binding protein-dependent adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transmit vitamin B12 across cellular membranes. Experimental studies have showed that during the transport cycle, the transporter undergoes conformational transitions between the "inward-facing" and "outward-facing" states, which results in the open-closed motions of the cytoplasmic gate of the transport channel. The opening-closing of the channel gate play critical roles for the function of the transporter, which enables the substrate vitamin B12 to be translocated into the cell. In the present work, the extent of opening of the cytoplasmic gate was chosen as a function-related internal coordinate. Then the mean-square fluctuation of the internal coordinate, as well as the cross-correlation between the displacement of the internal coordinate and the movement of each residue in the protein, were calculated based on the normal mode analysis of the elastic network model to analyze the function-related motions encoded in the structure of the system. In addition, the key residues important for the functional motions of the transporter were predicted by using a perturbation method. In order to facilitate the calculations, the internal coordinate was introduced as one of the axes of the coordinate space and the conventional Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space with linear approximation. All the calculations were carried out in this internal/Cartesian space. Our method can successfully identify the functional motions and key residues for the transporter BtuCD-BtuF, which are well consistent with the experimental observations.

  3. Dynamic Modulation of HIV-1 Integrase Structure and Function by Cellular Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Protein*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christopher J.; Kessl, Jacques J.; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Dar, Mohd Jamal; Engelman, Alan; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2008-01-01

    The mandatory integration of the reverse-transcribed HIV-1 genome into host chromatin is catalyzed by the viral protein integrase (IN), and IN activity can be regulated by numerous viral and cellular proteins. Among these, LEDGF has been identified as a cellular cofactor critical for effective HIV-1 integration. The x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic core domain (CCD) of IN in complex with the IN binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF has furthermore revealed essential protein-protein contacts. However, mutagenic studies indicated that interactions between the full-length proteins were more extensive than the contacts observed in the co-crystal structure of the isolated domains. Therefore, we have conducted detailed biochemical characterization of the interactions between full-length IN and LEDGF. Our results reveal a highly dynamic nature of IN subunit-subunit interactions. LEDGF strongly stabilized these interactions and promoted IN tetramerization. Mass spectrometric protein footprinting and molecular modeling experiments uncovered novel intra- and inter-protein-protein contacts in the full-length IN-LEDGF complex that lay outside of the observable IBD-CCD structure. In particular, our studies defined the IN tetramer interface important for enzymatic activities and high affinity LEDGF binding. These findings provide new insight into how LEDGF modulates HIV-1 IN structure and function, and highlight the potential for exploiting the highly dynamic structure of multimeric IN as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:18801737

  4. OCTOPUS-LIKE 2, a novel player in Arabidopsis root and vascular development, reveals a key role for OCTOPUS family genes in root metaphloem sieve tube differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Sola, M Aguila; Coiro, Mario; Crivelli, Simona; Zeeman, Samuel C; Schmidt Kjølner Hansen, Signe; Truernit, Elisabeth

    2017-09-06

    Protophloem and metaphloem sieve tubes are essential for transporting carbohydrates and signalling molecules towards sink tissues. OCTOPUS (OPS) was previously identified as an important regulator of protophloem differentiation in Arabidopsis roots. Here, we investigated the role of OCTOPUS-LIKE 2 (OPL2), a gene homologous to OPS. OPL2 expression patterns were analysed, and functional equivalence of OPS and OPL2 was tested. Mutant and double mutant phenotypes were investigated. OPS and OPL2 displayed overlapping expression patterns and a high degree of functional overlap. A mutation in OPL2 revealed redundant functions of OPS and OPL2 in developmental processes in which OPS was known to play a role, notably cotyledon vascular patterning and protophloem development. Moreover, we also uncovered redundant roles for OPS and OPL2 in leaf vascular patterning and, most interestingly, metaphloem sieve tube differentiation. Our results reveal a novel OPS-like protein that, together with OPS, is an important regulator of vascular patterning, root growth and phloem development. OPS and OPL2 are the first genes identified that play a role in metaphloem sieve tube differentiation. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. The inhibition process of HIV-1 integrase by diketoacids molecules: Understanding the factors governing the better efficiency of dolutegravir.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Léa; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Fermandjian, Serge; Maroun, Richard G; Gresh, Nohad; Hobaika, Zeina

    2017-07-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 integrase is responsible for the covalent insertion of a newly synthesized double-stranded viral DNA into the host cells, and is an emerging target for antivirus drug design. Raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG) are the first two integrase strand transfer inhibitors used in therapy. However, treated patients eventually develop detrimental resistance mutations. By contrast, a recently approved drug, dolutegravir (DTG), presents a high barrier to resistance. This study aims to understand the increased efficiency of DTG upon focusing on its interaction properties with viral DNA. The results showed DTG to be involved in more extended interactions with viral DNA than EVG. Such interactions involve the halobenzene and scaffold of DTG and EVG and bases 5'G(-4)3', 3'A(3)5'and 3'C(4)5'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Real-time monitoring of disintegration activity of catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase using molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-wei; Zhao, Ming-ming; He, Hong-qiu; Guo, Shun-xing

    2013-09-15

    HIV-1 integrase, an essential enzyme for retroviral replication, is a validated target for anti-HIV therapy development. The catalytic core domain of integrase (IN-CCD) is capable of catalyzing disintegration reaction. In this work, a hairpin-shaped disintegration substrate was designed and validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; a molecular beacon-based assay was developed for disintegration reaction of IN-CCD. Results showed that the disintegration substrate could be recognized and catalyzed by IN-CCD, and the disintegration reaction can be monitored according to the increase of fluorescent signal. The assay can be applied to real-time detection of disintegration with advantages of simplicity, high sensitivity, and excellent specificity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of HIV Integrase Resistance in Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Iris; Zhang, Yinfeng; Cummings, Vanessa; Cloherty, Gavin A; Connor, Matthew; Beauchamp, Geetha; Griffith, Sam; Rose, Scott; Gallant, Joel; Scott, Hyman M; Shoptaw, Steven; Del Rio, Carlos; Kuo, Irene; Mannheimer, Sharon; Tieu, Hong-Van; Hurt, Christopher B; Fields, Sheldon D; Wheeler, Darrell P; Mayer, Kenneth H; Koblin, Beryl A; Eshleman, Susan H

    2017-04-06

    Resistance to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors was frequently detected in HIV from black men who have sex with men (MSM) enrolled in the HIV prevention trials network (HPTN) 061 study. In this study, integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) resistance was analyzed in black MSM enrolled in HPTN 061 (134 infected at enrollment and 23 seroconverters) and a follow-up study, HPTN 073 (eight seroconverters). The ViroSeq HIV-1 Integrase Genotyping Kit (Abbott Molecular) was used for analysis. Major INSTI resistance mutations were not detected in any of the samples. HIV from 14 (8.4%) of the 165 men, including 4 (12.9%) of 31 seroconverters, had accessory or polymorphic INSTI-associated mutations. The most frequently detected mutation was E157Q. These findings are promising because INSTI-based regimens are now recommended for first-line antiretroviral treatment and because long-acting cabotegravir is being evaluated for pre-exposure prophylaxis.

  8. Genome Sequencing Reveals a Phage in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lehours, Philippe; Vale, Filipa F.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Melefors, Ojar; Advani, Reza; Glavas, Steve; Guegueniat, Julia; Gontier, Etienne; Lacomme, Sabrina; Alves Matos, António; Menard, Armelle; Mégraud, Francis; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Anders F.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa in more than half of the human population; in a subset of this population, its presence is associated with development of severe disease, such as gastric cancer. Genomic analysis of several strains has revealed an extensive H. pylori pan-genome, likely to grow as more genomes are sampled. Here we describe the draft genome sequence (63 contigs; 26× mean coverage) of H. pylori strain B45, isolated from a patient with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The major finding was a 24.6-kb prophage integrated in the bacterial genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (22/27) with prophage region II of Helicobacter acinonychis strain Sheeba. After UV treatment of liquid cultures, circular DNA carrying the prophage integrase gene could be detected, and intracellular tailed phage-like particles were observed in H. pylori cells by transmission electron microscopy, indicating that phage production can be induced from the prophage. PCR amplification and sequencing of the integrase gene from 341 H. pylori strains from different geographic regions revealed a high prevalence of the prophage (21.4%). Phylogenetic reconstruction showed four distinct clusters in the integrase gene, three of which tended to be specific for geographic regions. Our study implies that phages may play important roles in the ecology and evolution of H. pylori. PMID:22086490

  9. Analysis of natural variants of the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site reveals that primary sequence plays a key role in cap-independent translation

    PubMed Central

    Barría, María Inés; González, Angel; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; León, Ursula; Vollrath, Valeska; Marsac, Delphine; Monasterio, Octavio; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; Soza, Alejandro; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    The HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES) spans a region of ∼340 nt that encompasses most of the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the viral mRNA and the first 24–40 nt of the core-coding region. To investigate the implication of altering the primary sequence of the 5′UTR on IRES activity, naturally occurring variants of the 5′UTR were isolated from clinical samples and analyzed. The impact of the identified mutations on translation was evaluated in the context of RLuc/FLuc bicistronic RNAs. Results show that depending on their location within the RNA structure, these naturally occurring mutations cause a range of effects on IRES activity. However, mutations within subdomain IIId hinder HCV IRES-mediated translation. In an attempt to explain these data, the dynamic behavior of the subdomain IIId was analyzed by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Despite the loss of function, MD simulations predicted that mutant G266A/G268U possesses a structure similar to the wt-RNA. This prediction was validated by analyzing the secondary structure of the isolated IIId RNAs by circular dichroism spectroscopy in the presence or absence of Mg2+ ions. These data strongly suggest that the primary sequence of subdomain IIId plays a key role in HCV IRES-mediated translation. PMID:19106142

  10. Structure of Yeast OSBP-Related Protein Osh1 Reveals Key Determinants for Lipid Transport and Protein Targeting at the Nucleus-Vacuole Junction.

    PubMed

    Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Tong, Junsen; Im, Young Jun

    2017-03-10

    Yeast Osh1 belongs to the oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) family of proteins and contains multiple targeting modules optimized for lipid transport at the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ). The key determinants for NVJ targeting and the role of Osh1 at NVJs have remained elusive because of unknown lipid specificities. In this study, we determined the structures of the ankyrin repeat domain (ANK), and OSBP-related domain (ORD) of Osh1, in complex with Nvj1 and ergosterol, respectively. The Osh1 ANK forms a unique bi-lobed structure that recognizes a cytosolic helical segment of Nvj1. We discovered that Osh1 ORD binds ergosterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate PI(4)P in a competitive manner, suggesting counter-transport function of the two lipids. Ergosterol is bound to the hydrophobic pocket in a head-down orientation, and the structure of the PI(4)P-binding site in Osh1 is well conserved. Our results suggest that Osh1 performs non-vesicular transport of ergosterol and PI(4)P at the NVJ.

  11. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs.

    PubMed

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H

    2014-07-01

    Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  12. Selection and Counterselection of Hia Expression Reveals a Key Role for Phase-Variable Expression of Hia in Infection Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Winter, Linda E.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Barenkamp, Stephen J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Hia is a major adhesin of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and has long been investigated as a vaccine candidate. Here we show that Hia phase variation is controlled by changes in the length of a polythymidine tract located in the hia promoter. Studies of an invasive clinical isolate (strain R2866) show that strains expressing high Hia levels are more efficiently killed by opsonophagocytosis. An opsonophagocytic assay was used to select for a subpopulation of variants that expressed a low level of Hia, which facilitated their escape from killing by anti-Hia antisera. Conversely, a subpopulation of variants expressing a high level of Hia was selected for during passaging through Chang cells. In both cases, phase variation of Hia expression corresponded directly with discrete modal changes in polythymidine tract length. In the chinchilla model of NTHi infection, we observed consistent selection for high Hia expression upon nasopharyngeal colonization, confirming the key role of phase-variable expression of Hia within a specific niche in vivo. PMID:25712964

  13. Feline lentivirus evolution in cross-species infection reveals extensive G-to-A mutation and selection on key residues in the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Poss, Mary; Ross, Howard A; Painter, Sally L; Holley, David C; Terwee, Julie A; Vandewoude, Sue; Rodrigo, Allen

    2006-03-01

    Factors that restrict a virus from establishing productive infection in a new host species are important to understand because cross-species transmission events are often associated with emergent viral diseases. To determine the evolutionary pressures on viruses in new host species, we evaluated the molecular evolution of a feline immunodeficiency virus derived from a wild cougar, Puma concolor, during infection of domestic cats. Analyses were based on the coding portion of genome sequences recovered at intervals over 37 weeks of infection of six cats inoculated by either intravenous or oral-nasal routes. All cats inoculated intravenously, but only one inoculated orally-nasally, became persistently viremic. There were notable accumulations of lethal errors and predominance of G-to-A alterations throughout the genome, which were marked in the viral polymerase gene, pol. Viral structural (env and gag) and accessory (vif and orfA) genes evolved neutrally or were under purifying selection. However, sites under positive selection were identified in reverse transcriptase that involved residues in the nucleotide binding pocket or those contacting the RNA-DNA duplex. The findings of extensive G-to-A alterations in this cross-species infection are consistent with the recently described editing of host cytidine deaminase on lentivirus genomes. Additionally, we demonstrate that the primary site of hypermutation is the viral pol gene and the dominant selective force acting on this feline immunodeficiency virus as it replicates in a new host species is on key residues of the virus polymerase.

  14. Quantitative Proteomic analysis on Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells reversion Reveal STAT1 as a key regulator between Liver Fibrosis and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Fangyan; Fan, Xu; Lin, Cong; Hao, Yunwei; Wei, Handong; Lin, Weiran; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the changes of activated HSCs reversion is an essential step toward clarifying the potential roles of HSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis. In this study, we chose adipocyte differentiation mixture to induce LX-2 cells for 2 days in vitro as reversion phase, comparing with normal cultured LX-2 cells as activation phase. Mass spectrometric-based SILAC technology was adopted to study differentially expressed proteome of LX-2 cells between reversion and activation. Compared with activated HSCs, 273 proteins showed significant differences in reverted HSCs. The main pathway of up-regulated proteins associated with reversion of HSCs mainly related to oxidation-reduction and lipid metabolism, while the top pathway of down-regulated proteins was found in regulated cytoskeleton formation. Changes in the expression levels of selected proteins were verified by Western blotting analysis, especially STAT1, FLNA, LASP1, and NAMPT proteins. The distinct roles of STAT1 were further analyzed between activated and reverted of HSCs, it was found that STAT1 could affect cell proliferation of HSCs and could be viewed as a key regulator in the reversion of HSCs. Thus, the proteomic analysis could accelerate our understanding of the mechanisms of HSC reversion on cessation of fibrogenic stimuli and provide new targets for antifibrotic liver therapy. PMID:28322315

  15. A molecular mechanism for the origin of a key evolutionary innovation, the bird beak and palate, revealed by an integrative approach to major transitions in vertebrate history.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Morris, Zachary S; Sefton, Elizabeth M; Tok, Atalay; Tokita, Masayoshi; Namkoong, Bumjin; Camacho, Jasmin; Burnham, David A; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2015-07-01

    The avian beak is a key evolutionary innovation whose flexibility has permitted birds to diversify into a range of disparate ecological niches. We approached the problem of the mechanism behind this innovation using an approach bridging paleontology, comparative anatomy, and experimental developmental biology. First, we used fossil and extant data to show the beak is distinctive in consisting of fused premaxillae that are geometrically distinct from those of ancestral archosaurs. To elucidate underlying developmental mechanisms, we examined candidate gene expression domains in the embryonic face: the earlier frontonasal ectodermal zone (FEZ) and the later midfacial WNT-responsive region, in birds and several reptiles. This permitted the identification of an autapomorphic median gene expression region in Aves. To test the mechanism, we used inhibitors of both pathways to replicate in chicken the ancestral amniote expression. Altering the FEZ altered later WNT responsiveness to the ancestral pattern. Skeletal phenotypes from both types of experiments had premaxillae that clustered geometrically with ancestral fossil forms instead of beaked birds. The palatal region was also altered to a more ancestral phenotype. This is consistent with the fossil record and with the tight functional association of avian premaxillae and palate in forming a kinetic beak.

  16. Proteome profiling of exosomes derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells reveal differential expression of key metastatic factors and signal transduction components.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Greening, David W; Barnes, Thomas W; Lim, Justin W; Tauro, Bow J; Rai, Alin; Xu, Rong; Adda, Christopher; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular 40-100 nm diameter membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that can mediate intercellular transfer of RNAs and proteins to assist premetastatic niche formation. Using primary (SW480) and metastatic (SW620) human isogenic colorectal cancer cell lines we compared exosome protein profiles to yield valuable insights into metastatic factors and signaling molecules fundamental to tumor progression. Exosomes purified using OptiPrep™ density gradient fractionation were 40-100 nm in diameter, were of a buoyant density ~1.09 g/mL, and displayed stereotypic exosomal markers TSG101, Alix, and CD63. A major finding was the selective enrichment of metastatic factors (MET, S100A8, S100A9, TNC), signal transduction molecules (EFNB2, JAG1, SRC, TNIK), and lipid raft and lipid raft-associated components (CAV1, FLOT1, FLOT2, PROM1) in exosomes derived from metastatic SW620 cells. Additionally, using cryo-electron microscopy, ultrastructural components in exosomes were identified. A key finding of this study was the detection and colocalization of protein complexes EPCAM-CLDN7 and TNIK-RAP2A in colorectal cancer cell exosomes. The selective enrichment of metastatic factors and signaling pathway components in metastatic colon cancer cell-derived exosomes contributes to our understanding of the cross-talk between tumor and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  17. A systematic High-Content Screening microscopy approach reveals key roles for Rab33b, OATL1 and Myo6 in nanoparticle trafficking in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Panarella, Angela; Bexiga, Mariana G.; Galea, George; O’ Neill, Elaine D.; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Simpson, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles are promising tools for imaging and drug delivery; however the molecular details of cellular internalization and trafficking await full characterization. Current knowledge suggests that following endocytosis most nanoparticles pass from endosomes to lysosomes. In order to design effective drug delivery strategies that can use the endocytic pathway, or by-pass lysosomal accumulation, a comprehensive understanding of nanoparticle uptake and trafficking mechanisms is therefore fundamental. Here we describe and apply an RNA interference-based high-content screening microscopy strategy to assess the intracellular trafficking of fluorescently-labeled polystyrene nanoparticles in HeLa cells. We screened a total of 408 genes involved in cytoskeleton and membrane function, revealing roles for myosin VI, Rab33b and OATL1 in this process. This work provides the first systematic large-scale quantitative assessment of the proteins responsible for nanoparticle trafficking in cells, paving the way for subsequent genome-wide studies. PMID:27374232

  18. A Gene-Phenotype Network Based on Genetic Variability for Drought Responses Reveals Key Physiological Processes in Controlled and Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, David; Arribat, Sandrine; Maury, Pierre; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Hourlier, Thibaut; Laporte, Marion; Varès, Didier; Carrère, Sébastien; Grieu, Philippe; Balzergue, Sandrine; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the connections between molecular and physiological processes underlying the diversity of drought stress responses in plants is key for basic and applied science. Drought stress response involves a large number of molecular pathways and subsequent physiological processes. Therefore, it constitutes an archetypical systems biology model. We first inferred a gene-phenotype network exploiting differences in drought responses of eight sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genotypes to two drought stress scenarios. Large transcriptomic data were obtained with the sunflower Affymetrix microarray, comprising 32423 probesets, and were associated to nine morpho-physiological traits (integrated transpired water, leaf transpiration rate, osmotic potential, relative water content, leaf mass per area, carbon isotope discrimination, plant height, number of leaves and collar diameter) using sPLS regression. Overall, we could associate the expression patterns of 1263 probesets to six phenotypic traits and identify if correlations were due to treatment, genotype and/or their interaction. We also identified genes whose expression is affected at moderate and/or intense drought stress together with genes whose expression variation could explain phenotypic and drought tolerance variability among our genetic material. We then used the network model to study phenotypic changes in less tractable agronomical conditions, i.e. sunflower hybrids subjected to different watering regimes in field trials. Mapping this new dataset in the gene-phenotype network allowed us to identify genes whose expression was robustly affected by water deprivation in both controlled and field conditions. The enrichment in genes correlated to relative water content and osmotic potential provides evidence of the importance of these traits in agronomical conditions. PMID:23056196

  19. In situ analysis of metabolic characteristics reveals the key yeast in the spontaneous and solid-state fermentation process of Chinese light-style liquor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yu; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Yan

    2014-06-01

    The in situ metabolic characteristics of the yeasts involved in spontaneous fermentation process of Chinese light-style liquor are poorly understood. The covariation between metabolic profiles and yeast communities in Chinese light-style liquor was modeled using the partial least square (PLS) regression method. The diversity of yeast species was evaluated by sequence analysis of the 26S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1/D2 domains of cultivable yeasts, and the volatile compounds in fermented grains were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). Eight yeast species and 58 volatile compounds were identified, respectively. The modulation of 16 of these volatile compounds was associated with variations in the yeast population (goodness of prediction [Q(2)]>20%). The results showed that Pichia anomala was responsible for the characteristic aroma of Chinese liquor, through the regulation of several important volatile compounds, such as ethyl lactate, octanoic acid, and ethyl tetradecanoate. Correspondingly, almost all of the compounds associated with P. anomala were detected in a pure culture of this yeast. In contrast to the PLS regression results, however, ethyl lactate and ethyl isobutyrate were not detected in the same pure culture, which indicated that some metabolites could be generated by P. anomala only when it existed in a community with other yeast species. Furthermore, different yeast communities provided different volatile patterns in the fermented grains, which resulted in distinct flavor profiles in the resulting liquors. This study could help identify the key yeast species involved in spontaneous fermentation and provide a deeper understanding of the role of individual yeast species in the community.

  20. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  1. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Young Hwan; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus.

  2. Mn²⁺-deficiency reveals a key role for the Pleurotus ostreatus versatile peroxidase (VP4) in oxidation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Knop, Doriv; Ben-Ari, Julius; Salame, Tomer M; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2014-08-01

    The manganese peroxidase gene family (mnps) is a part of the ligninolytic system of Pleurotus ostreatus. This gene family is comprised of nine members, mnp1-9, encoding short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs) or versatile peroxidases (VPs). We show that unlike in Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone (GP) medium, where redundancy among mnps was reported, in Mn(2+)-deficient GP medium mnp4 [encoding versatile peroxidase isoenzyme 4 (VP4)] has a key and nonredundant function. The abundance of mnps transcripts at time points corresponding to the tropophase (active growth), early idiophase, and idiophase indicates that mnp4 is the predominantly expressed mnp gene and that its relative predominance is dependent on the age of the culture. In this medium, azo dye, Orange II (OII) decolorization occurs only during the idiophase and a Δmnp4 strain showed a drastic reduction in this decolorization. Three degradation metabolites were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS), indicating both asymmetric and symmetric enzymatic cleavage of the azo-bond. In addition, the culture filtrate of Δmnp4 showed negligible values of oxidation capability of four typical VP substrates: Mn(2+), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, phenol red, and Reactive Black 5 (RB5), compared to the wild-type strain PC9. We concluded that under Mn(2+)-deficient GP culture, VP4 (encoded by mnp4) is the main active ligninolytic enzyme able to oxidize Mn(2+) as well as high and low redox potential aromatic substrate, including dyes. Furthermore, other VPs/MnPs do not compensate for the lack of VP4 activity.

  3. Glider monitoring reveals high sub-seasonal variability at a key 'choke' point in the thermohaline circulation of the Western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslop, Emma; Ruiz, Simón; Allen, John; Luís López-Jurado, José; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2013-04-01

    demonstrate the value of glider monitoring at key transects and circulation 'choke' points.

  4. In Situ Analysis of Metabolic Characteristics Reveals the Key Yeast in the Spontaneous and Solid-State Fermentation Process of Chinese Light-Style Liquor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yu; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The in situ metabolic characteristics of the yeasts involved in spontaneous fermentation process of Chinese light-style liquor are poorly understood. The covariation between metabolic profiles and yeast communities in Chinese light-style liquor was modeled using the partial least square (PLS) regression method. The diversity of yeast species was evaluated by sequence analysis of the 26S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1/D2 domains of cultivable yeasts, and the volatile compounds in fermented grains were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). Eight yeast species and 58 volatile compounds were identified, respectively. The modulation of 16 of these volatile compounds was associated with variations in the yeast population (goodness of prediction [Q2] > 20%). The results showed that Pichia anomala was responsible for the characteristic aroma of Chinese liquor, through the regulation of several important volatile compounds, such as ethyl lactate, octanoic acid, and ethyl tetradecanoate. Correspondingly, almost all of the compounds associated with P. anomala were detected in a pure culture of this yeast. In contrast to the PLS regression results, however, ethyl lactate and ethyl isobutyrate were not detected in the same pure culture, which indicated that some metabolites could be generated by P. anomala only when it existed in a community with other yeast species. Furthermore, different yeast communities provided different volatile patterns in the fermented grains, which resulted in distinct flavor profiles in the resulting liquors. This study could help identify the key yeast species involved in spontaneous fermentation and provide a deeper understanding of the role of individual yeast species in the community. PMID:24727269

  5. Comparative transcriptome combined with morpho-physiological analyses revealed key factors for differential cadmium accumulation in two contrasting sweet sorghum genotypes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Jia, Weitao; Lv, Sulian; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Miao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Jihong; Li, Dongsheng; Zhu, Cheng; Li, Shizhong; Li, Yinxin

    2017-07-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread soil contaminant threatening human health. As an ideal energy plant, sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) has great potential in phytoremediation of Cd-polluted soils, although the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, key factors responsible for differential Cd accumulation between two contrasting sweet sorghum genotypes (high-Cd accumulation one H18, and low-Cd accumulation one L69) were investigated. H18 exhibited a much higher ability of Cd uptake and translocation than L69. Furthermore, Cd uptake through symplasmic pathway and Cd concentrations in xylem sap were both higher in H18 than those in L69. Root anatomy observation found the endodermal apoplasmic barriers were much stronger in L69, which may restrict the Cd loading into xylem. The molecular mechanisms underlying these morpho-physiological traits were further dissected by comparative transcriptome analysis. Many genes involved in cell wall modification and heavy metal transport were found to be Cd-responsive DEGs and/or DEGs between these two genotypes. KEGG pathway analysis found phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway was over-represented, indicating this pathway may play important roles in differential Cd accumulation between two genotypes. Based on these results, a schematic representation of main processes involved in differential Cd uptake and translocation in H18 and L69 is proposed, which suggests that higher Cd accumulation in H18 depends on a multilevel coordination of efficient Cd uptake and transport, including efficient root uptake and xylem loading, less root cell wall binding, and weaker endodermal apoplasmic barriers. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  7. Structure of transmembrane domain of lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) reveals key features for substrate specificity in chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ashok K; Strub, Marie-Paule; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Tjandra, Nico

    2014-12-19

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a highly regulated cellular process that mediates the degradation of a selective subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Increasing CMA activity is one way for a cell to respond to stress, and it leads to enhanced turnover of non-critical cytosolic proteins into sources of energy or clearance of unwanted or damaged proteins from the cytosol. The lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) together with a complex of chaperones and co-chaperones are key regulators of CMA. LAMP-2A is a transmembrane protein component for protein translocation to the lysosome. Here we present a study of the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane domain of human LAMP-2A in n-dodecylphosphocholine micelles by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We showed that LAMP-2A exists as a homotrimer in which the membrane-spanning helices wrap around each other to form a parallel coiled coil conformation, whereas its cytosolic tail is flexible and exposed to the cytosol. This cytosolic tail of LAMP-2A interacts with chaperone Hsc70 and a CMA substrate RNase A with comparable affinity but not with Hsp40 and RNase S peptide. Because the substrates and the chaperone complex can bind at the same time, thus creating a bimodal interaction, we propose that substrate recognition by chaperones and targeting to the lysosomal membrane by LAMP-2A are coupled. This can increase substrate affinity and specificity as well as prevent substrate aggregation, assist in the unfolding of the substrate, and promote the formation of the higher order complex of LAMP-2A required for translocation.

  8. Functional Characterization of the GATA Transcription Factors GNC and CGA1 Reveals Their Key Role in Chloroplast Development, Growth, and Division in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Zubo, Yan O.; Tapken, Wiebke; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lavanway, Ann M.; Howard, Louisa; Pilon, Marinus; Kieber, Joseph J.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts develop from proplastids in a process that requires the interplay of nuclear and chloroplast genomes, but key steps in this developmental process have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that the nucleus-localized transcription factors GATA NITRATE-INDUCIBLE CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA1 (CGA1) regulate chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GNC and CGA1 are highly expressed in green tissues, and the phytohormone cytokinin regulates their expression. A gnc cga1 mutant exhibits a reduction in overall chlorophyll levels as well as in chloroplast size in the hypocotyl. Ectopic overexpression of either GNC or CGA1 promotes chloroplast biogenesis in hypocotyl cortex and root pericycle cells, based on increases in the number and size of the chloroplasts, and also results in expanded zones of chloroplast production into the epidermis of hypocotyls and cotyledons and into the cortex of roots. Ectopic overexpression also promotes the development of etioplasts from proplastids in dark-grown seedlings, subsequently enhancing the deetiolation process. Inducible expression of GNC demonstrates that GNC-mediated chloroplast biogenesis can be regulated postembryonically, notably so for chloroplast production in cotyledon epidermal cells. Analysis of the gnc cga1 loss-of-function and overexpression lines supports a role for these transcription factors in regulating the effects of cytokinin on chloroplast division. These data support a model in which GNC and CGA1 serve as two of the master transcriptional regulators of chloroplast biogenesis, acting downstream of cytokinin and mediating the development of chloroplasts from proplastids and enhancing chloroplast growth and division in specific tissues. PMID:22811435

  9. Functional characterization of the GATA transcription factors GNC and CGA1 reveals their key role in chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Zubo, Yan O; Tapken, Wiebke; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lavanway, Ann M; Howard, Louisa; Pilon, Marinus; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts develop from proplastids in a process that requires the interplay of nuclear and chloroplast genomes, but key steps in this developmental process have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that the nucleus-localized transcription factors GATA NITRATE-INDUCIBLE CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA1 (CGA1) regulate chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GNC and CGA1 are highly expressed in green tissues, and the phytohormone cytokinin regulates their expression. A gnc cga1 mutant exhibits a reduction in overall chlorophyll levels as well as in chloroplast size in the hypocotyl. Ectopic overexpression of either GNC or CGA1 promotes chloroplast biogenesis in hypocotyl cortex and root pericycle cells, based on increases in the number and size of the chloroplasts, and also results in expanded zones of chloroplast production into the epidermis of hypocotyls and cotyledons and into the cortex of roots. Ectopic overexpression also promotes the development of etioplasts from proplastids in dark-grown seedlings, subsequently enhancing the deetiolation process. Inducible expression of GNC demonstrates that GNC-mediated chloroplast biogenesis can be regulated postembryonically, notably so for chloroplast production in cotyledon epidermal cells. Analysis of the gnc cga1 loss-of-function and overexpression lines supports a role for these transcription factors in regulating the effects of cytokinin on chloroplast division. These data support a model in which GNC and CGA1 serve as two of the master transcriptional regulators of chloroplast biogenesis, acting downstream of cytokinin and mediating the development of chloroplasts from proplastids and enhancing chloroplast growth and division in specific tissues.

  10. Synthesis, anti-HIV activity, integrase enzyme inhibition and molecular modeling of catechol, hydroquinone and quinol labdane analogs.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohan; Das, Tiyasa; Mishra, Sanjay; Nutan; Pancholi, Boskey; Gupta, Satish K; Bhat, Sujata V

    2014-01-01

    Labdane analogs with o-quinol, catechol and hydroquinone moiety have been synthesized using Diels-Alder reaction of methyl 3,4-dioxocyclohexa-1,5-diene-carboxylate, 3,4-dioxocyclohexa-1,5-diene-carboxylic acid and 3,6-dioxocyclohexa-1,4-dienecarboxylic acid with mono terpene 1,3-dienes, namely ocimene and myrcene. The resulting molecules and their derivatives were evaluated for their anti-HIV-1 activity using TZM-bl cell based virus infectivity assay. Two molecules 13 and 18 showed anti-HIV activity with IC50 values 5.0 (TI=11) and 4.6 (TI=46)μM, respectively. The compounds 17, 18 and 20 showed efficacy against HIV-1 integrase activity and showed inhibition with IC50 13.4, 11.1 and 11.5μM, respectively. The HIV-1 integrase inhibition activity of these synthetic molecules was comparable with integric acid, the natural fungal metabolite. Molecular modeling studies for the HIV-1 integrase inhibition of these active synthetic molecules indicated the binding to the active site residues of the enzyme.

  11. HIV-2 Integrase Polymorphisms and Longitudinal Genotypic Analysis of HIV-2 Infected Patients Failing a Raltegravir-Containing Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Cavaco-Silva, Joana; Abecasis, Ana; Miranda, Ana Cláudia; Poças, José; Narciso, Jorge; Águas, Maria João; Maltez, Fernando; Almeida, Isabel; Germano, Isabel; Diniz, António; Gonçalves, Maria de Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Cunha, Celso; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the HIV-2 integrase gene polymorphisms and the pathways to resistance of HIV-2 patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen, we studied 63 integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI)-naïve patients, and 10 heavily pretreated patients exhibiting virological failure while receiving a salvage raltegravir-containing regimen. All patients were infected by HIV-2 group A. 61.4% of the integrase residues were conserved, including the catalytic motif residues. No INSTI-major resistance mutations were detected in the virus population from naïve patients, but two amino acids that are secondary resistance mutations to INSTIs in HIV-1 were observed. The 10 raltegravir-experienced patients exhibited resistance mutations via three main genetic pathways: N155H, Q148R, and eventually E92Q - T97A. The 155 pathway was preferentially used (7/10 patients). Other mutations associated to raltegravir resistance in HIV-1 were also observed in our HIV-2 population (V151I and D232N), along with several novel mutations previously unreported. Data retrieved from this study should help build a more robust HIV-2-specific algorithm for the genotypic interpretation of raltegravir resistance, and contribute to improve the clinical monitoring of HIV-2-infected patients. PMID:24681625

  12. HIV-2 integrase polymorphisms and longitudinal genotypic analysis of HIV-2 infected patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen.

    PubMed

    Cavaco-Silva, Joana; Abecasis, Ana; Miranda, Ana Cláudia; Poças, José; Narciso, Jorge; Águas, Maria João; Maltez, Fernando; Almeida, Isabel; Germano, Isabel; Diniz, António; Gonçalves, Maria de Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Cunha, Celso; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the HIV-2 integrase gene polymorphisms and the pathways to resistance of HIV-2 patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen, we studied 63 integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI)-naïve patients, and 10 heavily pretreated patients exhibiting virological failure while receiving a salvage raltegravir-containing regimen. All patients were infected by HIV-2 group A. 61.4% of the integrase residues were conserved, including the catalytic motif residues. No INSTI-major resistance mutations were detected in the virus population from naïve patients, but two amino acids that are secondary resistance mutations to INSTIs in HIV-1 were observed. The 10 raltegravir-experienced patients exhibited resistance mutations via three main genetic pathways: N155H, Q148R, and eventually E92Q - T97A. The 155 pathway was preferentially used (7/10 patients). Other mutations associated to raltegravir resistance in HIV-1 were also observed in our HIV-2 population (V151I and D232N), along with several novel mutations previously unreported. Data retrieved from this study should help build a more robust HIV-2-specific algorithm for the genotypic interpretation of raltegravir resistance, and contribute to improve the clinical monitoring of HIV-2-infected patients.

  13. A highly efficient site-specific integration strategy using combination of homologous recombination and the ΦC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hailong; Huang, Ying; Ma, Qingwen; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Fanyi; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-09-20

    The introduction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at target sites could greatly enhance homologous recombination, and engineered nucleases, such as zinc finger and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, have been successfully developed for making such breaks. In this study, we present a highly efficient site-specific integration strategy based on homologous recombination and ΦC31 integrase. An attB sequence was introduced at the homologous arm of an insertion targeting vector. DSBs at the target locus and donor were then simultaneously generated by the ΦC31 integrase when co-transfected with the donor vector, consequently stimulating homologous recombination. The results demonstrated that our strategy is feasible and the efficiency at the BF4 target site, which we previously identified in the bovine genome, was as high as 93%. The frequency at another site (BF10) was almost two-fold greater in comparison to the vector without homologous arms. This technology requires no sophisticated nuclease design efforts, and the off-target effect is reduced by ΦC31 integrase compared to the use of engineered nucleases, thereby offering a simple and safe way to effectively express a donor gene at a desired locus. This development has great potential value, especially in transgenesis or gene therapy applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of conserved amino acid residues critical for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase function in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1992-01-01

    We have probed the structural organization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase protein by limited proteolysis and the functional organization by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acid residues. A central region of the protein was relatively resistant to proteolysis. Proteins with altered amino acids in this region, or in the N-terminal part of the protein that includes a putative zinc-binding motif, were purified and assayed for 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities in vitro. In general, these mutations had parallel effects on 3' processing and DNA strand transfer, suggesting that integrase may utilize a single active site for both reactions. The only proteins that were completely inactive in all three assays contained mutations at conserved amino acids in the central region, suggesting that this part of the protein may be involved in catalysis. In contrast, none of the mutations in the N-terminal region resulted in a protein that was inactive in all three assays, suggesting that this part of integrase may not be essential for catalysis. The disintegration reaction was particularly insensitive to these amino acid substitutions, indicating that some function that is important for 3' processing and DNA strand transfer may be dispensable for disintegration. Images PMID:1404595

  15. Single-molecule analysis of ϕC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination by tethered particle motion

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Hsieh, Tao-shih; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2016-01-01

    Serine and tyrosine site-specific recombinases (SRs and YRs, respectively) provide templates for understanding the chemical mechanisms and conformational dynamics of strand cleavage/exchange between DNA partners. Current evidence suggests a rather intriguing mechanism for serine recombination, in which one half of the cleaved synaptic complex undergoes a 180° rotation relative to the other. The ‘small’ and ‘large’ SRs contain a compact amino-terminal catalytic domain, but differ conspicuously in their carboxyl-terminal domains. So far, only one serine recombinase has been analyzed using single substrate molecules. We now utilized single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) to follow step-by-step recombination catalyzed by a large SR, phage ϕC31 integrase. The integrase promotes unidirectional DNA exchange between attB and attP sites to integrate the phage genome into the host chromosome. The recombination directionality factor (RDF; ϕC31 gp3) activates the excision reaction (attL × attR). From integrase-induced changes in TPM in the presence or absence of gp3, we delineated the individual steps of recombination and their kinetic features. The gp3 protein appears to regulate recombination directionality by selectively promoting or excluding active conformations of the synapse formed by specific att site partners. Our results support a ‘gated rotation’ of the synaptic complex between DNA cleavage and joining. PMID:27986956

  16. Comparative fiber property and transcriptome analyses reveal key genes potentially related to high fiber strength in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) line MD52ne.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md S; Fang, David D; Thyssen, Gregory N; Delhom, Chris D; Liu, Yongliang; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-02-01

    Individual fiber strength is an important quality attribute that greatly influences the strength of the yarn spun from cotton fibers. Fiber strength is usually measured from bundles of fibers due to the difficulty of reliably measuring strength from individual cotton fibers. However, bundle fiber strength (BFS) is not always correlated with yarn strength since it is affected by multiple fiber properties involved in fiber-to-fiber interactions within a bundle in addition to the individual fiber strength. Molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating individual fiber strength remain unknown. Gossypium hirsutum near isogenic lines (NILs), MD52ne and MD90ne showing variations in BFS provide an opportunity for dissecting the regulatory mechanisms involved in individual fiber strength. Comprehensive fiber property analyses of the NILs revealed that the superior bundle strength of MD52ne fibers resulted from high individual fiber strength with minor contributions from greater fiber length. Comparative transcriptome analyses of the NILs showed that the superior bundle strength of MD52ne fibers was potentially related to two signaling pathways: one is ethylene and the interconnected phytohormonal pathways that are involved in cotton fiber elongation, and the other is receptor-like kinases (RLKs) signaling pathways that are involved in maintaining cell wall integrity. Multiple RLKs were differentially expressed in MD52ne fibers and localized in genomic regions encompassing the strength quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Several candidate genes involved in crystalline cellulose assembly were also up-regulated in MD52ne fibers while the secondary cell wall was produced. Comparative phenotypic and transcriptomic analyses revealed differential expressions of the genes involved in crystalline cellulose assembly, ethylene and RLK signaling pathways between the MD52ne and MD90ne developing fibers. Ethylene and its phytohormonal network might promote the elongation of MD52ne fibers

  17. Albino T-DNA tomato mutant reveals a key function of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS1) in plant development and survival

    PubMed Central

    García-Alcázar, Manuel; Giménez, Estela; Pineda, Benito; Capel, Carmen; García-Sogo, Begoña; Sánchez, Sibilla; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity is indispensable for plant growth and survival and it depends on the synthesis of plastidial isoprenoids as chlorophylls and carotenoids. In the non-mevalonate pathway (MEP), the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase 1 (DXS1) enzyme has been postulated to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the formation of plastidial isoprenoids. In tomato, the function of DXS1 has only been studied in fruits, and hence its functional relevance during plant development remains unknown. Here we report the characterization of the wls-2297 tomato mutant, whose severe deficiency in chlorophylls and carotenoids promotes an albino phenotype. Additionally, growth of mutant seedlings was arrested without developing vegetative organs, which resulted in premature lethality. Gene cloning and silencing experiments revealed that the phenotype of wls-2297 mutant was caused by 38.6 kb-deletion promoted by a single T-DNA insertion affecting the DXS1 gene. This was corroborated by in vivo and molecular complementation assays, which allowed the rescue of mutant phenotype. Further characterization of tomato plants overexpressing DXS1 and comparative expression analysis indicate that DXS1 may play other important roles besides to that proposed during fruit carotenoid biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DXS1 is essentially required for the development and survival of tomato plants. PMID:28350010

  18. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  19. Albino T-DNA tomato mutant reveals a key function of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS1) in plant development and survival.

    PubMed

    García-Alcázar, Manuel; Giménez, Estela; Pineda, Benito; Capel, Carmen; García-Sogo, Begoña; Sánchez, Sibilla; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-03-28

    Photosynthetic activity is indispensable for plant growth and survival and it depends on the synthesis of plastidial isoprenoids as chlorophylls and carotenoids. In the non-mevalonate pathway (MEP), the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase 1 (DXS1) enzyme has been postulated to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the formation of plastidial isoprenoids. In tomato, the function of DXS1 has only been studied in fruits, and hence its functional relevance during plant development remains unknown. Here we report the characterization of the wls-2297 tomato mutant, whose severe deficiency in chlorophylls and carotenoids promotes an albino phenotype. Additionally, growth of mutant seedlings was arrested without developing vegetative organs, which resulted in premature lethality. Gene cloning and silencing experiments revealed that the phenotype of wls-2297 mutant was caused by 38.6 kb-deletion promoted by a single T-DNA insertion affecting the DXS1 gene. This was corroborated by in vivo and molecular complementation assays, which allowed the rescue of mutant phenotype. Further characterization of tomato plants overexpressing DXS1 and comparative expression analysis indicate that DXS1 may play other important roles besides to that proposed during fruit carotenoid biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DXS1 is essentially required for the development and survival of tomato plants.

  20. Key role of oxidative stress in animal models of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity revealed by a systematic analysis of the antioxidant-to-nephroprotective correlation.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alfredo G; Vicente-Vicente, Laura; Hernández-Sánchez, María Teresa; Pescador, Moisés; Prieto, Marta; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; Morales, Ana I; López-Hernández, Francisco J

    2017-06-15

    The clinical utility of aminoglycoside antibiotics is partly limited by their nephrotoxicity. Co-administration of a variety of candidate nephroprotectants has been tested at the preclinical level. According to a recent meta-analytic study, antioxidants are the only family of compounds with enough preclinical documentation to draw solid conclusions on their class nephroprotective capacity in animal models. In this study a systematic analysis of the relation between the level of antioxidation and the level of nephroprotection was performed. A regression model is presented which crosses the y-axis (i.e. the axis representing the level of nephroprotection) very nearly the zero value, meaning that maximal prevention of the oxidative stress induced by aminoglycosides results in almost maximal nephroprotection. This indicates that oxidative stress plays a central role in the hierarchy of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity. In addition, this model may potentially serve: i) as a standard to evaluate the role of the antioxidant effect of candidate nephroprotectants; ii) to reveal additional, antioxidant-independent effects among those compounds providing more nephroprotection than that expected from its antioxidant activity; and thus iii) to discriminate and focus most effective nephroprotectants on clinical usage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Network Model of Immune Responses Reveals Key Effectors to Single and Co-infection Dynamics by a Respiratory Bacterium and a Gastrointestinal Helminth

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Pathak, Ashutosh K.; Murphy, Lisa; Albert, Réka; Cattadori, Isabella M.

    2012-01-01

    identified key components that can be crucial for explaining individual variability between single and co-infections in natural populations. PMID:22253585

  2. Evolutionary engineering of a wine yeast strain revealed a key role of inositol and mannoprotein metabolism during low-temperature fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, María; García-Rios, Estéfani; Melgar, Bruno; Sanchez, Monica R; Dunham, Maitreya J; Guillamón, José Manuel

    2015-07-22

    Wine produced at low temperature is often considered to improve sensory qualities. However, there are certain drawbacks to low temperature fermentations: e.g. low growth rate, long lag phase, and sluggish or stuck fermentations. Selection and development of new Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains well adapted at low temperature is interesting for future biotechnological applications. This study aimed to select and develop wine yeast strains that well adapt to ferment at low temperature through evolutionary engineering, and to decipher the process underlying the obtained phenotypes. We used a pool of 27 commercial yeast strains and set up batch serial dilution experiments to mimic wine fermentation conditions at 12 °C. Evolutionary engineering was accomplished by using the natural yeast mutation rate and mutagenesis procedures. One strain (P5) outcompeted the others under both experimental conditions and was able to impose after 200 generations. The evolved strains showed improved growth and low-temperature fermentation performance compared to the ancestral strain. This improvement was acquired only under inositol limitation. The transcriptomic comparison between the evolved and parental strains showed the greatest up-regulation in four mannoprotein coding genes, which belong to the DAN/TIR family (DAN1, TIR1, TIR4 and TIR3). Genome sequencing of the evolved strain revealed the presence of a SNP in the GAA1 gene and the construction of a site-directed mutant (GAA1 (Thr108)) in a derivative haploid of the ancestral strain resulted in improved fermentation performance. GAA1 encodes a GPI transamidase complex subunit that adds GPI, which is required for inositol synthesis, to newly synthesized proteins, including mannoproteins. In this study we demonstrate the importance of inositol and mannoproteins in yeast adaptation at low temperature and the central role of the GAA1 gene by linking both metabolisms.

  3. RNA-Seq reveals dynamic changes of gene expression in key stages of intestine regeneration in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Yang, Hongsheng; Chen, Muyan; Ma, Deyou; Lin, Chenggang

    2013-01-01

    Sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea; Echinodermata) have the capacity to regenerate lost tissues and organs. Although the histological and cytological aspects of intestine regeneration have been extensively studied, little is known of the genetic mechanisms involved. There has, however, been a renewed effort to develop a database of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) in Apostichopus japonicus, an economically-important species that occurs in China. This is important for studies on genetic breeding, molecular markers and special physiological phenomena. We have also constructed a library of ESTs obtained from the regenerative body wall and intestine of A. japonicus. The database has increased to ~30000 ESTs. We used RNA-Seq to determine gene expression profiles associated with intestinal regeneration in A. japonicus at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post evisceration (dpe). This was compared to profiles obtained from a normally-functioning intestine. Approximately 5 million (M) reads were sequenced in every library. Over 2400 up-regulated genes (>10%) and over 1000 down-regulated genes (~5%) were observed at 3 and 7dpe (log2Ratio ≥ 1, FDR ≤ 0.001). Specific "Go terms" revealed that the DEGs (Differentially Expressed Genes) performed an important function at every regeneration stage. Besides some expected pathways (for example, Ribosome and Spliceosome pathway term), the "Notch signaling pathway," the "ECM-receptor interaction" and the "Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction" were significantly enriched. We also investigated the expression profiles of developmental genes, ECM-associated genes and Cytoskeletal genes. Twenty of the most important differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were verified by Real-time PCR, which resulted in a trend concordance of almost 100% between the two techniques. Our studies demonstrated dynamic changes in global gene expression during intestine regeneration and presented a series of candidate genes and enriched pathways that contribute to intestine

  4. An approach to revealing blood fluke life cycles, taxonomy, and diversity: provision of key reference data including DNA sequence from single life cycle stages.

    PubMed

    Brant, Sara V; Morgan, Jess A T; Mkoji, Gerald M; Snyder, Scott D; Rajapakse, R P V Jayanthe; Loker, Eric S

    2006-02-01

    Revealing diversity among extant blood flukes, and the patterns of relationships among them, has been hindered by the difficulty of determining if specimens described from different life cycle stages, hosts, geographic localities, and times represent the same or different species. Persistent collection of all available life cycle stages and provision of exact collection localities, host identification, reference DNA sequences for the parasite, and voucher specimens eventually will provide the framework needed to piece together individual life cycles and facilitate reconciliation with classical taxonomic descriptions, including those based on single life cycle stages. It also provides a means to document unique or rare species that might only ever be recovered from a single life cycle stage. With an emphasis on the value of new information from field collections of any available life cycle stages, here we provide data for several blood fluke cercariae from freshwater snails from Kenya, Uganda, and Australia. Similar data are provided for adult worms of Macrobilharzia macrobilharzia and miracidia of Bivitellobilharzia nairi. Some schistosome and sanguinicolid cercariae that we recovered have peculiar morphological features, and our phylogenetic analyses (18S and 28S rDNA and mtDNA CO1) suggest that 2 of the new schistosome specimens likely represent previously unknown lineages. Our results also provide new insights into 2 of the 4 remaining schistosome genera yet to be extensively characterized with respect to their position in molecular phylogenies, Macrobilharzia and Bivitellobilharzia. The accessibility of each life cycle stage is likely to vary dramatically from one parasite species to the next, and our examples validate the potential usefulness of information gleaned from even one such stage, whatever it might be.

  5. AN APPROACH TO REVEALING BLOOD FLUKE LIFE CYCLES, TAXONOMY, AND DIVERSITY: PROVISION OF KEY REFERENCE DATA INCLUDING DNA SEQUENCE FROM SINGLE LIFE CYCLE STAGES

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Sara V.; Morgan, Jess A. T.; Mkoji, Gerald M.; Snyder, Scott D.; Rajapakse, R. P. V. Jayanthe; Loker, Eric S.

    2008-01-01

    Revealing diversity among extant blood flukes, and the patterns of relationships among them, has been hindered by the difficulty of determining if specimens described from different life cycle stages, hosts, geographic localities, and times represent the same or different species. Persistent collection of all available life cycle stages and provision of exact collection localities, host identification, reference DNA sequences for the parasite, and voucher specimens eventually will provide the framework needed to piece together individual life cycles and facilitate reconciliation with classical taxonomic descriptions, including those based on single life cycle stages. It also provides a means to document unique or rare species that might only ever be recovered from a single life cycle stage. With an emphasis on the value of new information from field collections of any available life cycle stages, here we provide data for several blood fluke cercariae from freshwater snails from Kenya, Uganda, and Australia. Similar data are provided for adult worms of Macrobilharzia macrobilharzia and miracidia of Bivitellobilharzia nairi. Some schistosome and sanguinicolid cercariae that we recovered have peculiar morphological features, and our phylogenetic analyses (18S and 28S rDNA and mtDNA CO1) suggest that 2 of the new schistosome specimens likely represent previously unknown lineages. Our results also provide new insights into 2 of the 4 remaining schistosome genera yet to be extensively characterized with respect to their position in molecular phylogenies, Macrobilharzia and Bivitellobilharzia. The accessibility of each life cycle stage is likely to vary dramatically from one parasite species to the next, and our examples validate the potential usefulness of information gleaned from even one such stage, whatever it might be. PMID:16629320

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals that T3SS, Tfp, and xanthan gum are key factors in initial stages of Citrus sinensis infection by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Facincani, Agda P; Moreira, Leandro M; Soares, Márcia R; Ferreira, Cristiano B; Ferreira, Rafael M; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferro, Jesus A; Gozzo, Fabio C; de Oliveira, Julio C F

    2014-03-01

    The bacteria Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac) is the causal agent of citrus canker. The disease symptoms are characterized by localized host cell hyperplasia followed by tissue necrosis at the infected area. An arsenal of bacterial pathogenicity- and virulence-related proteins is expressed to ensure a successful infection process. At the post-genomic stage of Xac, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the proteins that are displayed differentially over time when the pathogen attacks the host plant. Protein extracts were prepared from infectious Xac grown in inducing medium (XAM1) for 24 h or from host citrus plants for 3 or 5 days after infection, detached times to evaluate the adaptation and virulence of the pathogen. The protein extracts were proteolyzed, and the peptides derived from tryptic digestion were investigated using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Changes in the protein expression profile were compared with the Xac genome and the proteome recently described under non-infectious conditions. An analysis of the proteome of Xac under infectious conditions revealed proteins directly involved in virulence such as the type III secretion system (T3SS) and effector proteins (T3SS-e), the type IV pilus (Tfp), and xanthan gum biosynthesis. Moreover, four new mutants related to proteins detected in the proteome and with different functions exhibited reduced virulence relative to the wild-type proteins. The results of the proteome analysis of infectious Xac define the processes of adaptation to the host and demonstrate the induction of the virulence factors of Xac involved in plant-pathogen interactions.

  7. Examination of halogen substituent effects on HIV-1 integrase inhibitors derived from 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-ones and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-diones

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Vu, B. Christie; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    Using 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-one and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione based HIV-1 integrase inhibitors as display platforms, we undertook a thorough examination of the effects of modifying the halogen substituents on a key benzyl ring that is hypothesized to bind in a hydrophobic pocket of the integrase•DNA complex. Data from this study suggest that in general dihalo – substituted analogues have higher potency than monohalo – substituted compounds, but that further addition of halogens is not beneficial. PMID:19364649

  8. Florida Keys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West. This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03890

  9. RNA-Seq Reveals Dynamic Changes of Gene Expression in Key Stages of Intestine Regeneration in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Yang, Hongsheng; Chen, Muyan; Ma, Deyou; Lin, Chenggang

    2013-01-01

    Background Sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea; Echinodermata) have the capacity to regenerate lost tissues and organs. Although the histological and cytological aspects of intestine regeneration have been extensively studied, little is known of the genetic mechanisms involved. There has, however, been a renewed effort to develop a database of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) in Apostichopus japonicus, an economically-important species that occurs in China. This is important for studies on genetic breeding, molecular markers and special physiological phenomena. We have also constructed a library of ESTs obtained from the regenerative body wall and intestine of A. japonicus. The database has increased to ∼30000 ESTs. Results We used RNA-Seq to determine gene expression profiles associated with intestinal regeneration in A. japonicus at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post evisceration (dpe). This was compared to profiles obtained from a normally-functioning intestine. Approximately 5 million (M) reads were sequenced in every library. Over 2400 up-regulated genes (>10%) and over 1000 down-regulated genes (∼5%) were observed at 3 and 7dpe (log2Ratio≥1, FDR≤0.001). Specific “Go terms” revealed that the DEGs (Differentially Expressed Genes) performed an important function at every regeneration stage. Besides some expected pathways (for example, Ribosome and Spliceosome pathway term), the “Notch signaling pathway,” the “ECM-receptor interaction” and the “Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction” were significantly enriched. We also investigated the expression profiles of developmental genes, ECM-associated genes and Cytoskeletal genes. Twenty of the most important differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were verified by Real-time PCR, which resulted in a trend concordance of almost 100% between the two techniques. Conclusion Our studies demonstrated dynamic changes in global gene expression during intestine regeneration and presented a series of candidate genes and

  10. In vivo approaches reveal a key role for DCs in CD4+ T cell activation and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental blood-stage malaria.

    PubMed

    Borges da Silva, Henrique; Fonseca, Raíssa; Cassado, Alexandra Dos Anjos; Machado de Salles, Érika; de Menezes, Maria Nogueira; Langhorne, Jean; Perez, Katia Regina; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Ryffel, Bernhard; Barreto, Vasco M; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Álvarez, José Maria; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP) of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin)-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip), with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc) parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection.

  11. Temporal analysis reveals a key role for VTE5 in vitamin E biosynthesis in olive fruit during on-tree development

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadou, Egli C.; Ntourou, Thessaloniki; Goulas, Vlasios; Manganaris, George A.; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to generate a high resolution temporal mapping of the biosynthetic pathway of vitamin E in olive fruit (Olea europaea cv. “Koroneiki”) during 17 successive on-tree developmental stages. Fruit material was collected from the middle of June until the end of January, corresponding to 6–38 weeks after flowering (WAF). Results revealed a variable gene regulation pattern among 6–38 WAF studied and more pronounced levels of differential regulation of gene expression for the first and intermediate genes in the biosynthetic pathway (VTE5, geranylgeranyl reductase, HPPD, VTE2, HGGT and VTE3) compared with the downstream components of the pathway (VTE1 and VTE4). Notably, expression of HGGT and VTE2 genes were significantly suppressed throughout the developmental stages examined. Metabolite analysis indicated that the first and intermediate stages of development (6–22 WAF) have higher concentrations of tocochromanols compared with the last on-tree stages (starting from 24 WAF onwards). The concentration of α-tocopherol (16.15 ± 0.60−32.45 ± 0.54 mg/100 g F.W.) were substantially greater (up to 100-fold) than those of β-, γ-, and δ-tocopherols (0.13 ± 0.01−0.25 ± 0.03 mg/100 g F.W., 0.13 ± 0.01−0.33 ± 0.04 mg/100 g F.W., 0.14 ± 0.01−0.28 ± 0.01 mg/100 g F.W., respectively). In regard with tocotrienol content, only γ-tocotrienol was detected. Overall, olive fruits (cv. “Koroneiki”) exhibited higher concentrations of vitamin E until 22 WAF as compared with later WAF, concomitant with the expression profile of phytol kinase (VTE5), which could be used as a marker gene due to its importance in the biosynthesis of vitamin E. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explores the complete biosynthetic pathway of vitamin E in a fruit tree crop of great horticultural importance such as olive, linking molecular gene expression analysis with tocochromanol content. PMID:26557125

  12. In Vivo Approaches Reveal a Key Role for DCs in CD4+ T Cell Activation and Parasite Clearance during the Acute Phase of Experimental Blood-Stage Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Borges da Silva, Henrique; Fonseca, Raíssa; Cassado, Alexandra dos Anjos; Machado de Salles, Érika; de Menezes, Maria Nogueira; Langhorne, Jean; Perez, Katia Regina; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Ryffel, Bernhard; Barreto, Vasco M.; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Álvarez, José Maria; D’Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP) of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin)-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip), with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc) parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection. PMID:25658925

  13. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  14. The Microbiota and Abundance of the Class 1 Integron-Integrase Gene in Tropical Sewage Treatment Plant Influent and Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Magna C; Ávila, Marcelo P; Reis, Mariana P; Costa, Patrícia S; Nardi, Regina M D; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are assumed to efficiently remove organic pollutants from sewage in sewage treatment plants, where antibiotic-resistance genes can move between species via mobile genetic elements known as integrons. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed bacterial diversity and class 1 integron abundance in tropical sewage. Here, we describe the extant microbiota, using V6 tag sequencing, and quantify the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) in raw sewage (RS) and activated sludge (AS). The analysis of 1,174,486 quality-filtered reads obtained from RS and AS samples revealed complex and distinct bacterial diversity in these samples. The RS sample, with 3,074 operational taxonomic units, exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices. Among the 25 phyla, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes represented 85% (AS) and 92% (RS) of all reads. Increased relative abundance of Micrococcales, Myxococcales, and Sphingobacteriales and reduced pathogen abundance were noted in AS. At the genus level, differences were observed for the dominant genera Simplicispira and Diaphorobacter (AS) as well as for Enhydrobacter (RS). The activated sludge process decreased (55%) the amount of bacteria harboring the intI1 gene in the RS sample. Altogether, our results emphasize the importance of biological treatment for diminishing pathogenic bacteria and those bearing the intI1 gene that arrive at a sewage treatment plant.

  15. The Microbiota and Abundance of the Class 1 Integron-Integrase Gene in Tropical Sewage Treatment Plant Influent and Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Magna C.; Ávila, Marcelo P.; Reis, Mariana P.; Costa, Patrícia S.; Nardi, Regina M. D.; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are assumed to efficiently remove organic pollutants from sewage in sewage treatment plants, where antibiotic-resistance genes can move between species via mobile genetic elements known as integrons. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed bacterial diversity and class 1 integron abundance in tropical sewage. Here, we describe the extant microbiota, using V6 tag sequencing, and quantify the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) in raw sewage (RS) and activated sludge (AS). The analysis of 1,174,486 quality-filtered reads obtained from RS and AS samples revealed complex and distinct bacterial diversity in these samples. The RS sample, with 3,074 operational taxonomic units, exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices. Among the 25 phyla, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes represented 85% (AS) and 92% (RS) of all reads. Increased relative abundance of Micrococcales, Myxococcales, and Sphingobacteriales and reduced pathogen abundance were noted in AS. At the genus level, differences were observed for the dominant genera Simplicispira and Diaphorobacter (AS) as well as for Enhydrobacter (RS). The activated sludge process decreased (55%) the amount of bacteria harboring the intI1 gene in the RS sample. Altogether, our results emphasize the importance of biological treatment for diminishing pathogenic bacteria and those bearing the intI1 gene that arrive at a sewage treatment plant. PMID:26115093

  16. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of chicoric acid analogs as inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Charvat, Trevor T; Lee, Deborah J; Robinson, W Edward; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2006-07-01

    A series of analogs of the potent HIV-1 integrase (HIV IN) inhibitor chicoric acid (CA) was designed with the intention of ameliorating some of the parent natural product's undesirable properties, in particular its toxicity, instability, and poor membrane permeability. More than 70 analogs were synthesized and assayed for three types of activity: (1) the ability to inhibit 3'-end processing and strand transfer reactions using recombinant HIV IN in vitro, (2) toxicity against the CD4+ lymphoblastoid cell line, MT2, and (3) anti-HIV activity against HIV(LAI). CA analogs lacking one of the carboxyl groups of CA and with 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamoyl sidechains in place of the caffeoyl group of CA exhibited the most potent inhibition of HIV replication and end-processing activity. Galloyl-substituted derivatives also displayed very potent in vitro and in vivo activities, in most cases exceeding the inhibitory effects of CA itself. Conversely, analogous monocarboxy caffeoyl analogs exhibited only modest inhibition, while the corresponding 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl-substituted compounds were devoid of activity.

  17. HIV integrase variability and genetic barrier in antiretroviral naïve and experienced patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 integrase (IN) variability in treatment naïve patients with different HIV-1 subtypes is a major issue. In fact, the effect of previous exposure to antiretrovirals other than IN inhibitors (INI) on IN variability has not been satisfactorily defined. In addition, the genetic barrier for specific INI resistance mutations remains to be calculated. Methods IN variability was analyzed and compared with reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (PR) variability in 41 treatment naïve and 54 RT inhibitor (RTI) and protease inhibitor (PRI) experienced patients from subjects infected with subtype B and non-B strains. In addition, four HIV-2 strains were analyzed in parallel. Frequency and distribution of IN mutations were compared between HAART-naïve and RTI/PI-experienced patients; the genetic barrier for 27 amino acid positions related to INI susceptibility was calculated as well. Results Primary mutations associated with resistance to INI were not detected in patients not previously treated with this class of drug. However, some secondary mutations which have been shown to contribute to INI resistance were found. Only limited differences in codon usage distribution between patient groups were found. HIV-2 strains from INI naïve patients showed the presence of both primary and secondary resistance mutations. Conclusion Exposure to antivirals other than INI does not seem to significantly influence the emergence of mutations implicated in INI resistance. HIV-2 strain might have reduced susceptibility to INI. PMID:21453487

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of geminal disulfones as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meadows, D Christopher; Mathews, Timothy B; North, Thomas W; Hadd, Michael J; Kuo, Chih Lin; Neamati, Nouri; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2005-07-14

    Integration of HIV-1 viral DNA into the host genome is carried out by HIV-integrase (IN) and is a critical step in viral replication. Although several classes of compounds have been reported to inhibit IN in enzymatic assays, inhibition is not always correlated with antiviral activity. Moreover, potent antiviral IN inhibitors such as the chicoric acids do not act upon the intended enzymatic target but behave as entry inhibitors instead. The charged nature of the chicoric acids contributes to poor cellular uptake, and these compounds are further plagued by rapid ester hydrolysis in vivo. To address these critical deficiencies, we designed neutral, nonhydrolyzable analogues of the chicoric acids. Herein, we report the synthesis, enzyme inhibition studies, and cellular antiviral data for a series of geminal disulfones. Of the 10 compounds evaluated, 8 showed moderate to high inhibition of IN in purified enzyme assays. The purified enzyme data correlated with antiviral assays for all but two compounds, suggesting alternative modes of inhibition. Time-of-addition studies were performed on these analogues, and the results indicate that they inhibit an early stage in the replication process, perhaps entry. In contrast, the most potent member of the correlative group shows behavior consistent with IN being the cellular target.

  19. Methods for the Analyses of Inhibitor-Induced Aberrant Multimerization of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Kessl, Jacques J.; Sharma, Amit; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target as its function is essential for the viral lifecycle. The discovery of multifunctional allosteric IN inhibitors or ALLINIs, which potently impair viral replication by promoting aberrant, higher order IN multimerization as well as inhibit IN interactions with its cellular cofactor, LEDGF/p75, has opened new venues to exploit IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, the recent discovery of multimerization selective IN inhibitors or MINIs, has provided new investigational probes to study the direct effects of aberrant IN multimerization in vitro and in infected cells. Here we describe three complementary methods designed to detect and quantify the effects of these new classes of inhibitors on IN multimerization. These methods include a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence-based assay which allows for measuring EC50 values for the inhibitor-induced aberrant IN multimerization, a dynamic light scattering-based assay which allows for monitoring the formation and sizes of oligomeric IN particles in a time-dependent manner, and a chemical cross-linking-based assay of interacting IN subunits which allows for the determination of IN oligomers in viral particles. PMID:26714710

  20. Virtual screening of integrase inhibitors by large scale binding free energy calculations: the SAMPL4 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Wickstrom, Lauren; Perryman, Alexander L.; Santiago, Daniel N.; Forli, Stefano; Olson, Arthur J.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge, filtered AutoDock Vina ligand docking predictions and large scale binding energy distribution analysis method binding free energy calculations have been applied to the virtual screening of a focused library of candidate binders to the LEDGF site of the HIV integrase protein. The computational protocol leveraged docking and high level atomistic models to improve enrichment. The enrichment factor of our blind predictions ranked best among all of the computational submissions, and second best overall. This work represents to our knowledge the first example of the application of an all-atom physics-based binding free energy model to large scale virtual screening. A total of 285 parallel Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics absolute protein-ligand binding free energy simulations were conducted starting from docked poses. The setup of the simulations was fully automated, calculations were distributed on multiple computing resources and were completed in a 6-weeks period. The accuracy of the docked poses and the inclusion of intramolecular strain and entropic losses in the binding free energy estimates were the major factors behind the success of the method. Lack of sufficient time and computing resources to investigate additional protonation states of the ligands was a major cause of mispredictions. The experiment demonstrated the applicability of binding free energy modeling to improve hit rates in challenging virtual screening of focused ligand libraries during lead optimization. PMID:24504704

  1. Blind prediction of HIV integrase binding from the SAMPL4 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, David L.; Liu, Shuai; Lim, Nathan M.; Wymer, Karisa L.; Perryman, Alexander L.; Forli, Stefano; Deng, Nanjie; Su, Justin; Branson, Kim; Olson, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we give an overview of the protein-ligand binding portion of the SAMPL4 challenge, which focused on predicting binding of HIV integrase inhibitors in the catalytic core domain. The challenge encompassed three components – a small “virtual screening” challenge, a binding mode prediction component, and a small affinity prediction component. Here, we give summary results and statistics concerning the performance of all submissions at each of these challenges. Virtual screening was particularly challenging here in part because, in contrast to more typical virtual screening test sets, the inactive compounds were tested because they were thought to be likely binders, so only the very top predictions performed significantly better than random. Pose prediction was also quite challenging, in part because inhibitors in the set bind to three different sites, so even identifying the correct binding site was challenging. Still, the best methods managed low RMSD predictions in many cases. Here, we give an overview of results, highlight some features of methods which worked particularly well, and refer the interested reader to papers in this issue which describe specific submissions for additional details. PMID:24595873

  2. Structural Basis for the Recognition Between HIV-1 Integrase and Transcriptional Coactivator p75

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov,P.; Ambrosio, A.; Rahman, S.; Ellenberger, T.; Engelman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an essential retroviral enzyme, and human transcriptional coactivator p75, which is also referred to as lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF), is the dominant cellular binding partner of HIV-1 IN. Here, we report the crystal structure of the dimeric catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN complexed to the IN-binding domain of LEDGF. Previously identified LEDGF hotspot residues anchor the protein to both monomers at the IN dimer interface. The principal structural features of IN that are recognized by the host factor are the backbone conformation of residues 168-171 from one monomer and a hydrophobic patch that is primarily comprised of {alpha}-helices 1 and 3 of the second IN monomer. Inspection of diverse retroviral primary and secondary sequence elements helps to explain the apparent lentiviral tropism of the LEDGF-IN interaction. Because the lethal phenotypes of HIV-1 mutant viruses unable to interact with LEDGF indicate that IN function is highly sensitive to perturbations of the structure around the LEDGF-binding site, we propose that small molecule inhibitors of the protein-protein interaction might similarly disrupt HIV-1 replication.

  3. Design of inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase core domain using virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Regon, Preetom; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The integrase (IN) enzyme of HIV interacts with several cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Thus, it represents an appropriate target for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We performed virtual screening of database compounds and designed analogues using Elvitegravir (EVG) as a standard compound. The 378 screened compounds were retrieved from ZINC, ChemSpider, PubChem, and ChemBank Chemical Databases based on chemical similarity and literature searches related to the structure of EVG. The Physiochemical properties, Bioactivity, Toxicity and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Molecules (ADME) of these compounds were predicted and docking Experiments were conducted using Molegro Virtual Docker software. The docking and ADME suggested very significant results in regard to EVG. The MolDock and Rerank scores were used to analyze the results. The compounds ZINC26507991 (-84.22), Analogue 9 (-68.49), ZINC20731658 (-66.79), ZINC00210363 (-43.44) showed better binding orientation with IN receptor model with respect to EVG (182.52). The ZINC26507991 has showed significant ADME result. PMID:24616558

  4. Metabolism, excretion, and mass balance of the HIV-1 integrase inhibitor dolutegravir in humans.

    PubMed

    Castellino, Stephen; Moss, Lee; Wagner, David; Borland, Julie; Song, Ivy; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Min, Sherene S; Goljer, Igor; Culp, Amanda; Piscitelli, Stephen C; Savina, Paul M

    2013-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of dolutegravir, an unboosted, once-daily human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitor, were studied in healthy male subjects following single oral administration of [(14)C]dolutegravir at a dose of 20 mg (80 μCi). Dolutegravir was well tolerated, and absorption of dolutegravir from the suspension formulation was rapid (median time to peak concentration, 0.5 h), declining in a biphasic fashion. Dolutegravir and the radioactivity had similar terminal plasma half-lives (t1/2) (15.6 versus 15.7 h), indicating metabolism was formation rate limited with no long-lived metabolites. Only minimal association with blood cellular components was noted with systemic radioactivity. Recovery was essentially complete (mean, 95.6%), with 64.0% and 31.6% of the dose recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged dolutegravir was the predominant circulating radioactive component in plasma and was consistent with minimal presystemic clearance. Dolutegravir was extensively metabolized. An inactive ether glucuronide, formed primarily via UGT1A1, was the principal biotransformation product at 18.9% of the dose excreted in urine and the principal metabolite in plasma. Two minor biotransformation pathways were oxidation by CYP3A4 (7.9% of the dose) and an oxidative defluorination and glutathione substitution (1.8% of the dose). No disproportionate human metabolites were observed.

  5. Metabolism, Excretion, and Mass Balance of the HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Stephen; Moss, Lee; Wagner, David; Borland, Julie; Song, Ivy; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Min, Sherene S.; Goljer, Igor; Culp, Amanda; Piscitelli, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of dolutegravir, an unboosted, once-daily human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitor, were studied in healthy male subjects following single oral administration of [14C]dolutegravir at a dose of 20 mg (80 μCi). Dolutegravir was well tolerated, and absorption of dolutegravir from the suspension formulation was rapid (median time to peak concentration, 0.5 h), declining in a biphasic fashion. Dolutegravir and the radioactivity had similar terminal plasma half-lives (t1/2) (15.6 versus 15.7 h), indicating metabolism was formation rate limited with no long-lived metabolites. Only minimal association with blood cellular components was noted with systemic radioactivity. Recovery was essentially complete (mean, 95.6%), with 64.0% and 31.6% of the dose recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged dolutegravir was the predominant circulating radioactive component in plasma and was consistent with minimal presystemic clearance. Dolutegravir was extensively metabolized. An inactive ether glucuronide, formed primarily via UGT1A1, was the principal biotransformation product at 18.9% of the dose excreted in urine and the principal metabolite in plasma. Two minor biotransformation pathways were oxidation by CYP3A4 (7.9% of the dose) and an oxidative defluorination and glutathione substitution (1.8% of the dose). No disproportionate human metabolites were observed. PMID:23669385

  6. Dolutegravir: a new integrase strand transfer inhibitor for the treatment of HIV.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik M; Schafer, Jason J; Desimone, Joseph A

    2014-05-01

    The first two integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) approved for treatment of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were raltegravir and elvitegravir. Both raltegravir and elvitegravir are now guideline-preferred agents as part of an antiretroviral regimen for treatment-naive patients. However, raltegravir is dosed twice/day. Elvitegravir is available in a single-tablet regimen and dosed once/day because it is administered with the pharmacokinetic booster cobicistat, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor that can lead to clinically significant drug-drug interactions. In addition, raltegravir and elvitegravir have a low genetic barrier to resistance and are associated with cross-resistance. Dolutegravir is a new-generation INSTI administered once/day without a pharmacokinetic booster and can be coformulated in a single-tablet regimen. Phase III studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of dolutegravir for treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients. Compared with other INSTIs, dolutegravir has a higher genetic barrier to resistance. Dolutegravir was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in August 2013 and joins raltegravir and elvitegravir as guideline-preferred agents for the management for HIV-infected treatment-naive patients. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  7. Virtual screening of integrase inhibitors by large scale binding free energy calculations: the SAMPL4 challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Wickstrom, Lauren; Perryman, Alexander L.; Santiago, Daniel N.; Forli, Stefano; Olson, Arthur J.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2014-04-01

    As part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge, filtered AutoDock Vina ligand docking predictions and large scale binding energy distribution analysis method binding free energy calculations have been applied to the virtual screening of a focused library of candidate binders to the LEDGF site of the HIV integrase protein. The computational protocol leveraged docking and high level atomistic models to improve enrichment. The enrichment factor of our blind predictions ranked best among all of the computational submissions, and second best overall. This work represents to our knowledge the first example of the application of an all-atom physics-based binding free energy model to large scale virtual screening. A total of 285 parallel Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics absolute protein-ligand binding free energy simulations were conducted starting from docked poses. The setup of the simulations was fully automated, calculations were distributed on multiple computing resources and were completed in a 6-weeks period. The accuracy of the docked poses and the inclusion of intramolecular strain and entropic losses in the binding free energy estimates were the major factors behind the success of the method. Lack of sufficient time and computing resources to investigate additional protonation states of the ligands was a major cause of mispredictions. The experiment demonstrated the applicability of binding free energy modeling to improve hit rates in challenging virtual screening of focused ligand libraries during lead optimization.

  8. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women.

  9. Discovery of a small-molecule HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Fikkert, Valery; Dayam, Raveendra; Witvrouw, Myriam; Burke, Terrence R.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Neamati, Nouri

    2006-01-01

    Herein, we report the identification of a unique HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor-binding site using photoaffinity labeling and mass spectrometric analysis. We chemically incorporated a photo-activatable benzophenone moiety into a series of coumarin-containing IN inhibitors. A representative of this series was covalently photo-crosslinked with the IN core domain and subjected to HPLC purification. Fractions were subsequently analyzed by using MALDI-MS and electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS to identify photo-crosslinked products. In this fashion, a single binding site for an inhibitor located within the tryptic peptide 128AACWWAGIK136 was identified. Site-directed mutagenesis followed by in vitro inhibition assays resulted in the identification of two specific amino acid residues, C130 and W132, in which substitutions resulted in a marked resistance to the IN inhibitors. Docking studies suggested a specific disruption in functional oligomeric IN complex formation. The combined approach of photo-affinity labeling/MS analysis with site-directed mutagenesis/molecular modeling is a powerful approach for elucidating inhibitor-binding sites of proteins at the atomic level. This approach is especially important for the study of proteins that are not amenable to traditional x-ray crystallography and NMR techniques. This type of structural information can help illuminate processes of inhibitor resistance and thereby facilitate the design of more potent second-generation inhibitors. PMID:16785440

  10. Integrase-mediated spacer acquisition during CRISPR–Cas adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, James K.; Lee, Amy S.Y.; Engelman, Alan; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea insert spacer sequences acquired from foreign DNAs into CRISPR loci to generate immunological memory. The Escherichia coli Cas1–Cas2 complex mediates spacer acquisition in vivo, but the molecular mechanism of this process is unknown. Here we show that the purified Cas1–Cas2 complex integrates oligonucleotide DNA substrates into acceptor DNA to yield products similar to those generated by retroviral integrases and transposases. Cas1 is the catalytic subunit, whereas Cas2 substantially increases integration activity. Protospacer DNA with free 3'-OH ends and supercoiled target DNA are required, and integration occurs preferentially at the ends of CRISPR repeats and at sequences adjacent to cruciform structures abutting A-T rich regions, similar to the CRISPR leader sequence. Our results demonstrate the Cas1–Cas2 complex to be the minimal machinery that catalyzes spacer DNA acquisition and explain the significance of CRISPR repeats in providing sequence and structural specificity for Cas1–Cas2-mediated adaptive immunity. PMID:25707795

  11. Inhibition on HIV-1 integrase activity and nitric oxide production of compounds from Ficus glomerata.

    PubMed

    Bunluepuech, Kingkan; Sudsai, Teeratad; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2011-08-01

    An ethanol Ficus glomerata wood extract and its purified components were investigated for their HIV-1 integrase (IN) and nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activities. From bioassay-guided isolation, five compounds: beta-sitosterol-D-glucoside (1), aloe-emodin (2), genistein (3), 1,3,6-trihydroxy-8-methyl-anthraquinone (4) and 3-(1-C-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2,6-dihydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid (5) were isolated. Among the tested samples, at concentrations of 100 microM; compound 2 showed 31.9% inhibition of HIV-1 IN, followed by 4 (19.5%), whereas other compounds were inactive. With regard to the inhibitory effect on NO production, 3 possessed the highest activity with an IC50 value of 27.5 microM, followed by 4 (IC50 = 34.7 microM) and 2 (IC50 = 41.8 microM), respectively. This is the first time that compounds 2-5 have been isolated from Ficus glomerata.

  12. Comparison of DNA binding and integration half-site selection by avian myeloblastosis virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, D P; Inman, R B; Vora, A C; Fitzgerald, M L

    1993-01-01

    Insertion of the linear retrovirus DNA genome into the host DNA by the virus-encoded integrase (IN) is essential for efficient replication. We devised an efficient virus-like DNA plasmid integration assay which mimics the standard oligonucleotide assay for integration. It permitted us to study, by electron microscopy and sequence analysis, insertion of a single long terminal repeat terminus (LTR half-site) of one plasmid into another linearized plasmid. The reaction was catalyzed by purified avian myeloblastosis virus IN in the presence of Mg2+. The recombinant molecules were easily visualized and quantitated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Agarose gel-purified recombinants could be genetically selected by transformation of ligated recombinants into Escherichia coli HB101 cells. Electron microscopy also permitted the identification and localization of IN-DNA complexes on the virus-like substrate in the absence of the joining reaction. Intramolecular and intermolecular DNA looping by IN was visualized. Although IN preferentially bound to AT-rich regions in the absence of the joining reaction, there was a bias towards GC-rich regions for the joining reaction. Alignment of 70 target site sequences 5' of the LTR half-site insertions with 68 target sites previously identified for the concerted insertion of both LTR termini (LTR full-site reaction) indicated similar GC inflection patterns with both insertional events. Comparison of the data suggested that IN recognized only half of the target sequences necessary for integration with the LTR half-site reaction. Images PMID:8474165

  13. Development and use of SIV-based Integrase defective lentiviral vector for immunization

    PubMed Central

    Michelini, Zuleika; Negri, Donatella RM; Baroncelli, Silvia; Spada, Massimo; Leone, Pasqualina; Bona, Roberta; Klotman, Mary E.; Cara, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) defective lentiviral vectors have a high safety profile and might prove useful as immunizing agents especially against HIV-1. However, IN defective SIV-based vectors must be developed in order to test their potential in the non human primate models (NHP) of AIDS. To this aim we tested a novel SIV-based IN defective lentiviral vector for its ability to induce sustained immune responses in mice. BALB/c mice were immunized once intramuscularly with a SIV-based IN defective lentiviral vector expressing the model antigen enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Immune responses were evaluated 90 days after the injection and compared with those elicited with the IN competent counterpart. The IN defective vector was able to efficiently elicit specific and long-lasting polyfunctional immune responses as evaluated by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays for interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in spleens, bone marrow (BM) and draining lymph nodes, and by intracellular staining (ICS) for IFN-γ, Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in both splenocytes and BM cells without integration of the vector into the host genome. This is the first demonstration that an IN defective SIV-based lentiviral vector provides effective immunization, thus paving the way for the construction of IN defective vectors expressing SIV antigen(s) and test their efficacy against a SIV virus challenge in the NHP model of AIDS. PMID:19523909

  14. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent.

  15. Using the class 1 integron-integrase gene as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution

    PubMed Central

    Gillings, Michael R; Gaze, William H; Pruden, Amy; Smalla, Kornelia; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Around all human activity, there are zones of pollution with pesticides, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and the microorganisms associated with human waste streams and agriculture. This diversity of pollutants, whose concentration varies spatially and temporally, is a major challenge for monitoring. Here, we suggest that the relative abundance of the clinical class 1 integron-integrase gene, intI1, is a good proxy for pollution because: (1) intI1 is linked to genes conferring resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and heavy metals; (2) it is found in a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria; (3) its abundance can change rapidly because its host cells can have rapid generation times and it can move between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer; and (4) a single DNA sequence variant of intI1 is now found on a wide diversity of xenogenetic elements, these being complex mosaic DNA elements fixed through the agency of human selection. Here we review the literature examining the relationship between anthropogenic impacts and the abundance of intI1, and outline an approach by which intI1 could serve as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution. PMID:25500508

  16. Using the class 1 integron-integrase gene as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution.

    PubMed

    Gillings, Michael R; Gaze, William H; Pruden, Amy; Smalla, Kornelia; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-06-01

    Around all human activity, there are zones of pollution with pesticides, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and the microorganisms associated with human waste streams and agriculture. This diversity of pollutants, whose concentration varies spatially and temporally, is a major challenge for monitoring. Here, we suggest that the relative abundance of the clinical class 1 integron-integrase gene, intI1, is a good proxy for pollution because: (1) intI1 is linked to genes conferring resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and heavy metals; (2) it is found in a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria; (3) its abundance can change rapidly because its host cells can have rapid generation times and it can move between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer; and (4) a single DNA sequence variant of intI1 is now found on a wide diversity of xenogenetic elements, these being complex mosaic DNA elements fixed through the agency of human selection. Here we review the literature examining the relationship between anthropogenic impacts and the abundance of intI1, and outline an approach by which intI1 could serve as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution.

  17. Initial Characterization of Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors for Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanoun, Naima; Gayral, Marion; Pointreau, Adeline; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority (85%) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are discovered at too of a late stage to allow curative surgery. In addition, PDAC is highly resistant to conventional methods of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which only offer a marginal clinical benefit. Consequently, the prognosis of this cancer is devastating, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. In this dismal context, we recently demonstrated that PDAC gene therapy using nonviral vectors is safe and feasible, with early signs of efficacy in selected patients. Our next step is to transfer to the clinic HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) that outshine other therapeutic vectors to treat experimental models of PDAC. However, a primary safety issue presented by LVs that may delay their use in patients is the risk of oncogenesis after vector integration in the host's cell DNA. Thus, we developed a novel anticancerous approach based on integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) and demonstrated that IDLVs can be successfully engineered to transiently deliver therapeutic genes to inhibit pancreatic cancer cells proliferation. This work stems for the use of therapeutic IDLVs for the management of PDAC, in forthcoming early phase gene therapy clinical trial for this disease with no cure.

  18. Specific anti-integrase abzymes from HIV-infected patients: a comparison of the cleavage sites of intact globular HIV integrase and two 20-mer oligopeptides corresponding to its antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Elena S; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2013-03-01

    HIV-infected patients possess anti-integrase (IN) IgGs and IgMs that, after isolation by chromatography on IN-Sepharose, unlike canonical proteases, specifically hydrolyze only IN but not many other tested proteins. Hydrolysis of intact globular IN first leads to formation of many long fragments of protein, while its long incubation with anti-IN antibodies, especially in the case of abzymes (Abzs) with a high proteolytic activity, results in the formation of short and very short oligopeptides (OPs). To identify all sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis corresponding to known AGDs of integrase, we have used a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization spectrometry, and thin-layer chromatography to analyze the cleavage products of two 20-mer OPs corresponding to these AGDs. Both OPs contained 9-10 mainly clustered major, medium, and minor sites of cleavage. The main superficial cleavage sites of the AGDs in the intact IN and sites of partial or deep hydrolysis of the peptides analyzed do not coincide. The active sites of anti-IN Abzs are localized on their light chains, whereas the heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of Abzs provide high specificity of IN hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-IN Abzs for intact integrase was ~1000-fold higher than for the OPs. The data suggest that both OPs interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal Abzs of the total pool of IgGs, which possesses lower affinity for substrates; and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific and remarkably different in comparison with the cleavage of intact globular IN.

  19. Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Using QSAR-Based Virtual Screening of the NCI Open Database.

    PubMed

    Ko, Gene M; Garg, Rajni; Bailey, Barbara A; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models can be used as a predictive tool for virtual screening of chemical libraries to identify novel drug candidates. The aims of this paper were to report the results of a study performed for descriptor selection, QSAR model development, and virtual screening for identifying novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitor drug candidates. First, three evolutionary algorithms were compared for descriptor selection: differential evolution-binary particle swarm optimization (DE-BPSO), binary particle swarm optimization, and genetic algorithms. Next, three QSAR models were developed from an ensemble of multiple linear regression, partial least squares, and extremely randomized trees models. A comparison of the performances of three evolutionary algorithms showed that DE-BPSO has a significant improvement over the other two algorithms. QSAR models developed in this study were used in consensus as a predictive tool for virtual screening of the NCI Open Database containing 265,242 compounds to identify potential novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Six compounds were predicted to be highly active (plC50 > 6) by each of the three models. The use of a hybrid evolutionary algorithm (DE-BPSO) for descriptor selection and QSAR model development in drug design is a novel approach. Consensus modeling may provide better predictivity by taking into account a broader range of chemical properties within the data set conducive for inhibition that may be missed by an individual model. The six compounds identified provide novel drug candidate leads in the design of next generation HIV- 1 integrase inhibitors targeting drug resistant mutant viruses.

  20. Novel and diverse integron integrase genes and integron-like gene cassettes are prevalent in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, H W; Nakamura, Takamichi; Kitamura, Keiko; Fuse, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2007-09-01

    The lack of information about mobile DNA in deep-sea hydrothermal vents limits our understanding of the phylogenetic diversity of the mobile genome of bacteria in these environments. We used culture-independent techniques to explore the diversity of the integron/mobile gene cassette system in a variety of hydrothermal vent communities. Three samples, which included two different hydrothermal vent fluids and a mussel species that contained essentially monophyletic sulfur-oxidizing bacterial endosymbionts, were collected from Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin, Japan, and Pika site, Mariana arc. First, using degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers, we amplified integron integrase genes from metagenomic DNA from each sample. From vent fluids, we discovered 74 new integrase genes that were classified into 11 previously undescribed integron classes. One integrase gene was recorded in the mussel symbiont and was phylogenetically distant from those recovered from vent fluids. Second, using PCR primers targeting the gene cassette recombination site (59-be), we amplified and subsequently identified 60 diverse gene cassettes. In multicassette amplicons, a total of 13 59-be sites were identified. Most of these sites displayed features that were atypical of the features previously well conserved in this family. The Suiyo vent fluid was characterized by gene cassette open reading frames (ORFs) that had significant homologies with transferases, DNA-binding proteins and metal transporter proteins, while the majority of Pika vent fluid gene cassettes contained novel ORFs with no identifiable homologues in databases. The symbiont gene cassette ORFs were found to be matched with DNA repair proteins, methionine aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase N, O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and glutamate synthase, which are proteins expected to play a role in animal/symbiont metabolism. The success of this study indicates that the integron/gene cassette system is common in deep-sea hydrothermal

  1. Mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Jing, N; Marchand, C; Liu, J; Mitra, R; Hogan, M E; Pommier, Y

    2000-07-14

    The G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides and have been identified as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) activity (Rando, R. F., Ojwang, J., Elbaggari, A., Reyes, G. R., Tinder, R., McGrath, M. S., and Hogan, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1754-1760; Mazumder, A., Neamati, N., Ojwang, J. O., Sunder, S., Rando, R. F., and Pommier, Y. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 13762-13771; Jing, N., and Hogan, M. E. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 34992-34999). To understand the inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by the G-quartet inhibitors, we have designed the oligonucleotides and, composed of three and four G-quartets with stem lengths of 19 and 24 A, respectively. The fact that increasing the G-quartet stem length from 15 to 24 A kept inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity unchanged suggests that the binding interaction occurs between a GTGT loop domain of the G-quartet inhibitors and a catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, referred to as a face-to-face interaction. Docking the NMR structure of (Jing and Hogan (1998)) into the x-ray structure of the core domain of HIV-1 IN, HIV-1 IN-(51-209) (Maignan, S., Guilloteau, J.-P. , Qing, Z.-L., Clement-Mella, C., and Mikol, V. (1998) J. Mol. Biol. 282, 359-368), was performed using the GRAMM program. The statistical distributions of hydrogen bonding between HIV-1 IN and were obtained from the analyses of 1000 random docking structures. The docking results show a high probability of interaction between the GTGT loop residues of the G-quartet inhibitors and the catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, in agreement with the experimental observation.

  2. Placental transfer of the HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir in an ex vivo human cotyledon perfusion model.

    PubMed

    Schalkwijk, Stein; Greupink, Rick; Colbers, Angela P; Wouterse, Alfons C; Verweij, Vivienne G M; van Drongelen, Joris; Teulen, Marga; van den Oetelaar, Daphne; Burger, David M; Russel, Frans G M

    2016-02-01

    Data on fetal exposure to antiretroviral agents during pregnancy are important to estimate their potential for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and possible toxicity. For the recently developed HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir, clinical data on fetal disposition are not yet available. Dual perfusion of a single placental lobule (cotyledon) provides a useful ex vivo model to predict the in vivo maternal-to-fetal transfer of this drug. The aim of this study was to estimate the transfer of dolutegravir across the human term placenta, using a dual-perfusion cotyledon model. After cannulation of the cotyledons (n = 6), a fetal circulation of 6 mL/min and maternal circulation of 12 mL/min were initiated. The perfusion medium consisted of Krebs-Henseleit buffer (pH = 7.2-7.4) supplemented with 10.1 mM glucose, 30 g/L human serum albumin and 0.5 mL/L heparin 5000IE. Dolutegravir was administered to the maternal circulation (∼ 4.2 mg/L) and analysed by UPLC-MS/MS. After 3 h of perfusion, the mean ± SD fetal-to-maternal (FTM) concentration ratio of dolutegravir was 0.6 ± 0.2 and the mean ± SD concentrations in the maternal and fetal compartments were 2.3 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 0.3 mg/L, respectively. Dolutegravir crosses the blood-placental barrier with a mean FTM concentration ratio of 0.6. Compared with other antiretroviral agents, placental transfer of dolutegravir is moderate to high. These data suggest that dolutegravir holds clinical potential for pre-exposure prophylaxis and consequently PMTCT, but also risk of fetal toxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Site-specific bacterial chromosome engineering mediated by IntA integrase from Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Tamayo, Rogelio; Torres-Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Brom, Susana; Romero, David

    2016-06-29

    The bacterial chromosome may be used to stably maintain foreign DNA in the mega-base range. Integration into the chromosome circumvents issues such as plasmid replication, stability, incompatibility, and copy number variance. The site-specific integrase IntA from Rhizobium etli CFN42 catalyzes a direct recombination between two specific DNA sites: attA and attD (23 bp). This recombination is stable. The aim of this work was to develop a R. etli derivative that may be used as recipient for the integration of foreign DNA in the chromosome, adapting the IntA catalyzed site-specific recombination system. To fulfill our aim, we designed a Rhizobium etli CFN42 derivative, containing a "landing pad" (LP) integrated into the chromosome. The LP sector consists of a green fluorescent protein gene under the control of the lacZ promoter and a spectinomycin resistance gene. Between the lacZ promoter and the GFP gene we inserted an IntA attachment site, which does not affect transcription from the lac promoter. Also, a mobilizable donor vector was generated, containing an attA site and a kanamycin resistance gene; to facilitate insertion of foreign DNA, this vector also contains a multicloning site. There are no promoters flanking the multicloning site. A biparental mating protocol was used to transfer the donor vector into the landing pad strain; insertion of the donor vector into the landing pad sector via IntA-mediated attA X attA recombination thereby interrupted the expression of the green fluorescent protein, generating site-specific cointegrants. Cointegrants were easily recognized by screening for antibiotic sensitivity and lack of GFP expression, and were obtained with an efficiency of 6.18 %. Integration of foreign DNA in Rhizobium, lacking any similarity with the genome, can be easily achieved by IntA-mediated recombination. This protocol contains the mating and selection procedures for creating and isolating integrants.

  4. Prevalence of Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors (INSTI) Resistance Mutations in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Han; Cheng, Chien-Lin; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Su, Yi-Ching; Su, Li-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Fang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy containing an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) plus two NRTIs has become the recommended treatment for antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in the updated guidelines. We aimed to determine the prevalence of INSTI-related mutations in Taiwan. Genotypic resistance assays were performed on plasma from ARV-naïve patients (N = 948), ARV-experienced but INSTI-naive patients (N = 359), and raltegravir-experienced patients (N = 63) from 2006 to 2015. Major INSTI mutations were defined according to the IAS-USA list and other substitutions with a Stanford HIVdb score ≧ 10 to at least one INSTI were defined as minor mutations. Of 1307 HIV-1 samples from patients never exposed to INSTIs, the overall prevalence of major resistance mutations to INSTIs was 0.9% (n = 12), with an increase to 1.2% in 2013. Of these 12 sequences, 11 harboured Q148H/K/R, one Y143R, and none N155H. Of 30 sequences (47.6%) with INSTI-resistant mutations from raltegravir-experienced patients, 17 harboured Q148H/K/R, 8 N155H, and 6 Y143C/R. Other than these major mutations, the prevalence of minor mutations were 5.3% and 38.1%, respectively, in ARV-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients. The overall prevalence of INSTI mutations remains low in Taiwan. Surveillance of INSTI resistance is warranted due to circulation of polymorphisms contributing to INSTI resistance and expected increasing use of INSTIs. PMID:27779200

  5. Coevolutionary Analysis Identifies Protein–Protein Interaction Sites between HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Hetti Arachchilage, Madara; Piontkivska, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome and integration of newly synthesized pro-viral DNA into the host genome. This is mediated by the viral proteins reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN). The formation and stabilization of the pre-integration complex (PIC), which is an essential step for reverse transcription, nuclear import, chromatin targeting, and subsequent integration, involves direct and indirect modes of interaction between RT and IN proteins. While epitope-based treatments targeting IN–viral DNA and IN–RT complexes appear to be a promising combination for an anti-HIV treatment, the mechanisms of IN-RT interactions within the PIC are not well understood due to the transient nature of the protein complex and the intrinsic flexibility of its components. Here, we identify potentially interacting regions between the IN and RT proteins within the PIC through the coevolutionary analysis of amino acid sequences of the two proteins. Our results show that specific regions in the two proteins have strong coevolutionary signatures, suggesting that these regions either experience direct and prolonged interactions between them that require high affinity and/or specificity or that the regions are involved in interactions mediated by dynamic conformational changes and, hence, may involve both direct and indirect interactions. Other regions were found to exhibit weak, but positive correlations, implying interactions that are likely transient and/or have low affinity. We identified a series of specific regions of potential interactions between the IN and RT proteins (e.g., specific peptide regions within the C-terminal domain of IN were identified as potentially interacting with the Connection domain of RT). Coevolutionary analysis can serve as an important step in predicting potential interactions, thus informing experimental studies. These studies can be integrated with structural data

  6. Dolutegravir: clinical and laboratory safety in integrase inhibitor-naive patients.

    PubMed

    Curtis, L; Nichols, G; Stainsby, C; Lim, J; Aylott, A; Wynne, B; Clark, A; Bloch, M; Maechler, G; Martin-Carpenter, L; Raffi, F; Min, S

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of dolutegravir (DTG) has been demonstrated in 5 randomized studies in integrase inhibitor (INI)-naive adult populations. To date, a detailed safety review of DTG has not been provided in the literature. To describe the safety and tolerability profile of DTG in adults based on 5 randomized, controlled trials and comparison with drugs in 3 major antiretroviral (ARV) classes. Safety data from phase IIb/III/IIIb trials in ART-naive and ART-experienced, INI-naive adults were integrated. In 4 ART-naive (SPRING-1, SPRING-2, SINGLE, FLAMINGO) and 1 ART-experienced, INI-naive study (SAILING), 1,579 individuals received a DTG-containing regimen. The proportion of individuals from DTG treatment arms who withdrew due to adverse events (AEs) was low (≤2%) compared to raltegravir (RAL; 2% SPRING-2, 4% SAILING), efavirenz (EFV)-containing comparator arm (10% SINGLE), and darunavir + ritonavir (DRV/r; 4% FLAMINGO). The most frequently observed AEs (diarrhea, nausea, headache), typically grade 1 or 2 in severity, did not lead to study discontinuation. Psychiatric and nervous system disorders with DTG were comparable to RAL- and DRV/r-containing regimens and favorable to EFV-containing regimens. In hepatitis B and/or C coinfected ART-naive individuals, the incidence of transaminase elevations was lower with DTG versus RAL and EFV comparators, but was similar to DRV/r. In SAILING, transaminase elevations were more commonly observed with DTG, particularly in the setting of inadequate hepatitis B therapy or immune reconstitution. On DTG treatment, mild creatinine elevations occurred and stabilized early. Few cases of hypersensitivity reaction and/or severe rash were seen. Rates of these events were comparable to or lower than with RAL-, EFV-, and DRV/r-containing regimens. The safety profile for DTG 50 mg once daily in INI-naive individuals was comparable to RAL- and DRV/r-