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Sample records for integrase-defective lentiviral vectors

  1. Initial Characterization of Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors for Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanoun, Naima; Gayral, Marion; Pointreau, Adeline; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority (85%) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are discovered at too of a late stage to allow curative surgery. In addition, PDAC is highly resistant to conventional methods of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which only offer a marginal clinical benefit. Consequently, the prognosis of this cancer is devastating, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. In this dismal context, we recently demonstrated that PDAC gene therapy using nonviral vectors is safe and feasible, with early signs of efficacy in selected patients. Our next step is to transfer to the clinic HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) that outshine other therapeutic vectors to treat experimental models of PDAC. However, a primary safety issue presented by LVs that may delay their use in patients is the risk of oncogenesis after vector integration in the host's cell DNA. Thus, we developed a novel anticancerous approach based on integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) and demonstrated that IDLVs can be successfully engineered to transiently deliver therapeutic genes to inhibit pancreatic cancer cells proliferation. This work stems for the use of therapeutic IDLVs for the management of PDAC, in forthcoming early phase gene therapy clinical trial for this disease with no cure.

  2. Simian immunodeficiency virus-Vpx for improving integrase defective lentiviral vector-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrase defective lentiviral vectors (IDLV) represent a promising delivery system for immunization purposes. Human dendritic cells (DC) are the main cell types mediating the immune response and are readily transduced by IDLV, allowing effective triggering of in vitro expansion of antigen-specific primed CD8+ T cells. However, IDLV expression in transduced DC is at lower levels than those of the integrase (IN) competent counterpart, thus requiring further improvement of IDLV for future use in the clinic. Results In this paper we show that the addition of simian immunodeficiency (SIV)-Vpx protein in the vector preparation greatly improves transduction of human and simian DC, but not of murine DC, thus increasing the ability of transduced DC to act as functional antigen presenting cells, in the absence of integrated vector sequences. Importantly, the presence of SIV-Vpx allows for using lower dose of input IDLV during in vitro transduction, thus further improving the IDLV safety profile. Conclusions These results have significant implications for the development of IDLV-based vaccines. PMID:22913641

  3. Development and use of SIV-based Integrase defective lentiviral vector for immunization

    PubMed Central

    Michelini, Zuleika; Negri, Donatella RM; Baroncelli, Silvia; Spada, Massimo; Leone, Pasqualina; Bona, Roberta; Klotman, Mary E.; Cara, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) defective lentiviral vectors have a high safety profile and might prove useful as immunizing agents especially against HIV-1. However, IN defective SIV-based vectors must be developed in order to test their potential in the non human primate models (NHP) of AIDS. To this aim we tested a novel SIV-based IN defective lentiviral vector for its ability to induce sustained immune responses in mice. BALB/c mice were immunized once intramuscularly with a SIV-based IN defective lentiviral vector expressing the model antigen enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Immune responses were evaluated 90 days after the injection and compared with those elicited with the IN competent counterpart. The IN defective vector was able to efficiently elicit specific and long-lasting polyfunctional immune responses as evaluated by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays for interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in spleens, bone marrow (BM) and draining lymph nodes, and by intracellular staining (ICS) for IFN-γ, Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in both splenocytes and BM cells without integration of the vector into the host genome. This is the first demonstration that an IN defective SIV-based lentiviral vector provides effective immunization, thus paving the way for the construction of IN defective vectors expressing SIV antigen(s) and test their efficacy against a SIV virus challenge in the NHP model of AIDS. PMID:19523909

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Rescues Gene Knockout Levels Achieved with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors Encoding Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Pelascini, Laetitia P.L.; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Holkers, Maarten; Cathomen, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) work as dimers to induce double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) at predefined chromosomal positions. In doing so, they constitute powerful triggers to edit and to interrogate the function of genomic sequences in higher eukaryotes. A preferred route to introduce ZFNs into somatic cells relies on their cotransduction with two integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) each encoding a monomer of a functional heterodimeric pair. The episomal nature of IDLVs diminishes the risk of genotoxicity and ensures the strict transient expression profile necessary to minimize deleterious effects associated with long-term ZFN activity. However, by deploying IDLVs and conventional lentiviral vectors encoding HPRT1- or eGFP-specific ZFNs, we report that DSB formation at target alleles is limited after IDLV-mediated ZFN transfer. This IDLV-specific underperformance stems, to a great extent, from the activity of chromatin-remodeling histone deacetylases (HDACs). Importantly, the prototypic and U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved inhibitors of metal-dependent HDACs, trichostatin A and vorinostat, respectively, did not hinder illegitimate recombination-mediated repair of targeted chromosomal DSBs. This allowed rescuing IDLV-mediated site-directed mutagenesis to levels approaching those achieved by using their isogenic chromosomally integrating counterparts. Hence, HDAC inhibition constitutes an efficacious expedient to incorporate in genome-editing strategies based on transient IDLV-mediated ZFN expression. Finally, we compared two of the most commonly used readout systems to measure targeted gene knockout activities based on restriction and mismatch-sensitive endonucleases. These experiments indicate that these enzymatic assays display a similar performance. PMID:24059449

  5. Transduction of Human Antigen-Presenting Cells with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vector Enables Functional Expansion of Primed Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Roberta; Michelini, Zuleika; Leone, Pasqualina; Macchia, Iole; Klotman, Mary E.; Salvatore, Mirella

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors are being developed as a efficient and safe delivery system for both gene therapy and vaccine purposes. Several reports have demonstrated that a single immunization with integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) delivering viral or tumor model antigens in mice was able to elicit broad and long-lasting specific immune responses in the absence of vector integration. At present, no evidence has been reported showing that IDLVs are able to expand preexisting immune responses in the human context. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages with IDLVs expressing influenza matrix M1 protein resulted in effective induction of in vitro expansion of M1-primed CD8+ T cells, as evaluated by both pentamer staining and cytokine production. This is the first demonstration that IDLVs represent an efficient delivery system for gene transfer and expression in human APCs, useful for immunotherapeutic applications. PMID:20210625

  6. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  7. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  8. Biosafety Features of Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Schambach, Axel; Zychlinski, Daniela; Ehrnstroem, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the past decades, lentiviral vectors have evolved as a benchmark tool for stable gene transfer into cells with a high replicative potential. Their relatively flexible genome and ability to transduce many forms of nondividing cells, combined with the potential for cell-specific pseudotyping, provides a rich resource for numerous applications in experimental platforms and therapeutic settings. Here, we give an overview of important biosafety features of lentiviral vectors, with detailed discussion of (i) the principles of the lentiviral split-genome design used for the construction of packaging cells; (ii) the relevance of modifications introduced into the lentiviral long terminal repeat (deletion of enhancer/promoter sequences and introduction of insulators); (iii) the basic features of mRNA processing, including the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) interaction and the modifications of the 3′ untranslated region of lentiviral vectors with various post-transcriptional regulatory elements affecting transcriptional termination, polyadenylation, and differentiation-specific degradation of mRNA; and (iv) the characteristic integration pattern with the associated risk of transcriptional interference with cellular genes. We conclude with considerations regarding the importance of cell targeting via envelope modifications. Along this course, we address canonical biosafety issues encountered with any type of viral vector: the risks of shedding, mobilization, germline transmission, immunogenicity, and insertional mutagenesis. PMID:23311447

  9. Biosafety features of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schambach, Axel; Zychlinski, Daniela; Ehrnstroem, Birgitta; Baum, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    Over the past decades, lentiviral vectors have evolved as a benchmark tool for stable gene transfer into cells with a high replicative potential. Their relatively flexible genome and ability to transduce many forms of nondividing cells, combined with the potential for cell-specific pseudotyping, provides a rich resource for numerous applications in experimental platforms and therapeutic settings. Here, we give an overview of important biosafety features of lentiviral vectors, with detailed discussion of (i) the principles of the lentiviral split-genome design used for the construction of packaging cells; (ii) the relevance of modifications introduced into the lentiviral long terminal repeat (deletion of enhancer/promoter sequences and introduction of insulators); (iii) the basic features of mRNA processing, including the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) interaction and the modifications of the 3' untranslated region of lentiviral vectors with various post-transcriptional regulatory elements affecting transcriptional termination, polyadenylation, and differentiation-specific degradation of mRNA; and (iv) the characteristic integration pattern with the associated risk of transcriptional interference with cellular genes. We conclude with considerations regarding the importance of cell targeting via envelope modifications. Along this course, we address canonical biosafety issues encountered with any type of viral vector: the risks of shedding, mobilization, germline transmission, immunogenicity, and insertional mutagenesis.

  10. Targeting retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, V; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    2003-01-01

    Retroviral vectors capable of efficient in vivo gene delivery to specific target cell types or to specific locations of disease pathology would greatly facilitate many gene therapy applications. The surface glycoproteins of membrane-enveloped viruses stand among the choice candidates to control the target cell receptor recognition and host range of retroviral vectors onto which they are incorporated. This can be achieved in many ways, such as the exchange of glycoprotein by pseudotyping, their biochemical modifications, their conjugation with virus-cell bridging agents or their structural modifications. Understanding the fundamental properties of the viral glycoproteins and the molecular mechanism of virus entry into cells has been instrumental in the functional alteration of their tropism. Here we briefly review the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral envelope glycoproteins and we discuss the emerging targeting strategies based on retroviral and lentiviral vector systems.

  11. New protocol for lentiviral vector mass production.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Garnier, Alain; Durocher, Yves; Ansorge, Sven; Kamen, Amine

    2010-01-01

    Multiplasmid transient transfection is the most widely used technique for the generation of lentiviral vectors. However, traditional transient transfection protocols using 293 T adherent cells and calcium phosphate/DNA co-precipitation followed by ultracentrifugation are tedious, time-consuming, and difficult to scale up. This chapter describes a streamlined protocol for the fast mass production of lentiviral vectors and their purification by affinity chromatography. Lentiviral particles are generated by transient transfection of suspension growing HEK 293 cells in serum-free medium using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Lentiviral vector production is carried out in Erlenmeyer flasks agitated on orbital shakers requiring minimum supplementary laboratory equipment. Alternatively, the method can be easily scaled up to generate larger volumes of vector stocks in bioreactors. Heparin affinity chromatography allows for selective concentration and purification of lentiviral particles in a singlestep directly from vector supernatants. The method is suitable for the production and purification of different vector pseudotypes.

  12. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Surface-engineering of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-02-01

    Vectors derived from retroviridae offer particularly flexible properties in gene transfer applications given the numerous possible associations of various viral surface glycoproteins (determining cell tropism) with different types of retroviral cores (determining genome replication and integration). Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) that cannot transduce non-proliferating target cells. Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system and their host range. There are however important gene transfer restrictions to some non-proliferative tissues or cell types and recent studies have shown that progenitor hematopoietic stem cells in G(0), non-activated primary blood lymphocytes or monocytes were not transducible by lentiviral vectors. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer applications in vivo. Several innovative approaches have been explored to overcome such problems that have given rise to novel concepts in the field and have provided promising results in preliminary evaluations in vivo. Here we review the different approaches explored to upgrade lentiviral vectors, aiming at developing vectors suitable for in vivo gene delivery.

  14. Targeting lentiviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Frederick; Breckpot, Karine; Collins, Mary; Escors, David

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of tumour-associated antigens (TAA) in a way that induces effective, specific immunity is a challenge in anti-cancer vaccine design. Circumventing tumour-induced tolerogenic mechanisms in vivo is also critical for effective immunotherapy. Effective immune responses are induced by professional antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). This requires presentation of the antigen to both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the context of strong co-stimulatory signals. Lentiviral vectors have been tested as vehicles, for both ex vivo and in vivo delivery of TAA and/or activation signals to DC, and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumour growth. This review will focus on the use of lentiviral vectors for in vivo gene delivery to DC, introducing strategies to target DC, either targeting cell entry or gene expression to improve safety of the lentiviral vaccine or targeting dendritic cell activation pathways to enhance performance of the lentiviral vaccine. In conclusion, this review highlights the potential of lentiviral vectors as a generally applicable ‘off-the-shelf’ anti-cancer immunotherapeutic. PMID:22983382

  15. Targeted, homology-driven gene insertion in stem cells by ZFN-loaded ‘all-in-one’ lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujia; Laustsen, Anders; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Chenglong; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Li, Shengting; Uldbjerg, Niels; Luo, Yonglun; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Biased integration remains a key challenge for gene therapy based on lentiviral vector technologies. Engineering of next-generation lentiviral vectors targeting safe genomic harbors for insertion is therefore of high relevance. In a previous paper (Cai et al., 2014a), we showed the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) as carriers of complete gene repair kits consisting of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins and repair sequences, allowing gene correction by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we follow this strategy to engineer ZFN-loaded IDLVs that insert transgenes by a homology-driven mechanism into safe loci. This insertion mechanism is driven by time-restricted exposure of treated cells to ZFNs. We show targeted gene integration in human stem cells, including CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Notably, targeted insertions are identified in 89% of transduced iPSCs. Our findings demonstrate the applicability of nuclease-loaded ‘all-in-one’ IDLVs for site-directed gene insertion in stem cell-based gene therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12213.001 PMID:27278774

  16. The Inside Out of Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Stéphanie; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses induce a wide variety of pathologies in different animal species. A common feature of the replicative cycle of these viruses is their ability to target non-dividing cells, a property that constitutes an extremely attractive asset in gene therapy. In this review, we shall describe the main basic aspects of the virology of lentiviruses that were exploited to obtain efficient gene transfer vectors. In addition, we shall discuss some of the hurdles that oppose the efficient genetic modification mediated by lentiviral vectors and the strategies that are being developed to circumvent them. PMID:22049307

  17. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  18. [Transfection of HL-60 cells by Venus lentiviral vector].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Hu, Shao-Yan; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2013-06-01

    In order to study the potential of Venus, lentiviral vector, applied to acute myeloid leukemia, the recombinant vector Venus-C3aR was transfected into 293T packing cells by DNA-calcium phosphate coprecipitation. All virus stocks were collected and transfected into HL-60, the GFP expression in HL-60 cells was measured by flow cytometry. The expression level of C3aR1 in transfected HL-60 cells was identified by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The lentiviral toxicity on HL-60 was measured by using CCK-8 method and the ability of cell differentiation was observed. The results indicated that the transfection efficacy of lentiviral vector on HL-60 cells was more than 95%, which meets the needs for further study. C3aR1 expression on HL-60 cells increased after being transfected with recombinant lentiviral vector. Before and after transfection, the proliferation and differentiation of cells were not changed much. It is concluded that the lentiviral vector showed a high efficacy to transfect AML cells and can be integrated in genome of HL-60 cells to realize the stable expression of interest gene. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector can not affect HL-60 cell ability to proliferate and differentiate.

  19. Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Efficiently Induces Functional and Persistent CD8+ T Cell Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Donatella R. M.; Michelini, Zuleika; Baroncelli, Silvia; Spada, Massimo; Vendetti, Silvia; Bona, Roberta; Leone, Pasqualina; Klotman, Mary E.; Cara, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are an essential component of an effective host immune response to tumors and viral infections. Genetic immunization is particularly suitable for inducing CTL responses, because the encoded proteins enter the MHC class I processing pathway through either transgene expression or cross-presentation. In order to compare the efficiency and persistence of immune response induced by genetic vaccines, BALB/c mice were immunized either twice intramuscularly with DNA plasmid expressing a codon-optimized HIV-1 gp120 Envelope sequence together with murine GM-CSF sequence or with a single immunization using an integrase defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) expressing the same proteins. Results strongly indicated that the schedule based on IDLV vaccine was more efficient in inducing specific immune response, as evaluated three months after the last immunization by IFNγ ELISPOT in both splenocytes and bone marrow- (BM-) derived cells, chromium release assay in splenocytes, and antibody detection in sera. In addition, IDLV immunization induced high frequency of polyfunctional CD8+ T cells able to simultaneously produce IFNγ, TNFα, and IL2. PMID:20508727

  20. Optimized production and concentration of lentiviral vectors containing large inserts.

    PubMed

    al Yacoub, Nadya; Romanowska, Malgorzata; Haritonova, Natalie; Foerster, John

    2007-07-01

    Generation of high titer lentiviral stocks and efficient virus concentration are central to maximize the utility of lentiviral technology. Here we evaluate published protocols for lentivirus production on a range of transfer vectors differing in size (7.5-13.2 kb). We present a modified virus production protocol robustly yielding useful titers (up to 10(7)/ml) for a range of different transfer vectors containing packaging inserts up to 7.5 kb. Moreover, we find that virus recovery after concentration by ultracentrifugation depends on the size of the packaged inserts, heavily decreasing for large packaged inserts. We describe a fast (4 h) centrifugation protocol at reduced speed allowing high virus recovery even for large and fragile lentivirus vectors. The protocols outlined in the current report should be useful for many labs interested in producing and concentrating high titer lentiviral stocks.

  1. Genetic engineering of human embryonic stem cells with lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chen; Tang, Dong-Qi; Xie, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Ke-Feng; Thompson, Winston E; Chou, Wayne; Gibbons, Gary H; Chang, Lung-Ji; Yang, Li-Jun; Chen, Yuqing E

    2005-08-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells present a valuable source of cells with a vast therapeutic potential. However, the low efficiency of directed differentiation of hES cells remains a major obstacle in their uses for regenerative medicine. While differentiation may be controlled by the genetic manipulation, effective and efficient gene transfer into hES cells has been an elusive goal. Here, we show stable and efficient genetic manipulations of hES cells using lentiviral vectors. This method resulted in the establishment of stable gene expression without loss of pluripotency in hES cells. In addition, lentiviral vectors were effective in conveying the expression of an U6 promoter-driven small interfering RNA (siRNA), which was effective in silencing its specific target. Taken together, our results suggest that lentiviral gene delivery holds great promise for hES cell research and application.

  2. Analysis of Partial Recombinants in Lentiviral Vector Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Kuate, Seraphin; Marino, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL) in lentiviral vector preparations is a major safety concern for clinical applications of such vectors. RCL are believed to emerge from rare recombinant vector genomes that are referred to as partial recombinants or Psi-Gag recombinants. To quantitatively determine the fraction of partial recombinants in lentiviral vector preparations and to analyze them at the DNA sequence level, we established a drug selection assay involving a lentiviral packaging construct containing a drug-resistance gene encoding blasticidin (BSD) resistance. Upon transduction of target cells, the BSD resistance gene confers BSD resistance to the transduced cells. The results obtained indicate that there were up to 156 BSD-resistant colonies in a total of 106 transducing vector particles. The predicted recombination events were verified by polymerase chain reaction using genomic DNA obtained from BSD-resistant cell clones and by DNA sequence analysis. In an attempt to reduce the emergence of partial recombinants, sequence overlaps between the packaging and the vector constructs were reduced by substituting the Rev response element (RRE) present in the vector construct using a heterologous RRE element derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). The results obtained showed that a reduction of sequence overlaps resulted in an up to sevenfold reduction of the frequency of BSD-resistant colonies, indicating that the capacity to form partial recombinants was diminished. PMID:24367910

  3. Overview of the HIV-1 Lentiviral Vector System.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Hawley, Robert G

    2002-11-01

    Replication-defective oncoretroviral vectors have been the most widely used vehicles for gene-transfer studies because of their capacity to efficiently introduce and stably express transgenes in mammalian cells. A limitation of oncoretroviral vectors is that cell division is required for proviral integration into the host genome. By comparison, lentiviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have evolved a nuclear-import machinery that allows them to infect nondividing as well as dividing cells. This unique property has led to the development of lentiviral vectors for gene delivery to a variety of nondividing or slowly dividing cells including neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system and others. This unit is intended to provide an overview of HIV-1 molecular biology and an introduction to successive generations of HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors.

  4. Lentiviral vector engineering for anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy.

    PubMed

    ter Brake, Olivier; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference or RNAi-based gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection has recently emerged as a highly effective antiviral approach. The lentiviral vector system is a good candidate for the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) in HIV-susceptible cells. However, this strategy can give rise to vector problems because the anti-HIV shRNAs can also target the HIV-based lentiviral vector system. In addition, there may be self-targeting of the shRNA-encoding sequences within the vector RNA genome in the producer cell. The insertion of microRNA (miRNA) cassettes in the vector may introduce Drosha cleavage sites that will also result in the destruction of the vector genome during the production and/or the transduction process. Here, we describe possible solutions to these lentiviral-RNAi problems. We also describe a strategy for multiple shRNA expression to establish a combinatorial RNAi therapy.

  5. Biosafety challenges for use of lentiviral vectors in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel

    2013-12-01

    Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for the genetic modification of cells in biomedical research and gene therapy. Their use in recent clinical trials for the treatment of adrenoleukodystrophy, β-thalassemia, Wiskott-Aldrich- Syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy underlined their efficacy for therapies especially in case of hereditary diseases. In comparison to gammaretroviral LTR-driven vectors, which were employed in the first clinical trials, lentiviral vectors present with some favorable features like the ability to transduce also non-dividing cells and a potentially safer insertion profile. However, genetic modification with viral vectors in general and stable integration of the therapeutic gene into the host cell genome bear concerns with respect to different levels of personal or environmental safety. Among them, insertional mutagenesis by enhancer mediated dysregulation of neighboring genes or aberrant splicing is still the biggest concern. However, also risks like immunogenicity of vector particles, the phenotoxicity of the transgene and potential vertical or horizontal transmission by replication competent retroviruses need to be taken into account. This review will give an overview on biosafety aspects that are relevant to the use of lentiviral vectors for genetic modification and gene therapy. Furthermore, assay systems aiming at evaluating biosafety in preclinical settings and recent promising clinical trials including efforts of monitoring of patients after gene therapy will be discussed.

  6. Lentiviral vectors: turning a deadly foe into a therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Trono, D

    2000-01-01

    The past 3 years have witnessed the spectacular irruption of lentiviral vectors into the limelight of the gene therapy scene. Owing to their ability to deliver transgenes in tissues that had long appeared irremediably refractory to stable genetic manipulation, lentivectors have opened fresh perspectives for the genetic treatment of a wide array of hereditary as well as acquired disorders, and a concrete proposal for their clinical use seems imminent. This article traces the path that has led to this rapid development and describes the current state of the art in the design and production of lentiviral vectors. The important question of biosafety is discussed. This system seems to have the edge over other gene delivery tools for particular targets, however, there remain several issues to be resolved before lentivectors make it to the bedside. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 20-23.

  7. The feasibility of incorporating Vpx into lentiviral gene therapy vectors

    PubMed Central

    McAllery, Samantha A; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L; Suzuki, Kazuo; Symonds, Geoff P; Kelleher, Anthony D; Turville, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    While current antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved, challenges still remain in life-long targeting of HIV-1 reservoirs. Lentiviral gene therapy has the potential to deliver protective genes into the HIV-1 reservoir. However, inefficient reverse transcription (RT) occurs in HIV-1 reservoirs during lentiviral gene delivery. The viral protein Vpx is capable of increasing lentiviral RT by antagonizing the restriction factor SAMHD1. Incorporating Vpx into lentiviral vectors could substantially increase gene delivery into the HIV-1 reservoir. The feasibility of this Vpx approach was tested in resting cell models utilizing macrophages and dendritic cells. Our results showed Vpx exposure led to increased permissiveness of cells over a period that exceeded 2 weeks. Consequently, significant lower potency of HIV-1 antiretrovirals inhibiting RT and integration was observed. When Vpx was incorporated with anti-HIV-1 genes inhibiting either pre-RT or post-RT stages of the viral life-cycle, transduction levels significantly increased. However, a stronger antiviral effect was only observed with constructs that inhibit pre-RT stages of the viral life cycle. In conclusion this study demonstrates a way to overcome the major delivery obstacle of gene delivery into HIV-1 reservoir cell types. Importantly, incorporating Vpx with pre-RT anti-HIV-1 genes, demonstrated the greatest protection against HIV-1 infection. PMID:27790625

  8. Integration-deficient Lentiviral Vectors: A Slow Coming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Wanisch, Klaus; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are very efficient at transducing dividing and quiescent cells, which makes them highly useful tools for genetic analysis and gene therapy. Traditionally this efficiency was considered dependent on provirus integration in the host cell genome; however, recent results have challenged this view. So called integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) can be produced through the use of integrase mutations that specifically prevent proviral integration, resulting in the generation of increased levels of circular vector episomes in transduced cells. These lentiviral episomes lack replication signals and are gradually lost by dilution in dividing cells, but are stable in quiescent cells. Compared to integrating lentivectors, IDLVs have a greatly reduced risk of causing insertional mutagenesis and a lower risk of generating replication-competent recombinants (RCRs). IDLVs can mediate transient gene expression in proliferating cells, stable expression in nondividing cells in vitro and in vivo, specific immune responses, RNA interference, homologous recombination (gene repair, knock-in, and knock-out), site-specific recombination, and transposition. IDLVs can be converted into replicating episomes, suggesting that if a clinically applicable system can be developed they would also become highly appropriate for stable transduction of proliferating tissues in therapeutic applications. PMID:19491821

  9. Prolonged Integration Site Selection of a Lentiviral Vector in the Genome of Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei; Wang, Yong; Li, Rui-fu; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Jing; Peng, Dai-zhi

    2017-01-01

    Background Lentiviral vectors have been successfully used for human skin cell gene transfer studies. Defining the selection of integration sites for retroviral vectors in the host genome is crucial in risk assessment analysis of gene therapy. However, genome-wide analyses of lentiviral integration sites in human keratinocytes, especially after prolonged growth, are poorly understood. Material/Methods In this study, 874 unique lentiviral vector integration sites in human HaCaT keratinocytes after long-term culture were identified and analyzed with the online tool GTSG-QuickMap and SPSS software. Results The data indicated that lentiviral vectors showed integration site preferences for genes and gene-rich regions. Conclusions This study will likely assist in determining the relative risks of the lentiviral vector system and in the design of a safe lentiviral vector system in the gene therapy of skin diseases. PMID:28255155

  10. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay.

  11. Production of lentiviral vectors by transient expression of minimal packaging genes from recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stefanou, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dennis; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    The potential of lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy has not yet been evaluated. One of the reasons is the cytotoxicity of lentiviral packaging genes which makes the generation of stable producer cell lines difficult. Therefore, a novel packaging system for lentiviral vectors based on transient expression of packaging genes by recombinant adenoviruses was developed. Adenoviral vectors expressing VSV-G, codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol, and codon-optimized SIV gag-pol under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter (adenoviral lenti-pack vectors) were constructed and the production levels of this vector system were evaluated. The generated adenoviral lenti-pack vectors could be grown to high titers when transgene expression was suppressed and no evidence for instabilities was obtained. Cells stably transfected with a SIV-based vector construct were converted into lentiviral vector producer cells by infection with the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. Lentiviral vector titers obtained were as high as vector titers obtained by transient cotransfection experiments. A protocol was developed that allowed preparation of lentiviral vector stocks with undetectable levels of contaminating adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. The adenoviral lenti-pack vectors described should provide a convenient alternative approach to inducible packaging cell lines for large-scale lentiviral vector production. Transient expression of cytotoxic lentiviral packaging genes by the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors circumvents loss of titers during prolonged culture of packaging cell lines. The design of the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors should reduce the risk of transfer of packaging genes to target cells and at the same time provide flexibility with respect to the lentiviral vector constructs that can be packaged.

  12. Quantification of HIV-based lentiviral vectors: influence of several cell type parameters on vector infectivity.

    PubMed

    Gay, Virginie; Moreau, Karen; Hong, Saw-See; Ronfort, Corinne

    2012-02-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus type (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein and encoding the GFP reporter gene was used to evaluate different methods of lentiviral vector titration. GFP expression, viral DNA quantification and the efficiency of vector DNA integration were assayed after infection of conventional HIV-1-permissive cell lines and human primary adult fibroblasts with the vector. We found that vector titers based on GFP expression determined by flow cytometry may vary by more than 50-fold depending on the cell type and the promoter-cell combination used. Interestingly, we observed that the viral integration process in primary HDFa cells was significantly more efficient compared to that in SupT1 or 293T cells. We propose that determination of the amount of integrated viral DNA by quantitative PCR be used in combination with the reporter gene expression assay.

  13. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated RNA Silencing in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Edmund; Moon, Lawrence D.F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract RNA silencing is an established method for investigating gene function and has attracted particular interest because of the potential for generating RNA-based therapeutics. Using lentiviral vectors as an efficient delivery system that offers stable, long-term expression in postmitotic cells further enhances the applicability of an RNA-based gene therapy for the CNS. In this review we provide an overview of both lentiviral vectors and RNA silencing along with design considerations for generating lentiviral vectors capable of RNA silencing. We go on to describe the current preclinical data regarding lentiviral vector-mediated RNA silencing for CNS disorders and discuss the concerns of side effects associated with lentiviral vectors and small interfering RNAs and how these might be mitigated. PMID:24090197

  14. Gene transfer in ovarian cancer cells: a comparison between retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, Stefano; Habeler, Walter; Tisato, Veronica; Stievano, Laura; Piovan, Erich; Tosello, Valeria; Esposito, Giovanni; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Amadori, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    Local gene therapy could be a therapeutic option for ovarian carcinoma, a life-threatening malignancy, because of disease containment within the peritoneal cavity in most patients. Lentiviral vectors, which are potentially capable of stable transgene expression, may be useful to vehicle therapeutic molecules requiring long-term production in these tumors. To investigate this concept, we used lentiviral vectors to deliver the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene to ovarian cancer cells. Their efficiency of gene transfer was compared with that of a retroviral vector carrying the same envelope. In vitro, both vectors infected ovarian cancer cells with comparable efficiency under standard culture conditions; however, the lentiviral vector was much more efficient in transducing growth-arrested cells when compared with the retroviral vector. Gene transfer was fully neutralized by an anti-VSV-G antibody, and in vitro stability was similar. In vivo, the lentiviral vector delivered the transgene 10-fold more efficiently to ovarian cancer cells growing i.p. in SCID mice, as evaluated by real-time PCR analysis of the tumors. Confocal microscopy analysis of tumor sections showed a dramatic difference at the level of transgene expression, because abundant EGFP(+) cells were detected only in mice receiving the lentiviral vector. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry confirmed this and indicated 0.05 and 5.6% EGFP(+) tumor cells after administration of the retroviral and lentiviral vector, respectively. Injection of ex vivo transduced tumor cells, sorted for EGFP expression, indicated that the lentiviral vector was considerably more resistant to in vivo silencing in comparison with the retroviral vector. Finally, multiple administrations of a murine IFN-alpha(1)-lentiviral vector to ovarian carcinoma-bearing mice significantly prolonged the animals' survival, indicating the therapeutic efficacy of this approach. These findings indicate that lentiviral vectors deserve

  15. Risks Associated With Lentiviral Vector Exposures and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schlimgen, Ryan; Howard, John; Wooley, Dawn; Thompson, Maureen; Baden, Lindsey R.; Yang, Otto O.; Christiani, David C.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Diamond, David V.; Duane, Elizabeth Gilman; Byers, Karen; Winters, Thomas; Gelfand, Jeffrey A.; Fujimoto, Gary; Hudson, T. Warner; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVVs) are powerful genetic tools that are being used with greater frequency in biomedical laboratories and clinical trials. Adverse events reported from initial clinical studies provide a basis for risk assessment of occupational exposures, yet many questions remain about the potential harm that LVVs may cause. We review those risks and provide a framework for principal investigators, Institutional Biosafety Committees, and occupational health professionals to assess and communicate the risks of exposure to staff. We also provide recommendations to federal research and regulatory agencies for tracking LVV exposures to evaluate long-term outcomes. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved antiviral drugs for HIV have theoretical benefits in LVV exposures, although evidence to support their use is currently limited. If treatment is appropriate, we recommend a 7-day treatment with an integrase inhibitor with or without a reverse transcriptase inhibitor within 72 hours of exposure. PMID:27930472

  16. Risks Associated With Lentiviral Vector Exposures and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Schlimgen, Ryan; Howard, John; Wooley, Dawn; Thompson, Maureen; Baden, Lindsey R; Yang, Otto O; Christiani, David C; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Diamond, David V; Duane, Elizabeth Gilman; Byers, Karen; Winters, Thomas; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; Fujimoto, Gary; Hudson, T Warner; Vyas, Jatin M

    2016-12-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVVs) are powerful genetic tools that are being used with greater frequency in biomedical laboratories and clinical trials. Adverse events reported from initial clinical studies provide a basis for risk assessment of occupational exposures, yet many questions remain about the potential harm that LVVs may cause. We review those risks and provide a framework for principal investigators, Institutional Biosafety Committees, and occupational health professionals to assess and communicate the risks of exposure to staff. We also provide recommendations to federal research and regulatory agencies for tracking LVV exposures to evaluate long-term outcomes. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved antiviral drugs for HIV have theoretical benefits in LVV exposures, although evidence to support their use is currently limited. If treatment is appropriate, we recommend a 7-day treatment with an integrase inhibitor with or without a reverse transcriptase inhibitor within 72 hours of exposure.

  17. Lentiviral vectors that carry anti-HIV shRNAs: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-09-01

    HIV-1 replication can be inhibited with RNA interference (RNAi) by expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) from a lentiviral vector. Because lentiviral vectors are based on HIV-1, viral sequences in the vector system are potential targets for the antiviral shRNAs. Here, we investigated all possible routes by which shRNAs can target the lentiviral vector system. Expression cassettes for validated shRNAs with targets within HIV-1 Leader, Gag-Pol, Tat/Rev and Nef sequences were inserted in the lentiviral vector genome. Third-generation self-inactivating HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors were produced and lentiviral vector capsid production and transduction titer determined. RNAi against HIV-1 sequences within the vector backbone results in a reduced transduction titer while capsid production was unaffected. The notable exception is self-targeting of the shRNA encoding sequence, which does not affect transduction titer. This is due to folding of the stable shRNA hairpin structure, which masks the target for the RNAi machinery. Targeting of Gag-Pol mRNA reduces both capsid production and transduction titer, which was improved with a human codon-optimized Gag-Pol construct. When Rev mRNA was targeted, no reduction in capsid production and transduction titer was observed. Lentiviral vector titers can be negatively affected when shRNAs against the vector backbone and the Gag-Pol mRNA are expressed during lentiviral vector production. Titer reductions due to targeting of the Gag-Pol mRNA can be avoided with a human codon-optimized Gag-Pol packaging plasmid. The remaining targets in the vector backbone may be modified by point mutations to resist RNAi-mediated degradation during vector production.

  18. Notable reduction in illegitimate integration mediated by a PPT-deleted, nonintegrating lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Boris; Bayer, Matthew; Ma, Hong; Samulski, Jude; Li, Chengwen; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2011-03-01

    Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors present a means of reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis in nondividing cells and enabling short-term expression of potentially hazardous gene products. However, residual, integrase-independent integration raises a concern that may limit the usefulness of this system. Here we present a novel 3' polypurine tract (PPT)-deleted lentiviral vector that demonstrates impaired integration efficiency and, when packaged into integrase-deficient particles, significantly reduced illegitimate integration. Cells transduced with PPT-deleted vectors exhibited predominantly 1-long terminal repeat (LTR) circles and a low level of linear genomes after reverse transcription (RT). Importantly, the PPT-deleted vector exhibited titers and in vitro and in vivo expression levels matching those of conventional nonintegrating lentiviral vectors. This safer nonintegrating lentiviral vector system will support emerging technologies, such as those based on transient expression of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) for gene editing, as well as reprogramming factors for inducing pluripotency.

  19. Notable Reduction in Illegitimate Integration Mediated by a PPT-deleted, Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; Bayer, Matthew; Ma, Hong; Samulski, Jude; Li, Chengwen; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2011-01-01

    Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors present a means of reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis in nondividing cells and enabling short-term expression of potentially hazardous gene products. However, residual, integrase-independent integration raises a concern that may limit the usefulness of this system. Here we present a novel 3′ polypurine tract (PPT)-deleted lentiviral vector that demonstrates impaired integration efficiency and, when packaged into integrase-deficient particles, significantly reduced illegitimate integration. Cells transduced with PPT-deleted vectors exhibited predominantly 1–long terminal repeat (LTR) circles and a low level of linear genomes after reverse transcription (RT). Importantly, the PPT-deleted vector exhibited titers and in vitro and in vivo expression levels matching those of conventional nonintegrating lentiviral vectors. This safer nonintegrating lentiviral vector system will support emerging technologies, such as those based on transient expression of zinc–finger nucleases (ZFNs) for gene editing, as well as reprogramming factors for inducing pluripotency. PMID:21157436

  20. Desmin-regulated Lentiviral Vectors for Skeletal Muscle Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Gillian E; Waddington, Simon N; Bales, Olivia; Tchen, Rose C; Antoniou, Michael N

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are highly attractive as a gene therapy agent as they are able to stably integrate their genomes in both dividing and nondividing cells and, in principle, provide long-term therapeutic benefit. However, their performance in skeletal muscle in adult animals has, to date, been disappointing. In order to gain clearer insight into their utility in this tissue type, we have conducted an extensive quantitative comparison of constitutive and muscle-specific promoter activities in skeletal muscle and nonmuscle systems following LV delivery in cell lines and neonatal mice. Our data show that LV delivery to hind leg skeletal muscle of neonatal mouse results in long-term transgene expression in adulthood. We find that the human desmin (DES) promoter/enhancer is the first muscle-specific control region to match the activity of the highly active constitutive human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoter/enhancer in skeletal muscle within a LV context both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the DES promoter/enhancer provides six- to eightfold greater expression per viral copy than the muscle-specific human muscle creatine kinase (CKM) promoter/enhancer. DES also confers a more reproducible and tissue-specific transgene expression profile compared to CKM and is therefore a highly attractive regulatory element for use in muscle gene therapy vectors. PMID:19935780

  1. Lentiviral vectors for the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Farinelli, Giada; Capo, Valentina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    In the last years important progress has been made in the treatment of several primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) with gene therapy. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy indeed represents a valid alternative to conventional transplantation when a compatible donor is not available and recent success confirmed the great potential of this approach. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors were promising and guaranteed clinical benefits to the patients. On the other hand, the outcome of severe adverse events as the development of hematological abnormalities highlighted the necessity to develop a safer platform to deliver the therapeutic gene. Self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors (LVVs) were studied to overcome this hurdle through their preferable integration pattern into the host genome. In this review, we describe the recent advancements achieved both in vitro and at preclinical level with LVVs for the treatment of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), ADA deficiency (ADA-SCID), Artemis deficiency, RAG1/2 deficiency, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (γchain deficiency, SCIDX1), X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome.

  2. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    SciTech Connect

    Caval, Vincent; Piver, Eric; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Pages, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  3. Optimization of the transductional efficiency of lentiviral vectors: effect of sera and polycations.

    PubMed

    Denning, Warren; Das, Suvendu; Guo, Siqi; Xu, Jun; Kappes, John C; Hel, Zdenek

    2013-03-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used as effective gene-delivery vehicles. Optimization of the conditions for efficient lentiviral transduction is of a high importance for a variety of research applications. Presence of positively charged polycations reduces the electrostatic repulsion forces between a negatively charged cell and an approaching enveloped lentiviral particle resulting in an increase in the transduction efficiency. Although a variety of polycations are commonly used to enhance the transduction with retroviruses, the relative effect of various types of polycations on the efficiency of transduction and on the potential bias in the determination of titer of lentiviral vectors is not fully understood. Here, we present data suggesting that DEAE-dextran provides superior results in enhancing lentiviral transduction of most tested cell lines and primary cell cultures. Specific type and source of serum affects the efficiency of transduction of target cell populations. Non-specific binding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-containing membrane aggregates in the presence of DEAE-dextran does not significantly affect the determination of the titer of EGFP-expressing lentiviral vectors. In conclusion, various polycations and types of sera should be tested when optimizing lentiviral transduction of target cell populations.

  4. Differences in Vector Genome Processing and Illegitimate Integration of Non-Integrating Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Aaron M.; Joseph, Guiandre L.; Jasti, Aparna C.; Sastry-Dent, Lakshmi; Witting, Scott; Cornetta, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mutations in lentiviral vector expression systems have been shown to generate a non-integrating phenotype. We studied a novel 12 base-pair U3-LTR integrase attachment site deletion (U3-LTR att site) mutant and found similar physical titers to the previously reported integrase catalytic core mutant IN/D116N. Both mutations led to a greater than two log reduction in vector integration; with IN/D116N providing lower illegitimate integration frequency, while the U3-LTR att site mutant provided a higher level of transgene expression. The improved expression of the U3-LTR att site mutant could not be explained solely based on an observed modest increase in integration frequency. In evaluating processing, we noted significant differences in unintegrated vector forms, with the U3-LTR att site mutant leading to a predominance of 1-LTR circles. The mutations also differed in the manner of illegitimate integration. The U3-LTR att site mutant vector demonstrated integrase-mediated integration at the intact U5-LTR att site and non-integrase mediated integration at the mutated U3-LTR att site. Finally, we combined a variety of mutations and modifications and assessed transgene expression and integration frequency to show that combining modifications can improve the potential clinical utility of non-integrating lentiviral vectors. PMID:27682478

  5. Large-scale production of lentiviral vector in a closed system hollow fiber bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Jonathan; Beltzer, Jim; Fury, Brian; Wilczek, Katarzyna; Tobin, Steve; Falconer, Danny; Nolta, Jan; Bauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used in the field of gene therapy as an effective method for permanent gene delivery. While current methods of producing small scale vector batches for research purposes depend largely on culture flasks, the emergence and popularity of lentiviral vectors in translational, preclinical and clinical research has demanded their production on a much larger scale, a task that can be difficult to manage with the numbers of producer cell culture flasks required for large volumes of vector. To generate a large scale, partially closed system method for the manufacturing of clinical grade lentiviral vector suitable for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we developed a method employing a hollow fiber bioreactor traditionally used for cell expansion. We have demonstrated the growth, transfection, and vector-producing capability of 293T producer cells in this system. Vector particle RNA titers after subsequent vector concentration yielded values comparable to lentiviral iPSC induction vector batches produced using traditional culture methods in 225 cm2 flasks (T225s) and in 10-layer cell factories (CF10s), while yielding a volume nearly 145 times larger than the yield from a T225 flask and nearly three times larger than the yield from a CF10. Employing a closed system hollow fiber bioreactor for vector production offers the possibility of manufacturing large quantities of gene therapy vector while minimizing reagent usage, equipment footprint, and open system manipulation. PMID:26151065

  6. Lentiviral vectors can be used for full-length dystrophin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Counsell, John R; Asgarian, Zeinab; Meng, Jinhong; Ferrer, Veronica; Vink, Conrad A; Howe, Steven J; Waddington, Simon N; Thrasher, Adrian J; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E; Danos, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of dystrophin expression in patient muscle fibres. Current DMD gene therapy strategies rely on the expression of internally deleted forms of dystrophin, missing important functional domains. Viral gene transfer of full-length dystrophin could restore wild-type functionality, although this approach is restricted by the limited capacity of recombinant viral vectors. Lentiviral vectors can package larger transgenes than adeno-associated viruses, yet lentiviral vectors remain largely unexplored for full-length dystrophin delivery. In our work, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can package and deliver inserts of a similar size to dystrophin. We report a novel approach for delivering large transgenes in lentiviruses, in which we demonstrate proof-of-concept for a 'template-switching' lentiviral vector that harnesses recombination events during reverse-transcription. During this work, we discovered that a standard, unmodified lentiviral vector was efficient in delivering full-length dystrophin to target cells, within a total genomic load of more than 15,000 base pairs. We have demonstrated gene therapy with this vector by restoring dystrophin expression in DMD myoblasts, where dystrophin was expressed at the sarcolemma of myotubes after myogenic differentiation. Ultimately, our work demonstrates proof-of-concept that lentiviruses can be used for permanent full-length dystrophin gene therapy, which presents a significant advancement in developing an effective treatment for DMD.

  7. Lentiviral vectors can be used for full-length dystrophin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Counsell, John R.; Asgarian, Zeinab; Meng, Jinhong; Ferrer, Veronica; Vink, Conrad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Waddington, Simon N.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Danos, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of dystrophin expression in patient muscle fibres. Current DMD gene therapy strategies rely on the expression of internally deleted forms of dystrophin, missing important functional domains. Viral gene transfer of full-length dystrophin could restore wild-type functionality, although this approach is restricted by the limited capacity of recombinant viral vectors. Lentiviral vectors can package larger transgenes than adeno-associated viruses, yet lentiviral vectors remain largely unexplored for full-length dystrophin delivery. In our work, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can package and deliver inserts of a similar size to dystrophin. We report a novel approach for delivering large transgenes in lentiviruses, in which we demonstrate proof-of-concept for a ‘template-switching’ lentiviral vector that harnesses recombination events during reverse-transcription. During this work, we discovered that a standard, unmodified lentiviral vector was efficient in delivering full-length dystrophin to target cells, within a total genomic load of more than 15,000 base pairs. We have demonstrated gene therapy with this vector by restoring dystrophin expression in DMD myoblasts, where dystrophin was expressed at the sarcolemma of myotubes after myogenic differentiation. Ultimately, our work demonstrates proof-of-concept that lentiviruses can be used for permanent full-length dystrophin gene therapy, which presents a significant advancement in developing an effective treatment for DMD. PMID:28303972

  8. A comparison of foamy and lentiviral vector genotoxicity in SCID-repopulating cells shows foamy vectors are less prone to clonal dominance

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Elizabeth M; Olzsko, Miles E; Leap, David J; Hocum, Jonah D; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy using retroviral vectors has immense potential, but vector-mediated genotoxicity limits use in the clinic. Lentiviral vectors are less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors and have become the vector of choice in clinical trials. Foamy retroviral vectors have a promising integration profile and are less prone to read-through transcription than gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors. Here, we directly compared the safety and efficacy of foamy vectors to lentiviral vectors in human CD34+ repopulating cells in immunodeficient mice. To increase their genotoxic potential, foamy and lentiviral vectors with identical transgene cassettes with a known genotoxic spleen focus forming virus promoter were used. Both vectors resulted in efficient marking in vivo and a total of 825 foamy and 460 lentiviral vector unique integration sites were recovered in repopulating cells 19 weeks after transplantation. Foamy vector proviruses were observed less often near RefSeq gene and proto-oncogene transcription start sites than lentiviral vectors. The foamy vector group were also more polyclonal with fewer dominant clones (two out of six mice) than the lentiviral vector group (eight out of eight mice), and only lentiviral vectors had integrants near known proto-oncogenes in dominant clones. Our data further support the relative safety of foamy vectors for HSC gene therapy. PMID:27579335

  9. Intrastriatal Delivery of Integration-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Broadstock, Martin; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Standard integration-proficient lentiviral vectors (IPLVs) are effective at much lower doses than other vector systems and have shown promise in several gene therapy approaches. Their main drawback is the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Novel biosafety-enhanced integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) offer a significant improvement and comparable transduction efficacy to their integrating counterparts in some central nervous system applications. We describe here methods for (1) production of IDLVs (and IPLVs), (2) IDLV/IPLV delivery into the striatum of a rat model of Parkinson's disease, and (3) postmortem brain processing.

  10. Polyploidization without mitosis improves in vivo liver transduction with lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Couton, Dominique; Desdouets, Chantal; Ferry, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles for therapeutic and research applications. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, they are able to infect most nonproliferating cells. In the liver, induction of cell proliferation dramatically improved hepatocyte transduction using all types of retroviral vectors. However, the precise relationship between hepatocyte division and transduction efficiency has not been determined yet. Here we compared gene transfer efficiency in the liver after in vivo injection of recombinant lentiviral or Moloney murine leukemia viral (MoMuLV) vectors in hepatectomized rats treated or not with retrorsine, an alkaloid that blocks hepatocyte division and induces megalocytosis. Partial hepatectomy alone resulted in a similar increase in hepatocyte transduction using either vector. In retrorsine-treated and partially hepatectomized rats, transduction with MoMuLV vectors dropped dramatically. In contrast, we observed that retrorsine treatment combined with partial hepatectomy increased lentiviral transduction to higher levels than hepatectomy alone. Analysis of nuclear ploidy in single cells showed that a high level of transduction was associated with polyploidization. In conclusion, endoreplication could be exploited to improve the efficiency of liver-directed lentiviral gene therapy.

  11. Construction of stable packaging cell lines for clinical lentiviral vector production

    PubMed Central

    Sanber, Khaled S.; Knight, Sean B.; Stephen, Sam L.; Bailey, Ranbir; Escors, David; Minshull, Jeremy; Santilli, Giorgia; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Collins, Mary K.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful experimental tools for stable gene delivery and have been used to treat human inherited genetic disorders and hematologic malignancies with promising results. Because some of the lentiviral vector components are cytotoxic, transient plasmid transfection has been used to produce the large batches needed for clinical trials. However, this method is costly, poorly reproducible and hard to scale up. Here we describe a general method for construction of stable packaging cell lines that continuously produce lentiviral vectors. This uses Cre recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to insert a codon-optimised HIV-1 Gag-Pol expression construct in a continuously expressed locus in 293FT cells. Subsequently Rev, envelope and vector genome expression cassettes are serially transfected. Vector titers in excess of 106 transducing units/ml can be harvested from the final producer clones, which can be increased to 108 TU/ml by concentration. This method will be of use to all basic and clinical investigators who wish to produce large batches of lentiviral vectors. PMID:25762005

  12. Rabies virus envelope glycoprotein targets lentiviral vectors to the axonal retrograde pathway in motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Islam, Tarin A; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Carpentier, David C J; Trabalza, Antonio; Parkinson, Michael; Schiavo, Giampietro; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2014-06-06

    Rabies pseudotyped lentiviral vectors have great potential in gene therapy, not least because of their ability to transduce neurons following their distal axonal application. However, very little is known about the molecular processes that underlie their retrograde transport and cell transduction. Using multiple labeling techniques and confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that pseudotyping with rabies virus envelope glycoprotein (RV-G) enabled the axonal retrograde transport of two distinct subtypes of lentiviral vector in motor neuron cultures. Analysis of this process revealed that these vectors trafficked through Rab5-positive endosomes and accumulated within a non-acidic Rab7 compartment. RV-G pseudotyped vectors were co-transported with both the tetanus neurotoxin-binding fragment and the membrane proteins thought to mediate rabies virus endocytosis (neural cell adhesion molecule, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and p75 neurotrophin receptor), thus demonstrating that pseudotyping with RV-G targets lentiviral vectors for transport along the same pathway exploited by several toxins and viruses. Using motor neurons cultured in compartmentalized chambers, we demonstrated that axonal retrograde transport of these vectors was rapid and efficient; however, it was not able to transduce the targeted neurons efficiently, suggesting that impairment in processes occurring after arrival of the viral vector in the soma is responsible for the low transduction efficiency seen in vivo, which suggests a novel area for improvement of gene therapy vectors.

  13. Transduction of Human Primitive Repopulating Hematopoietic Cells With Lentiviral Vectors Pseudotyped With Various Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34+ peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34+ cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34+ cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45+ cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37–45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the γ-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the γ-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector. PMID:20372106

  14. Transduction of human primitive repopulating hematopoietic cells with lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34(+) peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34(+) cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34(+) cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45(+) cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37-45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the gamma-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the gamma-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector.

  15. Selective transduction of astrocytic and neuronal CNS subpopulations by lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Chikungunya virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Dieringer, Michael; Poh, Xuan Ying; Sanchez-Garrido, Julia; Gao, Yunan; Sgourou, Argyro; Simmons, Laura E; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2017-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are gene delivery vehicles that integrate into the host genome of dividing and non-dividing mammalian cells facilitating long-term transgene expression. Lentiviral vector versatility is greatly increased by incorporating heterologous viral envelope proteins onto the vector particles instead of the native envelope, conferring on these pseudotyped vectors a modified tropism and host range specificity. We investigated the pseudotyping efficiency of HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors with alphaviral envelope proteins from the Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV-G) and Sindbis Virus (SINV-G). Following vector production optimisation, titres for the CHIKV-G pseudotype were comparable to the VSV-G pseudotype but those for the SINV-G pseudotype were significantly lower. High titre CHIKV-G pseudotyped vector efficiently transduced various human and mouse neural cell lines and normal human astrocytes (NHA) in vitro. Although transduction was broad, tropism for NHAs was observed. In vivo stereotaxic delivery in striatum, thalamus and hippocampus respectively in the adult rat brain revealed localised transduction restricted to striatal astrocytes and hippocampal dentate granule neurons. Transduction of different subtypes of granule neurons from precursor to post-mitotic stages of differentiation was evident in the sub-granular zone and dentate granule cell layer. No significant inflammatory response was observed, but comparable to that of VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors. Robust long-term expression followed for three months post-transduction along with absence of neuroinflammation, coupled to the selective and unique neuron/glial tropism indicates that these vectors could be useful for modelling and gene therapy studies in the CNS.

  16. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M. Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P.; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties. PMID:26612671

  17. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-11-27

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties.

  18. Mobilization and Mechanism of Transcription of Integrated Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanawa, Hideki; Persons, Derek A.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.

    2005-01-01

    Permanent genetic modification of replicating primitive hematopoietic cells by an integrated vector has many potential therapeutic applications. Both oncoretroviral and lentiviral vectors have a predilection for integration into transcriptionally active genes, creating the potential for promoter activation or gene disruption. The use of self-inactivating (SIN) vectors in which a deletion of the enhancer and promoter sequences from the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) is copied over into the 5′ LTR during vector integration is designed to improve safety by reducing the risk of mobilization of the vector genome and the influence of the LTR on nearby cellular promoters. Our results indicate that SIN vectors are mobilized in cells expressing lentiviral proteins, with the frequency of mobilization influenced by features of the vector design. The mechanism of transcription of integrated vector genomes was evaluated using a promoter trap design with a vector encoding tat but lacking an upstream promoter in a cell line in which drug resistance depended on tat expression. In six clones studied, all transcripts originated from cryptic promoters either upstream or within the vector genome. We estimate that approximately 1 in 3,000 integrated vector genomes is transcribed, leading to the inference that activation of cryptic promoters must depend on local features of chromatin structure and the constellation of nearby regulatory elements as well as the nature of the regulatory elements within the vector. PMID:15956585

  19. Efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Nanba, Daisuke; Matsushita, Natsuki; Toki, Fujio; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2013-10-18

    The development of an appropriate procedure for lentiviral gene transduction into keratinocyte stem cells is crucial for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine for genetic disorders of the skin. However, there is little information available on the efficiency of lentiviral transduction into human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells and the effects of gene transduction procedures on growth potential of the stem cells by systematic assessment. In this study, we explored the conditions for efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with a lentiviral vector, by using the culture of keratinocytes on a feeder layer of 3 T3 mouse fibroblasts. The gene transduction and expansion of keratinocytes carrying a transgene were analyzed by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and flow cytometry. Polybrene (hexadiamine bromide) markedly enhanced the efficiency of lentiviral gene transduction, but negatively affected the maintenance of the keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells at a concentration higher than 5 μg/ml. Rho-assiciated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, a small molecule which enhanced keratinocyte proliferation, significantly interfered with the lentiviral transduction into cultured human keratinocytes. However, a suitable combination of polybrene and Y-27632 effectively expanded keratinocytes carrying a transgene. This study provides information for effective expansion of cultured human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene. This point is particularly significant for the application of genetically modified keratinocyte stem/progenitor stem cells in regenerative medicine.

  20. Efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with lentiviral vector

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development of an appropriate procedure for lentiviral gene transduction into keratinocyte stem cells is crucial for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine for genetic disorders of the skin. However, there is little information available on the efficiency of lentiviral transduction into human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells and the effects of gene transduction procedures on growth potential of the stem cells by systematic assessment. Methods In this study, we explored the conditions for efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with a lentiviral vector, by using the culture of keratinocytes on a feeder layer of 3 T3 mouse fibroblasts. The gene transduction and expansion of keratinocytes carrying a transgene were analyzed by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and flow cytometry. Results Polybrene (hexadiamine bromide) markedly enhanced the efficiency of lentiviral gene transduction, but negatively affected the maintenance of the keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells at a concentration higher than 5 μg/ml. Rho-assiciated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, a small molecule which enhanced keratinocyte proliferation, significantly interfered with the lentiviral transduction into cultured human keratinocytes. However, a suitable combination of polybrene and Y-27632 effectively expanded keratinocytes carrying a transgene. Conclusions This study provides information for effective expansion of cultured human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene. This point is particularly significant for the application of genetically modified keratinocyte stem/progenitor stem cells in regenerative medicine. PMID:24406242

  1. Development of a replication-competent lentivirus assay for dendritic cell-targeting lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Daniel C; McCloskey, Laura; Thorne, Barbara A; Tareen, Semih U; Nicolai, Christopher J; Campbell, David J; Bannister, Richard; Stewart, Hannah J; Pearson, Laura JE; Moyer, Bentley J; Robbins, Scott H; Zielinski, Leah; Kim, Tae; Radcliffe, Pippa A; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Gombotz, Wayne R; Miskin, James E; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna

    2015-01-01

    It is a current regulatory requirement to demonstrate absence of detectable replication-competent lentivirus (RCL) in lentiviral vector products prior to use in clinical trials. Immune Design previously described an HIV-1-based integration-deficient lentiviral vector for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02). VP02 is enveloped with E1001, a modified Sindbis virus glycoprotein which targets dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on dendritic cells in vivo. Vector enveloped with E1001 does not transduce T-cell lines used in standard HIV-1-based RCL assays, making current RCL testing formats unsuitable for testing VP02. We therefore developed a novel assay to test for RCL in clinical lots of VP02. This assay, which utilizes a murine leukemia positive control virus and a 293F cell line expressing the E1001 receptor DC-SIGN, meets a series of evaluation criteria defined in collaboration with US regulatory authorities and demonstrates the ability of the assay format to amplify and detect a hypothetical RCL derived from VP02 vector components. This assay was qualified and used to test six independent GMP production lots of VP02, in which no RCL was detected. We propose that the evaluation criteria used to rationally design this novel method should be considered when developing an RCL assay for any lentiviral vector. PMID:26029728

  2. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, I; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C W

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but as yet compromise accuracy and comparability between laboratories and experimental systems, the former by using separate simplex reactions for the detection of endogene and lentiviral sequences and the latter by designing different PCR assays for analyses in human cells and animal disease models. In this study, we validate in human and murine cells a qPCR system for the single-tube assessment of lentiviral vector copy numbers that is suitable for analyses in at least 33 different mammalian species, including human and other primates, mouse, pig, cat and domestic ruminants. The established assay combines the accuracy of single-tube quantitation by duplex qPCR with the convenience of one-off assay optimisation for cross-species analyses and with the direct comparability of lentiviral transduction efficiencies in different species.

  3. Efficient transduction of cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 genes by a gene-regulatable lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Yasuhiko; Hieda, Kuniko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Suzuki, Youichi

    2009-10-01

    Lentiviral vectors modified from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) offer a promising approach for gene therapy, facilitating transduction of genes into non-dividing cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transducing cytotoxic or anti-HIV genes, however, the vector must avoid self-inhibition by the transgene that can lead to a disruption in production of infectious virions. In this study, we constructed two HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors harboring the mifepristone-inducible gene expression unit in either the forward or the reverse orientation with respect to the direction of viral genomic RNA. The ability of these vectors to transduce cytotoxic and anti-HIV genes was evaluated. When human CD14 was used as a transgene, infectious lentiviral vectors were produced by both forward and reverse vector systems. CD14 expression was efficiently induced in cells transduced by both lentiviral vectors following treatment with mifepristone. However, a higher level of basal transgene expression was observed in the forward vector system in the absence of mifepristone. In contrast, high titers of infectious lentiviral vector containing the cytotoxic vesicular stomatitis virus M gene were successfully generated using the reverse vector, but not the forward vector. In addition, when a VPS4Bdominant negative mutant against HIV-1 budding was cloned into the reverse vector, significant amounts of lentiviral vector were obtained. Subsequent transduction of cells with the VPS4B mutant resulted in approximately 50% inhibition of HIV-1 production only in the presence of mifepristone. Our study thus demonstrates that incorporation of a mifepristone-regulatable gene expression unit in the reverse orientation makes significant advances toward development of a lentiviral vector that allows transduction of harmful genes.

  4. Lentiviral vector transduction of spermatozoa as a tool for the study of early development

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekran, Anil; Isa, Ihsan; Dudhia, Jayesh; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Dibb, Nicholas; Casimir, Colin; Readhead, Carol; Winston, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Spermatozoa and lentiviruses are two of nature’s most efficient gene delivery vehicles. Both can be genetically modified and used independently for the generation of transgenic animals or gene transfer/therapy of inherited disorders. Here we show that mature spermatozoa can be directly transduced with various pseudotyped lentiviral vectors and used in in vitro fertilisation studies. Lentiviral vectors encoding Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) were shown to be efficiently processed and expressed in sperm. When these transduced sperm were used in in vitro fertilisation studies, GFP expression was observed in arising blastocysts. This simple technique of directly transducing spermatozoa has potential to be a powerful tool for the study of early and pre-implantation development and could be used as a technique in transgenic development and vertical viral transmission studies. PMID:24918038

  5. Analysis of factor VIII mediated suppression of lentiviral vector titres.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, P A; Sion, C J M; Wilkes, F J; Custard, E J; Beard, G L; Kingsman, S M; Mitrophanous, K A

    2008-02-01

    Effective gene therapy for haemophilia A necessitates a vector system that is not subject to a pre-existing immune response, has adequate coding capacity, gives long-term expression and preferably can target non-dividing cells. Vector systems based on lentiviruses such as equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) fulfil these criteria for the delivery of factor VIII (FVIII). We have found that B domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII protein inhibits functional viral particle production when co-expressed with the EIAV vector system. Although particle numbers (as measured by reverse transcriptase activity) are near normal, RNA genome levels are reduced and measurement of integrated copies revealed the virus is severely defective in its ability to transduce target cells. This is due to the absence of sufficient vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope on viral particles derived from cells expressing FVIII. By using an internal tissue-specific promoter, that has low activity in the producer cells, to drive expression of FVIII we have overcome this inhibitory effect allowing us to generate titres approaching those obtained with vector genomes encoding reporter genes. Furthermore, we report that codon optimization of the full-length FVIII gene increased vector titres approximately 10-fold in addition to substantially improving expression per integrated vector copy.

  6. Comparative analysis of lentiviral vectors and modular protein nanovectors for traumatic brain injury gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Negro-Demontel, María Luciana; Saccardo, Paolo; Giacomini, Cecilia; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael Joaquín; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Peluffo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains as one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide and there are no effective treatments currently available. Gene therapy applications have emerged as important alternatives for the treatment of diverse nervous system injuries. New strategies are evolving with the notion that each particular pathological condition may require a specific vector. Moreover, the lack of detailed comparative studies between different vectors under similar conditions hampers the selection of an ideal vector for a given pathological condition. The potential use of lentiviral vectors versus several modular protein-based nanovectors was compared using a controlled cortical impact model of TBI under the same gene therapy conditions. We show that variables such as protein/DNA ratio, incubation volume, and presence of serum or chloroquine in the transfection medium impact on both nanovector formation and transfection efficiency in vitro. While lentiviral vectors showed GFP protein 1 day after TBI and increased expression at 14 days, nanovectors showed stable and lower GFP transgene expression from 1 to 14 days. No toxicity after TBI by any of the vectors was observed as determined by resulting levels of IL-1β or using neurological sticky tape test. In fact, both vector types induced functional improvement per se. PMID:26015985

  7. Influenza M2 envelope protein augments avian influenza hemagglutinin pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    McKay, T; Patel, M; Pickles, R J; Johnson, L G; Olsen, J C

    2006-04-01

    Lentivirus-based gene transfer has the potential to efficiently deliver DNA-based therapies into non-dividing epithelial cells of the airway for the treatment of lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, significant barriers both to lung-specific gene transfer and to production of lentivirus vectors must be overcome before these vectors can be routinely used for applications to the lung. In this study, we investigated whether the ability to produce lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with fowl plague virus hemagglutinin (HA) could be improved by co-expression of influenza virus M2 in vector-producing cells. We found that M2 expression led to a 10-30-fold increase in production of HA-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors based upon equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Experiments using the M2 inhibitor amantadine and a drug-resistant mutant of M2 established that the ion channel activity of M2 was important for M2-dependent augmentation of vector production. Furthermore, the neuraminidase activity necessary for particle release from producer cells could also be incorporated into producer cells by co-expression of influenza NA cDNA. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with influenza envelope proteins were able to efficiently transduce via the apical membrane of polarized mouse tracheal cultures in vitro as well as mouse tracheal epithelia in vivo.

  8. Lentiviral vectors and cardiovascular diseases: a genetic tool for manipulating cardiomyocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, E; Latronico, M V G; Jotti, G S; Condorelli, G

    2012-06-01

    Engineered recombinant viral vectors are a powerful tool for vehiculating genetic information into mammalian cells. Because of their ability to infect both dividing and non-dividing cells with high efficiency, lentiviral vectors have gained particular interest for basic research and preclinical studies in the cardiovascular field. We review here the major applications for lentiviral-vector technology in the cardiovascular field: we will discuss their use in trailing gene expression during the induction of differentiation, in protocols for the isolation of cardiac cells and in the tracking of cardiac cells after transplantation in vivo; we will also describe lentivirally-mediated gene delivery uses, such as the induction of a phenotype of interest in a target cell or the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, a section of the review will be dedicated to reprogramming approaches, focusing attention on the generation of pluripotent stem cells and on transdifferentiation, two emerging strategies for the production of cardiac myocytes from human cells and for the investigation of human diseases. Finally, in order to give a perspective on their future clinical use we will critically discuss advantages and disadvantages of lentivirus-based strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Assessment of selected media supplements to improve F/HN lentiviral vector production yields.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Jean-François; Davies, Lee A; Gill, Deborah R; Hyde, Stephen C

    2017-08-31

    The development of lentiviral-based therapeutics is challenged by the high cost of current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) production. Lentiviruses are enveloped viruses that capture a portion of the host cell membrane during budding, which then constitutes part of the virus particle. This process might lead to lipid and protein depletion in the cell membrane and affect cell viability. Furthermore, growth in suspension also causes stresses that can affect virus production yields. To assess the impact of these issues, selected supplements (Cholesterol Lipid Concentrate, Chemically Defined Lipid Concentrate, Lipid Mixture 1, Gelatin Peptone N3, N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine and Pluronic F-68) were assayed in order to improve production yields in a transient transfection production of a Sendai virus F/HN-pseudotyped HIV-1-based third generation lentiviral vector in FreeStyle 293 (serum-free media) in suspension. None of the supplements tested had a significant positive impact on lentiviral vector yields, but small non-significant improvements could be combined to increase vector production in a cell line where other conditions have been optimised.

  10. Priming of Hepatocytes Enhances In Vivo Liver Transduction with Lentiviral Vectors in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Virginie; Boni, Sébastien; Baron, William; Nguyen, Tuan Huy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for liver disease gene therapy, because they can achieve protracted expression of transgenes in hepatocytes. However, the question as to whether cell division is required for optimal hepatocyte transduction has still not been completely answered. Liver gene-transfer efficiency after in vivo administration of recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of a liver-specific promoter in mice that were either hepatectomized or treated with cholic acid or phenobarbital was compared. Phenobarbital is known as a weak inducer of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas cholic acid has no direct effect on the cell cycle. This study shows that cholic acid is able to prime hepatocytes without mitosis induction. Both phenobarbital and cholic acid significantly increased hepatocyte transduction six- to ninefold, although cholic acid did not modify the mitotic index or cell-cycle entry. However, the effect of either compound was weaker than that observed after partial hepatectomy. In no cases was there a correlation between the expression of cell-cycle marker and transduction efficiency. We conclude that priming of hepatocytes should be considered a clinically applicable strategy to enhance in vivo liver gene therapy with lentiviral vectors. PMID:22428976

  11. Lentiviral Vectors for the Engineering of Implantable Cells Secreting Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Schneider, Bernard L

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of genetically modified cells is considered for the chronic delivery of therapeutic recombinant proteins in vivo. In the context of gene therapy, the genetic engineering of cells faces two main challenges. First, it is critical to generate expandable cell sources, which can maintain stable high productivity of the recombinant protein of interest over time, both in culture and after transplantation. In addition, gene transfer techniques need to be developed to engineer cells synthetizing complex polypeptides, such as recombinant monoclonal antibodies, to broaden the range of potential therapeutic applications. Here, we provide a workflow for the use of lentiviral vectors as a flexible tool to generate antibody-producing cells. In particular, lentiviral vectors can be used to genetically engineer the cell types compatible with encapsulation devices protecting the implanted cells from the host immune system. Detailed methods are provided for the design and production of lentiviral vectors, optimization of cell transduction, as well as for the quantification and quality control of the produced recombinant antibody.

  12. Priming of hepatocytes enhances in vivo liver transduction with lentiviral vectors in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Boni, Sébastien; Baron, William; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Ferry, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for liver disease gene therapy, because they can achieve protracted expression of transgenes in hepatocytes. However, the question as to whether cell division is required for optimal hepatocyte transduction has still not been completely answered. Liver gene-transfer efficiency after in vivo administration of recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of a liver-specific promoter in mice that were either hepatectomized or treated with cholic acid or phenobarbital was compared. Phenobarbital is known as a weak inducer of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas cholic acid has no direct effect on the cell cycle. This study shows that cholic acid is able to prime hepatocytes without mitosis induction. Both phenobarbital and cholic acid significantly increased hepatocyte transduction six- to ninefold, although cholic acid did not modify the mitotic index or cell-cycle entry. However, the effect of either compound was weaker than that observed after partial hepatectomy. In no cases was there a correlation between the expression of cell-cycle marker and transduction efficiency. We conclude that priming of hepatocytes should be considered a clinically applicable strategy to enhance in vivo liver gene therapy with lentiviral vectors.

  13. Cytotoxicity associated with artemis overexpression after lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Multhaup, Megan; Karlen, Andrea D; Swanson, Debra L; Wilber, Andrew; Somia, Nikunj V; Cowan, Morton J; McIvor, R Scott

    2010-07-01

    Artemis is a hairpin-opening endonuclease involved in nonhomologous end-joining and V(D)J recombination. Deficiency of Artemis results in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) characterized by complete absence of T and B cells due to an arrest at the receptor recombination stage. We have generated several lentiviral vectors for transduction of the Artemis sequence, intending to complement the deficient phenotype. We found that transduction by a lentiviral vector in which Artemis is regulated by a strong EF-1alpha promoter resulted in a dose-dependent loss of cell viability due to perturbed cell cycle distribution, increased DNA damage, and increased apoptotic cell frequency. This toxic response was not observed in cultures exposed to identical amounts of control vector. Loss of cell viability was also observed in cells transfected with an Artemis expression construct, indicating that toxicity is independent of lentiviral transduction. Reduced toxicity was observed when cells were transduced with a moderate-strength phosphoglycerate kinase promoter to regulate Artemis expression. These results present a novel challenge in the establishment of conditions that support Artemis expression at levels that are nontoxic yet sufficient to correct the T(-)B(-) phenotype, crucial for preclinical studies and clinical application of Artemis gene transfer in the treatment of human SCID-A.

  14. Cytotoxicity Associated with Artemis Overexpression After Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Megan; Karlen, Andrea D.; Swanson, Debra L.; Wilber, Andrew; Somia, Nikunj V.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Artemis is a hairpin-opening endonuclease involved in nonhomologous end-joining and V(D)J recombination. Deficiency of Artemis results in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) characterized by complete absence of T and B cells due to an arrest at the receptor recombination stage. We have generated several lentiviral vectors for transduction of the Artemis sequence, intending to complement the deficient phenotype. We found that transduction by a lentiviral vector in which Artemis is regulated by a strong EF-1α promoter resulted in a dose-dependent loss of cell viability due to perturbed cell cycle distribution, increased DNA damage, and increased apoptotic cell frequency. This toxic response was not observed in cultures exposed to identical amounts of control vector. Loss of cell viability was also observed in cells transfected with an Artemis expression construct, indicating that toxicity is independent of lentiviral transduction. Reduced toxicity was observed when cells were transduced with a moderate-strength phosphoglycerate kinase promoter to regulate Artemis expression. These results present a novel challenge in the establishment of conditions that support Artemis expression at levels that are nontoxic yet sufficient to correct the T−B− phenotype, crucial for preclinical studies and clinical application of Artemis gene transfer in the treatment of human SCID-A. PMID:20163250

  15. Distribution properties of lentiviral vectors administered into the striatum by convection-enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    White, Edward; Bienemann, Alison; Megraw, Lisa; Bunnun, Chotirote; Wyatt, Marcella; Taylor, Hannah; Gill, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Before the successful use of lentiviral vectors in clinical trials it is essential that strategies for direct vector delivery into the brain be evaluated in vivo, particularly as these vectors are significantly larger than the brain extracellular space. To date no such studies have been undertaken. In this study, convection-enhanced delivery (CED) was employed in an attempt to achieve widespread lentiviral delivery in the striatum. Infusions of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and HIV vector constructs expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase (β-Gal) were undertaken into the striatum at a range of flow rates and viral titers. In rats, all EIAV and HIV infusions led to the extensive transduction of cells in perivascular spaces throughout the brain. Although infusions were performed under standardized conditions, the number and volume of distribution of transduced cells were highly variable, with approximately one-third of EIAV infusions leading to no concentrated cell transduction in the striatum. Heparin coinfusion had no effect on EIAV distribution, although coinfusion of nimodipine resulted in a significant reduction in the number and volume of distribution of transduced cells. Intrastriatal EIAV delivery in pigs led to extensive transduction of mainly neurons, which could be effectively visualized in real time by T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. No infusions were associated with a significant inflammatory response. Therefore, despite its large size, lentiviral vectors can be administered by CED to the striatum in both small and large animal models. However, the variability in vector distribution under standardized conditions and widespread vector distribution through the perivascular spaces raise serious concerns regarding the practicality of lentivirus-mediated gene therapy in the brain in clinical practice.

  16. Application of lentiviral vectors for development of production cell lines and safety testing of lentiviral-derived cells or products.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Cherylene

    2010-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are frequently used to engineer cell lines for preclinical research purposes including assay development and target validation. Development of production cell lines for manufacturing recombinant protein therapeutics may also benefit from the use of LVs because they may reduce timelines and generate more uniform or higher expressing stable pools and clones. In addition, LVs could be advantageous for engineering new, alternative host cell substrates due to their ability to efficiently transduce most cell types. We demonstrate here that NS0 mouse myeloma cells, a host cell frequently used for protein production, can be transduced with LVs to greater than 80% efficiency and with no cytotoxic effects. The use of LVs for engineering of production cell lines will require additional testing procedures. Since LVs have previously been used in human gene therapy clinical trials, safety testing assays and procedures have been developed that could easily be applied to the development process for manufacturing cell lines to ensure the absence of unwanted viral material in cell banks and biologic products.

  17. High Efficiency Gene Transfer to Airways of Mice Using Influenza Hemagglutinin Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manij; Giddings, Angela M.; Sechelski, John; Olsen, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Background A limitation to efficient lentivirus-mediated airway gene transfer is the lack of receptors to commonly used viral envelopes on the luminal surface of airway epithelia. The use of viral envelopes with natural tropism to the airway could be useful for overcoming this limitation. Methods We investigated influenza hemagglutinin (HA) pseudotyped EIAV-derived lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer to the airway epithelium of adult and newborn mice. For these studies high-titer vectors were delivered by intranasal administration. In addition, we tested the feasibility of vector re-dosing to the nasal airway. Results Delivery of high-titer HA pseudotyped lentiviral vectors by nasal administration to newborn mouse pups or adult mice results in efficient transduction of airway epithelial cells in the nose, trachea, and lungs. In the nose vector expression was predominant in the respiratory epithelium and was not observed in the olfactory epithelium. In the trachea and large airways of the lung approximately 46% and 40%, respectively, of surface epithelial cells could be transduced. The efficiency of re-dosing to the nasal airway of mice was found to be dependent upon the age of the animal when the first dose is administered and the length of time between doses. Conclusions A single intranasal dose of concentrated influenza HA-pseudotyped lentiviral vector is sufficient for efficient gene transfer to the airways of mice. This is a promising result that could lead to the development of effective gene transfer reagents for the treatment of cystic fibrosis and other human lung diseases. PMID:23319179

  18. Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Long-Term and High Efficiency Transgene Expression in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Yan, Renhe; Li, Andrew; Zhang, Yanling; Li, Jinlong; Du, Hongyan; Chen, Baihong; Wei, Wenjin; Zhang, Yi; Sumners, Colin; Zheng, Haifa; Li, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives:Lentiviral vectors have been used successfully to rapidly produce decigram quantities of active recombinant proteins in mammalian cell lines. To optimize the protein production platform, the roles of Ubiquitous Chromatin Opening Element (UCOE), an insulator, and selected promoters were evaluated based on efficiency and stability of foreign gene expression mediated by lentiviral vectors. Methods: Five lentiviral vectors, pFIN-EF1α-GFP-2A-mCherH-WPRE containing EF1α promoter and HS4 insulator, p'HR.cppt.3'1.2kb-UCOE-SFFV-eGFP containing SFFV promoter and UCOE, pTYF-CMV(β-globin intron)-eGFP containing CMV promoter and β-globin intron, pTYF-CMV-eGFP containing CMV promoter, and pTYF-EF1α-eGFP with EF1α promoter were packaged, titered, and then transduced into 293T cells (1000 viral genomes per cell). The transduced cells were passaged once every three days at a ratio of 1:10. Expression level and stability of the foreign gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), was evaluated using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Furthermore, we constructed a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 recombinant lentiviral vector, pLV-CMV-E1, driven by the CMV promoter. This vector was packaged and transduced into 293T cells, and the recombinant cell lines with stable expression of E1 protein were established by limiting dilution. Results:GFP expression in 293T cells transduced with the five lentiviral vectors peaked between passages 3 and 5 and persisted for more than 5 weeks. The expression was prolonged in the cells transduced with TYF-CMV (β-globin intron)-eGFP or TYF-CMV-eGFP, demonstrating less than a 50% decrease even at 9 weeks post transduction (p>0.05). The TYF-CMV-eGFP-transduced cells began with a higher level of GFP expression than other vectors did. The percentage of GFP positive cells for any of the five lentiviral vectors sustained over time. Moreover, the survival rates of all transfected cells exceeded 80% at both 5 and 9 weeks post transduction

  19. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  20. A high excision potential of TALENs for integrated DNA of HIV-based lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Hirotaka; Kanemura, Yuka; Misawa, Naoko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    DNA-editing technology has made it possible to rewrite genetic information in living cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus, an integrated form of viral complementary DNA in host chromosomes, could be a potential target for this technology. We recently reported that HIV proviral DNA could be excised from the chromosomal DNA of HIV-based lentiviral DNA-transduced T cells after multiple introductions of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 endonuclease system targeting HIV long terminal repeats (LTR). Here, we generated a more efficient strategy that enables the excision of HIV proviral DNA using customized transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the same HIV LTR site. A single transfection of TALEN-encoding mRNA, prepared from in vitro transcription, resulted in more than 80% of lentiviral vector DNA being successfully removed from the T cell lines. Furthermore, we developed a lentiviral vector system that takes advantage of the efficient proviral excision with TALENs and permits the simple selection of gene-transduced and excised cells in T cell lines.

  1. A multicolor panel of novel lentiviral "gene ontology" (LeGO) vectors for functional gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kristoffer; Bartsch, Udo; Stocking, Carol; Fehse, Boris

    2008-04-01

    Functional gene analysis requires the possibility of overexpression, as well as downregulation of one, or ideally several, potentially interacting genes. Lentiviral vectors are well suited for this purpose as they ensure stable expression of complementary DNAs (cDNAs), as well as short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and can efficiently transduce a wide spectrum of cell targets when packaged within the coat proteins of other viruses. Here we introduce a multicolor panel of novel lentiviral "gene ontology" (LeGO) vectors designed according to the "building blocks" principle. Using a wide spectrum of different fluorescent markers, including drug-selectable enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)- and dTomato-blasticidin-S resistance fusion proteins, LeGO vectors allow simultaneous analysis of multiple genes and shRNAs of interest within single, easily identifiable cells. Furthermore, each functional module is flanked by unique cloning sites, ensuring flexibility and individual optimization. The efficacy of these vectors for analyzing multiple genes in a single cell was demonstrated in several different cell types, including hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem and progenitor cells, as well as hepatocytes. LeGO vectors thus represent a valuable tool for investigating gene networks using conditional ectopic expression and knock-down approaches simultaneously.

  2. Prolonged expansion of human nucleus pulposus cells expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated by lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Deli; Ruan, Dike; He, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chaofeng; Xin, Hongkui; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Human degenerative disc disease (DDD) is characterized by progressive loss of human nucleus pulposus (HNP) cells and extracellular matrix, in which the massive deposition are secreted by HNP cells. Cell therapy to supplement HNP cells to degenerated discs has been thought to be a promising strategy to treat DDD. However, obtaining a large quality of fully functional HNP cells has been severely hampered by limited proliferation capacity of HNP cells in vitro. Previous studies have used lipofectamine or recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors to deliver human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) into ovine or HNP cells to prolong the activity of nucleus pulposus cells with limited success. Here we developed a lentiviral vector bearing both hTERT and a gene encoding green fluorescence protein (L-hTERT/EGFP). This vector efficiently mediated both hTERT and EGFP into freshly isolated HNP cells. The expressions of both transgenes in L-hTERT/EGFP transduced HNP cells were detected up to day 210 post viral infection, which was twice as long as rAAV vector did. Furthermore, we observed restored telomerase activity, maintained telomere length, delayed cell senescence, and increased cell proliferation rate in those L-hTERT/EGFP transduced HNP cells. Our study suggests that lentiviral vector might be a useful gene delivery vehicle for HNP cell therapy to treat DDD.

  3. Specific Retrograde Transduction of Spinal Motor Neurons Using Lentiviral Vectors Targeted to Presynaptic NMJ Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadou, I; Trabalza, A; Ellison, SM; Gharun, K; Mazarakis, ND

    2014-01-01

    To understand how receptors are involved in neuronal trafficking and to be able to utilize them for specific targeting via the peripheral route would be of great benefit. Here, we describe the generation of novel lentiviral vectors with tropism to motor neurons that were made by coexpressing onto the lentiviral surface a fusogenic glycoprotein (mutated sindbis G) and an antibody against a cell-surface receptor (Thy1.1, p75NTR, or coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) on the presynaptic terminal of the neuromuscular junction. These vectors exhibit binding specificity and efficient transduction of receptor positive cell lines and primary motor neurons in vitro. Targeting of each of these receptors conferred to these vectors the capability of being transported retrogradely from the axonal tip, leading to transduction of motor neurons in vitro in compartmented microfluidic cultures. In vivo delivery of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor-targeted vectors in leg muscles of mice resulted in predicted patterns of motor neuron labeling in lumbar spinal cord. This opens up the clinical potential of these vectors for minimally invasive administration of central nervous system-targeted therapeutics in motor neuron diseases. PMID:24670531

  4. Refinement of lentiviral vector for improved RNA processing and reduced rates of self inactivation repair

    PubMed Central

    Koldej, Rachel M; Anson, Donald S

    2009-01-01

    Background Lentiviral gene therapy vectors are now finding clinical application. In order to fully exploit their potential it is important that vectors are made as efficient and as safe as possible. Accordingly, we have modified a previously reported vector to improve RNA processing, minimise Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) sequence content and reduce repair of the self inactivating (SIN) deletion. Results HIV-1 sequence in the vector was reduced by substituting the polyadenylation signal with a heterologous signal. Mutation of splice donor sites was undertaken to prevent the majority of splicing within the vector genomic RNA. In addition, a number of other sequences within the vector were deleted. The combination of these modifications was able to significantly reduce the rates of both vector mobilisation and repair of the self inactivating deletion after two rounds of marker rescue. Conclusion RNA processing can be improved by mutation of the major and minor HIV-1 splice donor sites in the vector. In addition the rate of vector mobilisation and repair of SIN vectors can be successfully reduced by careful vector design that reduces homology between the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs) to a minimum. PMID:19811661

  5. Lentiviral vectors as tools to understand central nervous system biology in mammalian model organisms.

    PubMed

    Parr-Brownlie, Louise C; Bosch-Bouju, Clémentine; Schoderboeck, Lucia; Sizemore, Rachel J; Abraham, Wickliffe C; Hughes, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviruses have been extensively used as gene delivery vectors since the mid-1990s. Usually derived from the human immunodeficiency virus genome, they mediate efficient gene transfer to non-dividing cells, including neurons and glia in the adult mammalian brain. In addition, integration of the recombinant lentiviral construct into the host genome provides permanent expression, including the progeny of dividing neural precursors. In this review, we describe targeted vectors with modified envelope glycoproteins and expression of transgenes under the regulation of cell-selective and inducible promoters. This technology has broad utility to address fundamental questions in neuroscience and we outline how this has been used in rodents and primates. Combining viral tract tracing with immunohistochemistry and confocal or electron microscopy, lentiviral vectors provide a tool to selectively label and trace specific neuronal populations at gross or ultrastructural levels. Additionally, new generation optogenetic technologies can be readily utilized to analyze neuronal circuit and gene functions in the mature mammalian brain. Examples of these applications, limitations of current systems and prospects for future developments to enhance neuroscience knowledge will be reviewed. Finally, we will discuss how these vectors may be translated from gene therapy trials into the clinical setting.

  6. Lentiviral vector design and imaging approaches to visualize the early stages of cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Warlich, Eva; Kuehle, Johannes; Cantz, Tobias; Brugman, Martijn H; Maetzig, Tobias; Galla, Melanie; Filipczyk, Adam A; Halle, Stephan; Klump, Hannes; Schöler, Hans R; Baum, Christopher; Schroeder, Timm; Schambach, Axel

    2011-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from somatic cells by gene transfer of reprogramming transcription factors. Expression levels of these factors strongly influence the overall efficacy to form iPSC colonies, but additional contribution of stochastic cell-intrinsic factors has been proposed. Here, we present engineered color-coded lentiviral vectors in which codon-optimized reprogramming factors are co-expressed by a strong retroviral promoter that is rapidly silenced in iPSC, and imaged the conversion of fibroblasts to iPSC. We combined fluorescence microscopy with long-term single cell tracking, and used live-cell imaging to analyze the emergence and composition of early iPSC clusters. Applying our engineered lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that vector silencing typically occurs prior to or simultaneously with the induction of an Oct4-EGFP pluripotency marker. Around 7 days post-transduction (pt), a subfraction of cells in clonal colonies expressed Oct4-EGFP and rapidly expanded. Cell tracking of single cell-derived iPSC colonies supported the concept that stochastic epigenetic changes are necessary for reprogramming. We also found that iPSC colonies may emerge as a genetic mosaic originating from different clusters. Improved vector design with continuous cell tracking thus creates a powerful system to explore the subtle dynamics of biological processes such as early reprogramming events.

  7. Lentiviral Vector Design and Imaging Approaches to Visualize the Early Stages of Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Warlich, Eva; Kuehle, Johannes; Cantz, Tobias; Brugman, Martijn H; Maetzig, Tobias; Galla, Melanie; Filipczyk, Adam A; Halle, Stephan; Klump, Hannes; Schöler, Hans R; Baum, Christopher; Schroeder, Timm; Schambach, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from somatic cells by gene transfer of reprogramming transcription factors. Expression levels of these factors strongly influence the overall efficacy to form iPSC colonies, but additional contribution of stochastic cell-intrinsic factors has been proposed. Here, we present engineered color-coded lentiviral vectors in which codon-optimized reprogramming factors are co-expressed by a strong retroviral promoter that is rapidly silenced in iPSC, and imaged the conversion of fibroblasts to iPSC. We combined fluorescence microscopy with long-term single cell tracking, and used live-cell imaging to analyze the emergence and composition of early iPSC clusters. Applying our engineered lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that vector silencing typically occurs prior to or simultaneously with the induction of an Oct4-EGFP pluripotency marker. Around 7 days post-transduction (pt), a subfraction of cells in clonal colonies expressed Oct4-EGFP and rapidly expanded. Cell tracking of single cell–derived iPSC colonies supported the concept that stochastic epigenetic changes are necessary for reprogramming. We also found that iPSC colonies may emerge as a genetic mosaic originating from different clusters. Improved vector design with continuous cell tracking thus creates a powerful system to explore the subtle dynamics of biological processes such as early reprogramming events. PMID:21285961

  8. [Construction of recombinant lentiviral vector of Tie2-RNAi and its influence on malignant melanoma cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiu-ying; Liu, Zhao-liang; Wang, Biao; Guo, Guo-xiang; Wang, Mei-shui; Zhuang, Fu-lian; Cai, Chuan-shu; Zhang, Ming-feng; Zhang, Yan-ding

    2011-07-01

    To construct lentivector carrying Tie2-Small interfering RNA (SiRNA), so as to study its influence on malignant melanoma cells. Recombinant plasmid pSilencer 1.0-U6-Tie2-siRNA and plasmid pNL-EGFP were digested with XbaI, ligated a target lentiviral transfer plasmid of pNL-EGFP-U6-Tie2-I or pNL-EGFP-U6-Tie2-II, and then the electrophoresis clones was sequenced. Plasmids of pNL-EGFP-U6-Tie2-I and pNL-EGFP-U6-Tie2-II were constructed and combined with pVSVG and pHelper, respectively, to constitute lentiviral vector system of three plasmids. The Lentiviral vector system was transfected into 293T cell to produce pNL-EGFP-U6-Tie2- I and pNL-EGFP-U6-Tie2-II lentivirus. Then the supernatant was collected to determine the titer. Malignant melanoma cells were infected by both lentiviruses and identified by Realtime RT-PCR to assess inhibitory efficiency. The recombinant lentiviral vectors of Tie2-RNAi were constructed successfully which were analyzed with restriction enzyme digestion and identified by sequencing. And the titer of lentiviral vector was 8.8 x 10(3)/ml, which was determined by 293T cell. The results of Realtime RT-PCR demonstrated that the lentiviral vectors of Tie2-RNAi could infect malignant melanoma cells and inhibit the expression of Tie2 genes in malignant melanoma cells (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the expression level (P>0.05) between the two lentiviral vectors of Tie2-RNAi. Lentivector carrying Tie2-SiRNA can be constructed successfully and inhibit the expression of Tie2 gene in vitro significantly. The study will supply the theory basis for the further research on the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo.

  9. Non-integrating lentiviral vectors based on the minimal S/MAR sequence retain transgene expression in dividing cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Lingling; Lu, Jing; Xu, Peng; Liu, Guang; Xie, Xuemin; Mu, Wenli; Wang, Yajun; Liu, Depei

    2016-10-01

    Safe and efficient gene transfer systems are the basis of gene therapy applications. Non-integrating lentiviral (NIL) vectors are among the most promising candidates for gene transfer tools, because they exhibit high transfer efficiency in both dividing and non-dividing cells and do not present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. However, non-integrating lentiviral vectors cannot introduce stable exogenous gene expression to dividing cells, thereby limiting their application. Here, we report the design of a non-integrating lentiviral vector that contains the minimal scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) sequence (SNIL), and this SNIL vector is able to retain episomal transgene expression in dividing cells. Using SNIL vectors, we detected the expression of the eGFP gene for 61 days in SNIL-transduced stable CHO cells, either with selection or not. In the NIL group without the S/MAR sequence, however, the transduced cells died under selection for the transient expression of NIL vectors. Furthermore, Southern blot assays demonstrated that the SNIL vectors were retained extrachromosomally in the CHO cells. In conclusion, the minimal S/MAR sequence retained the non-integrating lentiviral vectors in dividing cells, which indicates that SNIL vectors have the potential for use as a gene transfer tool.

  10. A scalable method to concentrate lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with measles virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Marino, M P; Panigaj, M; Ou, W; Manirarora, J; Wei, C-H; Reiser, J

    2015-03-01

    Lentiviral (LV) vectors have emerged as powerful tools for basic research and clinical applications because of their ability to stably transduce both dividing and nondividing cells. A wide range of viral envelope (Env) glycoproteins have the ability to associate with the membrane of LV vectors, a process that is referred to as pseudotyping. Pseudotyped vectors have the capacity to transduce specific cell types for specific applications. For example, LV vectors pseudotyped with the measles virus (MV)-derived hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins have the ability to transduce quiescent lymphocytes. In addition, the MV H glycoprotein can be engineered allowing cell-specific targeting of LV vectors. One problem with MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors is low titer during vector production. This results in the need to manufacture large volumes of the vectors and to concentrate them to appropriate titers. The commonly used centrifugation-based concentration techniques for LV vectors are not practical for large-scale vector manufacturing. Thus, there is a need for improved methods to concentrate LV vectors. In this study, we adapted an anion-exchange membrane chromatography method that we previously used in the context of LV vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein to concentate MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors. Up to 60% of the input vectors with an up to 5300-fold reduction in volume was achieved using this anion-exchange chromatography method in conjunction with a desalting/concentration step involving centrifugal filter units. This technique provides a rapid and scalable approach for concentrating MV-pseudotyped LV vectors that does not require an elaborate setup.

  11. Transgenic rabbit production with simian immunodeficiency virus-derived lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Hiripi, L; Negre, D; Cosset, F-L; Kvell, K; Czömpöly, T; Baranyi, M; Gócza, E; Hoffmann, O; Bender, B; Bosze, Zs

    2010-10-01

    Transgenic rabbit is the preferred disease model of atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism and cardiovascular diseases since upon introducing genetic mutations of human genes, rabbit models reflect human physiological and pathological states more accurately than mouse models. Beyond that, transgenic rabbits are also used as bioreactors to produce pharmaceutical proteins in their milk. Since in the laboratory rabbit the conventional transgenesis has worked with the same low efficiency in the last twenty five years and truly pluripotent embryonic stem cells are not available to perform targeted mutagenesis, our aim was to adapt lentiviral transgenesis to this species. A simian immunodeficiency virus based replication defective lentiviral vector was used to create transgenic rabbit through perivitelline space injection of fertilized oocytes. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was placed under the ubiquitous CAG promoter. Transgenic founder rabbits showed mosaic pattern of GFP expression. Transgene integration and expression was revealed in tissues derived from all three primary germ layers. Transgene expression was detected in the developing sperm cells and could get through the germ line without epigenetic silencing, albeit with very low frequency. Our data show for the first time, that lentiviral transgenesis could be a feasible and viable alternative method to create genetically modified laboratory rabbit.

  12. Broadening the versatility of lentiviral vectors as a tool in nucleic acid research via genetic code expansion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongxiang; Yu, Fei; Wu, Yiming; Si, Longlong; Xu, Huan; Zhang, Chuanling; Xia, Qing; Xiao, Sulong; Wang, Qi; He, Qiuchen; Chen, Peng; Wang, Jiangyun; Taira, Kazunari; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of broadening the versatility of lentiviral vectors as a tool in nucleic acid research, we expanded the genetic code in the propagation of lentiviral vectors for site-specific incorporation of chemical moieties with unique properties. Through systematic exploration of the structure–function relationship of lentiviral VSVg envelope by site-specific mutagenesis and incorporation of residues displaying azide- and diazirine-moieties, the modifiable sites on the vector surface were identified, with most at the PH domain that neither affects the expression of envelope protein nor propagation or infectivity of the progeny virus. Furthermore, via the incorporation of such chemical moieties, a variety of fluorescence probes, ligands, PEG and other functional molecules are conjugated, orthogonally and stoichiometrically, to the lentiviral vector. Using this methodology, a facile platform is established that is useful for tracking virus movement, targeting gene delivery and detecting virus–host interactions. This study may provide a new direction for rational design of lentiviral vectors, with significant impact on both basic research and therapeutic applications. PMID:25765642

  13. Broadening the versatility of lentiviral vectors as a tool in nucleic acid research via genetic code expansion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yongxiang; Yu, Fei; Wu, Yiming; Si, Longlong; Xu, Huan; Zhang, Chuanling; Xia, Qing; Xiao, Sulong; Wang, Qi; He, Qiuchen; Chen, Peng; Wang, Jiangyun; Taira, Kazunari; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2015-06-23

    With the aim of broadening the versatility of lentiviral vectors as a tool in nucleic acid research, we expanded the genetic code in the propagation of lentiviral vectors for site-specific incorporation of chemical moieties with unique properties. Through systematic exploration of the structure-function relationship of lentiviral VSVg envelope by site-specific mutagenesis and incorporation of residues displaying azide- and diazirine-moieties, the modifiable sites on the vector surface were identified, with most at the PH domain that neither affects the expression of envelope protein nor propagation or infectivity of the progeny virus. Furthermore, via the incorporation of such chemical moieties, a variety of fluorescence probes, ligands, PEG and other functional molecules are conjugated, orthogonally and stoichiometrically, to the lentiviral vector. Using this methodology, a facile platform is established that is useful for tracking virus movement, targeting gene delivery and detecting virus-host interactions. This study may provide a new direction for rational design of lentiviral vectors, with significant impact on both basic research and therapeutic applications.

  14. Multigenic lentiviral vectors for combined and tissue-specific expression of miRNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Askou, Anne Louise; Aagaard, Lars; Kostic, Corinne; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Bek, Toke; Jensen, Thomas Gryesten; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Lentivirus-based gene delivery vectors carrying multiple gene cassettes are powerful tools in gene transfer studies and gene therapy, allowing coexpression of multiple therapeutic factors and, if desired, fluorescent reporters. Current strategies to express transgenes and microRNA (miRNA) clusters from a single vector have certain limitations that affect transgene expression levels and/or vector titers. In this study, we describe a novel vector design that facilitates combined expression of therapeutic RNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors as well as a fluorescent reporter from back-to-back RNApolII-driven expression cassettes. This configuration allows effective production of intron-embedded miRNAs that are released upon transduction of target cells. Exploiting such multigenic lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate robust miRNA-directed downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, leading to reduced angiogenesis, and parallel impairment of angiogenic pathways by codelivering the gene encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Notably, subretinal injections of lentiviral vectors reveal efficient retinal pigment epithelium-specific gene expression driven by the VMD2 promoter, verifying that multigenic lentiviral vectors can be produced with high titers sufficient for in vivo applications. Altogether, our results suggest the potential applicability of combined miRNA- and protein-encoding lentiviral vectors in antiangiogenic gene therapy, including new combination therapies for amelioration of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26052532

  15. Genetic engineering of cell lines using lentiviral vectors to achieve antibody secretion following encapsulated implantation.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Bohrmann, Bernd; Kopetzki, Erhard; Schweitzer, Christoph; Jacobsen, Helmut; Moniatte, Marc; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard L

    2014-01-01

    The controlled delivery of antibodies by immunoisolated bioimplants containing genetically engineered cells is an attractive and safe approach for chronic treatments. To reach therapeutic antibody levels there is a need to generate renewable cell lines, which can long-term survive in macroencapsulation devices while maintaining high antibody specific productivity. Here we have developed a dual lentiviral vector strategy for the genetic engineering of cell lines compatible with macroencapsulation, using separate vectors encoding IgG light and heavy chains. We show that IgG expression level can be maximized as a function of vector dose and transgene ratio. This approach allows for the generation of stable populations of IgG-expressing C2C12 mouse myoblasts, and for the subsequent isolation of clones stably secreting high IgG levels. Moreover, we demonstrate that cell transduction using this lentiviral system leads to the production of a functional glycosylated antibody by myogenic cells. Subsequent implantation of antibody-secreting cells in a high-capacity macroencapsulation device enables continuous delivery of recombinant antibodies in the mouse subcutaneous tissue, leading to substantial levels of therapeutic IgG detectable in the plasma.

  16. Restoring ciliary function to differentiated Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia cells with a lentiviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Lawrence E; Yin, Weining; Patel, Manij; Sechelski, John; Rogers, Troy; Burns, Kimberlie; Grubb, Barbara R; Olsen, John C

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disease in which mutations disrupt ciliary function, leading to impaired mucociliary clearance and life-long lung disease. Mouse tracheal cells with a targeted deletion in the axonemal dynein intermediated chain gene Dnaic1 differentiate normally in culture but lack ciliary activity. Gene transfer to undifferentiated cultures of mouse Dnaic1−/− cells with a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with avian influenza hemagglutinin restored Dnaic1 expression and ciliary activity. Importantly, apical treatment of well-differentiated cultures of mouse Dnaic1−/− with lentiviral vector also restored ciliary activity, demonstrating successful gene transfer from the apical surface. Treatment of Dnaic1flox/flox mice expressing an estrogen responsive Cre recombinase with different doses of tamoxifen indicated that restoration of ~20% of ciliary activity may be sufficient to prevent the development of rhinosinusitis. However, while administration of a β-galactosidase expressing vector to control mice demonstrated efficient gene transfer to the nasal epithelium, treatment of Dnaic1−/− mice resulted in a low level of gene transfer, demonstrating that the severe rhinitis present in these animals impedes gene transfer. The results demonstrate that gene replacement therapy may be a viable treatment option for primary ciliary dyskinesia, but further improvements in the efficiency of gene transfer are necessary. PMID:24451115

  17. Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vectors Can Effectively Deliver Ovalbumin Antigen for Induction of Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biliang; Yang, Haiguang; Dai, Bingbing; Tai, April

    2009-01-01

    Abstract It has been demonstrated that nonintegrating lentiviral vectors (NILVs) are efficient in maintaining transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. Gene delivery by NILVs can significantly reduce nonspecific vector integration, which has been shown to cause malignant transformation in patients receiving gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. Strong and sustained immune responses were observed after a single immunization with NILVs carrying viral antigens. However, there is no report to date that evaluates the efficacy of NILVs in inducing antigen-specific antitumor immunity. Using a well-characterized tumor model, we tested in vivo immunization with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector harboring a defective integrase. A high frequency of ovalbumin peptide (OVAp1)-specific CD8+ T cells and a substantial antibody response were detected in naive mice immunized with an NILV encoding an OVA transgene. Furthermore, this immunization method completely protected the mice against the growth of E.G7 tumor cells expressing the OVA antigen. Thus, this study provides evidence that immunization using NILVs can be a safe and promising approach for exploring cancer immunotherapy. PMID:19663564

  18. Comparative analysis of molecular strategies attenuating positional effects in lentiviral vectors carrying multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Osti, Daniela; Marras, Emanuela; Ceriani, Isabella; Grassini, Greta; Rubino, Tiziana; Viganò, Daniela; Parolaro, Daniela; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2006-09-01

    Efficient, high-level expression of multiple genes is often difficult to achieve in retroviral vectors, due to positional effects affecting transcription of adjacent sequences. Here we describe the comparative analysis of different strategies for co-expressing two model cDNA sequences in the context of a second generation lentiviral vector system. A first option was based on the generation of a polycistronic construct by subcloning an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence between tandem cDNAs. IRES-dependent translation of the cDNA placed downstream (3') of the first transgene was poor, and the protein was barely detectable in transduced cells. A similar result was obtained when both transgenes were placed under the transcriptional control of two independent internal promoters. When these independent transcription units were separated by the 5'HS4 chromatin insulator of the chicken beta-globin locus, a marked increase of the expression of the downstream protein was observed. Similarly, insertion of a polyadenylation sequence between the tandem transcription units fully restored - in transfection experiments - the expression of the downstream sequence, whose protein pattern was identical to the single-gene control, suggesting that in this specific construct transcriptional interference was the likely cause of the observed positional effects. These results indicate that chromatin insulator sequences can be useful molecular tools to overcome positional effects in the context of lentiviral vectors.

  19. Functional correction of fanconi anemia group C hematopoietic cells by the use of a novel lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Olsen, J C; Patel, M; Rao, K W; Walsh, C E

    2001-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors transduce nondividing hematopoietic cells more efficiently than other currently available vector systems. Here we report the results of human hematopoietic cell gene transfer using lentiviral vectors based upon human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). EIAV is a nonprimate lentivirus and is severely restricted in its host range to horses and closely related equines. We employed the EIAV vector system to test for gene transfer to human Fanconi anemia (FA) hematopoietic cells by comparison with HIV-1- and Moloney murine leukemia virus-based systems. Fanconi anemia is characterized by bone marrow failure secondary to stem cell dysfunction. Fanconi anemia group C EBV-transformed lymphoblasts were transduced with all three viral vectors. Phenotypic correction of FA cells, as measured by mitomycin C drug resistance, was observed with a similar efficiency in all vector systems. This is the first description of lentiviral correction of FA cells and suggests that lentiviral vectors may be useful for FA gene transfer.

  20. Introducing a cleavable signal peptide enhances the packaging efficiency of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Japanese encephalitis virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanyang; Wu, Rui; Yuan, Lei; Tian, Geng; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Huang, Yong; Yan, Qigui; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian

    2017-02-02

    Research into the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has been facilitated by use of pseudotyped viruses. The signal peptide is a key determinant for membrane targeting and membrane insertion, which could affect packaging of pseudotyped viruses. In this study, we generated three lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with JEV envelope proteins that co-express either a strong signal peptide from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G (VSVMEpv) or a weak signal peptide of JEV (SPMEpv), or a virus without a signal peptide in front of the JEV prM/E (MEpv). Western blot demonstrated that JEV E protein and HIV p24 were present in the same particles of the three pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. Electron microscopy revealed that the three pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors were 120-180nm in diameter. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that the titer of VSVMEpv was 17-fold higher than that of MEpv, while the titer of SPMEpv was six-fold higher than that of MEpv. Inclusion of a signal peptide enhanced packaging efficiency of pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. With a strong signal peptide helping they generate a higher number of viral particles. Green fluorescent protein and luciferase expression showed that the transduction titer or relative fluorescence units of VSVMEpv, SPMEpv and MEpv were not significantly different. We suggest that the signal peptide does not influence the infectivity of pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. In addition, our findings indicated that pseudotyped JEVs show preferential tropism for BHK-21 cells, supporting the mimic function displayed by parental JEV. Therefore, our study provided a cost-effective method to generate pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors, which may represent a valid model to investigate some of the infectious properties of JEV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lentiviral vector system for coordinated constitutive and drug controlled tetracycline-regulated gene co-expression.

    PubMed

    Stahlhut, Maike; Schwarzer, Adrian; Eder, Matthias; Yang, Min; Li, Zhixiong; Morgan, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Kustikova, Olga S

    2015-09-01

    Constitutive co-expression of cooperating transgenes using retroviral integrating vectors is frequently used for genetic modification of different cell types to establish therapeutic or cancer models. However, such approaches are unable to dissect the influence of dose, order and reversibility of transgene expression on the fate of newly developed therapeutic/malignant phenotypes. We present a modular lentiviral vector system, which provides expression of constitutive and inducible components. To demonstrate its functionality, we constitutively expressed the well-described transcription factor Meis1 followed by inducible co-expression of collaborating partner Hoxa9 under the control of tetracycline responsive promoters in murine fibroblasts and primary hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Fluorescent markers to track transgene co-expression revealed tightly controlled, efficiently inducible and reversible but cell type dependent gene transfer over time. We demonstrated dose-dependent blockade of myeloid differentiation when both Meis1/Hoxa9 were concomitantly overexpressed in primary HPCs in vitro, but the absence of the transformed phenotype in non-induced samples or when Hoxa9 expression was down-regulated. This system combines the advantages of lentiviral gene transfer and the opportunity for drug-controlled co-expression of multiple transgenes to dissect, among others, gene networks governing complex cell behavior, such as proto-oncogene dose-dependent leukemogenic pathways or collaborating mechanisms of genes enhancing competitive fitness of hematopoietic cells.

  2. Correction of Methylmalonic Aciduria In Vivo Using a Codon-Optimized Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edward S.Y.; McIntyre, Chantelle; Peters, Heidi L.; Ranieri, Enzo; Anson, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder of organic acid metabolism with limited therapeutic options, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Positive results from combined liver/kidney transplantation suggest, however, that metabolic sink therapy may be efficacious. Gene therapy offers a more accessible approach for the treatment of methylmalonic aciduria than organ transplantation. Accordingly, we have evaluated a lentiviral vector–mediated gene transfer approach in an in vivo mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria. A mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria (Mut−/−MUTh2) was injected intravenously at 8 weeks of age with a lentiviral vector that expressed a codon-optimized human methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase transgene, HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM. Untreated Mut−/−MUTh2 and normal mice were used as controls. HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM-treated mice achieved near-normal weight for age, and Western blot analysis demonstrated significant methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme expression in their livers. Normalization of liver methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme activity in the treated group was associated with a reduction in plasma and urine methylmalonic acid levels, and a reduction in the hepatic methylmalonic acid concentration. Administration of the HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM vector provided significant, although incomplete, biochemical correction of methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model, suggesting that gene therapy is a potential treatment for this disorder. PMID:24568291

  3. Lentiviral Vector-based Insertional Mutagenesis Identifies Genes Involved in the Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Marco; Annunziato, Stefano; Calabria, Andrea; Brasca, Stefano; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The high transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors in a wide variety of cells makes them an ideal tool for forward genetics screenings addressing issues of cancer research. Although molecular targeted therapies have provided significant advances in tumor treatment, relapses often occur by the expansion of tumor cell clones carrying mutations that confer resistance. Identification of the culprits of anticancer drug resistance is fundamental for the achievement of long-term response. Here, we developed a new lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis screening to identify genes that confer resistance to clinically relevant targeted anticancer therapies. By applying this genome-wide approach to cell lines representing two subtypes of HER2+ breast cancer, we identified 62 candidate lapatinib resistance genes. We validated the top ranking genes, i.e., PIK3CA and PIK3CB, by showing that their forced expression confers resistance to lapatinib in vitro and found that their mutation/overexpression is associated to poor prognosis in human breast tumors. Then, we successfully applied this approach to the identification of erlotinib resistance genes in pancreatic cancer, thus showing the intrinsic versatility of the approach. The acquired knowledge can help identifying combinations of targeted drugs to overcome the occurrence of resistance, thus opening new horizons for more effective treatment of tumors. PMID:25195596

  4. Correction of murine Rag1 deficiency by self-inactivating lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, K; Rodijk, M; Ng, Y-Y; Baert, M R M; Lagresle-Peyrou, C; Schambach, A; Zhang, F; Hoeben, R C; Hacein-Bey-Abina, S; Lankester, A C; Bredius, R G M; Driessen, G J A; Thrasher, A J; Baum, C; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; van Dongen, J J M; Staal, F J T

    2011-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) patients with an inactivating mutation in recombination activation gene 1 (RAG1) lack B and T cells due to the inability to rearrange immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes. Gene therapy is a valid treatment option for RAG-SCID patients, especially for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow donor, but developing such therapy has proven challenging. As a preclinical model for RAG-SCID, we used Rag1-/- mice and lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN) vectors harboring different internal elements to deliver native or codon-optimized human RAG1 sequences. Treatment resulted in the appearance of B and T cells in peripheral blood and developing B and T cells were detected in central lymphoid organs. Serum Ig levels and Ig and TCR Vβ gene segment usage was comparable to wild-type (WT) controls, indicating that RAG-mediated rearrangement took place. Remarkably, relatively low frequencies of B cells produced WT levels of serum immunoglobulins. Upon stimulation of the TCR, corrected spleen cells proliferated and produced cytokines. In vivo challenge resulted in production of antigen-specific antibodies. No leukemia development as consequence of insertional mutagenesis was observed. The functional reconstitution of the B- as well as the T-cell compartment provides proof-of-principle for therapeutic RAG1 gene transfer in Rag1-/- mice using lentiviral SIN vectors.

  5. Treatment of pulmonary metastatic tumors in mice using lentiviral vector-engineered stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Zhao, P; Kennedy, C; Chen, K; Wiegand, J; Washington, G; Marrero, L; Cui, Y

    2008-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy relies on functional tumor-specific effector T lymphocytes for tumor elimination. Dendritic cells (DCs), as most potent antigen-presenting cells, have been popularly employed in clinical and experimental tumor treatments. We have previously demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated transgene delivery to DC progenitors, including bone marrow cells and hematopoietic stem cells, followed by transplantation supports systemic generation of great numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs. These DCs subsequently stimulate marked and systemic immune activation. Here, we examined whether this level of immune activation is sufficient to overcome tumor-induced tolerogenic environment for treating an established aggressive epithelial tumor. We showed that a combination treatment of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and cytosine-phosphate-guanine-containing oligonucleotide stimulated large numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs in situ from transgene-modified stem cells. Moreover, these in situ generated and activated DCs markedly stimulated activation of antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells by augmenting their numbers, as well as function, even in a tumor-bearing tolerogenic environment. This leads to significant improvement in the therapeutic efficacy of established pulmonary metastases. This study suggests that lentiviral vector-modified stem cells as DC progenitors may be used as an effective therapeutic regimen for treating metastatic epithelial tumors. PMID:18084244

  6. Prospects for Lentiviral Vector Mediated Prostaglandin F Synthase Gene Delivery in Monkey Eyes In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Suk; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Filla, Mark S.; Slauson, Sarah R.; Kolb, Aaron W.; Peters, Donna M.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Gabelt, B’Ann True; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most effective outflow drugs approved for clinical use are prostaglandin F2α analogues, but these require daily topical self-dosing and have various intraocular, ocular surface and extraocular side effects. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of the prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) gene, resulting in long-term reduction of IOP, may eliminate off-target tissue effects and the need for daily topical PGF2α self-administration. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of the PGFS gene to the anterior segment has been achieved in cats and non-human primates. Although these results are encouraging, our studies have identified a number of challenges that need to be overcome for prostaglandin gene therapy to be translated into the clinic. Using examples from our work in non-human primates, where we were able to achieve a significant reduction in IOP (2 mm Hg) for 5 months after delivery of the cDNA for bovine PGF synthase, we identify and discuss these issues and consider several possible solutions. PMID:24559478

  7. IL-7 surface-engineered lentiviral vectors promote survival and efficient gene transfer in resting primary T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Dardalhon, Valerie; Ducrey-Rundquist, Odile; Trono, Didier; Taylor, Naomi; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2003-03-15

    Important gene therapy target cells such as resting human T cells are refractory to transduction with lentiviral vectors. Completion of reverse transcription, nuclear import, and subsequent integration of the lentiviral genome occur in these cells only if they have been activated. In T-cell-based gene therapy trials performed to date, cells have been activated via their cognate antigen receptor. To couple activation with gene transfer, we previously generated lentiviral vectors displaying an anti-CD3 scFv fragment that allowed up to 48% transduction of freshly isolated T cells. However, transduction of highly purified resting T cells with these anti-CD3-displaying lentiviral vectors was inefficient and shifted the T cells from the naive to the memory phenotype. Here, we describe interleukin-7 (IL-7)-displaying HIV-1-derived vectors. Like recombinant IL-7, these modified particles could promote the survival of primary T cells placed in culture without inducing a naive-to-memory phenotypic switch. Furthermore, a single exposure to the IL-7-displaying vectors resulted in efficient gene transfer in both resting memory adult T cells and naive cord blood T cells. With adult naive T cells, preactivation with recombinant IL-7 was necessary for efficient gene transfer. Altogether, these results suggest that IL-7-displaying vectors could constitute interesting tools for T-cell-targeted gene therapy.

  8. Cocal-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors resist inactivation by human serum and efficiently transduce primate hematopoietic repopulating cells.

    PubMed

    Trobridge, Grant D; Wu, Robert A; Hansen, Michael; Ironside, Christina; Watts, Korashon L; Olsen, Philip; Beard, Brian C; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2010-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are established as efficient and convenient vehicles for gene transfer. They are almost always pseudotyped with the envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) due to the high titers that can be achieved, their stability, and broad tropism. We generated a novel cocal vesiculovirus envelope glycoprotein plasmid and compared the properties of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with cocal, VSV-G, and a modified feline endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoprotein (RD114/TR). Cocal-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors can be produced at titers as high as with VSV-G, have a broad tropism, and are stable, allowing for efficient concentration by centrifugation. Additionally, cocal vectors are more resistant to inactivation by human serum than VSV-G-pseudotyped vectors, and efficiently transduce human CD34(+) nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse-repopulating cells (SRCs), and long-term primate hematopoietic repopulating cells. These studies establish the potential of cocal-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors for a variety of scientific and therapeutic gene transfer applications, including in vivo gene delivery and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy.

  9. Lentiviral vectors in gene therapy: their current status and future potential

    PubMed Central

    Escors, David; Breckpot, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Summary The concept of gene therapy originated in the mid 20th century and was perceived as a revolutionary technology with the promise to cure almost any disease of which the molecular basis was understood. Since then, several gene vectors have been developed, and the feasibility of gene therapy shown in many animal models of human disease. However, clinical efficacy could not be demonstrated until the beginning of the new century in a small-scale clinical trial curing an otherwise fatal immunodeficiency disorder in children. This first success – achieved after retroviral therapy - was later on overshadowed by the occurrence of vector-related leukaemia in a significant number of the treated children, demonstrating that the future success of gene therapy depends on our understanding of vector biology. This has led to the development of later generation vectors with improved efficiency, specificity and safety. Amongst these are HIV-1 lentivirus-based vectors (lentivectors), which are being increasingly used in basic and applied research. Human gene therapy clinical trials are currently under way using lentivectors in a wide range of human diseases. The intention of this review is to describe the main scientific steps leading to the engineering of HIV-1 lentiviral vectors, and place them in the context of current human gene therapy. PMID:20143172

  10. Shedding of clinical-grade lentiviral vectors is not detected in a gene therapy setting.

    PubMed

    Cesani, M; Plati, T; Lorioli, L; Benedicenti, F; Redaelli, D; Dionisio, F; Biasco, L; Montini, E; Naldini, L; Biffi, A

    2015-06-01

    Gene therapy using viral vectors that stably integrate into ex vivo cultured cells holds great promises for the treatment of monogenic diseases as well as cancer. However, carry-over of infectious vector particles has been described to occur upon ex vivo transduction of target cells. This, in turn, may lead to inadvertent spreading of viral particles to off-target cells in vivo, raising concerns for potential adverse effects, such as toxicity of ectopic transgene expression, immunogenicity from in vivo transduced antigen-presenting cells and, possibly, gene transfer to germline cells. Here, we have investigated factors influencing the extent of lentiviral vector (LV) shedding upon ex vivo transduction of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our results indicate that, although vector carry-over is detectable when using laboratory-grade vector stocks, the use of clinical-grade vector stocks strongly decreases the extent of inadvertent transduction of secondary targets, likely because of the higher degree of purification. These data provide supportive evidence for the safe use of the LV platform in clinical settings.

  11. Lentiviral vectors in gene therapy: their current status and future potential.

    PubMed

    Escors, David; Breckpot, Karine

    2010-04-01

    The concept of gene therapy originated in the mid twentieth century and was perceived as a revolutionary technology with the promise to cure almost any disease of which the molecular basis was understood. Since then, several gene vectors have been developed and the feasibility of gene therapy has been shown in many animal models of human disease. However, clinical efficacy could not be demonstrated until the beginning of the new century in a small-scale clinical trial curing an otherwise fatal immunodeficiency disorder in children. This first success, achieved after retroviral therapy, was later overshadowed by the occurrence of vector-related leukemia in a significant number of the treated children, demonstrating that the future success of gene therapy depends on our understanding of vector biology. This has led to the development of later-generation vectors with improved efficiency, specificity, and safety. Amongst these are HIV-1 lentivirus-based vectors (lentivectors), which are being increasingly used in basic and applied research. Human gene therapy clinical trials are currently underway using lentivectors in a wide range of human diseases. The intention of this review is to describe the main scientific steps leading to the engineering of HIV-1 lentiviral vectors and place them in the context of current human gene therapy.

  12. Uncovering and Dissecting the Genotoxicity of Self-inactivating Lentiviral Vectors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cesana, Daniela; Ranzani, Marco; Volpin, Monica; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Duros, Caroline; Artus, Alexandre; Merella, Stefania; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Sergi Sergi, Lucia; Sanvito, Francesca; Brombin, Chiara; Nonis, Alessandro; Serio, Clelia Di; Doglioni, Claudio; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Cohen-Haguenauer, Odile; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors (LV) have an excellent therapeutic potential as demonstrated in preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, weaker mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis could still pose a significant risk in clinical applications. Taking advantage of novel in vivo genotoxicity assays, we tested a battery of LV constructs, including some with clinically relevant designs, and found that oncogene activation by promoter insertion is the most powerful mechanism of early vector-induced oncogenesis. SIN LVs disabled in their capacity to activate oncogenes by promoter insertion were less genotoxic and induced tumors by enhancer-mediated activation of oncogenes with efficiency that was proportional to the strength of the promoter used. On the other hand, when enhancer activity was reduced by using moderate promoters, oncogenesis by inactivation of tumor suppressor gene was revealed. This mechanism becomes predominant when the enhancer activity of the internal promoter is shielded by the presence of a synthetic chromatin insulator cassette. Our data provide both mechanistic insights and quantitative readouts of vector-mediated genotoxicity, allowing a relative ranking of different vectors according to these features, and inform current and future choices of vector design with increasing biosafety. PMID:24441399

  13. A Nonintegrative Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Sterile Protection against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Coutant, Frédéric; Sanchez David, Raul Yusef; Félix, Tristan; Boulay, Aude; Caleechurn, Laxmee; Souque, Philippe; Thouvenot, Catherine; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Trials testing the RTS,S candidate malaria vaccine and radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) have shown that protective immunity against malaria can be induced and that an effective vaccine is not out of reach. However, longer-term protection and higher protection rates are required to eradicate malaria from the endemic regions. It implies that there is still a need to explore new vaccine strategies. Lentiviral vectors are very potent at inducing strong immunological memory. However their integrative status challenges their safety profile. Eliminating the integration step obviates the risk of insertional oncogenesis. Providing they confer sterile immunity, nonintegrative lentiviral vectors (NILV) hold promise as mass pediatric vaccine by meeting high safety standards. In this study, we have assessed the protective efficacy of NILV against malaria in a robust pre-clinical model. Mice were immunized with NILV encoding Plasmodium yoelii Circumsporozoite Protein (Py CSP) and challenged with sporozoites one month later. In two independent protective efficacy studies, 50% (37.5–62.5) of the animals were fully protected (p = 0.0072 and p = 0.0008 respectively when compared to naive mice). The remaining mice with detectable parasitized red blood cells exhibited a prolonged patency and reduced parasitemia. Moreover, protection was long-lasting with 42.8% sterile protection six months after the last immunization (p = 0.0042). Post-challenge CD8+ T cells to CSP, in contrast to anti-CSP antibodies, were associated with protection (r = −0.6615 and p = 0.0004 between the frequency of IFN-g secreting specific T cells in spleen and parasitemia). However, while NILV and RAS immunizations elicited comparable immunity to CSP, only RAS conferred 100% of sterile protection. Given that a better protection can be anticipated from a multi-antigen vaccine and an optimized vector design, NILV appear as a promising malaria vaccine. PMID:23133649

  14. Eliminating HIV-1 Packaging Sequences from Lentiviral Vector Proviruses Enhances Safety and Expedites Gene Transfer for Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vink, Conrad A; Counsell, John R; Perocheau, Dany P; Karda, Rajvinder; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Brugman, Martijn H; Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; McKay, Tristan R; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J

    2017-08-02

    Lentiviral vector genomic RNA requires sequences that partially overlap wild-type HIV-1 gag and env genes for packaging into vector particles. These HIV-1 packaging sequences constitute 19.6% of the wild-type HIV-1 genome and contain functional cis elements that potentially compromise clinical safety. Here, we describe the development of a novel lentiviral vector (LTR1) with a unique genomic structure designed to prevent transfer of HIV-1 packaging sequences to patient cells, thus reducing the total HIV-1 content to just 4.8% of the wild-type genome. This has been achieved by reconfiguring the vector to mediate reverse-transcription with a single strand transfer, instead of the usual two, and in which HIV-1 packaging sequences are not copied. We show that LTR1 vectors offer improved safety in their resistance to remobilization in HIV-1 particles and reduced frequency of splicing into human genes. Following intravenous luciferase vector administration to neonatal mice, LTR1 sustained a higher level of liver transgene expression than an equivalent dose of a standard lentivirus. LTR1 vectors produce reverse-transcription products earlier and start to express transgenes significantly quicker than standard lentiviruses after transduction. Finally, we show that LTR1 is an effective lentiviral gene therapy vector as demonstrated by correction of a mouse hemophilia B model. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Titers of lentiviral vectors encoding shRNAs and miRNAs are reduced by different mechanisms that require distinct repair strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying Poi; Vink, Monique A; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Ramirez de Arellano, Eva; Konstantinova, Pavlina; Ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-07-01

    RNAi-based gene therapy is a powerful approach to treat viral infections because of its high efficiency and sequence specificity. The HIV-1-based lentiviral vector system is suitable for the delivery of RNAi inducers to HIV-1 susceptible cells due to its ability to transduce nondividing cells, including hematopoietic stem cells, and its ability for stable transgene delivery into the host cell genome. However, the presence of anti-HIV short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) cassettes can negatively affect the lentiviral vector titers. We show that shRNAs, which target the vector genomic RNA, strongly reduced lentiviral vector titers but inhibition of the RNAi pathway via saturation could rescue vector production. The presence of miRNAs in the vector RNA genome (sense orientation) results in a minor titer reduction due to Drosha processing. A major cause for titer reduction of miRNA vectors is due to incompatibility of the cytomegalovirus promoter with the lentiviral vector system. Replacement of this promoter with an inducible promoter resulted in an almost complete restoration of the vector titer. We also showed that antisense poly(A) signal sequences can have a dramatic effect on the vector titer. These results show that not all sequences are compatible with the lentiviral vector system and that care should be taken in the design of lentiviral vectors encoding RNAi inducers.

  16. Titers of lentiviral vectors encoding shRNAs and miRNAs are reduced by different mechanisms that require distinct repair strategies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying Poi; Vink, Monique A.; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Ramirez de Arellano, Eva; Konstantinova, Pavlina; Ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    RNAi-based gene therapy is a powerful approach to treat viral infections because of its high efficiency and sequence specificity. The HIV-1-based lentiviral vector system is suitable for the delivery of RNAi inducers to HIV-1 susceptible cells due to its ability to transduce nondividing cells, including hematopoietic stem cells, and its ability for stable transgene delivery into the host cell genome. However, the presence of anti-HIV short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) cassettes can negatively affect the lentiviral vector titers. We show that shRNAs, which target the vector genomic RNA, strongly reduced lentiviral vector titers but inhibition of the RNAi pathway via saturation could rescue vector production. The presence of miRNAs in the vector RNA genome (sense orientation) results in a minor titer reduction due to Drosha processing. A major cause for titer reduction of miRNA vectors is due to incompatibility of the cytomegalovirus promoter with the lentiviral vector system. Replacement of this promoter with an inducible promoter resulted in an almost complete restoration of the vector titer. We also showed that antisense poly(A) signal sequences can have a dramatic effect on the vector titer. These results show that not all sequences are compatible with the lentiviral vector system and that care should be taken in the design of lentiviral vectors encoding RNAi inducers. PMID:20498457

  17. Stable genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells by lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Gropp, Michal; Itsykson, Pavel; Singer, Orna; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Reinhartz, Etti; Galun, Eithan; Reubinoff, Benjamin E

    2003-02-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of the early preimplantation embryo. An efficient strategy for stable genetic modification of hES cells may be highly valuable for manipulating the cells in vitro and may promote the study of hES cell biology, human embryogenesis, and the development of cell-based therapies. Here, we demonstrate that vectors derived from self-inactivating (SIN) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are efficient tools for stable genetic modification of hES cells. Transduction of hES cells by a modified vector derived from SIN HIV-1 and containing the woodchuck hepatitis regulatory element (WPRE) and the central polypurine tract (cPPT) sequence facilitated stable transgene expression during prolonged (38 weeks) undifferentiated proliferation in vitro. Southern blot analysis revealed that the viral vector had integrated into the host cells' DNA. Transgene expression was maintained throughout differentiation into progeny of all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo in teratomas. Thus, the transduced hES cells retained the capability for self-renewal and their pluripotent potential. Genetic modification of hES cells by lentiviral vectors provides a powerful tool for basic and applied research in the area of human ES cells.

  18. Stable and Efficient Gene Transfer into the Retina Using an HIV-Based Lentiviral Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masayo; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    1997-09-01

    The development of methods for efficient gene transfer to terminally differentiated retinal cells is important to study the function of the retina as well as for gene therapy of retinal diseases. We have developed a lentiviral vector system based on the HIV that can transduce terminally differentiated neurons of the brain in vivo. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of HIV vectors to transfer genes into retinal cells. An HIV vector containing a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into the subretinal space of rat eyes. The GFP gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was efficiently expressed in both photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium. However, the use of the rhodopsin promoter resulted in expression predominantly in photoreceptor cells. Most successfully transduced eyes showed that photoreceptor cells in >80% of the area of whole retina expressed the GFP. The GFP expression persisted for at least 12 weeks with no apparent decrease. The efficient gene transfer into photoreceptor cells by HIV vectors will be useful for gene therapy of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa.

  19. Development of inducible EIAV-based lentiviral vector packaging and producer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Stewart, H J; Leroux-Carlucci, M A; Sion, C J M; Mitrophanous, K A; Radcliffe, P A

    2009-06-01

    Large-scale production of gene therapeutics comprising equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) -based lentiviral vectors (LVs) would benefit from the development of producer cell lines enabling the generation of larger quantities of vector than achievable by transient systems. Such cell lines would contain three vector components (Gag/Pol, VSV-G envelope and genome expression constructs). As the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) envelope protein is cytotoxic, its expression must be regulated. It is also desirable to regulate Gag/Pol expression to minimise metabolic burden on the cell. The Tet repressor (TetR) system was selected to regulate expression of VSV-G and Gag/Pol, necessitating the introduction of a fourth construct, encoding TetR, into the cell line. We have generated an inducible packaging cell line that shows tight control of the packaging components, and high-titre vector production on transient transfection of the EIAV genome. The cell line is stable for at least 7 weeks in the absence of selective pressure. To verify that this packaging cell line can support the generation of producer cell lines it was transfected stably with an EIAV genome cassette encoding ProSavin; a gene therapeutic for Parkinson's disease. Producer cell lines were generated, which on induction, yielded ProSavin with titres comparable to the transient system.

  20. Transient increase in intrahepatic pressure mediates successful treatment of the Gunn rat with reduced doses of lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Françoise; Flageul, Maude; Dariel, Anne; Pichard, Virginie; Pontes, Cecilia Abarrategui; Boni, Sébastien; Podevin, Guillaume; Myara, Anne; Ferry, Nicolas; Nguyen, Tuan Huy

    2010-10-01

    Lentiviral vectors can stably transduce hepatocytes and are promising tools for gene therapy of hepatic diseases. Although hepatocytes are accessible to blood-borne viral vectors through fenestrations of the hepatic endothelium, improved liver transduction after delivery of vectors to the blood stream is needed. As the normal endothelial fenestration and lentiviral vectors are similar in size (150 nm), we hypothesized that a transient increase in hepatic blood pressure may enhance in vivo gene transfer to hepatocytes. We designed a simple surgical procedure, by which the liver is temporarily excluded from blood flow. Lentiviral vectors were injected in a large volume to increase intrahepatic pressure. We demonstrated that in the Gunn rat, a model of Crigler-Najjar disease, the administration of low vector doses (corresponding to a multiplicity of infection of 0.2) by this procedure resulted in therapeutic correction of hyperbilirubinemia, without toxicity. The correction was sustained for 10 months (end of study). The same vector amounts yielded only partial correction after intraportal delivery. We believe that this new and clinically applicable strategy may broaden the range of genetic liver diseases accessible to gene therapy.

  1. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26029723

  2. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies.

  3. Anti-Apoptotic Effects of Lentiviral Vector Transduction Promote Increased Rituximab Tolerance in Cancerous B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Benyamin; Krogh, Louise Bechmann; Laursen, Maria Bach; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Marques, Sara Correia; Dybkær, Karen; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by great genetic and clinical heterogeneity which complicates prognostic prediction and influences treatment efficacy. The most common regimen, R-CHOP, consists of a combination of anthracycline- and immuno-based drugs including Rituximab. It remains elusive how and to which extent genetic variability impacts the response and potential tolerance to R-CHOP. Hence, an improved understanding of mechanisms leading to drug tolerance in B-cells is crucial, and modelling by genetic intervention directly in B-cells is fundamental in such investigations. Lentivirus-based gene vectors are widely used gene vehicles, which in B-cells are an attractive alternative to potentially toxic transfection-based methodologies. Here, we investigate the use of VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in B-cells for exploring the impact of microRNAs on tolerance to Rituximab. Notably, we find that robust lentiviral transduction of cancerous B-cell lines markedly and specifically enhances the resistance of transduced germinal center B-cells (GCBs) to Rituximab. Although Rituximab works partially through complement-mediated cell lysis, increased tolerance is not achieved through effects of lentiviral transduction on cell death mediated by complement. Rather, reduced levels of PARP1 and persistent high levels of CD43 in Rituximab-treated GCBs demonstrate anti-apoptotic effects of lentiviral transduction that may interfere with the outcome and interpretation of Rituximab tolerance studies. Our findings stress that caution should be exercised exploiting lentiviral vectors in studies of tolerance to therapeutics in DLBCL. Importantly, however, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the lentiviral gene delivery platform in studies addressing the impact of specific microRNAs on Rituximab responsiveness. PMID:27045839

  4. Surface engineering of lentiviral vectors for gene transfer into gene therapy target cells.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Camille; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-10-01

    Since they allow gene integration into their host genome, lentiviral vectors (LVs) have strong therapeutic potentials, as emphasized by recent clinical trials. The surface-display of the pantropic vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G) on LVs resulted in powerful tools for fundamental and clinical research. However, improved LVs are required either to genetically modify cell types not permissive to classical VSV-G-LVs or to restrict entry to specific cell types. Incorporation of heterologous viral glycoproteins (gps) on LVs often require modification of their cytoplasmic tails and ligands can be inserted into their ectodomain to target LVs to specific receptors. Recently, measles virus (MV) gps have been identified as strong candidates for LV-retargeting to multiple cell types, with the potential to evolve toward clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immune modulation by genetic modification of dendritic cells with lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Bricogne, Christopher; Lanna, Alessio; Dufait, Inès; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Laranga, Roberta; Padella, Antonella; Arce, Frederick; Baratchian, Mehdi; Ramirez, Natalia; Lopez, Natalia; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Guerrero-Setas, David; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2013-09-01

    Our work over the past eight years has focused on the use of HIV-1 lentiviral vectors (lentivectors) for the genetic modification of dendritic cells (DCs) to control their functions in immune modulation. DCs are key professional antigen presenting cells which regulate the activity of most effector immune cells, including T, B and NK cells. Their genetic modification provides the means for the development of targeted therapies towards cancer and autoimmune disease. We have been modulating with lentivectors the activity of intracellular signalling pathways and co-stimulation during antigen presentation to T cells, to fine-tune the type and strength of the immune response. In the course of our research, we have found unexpected results such as the surprising immunosuppressive role of anti-viral signalling pathways, and the close link between negative co-stimulation in the immunological synapse and T cell receptor trafficking. Here we review our major findings and put them into context with other published work.

  6. Establishment of mouse leukemia cell lines expressing human CD4/CCR5 using lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jing; ZhuGe, Fu-Yan; Zeng, Chang-Chun; He, Jin-Yang; Tan, Ning; Liang, Juan

    2017-04-01

    A low-cost rodent model of HIV infection and which presents high application value is an effective tool to investigate HIV infection and pathogenesis. However, development of such a small animal model has been hampered by the unsuitability of rodent cells for HIV-1 replication given that the retrovirus HIV-1 has high selectivity to its host cell. Our study used the mouse leukemia cell lines L615 and L1210 that were induced by murine leukemia virus and transfected with hCD4/CCR5 loaded-lentiviral vector. Lentiviral vectors containing the genes hCD4/CCR5 under the transcriptional control of cytomegalovirus promoter were designed. Transfection efficiencies of human CD4 and CCR5 in L615 and L1210 cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay. Results showed that hCD4 and CCR5 proteins were expressed on the cell surface, demonstrating that the L615 and L1210 cells were humanized and that they possess the characteristics necessary for HIV infection of human host cells. Moreover, the sensitivity of human CD4/CCR5 transgenic mouse cells to HIV infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Mouse leukemia cell lines that could express hCD4 and CCR5 were thus established to facilitate normal entry of HIV-1 so that a human CD4/CCR5 transgenic mice cell model can be used to investigate the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS and potential antiviral drugs against this disease.

  7. Production of germline transgenic pigs co-expressing double fluorescent proteins by lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yu; Zhu, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Fu-Xian; Huang, Jing; Hu, Xiao-Rui; Pan, Jian-Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Genomic integration of transgene by lentiviral vector has been proved an efficient method to produce single-transgenic animals. But it failed to create multi-gene transgenic offspring. Here, we have exploited lentivirus to generate the double-transgenic piglets through the female germline. The recombinant lentivirus containing fluorescent proteins genes (DsRed1 and Venus) were injected into the perivitelline space of 2-cell stage in vitro porcine embryos. Compared to control group, there was no significantly decreased in the proportion of blastocysts, and the two fluorescent protein genes were co-expressed in almost all the injected embryos. Total of 32 injected in vitro embryos were transferred to 2 recipients. One recipient gave birth of three live offspring, and one female piglet was identified as genomic transgene integration by PCR analysis. Subsequently, the female transgenic founder was mated naturally with a wild-type boar and gave birth of two litters of total 23 F(1) generation piglets, among which Venus and DsRed1 genes were detected in 11 piglets and 10 kinds of organs by PCR and RT-PCR respectively. The co-expression of two fluorescent proteins was visible in four different frozen tissue sections from the RT-PCR positive piglets, and 3 to 5 copies of the transgenes were detected to be integrated into the second generation genome by southern blotting analysis. The transgenes were heritable and stably integrated in the F(1) generation. The results indicated for the first time that lentiviral vector combined with natural mating has the potential to become a simple and practical technology to create germline double-transgenic livestock or biomedical animals.

  8. Optimized Lentiviral Vector Design Improves Titer and Transgene Expression of Vectors Containing the Chicken β-Globin Locus HS4 Insulator Element

    PubMed Central

    Hanawa, Hideki; Yamamoto, Motoko; Zhao, Huifen; Shimada, Takashi; Persons, Derek A

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell gene therapy using retroviral vectors has achieved success in clinical trials. However, safety issues regarding vector insertional mutagenesis have emerged. In two different trials, vector insertion resulted in the transcriptional activation of proto-oncogenes. One strategy for potentially diminishing vector insertional mutagenesis is through the use of self-inactivating lentiviral vectors containing the 1.2-kb insulator element derived from the chicken β-globin locus. However, use of this element can dramatically decrease both vector titer and transgene expression, thereby compromising its practical use. Here, we studied lentiviral vectors containing either the full-length 1.2-kb insulator or the smaller 0.25-kb core element in both orientations in the partially deleted long-terminal repeat. We show that use of the 0.25-kb core insulator rescued vector titer by alleviating a postentry block to reverse transcription associated with the 1.2-kb element. In addition, in an orientation-dependent manner, the 0.25-kb core element significantly increased transgene expression from an internal promoter due to improved transcriptional termination. This element also demonstrated barrier activity, reducing variability of expression due to position effects. As it is known that the 0.25-kb core insulator has enhancer-blocking activity, this particular insulated lentiviral vector design may be useful for clinical application. PMID:19223867

  9. Lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of Sox9 protected chondrocytes from IL-1β induced degeneration and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Chen, Mingwei; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    To explore whether the over-expression of Sry-related HMG box (Sox9) in degenerative chondrocytes is able to improve cell regeneration and protects cells from inflammation induced apoptosis, we generated a Sox9 over-expressing vector delivery system in which the Sox9 gene was inserted into a lentiviral vector. After infecting mouse chondrocytes with the Sox9-encoding vector, we observed a high level of gene transduction efficiency and achieved a high level of Sox9 expression in the infected chondrocytes. To explore whether over-expression of Sox9 is able to induce cell regeneration and improve cell survival, we induced Sox9 over-expression by lentiviral vector infection 48 hours before IL-1β treatment. The cells were infected with the reporter gene GFP-encoded lentiviral vector as a negative control or left uninfected. 48-hours after IL-1β treatment, the chrondrocytes treated with IL-1β alone, underwent a degenerative process, with elevated expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and ALP, but the cell specific anabolic proteins collagen II and aggrecan were significantly suppressed. The cells infected with the GFP reporter vector had no increased regeneration after IL-1β treatment. The results indicated that Sox9 is an important chondrocyte transcription factor, promoting chondrocyte regeneration and cell survival, which were mediated through affecting multiple cell differentiation as well as anti-apoptotic signaling pathways.

  10. Dystrophin Delivery to Muscles of mdx Mice Using Lentiviral Vectors Leads to Myogenic Progenitor Targeting and Stable Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, En; Li, Sheng; Gregorevic, Paul; Fall, Brent M; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    To explore whether stable transduction of myogenic stem cells using lentiviral vectors could be of benefit for treating dystrophic muscles, we generated vectors expressing a functional microdystrophin/enhanced green fluorescence protein fusion (µDys/eGFP) gene. Lentiviral vector injection into neonatal mdx4cv muscles resulted in widespread and stable expression of dystrophin for at least 2 years. This expression resulted in a significant amelioration of muscle pathophysiology as assessed by a variety of histological and functional assays. To assess whether this long-term expression was accompanied by stable transduction of satellite cells, we harvested muscle mononuclear cells 1 year after vector injection. Up to 20% of the cultured myoblast colonies expressed the µDys/eGFP transgene following myotube formation. Furthermore, transplantation of the muscle mononuclear cells into secondary mdx4cv recipients showed their ability to regenerate dystrophin-expressing myofibers in vivo. The ability to isolate myogenic cells able to form dystrophin-positive myotubes or myofibers in vitro and in vivo >1 year postinjection indicates that the vectors stably transduced muscle satellite cells, or a progenitor of such cells, in neonatal mdx4cv muscles. These studies suggest that integrating lentiviral vectors have potential utility for gene therapy of muscular dystrophy. PMID:19888194

  11. Towards a Safer, More Randomized Lentiviral Vector Integration Profile Exploring Artificial LEDGF Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Vranckx, Lenard S.; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to integrate transgenes into the host cell genome makes retroviral vectors an interesting tool for gene therapy. Although stable insertion resulted in successful correction of several monogenic disorders, it also accounts for insertional mutagenesis, a major setback in otherwise successful clinical gene therapy trials due to leukemia development in a subset of treated patients. Despite improvements in vector design, their use is still not risk-free. Lentiviral vector (LV) integration is directed into active transcription units by LEDGF/p75, a host-cell protein co-opted by the viral integrase. We engineered LEDGF/p75-based hybrid tethers in an effort to elicit a more random integration pattern to increase biosafety, and potentially reduce proto-oncogene activation. We therefore truncated LEDGF/p75 by deleting the N-terminal chromatin-reading PWWP-domain, and replaced this domain with alternative pan-chromatin binding peptides. Expression of these LEDGF-hybrids in LEDGF-depleted cells efficiently rescued LV transduction and resulted in LV integrations that distributed more randomly throughout the host-cell genome. In addition, when considering safe harbor criteria, LV integration sites for these LEDGF-hybrids distributed more safely compared to LEDGF/p75-mediated integration in wild-type cells. This approach should be broadly applicable to introduce therapeutic or suicide genes for cell therapy, such as patient-specific iPS cells. PMID:27788138

  12. Lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of human neural progenitor cells for ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Capowski, Elizabeth E; Schneider, Bernard L; Ebert, Allison D; Seehus, Corey R; Szulc, Jolanta; Zufferey, Romain; Aebischer, Patrick; Svendsen, Clive N

    2007-07-30

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) hold great potential as an ex vivo system for delivery of therapeutic proteins to the central nervous system. When cultured as aggregates, termed neurospheres, hNPC are capable of significant in vitro expansion. In the current study, we present a robust method for lentiviral vector-mediated gene delivery into hNPC that maintains the differentiation and proliferative properties of neurosphere cultures while minimizing the amount of viral vector used and controlling the number of insertion sites per population. This method results in long-term, stable expression even after differentiation of the hNPC to neurons and astrocytes and allows for generation of equivalent transgenic populations of hNPC. In addition, the in vitro analysis presented predicts the behavior of transgenic lines in vivo when transplanted into a rodent model of Parkinson's disease. The methods presented provide a powerful tool for assessing the impact of factors such as promoter systems or different transgenes on the therapeutic utility of these cells.

  13. Lent-On-Plus Lentiviral vectors for conditional expression in human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Benabdellah, Karim; Muñoz, Pilar; Cobo, Marién; Gutierrez-Guerrero, Alejandra; Sánchez-Hernández, Sabina; Garcia-Perez, Angélica; Anderson, Per; Carrillo-Gálvez, Ana Belén; Toscano, Miguel G; Martin, Francisco

    2016-11-17

    Conditional transgene expression in human stem cells has been difficult to achieve due to the low efficiency of existing delivery methods, the strong silencing of the transgenes and the toxicity of the regulators. Most of the existing technologies are based on stem cells clones expressing appropriate levels of tTA or rtTA transactivators (based on the TetR-VP16 chimeras). In the present study, we aim the generation of Tet-On all-in-one lentiviral vectors (LVs) that tightly regulate transgene expression in human stem cells using the original TetR repressor. By using appropriate promoter combinations and shielding the LVs with the Is2 insulator, we have constructed the Lent-On-Plus Tet-On system that achieved efficient transgene regulation in human multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. The generation of inducible stem cell lines with the Lent-ON-Plus LVs did not require selection or cloning, and transgene regulation was maintained after long-term cultured and upon differentiation toward different lineages. To our knowledge, Lent-On-Plus is the first all-in-one vector system that tightly regulates transgene expression in bulk populations of human pluripotent stem cells and its progeny.

  14. Lent-On-Plus Lentiviral vectors for conditional expression in human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Benabdellah, Karim; Muñoz, Pilar; Cobo, Marién; Gutierrez-Guerrero, Alejandra; Sánchez-Hernández, Sabina; Garcia-Perez, Angélica; Anderson, Per; Carrillo-Gálvez, Ana Belén; Toscano, Miguel G.; Martin, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Conditional transgene expression in human stem cells has been difficult to achieve due to the low efficiency of existing delivery methods, the strong silencing of the transgenes and the toxicity of the regulators. Most of the existing technologies are based on stem cells clones expressing appropriate levels of tTA or rtTA transactivators (based on the TetR-VP16 chimeras). In the present study, we aim the generation of Tet-On all-in-one lentiviral vectors (LVs) that tightly regulate transgene expression in human stem cells using the original TetR repressor. By using appropriate promoter combinations and shielding the LVs with the Is2 insulator, we have constructed the Lent-On-Plus Tet-On system that achieved efficient transgene regulation in human multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. The generation of inducible stem cell lines with the Lent-ON-Plus LVs did not require selection or cloning, and transgene regulation was maintained after long-term cultured and upon differentiation toward different lineages. To our knowledge, Lent-On-Plus is the first all-in-one vector system that tightly regulates transgene expression in bulk populations of human pluripotent stem cells and its progeny. PMID:27853296

  15. Durable, safe, multi-gene lentiviral vector expression in feline trabecular meshwork.

    PubMed

    Khare, Pranay D; Loewen, Nils; Teo, Wulin; Barraza, Román A; Saenz, Dyana T; Johnson, Douglas H; Poeschla, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    Multiple disease-specific considerations have led to interest in the potential of gene therapy to permanently correct elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), the main causal risk factor for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Since IOP elevation results from abnormal resistance to aqueous humor outflow from the eye through the trabecular meshwork (TM), a means to genetically modify this specialized outflow organ permanently and safely is a prioritized goal. Here we tested different lentiviral vector designs and doses for long-term transgene expression in a large animal model, and investigated whether exogenously introduced myocilin proteins influenced IOP. The anterior chambers of 18 domestic cats (36 eyes) were injected with dual-gene feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vectors. Substantial, well-tolerated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was achieved in TM and monitored non-invasively in vivo for 1.2-2.3 years, using both 5' cap-translation and internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-translation. In all 36 eyes, post-mortem examination revealed substantial TM transgene expression (which often greatly exceeded that observable non-invasively during life). However, co-expression with enhanced GFP of myocilin or a juvenile glaucoma-associated mutant myocilin did not elevate IOP. These results demonstrate a safe, long-term single and dual gene expression in TM and establish an experimental system for testing candidate therapeutic transgenes for POAG.

  16. [Construction and expression of recombinant lentiviral vectors of AKT2,PDK1 and BAD].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Chen, Bo-Jiang; Huang, Na; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-03-01

    To construct human protein kinase B (ATK2), phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and bcl-2-associated death protein (BAD) lentiviral expression vector, and to determine their expressions in 293T cells. Total RNA was extracted from lung cancer tissues. The full-length coding regions of human ATK2, BAD and PDK1 cDNA were amplified via RT-PCR using specific primers, subcloned into PGEM-Teasy and then sequenced for confirmation. The full-length coding sequence was cut out with a specific restriction enzyme digest and subclone into pCDF1-MCS2-EF1-copGFP. The plasmids were transfected into 293T cells using the calcium phosphate method. The over expression of AKT2, BAD and PDK1 were detected by Western blot. AKT2, PDK1 and BAD were subcloned into pCDF1-MCS2-EF1-copGFP, with an efficiency of transfection of 100%, 95%, and 90% respectively. The virus titers were 6.7 x 10(6) PFU/mL in the supernatant. After infection, the proteins of AKT2, PDK1 and BAD were detected by Western blot. The lentivial vector pCDF1-MCS2-EF1-copGFP containing AKT2, BAD and PDK1 were successfully constructed and expressed in 293T cells.

  17. Lentiviral vectors for induction of self-differentiation and conditional ablation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pincha, M; Salguero, G; Wedekind, D; Sundarasetty, B S; Lin, A; Kasahara, N; Brugman, M H; Jirmo, A C; Modlich, U; Gutzmer, R; Büsche, G; Ganser, A; Stripecke, R

    2011-01-01

    Development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) in the field of immunotherapy and immune regeneration will strongly rely on biosafety of the gene transfer. We demonstrated previously the feasibility of ex vivo genetic programming of mouse bone marrow precursors with LVs encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), which induced autonomous differentiation of long-lived dendritic cells (DCs), referred to as self-differentiated myeloid-derived antigen-presenting-cells reactive against tumors (SMART-DCs). Here, LV biosafety was enhanced by using a DC-restricted and physiological promoter, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II promoter, and including co-expression of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (sr39HSV-TK) conditional suicide gene. Tricistronic vectors co-expressing sr39HSV-TK, GM-CSF and IL-4 transcriptionally regulated by the MHCII promoter or the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were compared. Despite the different gene transfer effects, such as the kinetics, levels of transgene expression and persistency of integrated vector copies, both vectors induced highly viable SMART-DCs, which persisted for at least 70 days in vivo and could be ablated with the pro-drug Ganciclovir (GCV). SMART-DCs co-expressing the tyrosine-related protein 2 melanoma antigen administered subcutaneously generated antigen-specific, anti-melanoma protective and therapeutic responses in the mouse B16 melanoma model. GCV administration after immunotherapy did not abrogate DC vaccination efficacy. This demonstrates proof-of-principle of genetically programmed DCs that can be ablated pharmacologically. PMID:21412283

  18. Transduction of ferret airway epithelia using a pre-treatment and lentiviral gene vector.

    PubMed

    Cmielewski, Patricia; Farrow, Nigel; Donnelley, Martin; McIntyre, Chantelle; Penny-Dimri, Jahan; Kuchel, Tim; Parsons, David

    2014-11-21

    The safety and efficiency of gene therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) need to be assessed in pre-clinical models. Using the normal ferret, this study sought to determine whether ferret airway epithelia could be transduced with a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) pre-treatment followed by a VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 based lentiviral (LV) vector, in preparation for future studies in CF ferrets. Six normal ferrets (7 -8 weeks old) were treated with a 150 μL LPC pre-treatment, followed one hour later by a 500 μL LV vector dose containing the LacZ transgene. LacZ gene expression in the conducting airways and lung was assessed by X-gal staining after 7 days. The presence of transduction in the lung, as well as off-target transduction in the liver, spleen and gonads, were assessed by qPCR. The levels of LV vector p24 protein bio-distribution in blood sera were assessed by ELISA at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The dosing protocol was well tolerated. LacZ gene expression was observed en face in the trachea of all animals. Histology showed that ciliated and basal cells were transduced in the trachea, with rare LacZ transduced single cells noted in lung. p24 levels was not detectable in the sera of 5 of the 6 animals. The LacZ gene was not detected in the lung tissue and no off-target transduction was detected by qPCR. This study shows that ferret airway epithelia are transducible using our unique two-step pre-treatment and LV vector dosing protocol. We have identified a number of unusual anatomical factors that are likely to influence the level of transduction that can be achieved in ferret airways. The ability to transduce ferret airway epithelium is a promising step towards therapeutic LV-CFTR testing in a CF ferret model.

  19. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  20. Generation of an Optimized Lentiviral Vector Encoding a High-Expression Factor VIII Transgene for Gene Therapy of Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer M.; Denning, Gabriela; Doering, Christopher B.; Spencer, H. Trent

    2012-01-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: 1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), 2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems, and 3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1α), cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE. PMID:22996197

  1. B-cell reconstitution after lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy in patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castiello, Maria Carmina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Pala, Francesca; Ferrua, Francesca; Uva, Paolo; Brigida, Immacolata; Sereni, Lucia; van der Burg, Mirjam; Ottaviano, Giorgio; Albert, Michael H; Grazia Roncarolo, Maria; Naldini, Luigi; Aiuti, Alessandro; Villa, Anna; Bosticardo, Marita

    2015-09-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections, and susceptibility to autoimmunity and lymphomas. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice; however, administration of WAS gene-corrected autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been demonstrated as a feasible alternative therapeutic approach. Because B-cell homeostasis is perturbed in patients with WAS and restoration of immune competence is one of the main therapeutic goals, we have evaluated reconstitution of the B-cell compartment in 4 patients who received autologous hematopoietic stem cells transduced with lentiviral vector after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen combined with anti-CD20 administration. We evaluated B-cell counts, B-cell subset distribution, B cell-activating factor and immunoglobulin levels, and autoantibody production before and after gene therapy (GT). WAS gene transfer in B cells was assessed by measuring vector copy numbers and expression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. After lentiviral vector-mediated GT, the number of transduced B cells progressively increased in the peripheral blood of all patients. Lentiviral vector-transduced progenitor cells were able to repopulate the B-cell compartment with a normal distribution of B-cell subsets both in bone marrow and the periphery, showing a WAS protein expression profile similar to that of healthy donors. In addition, after GT, we observed a normalized frequency of autoimmune-associated CD19(+)CD21(-)CD35(-) and CD21(low) B cells and a reduction in B cell-activating factor levels. Immunoglobulin serum levels and autoantibody production improved in all treated patients. We provide evidence that lentiviral vector-mediated GT induces transgene expression in the B-cell compartment, resulting in ameliorated B-cell development and functionality and contributing to immunologic improvement in patients with WAS. Copyright

  2. Rescue of splicing-mediated intron loss maximizes expression in lentiviral vectors containing the human ubiquitin C promoter.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Aaron R; Lill, Georgia R; Gschweng, Eric H; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors almost universally use heterologous internal promoters to express transgenes. One of the most commonly used promoter fragments is a 1.2-kb sequence from the human ubiquitin C (UBC) gene, encompassing the promoter, some enhancers, first exon, first intron and a small part of the second exon of UBC. Because splicing can occur after transcription of the vector genome during vector production, we investigated whether the intron within the UBC promoter fragment is faithfully transmitted to target cells. Genetic analysis revealed that more than 80% of proviral forms lack the intron of the UBC promoter. The human elongation factor 1 alpha (EEF1A1) promoter fragment intron was not lost during lentiviral packaging, and this difference between the UBC and EEF1A1 promoter introns was conferred by promoter exonic sequences. UBC promoter intron loss caused a 4-fold reduction in transgene expression. Movement of the expression cassette to the opposite strand prevented intron loss and restored full expression. This increase in expression was mostly due to non-classical enhancer activity within the intron, and movement of putative intronic enhancer sequences to multiple promoter-proximal sites actually repressed expression. Reversal of the UBC promoter also prevented intron loss and restored full expression in bidirectional lentiviral vectors.

  3. Autoregulatory lentiviral vectors allow multiple cycles of doxycycline-inducible gene expression in human hematopoietic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Centlivre, M; Zhou, X; Pouw, S M; Weijer, K; Kleibeuker, W; Das, A T; Blom, B; Seppen, J; Berkhout, B; Legrand, N

    2010-01-01

    The efficient control of gene expression in vivo from lentiviral vectors remains technically challenging. To analyze inducible gene expression in a human setting, we generated 'human immune system' (HIS) mice by transplanting newborn BALB/c Rag2(-/-)IL-2Rgamma(c)(-/-) immunodeficient mice with human hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vector. We compared several methods of doxycycline delivery to mice, and could accurately measure doxycycline in vivo using a new sensitive detection assay. Two different lentiviral vector designs with constitutive (TRECMV-V14) or autoregulatory (TREAuto-V14) expression of an optimized reverse tetracycline transactivator were used to transduce human hematopoietic stem cells. After transplantation into immunodeficient mice, we analyzed the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in the human hematopoiesis-derived cells that develop and accumulate in the generated HIS mice. We show efficient inducible GFP expression in adult HIS mice containing TREAuto-V14-transduced human cells, whereas GFP expression is poor with the TRECMV-V14 vector. Multiple cycles of doxycycline exposure in the TREAuto-V14 group result in repeated cycles of GFP expression with no loss of intensity. These findings are of major interest for gene therapy and basic research settings that require inducible gene expression.

  4. Development of an enhanced B-specific lentiviral vector expressing BTK: a tool for gene therapy of XLA.

    PubMed

    Moreau, T; Barlogis, V; Bardin, F; Nunes, J A; Calmels, B; Chabannon, C; Tonnelle, C

    2008-06-01

    Further development of haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy will depend on enhancement of gene transfer safety: ad hoc improvement of vector design relating to each particular disease is thus a crucial issue for HSC gene therapy. We modified a previously described lentiviral vector by adding the Emumar B-specific enhancer to a human CD19 promoter-derived sequence (Mol Ther 2004;10:45-56). We thus significantly improved the level of expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene while retaining the specificity of expression in B-cell progeny of transduced human CD34+ progenitor cells obtained from cord blood or adult bone marrow. Indeed, GFP was strongly expressed from early medullary pro-B cells to splenic mature B cells whereas transgene expression remained low in transduced immature progenitors as in myeloid and T-lymphoid progeny retrieved from xenografted NOD/SCID/gammac(null) mice. Using this lentiviral vector, we further demonstrated the possibility to express a functional human BTK protein in long-term human CD34+ cell B-lymphoid progeny. This newly designed lentiviral vector fulfils one of the pre-requisites for the development of efficient and safe gene therapy for X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, the most common primary humoral immunodeficiency disorder.

  5. Characterization of a third generation lentiviral vector pseudotyped with Nipah virus envelope proteins for endothelial cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Witting, S R; Vallanda, P; Gamble, A L

    2013-10-01

    Lentiviruses are becoming progressively more popular as gene therapy vectors due to their ability to integrate into quiescent cells and recent clinical trial successes. Directing these vectors to specific cell types and limiting off-target transduction in vivo remains a challenge. Replacing the viral envelope proteins responsible for cellular binding, or pseudotyping, remains a common method to improve lentiviral targeting. Here, we describe the development of a high titer, third generation lentiviral vector pseudotyped with Nipah virus fusion protein (NiV-F) and attachment protein (NiV-G). Critical to high titers was truncation of the cytoplasmic domains of both NiV-F and NiV-G. As known targets of wild-type Nipah virus, primary endothelial cells are shown to be effectively transduced by the Nipah pseudotype. In contrast, human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors were not significantly transduced. Additionally, the Nipah pseudotype has increased stability in human serum compared with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped lentivirus. These findings suggest that the use of Nipah virus envelope proteins in third generation lentiviral vectors would be a valuable tool for gene delivery targeted to endothelial cells.

  6. Clinical-scale lentiviral vector transduction of PBL for TCR gene therapy and potential for expression in less differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shicheng; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In human gene therapy applications, lentiviral vectors may have advantages over gamma-retroviral vectors because of their ability to transduce non-dividing cells, their resistance to gene silencing, and a lack of integration site preference. In this study, we utilized VSV-G pseudotype third generation lentiviral vectors harboring specific anti-tumor T-cell receptor (TCR) to establish clinical-scale lentiviral transduction of PBL. Spinoculation (1000 × g, 32°C for 2 h) in the presence of protamine sulfate represents the most efficient and economical approach to transduce a large number of PBLs compared to RetroNectin-based methods. Up to 20 million cells per well of a 6-well plate were efficiently transduced and underwent an average 50-fold expansion in two weeks. TCR transduced PBL mediated specific anti-tumor activities including IFN-γ release and cell lysis. Compared to gamma-retroviral vectors, the TCR transgene could be preferentially expressed on a less-differentiated cell population. PMID:18833004

  7. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Correction of a Mouse Model of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I.

    PubMed

    Leon-Rico, Diego; Aldea, Montserrat; Sanchez-Baltasar, Raquel; Mesa-Nuñez, Cristina; Record, Julien; Burns, Siobhan O; Santilli, Giorgia; Thrasher, Adrian J; Bueren, Juan A; Almarza, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the ITGB2 gene and is characterized by recurrent and life-threatening bacterial infections. These mutations lead to defective or absent expression of β2 integrins on the leukocyte surface, compromising adhesion and extravasation at sites of infection. Three different lentiviral vectors (LVs) conferring ubiquitous or preferential expression of CD18 in myeloid cells were constructed and tested in human and mouse LAD-I cells. All three hCD18-LVs restored CD18 and CD11a membrane expression in LAD-I patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Corrected cells recovered the ability to aggregate and bind to sICAM-1 after stimulation. All vectors induced stable hCD18 expression in hematopoietic cells from mice with a hypomorphic Itgb2 mutation (CD18(HYP)), both in vitro and in vivo after transplantation of corrected cells into primary and secondary CD18(HYP) recipients. hCD18(+) hematopoietic cells from transplanted CD18(HYP) mice also showed restoration of mCD11a surface co-expression. The analysis of in vivo neutrophil migration in CD18(HYP) mice subjected to two different inflammation models demonstrated that the LV-mediated gene therapy completely restored neutrophil extravasation in response to inflammatory stimuli. Finally, these vectors were able to correct the phenotype of human myeloid cells derived from CD34(+) progenitors defective in ITGB2 expression. These results support for the first time the use of hCD18-LVs for the treatment of LAD-I patients in clinical trials.

  8. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Correction of a Mouse Model of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Rico, Diego; Aldea, Montserrat; Sanchez-Baltasar, Raquel; Mesa-Nuñez, Cristina; Record, Julien; Burns, Siobhan O.; Santilli, Giorgia; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Bueren, Juan A.; Almarza, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the ITGB2 gene and is characterized by recurrent and life-threatening bacterial infections. These mutations lead to defective or absent expression of β2 integrins on the leukocyte surface, compromising adhesion and extravasation at sites of infection. Three different lentiviral vectors (LVs) conferring ubiquitous or preferential expression of CD18 in myeloid cells were constructed and tested in human and mouse LAD-I cells. All three hCD18-LVs restored CD18 and CD11a membrane expression in LAD-I patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Corrected cells recovered the ability to aggregate and bind to sICAM-1 after stimulation. All vectors induced stable hCD18 expression in hematopoietic cells from mice with a hypomorphic Itgb2 mutation (CD18HYP), both in vitro and in vivo after transplantation of corrected cells into primary and secondary CD18HYP recipients. hCD18+ hematopoietic cells from transplanted CD18HYP mice also showed restoration of mCD11a surface co-expression. The analysis of in vivo neutrophil migration in CD18HYP mice subjected to two different inflammation models demonstrated that the LV-mediated gene therapy completely restored neutrophil extravasation in response to inflammatory stimuli. Finally, these vectors were able to correct the phenotype of human myeloid cells derived from CD34+ progenitors defective in ITGB2 expression. These results support for the first time the use of hCD18-LVs for the treatment of LAD-I patients in clinical trials. PMID:27056660

  9. Targeted expression of two proteins in neural retina using self-inactivating, insulated lentiviral vectors carrying two internal independent promoters.

    PubMed

    Semple-Rowland, Susan L; Eccles, Kristofer S; Humberstone, Elizabeth J

    2007-10-18

    There is increasing interest in developing viral vectors capable of reliably delivering multiple therapeutic genes to targeted cell populations. Currently, bicistronic vectors carrying two transgenes linked by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) are the most commonly employed vectors to accomplish this goal. We and others have found that the protein encoded downstream of the IRES in these vectors is not reliably expressed. The purpose of this study was to determine if replacement of the IRES in our self-inactivating, insulated, lentiviral vectors with a second, independent, cell-specific promoter would produce a vector that reliably expressed two proteins in targeted retinal cells in vivo. Five dual promoter lentiviral vectors were constructed using our self-inactivating (SIN), insulated, lentiviral backbone. Each vector carried two independent transgenes encoding a fluorescent protein (GFP or tdTomato) whose expression was driven by three photoreceptor promoters (interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein-IRPB1783; guanylate cyclase activating protein 1-GCAP292; rhodopsin-mOP500) and one ubiquitously expressed promoter (elongation factor 1alpha-EF1alpha). Constructs were packaged and injected into the optic vesicles of developing chicken embryos. The day before hatching, the retinas were removed and examined as whole mount tissues and as frozen sections using fluorescent microscopy. In our first experiment, we characterized the expression of the three photoreceptor promoters in chicken retina. The activities of GCAP292 and IRBP1783 were restricted to cone cells. GCAP292 was also active in a small sub-group of inner nuclear cells. The activity of mOP500 was restricted to rod cells. In our second experiment, we characterized the activity of three dual promoter vectors: GCAP292-GFP-IRBP1783-tdTomato, IRBP-tdTomato-GCAP292-GFP, and IRBP1783-tdTomato-mOP500-GFP. All three vectors produced easily detectable levels of GFP and tdTomato in transduced retinas, a result

  10. New-generation multicistronic expression platform: pTRIDENT vectors containing size-optimized IRES elements enable homing endonuclease-based cistron swapping into lentiviral expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Fux, Cornelia; Langer, Dominik; Kelm, Jens M; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2004-04-20

    Capitalizing on a proven multicistronic expression vector platform we have designed novel pTRIDENT vectors which (1). enable coordinated expression of three desired transgenes, (2). are size-optimized, (3). take advantage of small highly efficient internal ribosome entry sites of the GTX or Rbm3 type, (4). harbor various sites specific for homing endonucleases facilitating promoter/multicistronic expression unit/polyadenylation site swapping as well as (5). straightforward integration into human HIV-l-based lentiviral expression vectors tailored to contain compatible homing endonucleases. Multicistronic expression profiles of novel pTRIDENT vectors engineered for different tricistronic expression configurations encoding human low-molecular-weight urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA(LMW)) or Bacillus stearothermophilus-derived alpha-amylase (SAMY), human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF), and human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) have been quantified in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), mouse fibroblasts (NIH/3T3), and/or human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells. In addition, a pTRIDENT-derived SAMY-VEGF-SEAP expression cassette transferred into a compatible lentiviral expression vector enabled simultaneous high-level transgene expression following transduction of transgenic lentiviral particles into primary human chondrocytes. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering from a single lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, Ami M; Ousterout, David G; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-10-29

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that manipulate the human genome and transcriptome have enabled rapid advances in biomedical research. In particular, the RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been engineered to create site-specific double-strand breaks for genome editing or to direct targeted transcriptional regulation. A unique capability of the CRISPR/Cas9 system is multiplex genome engineering by delivering a single Cas9 enzyme and two or more single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeted to distinct genomic sites. This approach can be used to simultaneously create multiple DNA breaks or to target multiple transcriptional activators to a single promoter for synergistic enhancement of gene induction. To address the need for uniform and sustained delivery of multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering tools, we developed a single lentiviral system to express a Cas9 variant, a reporter gene and up to four sgRNAs from independent RNA polymerase III promoters that are incorporated into the vector by a convenient Golden Gate cloning method. Each sgRNA is efficiently expressed and can mediate multiplex gene editing and sustained transcriptional activation in immortalized and primary human cells. This delivery system will be significant to enabling the potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based multiplex genome engineering in diverse cell types.

  12. Use of a Closed Culture System to Improve the Safety of Lentiviral Vector Production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaëtan; Durand, Sarah; Lindner, Véronique; Gossé, Francine; Zona, Laetitia; Certoux, Jean-Marie; Diana, Michele; Baumert, Thomas F; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick; Robinet, Eric

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the possibility of introducing a combination of six oncogenes into primary porcine hepatocytes (PPH) using a lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer in order to develop a porcine hepatocellular carcinoma model based on autologous transplantation of ex vivo-transformed hepatocytes. The six oncogenes were introduced into three plasmids, hence enabling the production of LVs encoding a luciferase reporter gene and hTERT+p53(DD), cyclinD1+CDK4(R24C), and c-myc(T58A)+HRas(G21V) genes, respectively. In order to improve the protection of the laboratory personnel manipulating such LVs, we used a compact cell culture cassette (CliniCell(®) device) as a closed cell culture system. We demonstrated that the CliniCell device allows to produce LVs, through plasmid transfection of 293T cells, and, after transfer to a second cassette, to transduce PPH with a similar efficacy as conventional open cell culture systems such as flasks or Petri dishes. Additionally, it is possible to cryopreserve at -80°C the transduced cells, directly in the CliniCell device used for the transduction. In conclusion, the use of a closed culture system for the safe handling of oncogene-encoding LVs lays the foundation for the development of porcine tumor models based on the autologous transplantation of ex vivo-transformed primary cells.

  13. Lentiviral vector PLV-PI3KCG gene transfer inhibits hypoxic cardiomyocytes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Xin-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt signal pathway was suggested to be associated with apoptosis. However, it was still unclear whether activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway could inhibit hypoxic cardiomyocytes apoptosis. In this research, the recombinant PI3KCG lentiviral vector plasmid (PLV-PI3KCG) was constructed and transfected into neonatal rat hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury cardiomyocytes models which were randomly divided into five groups as the normal control group, H/R group, HR empty plasmid group (HRE group), HR PLV-PI3KCG transfection preconditioning group (HRP group), and HR PLV-PI3KCG transfection + LY294002 group (HRPL group). Compared with the H/R, HRE and HRPL groups, the cardiomyocytes beat frequency and survival rate in the HRP group were significantly increased (P<0.05) and the released LDH were significantly decreased (P<0.05). The Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly lower in H/R, HRE and HRPL groups than that in HRP group (P<0.05). Activated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway could play a protection role in the cardiomyocytes H/R injury process which could be inhibited by LY294002. PMID:26884933

  14. Specific Marking of HIV-1 Positive Cells using a Rev-dependent Lentiviral Vector Expressing the Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuntao

    2010-01-01

    Most of HIV-responsive expression vectors are based on the HIV promoter, the long terminal repeat (LTR). While responsive to an early HIV protein, Tat, the LTR is also responsive to cellular activation states and to the local chromatin activity where the integration has occurred. This can result in high HIV-independent activity, and has restricted the usefulness of LTR-based reporter to mark HIV positive cells 1,2,3. Here, we constructed an expression lentiviral vector that possesses, in addition to the Tat-responsive LTR, numerous HIV DNA sequences that include the Rev-response element and HIV splicing sites 4,5,6. The vector was incorporated into a lentiviral reporter virus, permitting highly specific detection of replicating HIV in living cell populations. The activity of the vector was measured by expression of the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The application of this vector as reported here offers a novel alternative approach to existing methods, such as in situ PCR or HIV antigen staining, to identify HIV-positive cells. The vector can also express therapeutic genes for basic or clinical experimentation to target HIV-positive cells. PMID:20972394

  15. Lentiviral Vector Gene Transfer of Endostatin/Angiostatin for Macular Degeneration (GEM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Campochiaro, Peter A.; Lauer, Andreas K.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Mir, Tahreem A.; Naylor, Stuart; Anderton, Matthew C.; Kelleher, Michelle; Harrop, Richard; Ellis, Scott; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2017-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) is a prevalent cause of vision loss. Intraocular injections of VEGF-neutralizing proteins provide benefit, but many patients require frequent injections for a prolonged period. Benefits are often lost over time due to lapses in treatment. New treatments that sustain anti-angiogenic activity are needed. This study tested the safety and expression profile of a lentiviral Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) vector expressing endostatin and angiostatin (RetinoStat®). Patients with advanced NVAMD were enrolled at three centers in the United States, and the study eye received a subretinal injection of 2.4 × 104 (n = 3), 2.4 × 105 (n = 3), or 8.0 × 105 transduction units (TU; n = 15). Each of the doses was well-tolerated with no dose-limiting toxicities. There was little or no ocular inflammation. There was one procedure-related serious adverse event (AE), a macular hole, which was managed without difficulty and resolved. There was a vector dose-related increase in aqueous humor levels of endostatin and angiostatin with high reproducibility among subjects within cohorts. Mean levels of endostatin and angiostatin peaked between 12 and 24 weeks after injection of 2.4 × 105 TU or 8.0 × 105 TU at 57–81 ng/mL for endostatin and 15–27 ng/mL for angiostatin, and remained stable through the last measurement at week 48. Long-term follow-up demonstrated expression was maintained at last measurement (2.5 years in eight subjects and >4 years in two subjects). Despite an apparent reduction in fluorescein angiographic leakage that broadly correlated with the expression levels in the majority of patients, only one subject showed convincing evidence of anti-permeability activity in these late-stage patients. There was no significant change in mean lesion size in subjects injected with 8.0 × 105 TU. These data demonstrate that EIAV vectors provide a safe platform with robust and

  16. Lentiviral Vector Gene Transfer of Endostatin/Angiostatin for Macular Degeneration (GEM) Study.

    PubMed

    Campochiaro, Peter A; Lauer, Andreas K; Sohn, Elliott H; Mir, Tahreem A; Naylor, Stuart; Anderton, Matthew C; Kelleher, Michelle; Harrop, Richard; Ellis, Scott; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2017-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) is a prevalent cause of vision loss. Intraocular injections of VEGF-neutralizing proteins provide benefit, but many patients require frequent injections for a prolonged period. Benefits are often lost over time due to lapses in treatment. New treatments that sustain anti-angiogenic activity are needed. This study tested the safety and expression profile of a lentiviral Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) vector expressing endostatin and angiostatin (RetinoStat(®)). Patients with advanced NVAMD were enrolled at three centers in the United States, and the study eye received a subretinal injection of 2.4 × 10(4) (n = 3), 2.4 × 10(5) (n = 3), or 8.0 × 10(5) transduction units (TU; n = 15). Each of the doses was well-tolerated with no dose-limiting toxicities. There was little or no ocular inflammation. There was one procedure-related serious adverse event (AE), a macular hole, which was managed without difficulty and resolved. There was a vector dose-related increase in aqueous humor levels of endostatin and angiostatin with high reproducibility among subjects within cohorts. Mean levels of endostatin and angiostatin peaked between 12 and 24 weeks after injection of 2.4 × 10(5) TU or 8.0 × 10(5) TU at 57-81 ng/mL for endostatin and 15-27 ng/mL for angiostatin, and remained stable through the last measurement at week 48. Long-term follow-up demonstrated expression was maintained at last measurement (2.5 years in eight subjects and >4 years in two subjects). Despite an apparent reduction in fluorescein angiographic leakage that broadly correlated with the expression levels in the majority of patients, only one subject showed convincing evidence of anti-permeability activity in these late-stage patients. There was no significant change in mean lesion size in subjects injected with 8.0 × 10(5) TU. These data demonstrate that EIAV vectors provide a safe platform with robust

  17. Effects of vector backbone and pseudotype on lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer: studies in infant ADA-deficient mice and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro Sarracino, Denise; Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I; Martinez, Michele; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Geiger, Sabine; Kahl, Christoph A; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-10-01

    Systemic delivery of a lentiviral vector carrying a therapeutic gene represents a new treatment for monogenic disease. Previously, we have shown that transfer of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA in vivo rescues the lethal phenotype and reconstitutes immune function in ADA-deficient mice. In order to translate this approach to ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency patients, neonatal ADA-deficient mice and newborn rhesus monkeys were treated with species-matched and mismatched vectors and pseudotypes. We compared gene delivery by the HIV-1-based vector to murine γ-retroviral vectors pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein or murine retroviral envelopes in ADA-deficient mice. The vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors had the highest titer and resulted in the highest vector copy number in multiple tissues, particularly liver and lung. In monkeys, HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus vectors resulted in similar biodistribution in most tissues including bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lung. Simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotyped with the gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope produced 10- to 30-fold lower titers than the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein pseudotype, but had a similar tissue biodistribution and similar copy number in blood cells. The relative copy numbers achieved in mice and monkeys were similar when adjusted to the administered dose per kg. These results suggest that this approach can be scaled-up to clinical levels for treatment of ADA-deficient severe combined immune deficiency subjects with suboptimal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation options.

  18. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency.

  19. S/MAR sequence confers long-term mitotic stability on non-integrating lentiviral vector episomes without selection.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Santhosh Chakkaramakkil; Goloviznina, Natalya A; Skinner, Amy M; Lipps, Hans J; Kurre, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Insertional oncogene activation and aberrant splicing have proved to be major setbacks for retroviral stem cell gene therapy. Integrase-deficient human immunodeficiency virus-1-derived vectors provide a potentially safer approach, but their circular genomes are rapidly lost during cell division. Here we describe a novel lentiviral vector (LV) that incorporates human ß-interferon scaffold/matrix-associated region sequences to provide an origin of replication for long-term mitotic maintenance of the episomal LTR circles. The resulting 'anchoring' non-integrating lentiviral vector (aniLV) achieved initial transduction rates comparable with integrating vector followed by progressive establishment of long-term episomal expression in a subset of cells. Analysis of aniLV-transduced single cell-derived clones maintained without selective pressure for >100 rounds of cell division showed sustained transgene expression from episomes and provided molecular evidence for long-term episome maintenance. To evaluate aniLV performance in primary cells, we transduced lineage-depleted murine hematopoietic progenitor cells, observing GFP expression in clonogenic progenitor colonies and peripheral blood leukocyte chimerism following transplantation into conditioned hosts. In aggregate, our studies suggest that scaffold/matrix-associated region elements can serve as molecular anchors for non-integrating lentivector episomes, providing sustained gene expression through successive rounds of cell division and progenitor differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Fetal gene transfer using lentiviral vectors and the potential for germ cell transduction in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lee, C Chang I; Jimenez, Daniel F; Kohn, Donald B; Tarantal, Alice F

    2005-04-01

    Genetic modification of germ cells in somatic gene therapy protocols is a concern, particularly with fetal approaches. This study focused on the potential for germ cell gene transfer post-fetal gene delivery using a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein (VSV-G). Rhesus monkey fetuses (n = 47) were administered vector supernatant (10(7) infectious particles per fetus) via the intraperitoneal (IP), intrapulmonary (Ipu), or intracardiac routes (Ica) under ultrasound guidance. Tissue harvests were performed near term or 3 months postnatal age, and genomic DNA obtained to analyze for vector sequences from collected sections of gonads and gonadal cells obtained by laser capture microdissection (germ cells, stroma, epithelium). Results indicated no evidence of germ cell gene transfer in fetuses or infants with Ipu or Ica routes of administration. However, evidence of the transgene (1.33 +/- 0.78 enhanced green fluorescent protein [EGFP] copies per copy epsilon-globin) was found in females, but not males, when using the IP administration approach (p < 0.05). The highest EGFP copies were detected on the surface epithelium (p < 0.05). The results of these studies suggest that the HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector pseudotyped with VSV-G may transduce a subpopulation of gonadal cells in female fetuses with IP administration, whereas no evidence of gene transfer was shown to occur in males or with organ-targeting approaches.

  1. Modified HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors have an effect on viral transduction efficiency and gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, F; Kay, M A

    2001-09-01

    Gene transfer using lentiviral vectors has been recently shown to be enhanced with cis-acting elements in a cell-type-dependent manner in vivo. For this reason, the study reported here was designed to modify lentiviral vectors that express lacZ, human factor IX (FIX), or human alpha1-anti-trypsin (AAT) to study the effect of different cis DNA elements on transduction efficiencies. We found that incorporation of the central polypurine tract sequence (cppt) increased transduction efficiency in vitro while increasing the transduction of non-cell-cycling hepatocytes in vivo. C57Bl/6 scid mice that were administered lentiviral vectors devoid of the cppt (2 x 10(8) transducing units (T.U.)/mouse) had 81% of their lacZ-transduced hepatocytes colabeled with the cell cycle marker 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). In contrast, inclusion of the cppt reduced the colabeling in mouse hepatocytes by 50%. Further modifications in the lentiviral vectors were performed to enhance viral titer and gene expression. We found that the inclusion of a matrix attachment region (MAR) from immunoglobulin-kappa (Igkappa) significantly increased the transduction efficiency, as measured by transgene protein expression and proviral DNA copy number, compared with vectors without Igkappa MAR. In vitro studies using human hepatoma cells demonstrated a significant increase (two- to fourfold) in human AAT and human FIX production when the Igkappa MAR was incorporated. In vivo transduction of partially hepatectomized C57Bl/6 mice given an optimized lentiviral vector containing the cppt and Igkappa MAR (2 x 10(8) T.U./mouse) resulted in sustained therapeutic levels of serum FIX (approximately 65 ng/ml). Our study demonstrates the importance of cis-acting elements to enhancing the transduction ability of lentiviral vectors and the expression of vector transgenes.

  2. Retargeting vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors with enhanced stability by in situ synthesized polymer shell.

    PubMed

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2013-02-01

    The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus "targeting nanovirus." The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes.

  3. An inducible packaging cell system for safe, efficient lentiviral vector production in the absence of HIV-1 accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Pacchia, A L; Adelson, M E; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    2001-03-30

    Lentiviral vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) possess the ability to deliver exogenous genes to both dividing and nondividing cells and to subsequently establish a stable provirus in these target cells, which can allow long-term expression of the transferred gene. Herein we describe a stable packaging cell line that is devoid of HIV-1 tat, vif, vpr, vpu, and nef. In order to avoid any risk of cytotoxicity associated with constitutive expression of HIV-1 protease or the VSV-G envelope protein, transcription of the packaging and envelope constructs was tightly controlled by employing the ecdysone-inducible system. Using this cell line, we have been able to consistently generate concentrated pseudotyped vector virus stocks with titers in the range of 10(8) IU/ml, which can efficiently transduce actively dividing and growth-arrested cells in vitro. This novel packaging cell line for lentiviral vectors facilitates the production of high-titer virus stocks in the absence of replication-competent virus and provides us with an important tool for use in future gene transfer studies.

  4. Retargeting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors with Enhanced Stability by In Situ Synthesized Polymer Shell

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus “targeting nanovirus.” The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes. PMID:23327104

  5. Visualization and genetic modification of resident brain microglia using lentiviral vectors regulated by microRNA-9.

    PubMed

    Åkerblom, Malin; Sachdeva, Rohit; Quintino, Luis; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Chapman, Katie Z; Manfre, Giuseppe; Lindvall, Olle; Lundberg, Cecilia; Jakobsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Functional studies of resident microglia require molecular tools for their genetic manipulation. Here we show that microRNA-9-regulated lentiviral vectors can be used for the targeted genetic modification of resident microglia in the rodent brain. Using transgenic reporter mice, we demonstrate that murine microglia lack microRNA-9 activity, whereas most other cells in the brain express microRNA-9. Injection of microRNA-9-regulated vectors into the adult rat brain induces transgene expression specifically in cells with morphological features typical of ramified microglia. The majority of transgene-expressing cells colabels with the microglia marker Iba1. We use this approach to visualize and isolate activated resident microglia without affecting circulating and infiltrating monocytes or macrophages in an excitotoxic lesion model in rat striatum. The microRNA-9-regulated vectors described here are a straightforward and powerful tool that facilitates functional studies of resident microglia.

  6. Hybrid HIV/MSCV LTR enhances transgene expression of lentiviral vectors in human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, J K; Hoang, N; Vilardi, A M; Conrad, P; Emerson, S G; Gewirtz, A M

    2001-01-01

    HIV-based lentiviral vectors can transduce nondividing cells, an important advantage over murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors when transducing slowly dividing hematopoietic stem cells. However, we find that in human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, the HIV-based vectors with an internal cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter express transgenes 100- to 1,000-fold less than the MLV-based retroviral vector murine stem cell virus (MSCV). To increase the expression of the integrated lentivirus, we replaced CMV promoter with that of the Rous sarcoma virus or MSCV and obtained a modest augmentation in expression. A more dramatic effect was seen when the CMV enhancer/promoter was removed and the HIV long-terminal repeat (LTR) was replaced by a novel HIV/MSCV hybrid LTR. This vector retains the ability to transduce nondividing cells but now expresses its transgene (enhanced green fluorescent protein) 10- to 100-fold greater than the original HIV-based vector. When compared under identical conditions, the HIV vector with the hybrid LTR transduced a higher percentage of CD34(+) cells than the MSCV-based retroviral vector (19.4% versus 2.4%). The number of transduced cells and level of transgene expression remain constant over 5-8 weeks as determined by long-term culture-initiating cells, fluoresence-activated cell sorting, and nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency repopulation assay.

  7. Development of an equine-tropic replication-competent lentivirus assay for equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Farley, Daniel C; Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A; Evans, Nerys E; Miskin, James E; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2012-10-01

    The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical "equine-tropic" RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems.

  8. Hemophilia A gene therapy via intraosseous delivery of factor VIII-lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Carol H

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A (HemA) patients with repeated infusions of factor VIII (FVIII; abbreviated as F8 in constructs) is costly, inconvenient, and incompletely effective. In addition, approximately 25 % of treated patients develop anti-factor VIII immune responses. Gene therapy that can achieve long-term phenotypic correction without the complication of anti-factor VIII antibody formation is highly desired. Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in stable integration of FVIII gene into the host genome, leading to persistent therapeutic effect. However, ex vivo HSC gene therapy requires pre-conditioning which is highly undesirable for hemophilia patients. The recently developed novel methodology of direct intraosseous (IO) delivery of LVs can efficiently transduce bone marrow cells, generating high levels of transgene expression in HSCs. IO delivery of E-F8-LV utilizing a ubiquitous EF1α promoter generated initially therapeutic levels of FVIII, however, robust anti-FVIII antibody responses ensued neutralized functional FVIII activity in the circulation. In contrast, a single IO delivery of G-FVIII-LV utilizing a megakaryocytic-specific GP1bα promoter achieved platelet-specific FVIII expression, leading to persistent, partial correction of HemA in treated animals. Most interestingly, comparable therapeutic benefit with G-F8-LV was obtained in HemA mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. Platelets is an ideal IO delivery vehicle since FVIII stored in α-granules of platelets is protected from high-titer anti-FVIII antibodies; and that even relatively small numbers of activated platelets that locally excrete FVIII may be sufficient to promote efficient clot formation during bleeding. Additionally, combination of pharmacological agents improved transduction of LVs and persistence of transduced cells and transgene expression. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV can generate long-term stable

  9. The use of an optimized chimeric envelope glycoprotein enhances the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer of a pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soshi; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Tsuge, Hitomi; Uezono, Shiori; Nagaya, Kiyomi; Fijiwara, Maki; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takada, Masahiko

    2017-02-28

    Lentiviral vectors have been used not only for various basic research experiments, but also for a wide range of gene therapy trials in animal models. The development of a pseudotyped lentiviral vector with the property of retrograde infection allows us to introduce foreign genes into neurons that are localized in regions innervating the site of vector injection. Here, we report the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer of a recently developed FuG-E pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the primate brain by comparing its transduction pattern with that of the parental FuG-C pseudotyped vector. After injection of the FuG-E vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the striatum of macaque monkeys, many GFP-immunoreactive neurons were found in regions projecting to the striatum, such as the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and substantia nigra. Quantitative analysis revealed that in all regions, the number of neurons retrogradely transduced with the FuG-E vector was larger than in the FuG-C vector injection case. It was also confirmed that the FuG-E vector displayed explicit neuronal specificity to the same extent as the FuG-C vector. This vector might promote approaches to pathway-selective gene manipulation and provide a powerful tool for effective gene therapy trials against neurological disorders through enhanced retrograde delivery.

  10. Construction of stable producer cells to make high-titer lentiviral vectors for dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Lin; Chou, Michael; Dai, Bingbing; Xiao, Liang; Wang, Pin

    2012-06-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) enveloped with an engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein can specifically bind to dendritic cells (DCs) through the surface receptor DC-SIGN and induce antigen expression, thus providing an efficient method for delivering DC-directed vaccines. In this study, we constructed a stable producer line (LV-MGFP) for synthesizing DC-SIGN-targeted HIV-1-based LVs (DC-LVs) encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) by a concatemeric array transfection technique. We demonstrated that the established stable clones could routinely produce vector supernatants with titers above 10(7) transduction units per milliliter (TU/mL) during a continuous 3-month cell passage. The producer cells were also capable of generating similar titers of DC-LVs in serum-free medium. Moreover, the addition of 1-deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) enabled the producer cells to manufacture DC-LVs with both improved titers and enhanced potency to evoke antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in mice. The stable lines could accommodate the replacement of the internal murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter with the human ubiquitin-C (Ubi) promoter in the lentiviral backbone. The resulting DC-LVs bearing Ubi exhibited the enhanced potency to elicit vaccine-specific immunity. Based on accumulated evidence, our studies support the application of this production method in manufacturing DC-LVs for preclinical and clinical testing of novel DC-based immunization. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Generation of a stable packaging cell line producing high-titer PPT-deleted integration-deficient lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Sands, Mark S; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2015-01-01

    The risk of insertional mutagenesis inherent to all integrating exogenous expression cassettes was the impetus for the development of various integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) systems. These systems were successfully employed in a plethora of preclinical applications, underscoring their clinical potential. However, current production of IDLVs by transient plasmid transfection is not optimal for large-scale production of clinical grade vectors. Here, we describe the development of the first tetracycline-inducible stable IDLV packaging cell line comprising the D64E integrase mutant and the VSV-G envelope protein. A conditional self-inactivating (cSIN) vector and a novel polypurine tract (PPT)-deleted vector were incorporated into the newly developed stable packaging cell line by transduction and stable transfection, respectively. High-titer (~107 infectious units (IU)/ml) cSIN vectors were routinely generated. Furthermore, screening of single-cell clones stably transfected with PPT-deleted vector DNA resulted in the identification of highly efficient producer cell lines generating IDLV titers higher than 108 IU/mL, which upon concentration increased to 1010 IU/ml. IDLVs generated by stable producer lines efficiently transduce CNS tissues of rodents. Overall, the availability of high-titer IDLV lentivirus packaging cell line described here will significantly facilitate IDLV-based basic science research, as well as preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:26229972

  12. Generation of a stable packaging cell line producing high-titer PPT-deleted integration-deficient lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Sands, Mark S; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2015-01-01

    The risk of insertional mutagenesis inherent to all integrating exogenous expression cassettes was the impetus for the development of various integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) systems. These systems were successfully employed in a plethora of preclinical applications, underscoring their clinical potential. However, current production of IDLVs by transient plasmid transfection is not optimal for large-scale production of clinical grade vectors. Here, we describe the development of the first tetracycline-inducible stable IDLV packaging cell line comprising the D64E integrase mutant and the VSV-G envelope protein. A conditional self-inactivating (cSIN) vector and a novel polypurine tract (PPT)-deleted vector were incorporated into the newly developed stable packaging cell line by transduction and stable transfection, respectively. High-titer (~10(7) infectious units (IU)/ml) cSIN vectors were routinely generated. Furthermore, screening of single-cell clones stably transfected with PPT-deleted vector DNA resulted in the identification of highly efficient producer cell lines generating IDLV titers higher than 10(8) IU/mL, which upon concentration increased to 10(10) IU/ml. IDLVs generated by stable producer lines efficiently transduce CNS tissues of rodents. Overall, the availability of high-titer IDLV lentivirus packaging cell line described here will significantly facilitate IDLV-based basic science research, as well as preclinical and clinical applications.

  13. Sustaining expression of B domain-deleted human factor VIII mediated by using lentiviral vectors in NOD/SCID mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Jie; Chen, Chong; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Cao, Jiang; Xu, Kai-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Recently, gene therapy has been become a promising approach to cure hemophilia A, a most common recessive bleeding disease. The aim of this study was to determine the perspective of lentiviral vector in hemophilia A gene therapy in vitro and in NOD/SCID mice. Lentivirus transfer vector pXZ9/BDDFVIII containing human B-domain-deleted Factor VIII-IRES-eGFP coding sequence and mock control pXZ9 were constructed. Lentivirus was prepared by co-transfecting 3 plasmids into 293FT cells. 293FT, HLF, human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Chang-liver cells were transfected with the prepared virus. Coagulant activity of human FVIII, human FVIII antigen, human FVIII mRNA transcription and genomic integration were assayed by ELISA, one-step method, RT-PCR and PCR after infection. Lentiviral particles were concentrated by ultracentrifugation and NOD/SCID mice were transfected via portal vein injection. Human FVIII antigen in mouse blood plasma was analyzed by ELISA. eGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscopy and human FVIII transcription in mouse liver was analyzed by RT-PCR at one month after transduction. The results showed that the high titer of recombinant virus was prepared and used to efficiently transduce the target cells in vitro. At 72 h after transfection, high levels of FVIII activity and FVIII antigen were detected. Human FVIII gene transcription could be detected in the liver of NOD/SCID mice received lentiviral particles carrying FVIII gene. Mouse hepatocytes were transfected with recombinant lentivirus efficiently in vivo. Human FVIII level in mouse blood plasma reached to (49 ± 6) mU, (54 ± 8) mU and (23 ± 4) mU at 72 h, one week and one month after transfection respectively. It is concluded that the lentiviral particles carrying BDDhFVIII gene can high efficiently transfect the target cells both in vitro and in vivo, and the transfected target cells can secrete hFVIII efficiently. The sustained expression of human FVIII in NOD/SCID mice is

  14. Tightly regulated 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors for protection of human hematopoietic cells from anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, N; Brennig, S; Hillje, R; Schermeier, H; Phaltane, R; Dahlmann, J; Gruh, I; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Baum, C; Moritz, T

    2015-11-01

    Successful application of gene therapy strategies may require stringently regulated transgene expression. Along this line, we describe a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible 'all-in-one' lentiviral vector design using the pTET-T11 (TII) minimal-promoter and a reverse transactivator protein (rtTA2S-M2) driven by the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter allowing for tight regulation of transgene expression (Lv.TII vectors). Vector design was evaluated in human hematopoietic cells in the context of cytidine deaminase (hCDD)-based myeloprotective gene therapy. Upon Dox administration, a rapid (16-24 h) and dose-dependent (>0.04 μg ml(-1) Dox) onset of transgene expression was detected in Lv.TII.CDD gene-modified K562 cells as well as in primary human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells. Importantly, in both cell models low background transgene expression was observed in the absence of Dox. Functionality of Dox-inducible hCDD expression was demonstrated by >10-fold increase in cytosine arabinoside (1-β-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine, Ara-C) resistance of Lv.TII.CDD-transduced K562 cells. In addition, Lv.TII.CDD-transduced CD34(+)-derived myeloid cells were protected from up to 300 nm Ara-C (control affected from 50 nm onwards). These data clearly demonstrate the suitability of our self-inactivating lentiviral vector to induce robust, tightly regulated transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells with minimal background activity and highlight the potential of our construct in myeloprotective gene therapy strategies.

  15. Innocuous full-length botulinum neurotoxin targets and promotes the expression of lentiviral vectors in central and autonomic neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, V B; Ovsepian, S V; Raghunath, A; Huo, Q; Lawrence, G W; Smith, L; Dolly, J O

    2011-07-01

    Fragments of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) have been explored as potential targeting moieties and carriers of biomolecules into neurons, although with lower binding and translocation efficiency compared with intact proteins. This study exploits a detoxified recombinant form of full-length BoNT/B (BoTIM/B) fused with core streptavidin (CS-BoTIM/B) for lentiviral targeting to central and autonomic neurons. CS-BoTIM/B underwent an activity-dependent entry into cultured spinal cord neurons. Coupling CS-BoTIM/B to biotinylated lentivirus-encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) endowed considerable neuron selectivity to the vector as evident from the preferential expression of the reporter in neurons co-cultured with skeletal muscle cells. CS-BoTIM/B-guided lentiviral transduction with the expression of a SNARE protein, SNAP-25 (S25), rendered non-susceptible to proteolysis by three BoNT serotypes, yielded a sizable decrease in cleaved S25 upon exposure of spinal cord neurons to these toxins. This was accompanied by synaptic transmission being spared from blockade by BoNT/A or BoNT/E, reflecting adequate translation and functional competence of recombinant multi-toxin-resistant S25. The augmented neurotropism conveyed on the lentivirus by CS-BoTIM/B was also demonstrated in vivo through enhanced expression of a reporter in intramural ganglionic neurons in the rat trachea, after injection of the targeted GFP-encoding lentivirus. Thus, a novel and realistic prospect for gene therapy of peripheral neuropathies is offered in this study through lentiviral targeting to neurons by CS-BoTIM/B.

  16. A simple and effective method to generate lentiviral vectors for ex vivo gene delivery to mature human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shicheng; Karne, Neel K; Goff, Stephanie L; Black, Mary A; Xu, Hui; Bischof, Daniela; Cornetta, Kenneth; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2012-04-01

    Human ex vivo gene therapy protocols have been used successfully to treat a variety of genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and cancer. Murine oncoretroviruses (specifically, gammaretroviruses) have served as the primary gene delivery vehicles for these trials. However, in some cases, such vectors have been associated with insertional mutagenesis. As a result, alternative vector platforms such as lentiviral vectors (LVVs) are being developed. LVVs may provide advantages compared with gammaretroviral vectors, including the ability to transduce large numbers of nondividing cells, resistance to gene silencing, and a potentially safer integration profile. The aim of this study was to develop a simplified process for the rapid production of clinical-grade LVVs. To that end, we used a self-inactivating bicistronic LVV encoding an MART (melanoma antigen recognized by T cells)-1-reactive T cell receptor containing oPRE, an optimized and truncated version of woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranslational regulatory element (wPRE). Using our simplified clinical production process, 293T cells were transiently transfected in roller bottles. The LVV supernatant was collected, treated with Benzonase, and clarified by modified step filtration. LVV produced in this manner exhibited titers and a biosafety profile similar to those of cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices) LVVs previously manufactured at the Indiana University Vector Production Facility in support of a phase I/II clinical trial. We describe a simple, efficient, and low-cost method for the production of clinical-grade LVV for ex vivo gene therapy protocols.

  17. Efficient transfer of HTLV-1 tax gene in various primary and immortalized cells using a flap lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Royer-Leveau, Christelle; Mordelet, Elodie; Delebecque, Frédéric; Gessain, Antoine; Charneau, Pierre; Ozden, Simona

    2002-08-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes two major diseases: adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). In order to understand the involvement of Tax protein in HTLV-1 pathogenesis, we constructed a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector containing the central DNA flap sequence and either the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or the HTLV-1 tax genes. Using these vectors, GFP and tax genes were introduced in several primary and immortalized cells of endothelial, lymphoid, astrocytic or macrophagic origin. As assessed by GFP expression, up to 100% efficiency of transduction was obtained for all cell types tested. Tax expression was detected by Western blot and immuno-fluorescence in the transduced cells. After transduction, the Tax transcriptional activity was confirmed by the transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR-lacZ or HTLV-1 LTR-GFP reporter genes. Increased CD25 and HLA DR expression was observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes transduced with the Tax vector. These results indicate that both pathways of Tax transactivation, CREB (viral LTR) and NF-kappa B (CD25 and HLA DR), are functional after transduction by TRIP Tax vector. Therefore, this vector provides a useful tool for investigating the role of the Tax viral protein in the pathogenesis of diseases linked to HTLV-1 infection.

  18. Generation of a Genome Scale Lentiviral Vector Library for EF1α Promoter-Driven Expression of Human ORFs and Identification of Human Genes Affecting Viral Titer

    PubMed Central

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer, Mareike; Purdon, Amy S.; Wilson, Benjamin M.; Ranall, Max V.; Blumenthal, Antje; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The bottleneck in elucidating gene function through high-throughput gain-of-function genome screening is the limited availability of comprehensive libraries for gene overexpression. Lentiviral vectors are the most versatile and widely used vehicles for gene expression in mammalian cells. Lentiviral supernatant libraries for genome screening are commonly generated in the HEK293T cell line, yet very little is known about the effect of introduced sequences on the produced viral titer, which we have shown to be gene dependent. We have generated an arrayed lentiviral vector library for the expression of 17,030 human proteins by using the GATEWAY® cloning system to transfer ORFs from the Mammalian Gene Collection into an EF1alpha promoter-dependent lentiviral expression vector. This promoter was chosen instead of the more potent and widely used CMV promoter, because it is less prone to silencing and provides more stable long term expression. The arrayed lentiviral clones were used to generate viral supernatant by packaging in the HEK293T cell line. The efficiency of transfection and virus production was estimated by measuring the fluorescence of IRES driven GFP, co-expressed with the ORFs. More than 90% of cloned ORFs produced sufficient virus for downstream screening applications. We identified genes which consistently produced very high or very low viral titer. Supernatants from select clones that were either high or low virus producers were tested on a range of cell lines. Some of the low virus producers, including two previously uncharacterized proteins were cytotoxic to HEK293T cells. The library we have constructed presents a powerful resource for high-throughput gain-of-function screening of the human genome and drug-target discovery. Identification of human genes that affect lentivirus production may lead to improved technology for gene expression using lentiviral vectors. PMID:23251614

  19. Evaluation of tolerance to lentiviral LV-RPE65 gene therapy vector after subretinal delivery in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Matet, Alexandre; Kostic, Corinne; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Moulin, Alexandre; Rosolen, Serge G; Martin, Samia; Mavilio, Fulvio; Amirjanians, Vazrik; Stieger, Knut; Lorenz, Birgit; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2017-10-01

    Several approaches have been developed for gene therapy in RPE65-related Leber congenital amaurosis. To date, strategies that have reached the clinical stages rely on adeno-associated viral vectors and two of them documented limited long-term effect. We have developed a lentiviral-based strategy of RPE65 gene transfer that efficiently restored protein expression and cone function in RPE65-deficient mice. In this study, we evaluated the ocular and systemic tolerances of this lentiviral-based therapy (LV-RPE65) on healthy nonhuman primates (NHPs), without adjuvant systemic anti-inflammatory prophylaxis. For the first time, we describe the early kinetics of retinal detachment at 2, 4, and 7 days after subretinal injection using multimodal imaging in 5 NHPs. We revealed prolonged reattachment times in LV-RPE65-injected eyes compared to vehicle-injected eyes. Low- (n = 2) and high-dose (n = 2) LV-RPE65-injected eyes presented a reduction of the outer nuclear and photoreceptor outer segment layer thickness in the macula, that was more pronounced than in vehicle-injected eyes (n = 4). All LV-RPE65-injected eyes showed an initial perivascular reaction that resolved spontaneously within 14 days. Despite foveal structural changes, full-field electroretinography indicated that the overall retinal function was preserved over time and immunohistochemistry identified no difference in glial, microglial, or leucocyte ocular activation between low-dose, high-dose, and vehicle-injected eyes. Moreover, LV-RPE65-injected animals did not show signs of vector shedding or extraocular targeting, confirming the safe ocular restriction of the vector. Our results evidence a limited ocular tolerance to LV-RPE65 after subretinal injection without adjuvant anti-inflammatory prophylaxis, with complications linked to this route of administration necessitating to block this transient inflammatory event. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficient construction of producer cell lines for a SIN lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy by concatemeric array transfection.

    PubMed

    Throm, Robert E; Ouma, Annastasia A; Zhou, Sheng; Chandrasekaran, Anantharaman; Lockey, Timothy; Greene, Michael; De Ravin, Suk See; Moayeri, Morvarid; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P; Gray, John T

    2009-05-21

    Retroviral vectors containing internal promoters, chromatin insulators, and self-inactivating (SIN) long terminal repeats (LTRs) may have significantly reduced genotoxicity relative to the conventional retroviral vectors used in recent, otherwise successful clinical trials. Large-scale production of such vectors is problematic, however, as the introduction of SIN vectors into packaging cells cannot be accomplished with the traditional method of viral transduction. We have derived a set of packaging cell lines for HIV-based lentiviral vectors and developed a novel concatemeric array transfection technique for the introduction of SIN vector genomes devoid of enhancer and promoter sequences in the LTR. We used this method to derive a producer cell clone for a SIN lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, which when grown in a bioreactor generated more than 20 L of supernatant with titers above 10(7) transducing units (TU) per milliliter. Further refinement of our technique enabled the rapid generation of whole populations of stably transformed cells that produced similar titers. Finally, we describe the construction of an insulated, SIN lentiviral vector encoding the human interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG) gene and the efficient derivation of cloned producer cells that generate supernatants with titers greater than 5 x 10(7) TU/mL and that are suitable for use in a clinical trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1).

  1. Simplified production and concentration of HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors using HYPERFlask vessels and anion exchange membrane chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, Robert H; Puthli, Sharon; Marino, Michael P; Reiser, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Background During the past twelve years, lentiviral (LV) vectors have emerged as valuable tools for transgene delivery because of their ability to transduce nondividing cells and their capacity to sustain long-term transgene expression in target cells in vitro and in vivo. However, despite significant progress, the production and concentration of high-titer, high-quality LV vector stocks is still cumbersome and costly. Methods Here we present a simplified protocol for LV vector production on a laboratory scale using HYPERFlask vessels. HYPERFlask vessels are high-yield, high-performance flasks that utilize a multilayered gas permeable growth surface for efficient gas exchange, allowing convenient production of high-titer LV vectors. For subsequent concentration of LV vector stocks produced in this way, we describe a facile protocol involving Mustang Q anion exchange membrane chromatography. Results Our results show that unconcentrated LV vector stocks with titers in excess of 108 transduction units (TU) per ml were obtained using HYPERFlasks and that these titers were higher than those produced in parallel using regular 150-cm2 tissue culture dishes. We also show that up to 500 ml of an unconcentrated LV vector stock prepared using a HYPERFlask vessel could be concentrated using a single Mustang Q Acrodisc with a membrane volume of 0.18 ml. Up to 5.3 × 1010 TU were recovered from a single HYPERFlask vessel. Conclusion The protocol described here is easy to implement and should facilitate high-titer LV vector production for preclinical studies in animal models without the need for multiple tissue culture dishes and ultracentrifugation-based concentration protocols. PMID:19220915

  2. Simplified production and concentration of HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors using HYPERFlask vessels and anion exchange membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kutner, Robert H; Puthli, Sharon; Marino, Michael P; Reiser, Jakob

    2009-02-16

    During the past twelve years, lentiviral (LV) vectors have emerged as valuable tools for transgene delivery because of their ability to transduce nondividing cells and their capacity to sustain long-term transgene expression in target cells in vitro and in vivo. However, despite significant progress, the production and concentration of high-titer, high-quality LV vector stocks is still cumbersome and costly. Here we present a simplified protocol for LV vector production on a laboratory scale using HYPERFlask vessels. HYPERFlask vessels are high-yield, high-performance flasks that utilize a multilayered gas permeable growth surface for efficient gas exchange, allowing convenient production of high-titer LV vectors. For subsequent concentration of LV vector stocks produced in this way, we describe a facile protocol involving Mustang Q anion exchange membrane chromatography. Our results show that unconcentrated LV vector stocks with titers in excess of 108 transduction units (TU) per ml were obtained using HYPERFlasks and that these titers were higher than those produced in parallel using regular 150-cm2 tissue culture dishes. We also show that up to 500 ml of an unconcentrated LV vector stock prepared using a HYPERFlask vessel could be concentrated using a single Mustang Q Acrodisc with a membrane volume of 0.18 ml. Up to 5.3 x 1010 TU were recovered from a single HYPERFlask vessel. The protocol described here is easy to implement and should facilitate high-titer LV vector production for preclinical studies in animal models without the need for multiple tissue culture dishes and ultracentrifugation-based concentration protocols.

  3. Preclinical demonstration of lentiviral vector-mediated correction of immunological and metabolic abnormalities in models of adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Zhang, Lin; Jin, Xiangyang; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia; Geiger, Sabine; Carmo, Marlene; Cooper, Aaron; Fairbanks, Lynette; Kaufman, Michael L; Sebire, Neil J; Hollis, Roger P; Blundell, Michael P; Senadheera, Shantha; Fu, Pei-Yu; Sahaghian, Arineh; Chan, Rebecca Y; Wang, Xiaoyan; Cornetta, Kenneth; Thrasher, Adrian J; Kohn, Donald B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2014-03-01

    Gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells by γ-retroviral vectors (gRV) is an effective treatment for adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, current gRV have significant potential for insertional mutagenesis as reported in clinical trials for other primary immunodeficiencies. To improve the efficacy and safety of ADA-SCID gene therapy (GT), we generated a self-inactivating lentiviral vector (LV) with a codon-optimized human cADA gene under the control of the short form elongation factor-1α promoter (LV EFS ADA). In ADA(-/-) mice, LV EFS ADA displayed high-efficiency gene transfer and sufficient ADA expression to rescue ADA(-/-) mice from their lethal phenotype with good thymic and peripheral T- and B-cell reconstitution. Human ADA-deficient CD34(+) cells transduced with 1-5 × 10(7) TU/ml had 1-3 vector copies/cell and expressed 1-2x of normal endogenous levels of ADA, as assayed in vitro and by transplantation into immune-deficient mice. Importantly, in vitro immortalization assays demonstrated that LV EFS ADA had significantly less transformation potential compared to gRV vectors, and vector integration-site analysis by nrLAM-PCR of transduced human cells grown in immune-deficient mice showed no evidence of clonal skewing. These data demonstrated that the LV EFS ADA vector can effectively transfer the human ADA cDNA and promote immune and metabolic recovery, while reducing the potential for vector-mediated insertional mutagenesis.

  4. CD30 Receptor-Targeted Lentiviral Vectors for Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Specific Gene Modification.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Thorsten; Jung-Klawitter, Sabine; Sebe, Attila; Schenk, Franziska; Modlich, Ute; Ivics, Zoltán; Schumann, Gerald G; Buchholz, Christian J; Schneider, Irene C

    2016-05-01

    Cultures of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) often contain cells of varying grades of pluripotency. We present novel lentiviral vectors targeted to the surface receptor CD30 (CD30-LV) to transfer genes into iPSCs that are truly pluripotent as demonstrated by marker gene expression. We demonstrate that CD30 expression is restricted to SSEA4(high) cells of human iPSC cultures and a human embryonic stem cell line. When CD30-LV was added to iPSCs during routine cultivation, efficient and exclusive transduction of cells positive for the pluripotency marker Oct-4 was achieved, while retaining their pluripotency. When added during the reprogramming process, CD30-LV solely transduced cells that became fully reprogrammed iPSCs as confirmed by co-expression of endogenous Nanog and the reporter gene. Thus, CD30-LV may serve as novel tool for the selective gene transfer into PSCs with broad applications in basic and therapeutic research.

  5. Co-transduction of lentiviral and adenoviral vectors for co-delivery of growth factor and shRNA genes in mesenchymal stem cells-based chondrogenic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Citra, Fudiman; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-09-01

    Gene delivery takes advantage of cellular mechanisms to express gene products and is an efficient way to deliver them into cells, influencing cellular behaviours and expression patterns. Among the delivery methods, viral vectors are applied due to their high efficiency. Two typical viral vectors for gene delivery include lentiviral vector for integrative transduction and adenoviral vector for transient episomal transduction, respectively. The selection and formulation of proper viral vectors applied to cells can modulate gene expression profiles and further impact the downstream pathways. In this study, recombinant lentiviral and adenoviral vectors were co-transduced in a synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs)-based articular chondrogenic system by which two transgenes were co-delivered - the gene for transforming growth factor (TGF)β3, to facilitate SMSC chondrogenesis, and the gene for small hairpin RNA (shRNA), targeting the mRNA of type I collagen (Col I) α1 chain to silence Col I expression and minimize fibrocartilage formation. Delivery of either gene could be achieved with either lentiviral or adenoviral vectors. Therefore, co-delivery of the two transgenes via the two types of vectors was performed to determine which combination was optimal for three-dimensional (3D) articular chondrogenesis to construct articular hyaline cartilage tissue. Suppression of Col I and expression of cartilage markers, including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), were assessed at both the transcriptome and protein phenotypic levels. It was concluded that the combination of lentiviral-mediated TGFβ3 release and adenoviral-mediated shRNA expression (LV-T + Ad-sh) generally demonstrated optimal efficacy in engineered articular cartilage with SMSCs.

  6. Transduction of photoreceptors with equine infectious anemia virus lentiviral vectors: safety and biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2013-06-12

    StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration.

  7. Transduction of Photoreceptors With Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Lentiviral Vectors: Safety and Biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Methods. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Results. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. Conclusions. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration. PMID:23620430

  8. MAC-T cells as a tool to evaluate lentiviral vector construction targeting recombinant protein expression in milk.

    PubMed

    Monzani, Paulo S; Guemra, Samuel; Adona, Paulo R; Ohashi, Otavio M; Meirelles, Flávio V; Wheeler, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Prior to generating transgenic animals for bioreactors, it is important to evaluate the vector constructed to avoid poor protein expression. Mammary epithelial cells cultured in vitro have been proposed as a model to reproduce the biology of the mammary gland. In the present work, three lentiviral vectors were constructed for the human growth hormone (GH), interleukin 2 (IL2), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF3) genes driven by the bovine β-casein promoter. The lentiviruses were used to transduce mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T), and the transformed cells were cultured on polystyrene in culture medium with and without prolactin. The gene expression of transgenes was evaluated by PCR using cDNA, and recombinant protein expression was evaluated by Western-blotting using concentrated medium and cellular extracts. The gene expression, of the three introduced genes, was detected in both induced and non induced MAC-T cells. The human GH protein was detected in the concentrated medium, whereas CSF3 was detected in the cellular extract. Apparently, the cellular extract is more appropriate than the concentrated medium to detect recombinant protein, principally because concentrated medium has a high concentration of bovine serum albumin. The results suggest that MAC-T cells may be a good system to evaluate vector construction targeting recombinant protein expression in milk.

  9. Lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 vector mediated miR-21 gene editing inhibits the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huo, Wenying; Zhao, Guannan; Yin, Jinggang; Ouyang, Xuan; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Chuanhe; Wang, Baojing; Dong, Peixin; Wang, Zhixiang; Watari, Hidemichi; Chaum, Edward; Pfeffer, Lawrence M; Yue, Junming

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mediated genome editing is a powerful approach for loss of function studies. Here we report that lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 vectors are highly efficient in introducing mutations in the precursor miRNA sequence, thus leading to the loss of miRNA expression and function. We constructed four different lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 vectors that target different regions of the precursor miR-21 sequence and found that these lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 miR-21 gRNA vectors induced mutations in the precursor sequences as shown by DNA surveyor mutation assay and Sanger sequencing. Two miR-21 lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 gRNA vectors were selected to probe miR-21 function in ovarian cancer SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Our data demonstrate that disruption of pre-miR-21 sequences leads to reduced cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated miR-21 gene editing sensitizes both SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells to chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Disruption of miR-21 leads to the inhibition of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells as evidenced by the upregulation of epithelial cell marker E-cadherin and downregulation of mesenchymal marker genes, vimentin and Snai2. The miR-21 target genes PDCD4 and SPRY2 were upregulated in cells transduced with miR-21gRNAs compared to controls. Our study indicates that lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9-mediated miRNA gene editing is an effective approach to address miRNA function, and disruption of miR-21 inhibits EMT in ovarian cancer cells.

  10. Lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 vector mediated miR-21 gene editing inhibits the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Wenying; Zhao, Guannan; Yin, Jinggang; Ouyang, Xuan; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Chuanhe; Wang, Baojing; Dong, Peixin; Wang, Zhixiang; Watari, Hidemichi; Chaum, Edward; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.; Yue, Junming

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mediated genome editing is a powerful approach for loss of function studies. Here we report that lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 vectors are highly efficient in introducing mutations in the precursor miRNA sequence, thus leading to the loss of miRNA expression and function. We constructed four different lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 vectors that target different regions of the precursor miR-21 sequence and found that these lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 miR-21 gRNA vectors induced mutations in the precursor sequences as shown by DNA surveyor mutation assay and Sanger sequencing. Two miR-21 lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9 gRNA vectors were selected to probe miR-21 function in ovarian cancer SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Our data demonstrate that disruption of pre-miR-21 sequences leads to reduced cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated miR-21 gene editing sensitizes both SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells to chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Disruption of miR-21 leads to the inhibition of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells as evidenced by the upregulation of epithelial cell marker E-cadherin and downregulation of mesenchymal marker genes, vimentin and Snai2. The miR-21 target genes PDCD4 and SPRY2 were upregulated in cells transduced with miR-21gRNAs compared to controls. Our study indicates that lentiviral CRISPR/Cas9-mediated miRNA gene editing is an effective approach to address miRNA function, and disruption of miR-21 inhibits EMT in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:28123598

  11. Transduction of Human CD34+ Repopulating Cells with a Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for SCID-X1 Produced at Clinical Scale by a Stable Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Timothy; Mehta, Perdeep K.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Eldridge, Paul W.; Gray, John T.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Self-inactivating (SIN)-lentiviral vectors have safety and efficacy features that are well suited for transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but generation of vector at clinical scale has been challenging. Approximately 280 liters of an X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder (SCID-X1) SIN-lentiviral vector in two productions from a stable cell line were concentrated to final titers of 4.5 and 7.2×108 tu/ml. These two clinical preparations and three additional development-scale preparations were evaluated in human CD34+ hematopoietic cells in vitro using colony forming cell (CFU-C) assay and in vivo using the NOD/Lt-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mouse xenotransplant model. A 40-hour transduction protocol using a single vector exposure conferred a mean NSG repopulating cell transduction of 0.23 vector genomes/human genome with a mean myeloid vector copy number of 3.2 vector genomes/human genome. No adverse effects on engraftment were observed from vector treatment. Direct comparison between our SIN-lentiviral vector using a 40-hour protocol and an MFGγc γ-retroviral vector using a five-day protocol demonstrated equivalent NSG repopulating cell transduction efficiency. Clonality survey by linear amplification-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LAM-PCR) with Illumina sequencing revealed common clones in sorted myeloid and lymphoid populations from engrafted mice demonstrating multipotent cell transduction. These vector preparations will be used in two clinical trials for SCID-X1. PMID:23075105

  12. Transduction of human CD34+ repopulating cells with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 produced at clinical scale by a stable cell line.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michael R; Lockey, Timothy; Mehta, Perdeep K; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Eldridge, Paul W; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2012-10-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN)-lentiviral vectors have safety and efficacy features that are well suited for transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but generation of vector at clinical scale has been challenging. Approximately 280 liters of an X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder (SCID-X1) SIN-lentiviral vector in two productions from a stable cell line were concentrated to final titers of 4.5 and 7.2×10(8) tu/ml. These two clinical preparations and three additional development-scale preparations were evaluated in human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells in vitro using colony forming cell (CFU-C) assay and in vivo using the NOD/Lt-scid/IL2Rγ(null) (NSG) mouse xenotransplant model. A 40-hour transduction protocol using a single vector exposure conferred a mean NSG repopulating cell transduction of 0.23 vector genomes/human genome with a mean myeloid vector copy number of 3.2 vector genomes/human genome. No adverse effects on engraftment were observed from vector treatment. Direct comparison between our SIN-lentiviral vector using a 40-hour protocol and an MFGγ(c) γ-retroviral vector using a five-day protocol demonstrated equivalent NSG repopulating cell transduction efficiency. Clonality survey by linear amplification-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LAM-PCR) with Illumina sequencing revealed common clones in sorted myeloid and lymphoid populations from engrafted mice demonstrating multipotent cell transduction. These vector preparations will be used in two clinical trials for SCID-X1.

  13. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Activates Transgene Expression from Integration-Defective Lentiviral Vectors in Dividing and Non-Dividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pelascini, Laetitia P.L.; Janssen, Josephine M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) are being increasingly deployed in both basic and preclinical gene transfer settings. Often, however, the IDLV transgene expression profile is muted when compared to that of their integration-proficient counterparts. We hypothesized that the episomal nature of IDLVs turns them into preferential targets for epigenetic silencing involving chromatin-remodeling histone deacetylation. Therefore, vectors carrying an array of cis-acting elements and transcriptional unit components were assembled with the aid of packaging constructs encoding either the wild-type or the class I mutant D116N integrase moieties. The transduction levels and transgene-product yields provided by each vector class were assessed in the presence and absence of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A. To investigate the role of the target cell replication status, we performed experiments in growth-arrested human mesenchymal stem cells and in post-mitotic syncytial myotubes. We found that IDLVs are acutely affected by HDACs regardless of their genetic makeup or target cell replication rate. Interestingly, the magnitude of IDLV transgene expression rescue due to HDAC inhibition varied in a vector backbone– and cell type–dependent manner. Finally, investigation of histone modifications by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) revealed a paucity of euchromatin marks distributed along IDLV genomes when compared to those measured on isogenic integration-competent vector templates. These findings support the view that IDLVs constitute preferential targets for epigenetic silencing involving histone deacetylation, which contributes to dampening their full transcriptional potential. Our data provide leads on how to most optimally titrate and deploy these promising episomal gene delivery vehicles. PMID:23140481

  14. A Ubiquitous Chromatin Opening Element (UCOE) Confers Resistance to DNA Methylation–mediated Silencing of Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Frost, Amy R; Blundell, Mike P; Bales, Olivia; Antoniou, Michael N; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation may restrict the activity of gene transfer vectors due to inadvertent silencing. In P19 embryonic carcinoma cells in vitro, we found that transgene expression regulated by the SFFV LTR and EF1α promoter declined rapidly within 16 days, but for A2UCOE derived from the human HNRPA2B1-CBX3 housekeeping gene locus, remained completely stable. Silencing correlated with extensive epigenetic methylation of CpG sites, whereas the A2UCOE was almost completely resistant. Linking of the A2UCOE upstream of the SFFV LTR protected this element from both DNA methylation and silencing. Analysis of engrafted hematopoietic cells in vivo transduced with the same vectors revealed a similar pattern. The A2UCOE displayed little or no methylation in either primary or secondary graft recipients, and gene expression profiles were highly conserved between the two groups. These studies provide convincing evidence that DNA methylation plays a direct role in regulating self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral transgene expression, and that the stability of expression from the A2UCOE is, at least in part, due to methylation resistance. The A2UCOE therefore has considerable utility for gene therapy applications where reliable and sustained gene expression is desirable. PMID:20588258

  15. Repopulation of B-lymphocytes with restricted gene expression using haematopoietic stem cells engineered with lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Taher, T E; Tulone, C; Fatah, R; D'Acquisto, F; Gould, D J; Mageed, R A

    2008-07-01

    B-lymphocytes play a key role in the pathogenesis of many immune-mediated diseases, such as autoimmune and atopic diseases. Therefore, targeting B-lymphocytes provides a rationale for refining strategies to treat such diseases for long-term clinical benefits and minimal side effects. In this study we describe a protocol for repopulating irradiated mice with B-lymphocytes engineered for restricted expression of transgenes using haematopoietic stem cells. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector, which encodes enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) from the spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) promoter, was used to generate new vectors that permit restricted EGFP expression in B-lymphocytes. To achieve this, the SFFV promoter was replaced with the B-lymphocyte-restricted CD19 promoter. Further, an immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer (Emu) flanked by the associated matrix attachment regions (MARs) was inserted upstream of the CD19 promoter. Incorporation of the Emu-MAR elements upstream of the CD19 promoter resulted in enhanced, stable and selective transgene expression in human and murine B-cell lines. In addition, this modification permitted enhanced selective EGFP expression in B-lymphocytes in vivo in irradiated mice repopulated with transduced bone marrow haematopoietic stem cells (BMHSCs). The study provides evidence for the feasibility of targeting B-lymphocytes for therapeutic restoration of normal B-lymphocyte functions in patients with B-cell-related diseases.

  16. Dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector immunization uses pseudotransduction and DNA-mediated STING and cGAS activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jocelyn T; Liu, Yarong; Kulkarni, Rajan P; Lee, Kevin K; Dai, Bingbing; Lovely, Geoffrey; Ouyang, Yong; Wang, Pin; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2017-07-21

    Dendritic cell (DC) activation and antigen presentation are critical for efficient priming of T cell responses. Here, we study how lentiviral vectors (LVs) deliver antigen and activate DCs to generate T cell immunization in vivo. We report that antigenic proteins delivered in vector particles via pseudotransduction were sufficient to stimulate an antigen-specific immune response. The delivery of the viral genome encoding the antigen increased the magnitude of this response in vivo but was irrelevant in vitro. Activation of DCs by LVs was independent of MyD88, TRIF, and MAVS, ruling out an involvement of Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor signaling. Cellular DNA packaged in LV preparations induced DC activation by the host STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and cGAS (cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase) pathway. Envelope-mediated viral fusion also activated DCs in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent but STING-independent process. Pseudotransduction, transduction, viral fusion, and delivery of cellular DNA collaborate to make the DC-targeted LV preparation an effective immunogen. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. A tetracycline-regulated cell line produces high-titer lentiviral vectors that specifically target dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Paul D; Zhang, Chupei; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wang, Pin

    2013-06-19

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are a powerful means of delivering genetic material to many types of cells. Because of safety concerns associated with these HIV-1 derived vectors, producing large quantities of LVs is challenging. In this paper, we report a method for producing high titers of self-inactivating LVs. We retrovirally transduce the tet-off stable producer cell line GPR to generate a cell line, GPRS, which can express all the viral components, including a dendritic cell-specific glycoprotein, SVGmu. Then, we use concatemeric DNA transfection to transfect the LV transfer plasmid encoding a reporter gene GFP in combination with a selectable marker. Several of the resulting clones can produce LV at a titer 10-fold greater than what we achieve with transient transfection. Plus, these viruses efficiently transduce dendritic cells in vitro and generate a strong T cell immune response to our reporter antigen. This method may be a good option for producing strong LV-based vaccines for clinical studies of cancer or infectious diseases.

  18. Vaccination with Lentiviral Vector Expressing the nfa1 Gene Confers a Protective Immune Response to Mice Infected with Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Yang, Hee-Jong; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun

    2013-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a pathogenic free-living amoeba, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and animals. The nfa1 gene (360 bp), cloned from a cDNA library of N. fowleri, produces a 13.1-kDa recombinant protein which is located on pseudopodia, particularly the food cup structure. The nfa1 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri infection. To examine the effect of nfa1 DNA vaccination against N. fowleri infection, we constructed a lentiviral vector (pCDH) expressing the nfa1 gene. For the in vivo mouse study, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of a viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene. To evaluate the effect of vaccination and immune responses of mice, we analyzed the IgG levels (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), cytokine induction (interleukin-4 [IL-4] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]), and survival rates of mice that developed PAM. The levels of both IgG and IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in vaccinated mice were significantly increased. The cytokine analysis showed that vaccinated mice exhibited greater IL-4 and IFN-γ production than the other control groups, suggesting a Th1/Th2 mixed-type immune response. In vaccinated mice, high levels of Nfa1-specific IgG antibodies continued until 12 weeks postvaccination. The mice vaccinated with viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene also exhibited significantly higher survival rates (90%) after challenge with N. fowleri trophozoites. Finally, the nfa1 vaccination effectively induced protective immunity by humoral and cellular immune responses in N. fowleri-infected mice. These results suggest that DNA vaccination using a viral vector may be a potential tool against N. fowleri infection. PMID:23677321

  19. Glycoprotein Ibalpha promoter drives megakaryocytic lineage-restricted expression after hematopoietic stem cell transduction using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Lavenu-Bombled, Cécile; Izac, Brigitte; Legrand, Faézeh; Cambot, Marie; Vigier, Agathe; Massé, Jean-Marc; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2007-06-01

    Megakaryocytic (MK) lineage is an attractive target for cell/gene therapy approaches, aiming at correcting platelet protein deficiencies. However, MK cells are short-lived cells, and their permanent modification requires modification of hematopoietic stem cells with an integrative vector such as a lentiviral vector. Glycoprotein (Gp) IIb promoter, the most studied among the MK regulatory sequences, is also active in stem cells. To strictly limit transgene expression to the MK lineage after transduction of human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells with a lentiviral vector, we looked for a promoter activated later during MK differentiation. Human cord blood, bone marrow, and peripheral-blood mobilized CD34(+) cells were transduced with a human immunodeficiency virus-derived self-inactivating lentiviral vector encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of GpIbalpha, GpIIb, or EF1alpha gene regulatory sequences. Both GpIbalpha and GpIIb promoters restricted GFP expression (analyzed by flow cytometry and immunoelectron microscopy) in MK cells among the maturing progeny of transduced cells. However, only the GpIbalpha promoter was strictly MK-specific, whereas GpIIb promoter was leaky in immature progenitor cells not yet engaged in MK cell lineage differentiation. We thus demonstrate the pertinence of using a 328-base-pair fragment of the human GpIbalpha gene regulatory sequence, in the context of a lentiviral vector, to tightly restrict transgene expression to the MK lineage after transduction of human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  20. A Simple High Efficiency Intra-Islet Transduction Protocol Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Moreno, Carmen Maria; Herrera-Gomez, Irene de Gracia; Lopez-Noriega, Livia; Lorenzo, Petra Isabel; Cobo-Vuilleumier, Nadia; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Mellado-Gil, Jose Manuel; Parnaud, Geraldine; Bosco, Domenico; Gauthier, Benoit Raymond; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Successful normalization of blood glucose in patients transplanted with pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors established the proof-of-concept that Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is a curable disease. Nonetheless, major caveats to the widespread use of this cell therapy approach have been the shortage of islets combined with the low viability and functional rates subsequent to transplantation. Gene therapy targeted to enhance survival and performance prior to transplantation could offer a feasible approach to circumvent these issues and sustain a durable functional β-cell mass in vivo. However, efficient and safe delivery of nucleic acids to intact islet remains a challenging task. Here we describe a simple and easy-to-use lentiviral transduction protocol that allows the transduction of approximately 80 % of mouse and human islet cells while preserving islet architecture, metabolic function and glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion. Our protocol will facilitate to fully determine the potential of gene expression modulation of therapeutically promising targets in entire pancreatic islets for xenotransplantation purposes.

  1. Genetic modification of hematopoietic cells using retroviral and lentiviral vectors: safety considerations for vector design and delivery into target cells.

    PubMed

    Dropulic, Boro

    2005-07-01

    The recent development of leukemia in three patients following retroviral vector gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in the death of one patient, has raised safety concerns for the use of integrating gene transfer vectors for human gene therapy. This review discusses these serious adverse events from the perspective of whether restrictions on vector design and vector-modified target cells are warranted at this time. A case is made against presently establishing specific restrictions for vector design and transduced cells; rather, their safety should be ascertained by empiric evaluation in appropriate preclinical models on a case-by-case basis. Such preclinical data, coupled with proper informed patient consent and a risk-benefit ratio analysis, provide the best available prospective evaluation of gene transfer vectors prior to their translation into the clinic.

  2. Long-term inhibition of ethanol intake by the administration of an aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2)-coding lentiviral vector into the ventral tegmental area of rats.

    PubMed

    Karahanian, Eduardo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Tampier, Lutske; Quintanilla, María Elena; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Israel, Yedy

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that acetaldehyde generated from ethanol in the brain is reinforcing. The present studies tested the feasibility of achieving a long-term reduction of chronic and post-deprivation binge ethanol drinking by a single administration into the brain ventral tegmental area (VTA) of a lentiviral vector that codes for aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), which degrades acetaldehyde. The ALDH2 gene coding vector or a control lentiviral vector were microinjected into the VTA of rats bred for their alcohol preference. In the chronic alcohol administration model, naïve animals administered the control vector and subsequently offered 10% ethanol and water ingested 8-9 g ethanol/kg body weight/day. The single administration of the ALDH2-coding vector prior to allowing ethanol availability reduced ethanol drinking by 85-90% (P < 0.001) for the 45 days tested. In the post-deprivation binge-drinking model, animals that had previously consumed ethanol chronically for 81 days were administered the lentiviral vector and were thereafter deprived of ethanol for three 7-day periods, each interrupted by a single 60-minute ethanol re-access after the last day of each deprivation period. Upon ethanol re-access, control vector-treated animals consumed intoxicating 'binge' amounts of ethanol, reaching intakes of 2.7 g ethanol/kg body weight in 60 minutes. The administration of the ALDH2-coding vector reduced re-access binge drinking by 75-80% (P < 0.001). This study shows that endowing the ventral tegmental with an increased ability to degrade acetaldehyde greatly reduces chronic alcohol consumption and post-deprivation binge drinking for prolonged periods and supports the hypothesis that brain-generated acetaldehyde promotes alcohol drinking. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Comparison of HIV-1 and EIAV-based lentiviral vectors in corneal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beutelspacher, Sven Christoph; Ardjomand, Navid; Tan, Peng Hong; Patton, Gillian Sarah; Larkin, D Frank P; George, Andrew J T; McClure, Myra O

    2005-06-01

    In this study we compare the ability of self-inactivating Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) and Equine Infectious Anaemia Virus (EIAV)-based vectors to mediate gene transfer to rabbit and human corneas and to a murine corneal endothelial cell line. Both vectors were pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus-G (VSV-G) envelope and contained marker transgenes under the control of an internal CMV promoter. For specificity of action, the heterologous promoter in the EIAV-vector was exchanged for an inducible E-Selectin promoter, previously shown to regulate gene-expression in a plasmid system. We show that EIAV is more efficient than HIV in transducing human and rabbit corneal endothelial cells. Rabbit corneal endothelial cells are transduced in higher quantity than human corneal endothelial cells. In the inducible system, however, we detected impairment between the vector and its internal E-Selectin promoter. Instead of controlled transgene expression or silencing of promoter activity, the U3-modified long-terminal-repeats (LTR) impaired the conditional activity of the E-Selectin promoter. Significant transgene expression was seen without stimulation of the inducible promoter. We show efficient transduction by lentiviruses of a corneal endothelial cell line and of full thickness corneas from different species, confirming that those vectors would be appropriate tools for gene therapy of selected corneal diseases. However, the modification within the U3-LTR did not adequately allow regulated transgene expression. These findings have important implications for vector design for diagnostic or therapeutic opportunities.

  4. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  5. In utero lung gene transfer using adeno-associated viral and lentiviral vectors in mice.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Luc; Danzer, Enrico; Limberis, Maria P; Zoltick, Philip W; Radu, Antoneta; Flake, Alan W; Davey, Marcus G

    2014-06-01

    Virus-mediated gene transfer to the fetal lung epithelium holds considerable promise for the therapeutic management of prenatally diagnosed, potentially life-threatening inherited lung diseases. In this study we hypothesized that efficient and life-long lung transduction can be achieved by in utero gene therapy, using viral vectors. To facilitate diffuse entry into the lung, viral vector was injected into the amniotic sac of C57BL/6 mice on embryonic day 16 (term, ∼ 20 days) in a volume of 10 μl. Vectors investigated included those based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) (serotypes 5, 6.2, 9, rh.64R1) and vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1-based lentivirus (LV). All vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of various promoters including chicken β-actin (CB) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) for AAV and CMV or MND (myeloproliferative sarcoma virus enhancer, negative control region deleted) for LV. Pulmonary GFP gene expression was detected by fluorescence stereoscopic microscopy and immunohistochemistry for up to 9 months after birth. At equivalent vector doses (mean, 12 × 10(10) genome copies per fetus) three AAV vectors resulted in long-term (up to 9 months) pulmonary epithelium transduction. AAV2/6.2 transduced predominantly cells of the conducting airway epithelium, although transduction decreased 2 months after vector delivery. AAV2/9-transduced cells of the alveolar epithelium with a type 1 pneumocyte phenotype for up to 6 months. Although minimal levels of GFP expression were observed with AAV2/5 up to 9 months, the transduced cells immunostained positive for F480 and were retrievable by bronchoalveolar lavage, confirming an alveolar macrophage phenotype. No GFP expression was observed in lung epithelial cells after AAV2/rh.64R1 and VSV-G-LV vector-mediated gene transfer. We conclude that these experiments demonstrate that prenatal lung gene transfer with AAV vectors engineered to target

  6. Silencing effect of lentiviral vectors encod-ing shRNA of Herp on endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, F L; Li, Q; Zhang, J Y; Lei, L J; Zhang, Z; Mahmoud, T N; Wang, X G; Lin, P F; Jin, Y P; Wang, A H

    2015-12-21

    Herp, a mammalian protein with a ubiquitin-like domain, can be strongly upregulated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress during ER-associated protein degradation. However, the other cellular functions of Herp remain unclear. We explored the effect of Herp on ER stress and inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages that had been exposed to tunicamycin or thapsigargin. We successfully constructed recombinant lentiviral vectors for Herp short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression to better understand the contribution made by Herp to other signaling pathways. Western blotting revealed that the recombinant Herp lentiviral shRNA vector significantly inhibited the expression of the Herp protein in the thapsigargin-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that knockdown Herp inhibited the expression of ER stress-related genes during exposure to tunicamycin or thapsigargin. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, knockdown Herp markedly attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to tunicamycin; however, it strongly enhanced the expression of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to thapsigargin. We concluded that Herp lentiviral shRNA vectors had been successfully constructed; knockdown Herp inhibited ER stress and had a different effect on inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages depending on whether they were exposed to tunicamycin or thapsigargin.

  7. Lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference targeted against prohibitin inhibits apoptosis of the retinoic acid-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line NB4-R1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; He, Pengcheng; Zhang, Mei; Wu, Di

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the possibility of prohibitin (PHB) inhibition by lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and its influence on cell apoptosis in the retinoic acid-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line NB4-R1, a lentiviral vector encoding a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted against PHB (pGCSIL-GFP-PHB) was constructed and transfected into the packaging cells 293T, and the viral supernatant was collected to transfect NB4-R1 cells. Quantitative real-time fluorescent PCR and western blotting were used to detect the expression levels of PHB. Flow cytometry and detection of enzymatic activity of caspase-3 by western blotting were employed to examine cell apoptosis. Our results provide evidence that the lentiviral vector pGCSIL-GFP-PHB was constructed successfully, and the PHB mRNA and the protein expression inhibitory rates were 90.3 and 95.8%, respectively. When compared to the control group, the activity of caspase-3 decreased significantly, which showed a 57.3% downregulation, and the apoptosis rate was reduced by 44.6% (P<0.05). In conclusion, downregulation of the PHB gene may inhibit apoptosis of NB4-R1 cells, and it is speculated that this was at least partly due to the downregulation of caspase-3, and PHB may be a novel target for gene therapy for retinoic acid-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  8. Correction of murine sickle cell disease using gamma-globin lentiviral vectors to mediate high-level expression of fetal hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Jay, Dennis; Gray, John T; Boyd, Kelli M; Persons, Derek A

    2009-02-01

    Increased levels of red cell fetal hemogloblin, whether due to hereditary persistence of expression or from induction with hydroxyurea therapy, effectively ameliorate sickle cell disease (SCD). Therefore, we developed erythroid-specific, gamma-globin lentiviral vectors for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-targeted gene therapy with the goal of permanently increasing fetal hemoglobin (HbF) production in sickle red cells. We evaluated two different gamma-globin lentiviral vectors for therapeutic efficacy in the BERK sickle cell mouse model. The first vector, V5, contained the gamma-globin gene driven by 3.1 kb of beta-globin regulatory sequences and a 130-bp beta-globin promoter. The second vector, V5m3, was identical except that the gamma-globin 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) was replaced with the beta-globin 3'-UTR. Adult erythroid cells have beta-globin mRNA 3'-UTR-binding proteins that enhance beta-globin mRNA stability and we postulated this design might enhance gamma-globin expression. Stem cell gene transfer was efficient and nearly all red cells in transplanted mice expressed human gamma-globin. Both vectors demonstrated efficacy in disease correction, with the V5m3 vector producing a higher level of gamma-globin mRNA which was associated with high-level correction of anemia and secondary organ pathology. These data support the rationale for a gene therapy approach to SCD by permanently enhancing HbF using a gamma-globin lentiviral vector.

  9. Correction of Murine Sickle Cell Disease Using γ-Globin Lentiviral Vectors to Mediate High-level Expression of Fetal Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Jay, Dennis; Gray, John T; Boyd, Kelli M; Persons, Derek A

    2008-01-01

    Increased levels of red cell fetal hemogloblin, whether due to hereditary persistence of expression or from induction with hydroxyurea therapy, effectively ameliorate sickle cell disease (SCD). Therefore, we developed erythroid-specific, γ-globin lentiviral vectors for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-targeted gene therapy with the goal of permanently increasing fetal hemoglobin (HbF) production in sickle red cells. We evaluated two different γ-globin lentiviral vectors for therapeutic efficacy in the BERK sickle cell mouse model. The first vector, V5, contained the γ-globin gene driven by 3.1 kb of β-globin regulatory sequences and a 130-bp β-globin promoter. The second vector, V5m3, was identical except that the γ-globin 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) was replaced with the β-globin 3′-UTR. Adult erythroid cells have β-globin mRNA 3′-UTR-binding proteins that enhance β-globin mRNA stability and we postulated this design might enhance γ-globin expression. Stem cell gene transfer was efficient and nearly all red cells in transplanted mice expressed human γ-globin. Both vectors demonstrated efficacy in disease correction, with the V5m3 vector producing a higher level of γ-globin mRNA which was associated with high-level correction of anemia and secondary organ pathology. These data support the rationale for a gene therapy approach to SCD by permanently enhancing HbF using a γ-globin lentiviral vector. PMID:19050697

  10. Integration-defective lentiviral vector mediates efficient gene editing through homology-directed repair in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yebo; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2016-11-28

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are used as platforms for disease study, drug screening and cell-based therapy. To facilitate these applications, it is frequently necessary to genetically manipulate the hESC genome. Gene editing with engineered nucleases enables site-specific genetic modification of the human genome through homology-directed repair (HDR). However, the frequency of HDR remains low in hESCs. We combined efficient expression of engineered nucleases and integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) transduction for donor template delivery to mediate HDR in hESC line WA09. This strategy led to highly efficient HDR with more than 80% of the selected WA09 clones harboring the transgene inserted at the targeted genomic locus. However, certain portions of the HDR clones contained the concatemeric IDLV genomic structure at the target site, probably resulted from recombination of the IDLV genomic input before HDR with the target. We found that the integrase protein of IDLV mediated the highly efficient HDR through the recruitment of a cellular protein, LEDGF/p75. This study demonstrates that IDLV-mediated HDR is a powerful and broadly applicable technology to carry out site-specific gene modification in hESCs.

  11. Real-time in vivo bioluminescence imaging of lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer in mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Kim, T S; Choi, H S; Ryu, B Y; Gang, G T; Kim, S U; Koo, D B; Kim, J M; Han, J H; Park, C K; Her, S; Lee, D S

    2010-01-01

    Although much research has focused on transferring exogenous genes into living mouse testis to investigate specific gene functions in spermatogenic, Sertoli, and Leydig cells, relatively little is known regarding real-time gene expression in vivo. In this study, we constructed a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LV) encoding firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP); this was a highly efficient in vivo gene transfer tool. After microinjecting LV into the seminiferous tubules the ICR mouse testis, we detected luciferase and EGFP expression in vivo and ex vivo in the injected tubules using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) with the IVIS-200 system and fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (CellViZio), respectively. In addition, with an in vivo BLI system, luciferase expression in the testis was detected for approximately 3 mo. Furthermore, EGFP expression in seminiferous tubules was confirmed in excised testes via three-dimensional fluorescent imaging with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. With immunostaining, EGFP expression was confirmed in several male germ cell types in the seminiferous tubules, as well as in Sertoli and Leydig cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that real-time in vivo BLI analysis can be used to noninvasively (in vivo) monitor long-term luciferase expression in mouse testis, and we verified that EGFP expression is localized in seminiferous tubules after bicistronic LV-mediated gene transfer into mouse testes. Furthermore, we anticipate the future use of in vivo BLI technology for real-time study of specific genes involved in spermatogenesis.

  12. Schwann cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding Fgf-2 promote motor neuron regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Ilary; Mecollari, Vasil; González-Pérez, Francisco; Eggers, Ruben; Hoyng, Stefan; Verhaagen, Joost; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2014-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is a trophic factor expressed by glial cells and different neuronal populations. Addition of FGF-2 to spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants demonstrated that FGF-2 specifically increases motor neuron axonal growth. To further explore the potential capability of FGF-2 to promote axon regeneration, we produced a lentiviral vector (LV) to overexpress FGF-2 (LV-FGF2) in the injured rat peripheral nerve. Cultured Schwann cells transduced with FGF-2 and added to collagen matrix embedding spinal cord or DRG explants significantly increased motor but not sensory neurite outgrowth. LV-FGF2 was as effective as direct addition of the trophic factor to promote motor axon growth in vitro. Direct injection of LV-FGF2 into the rat sciatic nerve resulted in increased expression of FGF-2, which was localized in the basal lamina of Schwann cells. To investigate the in vivo effect of FGF-2 overexpression on axonal regeneration after nerve injury, Schwann cells transduced with LV-FGF2 were grafted in a silicone tube used to repair the resected rat sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological tests conducted for up to 2 months after injury revealed accelerated and more marked reinnervation of hindlimb muscles in the animals treated with LV-FGF2, with an increase in the number of motor and sensory neurons that reached the distal tibial nerve at the end of follow-up. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. An optimized lentiviral vector system for conditional RNAi and efficient cloning of microRNA embedded short hairpin RNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Adams, Felix F; Heckl, Dirk; Hoffmann, Thomas; Talbot, Steven R; Kloos, Arnold; Thol, Felicitas; Heuser, Michael; Zuber, Johannes; Schambach, Axel; Schwarzer, Adrian

    2017-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) and CRISPR-Cas9-based screening systems have emerged as powerful and complementary tools to unravel genetic dependencies through systematic gain- and loss-of-function studies. In recent years, a series of technical advances helped to enhance the performance of virally delivered RNAi. For instance, the incorporation of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) into endogenous microRNA contexts (shRNAmiRs) allows the use of Tet-regulated promoters for synchronous onset of gene knockdown and precise interrogation of gene dosage effects. However, remaining challenges include lack of efficient cloning strategies, inconsistent knockdown potencies and leaky expression. Here, we present a simple, one-step cloning approach for rapid and efficient cloning of miR-30 shRNAmiR libraries. We combined a human miR-30 backbone retaining native flanking sequences with an optimized all-in-one lentiviral vector system for conditional RNAi to generate a versatile toolbox characterized by higher doxycycline sensitivity, reduced leakiness and enhanced titer. Furthermore, refinement of existing shRNA design rules resulted in substantially improved prediction of powerful shRNAs. Our approach was validated by accurate quantification of the knockdown potency of over 250 single shRNAmiRs. To facilitate access and use by the scientific community, an online tool was developed for the automated design of refined shRNA-coding oligonucleotides ready for cloning into our system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a novel transgenic rat overexpressing the P2Y(2) nucleotide receptor using a lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Agca, Cansu; Seye, Cheikh; Kashuba Benson, Corinna M; Rikka, Shivaji; Chan, Anthony W S; Weisman, Gary A; Agca, Yuksel

    2009-01-01

    The G protein-coupled P2Y(2) nucleotide receptor (P2Y(2)R) is upregulated in response to stress and tissue injury and has been postulated to play a role in chronic inflammation seen in atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Sjogren's syndrome. The role of P2Y(2)R upregulation in vivo is poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a P2Y(2)R overexpressing animal model. The P2Y(2)R overexpressing transgenic rat was generated using a lentiviral vector. Rats overexpressing P2Y(2)R showed a significant increase in P2Y(2)R mRNA levels in all tissues screened as compared to nontransgenic rats. Fura 2 imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) isolated from aorta indicated that the percentage of cells exhibiting increases in the intracellular free calcium concentration in response to P2Y(2)R agonists was significantly greater in freshly isolated SMCs from transgenic rats than wild-type controls. Histopathological examination of tissues revealed that P2Y(2)R overexpressing rats develop lymphocytic infiltration in lacrimal glands and kidneys as early as at 3 months of age. These rats show similarities to patients with Sjogren's syndrome who display lymphocyte-mediated tissue damage. This transgenic rat model of P2Y(2)R overexpression may prove useful for linking P2Y(2)R upregulation with chronic inflammatory diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and Sjogren's syndrome.

  15. Efficient in vivo regulation of cytidine deaminase expression in the haematopoietic system using a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vector system.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, N; Brennig, S; Pfaff, N; Schermeier, H; Dahlmann, J; Phaltane, R; Gruh, I; Modlich, U; Schambach, A; Baum, C; Moritz, T

    2013-03-01

    Regulated transgene expression may reduce transgene-specific and genotoxic risks associated with gene therapy. To prove this concept, we have investigated the suitability of doxycycline (Dox)-inducible human cytidine deaminase (hCDD) overexpression from lentiviral vectors to mediate effective myeloprotection while circumventing the lymphotoxicity observed with constitutive CDD activity. Rapid Dox-mediated transgene induction associated with a 6-17-fold increase in drug resistance was observed in 32D and primary murine bone marrow (BM) cells. Moreover, robust Dox-regulated transgene expression in the entire haematopoietic system was demonstrated for primary and secondary recipients of hCDD-transduced R26-M2rtTA transgenic BM cells. Furthermore, mice were significantly protected from myelosuppressive chemotherapy as evidenced by accelerated recovery of granulocytes (1.9±0.6 vs 1.3±0.3, P=0.034) and platelets (883±194 vs 584±160 10(3) per μl, P=0.011). Minimal transgene expression in the non-induced state and no overt cellular toxicities including lymphotoxicity were detected. Thus, using a relevant murine transplant model our data provide conclusive evidence that drug-resistance transgenes can be expressed in a regulated fashion in the lymphohaematopoietic system, and that Dox-inducible systems may be used to reduce myelotoxic side effect of anticancer chemotherapy or to avoid side effects of high constitutive transgene expression.

  16. Liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors reverses anti-factor IX pre-existing immunity in haemophilic mice

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Andrea; Cantore, Alessio; Della Valle, Patrizia; Goudy, Kevin; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Russo, Fabio; Bartolaccini, Sara; D'Angelo, Armando; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    A major complication of factor replacement therapy for haemophilia is the development of anti-factor neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors). Here we show that liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors (LVs) expressing factor IX (FIX) strongly reduces pre-existing anti-FIX antibodies and eradicates FIX inhibitors in haemophilia B mice. Concomitantly, plasma FIX levels and clotting activity rose to 50–100% of normal. The treatment was effective in 75% of treated mice. FIX-specific plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells were reduced, likely because of memory B-cell depletion in response to constant exposure to high doses of FIX. Regulatory T cells displaying FIX-specific suppressive capacity were induced in gene therapy treated mice and controlled FIX-specific T helper cells. Gene therapy proved safer than a regimen mimicking immune tolerance induction (ITI) by repeated high-dose FIX protein administration, which induced severe anaphylactoid reactions in inhibitors-positive haemophilia B mice. Liver gene therapy can thus reverse pre-existing immunity, induce active tolerance to FIX and establish sustained FIX activity at therapeutic levels. These data position gene therapy as an attractive treatment option for inhibitors-positive haemophilic patients. PMID:24106222

  17. Integration-defective lentiviral vector mediates efficient gene editing through homology-directed repair in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yebo; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are used as platforms for disease study, drug screening and cell-based therapy. To facilitate these applications, it is frequently necessary to genetically manipulate the hESC genome. Gene editing with engineered nucleases enables site-specific genetic modification of the human genome through homology-directed repair (HDR). However, the frequency of HDR remains low in hESCs. We combined efficient expression of engineered nucleases and integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) transduction for donor template delivery to mediate HDR in hESC line WA09. This strategy led to highly efficient HDR with more than 80% of the selected WA09 clones harboring the transgene inserted at the targeted genomic locus. However, certain portions of the HDR clones contained the concatemeric IDLV genomic structure at the target site, probably resulted from recombination of the IDLV genomic input before HDR with the target. We found that the integrase protein of IDLV mediated the highly efficient HDR through the recruitment of a cellular protein, LEDGF/p75. This study demonstrates that IDLV-mediated HDR is a powerful and broadly applicable technology to carry out site-specific gene modification in hESCs. PMID:27899664

  18. Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells by Using A Lentiviral Vector Carrying PDX1

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdi, Amir; Abroun, Saied; Jafarian, Arefeh; Soleimani, Masoud; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Eskandari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type I diabetes is an immunologically-mediated devastation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) in the pancreatic islet. Stem cells that produce β-cells are a new promising tool. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self renewing multi potent cells showing capabilities to differentiate into ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal tissues. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1) is a master regulator gene required for embryonic development of the pancreas and is crucial for normal pancreatic islets activities in adults. Materials and Methods We induced the over-expression of the PDX1 gene in human bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) by Lenti-PDX1 in order to generate IPCs. Next, we examine the ability of the cells by measuring insulin/c-peptide production and INSULIN and PDX1 gene expressions. Results After transduction, MSCs changed their morphology at day 5 and gradually differentiated into IPCs. INSULIN and PDX1 expressions were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining. IPC secreted insulin and C-peptide in the media that contained different glucose concentrations. Conclusion MSCs differentiated into IPCs by genetic manipulation. Our result showed that lentiviral vectors could deliver PDX1 gene to MSCs and induce pancreatic differentiation. PMID:26199902

  19. The New Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for Thalassemia Gene Therapy Combining Two HPFH Activating Elements Corrects Human Thalassemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Stamateris, Evangelos; Panetsos, Fottes; Karagiorga, Markisia; Tsaftaridis, Panagiotis; Graphakos, Stelios

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To address how low titer, variable expression, and gene silencing affect gene therapy vectors for hemoglobinopathies, in a previous study we successfully used the HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin)-2 enhancer in a series of oncoretroviral vectors. On the basis of these data, we generated a novel insulated self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector, termed GGHI, carrying the Aγ-globin gene with the −117 HPFH point mutation and the HPFH-2 enhancer and exhibiting a pancellular pattern of Aγ-globin gene expression in MEL-585 clones. To assess the eventual clinical feasibility of this vector, GGHI was tested on CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells from nonmobilized peripheral blood or bone marrow from 20 patients with β-thalassemia. Our results show that GGHI increased the production of γ-globin by 32.9% as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (p=0.001), with a mean vector copy number per cell of 1.1 and a mean transduction efficiency of 40.3%. Transduced populations also exhibited a lower rate of apoptosis and resulted in improvement of erythropoiesis with a higher percentage of orthochromatic erythroblasts. This is the first report of a locus control region (LCR)-free SIN insulated lentiviral vector that can be used to efficiently produce the anticipated therapeutic levels of γ-globin protein in the erythroid progeny of primary human thalassemic hematopoietic stem cells in vitro. PMID:21875313

  20. Inducible packaging cells for large-scale production of lentiviral vectors in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Broussau, Sophie; Jabbour, Nadine; Lachapelle, Guillaume; Durocher, Yves; Tom, Rosanne; Transfiguracion, Julia; Gilbert, Rénald; Massie, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    We have developed new packaging cell lines (293SF-PacLV) that can produce lentiviral vectors (LVs) in serum-free suspension cultures. A cell line derived from 293SF cells, expressing the repressor (CymR) of the cumate switch and the reverse transactivator (rtTA2(S)-M2) of the tetracycline (Tet) switch, was established first. We next generated clones stably expressing the Gag/Pol and Rev genes of human immunodeficiency virus-1, and the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G). Expression of Rev and VSV-G was tightly regulated by the cumate and Tet switches. Our best packaging cells produced up to 2.6 x 10(7) transducing units (TU)/ml after transfection with the transfer vector. Up to 3.4 x 10(7) TU/ml were obtained using stable producers generated by transducing the packaging cells with conditional-SIN-LV. The 293SF-PacLV was stable, as shown by the fact that some producers maintained high-level LV production for 18 weeks without selective pressure. The utility of the 293SF-PacLV for scaling up production in serum-free medium was demonstrated in suspension cultures and in a 3.5-L bioreactor. In shake flasks, the best packaging cells produced between 3.0 and 8.0 x 10(6) TU/ml/day for 3 days, and the best producer cells, between 1.0 and 3.4 x 10(7) TU/ml/day for 5 days. In the bioreactor, 2.8 liters containing 2.0 x 10(6) TU/ml was obtained after 3 days of batch culture following the transfection of packaging cells. In summary, the 293SF-PacLV possesses all the attributes necessary to become a valuable tool for scaling up LV production for preclinical and clinical applications.

  1. Development of B-lineage predominant lentiviral vectors for use in genetic therapies for B cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Sather, Blythe D; Ryu, Byoung Y; Stirling, Brigid V; Garibov, Mikhail; Kerns, Hannah M; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Astrakhan, Alexander; Rawlings, David J

    2011-03-01

    Sustained, targeted, high-level transgene expression in primary B lymphocytes may be useful for gene therapy in B cell disorders. We developed several candidate B-lineage predominant self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (LV) containing alternative enhancer/promoter elements including: the immunoglobulin β (Igβ) (B29) promoter combined with the immunoglobulin µ enhancer (EµB29); and the endogenous BTK promoter with or without Eµ (EµBtkp or Btkp). LV-driven enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter expression was evaluated in cell lines and primary cells derived from human or murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In murine primary cells, EµB29 and EµBtkp LV-mediated high-level expression in immature and mature B cells compared with all other lineages. Expression increased with B cell maturation and was maintained in peripheral subsets. Expression in T and myeloid cells was much lower in percentage and intensity. Similarly, both EµB29 and EµBtkp LV exhibited high-level activity in human primary B cells. In contrast to EµB29, Btkp and EµBtkp LV also exhibited modest activity in myeloid cells, consistent with the expression profile of endogenous Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Notably, EµB29 and EµBtkp activity was superior in all expression models to an alternative, B-lineage targeted vector containing the EµS.CD19 enhancer/promoter. In summary, EµB29 and EµBtkp LV comprise efficient delivery platforms for gene expression in B-lineage cells.

  2. Lysophosphatidylcholine as an adjuvant for lentiviral vector mediated gene transfer to airway epithelium: effect of acyl chain length

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poor gene transfer efficiency has been a major problem in developing an effective gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), a natural airway surfactant, can enhance viral gene transfer in animal models. We examined the electrophysiological and physical effect of airway pre-treatment with variants of LPC on lentiviral (LV) vector gene transfer efficiency in murine nasal airways in vivo. Methods Gene transfer was assessed after 1 week following nasal instillations of a VSV-G pseudotype LV vector pre-treated with a low and high dose of LPC variants. The electrophysiological effects of a range of LPC variants were assessed by nasal transepithelial potential difference measurements (TPD) to determine tight junction permeability. Any physical changes to the epithelium from administration of the LPC variants were noted by histological methods in airway tissue harvested after 1 hour. Results Gene transduction was significantly greater compared to control (PBS) for our standard LPC (palmitoyl/stearoyl mixture) treatment and for the majority of the other LPC variants with longer acyl chain lengths. The LPC variant heptadecanoyl also produced significantly greater LV gene transfer compared to our standard LPC mixture. LV gene transfer and the transepithelial depolarization produced by the 0.1% LPC variants at 1 hour were strongly correlated (r2 = 0.94), but at the 1% concentration the correlation was less strong (r2 = 0.59). LPC variants that displayed minor to moderate levels of disruption to the airway epithelium were clearly associated with higher LV gene transfer. Conclusions These findings show the LPC variants effect on airway barrier function and their correlation to the effectiveness of gene expression. The enhanced expression produced by a number of LPC variants should provide new options for preclinical development of efficient airway gene transfer techniques. PMID:20569421

  3. Sustained knockdown of a disease-causing gene in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells using lentiviral vector-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Eggenschwiler, Reto; Loya, Komal; Wu, Guangming; Sharma, Amar Deep; Sgodda, Malte; Zychlinski, Daniela; Herr, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Teckman, Jeffrey; Bals, Robert; Ott, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Schöler, Hans Robert; Cantz, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for studies on disease-related developmental processes and may serve as an autologous cell source for future treatment of many hereditary diseases. New genetic engineering tools such as zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nuclease allow targeted correction of monogenetic disorders but are very cumbersome to establish. Aiming at studies on the knockdown of a disease-causing gene, lentiviral vector-mediated expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) is a valuable option, but it is limited by silencing of the knockdown construct upon epigenetic remodeling during differentiation. Here, we propose an approach for the expression of a therapeutic shRNA in disease-specific iPSCs using third-generation lentiviral vectors. Targeting severe α-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency, we overexpressed a human microRNA 30 (miR30)-styled shRNA directed against the PiZ variant of A1AT, which is known to cause chronic liver damage in affected patients. This knockdown cassette is traceable from clonal iPSC lines to differentiated hepatic progeny via an enhanced green fluorescence protein reporter expressed from the same RNA-polymerase II promoter. Importantly, the cytomegalovirus i/e enhancer chicken β actin (CAG) promoter-driven expression of this construct is sustained without transgene silencing during hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. At low lentiviral copy numbers per genome we confirmed a functional relevant reduction (-66%) of intracellular PiZ protein in hepatic cells after differentiation of patient-specific iPSCs. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated expression of shRNAs can be efficiently used to knock down and functionally evaluate disease-related genes in patient-specific iPSCs.

  4. Lentiviral vector-based prime/boost vaccination against AIDS: pilot study shows protection against Simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac251 challenge in macaques.

    PubMed

    Beignon, Anne-Sophie; Mollier, Karine; Liard, Christelle; Coutant, Frédéric; Munier, Sandie; Rivière, Julie; Souque, Philippe; Charneau, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    AIDS vaccination has a pressing need for more potent vaccination vectors capable of eliciting strong, diversified, and long-lasting cellular immune responses against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lentiviral vectors have demonstrated efficiency not only as gene delivery vehicles for gene therapy applications but also as vaccination tools. This is likely due to their ability to transduce nondividing cells, including dendritic cells, enabling sustained endogenous antigen presentation and thus the induction of high proportions of specific cytotoxic T cells and long-lasting memory T cells. We show in a first proof-of-concept pilot study that a prime/boost vaccination strategy using lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with a glycoprotein G from two non-cross-reactive vesicular stomatitis virus serotypes elicited robust and broad cellular immune responses against the vector-encoded antigen, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) GAG, in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination conferred strong protection against a massive intrarectal challenge with SIVmac251, as evidenced both by the reduction of viremia at the peak of acute infection (a mean of over 2 log(10) fold reduction) and by the full preservation of the CD28(+) CD95(+) memory CD4(+) T cells during the acute phase, a strong correlate of protection against pathogenesis. Although vaccinees continued to display lower viremia than control macaques during the early chronic phase, these differences were not statistically significant by day 50 postchallenge. A not-optimized SIV GAG antigen was chosen to show the strong potential of the lentiviral vector system for vaccination. Given that a stronger protection can be anticipated from a modern HIV-1 antigen design, gene transfer vectors derived from HIV-1 appear as promising candidates for vaccination against HIV-1 infection.

  5. Development of a Non-integrating Rev-dependent Lentiviral Vector Carrying Diphtheria Toxin A Chain and Human TRAF6 to Target HIV Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhirui; Tang, Zhongwei; Zheng, Yanfang; Yu, Dongyang; Spear, Mark; Iyer, Subashini R.; Bishop, Barney; Wu, Yuntao

    2010-01-01

    Persistence of HIV despite highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a lasting challenge to virus eradication. To develop a strategy complementary to HAART, we constructed a series of Rev-dependent lentiviral vectors carrying diphtheria toxin A chain (DT-A) and its attenuated mutants, as well as human TRAF6. Expression of these suicide genes following delivery through viral particles is dependent on Rev, which exists only in infected cells. Among these toxins, DT-A has been known to trigger cell death with as little as a single molecule, whereas two of the attenuated mutants in this study, DT-A(176) and DT-A(ΔN), were well-tolerated by cells at low levels. TRAF6 induced apoptosis only with persistent overexpression. Thus, these suicide genes, which induce cell death at different expression levels, offer a balance between efficacy and safety. To minimize possible mutagenesis introduced by retroviral integration in non-target cells, we further developed a non-integrating Rev-dependent (NIRD) lentiviral vector to deliver these genes. In addition, we constructed a DT-A-resistant human cell line by introducing a human elongation factor 2 (EF-2) mutant into HEK293T cells. This allowed us to manufacture the first high-titer NIRD lentiviral particles carrying DT-A to target HIV-positive cells. PMID:20410930

  6. Quantitative shearing linear amplification polymerase chain reaction: an improved method for quantifying lentiviral vector insertion sites in transplanted hematopoietic cell systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sheng; Bonner, Melissa A; Wang, Yong-Dong; Rapp, Samuel; De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2015-02-01

    In gene therapy trials targeting blood disorders, it is important to detect dominance of transduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) clones arising from vector insertion site (VIS) effects. Current methods for VIS analysis often do not have defined levels of quantitative accuracy and therefore can fail to detect early clonal dominance. We have developed a rapid and inexpensive method for measuring clone size based on random shearing of genomic DNA, minimal exponential PCR amplification, and shear site counts as a quantitative endpoint. This quantitative shearing linear amplification PCR (qsLAM PCR) assay utilizes an internal control sample containing 19 lentiviral insertion sites per cell that is mixed with polyclonal samples derived from transduced human CD34+ cells. Samples were analyzed from transplanted pigtail macaques and from a participant in our X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) lentiviral vector trial and yielded controlled and quantitative results in all cases. One case of early clonal dominance was detected in a monkey transplanted with limiting numbers of transduced HSCs, while the clinical samples from the XSCID trial participant showed highly diverse clonal representation. These studies demonstrate that qsLAM PCR is a facile and quantitative assay for measuring clonal repertoires in subjects enrolled in human gene therapy trials using lentiviral-transduced HSCs.

  7. Antiviral effects of autologous CD4 T cells genetically modified with a conditionally replicating lentiviral vector expressing long antisense to HIV.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Mukherjee, Rithun; Brady, Troy; Rebello, Tessio; Humeau, Laurent; Kalos, Michael; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Montaner, Luis J; Schullery, Daniel; Shaheen, Farida; Brennan, Andrea L; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Slepushkin, Vladimir; Veloso, Elizabeth; Mackley, Adonna; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Aberra, Faten; Zhan, Jenny; Boyer, Jean; Collman, Ronald G; Bushman, Frederic D; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-02-28

    We report the safety and tolerability of 87 infusions of lentiviral vector–modified autologous CD4 T cells (VRX496-T; trade name, Lexgenleucel-T) in 17 HIV patients with well-controlled viremia. Antiviral effects were studied during analytic treatment interruption in a subset of 13 patients. VRX496-T was associated with a decrease in viral load set points in 6 of 8 subjects (P = .08). In addition, A → G transitions were enriched in HIV sequences after infusion, which is consistent with a model in which transduced CD4 T cells exert antisense-mediated genetic pressure on HIV during infection. Engraftment of vector-modified CD4 T cells was measured in gut-associated lymphoid tissue and was correlated with engraftment in blood. The engraftment half-life in the blood was approximately 5 weeks, with stable persistence in some patients for up to 5 years. Conditional replication of VRX496 was detected periodically through 1 year after infusion. No evidence of clonal selection of lentiviral vector–transduced T cells or integration enrichment near oncogenes was detected. This is the first demonstration that gene-modified cells can exert genetic pressure on HIV. We conclude that gene-modified T cells have the potential to decrease the fitness of HIV-1 and conditionally replicative lentiviral vectors have a promising safety profile in T cells.

  8. Antiviral effects of autologous CD4 T cells genetically modified with a conditionally replicating lentiviral vector expressing long antisense to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Mukherjee, Rithun; Brady, Troy; Rebello, Tessio; Humeau, Laurent; Kalos, Michael; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Montaner, Luis J.; Schullery, Daniel; Shaheen, Farida; Brennan, Andrea L.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Slepushkin, Vladimir; Veloso, Elizabeth; Mackley, Adonna; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Aberra, Faten; Zhan, Jenny; Boyer, Jean; Collman, Ronald G.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Levine, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the safety and tolerability of 87 infusions of lentiviral vector–modified autologous CD4 T cells (VRX496-T; trade name, Lexgenleucel-T) in 17 HIV patients with well-controlled viremia. Antiviral effects were studied during analytic treatment interruption in a subset of 13 patients. VRX496-T was associated with a decrease in viral load set points in 6 of 8 subjects (P = .08). In addition, A → G transitions were enriched in HIV sequences after infusion, which is consistent with a model in which transduced CD4 T cells exert antisense-mediated genetic pressure on HIV during infection. Engraftment of vector-modified CD4 T cells was measured in gut-associated lymphoid tissue and was correlated with engraftment in blood. The engraftment half-life in the blood was approximately 5 weeks, with stable persistence in some patients for up to 5 years. Conditional replication of VRX496 was detected periodically through 1 year after infusion. No evidence of clonal selection of lentiviral vector–transduced T cells or integration enrichment near oncogenes was detected. This is the first demonstration that gene-modified cells can exert genetic pressure on HIV. We conclude that gene-modified T cells have the potential to decrease the fitness of HIV-1 and conditionally replicative lentiviral vectors have a promising safety profile in T cells. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as number NCT00295477. PMID:23264589

  9. A rapid and efficient polyethylenimine-based transfection method to prepare lentiviral or retroviral vectors: useful for making iPS cells and transduction of primary cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaozhe; Shi, Haijun; Chu, Xinran; Zhou, Xiaoling; Sun, Pingnan

    2016-09-01

    To improve the efficiency, reproducibility and consistency of the PEI-based transfection method that is often used in preparation of recombinant lentiviral or retroviral vectors. The contributions to transfection efficiency of multi-factors including concentration of PEI or DNA, dilution buffer for PEI/DNA, manner to prepare PEI/DNA complexes, influence of serum, incubation time for PEI/DNA complexes, and transfection time were studied. Gentle mixing during the preparation of PEI/DNA transfection complexes is critical for a high transfection efficiency. PEI could be stored at room temperature or 4 °C, and most importantly, multigelation should be avoided. The transfection efficiency of the PEI-based new method in different types of cells, such as 293T, Cos-7, HeLa, HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7 and L02, was also higher than that of the previous method. After optimization, the titer of our lentiviral system or retroviral system produced by PEI-based new method was about 10- or 3-times greater than that produced by PEI-based previous method, respectively. We provide a rapid and efficient PEI-based method for preparation of recombinant lentiviral or retroviral vectors which is useful for making iPS cells as well as transduction of primary cell cultures.

  10. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  11. [Construction of Protein Phosphatase 2A Catalytic Subunit β (PPP2Cβ) Overexpression Lentiviral Vector and Its Effect on K562 Erythroid Differentiation].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhao, Ke; Dong, Xiao-Ming; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Chang-Yan

    2016-08-01

    To construct the ovexpression lentivirus vector of PPP2Cβ, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, so as to obtain high-titer packaged lentivirus particles, and to examine the effect of PPP2Cβ on the erythroid differentiation Methods: The CDS of PPP2Cβ was cloned into the second generation of lentivirus vector FUGW, which should be used to co-transfect HEK 293T cells with the lentiviral expression vector and packaging vectors including pMD2G and pSPAX2. Lentiviruses were harvested at 36 and 48 hours after transfection. Titers of viral stock were determined by using flow cytometric analysis. The Western blot was performed to detect the expression level of PPP2Cβ in K562 cells transinfected with the lentiviruses. Benzidine staining and real-time PCR analysis were used to assess the erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. The PPP2Cβ overexpressing lentivirus vectors were constructed, the high-titer lentiviral particles were obtained, and then the PPP2Cβ overexpression K562 cell line was established and promote erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. This study suggests that overexpression PPP2Cβ can promote K562 cell erythroid differentiation.

  12. Transgenic expression of human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor from integration-deficient lentiviral vectors is neuroprotective in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Broadstock, Martin; Schliesser, Maximilian G; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2014-07-01

    Standard integration-proficient lentiviral vectors (IPLVs) are effective at much lower doses than other vector systems and have shown promise for gene therapy of Parkinson's disease (PD). Their main drawback is the risk of insertional mutagenesis. The novel biosafety-enhanced integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) may offer a significant enhancement in biosafety, but have not been previously tested in a model of a major disease. We have assessed biosafety and transduction efficiency of IDLVs in a rat model of PD, using IPLVs as a reference. Genomic insertion of lentivectors injected into the lesioned striatum was studied by linear amplification-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by deep sequencing and insertion site analysis, demonstrating lack of significant IDLV integration. Reporter gene expression studies showed efficient, long-lived, and transcriptionally targeted expression from IDLVs injected ahead of lesioning in the rat striatum, although at somewhat lower expression levels than from IPLVs. Transgenic human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF) expression from IDLVs was used for a long-term investigation of lentivector-mediated, transcriptionally targeted neuroprotection in this PD rat model. Vectors were injected before striatal lesioning, and the results showed improvements in nigral dopaminergic neuron survival and behavioral tests regardless of lentiviral integration proficiency, although they confirmed lower expression levels of hGDNF from IDLVs. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of IDLVs in a model of a major disease and indicate that these vectors could provide long-term PD treatment at low dose, combining efficacy and biosafety for targeted central nervous system applications.

  13. Efficient gene transfer into human primary blood lymphocytes by surface-engineered lentiviral vectors that display a T cell-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Marielle; Verhoeyen, Els; Salmon, Patrick; Trono, Didier; Russell, Stephen J; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-04-01

    In contrast to oncoretroviruses, lentiviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) are able to integrate their genetic material into the genome of nonproliferating cells that are metabolically active. Likewise, vectors derived from HIV-1 can transduce many types of nonproliferating cells, with the exception of some particular quiescent cell types such as resting T cells. Completion of reverse transcription, nuclear import, and subsequent integration of the lentivirus genome do not occur in these cells unless they are activated via the T-cell receptor (TCR) or by cytokines or both. However, to preserve the functional properties of these important gene therapy target cells, only minimal activation with cytokines or TCR-specific antibodies should be performed during gene transfer. Here we report the characterization of HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors whose virion surface was genetically engineered to display a T cell-activating single-chain antibody polypeptide derived from the anti-CD3 OKT3 monoclonal antibody. Interaction of OKT3 IgGs with the TCR can activate resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by promoting the transition from G(0) to G(1) phases of the cell cycle. Compared to unmodified HIV-1-based vectors, OKT3-displaying lentiviral vectors strongly increased gene delivery in freshly isolated PBLs by up to 100-fold. Up to 48% transduction could be obtained without addition of PBL activation stimuli during infection. Taken together, these results show that surface-engineered lentiviral vectors significantly improve transduction of primary lymphocytes by activating the target cells. Moreover these results provide a proof of concept for an approach that may have utility in various gene transfer applications, including in vivo gene delivery.

  14. Remarkable stability of an instability-prone lentiviral vector plasmid in Escherichia coli Stbl3.

    PubMed

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Tolmachov, Oleg E; Zambetti, Lia Paola; Tchetchelnitski, Viktoria; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale production of plasmid DNA to prepare therapeutic gene vectors or DNA-based vaccines requires a suitable bacterial host, which can stably maintain the plasmid DNA during industrial cultivation. Plasmid loss during bacterial cell divisions and structural changes in the plasmid DNA can dramatically reduce the yield of the desired recombinant plasmid DNA. While generating an HIV-based gene vector containing a bicistronic expression cassette 5'-Olig2cDNA-IRES-dsRed2-3', we encountered plasmid DNA instability, which occurred in homologous recombination deficient recA1 Escherichia coli strain Stbl2 specifically during large-scale bacterial cultivation. Unexpectedly, the new recombinant plasmid was structurally changed or completely lost in 0.5 L liquid cultures but not in the preceding 5 mL cultures. Neither the employment of an array of alternative recA1 E. coli plasmid hosts, nor the lowering of the culture incubation temperature prevented the instability. However, after the introduction of this instability-prone plasmid into the recA13E. coli strain Stbl3, the transformed bacteria grew without being overrun by plasmid-free cells, reduction in the plasmid DNA yield or structural changes in plasmid DNA. Thus, E. coli strain Stbl3 conferred structural and maintenance stability to the otherwise instability-prone lentivirus-based recombinant plasmid, suggesting that this strain can be used for the faithful maintenance of similar stability-compromised plasmids in large-scale bacterial cultivations. In contrast to Stbl2, which is derived wholly from the wild type isolate E. coli K12, E. coli Stbl3 is a hybrid strain of mixed E. coli K12 and E. coli B parentage. Therefore, we speculate that genetic determinants for the benevolent properties of E. coli Stbl3 for safe plasmid propagation originate from its E. coli B ancestor.

  15. Development of a Novel Transgenic Rat Overexpressing the P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Using a Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Agca, Cansu; Seye, Cheikh; Benson, Corinna M. Kashuba; Rikka, Shivaji; Chan, Anthony W.S.; Weisman, Gary A.; Agca, Yuksel

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is upregulated in response to stress and tissue injury and has been postulated to play a role in chronic inflammation seen in atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Sjögren’s syndrome. The role of P2Y2R upregulation in vivo is poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a P2Y2R overexpressing animal model. The P2Y2R overexpressing transgenic rat was generated using a lentiviral vector. Rats overexpressing P2Y2R showed a significant increase in P2Y2R mRNA levels in all tissues screened as compared to nontransgenic rats. Fura 2 imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) isolated from aorta indicated that the percentage of cells exhibiting increases in the intracellular free calcium concentration in response to P2Y2R agonists was significantly greater in freshly isolated SMCs from transgenic rats than wild-type controls. Histopathological examination of tissues revealed that P2Y2R overexpressing rats develop lymphocytic infiltration in lacrimal glands and kidneys as early as at 3 months of age. These rats show similarities to patients with Sjögren’s syndrome who display lymphocyte-mediated tissue damage. This transgenic rat model of P2Y2R overexpression may prove useful for linking P2Y2R upregulation with chronic inflammatory diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:19155635

  16. A bicistronic SIN-lentiviral vector containing G156A MGMT allows selection and metabolic correction of hematopoietic protoporphyric cell lines.

    PubMed

    Richard, Emmanuel; Géronimi, Fabien; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Redonnet-Vernhet, Isabelle; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Gerson, Stanton L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2003-09-01

    Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is an inherited disease characterised by a ferrochelatase (FECH) deficiency, the latest enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, leading to the accumulation of toxic protoporphyrin in the liver, bone marrow and spleen. We have previously shown that a successful gene therapy of a murine model of the disease was possible with lentiviral vectors even in the absence of preselection of corrected cells, but lethal irradiation of the recipient was necessary to obtain an efficient bone marrow engraftment. To overcome a preconditioning regimen, a selective growth advantage has to be conferred to the corrected cells. We have developed a novel bicistronic lentiviral vector that contains the human alkylating drug resistance mutant O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT G156A) and FECH cDNAs. We tested their capacity to protect hematopoietic cell lines efficiently from alkylating drug toxicity and correct enzymatic deficiency. EPP lymphoblastoid (LB) cell lines, K562 and cord-blood-derived CD34(+) cells were transduced at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the bicistronic constructs. Resistance to O(6)-benzylguanine (BG)/N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea (BCNU) was clearly shown in transduced cells, leading to the survival and expansion of provirus-containing cells. Corrected EPP LB cells were selectively amplified, leading to complete restoration of enzymatic activity and the absence of protoporphyrin accumulation. This study demonstrates that a lentiviral vector including therapeutic and G156A MGMT genes followed by BG/BCNU exposure can lead to a full metabolic correction of deficient cells. This vector might form the basis of new EPP mouse gene therapy protocols without a preconditioning regimen followed by in vivo selection of corrected hematopoietic stem cells. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Production of functional coagulation factor VIII from iPSCs using a lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Y; Ohmori, T; Mimuro, J; Madoiwa, S; Inoue, M; Hasegawa, M; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y

    2014-01-01

    The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as an autologous cell source has shed new light on cell replacement therapy with respect to the treatment of numerous hereditary disorders. We focused on the use of iPSCs for cell-based therapy of haemophilia. We generated iPSCs from mesenchymal stem cells that had been isolated from C57BL/6 mice. The mouse iPSCs were generated through the induction of four transcription factor genes Oct3/4, Klf-4, Sox-2 and c-Myc. The derived iPSCs released functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) following transduction with a simian immunodeficiency virus vector. The subcutaneous transplantation of iPSCs expressing FVIII into nude mice resulted in teratoma formation, and significantly increased plasma levels of FVIII. The plasma concentration of FVIII was at levels appropriate for human therapy at 2-4 weeks post transplantation. Our data suggest that iPSCs could be an attractive and prospective autologous cell source for the production of coagulation factor, and that engineered iPSCs expressing coagulation factor might provide a cell-based therapeutic strategy appropriate for haemophilia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Low-Affinity Neurotrophin Receptor p75 Promotes the Transduction of Targeted Lentiviral Vectors to Cholinergic Neurons of Rat Basal Forebrain.

    PubMed

    Antyborzec, Inga; O'Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, James O; Ovsepian, Saak V

    2016-10-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) are one of the most affected neuronal types in Alzheimer's disease (AD), with their extensive loss documented at late stages of the pathology. While discriminatory provision of neuroprotective agents and trophic factors to these cells is thought to be of substantial therapeutic potential, the intricate topography and structure of the forebrain cholinergic system imposes a major challenge. To overcome this, we took advantage of the physiological enrichment of BFCNs with a low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) for their targeting by lentiviral vectors within the intact brain of adult rat. Herein, a method is described that affords selective and effective transduction of BFCNs with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter, which combines streptavidin-biotin technology with anti-p75(NTR) antibody-coated lentiviral vectors. Specific GFP expression in cholinergic neurons was attained in the medial septum and nuclei of the diagonal band Broca after a single intraventricular administration of such targeted vectors. Bioelectrical activity of GFP-labeled neurons was proven to be unchanged. Thus, proof of principle is obtained for the utility of the low-affinity p75(NTR) for targeted transduction of vectors to BFCNs in vivo.

  19. Immunization of Mice with Lentiviral Vectors Targeted to MHC Class II+ Cells Is Due to Preferential Transduction of Dendritic Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ciré, Séverine; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Yao, Roseline; Fisson, Sylvain; Buchholz, Christian J.; Collins, Mary K.; Galy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors such as lentiviral vectors offer versatile possibilities to express transgenic antigens for vaccination purposes. However, viral vaccines leading to broad transduction and transgene expression in vivo, are undesirable. Therefore, strategies capable of directing gene transfer only to professional antigen-presenting cells would increase the specific activity and safety of genetic vaccines. A lentiviral vector pseudotype specific for murine major histocompatibilty complex class II (LV-MHCII) was recently developed and the present study aims to characterize the in vivo biodistribution profile and immunization potential of this vector in mice. Whereas the systemic administration of a vector pseudotyped with a ubiquitously-interacting envelope led to prominent detection of vector copies in the liver of animals, the injection of an equivalent amount of LV-MHCII resulted in a more specific biodistribution of vector and transgene. Copies of LV-MHCII were found only in secondary lymphoid organs, essentially in CD11c+ dendritic cells expressing the transgene whereas B cells were not efficiently targeted in vivo, contrary to expectations based on in vitro testing. Upon a single injection of LV-MHCII, naive mice mounted specific effector CD4 and CD8 T cell responses against the intracelllular transgene product with the generation of Th1 cytokines, development of in vivo cytotoxic activity and establishment of T cell immune memory. The targeting of dendritic cells by recombinant viral vaccines must therefore be assessed in vivo but this strategy is feasible, effective for immunization and cross-presentation and constitutes a potentially safe alternative to limit off-target gene expression in gene-based vaccination strategies with integrative vectors. PMID:25058148

  20. HTLV type 1 Tax transduction in microglial cells and astrocytes by lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Wrzesinski, S; Séguin, R; Liu, Y; Domville, S; Planelles, V; Massa, P; Barker, E; Antel, J; Feuer, G

    2000-11-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) can result in the development of HAM/TSP, a nonfatal, chronic inflammatory disease involving neuronal degeneration and demyelination of the central nervous system. Elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1 observed in the cerebrospinal fluid of HAM-TSP patients suggest that cytokine dysregulation within the CNS is involved in neuropathogenesis. HTLV-1 infection and enhanced expression of TNF-alpha by microglial cells, astrocytes, and macrophages has been hypothesized to lead to the destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes in the CNS. Although the association of HTLV-2 infection and development of neurological disease is more tenuous, HTLV-2 has also been found to be associated with peripheral neuropathies. To investigate the roles of HTLV Tax(1) and Tax(2) in the induction of cytokine disregulation in these cell types, we are currently developing gene delivery vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) capable of stably coexpressing the HTLV-1 or -2 tax and eGFP reporter genes in primary human cells. Transduction frequencies of up to 50%, as assessed by eGFP expression, can be achieved in human monocyte-derived macrophages and in explanted cultures of human microglia. Preliminary data suggest that Tax(1) expression is sufficient to up-regulate the proinflammatory cytokine profile in explanted human microglial cells. Future experiments will compare and evaluate the effect of tax(1) and tax(2) gene expression on the cellular proinflammatory cytokine expression profile, as well as demonstrate the effects of transducing human fetal astrocytes and PBMC-derived macrophages.

  1. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vector as an All-in-One Platform for Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Ortinski, Pavel I; O'Donovan, Bernadette; Dong, Xiaoyu; Kantor, Boris

    2017-06-16

    The CRISPR/Cas9 systems have revolutionized the field of genome editing by providing unprecedented control over gene sequences and gene expression in many species, including humans. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are one of the primary delivery platforms for the CRISPR/Cas9 system due to their ability to accommodate large DNA payloads and sustain robust expression in a wide range of dividing and non-dividing cells. However, long-term expression of LV-delivered Cas9/guide RNA may lead to undesirable off-target effects characterized by non-specific RNA-DNA interactions and off-target DNA cleavages. Integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) present an attractive means for delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 components because: (1) they are capable of transducing a broad range of cells and tissues, (2) have superior packaging capacity compared to other vectors (e.g., adeno-associated viral vectors), and (3) they are expressed transiently and demonstrate very weak integration capability. In this manuscript, we aimed to establish IDLVs as a means for safe and efficient delivery of CRISPR/Cas9. To this end, we developed an all-in-one vector cassette with increased production efficacy and demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 delivered by the improved IDLV vectors can mediate rapid and robust gene editing in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells and post-mitotic brain neurons in vivo, via transient expression and with higher gene-targeting specificity than the corresponding integrase-competent vectors.

  2. Intrapulmonary and intramyocardial gene transfer in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): safety and efficiency of HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors for fetal gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; McDonald, Ruth J; Jimenez, Daniel F; Lee, C Chang I; O'Shea, Cristin E; Leapley, Alyssa C; Won, Rosa H; Plopper, Charles G; Lutzko, Carolyn; Kohn, Donald B

    2005-07-01

    Fetal gene transfer was studied using intrapulmonary and intramyocardial transfer of SIN HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors expressing EGFP in rhesus monkeys. Fetuses were monitored sonographically during gestation and tissue analyses performed at term or 3 months postnatal age. Animals remained healthy during the study period as evidenced by normal growth, development, hematology, clinical chemistry, echocardiography, and pulmonary function tests. Strong pulmonary fluorescence was observed postnatally after fetal intrapulmonary delivery of lenti-CMV, but not lenti-SP-C, and compared to nontransferred controls. High EGFP copy numbers were found by quantitative PCR with both vector constructs in lung lobes (lentiviral vector-mediated gene delivery.

  3. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy that does not activate LMO2 expression in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sheng; Mody, Disha; DeRavin, Suk See; Hauer, Julia; Lu, Taihe; Ma, Zhijun; Hacein-Bey Abina, Salima; Gray, John T; Greene, Michael R; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2010-08-12

    To develop safer and more effective vectors for gene therapy of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), we have evaluated new self-inactivating lentiviral vectors based on the HIV virus. The CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector contains the entire human common gamma chain (gamma(c)) genomic sequence driven by the gamma(c) promoter. The CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector uses a promoter fragment from the eukaryotic elongation factor alpha (EF1alpha) gene to express a codon-optimized human gamma(c) cDNA. Both vectors contain a 400-bp insulator fragment from the chicken beta-globin locus within the self-inactivating long-terminal repeat. Transduction of bone marrow cells using either of these vectors restored T, B, and natural killer lymphocyte development and function in a mouse SCID-X1 transplantation model. Transduction of human CD34(+) bone marrow cells from SCID-X1 patients with either vector restored T-cell development in an in vitro assay. In safety studies using a Jurkat LMO2 activation assay, only the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector lacked the ability to transactivate LMO2 protein expression, whereas the CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector significantly activated LMO2 protein expression. In addition, the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector has not caused any tumors in transplanted mice. We conclude that the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector may be suitable for testing in a clinical trial based on these preclinical demonstrations of efficacy and safety.

  4. CCR5 Gene Disruption via Lentiviral Vectors Expressing Cas9 and Single Guided RNA Renders Cells Resistant to HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T.; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1. PMID:25541967

  5. Targeting expression of the leukemogenic PML-RARα fusion protein by lentiviral vector-mediated small interfering RNA results in leukemic cell differentiation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Simone V; Sternsdorf, Thomas; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2011-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) results from a chromosomal translocation that gives rise to the leukemogenic fusion protein PML-RARα (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid α receptor). Differentiation of leukemic cells and complete remission of APL are achieved by treatment of patients with pharmacological doses of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), making APL a model disease for differentiation therapy. However, because patients are resistant to further treatment with ATRA on relapse, it is necessary to develop alternative treatment strategies to specifically target APL. We therefore sought to develop a treatment strategy based on lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets the breakpoint region of PML-RARα. Unlike treatment with ATRA, which resulted in differentiation of leukemic NB4 cells, delivery of siRNA targeting PML-RARα into NB4 cells resulted in both differentiation and apoptosis, consistent with the specific knockdown of PML-RARα. Intraperitoneal injection of NB4 cells transduced with lentiviral vectors delivering PML-RARα-specific siRNA but not control siRNA prevented development of disease in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that development of PML-RARα-specific siRNA may represent a promising treatment strategy for ATRA-resistant APL.

  6. CCR5 gene disruption via lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and single guided RNA renders cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Ye, Chaobaihui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1.

  7. Fetal gene transfer using lentiviral vectors: in vivo detection of gene expression by microPET and optical imaging in fetal and infant monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I; Jimenez, Daniel F; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-12-01

    Fetal intraperitoneal administration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-l-derived lentiviral vectors (10(7) infectious particles/fetus) has consistently shown high levels of transduction and gene expression in the omentum, peritoneum, and diaphragm when assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and whole tissue fluorescence. In vivo imaging techniques were explored with early-gestation long-tailed macaques that were administered the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector expressing a mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-sr39tk) and firefly luciferase under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Fetuses were monitored sonographically and twice during gestation 9-[4-[18F]Fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine (18F-FHBG) was injected into the fetal circulation under ultrasound guidance in preparation for microPET imaging. All newborns were delivered at term by cesarean section and raised in the nursery for postnatal studies. At 2 months postnatal age, animals were imaged and biodistribution was assessed. Optical imaging for firefly luciferase expression was also performed every 2 months postnatal age. Under all imaging conditions gene expression was observed in the abdominal region, and closely paralleled findings from prior studies based on whole tissue fluorescence. These investigations have shown that HSV-1-sr39tk and firefly luciferase can be used to safely detect transgene expression at multiple time points in fetal and infant monkeys in vivo and without evidence of adverse effects.

  8. Long-term replacement of a mutated nonfunctional CNS gene: reversal of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus using an EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Bienemann, Alison S; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Cosgrave, Anna S; Glover, Colin P J; Wong, Liang-Fong; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Uney, James B

    2003-05-01

    Due to the complexity of brain function and the difficulty in monitoring alterations in neuronal gene expression, the potential of lentiviral gene therapy vectors to treat disorders of the CNS has been difficult to fully assess. In this study, we have assessed the utility of a third-generation equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in the Brattleboro rat model of diabetes insipidus, in which a mutation in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene results in the production of nonfunctional mutant AVP precursor protein. Importantly, by using this model it is possible to monitor the success of the gene therapy treatment by noninvasive assays. Injection of an EIAV-CMV-AVP vector into the supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus resulted in expression of functional AVP peptide in magnocellular neurons. This was accompanied by a 100% recovery in water homeostasis as assessed by daily water intake, urine production, and urine osmolality lasting for a 1-year measurement period. These data show that a single gene defect leading to a neurological disorder can be corrected with a lentiviral-based strategy. This study highlights the potential of using viral gene therapy for the long-term treatment of disorders of the CNS.

  9. The promotion of functional recovery and nerve regeneration after spinal cord injury by lentiviral vectors encoding Lingo-1 shRNA delivered by Pluronic F-127.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong-Fu; Cen, Jing-Sheng; Zhong, Qian; Chen, Luming; Wang, Jue; Deng, David Y B; Wan, Yong

    2013-02-01

    Lingo-1 is selectively expressed on both oligodendrocytes and neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and serves as a key negative regulator of nerve regeneration, implying a therapeutic target for spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we described a strategy to knock-down Lingo-1 expression in vivo using lentiviral vectors encoding Lingo-1 short harpin interfering RNA (shRNA) delivered by Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) gel, a non-cytotoxic scaffold and gene delivery carrier, after the complete transection of the T10 spinal cord in adult rats. We showed administration of PF-127 encapsulating Lingo-1 shRNA lentiviral vectors efficiently down-regulated the expression of Lingo-1, and exhibited transduction efficiency comparable to using vectors alone in oligodendrocyte culture in vitro. Furthermore, similar silencing effects and higher transfection efficiency were observed in vivo when Lingo-1 shRNA was co-delivered to the injured site by PF-127 gel with lower viral concentrations. Cografting of gel and Lingo-1 RNAi significantly promoted functional recovery and nerve regeneration, enhanced neurite outgrowth and synapses formation, preserved myelinated axons, and induced the proliferation of glial cells. In addition, the combined implantation also improved neuronal survival and inhibited cell apoptosis, which may be associated with the attenuation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress after SCI. Together, our data indicated that delivering Lingo-1 shRNA by gel scaffold was a valuable treatment approach to SCI and PF-127 delivery of viral vectors to the spinal cord may provide strategy to study and develop therapies for SCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A lentiviral vector with expression controlled by E2F-1: A potential tool for the study and treatment of proliferative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Bryan E.; Vieira de Carvalho, Anna Carolina; Bajgelman, Marcio C.

    2006-10-06

    We have constructed a lentiviral vector with expression limited to cells presenting active E2F-1 protein, a potential advantage for gene therapy of proliferative diseases. For the FE2FLW vector, the promoter region of the human E2F-1 gene was utilized to drive expression of luciferase cDNA, included as a reporter of viral expression. Primary, immortalized, and transformed cells were transduced with the FE2FLW vector and cell cycle alterations were induced with serum starvation/replacement, contact inhibition or drug treatment, revealing cell cycle-dependent changes in reporter activity. Forced E2F-1 expression, but not E2F-2 or E2F-3, increased reporter activity, indicating a major role for this factor in controlling expression from the FE2FLW virus. We show the utility of this vector as a reporter of E2F-1 and proliferation-dependent cellular alterations upon cytotoxic/cytostatic treatment, such as the introduction of tumor suppressor genes. We propose that the FE2FLW vector may be a starting point for the development of gene therapy strategies for proliferative diseases, such as cancer or restinosis.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of efficacy and safety of an improved lentiviral vector for the treatment of β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Negre, Olivier; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Beuzard, Yves; Cavazzana, Marina; Christiansen, Lauryn; Courne, Céline; Deichmann, Annette; Denaro, Maria; de Dreuzy, Edouard; Finer, Mitchell; Fronza, Raffaele; Gillet-Legrand, Béatrix; Joubert, Christophe; Kutner, Robert; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche, Leïla; Paulard, Anaïs; Pierciey, Francis J; Rothe, Michael; Ryu, Byoung; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Payen, Emmanuel; Veres, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A previously published clinical trial demonstrated the benefit of autologous CD34(+) cells transduced with a selfinactivating lentiviral vector (HPV569) containing an engineered β-globin gene (β(A-T87Q)-globin) in a subject with β thalassemia major. This vector has been modified to increase transduction efficacy without compromising safety. In vitro analyses indicated that the changes resulted in both increased vector titers (3 to 4 fold) and increased transduction efficacy (2 to 3 fold). An in vivo study in which 58 β-thalassemic mice were transplanted with vector- or mock-transduced syngenic bone marrow cells indicated sustained therapeutic efficacy. Secondary transplantations involving 108 recipients were performed to evaluate long-term safety. The six month study showed no hematological or biochemical toxicity. Integration site (IS) profile revealed an oligo/polyclonal hematopoietic reconstitution in the primary transplants and reduced clonality in secondary transplants. Tumor cells were detected in the secondary transplant mice in all treatment groups (including the control group), without statistical differences in the tumor incidence. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that tumor cells were not derived from transduced donor cells. This comprehensive efficacy and safety data provided the basis for initiating two clinical trials with this second generation vector (BB305) in Europe and in the USA in patients with β-thalassemia major and sickle cell disease.

  12. Long-Term Fate Mapping Using Conditional Lentiviral Vectors Reveals a Continuous Contribution of Radial Glia-Like Cells to Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aelvoet, Sarah-Ann; Pascual-Brazo, Jesus; Libbrecht, Sarah; Reumers, Veerle; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Newborn neurons are generated throughout life in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Stimulation of adult neurogenesis is considered as an attractive endogenous repair mechanism to treat different neurological disorders. Although tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, important questions remain unanswered, regarding the identity and the behavior of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus. We previously showed that conditional Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors can be used to label neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and to track the migration of their progeny with non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. Here, we applied these Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors to study neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus with bioluminescence imaging and histological techniques. Stereotactic injection of the Cre-Flex vectors into the dentate gyrus of transgenic Nestin-Cre mice resulted in specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells. The labeled cell population could be detected with bioluminescence imaging until 9 months post injection, but no significant increase in the number of labeled cells over time was observed with this imaging technique. Nevertheless, the specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells, combined with histological analysis at different time points, allowed detailed analysis of their neurogenic potential. This long-term fate mapping revealed that a stable pool of labeled nestin-positive neural stem cells continuously contributes to the generation of newborn neurons in the mouse brain until 9 months post injection. In conclusion, the Cre-Flex technology is a valuable tool to address remaining questions regarding neural stem cell identity and behavior in the dentate gyrus. PMID:26600383

  13. Gene Therapy for Neuropathic Pain by Silencing of TNF-α Expression with Lentiviral Vectors Targeting the Dorsal Root Ganglion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Hiromichi; Terashima, Tomoya; Kojima, Hideto; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be a debilitating condition. Many types of drugs that have been used to treat neuropathic pain have only limited efficacy. Recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) are involved in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. In the present study, we engineered a gene therapy strategy to relieve neuropathic pain by silencing TNF-α expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using lentiviral vectors expressing TNF short hairpin RNA1-4 (LV-TNF-shRNA1-4) in mice. First, based on its efficacy in silencing TNF-α in vitro, we selected shRNA3 to construct LV-TNF-shRNA3 for in vivo study. We used L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT) mice as a neuropathic pain model. These animals were found to display up-regulated mRNA expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), injury markers, and interleukin (IL)-6, an inflammatory cytokine in the ipsilateral L5 DRG. Injection of LV-TNF-shRNA3 onto the proximal transected site suppressed significantly the mRNA levels of ATF3, NPY and IL-6, reduced mechanical allodynia and neuronal cell death of DRG neurons. These results suggest that lentiviral-mediated silencing of TNF-α in DRG relieves neuropathic pain and reduces neuronal cell death, and may constitute a novel therapeutic option for neuropathic pain. PMID:24642694

  14. A lentiviral vector-based therapeutic vaccine encoding Ag85B-Rv3425 potently increases resistance to acute tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Feifei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Honghai; Hu, Yong; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2015-08-01

    Few treatment options for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB call attention to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for TB. Therapeutic vaccines are promising candidates because they can induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses, which play an important role in the elimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). In this study, a novel lentiviral vector therapeutic vaccine for delivering MTB-specific fusion protein Ag85B-Rv3425 was constructed. Results showed that one single-injection of this recombinant lentivirus vaccine could trigger antigen-specific Th1-type immune responses in mice. More importantly, mice with acute infection benefited a lot from a single-dose administration of this vaccine by markedly reduced MTB burdens in lungs and spleens as well as attenuated lesions in lungs compared with untreated mice. These results displayed good prospects of this novel vaccine for the immunotherapy of TB.

  15. Efficient Transduction of Human and Rhesus Macaque Primary T Cells by a Modified Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Based Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Xue, Jing; Wang, Weiming; Liu, Lihong; Ye, Chaobaihui; Cong, Zhe; Kimata, Jason T; Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors efficiently transduce genes to human, but not rhesus, primary T cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The poor transduction of HIV-1 vectors to rhesus cells is mainly due to species-specific restriction factors such as rhesus TRIM5α. Previously, several strategies to modify HIV-1 vectors were developed to overcome rhesus TRIM5α restriction. While the modified HIV-1 vectors efficiently transduce rhesus HSCs, they remain suboptimal for rhesus primary T cells. Recently, HIV-1 variants that encode combinations of LNEIE mutations in capsid (CA) protein and SIVmac239 Vif were found to replicate efficiently in rhesus primary T cells. Thus, the present study tested whether HIV-1 vectors packaged by a packaging construct containing these CA substitutions could efficiently transduce both human and rhesus primary CD4 T cells. To accomplish this, LNEIE mutations were made in the packaging construct CEMΔ8.9, and recombinant HIV-1 vectors packaged by Δ8.9 WT or Δ8.9 LNEIE were generated. Transduction rates, CA stability, and vector integration in CEMss-CCR5 and CEMss-CCR5-rhTRIM5α/green fluorescent protein cells, as well as transduction rates in human and rhesus primary CD4 T cells by Δ8.9 WT or Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1 vectors, were compared. Finally, the influence of rhesus TRIM5α variations in transduction rates to primary CD4 T cells from a cohort of 37 Chinese rhesus macaques was studied. While it maintains efficient transduction for human T-cell line and primary CD4 T cells, Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1 vector overcomes rhesus TRIM5α-mediated CA degradation, resulting in significantly higher transduction efficiency of rhesus primary CD4 T cells than Δ8.9 WT-packaged HIV-1 vector. Rhesus TRIM5α variations strongly influence transduction efficiency of rhesus primary CD4 T cells by both Δ8.9 WT or Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1 vectors. Thus, it is concluded that Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1

  16. Therapeutic levels of fetal hemoglobin in erythroid progeny of β-thalassemic CD34+ cells after lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Andrew; Hargrove, Phillip W.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Riberdy, Janice M.; Sankaran, Vijay G.; Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.

    2011-01-01

    β-Thalassemia major results from severely reduced or absent expression of the β-chain of adult hemoglobin (α2β2;HbA). Increased levels of fetal hemoglobin (α2γ2;HbF), such as occurs with hereditary persistence of HbF, ameliorate the severity of β-thalassemia, raising the potential for genetic therapy directed at enhancing HbF. We used an in vitro model of human erythropoiesis to assay for enhanced production of HbF after gene delivery into CD34+ cells obtained from mobilized peripheral blood of normal adults or steady-state bone marrow from patients with β-thalassemia major. Lentiviral vectors encoding (1) a human γ-globin gene with or without an insulator, (2) a synthetic zinc-finger transcription factor designed to interact with the γ-globin gene promoters, or (3) a short-hairpin RNA targeting the γ-globin gene repressor, BCL11A, were tested. Erythroid progeny of normal CD34+ cells demonstrated levels of HbF up to 21% per vector copy. For β-thalassemic CD34+ cells, similar gene transfer efficiencies achieved HbF production ranging from 45% to 60%, resulting in up to a 3-fold increase in the total cellular Hb content. These observations suggest that both lentiviral-mediated γ-globin gene addition and genetic reactivation of endogenous γ-globin genes have potential to provide therapeutic HbF levels to patients with β-globin deficiency. PMID:21156846

  17. Measles virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer into quiescent lymphocytes requires binding to both SLAM and CD46 entry receptors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Lévy, Camille; Costa, Caroline; Nègre, Didier; Amirache, Fouzia; Buckland, Robin; Russell, Steven J; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2011-06-01

    Gene transfer into quiescent T and B cells is of importance for gene therapy and immunotherapy approaches to correct hematopoietic disorders. Previously, we generated lentiviral vectors (LVs) pseudotyped with the Edmonston measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins (Hgps and Fgps) (H/F-LVs), which, for the first time, allowed efficient transduction of quiescent human B and T cells. These target cells express both MV entry receptors used by the vaccinal Edmonston strain, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). Interestingly, LVs pseudotyped with an MV Hgp, blind for the CD46 binding site, were completely inefficient for resting-lymphocyte transduction. Similarly, SLAM-blind H mutants that recognize only CD46 as the entry receptor did not allow stable LV transduction of resting T cells. The CD46-tropic LVs accomplished vector-cell binding, fusion, entry, and reverse transcription at levels similar to those achieved by the H/F-LVs, but efficient proviral integration did not occur. Our results indicate that both CD46 and SLAM binding sites need to be present in cis in the Hgp to allow successful stable transduction of quiescent lymphocytes. Moreover, the entry mechanism utilized appears to be crucial: efficient transduction was observed only when CD46 and SLAM were correctly engaged and an entry mechanism that strongly resembles macropinocytosis was triggered. Taken together, our results suggest that although vector entry can occur through the CD46 receptor, SLAM binding and subsequent signaling are also required for efficient LV transduction of quiescent lymphocytes to occur.

  18. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  19. RD2-MolPack-Chim3, a Packaging Cell Line for Stable Production of Lentiviral Vectors for Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovani, Bianca Maria; Bossi, Sergio; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Corna, Stefano; Salvatori, Francesca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the last two decades, several attempts to generate packaging cells for lentiviral vectors (LV) have been made. Despite different technologies, no packaging clone is currently employed in clinical trials. We developed a new strategy for LV stable production based on the HEK-293T progenitor cells; the sequential insertion of the viral genes by integrating vectors; the constitutive expression of the viral components; and the RD114-TR envelope pseudotyping. We generated the intermediate clone PK-7 expressing constitutively gag/pol and rev genes and, by adding tat and rd114-tr genes, the stable packaging cell line RD2-MolPack, which can produce LV carrying any transfer vector (TV). Finally, we obtained the RD2-MolPack-Chim3 producer clone by transducing RD2-MolPack cells with the TV expressing the anti-HIV transgene Chim3. Remarkably, RD114-TR pseudovirions have much higher potency when produced by stable compared with transient technology. Most importantly, comparable transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is obtained with 2-logs less physical particles respect to VSV-G pseudovirions produced by transient transfection. Altogether, RD2-MolPack technology should be considered a valid option for large-scale production of LV to be used in gene therapy protocols employing HSC, resulting in the possibility of downsizing the manufacturing scale by about 10-fold in respect to transient technology. PMID:23767932

  20. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with a modified RD114 envelope glycoprotein show increased stability in sera and augmented transduction of primary lymphocytes and CD34+ cells derived from human and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Boson, Bertrand; Salmon, Patrick; Gay, Wilfried; Nègre, Didier; Le Grand, Roger; Trono, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-08-01

    Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system, and their host range. We have investigated the capacity of a panel of GPs of both retroviral (amphotropic murine leukemia virus [MLV-A]; gibbon ape leukemia virus [GALV]; RD114, feline endogenous virus) and nonretroviral (fowl plague virus [FPV]; Ebola virus [EboV]; vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV]; lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]) origins to pseudotype lentiviral vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251). SIV vectors were efficiently pseudotyped with the FPV hemagglutinin, VSV-G, LCMV, and MLV-A GPs. In contrast, the GALV and RD114 GPs conferred much lower infectivity to the vectors. Capitalizing on the conservation of some structural features in the transmembrane domains and cytoplasmic tails of the incorporation-competent MLV-A GP and in RD114 and GALV GPs, we generated chimeric GPs encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of GALV or RD114 GPs fused to the cytoplasmic tail (designated TR) of MLV-A GP. Importantly, SIV-derived vectors pseudotyped with these GALV/TR and RD114/TR GP chimeras had significantly higher titers than vectors coated with the parental GPs. Additionally, RD114/TR-pseudotyped vectors were efficiently concentrated and were resistant to inactivation induced by the complement of both human and macaque sera, indicating that modified RD114 GP-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors may be of particular interest for in vivo gene transfer applications. Furthermore, as compared to vectors pseudotyped with other retroviral GPs or with VSV-G, RD114/TR-pseudotyped vectors showed augmented transduction of human and macaque primary blood lymphocytes and CD34+ cells.

  1. Suppression of neovascularization of donor corneas by transduction with equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors expressing endostatin and angiostatin.

    PubMed

    Parker, Maria; Bellec, Jessica; McFarland, Trevor; Scripps, Vicky; Appukuttan, Binoy; Hartzell, Matt; Yeager, Austen; Hady, Thomas; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Stout, Tim; Ellis, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Corneal transplantation is the oldest and one of the most successful transplant procedures with a success rate in many studies in excess of 90%. The high success rate is mainly attributable to the relatively immune-privileged status of the eye and the fact that the cornea is largely avascular. However, the success rate in patients with failed grafts is much lower such that regrafting is frequently the top indication for corneal transplantation in many centers. Neovascularization is the most important risk factor for rejection, as it allows access of the immune system to the donor tissue, compromising immune privilege of the graft/eye. We have developed a process to modify donor corneal tissue to prevent rejection by a single exposure to a gene therapy vector before surgery (EncorStat(®)). The vector used is based on clinically relevant equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-derived lentiviral platform and contains genes for two potently angiostatic genes, endostatin and angiostatin. We show that incubation of rabbit, primate, and human corneal tissue with the EIAV vector mediates strong, stable expression in the corneal endothelium. We have optimized this process to maximize transduction and, once this is complete, maximize the removal of free vector before transplant. Rabbit corneas treated with two different antiangiogenic expression vectors (EIAV-EndoAngio and to a lesser extent EIAV-Endo:k5) significantly suppressed neovascularization in a rabbit model of corneal rejection. As a result, corneal opacity, edema, and inflammatory infiltrates were reduced in these corneas. This study demonstrates that angiogenesis is a suitable target to prevent corneal rejection, and provides the first proof-of-concept data for the development of EncorStat, an ex vivo gene therapy treatment to prevent corneal rejection.

  2. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients.

  3. Development of lentiviral vectors for transient and stable protein overexpression in mammalian cells. A new strategy for recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) production.

    PubMed

    Mufarrege, Eduardo Federico; Antuña, Sebastián; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Prieto, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Recombinant protein overexpression in mammalian cells constitutes a real challenge in therapeutic protein production. Following the discovery of intron functionality in gene expression, various expression vectors that include them in their sequences have been developed. In this study, the main goal was to develop new lentiviral vectors (LVs) carrying different promoter and intron-containing 5'UTR (5' untranslated region) combinations and the design of LVs for rhFVIII production in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. By combining the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or the elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) promoters along with different 5'UTRs that included leader introns, between 2 and 12-fold increases were reached, when transient and stable expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and rhFVIII were analyzed. Also, new LVs provided with promoters and 5'UTRs from high expression genes, according to a gene database, were designed. Three of them were shown to be superior to the EF-1α promoter in three widely used cell lines. In the present work, LVs containing different promoters and 5'UTRs were designed. In transient and stable assays some of these constructs have shown higher activity compared with commercial promoters and, therefore, constitute promising candidates for therapeutic protein production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimized Lentiviral Vectors for HIV Gene Therapy: Multiplexed Expression of Small RNAs and Inclusion of MGMTP140K Drug Resistance Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Janet; Scherer, Lisa J; Gu, Angel; Gardner, Agnes M; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Epps, Elizabeth W; DiGiusto, David L; Rossi, John J

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is a promising approach to engineering immunity to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that may lead to a functional cure for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In support of this approach, we created lentiviral vectors with an engineered polycistronic platform derived from the endogenous MCM7 gene to express a diverse set of small antiviral RNAs and a drug resistance MGMTP140K marker. Multiple strategies for simultaneous expression of up to five RNA transgenes were tested. The placement and orientation of each transgene and its promoter were important determinants for optimal gene expression. Antiviral RNA expression from the MCM7 platform with a U1 promoter was sufficient to provide protection from R5-tropic HIV in macrophages and resulted in reduced hematopoietic toxicity compared with constructs expressing RNA from independent RNA polymerase III promoters. The addition of an HIV entry inhibitor and nucleolar TAR RNA decoy did not enhance antiviral potency over constructs that targeted only viral RNA transcripts. We also demonstrated selective enrichment of gene-modified cells in vivo using a humanized mouse model. The use of these less toxic, potent anti-HIV vectors expressing a drug selection marker is likely to enhance the in vivo efficacy of our stem cell gene therapy approach in treating HIV/AIDS. PMID:24576853

  5. A VSV-G Pseudotyped Last Generation Lentiviral Vector Mediates High Level and Persistent Gene Transfer in Models of Airway Epithelium In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Copreni, Elena; Palmieri, Lucia; Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency and duration of gene expression mediated by a VSV-G pseudotyped last generation lentiviral (LV) vector. We studied LV efficiency in ex-vivo models of respiratory epithelial cells, obtained from bronchial biopsies and nasal polyps, by GFP epifluorescence and cytofluorimetry. In vivo efficiency and persistence of gene expression was investigated by GFP immunohistochemistry and luciferase activity in lung cryosections and homogenates, respectively, upon intranasal and intratracheal administration protocols in C57Bl/6 mice. Both primary bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were transduced up to 70–80% 72 hr after the LV infection. In vivo nasal luciferase expression was increased by lysophosphatidylcholine pre-treatment of the nose. Conversely, the bronchial epithelium was transduced in the absence of any pre-conditioning treatment and luciferase expression lasted for at least 6 months without any decline. We conclude that a last generation LV vector is a promising gene transfer agent in the target organ of genetic and acquired lung diseases, as in the case of cystic fibrosis. PMID:21994695

  6. Novel lentiviral vectors displaying "early-acting cytokines" selectively promote survival and transduction of NOD/SCID repopulating human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Olivier, Delphine; Izac, Brigitte; Trono, Didier; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2005-11-15

    A major limitation of current lentiviral vectors (LVs) is their inability to govern efficient gene transfer into quiescent cells, such as human CD34(+) cells, that reside in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle and that are highly enriched in hematopoietic stem cells. This hampers their application for gene therapy of hematopoietic cells. Here, we designed novel LVs that overcome this restriction by displaying "early-acting cytokines" on their surface. Display of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, or both cytokines on the LV surface allowed efficient gene delivery into quiescent cord blood CD34(+) cells. Moreover, these surface-engineered LVs preferentially transduced and promoted survival of resting CD34(+) cells rather than cycling cells. Finally, and most importantly, these novel LVs allowed superior gene transfer in the most immature CD34(+) cells as compared to conventional LVs, even when the latter vectors were used to transduce cells in the presence of recombinant cytokines. This was demonstrated by their capacity to promote selective transduction of CD34(+) cell in in vitro derived long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) colonies and of long-term NOD/SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) in vivo.

  7. Optimized lentiviral vectors for HIV gene therapy: multiplexed expression of small RNAs and inclusion of MGMT(P140K) drug resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Chung, Janet; Scherer, Lisa J; Gu, Angel; Gardner, Agnes M; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Epps, Elizabeth W; Digiusto, David L; Rossi, John J

    2014-05-01

    Gene therapy with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is a promising approach to engineering immunity to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that may lead to a functional cure for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In support of this approach, we created lentiviral vectors with an engineered polycistronic platform derived from the endogenous MCM7 gene to express a diverse set of small antiviral RNAs and a drug resistance MGMT(P140K) marker. Multiple strategies for simultaneous expression of up to five RNA transgenes were tested. The placement and orientation of each transgene and its promoter were important determinants for optimal gene expression. Antiviral RNA expression from the MCM7 platform with a U1 promoter was sufficient to provide protection from R5-tropic HIV in macrophages and resulted in reduced hematopoietic toxicity compared with constructs expressing RNA from independent RNA polymerase III promoters. The addition of an HIV entry inhibitor and nucleolar TAR RNA decoy did not enhance antiviral potency over constructs that targeted only viral RNA transcripts. We also demonstrated selective enrichment of gene-modified cells in vivo using a humanized mouse model. The use of these less toxic, potent anti-HIV vectors expressing a drug selection marker is likely to enhance the in vivo efficacy of our stem cell gene therapy approach in treating HIV/AIDS.

  8. Suicide gene approach using a dual-expression lentiviral vector to enhance the safety of ex vivo gene therapy for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Alaee, F; Sugiyama, O; Virk, M S; Tang, H; Drissi, H; Lichtler, A C; Lieberman, J R

    2014-02-01

    'Ex vivo' gene therapy using viral vectors to overexpress BMP-2 is shown to heal critical-sized bone defects in experimental animals. To increase its safety, we constructed a dual-expression lentiviral vector to overexpress BMP-2 or luciferase and an HSV1-tk analog, Δtk (LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2/Luc). We hypothesized that administering ganciclovir (GCV) will eliminate the transduced cells at the site of implantation. The vector-induced expression of BMP-2 and luciferase in a mouse stromal cell line (W-20-17 cells) and mouse bone marrow cells (MBMCs) was reduced by 50% compared with the single-gene vector. W-20-17 cells were more sensitive to GCV compared with MBMCs (90-95% cell death at 12 days with GCV at 1 μg ml(-1) in MBMCs vs 90-95% cell death at 5 days by 0.1 μg ml(-1) of GCV in W-20-17 cells). Implantation of LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2 transduced MBMCs healed a 2 mm femoral defect at 4 weeks. Early GCV treatment (days 0-14) postoperatively blocked bone formation confirming a biologic response. Delayed GCV treatment starting at day 14 for 2 or 4 weeks reduced the luciferase signal from LV-Δtk-T2A-Luc-transduced MBMCs, but the signal was not completely eliminated. These data suggest that this suicide gene strategy has potential for clinical use in the future, but will need to be optimized for increased efficiency.

  9. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect.

  10. Concurrent measures of fusion and transduction efficiency of primary CD34+ cells with human immunodeficiency virus 1-based lentiviral vectors reveal different effects of transduction enhancers.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Dina; Majdoul, Saliha; Seye, Ababacar K; Galy, Anne; Fenard, David

    2014-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are used for various gene transfer applications, notably for hematopoietic gene therapy, but methods are lacking for precisely evaluating parameters that control the efficiency of transduction in relation to the entry of vectors into target cells. We adapted a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based human immunodeficiency virus-1 fusion assay to measure the entry of nonreplicative recombinant LVs in various cell types, including primary human hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs), and to quantify the level of transduction of the same initially infected cells. The assay utilizes recombinant LVs containing β-lactamase (BLAM)-Vpr chimeric proteins (BLAM-LVs) and encoding a truncated form of the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (ΔNGFR). After infection of target cells with BLAM-LVs, the vector entry rapidly leads to BLAM-Vpr release into the cytoplasm, which is measured by cleavage of a fluorescent substrate using flow cytometry. Parallel cultures of the same infected cells show transduction efficiency resulting from ΔNGFR expression. This LV-based fusion/transduction assay is a dynamic and versatile tool, revealing, for instance, the postentry restrictions of LVs known to occur in cells of hematopoietic origin, especially human HSPCs. Furthermore, this BLAM-LV assay allowed us to evaluate the effect of cytokine prestimulation of HSPCs on the entry step of LVs. The assay also shows that transduction enhancers such as Vectofusin-1 or Retronectin can partially relieve the postentry block, but their effects differ in how they promote LV entry. In conclusion, one such assay should be useful to study hematopoietic postentry restrictions directed against LVs and therefore should allow improvements in various LV-based gene therapy protocols.

  11. In Vitro Generation of IL-35-expressing Human Wharton's Jelly-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Amari, Afshin; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mohammadi Amirabad, Leila; Tahoori, Mohammad Taher; Massumi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Human Wharton's Jelly-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hWJ-MSCs) are easily available cells without transplant rejection problems or ethical concerns compared to bone-marrow-derived MSCs for prospective clinical applications. These cells display immunosuppressive properties and may be able to play an important role in autoimmune disorders. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are important to prevent autoimmune disease development. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) induces the proliferation of Treg cell populations and reduces the activity of T helper 17 (Th17) and T helper 1 (Th1) cells, which play a central role in initiation of inflammation and autoimmune disease. Recent studies identified IL-35 as a new inhibitory cytokine required for the suppressive function of Treg cells. We created IL-35-producing hWJ-MSCs as a good vehicle for reduction of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. We isolated hWJ-MSCs based on explant culture. HWJ-MSCs were transduced at MOI=50 (Multiplicity of Infection) with lentiviral particles harboring murine Interleukin 35 (mIL-35). Expression of IL-35 in hWJ-MSCs was quantified by an IL-35 ELISA kit. IL-35 bioactivity was analyzed by inhibiting the proliferation of mouse splenocytes using CFSE cell proliferation kit. Frequency of CD4+CD25+CD127 low/neg Foxp3+ Treg cells was measured by flow cytometry. There was an up to 85% GFP positive transduction rate, and the cells successfully released a high level of mIL-35 protein (750 ng/ml). IL-35 managed to inhibit CD4+ T cell proliferation with PHA, and improved the frequency of Treg cells. Our data suggest that transduced hWJ-MSCs overexpressing IL-35 may provide a useful approach for basic research on gene therapy for autoimmune disorders.

  12. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  13. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  14. A new system for parallel drug screening against multiple-resistant HIV mutants based on lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN) vectors and multi-colour analyses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite progress in the development of combined antiretroviral therapies (cART), HIV infection remains a significant challenge for human health. Current problems of cART include multi-drug-resistant virus variants, long-term toxicity and enormous treatment costs. Therefore, the identification of novel effective drugs is urgently needed. Methods We developed a straightforward screening approach for simultaneously evaluating the sensitivity of multiple HIV gag-pol mutants to antiviral drugs in one assay. Our technique is based on multi-colour lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN) LeGO vector technology. Results We demonstrated the successful use of this approach for screening compounds against up to four HIV gag-pol variants (wild-type and three mutants) simultaneously. Importantly, the technique was adapted to Biosafety Level 1 conditions by utilising ecotropic pseudotypes. This allowed upscaling to a large-scale screening protocol exploited by pharmaceutical companies in a successful proof-of-concept experiment. Conclusions The technology developed here facilitates fast screening for anti-HIV activity of individual agents from large compound libraries. Although drugs targeting gag-pol variants were used here, our approach permits screening compounds that target several different, key cellular and viral functions of the HIV life-cycle. The modular principle of the method also allows the easy exchange of various mutations in HIV sequences. In conclusion, the methodology presented here provides a valuable new approach for the identification of novel anti-HIV drugs. PMID:23286882

  15. A SIN lentiviral vector containing PIGA cDNA allows long-term phenotypic correction of CD34+-derived cells from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Robert, David; Mahon, François-Xavier; Richard, Emmanuel; Etienne, Gabriel; de Verneuil, Hubert; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2003-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder in which an acquired somatic mutation of the X-linked PIGA gene results in a deficiency in GPI-anchored surface proteins. Clinically, PNH is dominated by a chronic hemolytic anemia, often associated with recurrent nocturnal exacerbations, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic tendency. Allogenic bone marrow transplantation is the only potentially curative treatment for severe forms of PNH but is associated with a high treatment-related morbidity and mortality. HSC gene therapy could provide a new therapeutic option, especially when an HLA-matched donor is not available. To develop an efficient gene transfer approach, we have designed a new SIN lentiviral vector (TEPW) that contains the PIGA cDNA driven by the human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter, the central DNA flap of HIV-1, and the WPRE cassette. TEPW transduction led to a complete surface expression of the GPI anchor and CD59 in PIGA-deficient cell lines without any selection procedure. Moreover, efficient gene transfer was achieved in bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cells derived from two patients with severe PNH disease. This expression was stable during erythroid, myeloid, and megakaryocytic liquid culture differentiation. CD59 surface cell expression was fully restored during 5 weeks of long-term culture.

  16. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  17. Lentiviral vectors displaying modified measles virus gp overcome pre-existing immunity in in vivo-like transduction of human T and B cells.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Camille; Amirache, Fouzia; Costa, Caroline; Frecha, Cecilia; Muller, Claude P; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2012-09-01

    Gene transfer into quiescent T and B cells is important for gene therapy and immunotherapy approaches. Previously, we generated lentiviral vectors (LVs) pseudotyped with Edmonston (Ed) measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins (H/F-LVs), which allowed efficient transduction of quiescent human T and B cells. However, a major obstacle in the use of H/F-LVs in vivo is that most of the human population is vaccinated against measles. As the MV humoral immune response is exclusively directed against the H protein of MV, we mutated the two dominant epitopes in H, Noose, and NE. LVs pseudotyped with these mutant H-glycoproteins escaped inactivation by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) but were still neutralized by human serum. Consequently, we took advantage of newly emerged MV-D genotypes that were less sensitive to MV vaccination due to a different glycosylation pattern. The mutation responsible was introduced into the H/F-LVs, already mutated for Noose and NE epitopes. We found that these mutant H/F-LVs could efficiently transduce quiescent lymphocytes in the presence of high concentrations of MV antibody-positive human serum. Finally, upon incubation with total blood, mimicking the in vivo situation, the mutant H/F-LVs escaped MV antibody neutralization, where the original H/F-LVs failed. Thus, these novel H/F-LVs offer perspectives for in vivo lymphocyte-based gene therapy and immunotherapy.

  18. Ex vivo gene therapy with lentiviral vectors rescues adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice and corrects their immune and metabolic defects.

    PubMed

    Mortellaro, Alessandra; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Guerrini, Matteo M; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Sanvito, Francesca; Doglioni, Claudio; Di Serio, Clelia; Biasco, Luca; Follenzi, Antonia; Naldini, Luigi; Bordignon, Claudio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2006-11-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is caused by a purine metabolic dysfunction, leading to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and multiple organ damage. To investigate the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy with self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (LVs) in correcting this complex phenotype, we used an ADA(-/-) mouse model characterized by early postnatal lethality. LV-mediated ADA gene transfer into bone marrow cells combined with low-dose irradiation rescued mice from lethality and restored their growth, as did transplantation of wild-type bone marrow. Mixed chimerism with multilineage engraftment of transduced cells was detected in the long term in animals that underwent transplantation. ADA activity was normalized in lymphocytes and partially corrected in red blood cells (RBCs), resulting in full metabolic detoxification and prevention of severe pulmonary insufficiency. Moreover, gene therapy restored normal lymphoid differentiation and immune functions, including antigen-specific antibody production. Similar degrees of detoxification and immune reconstitution were obtained in mice treated early after birth or after 1 month of enzyme-replacement therapy, mimicking 2 potential applications for ADA-SCID. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of LV gene transfer in correcting both the immunological and metabolic phenotypes of ADA-SCID and supports the future clinical use of this approach.

  19. NIH oversight of human gene transfer research involving retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated virus vectors and the role of the NIH recombinant DNA advisory committee.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marina; Shipp, Allan; Rosenthal, Eugene; Jambou, Robert; Shih, Tom; Montgomery, Maureen; Gargiulo, Linda; Patterson, Amy; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In response to public and scientific concerns regarding human gene transfer research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a transparent oversight system that extends to human gene transfer protocols that are either conducted with NIH funding or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding for recombinant DNA research. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has been the primary advisory body to NIH regarding the conduct of this research. Human gene transfer research proposals that are subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) must be submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), and protocols that raise novel scientific, safety, medical, ethical, or social issues are publicly discussed at the RAC's quarterly public meetings. OBA also convenes gene transfer safety symposia and policy conferences to provide a public forum for scientific experts to discuss emerging issues in the field. This transparent system of review promotes the rapid exchange of important scientific information and dissemination of data. The goal is to optimize the conduct of individual research protocols and to advance gene transfer research generally. This process has fostered the development of retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene delivery.

  20. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  1. A PCR-Based Method to Construct Lentiviral Vector Expressing Double Tough Decoy for miRNA Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lan; Liu, Nian; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Peng, Wenda; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    DNA vector-encoded Tough Decoy (TuD) miRNA inhibitor is attracting increased attention due to its high efficiency in miRNA suppression. The current methods used to construct TuD vectors are based on synthesizing long oligonucleotides (~90 mer), which have been costly and problematic because of mutations during synthesis. In this study, we report a PCR-based method for the generation of double Tough Decoy (dTuD) vector in which only two sets of shorter oligonucleotides (< 60 mer) were used. Different approaches were employed to test the inhibitory potency of dTuDs. We demonstrated that dTuD is the most efficient method in miRNA inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Using this method, a mini dTuD library against 88 human miRNAs was constructed and used for a high-throughput screening (HTS) of AP-1 pathway-related miRNAs. Seven miRNAs (miR-18b-5p, -101-3p, -148b-3p, -130b-3p, -186-3p, -187-3p and -1324) were identified as candidates involved in AP-1 pathway regulation. This novel method allows for an accurate and cost-effective generation of dTuD miRNA inhibitor, providing a powerful tool for efficient miRNA suppression in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26624995

  2. Striatal modulation of BDNF expression using microRNA124a-expressing lentiviral vectors impairs ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference and voluntary alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major health, economic and social concern in modern societies, but the exact molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol addiction remain elusive. Recent findings show that small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) signaling contributes to complex behavioral disorders including drug addiction. However, the role of miRNAs in ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference (CPP) and voluntary alcohol consumption has not yet been directly addressed. Here, we assessed the expression profile of miR124a in the dorsal striatum of rats upon ethanol intake. The results show that miR124a was downregulated in the dorso-lateral striatum (DLS) following alcohol drinking. Then, we identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a direct target of miR124a. In fact, BDNF mRNA was upregulated following ethanol drinking. We used lentiviral vector (LV) gene transfer technology to further address the role of miR124a and its direct target BDNF in ethanol-induced CPP and alcohol consumption. Results reveal that stereotaxic injection of LV-miR124a in the DLS enhances ethanol-induced CPP as well as voluntary alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm. Moreover, miR124a-silencer (LV-siR124a) as well as LV-BDNF infusion in the DLS attenuates ethanol-induced CPP as well as voluntary alcohol consumption. Importantly, LV-miR124a, LV-siR124a and LV-BDNF have no effect on saccharin and quinine intake. Our findings indicate that striatal miR124a and BDNF signaling have crucial roles in alcohol consumption and ethanol conditioned reward.

  3. CFTR inactivation by lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Jessica; Bacchetta, Marc; Losa, Davide; Anegon, Ignacio; Chanson, Marc; Nguyen, Tuan Huy

    2015-01-01

    Polarized airway epithelial cell cultures modelling Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) defect are crucial for CF and biomedical research. RNA interference has proven its value to generate knockdown models for various pathologies. More recently, genome editing using CRISPR-Cas9 artificial endonuclease was a valuable addition to the toolbox of gene inactivation. Calu-3 cells and primary HAECs were transduced with HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors (LVV) encoding small hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequence or CRISPR-Cas9 components targeting CFTR alongside GFP. After sorting of GFP-positive cells, CFTR expression was measured by RT-qPCR and Western blot in polarized or differentiated cells. CFTR channel function was assessed in Ussing chambers. Il-8 secretion, proliferation and cell migration were also studied in transduced cells. shRNA interference and CRISPRCas9 strategies efficiently decreased CFTR expression in Calu-3 cells. Strong CFTR knockdown was confirmed at the functional level in CRISPR-Cas9-modified cells. CFTR-specific shRNA sequences did not reduce gene expression in primary HAECs, whereas CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene modification activity was correlated with a reduction of transepithelial secretion and response to a CFTR inhibitor. CFTR inactivation in the CRISPR-Cas9-modified Calu-3 cells did not affect migration and proliferation but slightly increased basal interleukin-8 secretion. We generated CFTR inactivated cell lines and demonstrated that CRISPR-Cas9 vectorised in a single LVV efficiently promotes CFTR inactivation in primary HAECs. These results provide a new protocol to engineer CF primary epithelia with their isogenic controls and pave the way for manipulation of CFTR expression in these cultures.

  4. A Chimeric HS4-SAR Insulator (IS2) That Prevents Silencing and Enhances Expression of Lentiviral Vectors in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Guerrero, Alejandra; Cobo, Marién; Muñoz, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin insulators, such as the chicken β-globin locus control region hypersensitive site 4 (HS4), and scaffold/matrix attachment regions (SARs/MARs) have been incorporated separately or in combination into retroviral vectors (RVs) in order to increase transgene expression levels, avoid silencing and reduce expression variability. However, their incorporation into RVs either produces a reduction on titer and/or expression levels or do not have sufficient effect on stem cells. In order to develop an improved insulator we decided to combine SAR elements with HS4 insulators. We designed several synthetic shorter SAR elements containing 4 or 5 MAR/SARs recognition signatures (MRS) and studied their effects on a lentiviral vector (LV) expressing eGFP through the SFFV promoter (SE). A 388 bp SAR element containing 5 MRS, named SAR2, was as efficient or superior to the other SARs analyzed. SAR2 enhanced transgene expression and reduced silencing and variability on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We next compared the effect of different HS4-based insulators, the HS4-Core (250 bp), the HS4-Ext (400 bp) and the HS4-650 (650 bp). All HS4 elements reduced silencing and expression variability but they also had a negative effect on transgene expression levels and titer. In general, the HS4-650 element had a better overall effect. Based on these data we developed a chimeric insulator, IS2, combining the SAR2 and the HS4-650. When incorporated into the 3′ LTR of the SE LV, the IS2 element was able to enhance expression, avoid silencing and reduce variability of expression on hESCs. Importantly, these effects were maintained after differentiation of the transduced hESCs toward the hematopoietic linage. Neither the HS4-650 nor the SAR2 elements had these effects. The IS2 element is therefore a novel insulator that confers expression stability and enhances expression of LVs on stem cells. PMID:24400083

  5. A tandem CD19/CD20 CAR lentiviral vector drives on-target and off-target antigen modulation in leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dina; Xiong, Ying; Wu, Darong; Nӧlle, Volker; Schmitz, Sarah; Haso, Waleed; Kaiser, Andrew; Dropulic, Boro; Orentas, Rimas J

    2017-01-01

    Clinical success with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)- based immunotherapy for leukemia has been accompanied by the associated finding that antigen-escape variants of the disease are responsible for relapse. To target hematologic malignancies with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that targets two antigens with a single vector, and thus potentially lessen the chance of leukemic escape mutations, a tandem-CAR approach was investigated. Antigen binding domains from the FMC63 (anti-CD19) and Leu16 (anti-CD20) antibodies were linked in differing configurations to transmembrane and T cell signaling domains to create tandem-CARs. Expression on the surface of primary human T cells was induced by transduction with a single lentiviral vector (LV) encoding the tandem-CAR. Tandem-CARs were compared to single antigen targeting CARs in vitro and in vivo, and to an admixture of transduced cells expressing each CAR in vivo in immunodeficient (NSG) disease-bearing mice. Tandem constructs efficient killed the Raji leukemia cell line both in vitro and in vivo. Tandem CARs generated less cytokine than the CD20 CAR, but similar to CD19 CARs, on their own. In co-culture experiments at low effector to target ratios with both single- and tandem- CAR-T cells, a rapid down-modulation of full-length CD19 expression was seen on leukemia targets. There also was a partial down-modulation of CD22, and to a lesser degree, of CD20. Our data also highlight the extreme sensitivity of the NALM-6 cell line to general lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. While single and tandem constructs were effective in vivo in a standard setting, in a high-disease burden setting, the tandem CAR proved both effective and less toxic than an admixture of transduced T cell populations expressing single CARs. Tandem CARs are equally effective in standard disease models to single antigen specificity CARs, and may be both more effective and less toxic in a higher disease burden setting. This may be due to optimized cell

  6. Lentiviral Delivery of Proteins for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have evolved to traverse cellular barriers and travel to the nucleus by mechanisms that involve active transport through the cytoplasm and viral quirks to resist cellular restriction factors and innate immune responses. Virus-derived vector systems exploit the capacity of viruses to ferry genetic information into cells, and now - more than three decades after the discovery of HIV - lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 have become instrumental in biomedical research and gene therapies that require genomic insertion of transgenes. By now, the efficacy of lentiviral gene delivery to stem cells, cells of the immune system including T cells, hepatic cells, and many other therapeutically relevant cell types is well established. Along with nucleic acids, HIV-1 virions carry the enzymatic tools that are essential for early steps of infection. Such capacity to package enzymes, even proteins of nonviral origin, has unveiled new ways of exploiting cellular intrusion of HIV-1. Based on early findings demonstrating the packaging of heterologous proteins into virus particles as part of the Gag and GagPol polypeptides, we have established lentiviral protein transduction for delivery of DNA transposases and designer nucleases. This strategy for delivering genome-engineering proteins facilitates high enzymatic activity within a short time frame and may potentially improve the safety of genome editing. Exploiting the full potential of lentiviral vectors, incorporation of foreign protein can be combined with the delivery of DNA transposons or a donor sequence for homology-directed repair in so-called 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors. Here, we briefly describe intracellular restrictions that may affect lentiviral gene and protein delivery and review the current status of lentiviral particles as carriers of tool kits for genome engineering.

  7. In vivo transduction by intravenous injection of a lentiviral vector expressing human ADA into neonatal ADA gene knockout mice: a novel form of enzyme replacement therapy for ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Petersen, Denise; Wang, Xingchao; Dorey, Fred; Kil, Ki Soo; Aldrich, Melissa; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Kohn, Donald B

    2006-06-01

    Using a mouse model of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency syndrome (ADA-deficient SCID), we have developed a noninvasive method of gene transfer for the sustained systemic expression of human ADA as enzyme replacement therapy. The method of delivery is a human immunodeficiency virus 1-based lentiviral vector given systemically by intravenous injection on day 1 to 2 of life. In this article we characterize the biodistribution of the integrated vector, the expression levels of ADA enzyme activity in various tissues, as well as the efficacy of systemic ADA expression to correct the ADA-deficient phenotype in this mouse model. The long-term expression of enzymatically active ADA achieved by this method, primarily from transduction of liver and lung, restored immunologic function and significantly extended survival. These studies illustrate the potential for sustained in vivo production of enzymatically active ADA, as an alternative to therapy by frequent injection of exogenous ADA protein.

  8. A MicroRNA-regulated and GP64-pseudotyped Lentiviral Vector Mediates Stable Expression of FVIII in a Murine Model of Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hideto; Hegadorn, Carol; Ozelo, Margareth; Burnett, Erin; Tuttle, Angie; Labelle, Andrea; McCray, Paul B; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, Brian; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective to use gene therapy to provide sustained, therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A is compromised by the emergence of inhibitory antibodies that prevent FVIII from performing its essential function as a cofactor for factor IX (FIX). FVIII appears to be more immunogenic than FIX and an immune response is associated more frequently with FVIII than FIX gene therapy strategies. We have evaluated a modified lentiviral delivery strategy that facilitates liver-restricted transgene expression and prevents off-target expression in hematopoietic cells by incorporating microRNA (miRNA) target sequences. In contrast to outcomes using this strategy to deliver FIX, this modified delivery strategy was in and of itself insufficient to prevent an anti-FVIII immune response in treated hemophilia A mice. However, pseudotyping the lentivirus with the GP64 envelope glycoprotein, in conjunction with a liver-restricted promoter and a miRNA-regulated FVIII transgene resulted in sustained, therapeutic levels of FVIII. These modifications to the lentiviral delivery system effectively restricted FVIII transgene expression to the liver. Plasma levels of FVIII could be increased to around 9% that of normal levels when macrophages were depleted prior to treating the hemophilia A mice with the modified lentiviral FVIII delivery system. PMID:21285959

  9. T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer with lentiviral vectors allows efficient redirection of tumor specificity in naive and memory T cells without prior stimulation of endogenous TCR.

    PubMed

    Circosta, Paola; Granziero, Luisa; Follenzi, Antonia; Vigna, Elisa; Stella, Stefania; Vallario, Antonella; Elia, Angela Rita; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Orso, Francesca; Geuna, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Todorovic, Maja; Giachino, Claudia; Cignetti, Alessandro

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of introducing exogenous T cell receptor (TCR) genes into T cells by lentiviral transduction, without prior stimulation of endogenous TCR with anti-CD3. TCR transfer is used to impose tumor antigen specificity on recipient T cells, but sustained activation required for retroviral transduction may affect the clinical efficacy of engineered T cells. Cytokine stimulation makes T cells susceptible to lentiviral transduction in the absence of TCR triggering, but this advantage has never been exploited for TCR transfer. Autoimmune diseases are a source of high-affinity TCRs specific for self/tumor antigens. We selected, from a patient with vitiligo, a Mart1-specific TCR based on intrinsic interchain pairing properties and functional avidity. After lentiviral transduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, preferential pairing of exogenous alpha and beta chains was observed, together with effective recognition of Mart1(+) melanoma cells. We tested transduction efficiency on various T cell subsets prestimulated with interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 (alone or in combination). Both naive and unfractionated CD8(+) T cells could be transduced without requiring endogenous TCR triggering. IL-7 plus IL-15 was the most powerful combination, allowing high levels of transgene expression without inducing T cell differentiation (34 +/- 5% Mart1-TCR(+) cells in naive CD8(+) and 16 +/- 6% in unfractionated CD8(+)). Cytokine-prestimulated, Mart1-redirected naive and unfractionated CD8(+) cells expanded better than CD3-CD28-prestimulated counterparts in response to both peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells and Mart1(+) melanoma cells. This strategy allows the generation of tumor-specific T cells encompassing truly naive T cells, endowed with an intact proliferative potential and a preserved differentiation stage.

  10. The β-globin locus control region in combination with the EF1α short promoter allows enhanced lentiviral vector-mediated erythroid gene expression with conserved multilineage activity.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Zhang, Lin; Knight, Sean; Saadeh, Heba; Scholz, Simone; Carmo, Marlene; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Monkeviciute, Aiste; Schulz, Reiner; Collins, Mary; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Schmidt, Manfred; Fairbanks, Lynette; Antoniou, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-07-01

    Some gene therapy strategies are compromised by the levels of gene expression required for therapeutic benefit, and also by the breadth of cell types that require correction. We designed a lentiviral vector system in which a transgene is under the transcriptional control of the short form of constitutively acting elongation factor 1α promoter (EFS) combined with essential elements of the locus control region of the β-globin gene (β-LCR). We show that the β-LCR can upregulate EFS activity specifically in erythroid cells but does not alter EFS activity in myeloid or lymphoid cells. Experiments using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter or the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene demonstrate 3-7 times upregulation in vitro but >20 times erythroid-specific upregulation in vivo, the effects of which were sustained for 1 year. The addition of the β-LCR did not alter the mutagenic potential of the vector in in vitro mutagenesis (IM) assays although microarray analysis showed that the β-LCR upregulates ~9% of neighboring genes. This vector design therefore combines the benefits of multilineage gene expression with high-level erythroid expression, and has considerable potential for correction of multisystem diseases including certain lysosomal storage diseases through a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy approach.

  11. Lentiviral vector-mediated down-regulation of IL-17A receptor in hepatic stellate cells results in decreased secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng-Chu; Zheng, Yi-Hu; Yu, Pan-Pan; Min, Tan Hooi; Yu, Fu-Xiang; Ye, Chao; Xie, Yuan-Kang; Zhang, Qi-Yu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of interleukin (IL)-6 secretion through blocking the IL-17A/IL-17A receptor (IL-17RA) signaling pathway with a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in vitro. METHODS: HSCs were derived from the livers of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. IL-6 expression was evaluated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation activity of p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) 1/2 upon induction by IL-17A and suppression by IL-17RA shRNA were examined using Western blotting. RESULTS: IL-6 expression induced by IL-17A was significantly increased compared to control in HSCs (P < 0.01 in a dose-dependent manner). Suppression of IL-17RA using lentiviral-mediated shRNA inhibited IL-6 expression induced by IL-17A compared to group with only IL-17A treatment (1.44 ± 0.17 vs 4.07 ± 0.43, P < 0.01). IL-17A induced rapid phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 after 5 min exposure, and showed the strongest levels of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 at 15 min in IL-17A-treated HSCs. IL-6 mRNA expression induced by IL-17A (100 ng/mL) for 3 h exposure was inhibited by preincubation with specific inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB-203580) and ERK1/2 (PD-98059) compared to groups without inhibitors preincubation (1.67 ± 0.24, 2.01 ± 0.10 vs 4.08 ± 0.59, P < 0.01). Moreover, Lentiviral-mediated IL-17RA shRNA 1 inhibited IL-17A-induced IL-6 mRNA expression compared to random shRNA in HSCs (1.44 ± 0.17 vs 3.98 ± 0.68, P < 0.01). Lentiviral-mediated IL-17RA shRNA 1 inhibited phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 induced by 15 min IL-17A (100 ng/mL) exposure. CONCLUSION: Down-regulation of the IL-17RA receptor by shRNA decreased IL-6 expression induced by IL-17A via p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HSCs. Suppression of IL-17RA expression may be a strategy to reduce the inflammatory response induced by IL-17A in

  12. Lentiviral vectors containing mouse Csf1r control elements direct macrophage-restricted expression in multiple species of birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pridans, Clare; Lillico, Simon; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2014-01-01

    The development of macrophages requires signaling through the lineage-restricted receptor Csf1r. Macrophage-restricted expression of transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r requires the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element (FIRE). We have created a lentiviral construct containing mouse FIRE and promoter. The lentivirus is capable of directing macrophage-restricted reporter gene expression in mouse, rat, human, pig, cow, sheep, and even chicken. Rat bone marrow cells transduced with the lentivirus were capable of differentiating into macrophages expressing the reporter gene in vitro. Macrophage-restricted expression may be desirable for immunization or immune response modulation, and for gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases and some immunodeficiencies. The small size of the Csf1r transcription control elements will allow the insertion of large “cargo” for applications in gene therapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26015955

  13. Lentiviral vectors containing mouse Csf1r control elements direct macrophage-restricted expression in multiple species of birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Pridans, Clare; Lillico, Simon; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2014-01-01

    The development of macrophages requires signaling through the lineage-restricted receptor Csf1r. Macrophage-restricted expression of transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r requires the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element (FIRE). We have created a lentiviral construct containing mouse FIRE and promoter. The lentivirus is capable of directing macrophage-restricted reporter gene expression in mouse, rat, human, pig, cow, sheep, and even chicken. Rat bone marrow cells transduced with the lentivirus were capable of differentiating into macrophages expressing the reporter gene in vitro. Macrophage-restricted expression may be desirable for immunization or immune response modulation, and for gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases and some immunodeficiencies. The small size of the Csf1r transcription control elements will allow the insertion of large "cargo" for applications in gene therapy and vaccine delivery.

  14. First-in-Human Treatment With a Dendritic Cell-targeting Lentiviral Vector-expressing NY-ESO-1, LV305, Induces Deep, Durable Response in Refractory Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma Patient.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Seth M; Lu, Hailing; Gnjatic, Sacha; Somaiah, Neeta; O'Malley, Ryan B; Jones, Robin L; Hsu, Frank J; Ter Meulen, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Effective induction of antitumor T cells is a pivotal goal of cancer immunotherapy. To this end, lentiviral vectors (LV) are uniquely poised to directly prime CD8 T-cell responses via transduction of dendritic cells in vivo and have shown promise as active cancer therapeutics in preclinical tumor models. However, until now, significant barriers related to production and regulation have prevented their widespread use in the clinic. We developed LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting, integration-deficient, replication incompetent LV from the ZVex platform, encoding the full-length cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. LV305 is currently being evaluated in phase 1 and 2 trials in metastatic recurrent cancer patients with NY-ESO-1 positive solid tumors as a single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1. Here we report on the first patient treated with LV305, a young woman with metastatic, recurrent, therapy-refractive NY-ESO-1 synovial sarcoma. The patient developed a robust NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell response after 3 intradermal injections with LV305, and subsequently over 85% disease regression that is continuing for >2.5 years posttherapy. No adverse events >grade 2 occurred. This case demonstrates that LV305 can be safely administered and has the potential to induce a significant clinical benefit and immunologic response in a patient with advanced stage cancer.

  15. Driving DNA transposition by lentiviral protein transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-01-01

    Gene vectors derived from DNA transposable elements have become powerful molecular tools in biomedical research and are slowly moving into the clinic as carriers of therapeutic genes. Conventional uses of DNA transposon-based gene vehicles rely on the intracellular production of the transposase protein from transfected nucleic acids. The transposase mediates mobilization of the DNA transposon, which is typically provided in the context of plasmid DNA. In recent work, we established lentiviral protein transduction from Gag precursors as a new strategy for direct delivery of the transposase protein. Inspired by the natural properties of infecting viruses to carry their own enzymes, we loaded lentivirus-derived particles not only with vector genomes carrying the DNA transposon vector but also with hundreds of transposase subunits. Such particles were found to drive efficient transposition of the piggyBac transposable element in a range of different cell types, including primary cells, and offer a new transposase delivery approach that guarantees short-term activity and limits potential cytotoxicity. DNA transposon vectors, originally developed and launched as a non-viral alternative to viral integrating vectors, have truly become viral. Here, we briefly review our findings and speculate on the perspectives and potential advantages of transposase delivery by lentiviral protein transduction. PMID:25057443

  16. In vitro incorporation of a cell-binding protein to a lentiviral vector using an engineered split intein enables targeted delivery of genetic cargo.

    PubMed

    Chamoun-Emanuelli, Ana M; Wright, Gus; Roger, Smith; Münch, Robert C; Buchholz, Christian J; Chen, Zhilei

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising therapeutic paradigm for addressing many disorders, but the absence of a vector that can be robustly and reproducibly functionalized with cell-homing functionality to mediate the delivery of genetic cargo specifically to target cells following systemic administration has stood as a major impediment. In this study, a high-affinity protein-protein pair comprising a splicing-deficient naturally split intein was used as molecular Velcro to append a HER2/neu-binding protein (DARPin) onto the surface of a binding-deficient, fusion-competent lentivirus. HER2/neu-specific lentiviruses created using this in vitro pseudotyping approach were able to deliver their genetic reporter cargo specifically to cells that express the target receptor at high levels in a co-culture. We envision that the described technology could provide a powerful, broadly applicable platform for the incorporation of cell-targeting functionality onto viral vectors.

  17. TRIM5α variations influence transduction efficiency with lentiviral vectors in both human and rhesus CD34(+) cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Evans, Molly E; Kumkhaek, Chutima; Hsieh, Matthew M; Donahue, Robert E; Tisdale, John F; Uchida, Naoya

    2014-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vectors can transduce human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), but transduction efficiency varies among individuals. The innate immune factor tripartite motif-containing protein 5α (TRIM5α) plays an important role for restriction of retroviral infection. In this study, we examined whether TRIM5α could account for variations in transduction efficiency using both an established rhesus gene therapy model and human CD34(+) cell culture. Evaluation of TRIM5α genotypes (Mamu-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and TrimCyp) in 16 rhesus macaques that were transplanted with transduced CD34(+) cells showed a significant correlation between TRIM5α Mamu-4 and high gene marking in both lymphocytes and granulocytes 6 months after transplantation. Since significant human TRIM5α coding polymorphisms were not known, we evaluated TRIM5α expression levels in human CD34(+) cells from 14 donors. Three days after HIV-1 vector transduction, measured transduction efficiency varied significantly among donors and was negatively correlated with TRIM5α expression levels. In summary, transduction efficiency in both rhesus and human CD34(+) cells was influenced by TRIM5α variations (genotypes and expression levels). Our findings are important for both understanding and mitigating the variability of transduction efficiency for rhesus and human CD34(+) cells.

  18. “Marker of Self” CD47 on lentiviral vectors decreases macrophage-mediated clearance and increases delivery to SIRPA-expressing lung carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sosale, Nisha G; Ivanovska, Irena I; Tsai, Richard K; Swift, Joe; Hsu, Jake W; Alvey, Cory M; Zoltick, Philip W; Discher, Dennis E

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses infect many cell types and are now widely used for gene delivery in vitro, but in vivo uptake of these foreign vectors by macrophages is a limitation. Lentivectors are produced here from packaging cells that overexpress “Marker of Self” CD47, which inhibits macrophage uptake of cells when prophagocytic factors are also displayed. Single particle analyses show “hCD47-Lenti” display properly oriented human-CD47 for interactions with the macrophage’s inhibitory receptor SIRPA. Macrophages derived from human and NOD/SCID/Il2rg−/− (NSG) mice show a SIRPA-dependent decrease in transduction, i.e., transgene expression, by hCD47-Lenti compared to control Lenti. Consistent with known “Self” signaling pathways, macrophage transduction by control Lenti is decreased by drug inhibition of Myosin-II to the same levels as hCD47-Lenti. In contrast, human lung carcinoma cells express SIRPA and use it to enhance transduction by hCD47-Lenti- as illustrated by more efficient gene deletion using CRISPR/Cas9. Intravenous injection of hCD47-Lenti into NSG mice shows hCD47 prolongs circulation, unless a blocking anti-SIRPA is preinjected. In vivo transduction of spleen and liver macrophages also decreases for hCD47-Lenti while transduction of lung carcinoma xenografts increases. hCD47 could be useful when macrophage uptake is limiting on other viral vectors that are emerging in cancer treatments (e.g., Measles glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivectors) and also in targeting various SIRPA-expressing tumors such as glioblastomas. PMID:28053997

  19. First-in-Human Treatment With a Dendritic Cell-targeting Lentiviral Vector-expressing NY-ESO-1, LV305, Induces Deep, Durable Response in Refractory Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma Patient.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Seth M; Lu, Hailing; Gnjatic, Sacha; Somaiah, Neeta; O'Malley, Ryan B; Jones, Robin L; Hsu, Frank J; Ter Meulen, Jan

    2017-09-18

    Effective induction of antitumor T cells is a pivotal goal of cancer immunotherapy. To this end, lentiviral vectors (LV) are uniquely poised to directly prime CD8 T-cell responses via transduction of dendritic cells in vivo and have shown promise as active cancer therapeutics in preclinical tumor models. However, until now, significant barriers related to production and regulation have prevented their widespread use in the clinic. We developed LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting, integration-deficient, replication incompetent LV from the ZVex platform, encoding the full-length cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. LV305 is currently being evaluated in phase 1 and 2 trials in metastatic recurrent cancer patients with NY-ESO-1 positive solid tumors as a single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1. Here we report on the first patient treated with LV305, a young woman with metastatic, recurrent, therapy-refractive NY-ESO-1 synovial sarcoma. The patient developed a robust NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell response after 3 intradermal injections with LV305, and subsequently over 85% disease regression that is continuing for >2.5 years posttherapy. No adverse events >grade 2 occurred. This case demonstrates that LV305 can be safely administered and has the potential to induce a significant clinical benefit and immunologic response in a patient with advanced stage cancer.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  20. RD-MolPack technology for the constitutive production of self-inactivating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the nontoxic RD114-TR envelope

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Virna; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovan, Claudia; Corna, Stefano; Bossi, Sergio; Pema, Monika; Giuliani, Erica; Scavullo, Cinzia; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    To date, gene therapy with transiently derived lentivectors has been very successful to cure rare infant genetic diseases. However, transient manufacturing is unfeasible to treat adult malignancies because large vector lots are required. By contrast, stable manufacturing is the best option for high-incidence diseases since it reduces the production cost, which is the major current limitation to scale up the transient methods. We have previously developed the proprietary RD2-MolPack technology for the stable production of second-generation lentivectors, based on the RD114-TR envelope. Of note, opposite to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope, RD114-TR does not need inducible expression thanks to lack of toxicity. Here, we present the construction of RD2- and RD3-MolPack cells for the production of self-inactivating lentivectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a proof-of-concept of the feasibility and safety of this technology before its later therapeutic exploitation. We report that human T lymphocytes transduced with self-inactivating lentivectors derived from RD3-MolPack cells or with self-inactivating VSV-G pseudotyped lentivectors derived from transient transfection show identical T-cell memory differentiation phenotype and comparable transduction efficiency in all T-cell subsets. RD-MolPack technology represents, therefore, a straightforward tool to simplify and standardize lentivector manufacturing to engineer T-cells for frontline immunotherapy applications. PMID:27222840

  1. Long-term safety and tolerability of ProSavin, a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy for Parkinson's disease: a dose escalation, open-label, phase 1/2 trial.

    PubMed

    Palfi, Stéphane; Gurruchaga, Jean Marc; Ralph, G Scott; Lepetit, Helene; Lavisse, Sonia; Buttery, Philip C; Watts, Colin; Miskin, James; Kelleher, Michelle; Deeley, Sarah; Iwamuro, Hirokazu; Lefaucheur, Jean Pascal; Thiriez, Claire; Fenelon, Gilles; Lucas, Cherry; Brugières, Pierre; Gabriel, Inanna; Abhay, Kou; Drouot, Xavier; Tani, Naoki; Kas, Aurelie; Ghaleh, Bijan; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Dolphin, Patrice; Breen, David P; Mason, Sarah; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Radcliffe, Pippa A; Harrop, Richard; Kingsman, Susan M; Rascol, Olivier; Naylor, Stuart; Barker, Roger A; Hantraye, Philippe; Remy, Philippe; Cesaro, Pierre; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2014-03-29

    Parkinson's disease is typically treated with oral dopamine replacement therapies; however, long-term treatment leads to motor complications and, occasionally, impulse control disorders caused by intermittent stimulation of dopamine receptors and off-target effects, respectively. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of bilateral, intrastriatal delivery of ProSavin, a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy aimed at restoring local and continuous dopamine production in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. We undertook a phase 1/2 open-label trial with 12-month follow-up at two study sites (France and UK) to assess the safety and efficacy of ProSavin after bilateral injection into the putamen of patients with Parkinson's disease. All patients were then enrolled in a separate open-label follow-up study of long-term safety. Three doses were assessed in separate cohorts: low dose (1·9×10(7) transducing units [TU]); mid dose (4·0×10(7) TU); and high dose (1×10(8) TU). Inclusion criteria were age 48-65 years, disease duration 5 years or longer, motor fluctuations, and 50% or higher motor response to oral dopaminergic therapy. The primary endpoints of the phase 1/2 study were the number and severity of adverse events associated with ProSavin and motor responses as assessed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III (off medication) scores, at 6 months after vector administration. Both trials are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00627588 and NCT01856439. 15 patients received ProSavin and were followed up (three at low dose, six mid dose, six high dose). During the first 12 months of follow-up, 54 drug-related adverse events were reported (51 mild, three moderate). Most common were increased on-medication dyskinesias (20 events, 11 patients) and on-off phenomena (12 events, nine patients). No serious adverse events related to the study drug or surgical procedure were reported. A significant improvement in mean UPDRS part

  2. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra; Montini, Eugenio; Lorioli, Laura; Cesani, Martina; Fumagalli, Francesca; Plati, Tiziana; Baldoli, Cristina; Martino, Sabata; Calabria, Andrea; Canale, Sabrina; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Vallanti, Giuliana; Biasco, Luca; Leo, Simone; Kabbara, Nabil; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Rizzo, William B; Mehta, Nalini A L; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Boelens, Jaap J; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Dow, David J; Schmidt, Manfred; Assanelli, Andrea; Neduva, Victor; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gardner, Jason; von Kalle, Christof; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Rovelli, Attilio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Sessa, Maria; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-08-23

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) deficiency. Patients with MLD exhibit progressive motor and cognitive impairment and die within a few years of symptom onset. We used a lentiviral vector to transfer a functional ARSA gene into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from three presymptomatic patients who showed genetic, biochemical, and neurophysiological evidence of late infantile MLD. After reinfusion of the gene-corrected HSCs, the patients showed extensive and stable ARSA gene replacement, which led to high enzyme expression throughout hematopoietic lineages and in cerebrospinal fluid. Analyses of vector integrations revealed no evidence of aberrant clonal behavior. The disease did not manifest or progress in the three patients 7 to 21 months beyond the predicted age of symptom onset. These findings indicate that extensive genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis can be achieved with lentiviral vectors and that this approach may offer therapeutic benefit for MLD patients.

  3. Surface modification via strain-promoted click reaction facilitates targeted lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanjie; Oum, Yoon Hyeun; Carrico, Isaac S

    2016-01-01

    As a result of their ability to integrate into the genome of both dividing and non-dividing cells, lentiviruses have emerged as a promising vector for gene delivery. Targeted gene transduction of specific cells and tissues by lentiviral vectors has been a major goal, which has proven difficult to achieve. We report a novel targeting protocol that relies on the chemoselective attachment of cancer specific ligands to unnatural glycans on lentiviral surfaces. This strategy exhibits minimal perturbation on virus physiology and demonstrates remarkable flexibility. It allows for targeting but can be more broadly useful with applications such as vector purification and immunomodulation.

  4. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Biasco, Luca; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Ferrua, Francesca; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Baricordi, Cristina; Dionisio, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Giannelli, Stefania; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Bosticardo, Marita; Evangelio, Costanza; Assanelli, Andrea; Casiraghi, Miriam; Di Nunzio, Sara; Callegaro, Luciano; Benati, Claudia; Rizzardi, Paolo; Pellin, Danilo; Di Serio, Clelia; Schmidt, Manfred; Von Kalle, Christof; Gardner, Jason; Mehta, Nalini; Neduva, Victor; Dow, David J; Galy, Anne; Miniero, Roberto; Finocchi, Andrea; Metin, Ayse; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Orange, Jordan S; Galimberti, Stefania; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Biffi, Alessandra; Montini, Eugenio; Villa, Anna; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-08-23

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an inherited immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the gene encoding WASP, a protein regulating the cytoskeleton. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) transplants can be curative, but, when matched donors are unavailable, infusion of autologous HSPCs modified ex vivo by gene therapy is an alternative approach. We used a lentiviral vector encoding functional WASP to genetically correct HSPCs from three WAS patients and reinfused the cells after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. All three patients showed stable engraftment of WASP-expressing cells and improvements in platelet counts, immune functions, and clinical scores. Vector integration analyses revealed highly polyclonal and multilineage haematopoiesis resulting from the gene-corrected HSPCs. Lentiviral gene therapy did not induce selection of integrations near oncogenes, and no aberrant clonal expansion was observed after 20 to 32 months. Although extended clinical observation is required to establish long-term safety, lentiviral gene therapy represents a promising treatment for WAS.

  5. Lentiviral-mediated gene correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Donald S; McIntyre, Chantelle; Thomas, Belinda; Koldej, Rachel; Ranieri, Enzo; Roberts, Ainslie; Clements, Peter R; Dunning, Kylie; Byers, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is the most common of the mucopolysaccharidoses. The disease is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme sulphamidase and results in the storage of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparan sulphate. MPS IIIA is characterised by widespread storage and urinary excretion of heparan sulphate, and a progressive and eventually profound neurological course. Gene therapy is one of the few avenues of treatment that hold promise of a sustainable treatment for this disorder. Methods The murine sulphamidase gene cDNA was cloned into a lentiviral vector and high-titre virus produced. Human MPS IIIA fibroblast cultures were transduced with the sulphamidase vector and analysed using molecular, enzymatic and metabolic assays. High-titre virus was intravenously injected into six 5-week old MPS IIIA mice. Three of these mice were pre-treated with hyperosmotic mannitol. The weight of animals was monitored and GAG content in urine samples was analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Transduction of cultured MPS IIIA fibroblasts with the sulphamidase gene corrected both the enzymatic and metabolic defects. Sulphamidase secreted by gene-corrected cells was able to cross correct untransduced MPS IIIA cells. Urinary GAG was found to be greatly reduced in samples from mice receiving the vector compared to untreated MPS IIIA controls. In addition, the weight of treated mice became progressively normalised over the 6-months post-treatment. Conclusion Lentiviral vectors appear promising vehicles for the development of gene therapy for MPS IIIA. PMID:17227588

  6. Immune response to lentiviral bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase gene transfer in fetal and neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Seppen, J; van Til, N P; van der Rijt, R; Hiralall, J K; Kunne, C; Elferink, R P J Oude

    2006-04-01

    Gene therapy for inherited disorders might cause an immune response to the therapeutic protein. A solution would be to introduce the gene in the fetal or neonatal period, which should lead to tolerization. Lentiviral vectors mediate long-term gene expression, and are well suited for gene therapy early in development. A model for fetal or neonatal gene therapy is the inherited disorder of bilirubin metabolism, Crigler-Najjar disease (CN). The absence of bilirubin UDP-glucoronyltransferase (UGT1A1) activity in CN patients causes high serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin and brain damage in infancy. CN is attractive for the development of gene therapy because the mutant Gunn rat closely mimics the human disease. Injection of UGT1A1 lentiviral vectors corrected the hyperbilirubinemia for more than a year in rats injected as fetuses and for up to 18 weeks in rats injected the day of birth. UGT1A1 gene transfer was confirmed by the presence of bilirubin glucuronides in bile. All animals injected with UGT1A1 lentiviral vectors developed antibodies to UGT1A1. Animals injected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) lentiviral vectors did not develop antibodies to GFP. Our results indicate that fetal and neonatal gene therapy with immunogenic proteins such as UGT1A1 does not necessarily lead to tolerization.

  7. Lentiviral-mediated phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Ashley L.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Shah, Viral S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Stroik, Mallory R.; Powers, Linda S.; Gansemer, Nick D.; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Sinn, Patrick L.; McCray, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), resulting in defective anion transport. Regardless of the disease-causing mutation, gene therapy is a strategy to restore anion transport to airway epithelia. Indeed, viral vector–delivered CFTR can complement the anion channel defect. In this proof-of-principle study, functional in vivo CFTR channel activity was restored in the airways of CF pigs using a feline immunodeficiency virus–based (FIV-based) lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the GP64 envelope. Three newborn CF pigs received aerosolized FIV-CFTR to the nose and lung. Two weeks after viral vector delivery, epithelial tissues were analyzed for functional correction. In freshly excised tracheal and bronchus tissues and cultured ethmoid sinus cells, we observed a significant increase in transepithelial cAMP-stimulated current, evidence of functional CFTR. In addition, we observed increases in tracheal airway surface liquid pH and bacterial killing in CFTR vector–treated animals. Together, these data provide the first evidence to our knowledge that lentiviral delivery of CFTR can partially correct the anion channel defect in a large-animal CF model and validate a translational strategy to treat or prevent CF lung disease. PMID:27656681

  8. Genomic integration occurs in the packaging cell via unexported lentiviral precursors.

    PubMed

    Mosabbir, Abdullah Al; Truong, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    To use HIV-1 based lentivirus components to produce gene integration and the formation of a stable cell line in the packaging cell line without viral infection. A co-transfection of a Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) 293 packaging cell line with Gag-pol (GP) and a transfer vector, without the envelope vector, produces a stable cell line after 2 weeks of selection. Furthermore, a matrix protein deficient GP in the packaging vector enhances this integration. This supports that, in theory, unexported lentiviral cores produced within the packaging cell can infect itself without requiring the release of any lentiviral particles. If the packaging cell is also the target cell, then gene integration leading to a stable cell line can be accomplished without viral particle infection.

  9. A guide to approaching regulatory considerations for lentiviral-mediated gene therapies.

    PubMed

    White, Michael; Whittaker, Roger; Stoll, Elizabeth Ann

    2017-06-12

    Lentiviral vectors are increasingly the gene transfer tool of choice for gene or cell therapies, with multiple clinical investigations showing promise for this viral vector in terms of both safety and efficacy. The third-generation vector system is well-characterized, effectively delivers genetic material and maintains long-term stable expression in target cells, delivers larger amounts of genetic material than other methods, is non-pathogenic and does not cause an inflammatory response in the recipient. This report aims to help academic scientists and regulatory managers negotiate the governance framework to achieve successful translation of a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy. The focus is on European regulations, and how they are administered in the United Kingdom, although many of the principles will be similar for other regions including the United States. The report justifies the rationale for using third-generation lentiviral vectors to achieve gene delivery for in vivo and ex vivo applications; briefly summarises the extant regulatory guidance for gene therapies, categorised as advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs); provides guidance on specific regulatory issues regarding gene therapies; presents an overview of the key stakeholders to be approached when pursuing clinical trials authorization for an ATMP; and includes a brief catalogue of the documentation required to submit an application for regulatory approval of a new gene therapy.

  10. A Guide to Approaching Regulatory Considerations for Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Therapies.

    PubMed

    White, Michael; Whittaker, Roger; Gándara, Carolina; Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2017-08-01

    Lentiviral vectors are increasingly the gene transfer tool of choice for gene or cell therapies, with multiple clinical investigations showing promise for this viral vector in terms of both safety and efficacy. The third-generation vector system is well characterized, effectively delivers genetic material and maintains long-term stable expression in target cells, delivers larger amounts of genetic material than other methods, is nonpathogenic, and does not cause an inflammatory response in the recipient. This report aims to help academic scientists and regulatory managers negotiate the governance framework to achieve successful translation of a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy. The focus is on European regulations and how they are administered in the United Kingdom, although many of the principles will be similar for other regions, including the United States. The report justifies the rationale for using third-generation lentiviral vectors to achieve gene delivery for in vivo and ex vivo applications; briefly summarizes the extant regulatory guidance for gene therapies, categorized as advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs); provides guidance on specific regulatory issues regarding gene therapies; presents an overview of the key stakeholders to be approached when pursuing clinical trials authorization for an ATMP; and includes a brief catalogue of the documentation required to submit an application for regulatory approval of a new gene therapy.

  11. Biosafety in Ex Vivo Gene Therapy and Conditional Ablation of Lentivirally Transduced Hepatocytes in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Olivier; Birraux, Jacques; Wildhaber, Barbara E; Jond, Caty; Lasne, Françoise; Habre, Walid; Trono, Didier; Nguyen, Tuan H; Chardot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy is an interesting alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for treating metabolic liver diseases. In this study, we investigated its efficacy and biosafety in nonhuman primates. Hepatocytes isolated from liver lobectomy were transduced in suspension with a bicistronic liver-specific lentiviral vector and immediately autotransplanted (SLIT) into three cynomolgus monkeys. The vector encoded cynomolgus erythropoietin (EPO) and the conditional suicide gene herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). Survival of transduced hepatocytes and vector dissemination were evaluated by detecting transgene expression and vector DNA. SLIT was safely performed within a day in all three subjects. Serum EPO and hematocrit rapidly increased post-SLIT and their values returned to baseline within about 1 month. Isoforms of EPO detected in monkeys' sera differed from the physiological renal EPO. In liver biopsies at months 8 and 15, we detected EPO protein, vector mRNA and DNA, demonstrating long-term survival and functionality of transplanted lentivirally transduced hepatocytes. Valganciclovir administration resulted in complete ablation of the transduced hepatocytes. We demonstrated the feasibility and biosafety of SLIT, and the long term (>1 year) functionality of lentivirally transduced hepatocytes in nonhuman primates. The HSV-TK/valganciclovir suicide strategy can increase the biosafety of liver gene therapy protocols by safely and completely ablating transduced hepatocytes on demand. PMID:19568222

  12. A Guide to Approaching Regulatory Considerations for Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Therapies

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael; Whittaker, Roger; Gándara, Carolina; Stoll, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are increasingly the gene transfer tool of choice for gene or cell therapies, with multiple clinical investigations showing promise for this viral vector in terms of both safety and efficacy. The third-generation vector system is well characterized, effectively delivers genetic material and maintains long-term stable expression in target cells, delivers larger amounts of genetic material than other methods, is nonpathogenic, and does not cause an inflammatory response in the recipient. This report aims to help academic scientists and regulatory managers negotiate the governance framework to achieve successful translation of a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy. The focus is on European regulations and how they are administered in the United Kingdom, although many of the principles will be similar for other regions, including the United States. The report justifies the rationale for using third-generation lentiviral vectors to achieve gene delivery for in vivo and ex vivo applications; briefly summarizes the extant regulatory guidance for gene therapies, categorized as advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs); provides guidance on specific regulatory issues regarding gene therapies; presents an overview of the key stakeholders to be approached when pursuing clinical trials authorization for an ATMP; and includes a brief catalogue of the documentation required to submit an application for regulatory approval of a new gene therapy. PMID:28817344

  13. Efficient lentiviral gene transfer to canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol.

    PubMed

    Horn, Peter A; Keyser, Kirsten A; Peterson, Laura J; Neff, Tobias; Thomasson, Bobbie M; Thompson, Jesse; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-15

    The use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of hematopoietic stem cells has evoked much interest owing to their ability to stably integrate into the genome of nondividing cells. However, published large animal studies have reported highly variable gene transfer rates of typically less than 1%. Here we report the use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of canine CD34(+) hematopoietic repopulating cells using a very short, 18-hour transduction protocol. We compared lentiviral transduction of hematopoietic repopulating cells from either stem cell factor (SCF)- and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed marrow or mobilized peripheral blood in a competitive repopulation assay in 3 dogs. All dogs engrafted rapidly within 9 days. Transgene expression was detected in all lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, and red blood cells as well as platelets) indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells, with overall long-term marking levels of up to 12%. Gene transfer levels in mobilized peripheral blood cells were slightly higher than in primed marrow cells. In conclusion, we show efficient lentiviral transduction of canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol. These results have important implications for the design of stem cell gene therapy protocols, especially for those diseases in which the maintenance of stem cells in culture is a major limitation.

  14. Lentiviral small hairpin RNA delivery reduces apical sodium channel activity in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Aarbiou, Jamil; Copreni, Elena; Buijs-Offerman, Ruvalic M; van der Wegen, Pascal; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Tilesi, Francesca; Fradiani, Piera; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Yueksekdag, Guelnihal; Diana, Anna; Rosenecker, Joseph; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Conese, Massimo; Scholte, Bob J

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) hyperactivity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) by dysregulation of fluid and electrolytes in the airways. In the present study, we show proof-of-principle for ENaC inhibition by lentiviral-mediated RNA interference. Immortalized normal (H441) and CF mutant (CFBE) airway cells, and differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells in air liquid interface culture (HBEC-ALI) were transduced with a vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral (LV) vector expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting the α subunit of ENaC (ENaCα), and a marker gene. Efficacy of ENaCα down-regulation was assayed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), membrane potential assay, western blotting, short-circuit currents and fluid absorption. Off-target effects were investigated by a lab-on-a-chip quantitative PCR array. Transduction to near one hundred percentage efficiency of H441, CFBE and HBEC-ALI was achieved by the addition of the LV vector before differentiation and polarization. Transduction resulted in the inhibition of ENaCα mRNA and antigen expression, and a proportional decrease in ENaC-dependent short circuit current and fluid transport. No effect on transepithelial resistance or cAMP-induced secretion responses was observed in HBEC-ALI. The production of interferon α and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA, indicating Toll-like receptor 3 or RNA-induced silencing complex mediated off-target effects, was not observed in HBEC-ALI transduced with this vector. We have established a generic method for studying the effect of RNA interference in HBEC-ALI using standard lentiviral vectors. Down-regulation of ENaCα by lentiviral shRNA expression vectors as shown in the absence off-target effects has potential therapeutic value in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Restriction of transgene expression to the B-lymphoid progeny of human lentivirally transduced CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Bardin, Florence; Imbert, Jean; Chabannon, Christian; Tonnelle, Cécile

    2004-07-01

    Development of gene transfer strategies will necessitate improved efficiency and control of transduction and transgene expression. We here provide evidence that targeting expression of the GFP reporter gene to the B-lymphoid progeny of genetically modified human hematopoietic progenitor cells can be achieved through the insertion of regulatory sequences from the human CD19 gene promoter into a lentiviral vector. Based on a bioinformatics approach, three human CD19-derived sequences were designed and inserted into a self-inactivated lentiviral vector backbone upstream of the GFP gene: S.CD19 (230 bp), M.CD19 (464 bp), and L.CD19 (1274 bp). These new lentiviral vectors efficiently transduced cord blood CD34(+) cells. The M.CD19 and especially L.CD19 sequences preferentially targeted GFP expression to in vitro and in vivo differentiated CD19(+) progeny; moreover, transgene expression was detected from the CD34(+) pro/pre-B cell to the mature peripheral IgM(+) B cell stage. In contrast, GFP expression was weak or absent in primary T-lymphoid and uncommitted progenitor cells or in erythroid, natural killer, or myeloid differentiated cells. Such B-lineage-specific lentiviral vectors may be useful for correcting inherited disorders that affect B-lymphoid cells or for deciphering the transcriptional program that controls B cell commitment and differentiation.

  16. Safety considerations in vector development.

    PubMed

    Kappes, J C; Wu, X

    2001-11-01

    The inadvertent production of replication competent retrovirus (RCR) constitutes the principal safety concern for the use of lentiviral vectors in human clinical protocols. Because of limitations in animal models to evaluate lentiviral vectors for their potential to recombine and induce disease, the vector design itself should ensure against the emergence of RCR in vivo. Issues related to RCR generation and one approach to dealing with this problem are discussed in this chapter. To assess the risk of generating RCR, a highly sensitive biological assay was developed to specifically detect vector recombination in transduced cells. Analysis of lentiviral vector stocks has shown that recombination occurs during reverse transcription in primary target cells. Rejoining of viral protein-coding sequences of the packaging construct and cis-acting sequences of the vector was demonstrated to generate env-minus recombinants (LTR-gag-pol-LTR). Mobilization of recombinant lentiviral genomes was also demonstrated but was dependent on pseudotyping of the vector core with an exogenous envelope protein. 5' sequence analysis has demonstrated that recombinants consist of U3, R, U5, and the psi packaging signal joined with an open gag coding region. Analysis of the 3' end has mapped the point of vector recombination to the poly(A) tract of the packaging construct's mRNA. The state-of-the-art third generation packaging construct and SIN vector also have been shown to generate env-minus proviral recombinants capable of mobilizing retroviral DNA when pseudotyped with an exogenous envelope protein. A new class of HIV-based vector (trans-vector) was recently developed that splits the gag-pol component of the packaging construct into two parts: one that expresses Gag/Gag-Pro and another that expresses Pol (RT and IN) fused with Vpr. Unlike other lentiviral vectors, the trans-vector has not been shown to form recombinants capable of DNA mobilization. These results indicate the trans-vector

  17. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G; Corydon, Thomas J; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo.

  18. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G.; Corydon, Thomas J.; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo. PMID:26204415

  19. Gene therapy using retrovirus vectors: vector development and biosafety at clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doi, Knayo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Retrovirus vectors (gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors) have been considered as promising tools to transfer therapeutic genes into patient cells because they can permanently integrate into host cellular genome. To treat monogenic, inherited diseases, retroviral vectors have been used to add correct genes into patient cells. Conventional gammaretroviral vectors achieved successful results in clinical trials: treated patients had therapeutic gene expression in target cells and had improved symptoms of diseases. However, serious side-effects of leukemia occurred, caused by retroviral insertional mutagenesis (IM). These incidences stressed the importance of monitoring vector integration sites in patient cells as well as of re-consideration on safer vectors. More recently lentiviral vectors which can deliver genes into non-dividing cells started to be used in clinical trials including neurological disorders, showing their efficacy. Vector integration site analysis revealed that lentiviruses integrate less likely to near promoter regions of oncogenes than gammaretroviruses and no adverse events have been reported in lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy clinical trials. Therefore lentiviral vectors have promises to be applied to a wide range of common diseases in near future. For example, T cells from cancer patients were transduced to express chimeric T cell receptors recognizing their tumour cells enhancing patients' anti-cancer immunity.

  20. Long-term correction of hemophilia A mice following lentiviral mediated delivery of an optimized canine factor VIII gene.

    PubMed

    Staber, J M; Pollpeter, M J; Anderson, C-G; Burrascano, M; Cooney, A L; Sinn, P L; Rutkowski, D T; Raschke, W C; McCray, P B

    2017-09-14

    Current therapies for hemophilia A include frequent prophylactic or on-demand intravenous factor treatments which are costly, inconvenient and may lead to inhibitor formation. Viral vector delivery of factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has the potential to alleviate the debilitating clotting defects. Lentiviral-based vectors delivered to murine models of hemophilia A mediate phenotypic correction. However, a limitation of lentiviral-mediated FVIII delivery is inefficient transduction of target cells. Here, we engineer a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) -based lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoprotein to mediate efficient gene transfer to mouse hepatocytes. In anticipation of future studies in FVIII-deficient dogs, we investigated the efficacy of FIV-delivered canine FVIII (cFVIII). Codon-optimization of the cFVIII sequence increased activity and decreased blood loss as compared to the native sequence. Further, we compared a standard B-domain deleted FVIII cDNA to a cDNA including 256 amino acids of the B-domain with 11 potential asparagine-linked oligosaccharide linkages. Restoring a partial B-domain resulted in modest reduction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers. Importantly, our optimized vectors achieved wild-type levels of phenotypic correction with minimal inhibitor formation. These studies provide insights into optimal design of a therapeutically relevant gene therapy vector for a devastating bleeding disorder.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 14 September 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.67.

  1. Vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV).

    PubMed

    Nègre, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-11-01

    In contrast to other retroviruses, lentiviruses have the unique property of infecting non-proliferating cells. Thus vectors derived from lentiviruses are promising tools for in vivo gene delivery applications. Vectors derived from human primate and non-primate lentiviruses have recently been described and, unlike retroviral vectors derived from murine leukemia viruses, lead to stable integration of the transgene into quiescent cells in various organs. Despite all the safety safeguards that have been progressively introduced in lentiviral vectors, the clinical acceptance of vectors derived from pathogenic lentiviruses is subject to debate. It is therefore essential to design vectors derived from a wide range of lentivirus types and to comparatively examine their properties in terms of transduction efficiency and bio-safety. Here, we review the properties of lentiviral vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV).

  2. Sustained high-level polyclonal hematopoietic marking and transgene expression 4 years after autologous transplantation of rhesus macaques with SIV lentiviral vector–transduced CD34+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Larochelle, Andre; Renaud, Gabriel; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Adler, Rima; Donahue, Robert E.; Hematti, Peiman; Hong, Bum-Kee; Roayaei, Jean; Akagi, Keiko; Riberdy, Janice M.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.; Persons, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that lentiviral vectors derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) were efficient at transducing rhesus hematopoietic repopulating cells. To evaluate the persistence of vector-containing and -expressing cells long term, and the safety implications of SIV lentiviral vector–mediated gene transfer, we followed 3 rhesus macaques for more than 4 years after transplantation with transduced CD34+ cells. All 3 animals demonstrated significant vector marking and expression of the GFP transgene in T cells, B cells, and granulocytes, with mean GFP+ levels of 6.7% (range, 3.3%-13.0%), 7.4% (4.2%-13.4%), and 5.6% (3.1%-10.5%), respectively. There was no vector silencing in hematopoietic cells over time. Vector insertion site analysis of granulocytes demonstrated sustained highly polyclonal reconstitution, with no evidence for progression to oligoclonality. A significant number of clones were found to contribute at both 1-year and 3- or 4-year time points. No vector integrations were detected in the MDS1/EVI1 region, in contrast to our previous findings with a γ-retroviral vector. These data show that lentiviral vectors can mediate stable and efficient long-term expression in the progeny of transduced hematopoietic stem cells, with an integration profile that may be safer than that of standard Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV)–derived retroviral vectors. PMID:19339698

  3. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  4. Comparison of Lentiviral and Sleeping Beauty Mediated αβ T Cell Receptor Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm’s tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  5. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1.

  6. Lentiviral Effector Pathways of TRIM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Turrini, Filippo; Di Pietro, Andrea; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2014-04-01

    The human tripartite motif (TRIM) family, composed of more than 77 members, encompasses an emerging group of innate antiviral factors. Most TRIM proteins are characterized by being E3 ubiquitin ligases, but also engage in specific interactions with a variety of cellular and viral partners. They are involved in many cellular processes, including cell differentiation, transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton remodeling, intracellular trafficking, membrane repair, and oncogenesis. In regard to antiviral immunity, they restrict both retroviruses and lentiviruses as well as other DNA and RNA viruses. This review will focus on the TRIM members endowed with anti-retroviral and anti-lentiviral activities and, in particular, human immunodeficiency virus.

  7. A novel transgenic mouse model produced from lentiviral germline integration for the study of beta-thalassemia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xie, Shuyang; Guo, Xinbing; Gong, Xiuli; Wang, Shu; Lin, Dan; Zhang, Jingzhi; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Fanyi; Zeng, Yitao

    2008-03-01

    beta-thalassemia is one of the most common genetic diseases in the world and requires extensive therapy. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy has been successfully exploited in the treatment of beta-thalassemia and showed promise in clinical application. Using a human beta-globin transgenic mouse line in a beta-thalassemia diseased model generated with a lentiviral-mediated approach, we investigate the stable therapeutic effect on a common thalassemia syndrome. Human beta-globin gene lentiviral vector was constr ucted, followed by subzonal microinjection into single-cell embryos of beta(IVS-2-654)-thalassemia mice to generate a transgenic line. Human beta-globin gene expression was examined with RT-PCR, Western-blotting and ELISA. The hematologic parameters and tissue pathology were investigated over time in founder mice and their off-spring. Transgenic mice with stable expression of the lentivirus carrying human beta-globin gene were obtained. A marked improvement in red blood cell indices and a dramatic reduction in red blood cell anisocytosis, poikilocytosis and target cells were observed. Nucleated cell proportion was greatly decreased in bone marrow, and splenomegaly with extramedullary hematopoiesis was ameliorated. Iron deposition in liver was also reduced. There was a two-fold increase in the survival rate of the beta(IVS-2-654) mice carrying human beta-globin transgene. Significantly, the germline integration of the lentiviral construct was obtained and stable hematologic phenotype correction was observed over the next two generations of the transgenic mice. The generation of human beta-globin transgenic mice in a beta(IVS-2-654)-thalassemia mouse mediated with lentiviral vectors provides a useful model and offers an attractive means to investigate the transgenic stable therapeutic effect in beta-thalassemia.

  8. Lentiviral gene therapy using cellular promoters cures type 1 Gaucher disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Maria; Doyle, Alexander; Olsson, Karin; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M; Ehinger, Mats; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Karlsson, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Due to the lack of a fully functional enzyme, there is progressive build-up of the lipid component glucosylceramide. Insufficient glucosylceramidase activity results in hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and bone disease in patients. Gene therapy represents a future therapeutic option for patients unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy and lacking a suitable bone marrow donor. By proof-of-principle experiments, we have previously demonstrated a reversal of symptoms in a murine disease model of type 1 Gaucher disease, using gammaretroviral vectors harboring strong viral promoters to drive glucosidase β-acid (GBA) gene expression. To investigate whether safer vectors can correct the enzyme deficiency, we utilized self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (SIN LVs) with the GBA gene under the control of human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and CD68 promoter, respectively. Here, we report prevention of, as well as reversal of, manifest disease symptoms after lentiviral gene transfer. Glucosylceramidase activity above levels required for clearance of glucosylceramide from tissues resulted in reversal of splenomegaly, reduced Gaucher cell infiltration and a restoration of hematological parameters. These findings support the use of SIN-LVs with cellular promoters in future clinical gene therapy protocols for type 1 Gaucher disease.

  9. Lentiviral Gene Therapy Using Cellular Promoters Cures Type 1 Gaucher Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Maria; Doyle, Alexander; Olsson, Karin; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M; Ehinger, Mats; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Karlsson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Due to the lack of a fully functional enzyme, there is progressive build-up of the lipid component glucosylceramide. Insufficient glucosylceramidase activity results in hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and bone disease in patients. Gene therapy represents a future therapeutic option for patients unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy and lacking a suitable bone marrow donor. By proof-of-principle experiments, we have previously demonstrated a reversal of symptoms in a murine disease model of type 1 Gaucher disease, using gammaretroviral vectors harboring strong viral promoters to drive glucosidase β-acid (GBA) gene expression. To investigate whether safer vectors can correct the enzyme deficiency, we utilized self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (SIN LVs) with the GBA gene under the control of human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and CD68 promoter, respectively. Here, we report prevention of, as well as reversal of, manifest disease symptoms after lentiviral gene transfer. Glucosylceramidase activity above levels required for clearance of glucosylceramide from tissues resulted in reversal of splenomegaly, reduced Gaucher cell infiltration and a restoration of hematological parameters. These findings support the use of SIN-LVs with cellular promoters in future clinical gene therapy protocols for type 1 Gaucher disease. PMID:25655314

  10. Development of a multipurpose GATEWAY-based lentiviral tetracycline-regulated conditional RNAi system (GLTR).

    PubMed

    Sigl, Reinhard; Ploner, Christian; Shivalingaiah, Giridhar; Kofler, Reinhard; Geley, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technology for functional gene analysis. Its success, however, depends on the effective expression of RNAi-inducing small double-stranded interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs) in target cells. In many cell types, RNAi can be achieved by transfection of chemically synthesised siRNAs, which results in transient knockdown of protein expression. Expression of double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) provides another means to induce RNAi in cells that are hard to transfect. To facilitate the generation of stable, conditional RNAi cell lines, we have developed novel one- and two-component vector GATEWAY-compatible lentiviral tetracycline-regulated RNAi (GLTR) systems. The combination of a modified RNA-polymerase-III-dependent H1 RNA promoter (designated 'THT') for conditional shRNA expression with different lentiviral delivery vectors allows (1) the use of fluorescent proteins for colour-coded combinatorial RNAi or for monitoring RNAi induction (pGLTR-FP), (2) selection of transduced cells (pGLTR-S), and (3) the generation of conditional cell lines using a one vector system (pGLTR-X). All three systems were found to be suitable for the analysis of essential genes, such as CDC27, a component of the mitotic ubiquitin ligase APC/C, in cell lines and primary human cells.

  11. Inhibition of intracellular antiviral defense mechanisms augments lentiviral transduction of human natural killer cells: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sutlu, Tolga; Nyström, Sanna; Gilljam, Mari; Stellan, Birgitta; Applequist, Steven E; Alici, Evren

    2012-10-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified natural killer (NK) cells is a promising approach for cancer treatment. Yet, optimization of highly efficient and clinically applicable gene transfer protocols for NK cells still presents a challenge. In this study, we aimed at identifying conditions under which optimum lentiviral gene transfer to NK cells can be achieved. Our results demonstrate that stimulation of NK cells with interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 supports efficient transduction using a VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vector. Moreover, we have identified that inhibition of innate immune receptor signaling greatly enhances transduction efficiency. We were able to boost the efficiency of lentiviral genetic modification on average 3.8-fold using BX795, an inhibitor of the TBK1/IKKɛ complex acting downstream of RIG-I, MDA-5, and TLR3. We have also observed that the use of BX795 enhances lentiviral transduction efficiency in a number of human and mouse cell lines, indicating a broadly applicable, practical, and safe approach that has the potential of being applicable to various gene therapy protocols.

  12. Optimized Lentiviral Transduction Protocols by Use of a Poloxamer Enhancer, Spinoculation, and scFv-Antibody Fusions to VSV-G.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Nataša; Höfig, Ines; Mall, Sabine; Krackhardt, Angela M; Thirion, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) are widely used to successfully transduce cells for research and clinical applications. This optimized LV infection protocol includes a nontoxic poloxamer-based adjuvant combined with antibody-retargeted lentiviral particles. The novel poloxamer P338 demonstrates superior characteristics for enhancing lentiviral transduction over the best-in-class polybrene-assisted transduction. Poloxamer P338 exhibited dual benefits of low toxicity and high efficiency of lentiviral gene delivery into a range of different primary cell cultures. One of the major advantages of P338 is its availability in pharma grade and applicability as cell culture medium additive in clinical protocols. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can be produced to high titers and mediate high transduction efficiencies in vitro. For clinical applications the need for optimized transduction protocols, especially for transduction of primary T and stem cells, is high. The successful use of retronectin, the second lentivirus enhancer available as GMP material, requires the application of specific coating protocols not applicable in all processes, and results in the need of a relatively high multiplicity of infection (MOI) to achieve effective transduction efficiencies for hematopoietic cells (e.g., CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells). Cell specificity of lentiviral vectors was successfully increased by displaying different ratios of scFv-fused VSV-G glycoproteins on the viral envelope. The system has been validated with human CD30+ lymphoma cells, resulting in preferential gene delivery to CD30+ cells, which was increased fourfold in mixed cell cultures, by presenting scFv antibody fragments binding to respective surface markers. A combination of spinoculation and poloxamer-based chemical adjuvant increases the transduction of primary T-cells by greater than twofold. The combination of poloxamer-based and scFv-retargeted LVs increased

  13. Strategies for retargeted gene delivery using vectors derived from lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Cosset, Francois-Loic

    2004-12-01

    With the development of the first viral vector systems 20 years ago [Mann et al., 1983; Watanabe and Temin, 1983] gene therapy strategies have come to the forefront of novel therapeutics [Cavazzana-Calvo et al., 2000]. A deeper understanding of vector biology and the molecular mechanisms of disease alongside tremendous advances in vector technology have significantly advanced the field of human gene therapy. Over the last few years several challenges needed to be overcome in order to bring gene therapy strategies closer to the clinic. These hurdles include the preparation of large amounts of stable, high titre vectors, minimising vector-related immunology and last but not least targeting infection and transgene expression to tissue or cells, which in many cases are not or only slowly dividing. Viral vectors are useful vehicles for the delivery of foreign genes into target cells, and retroviral vectors have been popular because of their ability to integrate into the host cell genome and maintain persistent gene expression. Moreover, lentiviruses, members of the retroviral family, have the ability to infect cells at both mitotic and post-mitotic stages of the cell cycle thus opening up the possibility to target non-dividing target cells and tissues. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) based vectors have been used in vitro and in vivo in a number of situations, however, safety concerns still exist, and therefore the development of vector systems based on primate as well as non-primate lentiviruses is ongoing. Concomitantly with lentiviral vector design, much has been learned about the incorporation of heterologous env proteins on lentiviral cores in order to combine specific targeting properties of envelope glycoproteins with the biological properties of lentiviral vectors. In this review article we will give an overview over advantages lentiviral vector systems offer. We will then discuss the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral

  14. A supramolecular assembly mediates lentiviral DNA integration

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Locke, Julia; Swuec, Paolo; Jónsson, Stefán R.; Kotecha, Abhay; Cook, Nicola J.; Pye, Valerie E.; Taylor, Ian A.; Andrésdóttir, Valgerdur; Engelman, Alan N.; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) functions within the intasome nucleoprotein complex to catalyze insertion of viral DNA into cellular chromatin. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we now visualize the functional maedi-visna lentivirus intasome at 4.9 Å resolution. The intasome comprises a homo-hexadecamer of IN with a tetramer-of-tetramers architecture featuring eight structurally distinct types of IN protomers supporting two catalytically competent subunits. The conserved intasomal core, previously observed in simpler retroviral systems, is formed between two IN tetramers, with a pair of C-terminal domains from flanking tetramers completing the synaptic interface. Our results explain how HIV-1 IN, which self-associates into higher order multimers, can form a functional intasome, reconcile the bulk of early HIV-1 IN biochemical and structural data, and provide a lentiviral platform for design of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:28059770

  15. Envelope Determinants of Equine Lentiviral Vaccine Protection

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Cook, Sheila J.; Chong, Liu; Horohov, David; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Lentiviral envelope (Env) antigenic variation and associated immune evasion present major obstacles to vaccine development. The concept that Env is a critical determinant for vaccine efficacy is well accepted, however defined correlates of protection associated with Env variation have yet to be determined. We reported an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine study that directly examined the effect of lentiviral Env sequence variation on vaccine efficacy. The study identified a significant, inverse, linear correlation between vaccine efficacy and increasing divergence of the challenge virus Env gp90 protein compared to the vaccine virus gp90. The report demonstrated approximately 100% protection of immunized ponies from disease after challenge by virus with a homologous gp90 (EV0), and roughly 40% protection against challenge by virus (EV13) with a gp90 13% divergent from the vaccine strain. In the current study we examine whether the protection observed when challenging with the EV0 strain could be conferred to animals via chimeric challenge viruses between the EV0 and EV13 strains, allowing for mapping of protection to specific Env sequences. Viruses containing the EV13 proviral backbone and selected domains of the EV0 gp90 were constructed and in vitro and in vivo infectivity examined. Vaccine efficacy studies indicated that homology between the vaccine strain gp90 and the N-terminus of the challenge strain gp90 was capable of inducing immunity that resulted in significantly lower levels of post-challenge virus and significantly delayed the onset of disease. However, a homologous N-terminal region alone inserted in the EV13 backbone could not impart the 100% protection observed with the EV0 strain. Data presented here denote the complicated and potentially contradictory relationship between in vitro virulence and in vivo pathogenicity. The study highlights the importance of structural conformation for immunogens and emphasizes the need for

  16. Extensive Methylation of Promoter Sequences Silences Lentiviral Transgene Expression During Stem Cell Differentiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Friederike; Ball, Claudia R; Tuorto, Francesca; Nowrouzi, Ali; Wang, Wei; Zavidij, Oksana; Dieter, Sebastian M; Fessler, Sylvia; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Kloz, Ulrich; Lyko, Frank; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Glimm, Hanno

    2012-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) are widely used to stably transfer genes into target cells investigating or treating gene functions. In addition, gene transfer into early murine embryos may be improved to efficiently generate transgenic mice. We applied lentiviral gene transfer to generate a mouse model transgenic for SET binding protein-1 (Setbp1) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). Neither transgenic founders nor their vector-positive offspring transcribed or expressed the transgenes. Bisulfite sequencing of the internal spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) promoter demonstrated extensive methylation of all analyzed CpGs in the transgenic mice. To analyze the impact of Setbp1 on epigenetic silencing, embryonic stem cells (ESC) were differentiated into cardiomyocytes (CM) in vitro. In contrast to human promoters in LV, virally derived promoter sequences were strongly methylated during differentiation, independent of the transgene. Moreover, the commonly used SFFV promoter (SFFVp) was highly methylated with remarkable strength and frequency during hematopoietic differentiation in vivo in LV but less in γ-retroviral (γ-RV) backbones. In summary, we conclude that LV using an internal SFFVp are not suitable to generate transgenic mice or perform constitutive expression studies in differentiating cells. Choosing the appropriate promoter is also crucial to allow stable transgene expression in clinical gene therapy. PMID:22434137

  17. Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-04-24

    Future therapeutic use of engineered site-directed nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), relies on safe and effective means of delivering nucleases to cells. In this study, we adapt lentiviral vectors as carriers of designer nuclease proteins, providing efficient targeted gene disruption in vector-treated cell lines and primary cells. By co-packaging pairs of ZFN proteins with donor RNA in 'all-in-one' lentiviral particles, we co-deliver ZFN proteins and the donor template for homology-directed repair leading to targeted DNA insertion and gene correction. Comparative studies of ZFN activity in a predetermined target locus and a known nearby off-target locus demonstrate reduced off-target activity after ZFN protein transduction relative to conventional delivery approaches. Additionally, TALEN proteins are added to the repertoire of custom-designed nucleases that can be delivered by protein transduction. Altogether, our findings generate a new platform for genome engineering based on efficient and potentially safer delivery of programmable nucleases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01911.001.

  18. Lentiviral-mediated Genetic Correction of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells From Fanconi Anemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Luz Lozano, M; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34(+) cells with γ-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34(+) cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34(+) cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34(-) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs).

  19. Lentiviral-mediated genetic correction of hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Lozano, M Luz; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34(+) cells with gamma-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34(+) cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34(+) cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34(-) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs).

  20. Lentiviral-mediated Genetic Correction of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells From Fanconi Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Luz Lozano, M; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34+ cells with γ-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34+ cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34+ cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34− mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs). PMID:19277017

  1. A protocol for lentiviral transduction and downstream analysis of intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Van Lidth de Jeude, Jooske F; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L M; Montenegro-Miranda, Paula S; Van den Brink, Gijs R; Heijmans, Jarom

    2015-04-20

    Intestinal crypt-villus structures termed organoids, can be kept in sustained culture three dimensionally when supplemented with the appropriate growth factors. Since organoids are highly similar to the original tissue in terms of homeostatic stem cell differentiation, cell polarity and presence of all terminally differentiated cell types known to the adult intestinal epithelium, they serve as an essential resource in experimental research on the epithelium. The possibility to express transgenes or interfering RNA using lentiviral or retroviral vectors in organoids has increased opportunities for functional analysis of the intestinal epithelium and intestinal stem cells, surpassing traditional mouse transgenics in speed and cost. In the current video protocol we show how to utilize transduction of small intestinal organoids with lentiviral vectors illustrated by use of doxycylin inducible transgenes, or IPTG inducible short hairpin RNA for overexpression or gene knockdown. Furthermore, considering organoid culture yields minute cell counts that may even be reduced by experimental treatment, we explain how to process organoids for downstream analysis aimed at quantitative RT-PCR, RNA-microarray and immunohistochemistry. Techniques that enable transgene expression and gene knock down in intestinal organoids contribute to the research potential that these intestinal epithelial structures hold, establishing organoid culture as a new standard in cell culture.

  2. Correction of the disease phenotype in the mouse model of Stargardt disease by lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Kim, S-R; Binley, K; Pata, I; Doi, K; Mannik, J; Zernant-Rajang, J; Kan, O; Iqball, S; Naylor, S; Sparrow, J R; Gouras, P; Allikmets, R

    2008-10-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a macular dystrophy caused by mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene. The disease phenotype that is most recognized in STGD1 patients, and also in the Abca4-/- mouse (a disease model), is lipofuscin accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium. Here, we tested whether delivery of the normal (wt) human ABCA4 gene to the subretinal space of the Abca4 -/- mice via lentiviral vectors would correct the disease phenotype; that is, reduce accumulation of the lipofuscin pigment A2E. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-derived lentiviral vectors were constructed expressing either the human ABCA4 gene or the LacZ reporter gene under the control of the constitutive (CMV) or photoreceptor-specific (Rho) promoters. Abca4-/- mice were injected subretinally with 1 microl ( approximately 5.0 x 10(5) TU) of each EIAV vector in one eye at postnatal days 4 and 5. An injection of saline, an EIAV-null vector, or an uninjected contralateral eye served as a control. Mice were killed at various times after injection to determine photoreceptor (PR) transduction efficiency and A2E concentrations. EIAV-LacZ vectors transduced from 5 to 20% of the PRs in the injected area in mice. Most importantly, a single subretinal injection of EIAV-CMV-ABCA4 to Abca4-/- mouse eyes substantially reduced disease-associated A2E accumulation compared to untreated and mock-treated control eyes. Treated eyes of Abca4-/- mice accumulated 8-12 pmol per eye (s.d.=2.7) of A2E 1 year after treatment, amounts comparable to wt controls, whereas mock-treated or untreated eyes had 3-5 times more A2E (27-39 pmol per eye, s.d.=1.5; P=0.001-0.005). Although extrapolation to humans requires caution, the high transduction efficiency of both rod and cone photoreceptors and the statistically significant reduction of A2E accumulation in the mouse model of STGD1 suggest that lentiviral gene therapy is a potentially efficient tool for treating ABCA4-associated diseases.

  3. Correction of the disease phenotype in the mouse model of Stargardt disease by lentiviral gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, J; Kim, S-R; Binley, K; Pata, I; Doi, K; Mannik, J; Zernant-Rajang, J; Kan, O; Iqball, S; Naylor, S; Sparrow, JR; Gouras, P; Allikmets, R

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a macular dystrophy caused by mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene. The disease phenotype that is most recognized in STGD1 patients, and also in the Abca4−/− mouse (a disease model), is lipofuscin accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium. Here, we tested whether delivery of the normal (wt) human ABCA4 gene to the subretinal space of the Abca4−/− mice via lentiviral vectors would correct the disease phenotype; that is, reduce accumulation of the lipofuscin pigment A2E. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-derived lentiviral vectors were constructed expressing either the human ABCA4 gene or the LacZ reporter gene under the control of the constitutive (CMV) or photoreceptor-specific (Rho) promoters. Abca4−/− mice were injected subretinally with 1 µl (~5.0 × 105 TU) of each EIAV vector in one eye at postnatal days 4 and 5. An injection of saline, an EIAV-null vector, or an uninjected contralateral eye served as a control. Mice were killed at various times after injection to determine photoreceptor (PR) transduction efficiency and A2E concentrations. EIAV-LacZ vectors transduced from 5 to 20% of the PRs in the injected area in mice. Most importantly, a single subretinal injection of EIAV-CMV-ABCA4 to Abca4−/− mouse eyes substantially reduced disease-associated A2E accumulation compared to untreated and mock-treated control eyes. Treated eyes of Abca4−/− mice accumulated 8–12 pmol per eye (s.d. = 2.7) of A2E 1 year after treatment, amounts comparable to wt controls, whereas mock-treated or untreated eyes had 3–5 times more A2E (27–39 pmol per eye, s.d. = 1.5; P = 0.001–0.005). Although extrapolation to humans requires caution, the high transduction efficiency of both rod and cone photoreceptors and the statistically significant reduction of A2E accumulation in the mouse model of STGD1 suggest that lentiviral gene therapy is a potentially efficient tool for treating ABCA4-associated diseases

  4. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD. © 2016

  5. Gene therapy in skin: choosing the optimal viral vector.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esther H; Cross, Kevin J; Bomsztyk, Elan D; Lyden, David C; Spector, Jason A

    2009-05-01

    Skin is an ideal gene therapy target because it is readily accessible and is involved in many pathologic processes. Viruses are the most common gene vectors, however, few comparative studies exist examining their efficacy in skin. This study evaluates adenovirus serotype 5, adeno-associated virus type 2 and 5, MMLV-derived retrovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus-1 derived lentivirus for gene vector activity in human dermal fibroblasts and other skin cell lines. Human immunodeficiency virus-1-based lentiviral vector resulted in over 90% transduction in all cell lines tested. Transduced cells maintained reporter expression over several passages after a single exposure. In contrast, gene activity fell rapidly over cell divisions with adenoviral and adeno-associated vectors. Therefore, lentiviral vectors are the delivery mechanism of choice for long-term therapeutic gene expression in dermal fibroblasts and other skin cell lines, whereas adenoviral or adeno-associated vectors may be preferred for short-term therapy.

  6. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  7. Muscle Fiber Type-Predominant Promoter Activity in Lentiviral-Mediated Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Tomohiro; Kimura, En; Morioka, Yuka; Ikawa, Masahito; Li, Sheng; Uchino, Katsuhisa; Uchida, Yuji; Yamashita, Satoshi; Maeda, Yasushi; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Uchino, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Variations in gene promoter/enhancer activity in different muscle fiber types after gene transduction was noticed previously, but poorly analyzed. The murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter drives strong, stable gene expression in hematopoietic stem cells and several other cells, including cerebellar Purkinje cells, but it has not been studied in muscle. We injected a lentiviral vector carrying an MSCV-EGFP cassette (LvMSCV-EGFP) into tibialis anterior muscles and observed strong EGFP expression in muscle fibers, primary cultured myoblasts, and myotubes isolated from injected muscles. We also generated lentiviral-mediated transgenic mice carrying the MSCV-EGFP cassette and detected transgene expression in striated muscles. LvMSCV-EGFP transgenic mice showed fiber type-dependent variations in expression: highest in types I and IIA, intermediate in type IID/X, and lowest in type IIB fibers. The soleus and diaphragm muscles, consisting mainly of types I and IIA, are most severely affected in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. Further analysis of this promoter may have the potential to achieve certain gene expression in severely affected muscles of mdx mice. The Lv-mediated transgenic mouse may prove a useful tool for assessing the enhancer/promoter activities of a variety of different regulatory cassettes. PMID:21445245

  8. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  9. Lentivirally overexpressed T-bet regulates T-helper cell lineage commitment in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueni; Tang, Zhenghao; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Jianjun; Li, Dan; Zang, Guoqing; Yu, Yongsheng

    2012-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is commonly considered to occur as a result of disturbance of the immune system. T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) is an essential transcription factor for T helper (Th) cell differentiation and function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of T-bet overexpression on Th cell differentiation and the possible mechanism in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood of 23 CHB patients, 8 acute hepatitis B (AHB) patients and 10 healthy controls were isolated. T-bet mRNA expression of CD4+ T cells was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The T-bet DNA fragment was subcloned into the pGC-FU vector containing GFP to generate a recombinant lentiviral vector, pGC-FU-T-bet, while a no-load pGC-FU vector was used as the negative control. After transduction into CD4+ T cells from another 22 CHB patients, the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines was assayed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to measure the mRNA and transcription levels of H2.0-like homeobox (HLX1), GATA-3 and STAT-6. T-bet mRNA expression in CD4+ T cells from AHB patients was enhanced compared with CHB patients and healthy controls. Th1-type cytokines and HLX1 expression was upregulated, while Th2-type cytokines and GATA-3 and STAT-6 expression was repressed after lentiviral introduction of T-bet. In conclusion, lentivirally overexpressed T-bet regulates Th cell lineage commitment in CHB patients, which may be mediated by regulating HLX1, GATA-3 and STAT-6 expression.

  10. Direct gene transfer in the Gottingen minipig CNS using stereotaxic lentiviral microinjections.

    PubMed

    Norgaard Glud, Andreas; Hedegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Mette Slot; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Bendixen, Christian; Jensen, Poul Henning; Larsen, Knud; Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies

    2010-01-01

    We aim to induce direct viral mediated gene transfer in the substantia nigra (SN) of the Gottingen minipig using MRI guided stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Nine female Gottingen minipigs were injected unilaterally into the SN with 6 per 2.5 microliters lentivirus capable of transducing cells and mediating expression of recombinant EGFP. The animals were euthanized after four (n=3) or twenty weeks (n=6). Fresh brain tissue from three animals was used for PCR. The remaining six brains were cryo- or paraffin-sectioned for fluorescence, Nissl-, and immunohistochemical EGFP visualization. EGFP was seen in nigral neurons, axons, glial cells, endothelial cells, and in nigral fibers targeting the striatum. PCR-based detection confirmed the presence of the transgene in SN, whereas all other examined brain areas were negative, indicating that the immunohistochemically detected EGFP in the striatum derived from transfected nigral cells.

  11. Reversal of senescence in mouse fibroblasts through lentiviral suppression of p53.

    PubMed

    Dirac, Annette M G; Bernards, René

    2003-04-04

    Senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G(1) cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. In mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), induction of senescence requires the presence of p19(ARF) and p53, as genetic ablation of either of these genes allows escape from senescence and leads to immortalization. We have developed a lentiviral vector that directs the synthesis of a p53-specific short hairpin transcript, which mediates stable suppression of p53 expression through RNA interference. We show that suppression of p53 expression in senescent MEFs leads to rapid cell cycle re-entry, is associated with loss of expression of senescence-associated genes, and leads to immortalization. These data indicate that senescence in MEFs is reversible and demonstrate that both initiation and maintenance of senescence is p53-dependent.

  12. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease.

  13. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  14. Mucosal gene therapy using a pseudotyped lentivirus vector encoding murine interleukin-10 (mIL-10) suppresses the development and relapse of experimental murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic gene transfer is currently being evaluated as a potential therapy for inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigates the safety and therapeutic benefit of a locally administered lentiviral vector encoding murine interleukin-10 in altering the onset and relapse of dextran sodium sulfate induced murine colitis. Methods Lentiviral vectors encoding the reporter genes firefly-luciferase and murine interleukin-10 were administered by intrarectal instillation, either once or twice following an ethanol enema to facilitate mucosal uptake, on Days 3 and 20 in Balb/c mice with acute and relapsing colitis induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). DSS colitis was characterized using clinical disease activity, macroscopic, and microscopic scores. Bioluminescence optical imaging analysis was employed to examine mucosal lentiviral vector uptake and transgene expression. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in homogenates of rectal tissue were measured by ELISA. Biodistribution of the lentiviral vector to other organs was evaluated by real time quantitative PCR. Results Mucosal delivery of lentiviral vector resulted in significant transduction of colorectal mucosa, as shown by bioluminescence imaging analysis. Lentiviral vector-mediated local expression of interleukin-10 resulted in significantly increased levels of this cytokine, as well as reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and significantly reduced the clinical disease activity, macroscopic, and microscopic scores of DSS colitis. Systemic biodistribution of locally instilled lentiviral vector to other organs was not detected. Conclusions Topically-delivered lentiviral vectors encoding interleukin-10 safely penetrated local mucosal tissue and had therapeutic benefit in this DSS model of murine colitis. PMID:24712338

  15. Molecular Determinants of Vectofusin-1 and Its Derivatives for the Enhancement of Lentivirally Mediated Gene Transfer into Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Majdoul, Saliha; Seye, Ababacar K.; Kichler, Antoine; Holic, Nathalie; Galy, Anne; Bechinger, Burkhard; Fenard, David

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery into hCD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) using human immunodeficiency virus, type 1-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Numerous clinical trials are currently underway. However, the efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist, such as fibronectin fragments or cationic compounds. Recently, we discovered Vectofusin-1, a new transduction enhancer, also called LAH4-A4, a short histidine-rich amphipathic peptide derived from the LAH4 family of DNA transfection agents. Vectofusin-1 enhances the infectivity of lentiviral and γ-retroviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope glycoproteins. In this study, we compared a family of Vectofusin-1 isomers and showed that Vectofusin-1 remains the lead peptide for HSPC transduction enhancement with LVs pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins and also with modified gibbon ape leukemia virus glycoproteins. By comparing the capacity of numerous Vectofusin-1 variants to promote the modified gibbon ape leukemia virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector infectivity of HSPCs, the lysine residues on the N-terminal extremity of Vectofusin-1, a hydrophilic angle of 140° formed by the histidine residues in the Schiffer-Edmundson helical wheel representation, hydrophobic residues consisting of leucine were all found to be essential and helped to define a minimal active sequence. The data also show that the critical determinants necessary for lentiviral transduction enhancement are partially different from those necessary for efficient antibiotic or DNA transfection activity of LAH4 derivatives. In conclusion, these results help to decipher the action mechanism of Vectofusin-1 in the context of hCD34+ cell-based gene therapy. PMID:26668323

  16. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  17. The Fetal Mouse Is a Sensitive Genotoxicity Model That Exposes Lentiviral-associated Mutagenesis Resulting in Liver Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne MK; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis. PMID:23299800

  18. The fetal mouse is a sensitive genotoxicity model that exposes lentiviral-associated mutagenesis resulting in liver oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-02-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis.

  19. Vectofusin-1, a New Viral Entry Enhancer, Strongly Promotes Lentiviral Transduction of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer into hCD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In this study, we describe a new transduction enhancer called Vectofusin-1, which is a short cationic peptide, active on several LV pseudotypes. Vectofusin-1 is used as a soluble additive to safely increase the frequency of transduced HSCs and to augment the level of transduction to one or two copies of vector per cell in a vector dose-dependent manner. Vectofusin-1 acts at the entry step by promoting the adhesion and the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Vectofusin-1 is therefore a promising additive that could significantly ameliorate hCD34+ cell-based gene therapy. PMID:23653154

  20. Role of Transgene Regulation in Ex Vivo Lentiviral Correction of Artemis Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Megan M.; Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Karlen, Andrea D.; Olson, Erik R.; Gunther, Roland; Somia, Nikunj V.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Artemis is a single-stranded endonuclease, deficiency of which results in a radiation-sensitive form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-A) most effectively treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and potentially treatable by administration of genetically corrected autologous HSCs. We previously reported cytotoxicity associated with Artemis overexpression and subsequently characterized the human Artemis promoter with the intention to provide Artemis expression that is nontoxic yet sufficient to support immunodevelopment. Here we compare the human Artemis promoter (APro) with the moderate-strength human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter and the strong human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter to regulate expression of Artemis after ex vivo lentiviral transduction of HSCs in a murine model of SCID-A. Recipient animals treated with the PGK-Artemis vector exhibited moderate repopulation of their immune compartment, yet demonstrated a defective proliferative T lymphocyte response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Animals treated with the EF1α-Artemis vector displayed high levels of T lymphocytes but an absence of B lymphocytes and deficient lymphocyte function. In contrast, ex vivo transduction with the APro-Artemis vector supported effective immune reconstitution to wild-type levels, resulting in fully functional T and B lymphocyte responses. These results demonstrate the importance of regulated Artemis expression in immune reconstitution of Artemis-deficient SCID. PMID:25738323

  1. Role of transgene regulation in ex vivo lentiviral correction of artemis deficiency.

    PubMed

    Multhaup, Megan M; Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M; Karlen, Andrea D; Olson, Erik R; Gunther, Roland; Somia, Nikunj V; Blazar, Bruce R; Cowan, Morton J; McIvor, R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Artemis is a single-stranded endonuclease, deficiency of which results in a radiation-sensitive form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-A) most effectively treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and potentially treatable by administration of genetically corrected autologous HSCs. We previously reported cytotoxicity associated with Artemis overexpression and subsequently characterized the human Artemis promoter with the intention to provide Artemis expression that is nontoxic yet sufficient to support immunodevelopment. Here we compare the human Artemis promoter (APro) with the moderate-strength human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter and the strong human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter to regulate expression of Artemis after ex vivo lentiviral transduction of HSCs in a murine model of SCID-A. Recipient animals treated with the PGK-Artemis vector exhibited moderate repopulation of their immune compartment, yet demonstrated a defective proliferative T lymphocyte response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Animals treated with the EF1α-Artemis vector displayed high levels of T lymphocytes but an absence of B lymphocytes and deficient lymphocyte function. In contrast, ex vivo transduction with the APro-Artemis vector supported effective immune reconstitution to wild-type levels, resulting in fully functional T and B lymphocyte responses. These results demonstrate the importance of regulated Artemis expression in immune reconstitution of Artemis-deficient SCID.

  2. Dendritic cell functional improvement in a preclinical model of lentiviral-mediated gene therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Catucci, Marco; Prete, Francesca; Bosticardo, Marita; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Draghici, Elena; Locci, Michela; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Benvenuti, Federica; Villa, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by the defective expression of the WAS protein (WASP) in hematopoietic cells. It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are functionally impaired in WAS patients and was−/− mice. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy and safety of a murine model of WAS gene therapy (GT), using stem cells transduced with a lentiviral vector. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GT can correct DC defects in was−/− mice. As DCs expressing WASP were detected in the secondary lymphoid organs of the treated mice, we tested the in vitro and in vivo function of bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The BMDCs showed efficient in vitro uptake of latex beads and Salmonella typhimurium. When BMDCs from the treated mice (GT BMDCs) and the was−/− mice were injected into wild type hosts, we found a higher number of cells that had migrated to the draining lymph nodes compared to mice injected with was−/− BMDCs. Finally, we found that OVA-pulsed GT BMDCs or vaccination with anti-DEC205 OVA fusion protein can efficiently induce antigen-specific T cell activation in vivo. These findings show that WAS GT significantly improves DC function, thus adding new evidence of the preclinical efficacy of lentiviral vector-mediated WAS GT. PMID:22189416

  3. Endogenous lentiviral elements in the weasel family (Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Han, Guan-Zhu; Worobey, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Endogenous retroviruses provide molecular fossils for studying the ancient evolutionary history of retroviruses. Here, we report our independent discovery and analysis of endogenous lentiviral insertions (Mustelidae endogenous lentivirus [MELV]) within the genomes of weasel family (Mustelidae). Genome-scale screening identified MELV elements in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) genome (MELVmpf). MELVmpf exhibits a typical lentiviral genomic organization. Phylogenetic analyses position MELVmpf basal to either primate lentiviruses or feline immunodeficiency virus. Moreover, we verified the presence of MELV insertions in the genomes of several species of the Lutrinae and Mustelinae subfamilies but not the Martinae subfamily, suggesting that the invasion of MELV into the Mustelidae genomes likely took place between 8.8 and 11.8 Ma. The discovery of MELV in weasel genomes extends the host range of lentiviruses to the Caniformia (order Carnivora) and provides important insights into the prehistoric diversity of lentiviruses.

  4. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV based vector systems, and we will review our activities in this particular field. This includes the generation of a conditionally replicating HIV 1 variant as a safe live attenuated virus vaccine, the construction of mini HIV variants as cancer selective viruses for virotherapy against leukemia, and the use of a conditionally live anti HIV gene therapy vector. Although safety concerns will undoubtedly remain for the use of replication competent HIV based vector systems, some of the results in cell culture systems are very promising and warrant further testing in appropriate animal models. PMID:20582153

  5. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors.

    PubMed

    Das, Atze T; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV based vector systems, and we will review our activities in this particular field. This includes the generation of a conditionally replicating HIV 1 variant as a safe live attenuated virus vaccine, the construction of mini HIV variants as cancer selective viruses for virotherapy against leukemia, and the use of a conditionally live anti HIV gene therapy vector. Although safety concerns will undoubtedly remain for the use of replication competent HIV based vector systems, some of the results in cell culture systems are very promising and warrant further testing in appropriate animal models.

  6. Improved lentiviral transduction of ALS motoneurons in vivo via dual targeting.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Valerie B; Ovsepian, Saak V; Bodeker, Macdara; Dolly, J Oliver

    2013-11-04

    Treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is hampered by its complex etiology and lack of efficient means for targeted transfer of therapeutics into motoneurons. The objective of this research was engineering of a versatile motoneuron targeting adapter--a full-length atoxic tetanus toxin fused to core-streptavidin (CS-TeTIM)--for retro-axonal transduction of viral vectors; validation of the targeting efficiency of CS-TeTIM in vivo, by expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter in motoneurons of presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS-like SOD1(G93A) mice, and comparison with age-matched controls; and appraisal of lentiviral transduction with CS-TeTIM relative to (1) a HC binding fragment of tetanus toxin CS-TeTx(HC), (2) rabies glycoprotein (RG), and (3) a CS-TeTIM-RG dual targeting approach. CS-TeTIM and CS-TeTx(HC) were engineered using recombinant technology and site-directed mutagenesis. Biotinylated vectors, pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) or RG, were linked to these adaptors and injected intraperitoneally (ip) into presymptomatic (12 weeks old), symptomatic SOD1(G93A) (22 weeks old) or wild type control mice, followed by monitoring of GFP expression in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures with quantitative PCR and immuno-histochemistry. Transcripts were detected in the spinal cord and supraspinal motor structures of all mice 2 weeks after receiving a single ip injection, although in symptomatic SOD1(G93A) animals reporter RNA levels were lower compared to presymptomatic and wild-type controls irrespective of the targeting approach. GFP transduction with CS-TeTIM proved more efficient than CS-TeTx(HC) across all groups while CS-TeTIM-RG dual-targeted vectors yielded the highest transcript numbers. Importantly, in both wild-type and presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice strong colabeling of choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) and GFP was visualized in neurons of the

  7. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nalla, Arun K.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV. PMID:28536375

  8. Germ-line transmission of lentiviral PGK-EGFP integrants in transgenic cattle: new perspectives for experimental embryology.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Myriam; Lim, Tiongti; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Guengoer, Tuna; Habermann, Felix A; Matthiesen, Marieke; Hofmann, Andreas; Weber, Frank; Zerbe, Holm; Grupp, Thomas; Sinowatz, Fred; Pfeifer, Alexander; Wolf, Eckhard

    2010-08-01

    Lentiviral vectors are a powerful tool for the genetic modification of livestock species. We previously generated transgenic founder cattle with lentiviral integrants carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. In this study, we investigated the transmission of LV-PGK-EGFP integrants through the female and male germ line in cattle. A transgenic founder heifer (#562, Kiki) was subjected to superovulation treatment and inseminated with semen from a non-transgenic bull. Embryos were recovered and transferred to synchronized recipient heifers, resulting in the birth of a healthy male transgenic calf expressing EGFP as detected by in vivo imaging. Semen from a transgenic founder bull (#561, Jojo) was used for in vitro fertilization (IVF) of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes from non-transgenic cows. The rates of cleavage and development to blastocyst in vitro corresponded to 52.0 +/- 4.1 and 24.5 +/- 4.4%, respectively. Expression of EGFP was observed at blastocyst stage (day 7 after IVF) and was seen in 93.0% (281/302) of the embryos. 24 EGFP-expressing embryos were transferred to 9 synchronized recipients. Analysis of 2 embryos, flushed from the uterus on day 15, two fetuses recovered on day 45, and a healthy male transgenic calf revealed consistent high-level expression of EGFP in all tissues investigated. Our study shows for the first time transmission of lentiviral integrants through the germ line of female and male transgenic founder cattle. The pattern of inheritance was consistent with Mendelian rules. Importantly, high fidelity expression of EGFP in embryos, fetuses, and offspring of founder #561 provides interesting tools for developmental studies in cattle, including interactions of gametes, embryos and fetuses with their maternal environment.

  9. Lentiviral-Transduced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Persistently Express Therapeutic Levels of Enzyme in a Xenotransplantation Model of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meyerrose, Todd E.; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Vogler, Carole A.; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  10. Viral Vector Biosafety in Laboratory Animal Research.

    PubMed

    Collins, Dalis E; Reuter, Jon D; Rush, Howard G; Villano, Jason S

    2017-06-01

    Viral vector research presents unique occupational health and safety challenges to institutions due to the rapid development of both in vivo and in vitro gene-editing technologies. Risks to human and animal health make it incumbent on institutions to appropriately evaluate viral vector usage in research on the basis of available information and governmental regulations and guidelines. Here we review the factors related to risk assessment regarding viral vector usage in animals and the relevant regulatory documents associated with this research, and we highlight the most commonly used viral vectors in research today. This review is particularly focused on the background, use in research and associated health and environmental risks related to adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, lentiviral, and herpesviral vectors.

  11. Use of HIV as a gene transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Krzysztof; Kacprzak, Magdalena Marta

    2009-01-01

    Despite the extensive research efforts over the past 25 years that have focused on HIV, there is still no cure for AIDS. However, tremendous progress in the understanding of the structure and biology of the HIV virus led to the development of safe and potent HIV-based transgene delivery vectors. These genetic vehicles are referred to as lentiviral vectors. They appear to be better suited for particular applications, such as transgene delivery into stem cells, compared to other viral- and non-viral vectors. This is because Lentivirus-based vectors can efficiently infect nondividing and slowly dividing cells. In the present review article, the current state of understanding of HIV-1 is discussed and the main characteristics that had an impact on vector design are outlined. A historical view on the vector concept is presented to facilitate discussion of recent results in vector engineering in a broader context. Subsequently, a state of the art overview concerning vector construction and vector production is given. This review also touches upon the subject of lentiviral vector safety and related topics that can be helpful in addressing this issue are discussed. Finally, examples of Lentivirus-based gene delivery systems and their applications are presented, with emphasis on animal transgenesis and human gene therapy.

  12. Correction of murine SCID-X1 by lentiviral gene therapy using a codon-optimized IL2RG gene and minimal pretransplant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; van Til, Niek P; Visser, Trudi P; Arshad, Shazia; Brugman, Martijn H; Cattoglio, Claudia; Nowrouzi, Ali; Li, Yuedan; Schambach, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Baum, Christopher; von Kalle, Christof; Mavilio, Fulvio; Zhang, Fang; Blundell, Mike P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Verstegen, Monique M A; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated the potential of ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to treat X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) using γ-retroviral vectors, leading to immune system functionality in the majority of treated patients without pretransplant conditioning. The success was tempered by insertional oncogenesis in a proportion of the patients. To reduce the genotoxicity risk, a self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector (LV) with improved expression of a codon optimized human interleukin-2 receptor γ gene (IL2RG) cDNA (coγc), regulated by its 1.1 kb promoter region (γcPr), was compared in efficacy to the viral spleen focus forming virus (SF) and the cellular phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoters. Pretransplant conditioning of Il2rg(-/-) mice resulted in long-term reconstitution of T and B lymphocytes, normalized natural antibody titers, humoral immune responses, ConA/IL-2 stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and polyclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements with a clear integration preference of the SF vector for proto-oncogenes, contrary to the PGK and γcPr vectors. We conclude that SIN lentiviral gene therapy using coγc driven by the γcPr or PGK promoter corrects the SCID phenotype, potentially with an improved safety profile, and that low-dose conditioning proved essential for immune competence, allowing for a reduced threshold of cell numbers required.

  13. Lentiviral MGMT(P140K)-mediated in vivo selection employing a ubiquitous chromatin opening element (A2UCOE) linked to a cellular promoter.

    PubMed

    Phaltane, Ruhi; Lachmann, Nico; Brennig, Sebastian; Ackermann, Mania; Modlich, Ute; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Notwithstanding recent successes, insertional mutagenesis as well as silencing and variegation of transgene expression still represent considerable obstacles to hematopoietic gene therapy. This also applies to O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)-mediated myeloprotection, a concept recently proven clinically effective in the context of glioblastoma therapy. To improve on this situation we here evaluate a SIN-lentiviral vector expressing the MGMT(P140K)-cDNA from a combined A2UCOE/PGK-promoter. In a murine in vivo chemoselection model the A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT construct allowed for significant myeloprotection as well as robust and stable selection of transgenic hematopoietic cells. In contrast, only transient enrichment and severe myelotoxicity was observed for a PGK.MGMT control vector. Selection of A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT-transduced myeloid and lymphoid mature and progenitor cells was demonstrated in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, spleen, and thymus. Unlike the PGK and SFFV promoters used as controls, the A2UCOE.PGK promoter allowed for sustained vector copy number-related transgene expression throughout the experiment indicating an increased resistance to silencing, which was further confirmed by CpG methylation studies of the PGK promoter. Thus, our data support a potential role of the A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT-vector in future MGMT-based myeloprotection and chemoselection strategies, and underlines the suitability of the A2UCOE element to stabilize lentiviral transgene expression in hematopoietic gene therapy.

  14. Stable and functional lymphoid reconstitution in artemis-deficient mice following lentiviral artemis gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Fatine; Garrigue, Alexandrine; Demerens-de Chappedelaine, Corinne; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Malassis-Séris, Michele; Stockholm, Daniel; Hauer, Julia; Blondeau, Johanna; Rivière, Julie; Lim, Annick; Le Lorc'h, Marc; Romana, Serge; Brousse, Nicole; Pâques, Frederique; Galy, Anne; Charneau, Pierre; Fischer, Alain; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-08-01

    Patients with mutations in the Artemis gene display a complete absence of T- and B lymphocytes, together with increased cellular radiosensitivity; this leads to a radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID). Allogenic hematopoietic stem-cell (HSC) transplantation is only partially successful in the absence of an human leukocyte antigen-genoidentical donor, and this has prompted a search for alternative therapeutic approaches such as gene therapy. In this study, a self-inactivated lentiviral vector expressing Artemis was used to complement the Artemis knockout mouse (Art(-/-)). Transplantation of Artemis-transduced HSCs into irradiated Art(-/-) mice restored a stable (over a 15-month period of follow-up) and functional T- and cell repertoire that was comparable to that of control mice. The success of secondary transplantations demonstrated that the HSCs had been transduced. One of thirteen mice developed a thymoma 6 months after gene therapy. Although thymic cells were seen to be carrying two lentiviral integration sites, there was no evidence of lentivirus-driven oncogene activation. The Art(-/-) mice were found to be prone to develop T-cell lymphomas, either spontaneously or after irradiation. These data indicate that the observed lymphoproliferation was probably the consequence of the chromosomal instability associated with the Artemis-deficient background. As a whole, our work provides a basis for supporting the gene therapy approach in Artemis-deficient SCID.

  15. Retroviral vectors elevate coexpressed protein levels in trans through cap-dependent translation.

    PubMed

    Gou, Yongqiang; Byun, Hyewon; Zook, Adam E; Singh, Gurvani B; Nash, Andrea K; Lozano, Mary M; Dudley, Jaquelin P

    2015-03-17

    Retroviruses cause immunodeficiency and cancer but also are used as vectors for the expression of heterologous genes. Nevertheless, optimal translation of introduced genes often is not achieved. Here we show that transfection into mammalian cells of lentiviral or gammaretroviral vectors, including those with specific shRNAs, increased expression of a cotransfected gene relative to standard plasmid vectors. Levels of most endogenous cellular proteins were unchanged. Transfer of lentiviral vector sequences into a standard plasmid conferred the ability to give increased expression of cotransfected genes (superinduction). Superinduction by the retroviral vector was not dependent on the cell type or species, the type of reporter gene, or the method of transfection. No differences were detected in the IFN, unfolded protein, or stress responses in the presence of retroviral vectors. RT-PCRs revealed that RNA levels of cotransfected genes were unchanged during superinduction, yet Western blotting, pulse labeling, and the use of bicistronic vectors showed increased cap-dependent translation of cointroduced genes. Expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase target 4E-BP1, but not the mTOR inhibitor Torin 1, preferentially inhibited superinduction relative to basal protein expression. Furthermore, transcription of lentiviral vector sequences from a doxycycline-inducible promoter eliminated superinduction, consistent with a DNA-triggered event. Thus, retroviral DNA increased translation of cointroduced genes in trans by an mTOR-independent signaling mechanism. Our experiments have broad applications for the design of retroviral vectors for transfections, DNA vaccines, and gene therapy.

  16. Efficient Generation of A9 Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons by Lentiviral Delivery of LMX1A in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Danés, A.; Richaud, Y.; Rodríguez-Pizà, I.; Dehay, B.; Edel, M.; Bové, J.; Memo, M.; Vila, M.; Raya, A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) offer great hope for in vitro modeling of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as for designing cell-replacement therapies. To realize these opportunities, there is an urgent need to develop efficient protocols for the directed differentiation of hESC/iPSC into dopamine (DA) neurons with the specific characteristics of the cell population lost to PD, i.e., A9-subtype ventral midbrain DA neurons. Here we use lentiviral vectors to drive the expression of LMX1A, which encodes a transcription factor critical for ventral midbrain identity, specifically in neural progenitor cells. We show that clonal lines of hESC engineered to contain one or two copies of this lentiviral vector retain long-term self-renewing ability and pluripotent differentiation capacity. Greater than 60% of all neurons generated from LMX1A-engineered hESC were ventral midbrain DA neurons of the A9 subtype, compared with ∼10% in green fluorescent protein–engineered controls, as judged by specific marker expression and functional analyses. Moreover, DA neuron precursors differentiated from LMX1A-engineered hESC were able to survive and differentiate when grafted into the brain of adult mice. Finally, we provide evidence that LMX1A overexpression similarly increases the yield of DA neuron differentiation from human iPSC. Taken together, our data show that stable genetic engineering of hESC/iPSC with lentiviral vectors driving controlled expression of LMX1A is an efficient way to generate enriched populations of human A9-subtype ventral midbrain DA neurons, which should prove useful for modeling PD and may be helpful for designing future cell-replacement strategies. PMID:21877920

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) derived vectors: safety considerations and controversy over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Tonini, Tiziana; Giordano, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The latest generation of lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 is one of the most efficient tools for gene transduction of mammalian cells. However, the possible employment of HIV-based vectors in clinical trials is a very controversial issue, mainly due to safety and ethical concerns. HIV-1 is a lethal pathogenic agent, which induces AIDS. Genetic vectors must derive either from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans, or that eventually just cause mild illnesses. Patients exposed to HIV-based vectors will test seropositive to certain components of HIV-1. In addition, there might be other possible adverse effects in patients that cannot be predicted, as many aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS have not been completely understood yet. On these grounds, it seems necessary to improve the design of other lentiviral vectors, which derive from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans and are distantly related to primate retroviridae.

  18. Gaining the hard yard: pre-clinical evaluation of lentiviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Milsom, Michael D; Williams, David A

    2010-08-01

    Gene therapy is one potential novel therapeutic avenue for the treatment of inherited monogenic disorders. Diseases of the blood are frequent targets for gene therapy because it is relatively easy to harvest haematopoiesis stem cells (HSCs) from the bone marrow, genetically modify the cells ex vivo, and then re-administer the corrected cells back into the patient via intra-venous injection. In this Closeup, Milsom and Williams discuss the work of Roselli et al, who describe the pre-clinical evaluation of the treatment for beta-thalassemia in erythroid cells via the genetic correction of patient HSCs using a lentiviral vector.

  19. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions. PMID:27886077

  20. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M.; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A.; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R.; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J.; McGrath, John A.; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgammanull recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  1. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  2. Lentiviral transduction of CD34(+) cells induces genome-wide epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Parietti, Véronique; Stockholm, Daniel; Corre, Guillaume; Poinsignon, Catherine; Touleimat, Nizar; Delafoy, Damien; Besse, Céline; Tost, Jörg; Galy, Anne; Paldi, András

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications may occur during in vitro manipulations of stem cells but these effects have remained unexplored in the context of cell and gene therapy protocols. In an experimental model of ex vivo gene modification for hematopoietic gene therapy, human CD34(+) cells were cultured shortly in the presence of cytokines then with a gene transfer lentiviral vector (LV) expected to transduce cells but to have otherwise limited biological effects on the cells. At the end of the culture, the population of cells remained largely similar at the phenotypic level but some epigenetic changes were evident. Exposure of CD34(+) cells to cytokines increased nuclear expression of epigenetic regulators SIRT1 or DNMT1 and caused genome-wide DNA methylation changes. Surprisingly, the LV caused additional and distinct effects. Large-scale genomic DNA methylation analysis showed that balanced methylation changes occurred in about 200 genes following culture of CD34(+) cells in the presence of cytokines but 900 genes were modified following addition of the LV, predominantly increasing CpG methylation. Epigenetic effects resulting from ex vivo culture and from the use of LV may constitute previously unsuspected sources of biological effects in stem cells and may provide new biomarkers to rationally optimize gene and cell therapy protocols.

  3. Cryopreservation and lentiviral-mediated genetic modification of human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Leejee H; Zhang, Cheng; Chuck, Roy S; Stark, Walter J; Naylor, Stuart; Binley, Katie; Chakravarti, Shukti; Jun, Albert S

    2007-07-01

    To determine the viability and potential usefulness of cryopreserved human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells by characterizing their morphology, gene expression, and ability for genetic modification by the lentiviral vector equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Primary cultured endothelial cells were dissociated from human corneas and grown in organ culture medium. Corneal endothelial cell origin was confirmed by morphology and immunostaining with polyclonal anti-collagen VIII antibodies. Cells of different passages were cryopreserved in medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide and were assessed after thawing for morphology, proliferative capacity, gene expression, and ability to form cell-cell junctions. EIAV encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was used to transduce cryopreserved human corneal endothelial cells. Transduced cells were then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Cryopreserved, primary, cultured human corneal endothelial cells are viable and retain their ability to proliferate, produce collagen VIII, and express ZO-1, a tight-junction protein. EIAV-based gene transfer of eGFP is highly efficient and nontoxic to cryopreserved human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells. These genetically modified cells can be selected to nearly pure populations with FACS sorting. Human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells retain their phenotypic properties after cryopreservation. The ability to store, genetically modify, and sort these cells through FACS to pure populations has the potential to greatly expand their future therapeutic application to treat corneal endothelial disorders.

  4. In vitro rescue of FGA deletion by lentiviral transduction of an afibrinogenemic patient's hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Stroka, D; Keogh, A; Vu, D; Fort, A; Stoffel, M H; Kühni-Boghenbor, K; Furer, C; Banz, V; Demarmels Biasiutti, F; Lämmle, B; Candinas, D; Neerman-Arbez, M

    2014-11-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder in which a mutation in one of three genes coding for the fibrinogen polypeptide chains Aα, Bβ and γ results in the absence of a functional coagulation protein. A patient with congenital afibrinogenemia, resulting from an FGA homozygous gene deletion, underwent an orthotopic liver transplant that resulted in complete restoration of normal hemostasis. The patient's explanted liver provided a unique opportunity to further investigate a potential novel treatment modality. To explore a targeted gene therapy approach for patients with congenital afibrinogenemia. At the time of transplant, the patient's FGA-deficient hepatocytes were isolated and transduced with lentiviral vectors encoding the human fibrinogen Aα-chain. FGA-transduced hepatocytes produced fully functional fibrinogen in vitro. Orthotopic liver transplantation is a possible rescue treatment for failure of on-demand fibrinogen replacement therapy. In addition, we provide evidence that hepatocytes homozygous for a large FGA deletion can be genetically modified to restore Aα-chain protein expression and secrete a functional fibrinogen hexamer. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications Are the Molecular Lock in Lentivirally Transduced Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, Siew Ching; Rosli, Rozita; Al Abbar, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Stable introduction of a functional gene in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) has appeared to be an alternative approach to correct genetically linked blood diseases. However, it is still unclear whether lentiviral vector (LV) is subjected to gene silencing in HPCs. Here, we show that LV carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene driven by cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter was subjected to transgene silencing after transduction into HPCs. This phenomenon was not due to the deletion of proviral copy number. Study using DNA demethylating agent and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor showed that the drugs could either prevent or reverse the silencing effect. Using sodium bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we demonstrated that DNA methylation occurred soon after LV transduction. At the highest level of gene expression, CMV promoter was acetylated and was in a euchromatin state, while GFP reporter gene was acetylated but was strangely in a heterochromatin state. When the expression declined, CMV promoter underwent transition from acetylated and euchromatic state to a heterochromatic state, while the GFP reporter gene was in deacetylated and heterochromatic state. With these, we verify that DNA methylation and dynamic histone modifications lead to transgene silencing in HPCs transduced with LV. PMID:25961011

  6. Introducing a single-cell-derived human mesenchymal stem cell line expressing hTERT after lentiviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Böcker, Wolfgang; Yin, Zhanhai; Drosse, Inga; Haasters, Florian; Rossmann, Oliver; Wierer, Matthias; Popov, Cvetan; Locher, Melanie; Mutschler, Wolf; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias

    2008-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be readily isolated from bone marrow and differentiate into multiple tissues, making them a promising target for future cell and gene therapy applications. The low frequency of hMSCs in bone marrow necessitates their isolation and expansion in vitro prior to clinical use, but due to senescence-associated growth arrest during culture, limited cell numbers can be generated. The lifespan of hMSCs has been extended by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) using retroviral vectors. Since malignant transformation was observed in hMSCs and retroviral vectors cause insertional mutagenesis, we ectopically expressed hTERT using lentiviral gene transfer. Single-cell-derived hMSC clones expressing hTERT did not show malignant transformation in vitro and in vivo after extended culture periods. There were no changes observed in the expression of tumour suppressor genes and karyotype. Cultured hMSCs lack telomerase activity, but it was significantly increased by ectopic expression of hTERT. HTERT expression prevented hMSC senescence and the cells showed significantly higher and unlimited proliferation capacity. Even after an extended culture period, hMSCs expressing hTERT preserved their stem cells character as shown by osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. In summary, extending the lifespan of human mesenchymal stem cells by ectopic expression of hTERT using lentiviral gene transfer may be an attractive and safe way to generate appropriate cell numbers for cell and gene therapy applications.

  7. Stability of Retroviral Vectors Against Ultracentrifugation Is Determined by the Viral Internal Core and Envelope Proteins Used for Pseudotyping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lim, Kwang-Il

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral and lentiviral vectors are mostly pseudotyped and often purified and concentrated via ultracentrifugation. In this study, we quantified and compared the stabilities of retroviral [murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based] and lentiviral [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-based] vectors pseudotyped with relatively mechanically stable envelope proteins, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins (VSVGs), and the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins against ultracentrifugation. Lentiviral genomic and functional particles were more stable than the corresponding retroviral particles against ultracentrifugation when pseudotyped with VSVGs. However, both retroviral and lentiviral particles were unstable when pseudotyped with the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins. Therefore, the stabilities of pseudotyped retroviral and lentiviral vectors against ultracentrifugation process are a function of not only the type of envelope proteins, but also the type of viral internal core (MLV or HIV-1 core). In addition, the fraction of functional viral particles among genomic viral particles greatly varied at times during packaging, depending on the type of envelope proteins used for pseudotyping and the viral internal core.

  8. Correction of a mouse model of sickle cell disease: lentiviral/antisickling beta-globin gene transduction of unmobilized, purified hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Dana N; Ryan, Thomas M; Pawlik, Kevin M; Townes, Tim M

    2003-12-15

    Although sickle cell anemia was the first hereditary disease to be understood at the molecular level, there is still no adequate long-term treatment. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the only available cure, but this procedure is limited to a minority of patients with an available, histocompatible donor. Autologous transplantation of bone marrow stem cells that are transduced with a stably expressed, antisickling globin gene would benefit a majority of patients with sickle cell disease. Therefore, the development of a gene therapy protocol that corrects the disease in an animal model and is directly translatable to human patients is critical. A method is described in which unmobilized, highly purified bone marrow stem cells are transduced with a minimum amount of self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector containing a potent antisickling beta-globin gene. These cells, which were transduced in the absence of cytokine stimulation, fully reconstitute irradiated recipients and correct the hemolytic anemia and organ pathology that characterize the disease in humans. The mean increase of hemoglobin concentration was 46 g/L (4.6 g/dL) and the average lentiviral copy number was 2.2; therefore, a 21-g/L /vector copy increase (2.1-g/dL) was achieved. This transduction protocol may be directly translatable to patients with sickle cell disease who cannot tolerate current bone marrow mobilization procedures and may not safely be exposed to large viral loads.

  9. Chikungunya Virus Glycoproteins Pseudotype with Lentiviral Vectors and Reveal a Broad Spectrum of Cellular Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Sun, Lingfen; Qu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection has been documented in over 40 countries, resulting in clinical symptoms characterized by fever and joint pain. Diagnosing CHIKV in a clinical lab setting is often omitted because of the high lab safety requirement. An infection system that mimics CHIKV infection will permit clinical evaluation of the production of neutralizing antibody for both disease diagnostics and treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated a CHIKV construct expressing CHIKV structural proteins. This construct permits the production of CHIKV pseudo-viral particles with a luciferase reporter. The pseudo-virus was able to infect a wide range of cell lines. The pseudovirus could be neutralized by the addition of neutralizing antibodies from patients. Conclusions Taken together, we have developed a powerful system that can be handled at biosafety level 2 laboratories for evaluation of existence of CHIKV neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25333782

  10. Identification and Characterization of Enhancer-Blocking Insulators to Reduce Retroviral Vector Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Lovelett, Emilie; Emery, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity. PMID:24098520

  11. Lentiviral Delivery of Small Hairpin RNA Targeting Connective Tissue Growth Factor Blocks Profibrotic Signaling in Tenon's Capsule Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dawei; Dong, Changgui; Wu, William Ka Kei; Dong, Aimeng; Li, Tingting; Chan, Matthew T V; Zhou, Xinrong; Yuan, Huiping

    2016-10-01

    Trabeculectomy is a surgical procedure for lowering intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients, in which excessive scarring leading to failure of the filtering bleb adversely affects the surgical outcome. Heightened Tenon's capsule fibroblast (TCF) proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition are implicated in this process but endogenous factors that regulate TCF functions remain largely elusive. This study sought to elucidate the role of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the regulation of TCF phenotypes and signaling. Expression of CTGF in scarring and nonscarring Tenon's capsules was measured by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. Knockdown of CTGC was achieved by lentivirus delivery of small-hairpin RNA. Cell proliferation was measured by CCK8, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis by flow cytometry, adhesion, migration, and invasion of TCF by functional assays in vitro. Proteins and cytokines related to fibrosis were measured by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Expression of CTGF was significantly upregulated in scarring Tenon's capsules and their isolated fibroblasts when compared with the nonfibrotic counterparts. Functionally, targeting CTGF with lentivirus-delivered small-hairpin RNA inhibited the proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of TCFs, accompanied by downregulation of p38 and nuclear factor-κB as well as matrix metalloproteinase-2, cyclin D1, and collagen I. In addition, lentiviral targeting of CTGF reduced the release of fibrosis-related cytokines from TCFs and inhibited TCF-conditioned, medium-induced macrophage chemotaxis. Our study supports a crucial role of CTGF in the regulation of TCF proliferation and ECM deposition. Targeting CTGF using lentiviral vector may be a promising approach for preventing excessive scarring after trabeculectomy.

  12. Oviduct-specific expression of human neutrophil defensin 4 in lentivirally generated transgenic chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxin; Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Li, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yaqiong; Li, Ning; Hu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    The expression of oviduct-specific recombinant proteins in transgenic chickens is a promising technology for the production of therapeutic biologics in eggs. In this study, we constructed a lentiviral vector encoding an expression cassette for human neutrophil defensin 4 (HNP4), a compound that displays high activity against Escherichia coli, and produced transgenic chickens that expressed the recombinant HNP4 protein in egg whites. After the antimicrobial activity of the recombinant HNP4 protein was tested at the cellular level, a 2.8-kb ovalbumin promoter was used to drive HNP4 expression specifically in oviduct tissues. From 669 injected eggs, 218 chickens were successfully hatched. Ten G0 roosters, with semens identified as positive for the transgene, were mated with wild-type hens to generate G1 chickens. From 1,274 total offspring, fifteen G1 transgenic chickens were positive for the transgene, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The results of the Southern blotting and genome walking indicated that a single copy of the HNP4 gene was integrated into chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 of the chickens. As expected, HNP4 expression was restricted to the oviduct tissues, and the levels of both transcriptional and translational HNP4 expression varied greatly in transgenic chickens with different transgene insertion sites. The amount of HNP4 protein expressed in the eggs of G1 and G2 heterozygous transgenic chickens ranged from 1.65 μg/ml to 10.18 μg/ml. These results indicated that the production of transgenic chickens that expressed HNP4 protein in egg whites was successful.

  13. Scaffold-mediated lentiviral transduction for functional tissue engineering of cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Jonathan M.; Huynh, Nguyen P. T.; Guenther, Caitlin M.; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Moutos, Franklin T.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Gersbach, Charles A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop tissue constructs with matrix composition and biomechanical properties that promote rapid tissue repair or regeneration remains an enduring challenge in musculoskeletal engineering. Current approaches require extensive cell manipulation ex vivo, using exogenous growth factors to drive tissue-specific differentiation, matrix accumulation, and mechanical properties, thus limiting their potential clinical utility. The ability to induce and maintain differentiation of stem cells in situ could bypass these steps and enhance the success of engineering approaches for tissue regeneration. The goal of this study was to generate a self-contained bioactive scaffold capable of mediating stem cell differentiation and formation of a cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) using a lentivirus-based method. We first showed that poly-l-lysine could immobilize lentivirus to poly(ε-caprolactone) films and facilitate human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) transduction. We then demonstrated that scaffold-mediated gene delivery of transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3), using a 3D woven poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold, induced robust cartilaginous ECM formation by hMSCs. Chondrogenesis induced by scaffold-mediated gene delivery was as effective as traditional differentiation protocols involving medium supplementation with TGF-β3, as assessed by gene expression, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses. Using lentiviral vectors immobilized on a biomechanically functional scaffold, we have developed a system to achieve sustained transgene expression and ECM formation by hMSCs. This method opens new avenues in the development of bioactive implants that circumvent the need for ex vivo tissue generation by enabling the long-term goal of in situ tissue engineering. PMID:24550481

  14. Oviduct-Specific Expression of Human Neutrophil Defensin 4 in Lentivirally Generated Transgenic Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongxin; Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Li, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yaqiong; Li, Ning; Hu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    The expression of oviduct-specific recombinant proteins in transgenic chickens is a promising technology for the production of therapeutic biologics in eggs. In this study, we constructed a lentiviral vector encoding an expression cassette for human neutrophil defensin 4 (HNP4), a compound that displays high activity against Escherichia coli, and produced transgenic chickens that expressed the recombinant HNP4 protein in egg whites. After the antimicrobial activity of the recombinant HNP4 protein was tested at the cellular level, a 2.8-kb ovalbumin promoter was used to drive HNP4 expression specifically in oviduct tissues. From 669 injected eggs, 218 chickens were successfully hatched. Ten G0 roosters, with semens identified as positive for the transgene, were mated with wild-type hens to generate G1 chickens. From 1,274 total offspring, fifteen G1 transgenic chickens were positive for the transgene, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The results of the Southern blotting and genome walking indicated that a single copy of the HNP4 gene was integrated into chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 of the chickens. As expected, HNP4 expression was restricted to the oviduct tissues, and the levels of both transcriptional and translational HNP4 expression varied greatly in transgenic chickens with different transgene insertion sites. The amount of HNP4 protein expressed in the eggs of G1 and G2 heterozygous transgenic chickens ranged from 1.65 μg/ml to 10.18 μg/ml. These results indicated that the production of transgenic chickens that expressed HNP4 protein in egg whites was successful. PMID:26020529

  15. IL10 released by a new inflammation-regulated lentiviral system efficiently attenuates zymosan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Garaulet, Guillermo; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Torrente, María; Escolano, Amelia; López-Fontal, Raquel; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Redondo, Juan M; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Administration of anti-inflammatory cytokines is a common therapeutic strategy in chronic inflammatory diseases. Gene therapy is an efficient method for delivering therapeutic molecules to target cells. Expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin (ESEL), which is expressed in the early stages of inflammation, is controlled by proinflammatory cytokines, making its promoter a good candidate for the design of inflammation-regulated gene therapy vectors. This study describes an ESEL promoter (ESELp)-based lentiviral vector (LV) that drives localized transgene expression during inflammation. Mouse matrigel plug assays with ESELp-transduced endothelial cells showed that systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration selectively induces ESELp-controlled luciferase expression in vivo. Inflammation-specific induction was confirmed in a mouse model of arthritis, showing that this LV is repeatedly induced early in acute inflammation episodes and is downregulated during remission. Moreover, the local acute inflammatory response in this animal model was efficiently blocked by expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL10) driven by our LV system. This inflammation-regulated expression system has potential application in the design of new strategies for the local treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases.

  16. IL10 Released by a New Inflammation-regulated Lentiviral System Efficiently Attenuates Zymosan-induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garaulet, Guillermo; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Torrente, María; Escolano, Amelia; López-Fontal, Raquel; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Redondo, Juan M; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Administration of anti-inflammatory cytokines is a common therapeutic strategy in chronic inflammatory diseases. Gene therapy is an efficient method for delivering therapeutic molecules to target cells. Expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin (ESEL), which is expressed in the early stages of inflammation, is controlled by proinflammatory cytokines, making its promoter a good candidate for the design of inflammation-regulated gene therapy vectors. This study describes an ESEL promoter (ESELp)-based lentiviral vector (LV) that drives localized transgene expression during inflammation. Mouse matrigel plug assays with ESELp-transduced endothelial cells showed that systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration selectively induces ESELp-controlled luciferase expression in vivo. Inflammation-specific induction was confirmed in a mouse model of arthritis, showing that this LV is repeatedly induced early in acute inflammation episodes and is downregulated during remission. Moreover, the local acute inflammatory response in this animal model was efficiently blocked by expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL10) driven by our LV system. This inflammation-regulated expression system has potential application in the design of new strategies for the local treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22760540

  17. Highly efficient lentiviral gene transfer in CD34+ and CD34+/38-/lin- cells from mobilized peripheral blood after cytokine prestimulation.

    PubMed

    Géronimi, Fabien; Richard, Emmanuel; Redonnet-Vernhet, Isabelle; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Moreau-Gaudry, François; De Verneuil, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Because mobilized peripheral blood (mPB) represents an attractive source of cells for gene therapy, we investigated lentiviral gene transfer in CD34(+) cells and the stem/progenitor-cell-enriched CD34(+)/38(-)/lin(-) cell subset isolated from mPB. In this study, we used an optimized third-generation self-inactivating lentiviral vector containing both the central polypurine tract and the woodchuck hepatitis posttranscriptional regulatory element sequences and encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the elongation factor lalpha promoter. This lentivector was first used to compare multiplicity of infection (MOI)-dependent gene transfer efficiency in cord blood (CB) versus mPB CD34(+)-derived cells, colony-forming cells (CFCs), and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs). Results showed a difference in the percentage of transduced cells particularly significant at low MOIs. A plateau was reached where 15% and 25% of CB and mPB cells, respectively, remained refractory to lentiviral trans-duction. Effects of a cytokine prestimulation period (18 hours) with interleukin-3, stem cell factor, Flt-3 ligand, and thrombopoietin were then analyzed in total cells, CFCs, and LTC-ICs derived from mPB CD34(+) cells. Transduction levels in those conditions demonstrated a two- and fourfold increase in CFCs and LTC-ICs, respectively, compared with unstimulated (<3 hours) control cells. Moreover, using the same transduction protocol, we were able to efficiently transduce CD34(+)/38(-)/lin(-) cells isolated from mPB, with up to >85% of colonies derived from LTC-ICs expressing EGFP and gene transfer levels remaining stable for 10 weeks in liquid culture. We therefore demonstrate a highly efficient gene transfer in this therapeutically relevant target cell population.

  18. Lentivirus-expressed siRNA vectors against Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kevin A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and the accumulation of APP products ultimately leads to the familiar histopathological and clinical manifestations associated with this most common form of dementia. A protein that has been shown to promote APP accumulation is beta-secretase (beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, or BACE1), which is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid in those affected with Alzheimer disease. Through in vivo studies using APP transgenic mice, we demonstrated that decreasing the expression of BACE1 via lentiviral vector delivery of BACE1 siRNA has the potential for significantly reducing the cleavage of APP, accumulation of these products, and consequent neurodegeneration. As such, lentiviral-expressed siRNA against BACE1 is a therapeutic possibility in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. We detail the use of lentivirus-expressed siRNA as a method to ameliorate Alzheimer disease neuropathology in APP transgenic mice.

  19. Lentiviral-Mediated Overexpression of the 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Ameliorates LPS-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xue, Rui; Li, Lei; Zhao, Weixing; Fu, Qiang; Mi, Weidong; Li, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is involved in the immune/inflammatory response. However, the exact role that TSPO plays in neuroinflammation-induced cognitive impairment is still elusive. The purpose of our present study was to investigate the effects of lentiviral-mediated hippocampal overexpression of the TSPO in a mouse model of LPS-induced cognitive impairment. We established a mouse cognitive impairment model using systematic daily administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.5 mg/kg). Microinjection of the dentate gyrus of the mouse with lentiviral vectors, which contained a cDNA targeting TSPO (Lv-TSPO), resulted in a significant increase in TSPO expression and allopregnanolone production. Mice treated with LPS showed cognitive deficits in the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test that could be ameliorated by TSPO overexpression. In addition, TSPO overexpression reversed LPS-induced microglial activation and accumulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Moreover, TSPO overexpression attenuated the LPS-induced impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Our results suggest that local overexpression of TSPO in the hippocampal dentate gyrus alleviated LPS-induced cognitive deficits, and its effects might be mediated by the attenuation of inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of microglial activation, and promotion of neurogenesis. PMID:27803668

  20. Hepatoma cell-specific ganciclovir-mediated toxicity of a lentivirally transduced HSV-TkEGFP fusion protein gene placed under the control of rat alpha-fetoprotein gene regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Uch, Rathviro; Gérolami, René; Faivre, Jamila; Hardwigsen, Jean; Mathieu, Sylvie; Mannoni, Patrice; Bagnis, Claude

    2003-09-01

    Suicide gene therapy combining herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transfer and ganciclovir administration can be envisioned as a powerful therapeutical approach in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma; however, safety issues regarding transgene expression in parenchyma cells have to be addressed. In this study, we constructed LATKW, a lentiviral vector expressing the HSV-TkEGFP gene placed under the control of the promoter elements that control the expression of the rat alpha-fetoprotein, and assayed its specific expression in vitro in hepatocarcinoma and nonhepatocarcinoma human cell lines, and in epidermal growth factor stimulated human primary hepatocytes. Using LATKW, a strong expression of the transgene was found in transduced hepatocarcinoma cells compared to a very low expression in nonhepatocarcinoma human cell lines, as assessed by Northern blot, RT-PCR, FACS analysis and ganciclovir-mediated toxicity assay, and no expression was found in lentivirally transduced normal human hepatocytes. Altogether, these results demonstrate the possibility to use a lentivirally transduced expression unit containing the rat alpha-fetoprotein promoter to restrict the HSV-TK-mediated induced GCV sensitivity to human hepatocarcinoma cells.

  1. Lentiviral Transduction of Neurons in Adult Brain: Evaluation of Inflammatory Response and Cognitive Effects in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kunitsyna, T A; Ivashkina, O I; Roshchina, M A; Toropova, K A; Anokhin, K V

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of hippocampal injection of lentiviral particles p156-CMV-EGFP on behavior, learning, and microglial Iba1(+) cells activation in mice. Testing in the open field and elevated plus-maze revealed higher anxiety levels in lentiviral-injected mice in comparison with animals injected with vehicle. At the same time, lentivirus injection did not change learning and memory of mice in the hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning task. Microglia density in lentivirus-injected mice was significantly higher than in vehicle-injected mice. Thus, hippocampal injection of lentiviral particles with minimum content of transgenes produced evident inflammation process, changed anxiety level of experimental animals, but had no effect on hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  2. Enhancing titres of therapeutic viral vectors using the transgene repression in vector production (TRiP) system

    PubMed Central

    Maunder, H. E.; Wright, J.; Kolli, B. R.; Vieira, C. R.; Mkandawire, T. T.; Tatoris, S.; Kennedy, V.; Iqball, S.; Devarajan, G.; Ellis, S.; Lad, Y.; Clarkson, N. G.; Mitrophanous, K. A.; Farley, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    A key challenge in the field of therapeutic viral vector/vaccine manufacturing is maximizing production. For most vector platforms, the ‘benchmark' vector titres are achieved with inert reporter genes. However, expression of therapeutic transgenes can often adversely affect vector titres due to biological effects on cell metabolism and/or on the vector virion itself. Here, we exemplify the novel ‘Transgene Repression In vector Production' (TRiP) system for the production of both RNA- and DNA-based viral vectors. The TRiP system utilizes a translational block of one or more transgenes by employing the bacterial tryptophan RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP), which binds its target RNA sequence close to the transgene initiation codon. We report enhancement of titres of lentiviral vectors expressing Cyclo-oxygenase-2 by 600-fold, and adenoviral vectors expressing the pro-apoptotic gene Bax by >150,000-fold. The TRiP system is transgene-independent and will be a particularly useful platform in the clinical development of viral vectors expressing problematic transgenes. PMID:28345582

  3. Effects of lentiviral short hairpin RNA silencing of Toll-like receptor 4 on the lens epithelial cell line HLEC.

    PubMed

    Yu, H T; Lu, P R

    2016-06-03

    The aim of this study was to observe the proliferation of, and cell-cycle changes in, the human lens epithelial cell line HLEC after Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene silencing. HLEC cells were transfected with four TLR4-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vectors or the control lentivirus (pGCL-GFP-shRP-1, -2, -3, -4, NC). TLR4 silencing was verified in these cells 96 h post-transfection using real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. We also observed the change in number of pGCL-GFP-shRP-4-transfected HLEC cells with silenced TLR4 (multiplicity of infection = 10). Cell proliferation was analyzed 48 h after transfection by a standard Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, and the cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometry. The number of cells with silenced TLR4 decreased with time. The decrease in TLR4 expression led to decelerated cell proliferation. Cells with silenced TLR4 (for 48 h) were arrested in the G1 phase; that is, the cell cycle was prolonged and cell division was decelerated. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference effectively silenced TLR4 expression in HLEC cells, which decelerated their proliferation rate and extended the cell cycle.

  4. Dendritic cell functional improvement in a preclinical model of lentiviral-mediated gene therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catucci, M; Prete, F; Bosticardo, M; Castiello, M C; Draghici, E; Locci, M; Roncarolo, M G; Aiuti, A; Benvenuti, F; Villa, A

    2012-12-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by the defective expression of the WAS protein (WASP) in hematopoietic cells. It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are functionally impaired in WAS patients and was(-/-) mice. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy and safety of a murine model of WAS gene therapy (GT), using stem cells transduced with a lentiviral vector (LV). The aim of this study was to investigate whether GT can correct DC defects in was(-/-) mice. As DCs expressing WASP were detected in the secondary lymphoid organs of the treated mice, we tested the in vitro and in vivo function of bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The BMDCs showed efficient in vitro uptake of latex beads and Salmonella typhimurium. When BMDCs from the treated mice (GT BMDCs) and the was(-/-) mice were injected into wild-type hosts, we found a higher number of cells that had migrated to the draining lymph nodes compared with mice injected with was(-/-) BMDCs. Finally, we found that ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed GT BMDCs or vaccination of GT mice with anti-DEC205 OVA fusion protein can efficiently induce antigen-specific T-cell activation in vivo. These findings show that WAS GT significantly improves DC function, thus adding new evidence of the preclinical efficacy of LV-mediated WAS GT.

  5. Lentiviral transduction of primary myeloma cells with CD80 and CD154 generates antimyeloma effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Alessandro; Vallario, Antonella; Follenzi, Antonia; Circosta, Paola; Capaldi, Antonio; Gottardi, Daniela; Naldini, Luigi; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico

    2005-04-01

    The development of immunotherapy approaches designed to obtain tumor-specific T cells might help eradicate residual malignant cells in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. To this end, we used autologous primary MM cells as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Gene transfer of both CD80 and CD154 by lentiviral vectors was necessary to significantly improve the APC function of human MM cells. Simultaneous CD80/CD154 expression on MM cells allowed the generation of CD8+ T cells that recognized unmodified MM cells in 11 of 16 cases, specifically in six of six patients with low-stage disease, but only in five of ten patients with advanced disease. The activity of CD8+ T cells was MHC restricted and MM specific. In seven of seven cases, CD8+ T cell activity was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against HLA class I, and in four of four cases, CD8+ T cells recognized autologous MM cells but not autologous normal B and T lymphocytes nor bone marrow stromal cells. In addition, the activity of CD8+ T cells was directed against allogeneic MM cells that shared at least one MHC allele with the autologous counterpart, but not against MHC mismatched MM cells. These data lay the ground for the isolation of new MM antigens and for the design of vaccination protocols with primary MM cells genetically engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules.

  6. Inhibition of p53 by lentiviral mediated shRNA abrogates G1 arrest and apoptosis in retinal pigmented epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ayyappan R; Schliekelman, Mark; Thomas, Mary Beth; Wakefield, John; Jurgensen, Stewart; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2005-05-01

    We silenced p53 gene expression in ARPE-19, a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line using RNA interference. The effect of silencing the p53 gene in proliferating ARPE-19 cells was studied. Four short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting different regions of human p53 mRNA were delivered individually into ARPE-19 cells using lentiviral vector to produce stable cell lines. p53 mRNA and protein levels were reduced to varying extents in the four shRNA-transduced ARPE-19 cell lines. The cell line that showed greatest reduction (85-90%) of p53 expression showed decreased p21 promoter activation after DNA damage with camptothecin, etoposide and MMS. Whereas treatment of wild type ARPE-19 cells with camptothecin resulted in apoptosis, silencing p53 expression increased their survival. Cell cycle analyses indicated that irradiation resulted in a G(1) arrest in ARPE-19 cells, and that the arrest was significantly reduced in p53-silenced cells. Thus, p53 plays a central role in the response of ARPE-19 cells to DNA damaging agents that act via different mechanisms. Additionally, ARPE-19 cells with reduced p53 expression behave similar to tumor cell lines with mutated or non-functional p53. The present data demonstrate the utility of lentiviral vectors to create stable isogenic cell lines with reduced expression of a specific gene, thereby permitting the study of the function of a gene, the pathways controlled by it, and the effect of therapeutics on a cell with altered genetic makeup in a pair-wise fashion.

  7. Lentiviral delivery of PPARγ shRNA alters the balance of osteogenesis and adipogenesis, improving bone microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shen, Jia; Khadarian, Kevork; Pang, Shen; Chung, Greg; Goyal, Raghav; Asatrian, Greg; Velasco, Omar; Kim, Jung; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal aging is associated not only with alterations in osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC) number and activity within the basic metabolic unit, but also with increased marrow adiposity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is commonly considered the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis, however, it has known roles in osteoblast and osteoclast function as well. Here, we designed a lentiviral delivery system for PPARγ shRNA, and examined its effects in vitro on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and in a mouse intramedullary injection model. PPARγ shRNA was delivered by a replication-deficient lentiviral vector, after in vitro testing to confirm purity, concentration, and efficacy for Pparg transcript reduction. Next, control green fluorescent protein lentivirus or PPARγ shRNA expressing lentivirus were delivered by intramedullary injection into the femoral bone marrow of male SCID mice. Analyses included daily monitoring of animal health, and postmortem analysis at 4 weeks. Postmortem analyses included high resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) reconstructions and analysis, routine histology and histomorphometric analysis, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analysis of Pparg transcript levels, and immunohistochemical analysis for markers of adipocytes (PPARγ, fatty acid binding protein 4 [FABP4]), osteoblasts (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], osteocalcin [OCN]), and osteoclasts (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase [TRAP], Cathepsin K). In vitro, PPARγ shRNA delivery significantly reduced Pparg expression in mouse BMSC, accompanied by a significant reduction in lipid droplet accumulation. In vivo, a near total reduction in mature marrow adipocytes was observed at 4 weeks postinjection. This was accompanied by significant reductions in adipocyte-specific markers. Parameters of trabecular bone were significantly increased by both microCT and histomorphometric analysis. By immunohistochemical staining and semi

  8. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  9. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  10. Correction of Murine Rag2 Severe Combined Immunodeficiency by Lentiviral Gene Therapy Using a Codon-optimized RAG2 Therapeutic Transgene

    PubMed Central

    van Til, Niek P; de Boer, Helen; Mashamba, Nomusa; Wabik, Agnieszka; Huston, Marshall; Visser, Trudi P; Fontana, Elena; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cassani, Barbara; Zhang, Fang; Thrasher, Adrian J; Villa, Anna; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2) deficiency results in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with complete lack of T and B lymphocytes. Initial gammaretroviral gene therapy trials for other types of SCID proved effective, but also revealed the necessity of safe vector design. We report the development of lentiviral vectors with the spleen focus forming virus (SF) promoter driving codon-optimized human RAG2 (RAG2co), which improved phenotype amelioration compared to native RAG2 in Rag2−/− mice. With the RAG2co therapeutic transgene, T-cell receptor (TCR) and immunoglobulin repertoire, T-cell mitogen responses, plasma immunoglobulin levels and T-cell dependent and independent specific antibody responses were restored. However, the thymus double positive T-cell population remained subnormal, possibly due to the SF virus derived element being sensitive to methylation/silencing in the thymus, which was prevented by replacing the SF promoter by the previously reported silencing resistant element (ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE)), and also improved B-cell reconstitution to eventually near normal levels. Weak cellular promoters were effective in T-cell reconstitution, but deficient in B-cell reconstitution. We conclude that immune functions are corrected in Rag2−/− mice by genetic modification of stem cells using the UCOE driven codon-optimized RAG2, providing a valid optional vector for clinical implementation. PMID:22692499

  11. Genetic modification of lymphocytes by retrovirus-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Suerth, Julia D; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    The genetic modification of lymphocytes is an important topic in the emerging field of gene therapy. Many clinical trials targeting immunodeficiency syndromes or cancer have shown therapeutic benefit; further applications address inflammatory and infectious disorders. Retroviral vector development requires a detailed understanding of the interactions with the host. Most researchers have used simple gammaretroviral vectors to modify lymphocytes, either directly or via hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Lentiviral, spumaviral (foamyviral) and alpharetroviral vectors were designed to reduce the necessity for cell stimulation and to utilize potentially safer integration properties. Novel surface modifications (pseudotyping) and transgenes, built using synthetic components, expand the retroviral toolbox, altogether promising increased specificity and potency. Product consistency will be an important criterion for routine clinical use.

  12. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  13. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  14. CD25 preselective anti-HIV vectors for improved HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Lawson, Je'tai; Chen, Rachel X; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A; Anderson, Joseph S

    2012-12-01

    As HIV continues to be a global public health problem with no effective vaccine available, new and innovative therapies, including HIV gene therapies, need to be developed. Due to low transduction efficiencies that lead to low in vivo gene marking, therapeutically relevant efficacy of HIV gene therapy has been difficult to achieve in a clinical setting. Methods to improve the transplantation of enriched populations of anti-HIV vector-transduced cells may greatly increase the in vivo efficacy of HIV gene therapies. Here we describe the development of preselective anti-HIV lentiviral vectors that allow for the purification of vector-transduced cells to achieve an enriched population of HIV-resistant cells. A selectable protein, human CD25, not normally found on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), was incorporated into a triple combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector. Upon purification of cells transduced with the preselective anti-HIV vector, safety was demonstrated in CD34+ HPCs and in HPC-derived macrophages in vitro. Upon challenge with HIV-1, improved efficacy was observed in purified preselective anti-HIV vector-transduced macrophages compared to unpurified cells. These proof-of-concept results highlight the potential use of this method to improve HIV stem cell gene therapy for future clinical applications.

  15. Hemato-endothelial differentiation from lentiviral-transduced human embryonic stem cells retains durable reporter gene expression under the control of ubiquitin promoter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Lin, Xiaolong; Feng, Youji; Xie, Yi; Han, Jinlan; Zhang, Yueping; Wang, Zack Z; Chen, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are able to give rise to a variety of cell lineages under specific culture condition. An effective strategy for stable genetic modification in hES cells may provide a powerful tool for study of human embryogenesis and cell-based therapies. However, gene silences are documented in hES cells. In current study, we investigated whether genes controlled under ubiquitin promoter are expressed during hematopoietic-endothelial differentiation in hES cells. Undifferentiated hES cells (H1) were transduced by lentivirus encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under ubiquitin promoter. GFP-expressing hES cells (GFP-H1) were established after several rounds of mechanical selection under fluorescence microscope. GFP gene was stably expressed in hES cells throughout prolonged (> 50 passages) cultivation, and in differentiated embryo body (EB) and teratoma. Hematopoietic and endothelial markers, including KDR (VEGFR2), CD34, CD31, Tie-2, GATA-1 and GATA-2, were expressed at similar levels during hES cell differentiation in parent hES cells and GFP-H1 hES cells. CD34(+) cells isolated from GFP-H1 hES cells were capable to generate hematopoietic colony-forming cells and tubular structure-forming cells. Differentiated GFP-EB formed vasculature structures in a semi-solid sprouting EB model. These results indicated that a transgene under ubiquitin promoter in lentiviral transduced hES cells retained its expression in undifferentiated hES cells and in hES-derived hematopoietic and endothelial cells. With the view of embryonic mesodermal developing events in humans, genetic modification of hES cells by lentiviral vectors provides a powerful tool for study of hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis.

  16. Improved Hepatocyte Engraftment After Portal Vein Occlusion in LDL Receptor-Deficient WHHL Rabbits and Lentiviral-Mediated Phenotypic Correction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tranchart, Hadrien; Groyer-Picard, Marie-Thérèse; Lainas, Panagiotis; Saloum Diop, Papa; Holopherne, Delphine; Gonin, Patrick; Benihoud, Karim; Ba, Nathalie; Gauthier, Olivier; Franco, Dominique; Guettier, Catherine; Pariente, Danièle; Weber, Anne; Dagher, Ibrahim; Huy Nguyen, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Innovative cell-based therapies are considered as alternatives to liver transplantation. Recent progress in lentivirus-mediated hepatocyte transduction has renewed interest in cell therapy for the treatment of inherited liver diseases. However, hepatocyte transplantation is still hampered by inefficient hepatocyte engraftment. We previously showed that partial portal vein embolization (PVE) improved hepatocyte engraftment in a nonhuman primate model. We developed here an ex vivo approach based on PVE and lentiviral-mediated transduction of hepatocytes from normal (New Zealand White, NZW) and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits: the large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia type IIa (FH). FH is a life-threatening human inherited autosomal disease caused by a mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, which leads to severe hypercholesterolemia and premature coronary heart disease. Rabbit hepatocytes were isolated from the resected left liver lobe, and the portal branches of the median lobes were embolized with Histoacryl® glue under radiologic guidance. NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were each labeled with Hoechst dye or transduced with lentivirus expressing GFP under the control of a liver-specific promoter (mTTR, a modified murine transthyretin promoter) and were then immediately transplanted back into donor animals. In our conditions, 65–70% of the NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were transduced. Liver repopulation after transplantation with the Hoechst-labeled hepatocytes was 3.5 ± 2%. It was 1.4 ± 0.6% after transplantation with either the transduced NZW hepatocytes or the transduced WHHL hepatocytes, which was close to that obtained with Hoechst-labeled cells, given the mean transduction efficacy. Transgene expression persisted for at least 8 weeks posttransplantation. Transduction of WHHL hepatocytes with an LDLR-encoding vector resulted in phenotypic correction in vitro as assessed by internalization of fluorescent LDL

  17. Lentiviral Gene Transfer of Rpe65 Rescues Survival and Function of Cones in a Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Sylvain V; Hauswirth, William W; Lem, Janis; Munier, Francis L; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wenzel, Andreas; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Background RPE65 is specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and is essential for the recycling of 11-cis-retinal, the chromophore of rod and cone opsins. In humans, mutations in RPE65 lead to Leber congenital amaurosis or early-onset retinal dystrophy, a severe form of retinitis pigmentosa. The proof of feasibility of gene therapy for RPE65 deficiency has already been established in a dog model of Leber congenital amaurosis, but rescue of the cone function, although crucial for human high-acuity vision, has never been strictly proven. In Rpe65 knockout mice, photoreceptors show a drastically reduced light sensitivity and are subject to degeneration, the cone photoreceptors being lost at early stages of the disease. In the present study, we address the question of whether application of a lentiviral vector expressing the Rpe65 mouse cDNA prevents cone degeneration and restores cone function in Rpe65 knockout mice. Methods and Findings Subretinal injection of the vector in Rpe65-deficient mice led to sustained expression of Rpe65 in the retinal pigment epithelium. Electroretinogram recordings showed that Rpe65 gene transfer restored retinal function to a near-normal pattern. We performed histological analyses using cone-specific markers and demonstrated that Rpe65 gene transfer completely prevented cone degeneration until at least four months, an age at which almost all cones have degenerated in the untreated Rpe65-deficient mouse. We established an algorithm that allows prediction of the cone-rescue area as a function of transgene expression, which should be a useful tool for future clinical trials. Finally, in mice deficient for both RPE65 and rod transducin, Rpe65 gene transfer restored cone function when applied at an early stage of the disease. Conclusions By demonstrating that lentivirus-mediated Rpe65 gene transfer protects and restores the function of cones in the Rpe65−/− mouse, this study reinforces the therapeutic value of gene therapy

  18. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  19. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina's compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs' limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations.

  20. Vector carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Dovey, D.

    1995-03-22

    Previous papers have described a general method for visualizing vector fields that involves drawing many small ``glyphs`` to represent the field. This paper shows how to improve the speed of the algorithm by utilizing hardware support for line drawing and extends the technique from regular to unstructured grids. The new approach can be used to visualize vector fields at arbitrary surfaces within regular and unstructured grids. Applications of the algorithm include interactive visualization of transient electromagnetic fields and visualization of velocity fields in fluid flow problems.

  1. Embryo development, fetal growth and postnatal phenotype of eGFP lambs generated by lentiviral transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Crispo, M; Vilariño, M; dos Santos-Neto, P C; Núñez-Olivera, R; Cuadro, F; Barrera, N; Mulet, A P; Nguyen, T H; Anegón, I; Menchaca, A

    2015-02-01

    Lentiviral technology has been recently proposed to generate transgenic farm animals more efficiently and easier than traditional techniques. The objective was to evaluate several parameters of lambs obtained by lentiviral transgenesis in comparison with non-transgenic counterparts. In vitro produced embryos were microinjected (TG group) at two-cell stage with a lentiviral construct containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene, while embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF group) or intrauterine insemination (IUI group) were not microinjected. Microinjection technique efficiently generated eight-cell transgenic embryos (97.4%; 114/117). Development rate on day 5 after fertilization was similar for TG (39.3%, 46/117) and IVF embryos (39.6%, 44/111). Pregnancy rate was detected in 50.0% (6/12) of recipient ewes with TG embryos, in 46.7% (7/15) with IVF embryos, and in 65.0% (13/20) of IUI ewes (P = NS). Nine lambs were born in TG group, six lambs in IVF group, and 16 lambs in IUI group. All TG lambs (9/9) were GFP positive to real-time PCR and eight (88.9%) showed a strong and evident GFP expression in mucosae, eyes and keratin tissues. Fetal growth monitored every 15 day by ultrasonography did not show significant differences. Transgenic lambs neither differ in morphometric variables in comparison with non transgenic IVF lambs within 3 months after birth. Transmission of the transgene to the progeny was observed in green fluorescent embryos produced by IVF using semen from the TG founder lambs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the high efficiency of lentiviral technology to produce transgenic sheep, with no clinic differences in comparison with non transgenic lambs.

  2. VISPA: a computational pipeline for the identification and analysis of genomic vector integration sites.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Andrea; Leo, Simone; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Cesana, Daniela; Spinozzi, Giulio; Orsini, Massimilano; Merella, Stefania; Stupka, Elia; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the genomic distribution of viral vector genomic integration sites is a key step in hematopoietic stem cell-based gene therapy applications, allowing to assess both the safety and the efficacy of the treatment and to study the basic aspects of hematopoiesis and stem cell biology. Identifying vector integration sites requires ad-hoc bioinformatics tools with stringent requirements in terms of computational efficiency, flexibility, and usability. We developed VISPA (Vector Integration Site Parallel Analysis), a pipeline for automated integration site identification and annotation based on a distributed environment with a simple Galaxy web interface. VISPA was successfully used for the bioinformatics analysis of the follow-up of two lentiviral vector-based hematopoietic stem-cell gene therapy clinical trials. Our pipeline provides a reliable and efficient tool to assess the safety and efficacy of integrating vectors in clinical settings.

  3. Detection of adeno- and lentiviral (HIV1) contaminations on laboratory surfaces as a tool for the surveillance of biosafety standards.

    PubMed

    Bagutti, C; Alt, M; Schmidlin, M; Vogel, G; Vögeli, U; Brodmann, P

    2011-07-01

    As a biosafety laboratory, we survey the handling of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) and HIV1-derived lentivirus in contained-use facilities in Switzerland to identify insufficiencies of the safety precautions taken by the laboratories. In the past 9 years, we took 430 swab samples from various types of surfaces in research laboratories. Samples were examined for Ad5 contaminations by real-time PCR and infectivity assay or for the presence of lentivirus (HIV1) nucleic acids by real-time (RT) PCR. Samples collected from centrifuges did not only contain Ad5 DNA more frequently but also exhibited higher numbers of Ad5 and lentiviral (HIV1) DNA copies than swabs from any other area of sampling. Five of ten samples containing infectious Ad5 particles or lentivirus (HIV1) RNA were found in samples taken from centrifuges. Ad5 contamination rates were higher in the tube holder and lower on the inner wall of the rotor chamber in centrifuges that were fitted with aerosol tight covers compared to centrifuges without covers. Our results allowed the comparison of hygiene standards of different laboratories and lead to the identification of centrifuges as hotspots for contaminations. Based on our results, we propose to use the collected data as a tool for rating future swab results. Furthermore, the amount of Ad5 and HIV1-derived lentivirus DNA could serve as an indicator of the level of good laboratory practice in contained-use laboratories handling these viral vectors. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Hematopoietic Stem cell transplantation and lentiviral vector‐based gene therapy for Krabbe's disease: Present convictions and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Nikolaishvili‐Feinberg, Nana; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bi, Yanmin; Pan, Dao; Moore, Dominic; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Sands, Mark S.; Miller, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, presymtomatic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation (HSPCT) is the only therapeutic modality that alleviates Krabbe's disease (KD)‐induced central nervous system damage. However, all HSPCT‐treated patients exhibit severe deterioration in peripheral nervous system function characterized by major motor and expressive language pathologies. We hypothesize that a combination of several mechanisms contribute to this phenomenon, including 1) nonoptimal conditioning protocols with consequent inefficient engraftment and biodistribution of donor‐derived cells and 2) insufficient uptake of donor cell‐secreted galactocerebrosidease (GALC) secondary to a naturally low expression level of the cation‐independent mannose 6‐phosphate‐receptor (CI‐MPR). We have characterized the effects of a busulfan (Bu) based conditioning regimen on the efficacy of HSPCT in prolonging twi mouse average life span. There was no correlation between the efficiency of bone marrow engraftment of donor cells and twi mouse average life span. HSPCT prolonged the average life span of twi mice, which directly correlated with the aggressiveness of the Bu‐mediated conditioning protocols. HSPC transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying the GALC cDNA under control of cell‐specific promoters were efficiently engrafted in twi mouse bone marrow. To facilitate HSPCT‐mediated correction of GALC deficiency in target cells expressing low levels of CI‐MPR, a novel GALC fusion protein including the ApoE1 receptor was developed. Efficient cellular uptake of the novel fusion protein was mediated by a mannose‐6‐phosphate‐independent mechanism. The novel findings described here elucidate some of the cellular mechanisms that impede the cure of KD patients by HSPCT and concomitantly open new directions to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSPCT protocols for KD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638600

  5. Therapeutic benefit of lentiviral-