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Sample records for integrated 4-dimensional patterning

  1. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  2. Investigation on navigation patterns of inertial/celestial integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dacheng; Liu, Yan; Liu, Zhiguo; Jiao, Wei; Wang, Qiuyan

    2014-11-01

    It is known that Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and Celestial Navigation System (CNS) can complement each other's advantages. The SINS/CNS integrated system, which has the characteristics of strong autonomy, high accuracy and good anti-jamming, is widely used in military and civilian applications. Similar to SINS/GNSS integrated system, the SINS/CNS integrated system can also be divided into three kinds according to the difference of integrating depth, i.e., loosely coupled pattern, tightly coupled pattern and deeply coupled pattern. In this paper, the principle and characteristics of each pattern of SINS/CNS system are analyzed. Based on the comparison of these patterns, a novel deeply coupled SINS/CNS integrated navigation scheme is proposed. The innovation of this scheme is that a new star pattern matching method aided by SINS information is put forward. Thus the complementary features of these two subsystems are reflected.

  3. Gain calibration of a horn antenna using pattern integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, A. C.; Hardy, J.; Norman, R.

    1972-01-01

    Gain measurement of a horn antenna using three different techniques is discussed. The methods include a two-antenna insertion loss measurement, a pattern integration method, and a near-field measurement method. The application of the pattern integration method is considered, as well as the evaluation of the near-field gain correction factors for the horn, which are determined by a method based directly on measured data. This method involves a spherical wave expansion of the experimental radiation pattern of the specific antenna being tested, rather than evaluation of an assumed analytical model. The spherical wave expansion is also compared to experimental near-field pattern data.

  4. System integration of pattern recognition, adaptive aided, upper limb prostheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, J.; Freedy, A.; Solomonow, M.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements for successful integration of a computer aided control system for multi degree of freedom artificial arms are discussed. Specifications are established for a system which shares control between a human amputee and an automatic control subsystem. The approach integrates the following subsystems: (1) myoelectric pattern recognition, (2) adaptive computer aiding; (3) local reflex control; (4) prosthetic sensory feedback; and (5) externally energized arm with the functions of prehension, wrist rotation, elbow extension and flexion and humeral rotation.

  5. Energy dependent 4-dimensional multiple scattering distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschalär, C.

    1984-12-01

    A complete analytic solution in Fourier space is presented of the four dimensional small angle, multiple scattering distribution MSD in angle and space, produced by an energy dependent single scattering cross section from an initial pencil beam of heavy particles. Independently, simple integrals are derived for the central moments of the energy dependent MSD in the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The distributions of the projections t and x of the scattering angle and displacement into a plane through the axis of propagation are evaluated numerically for a truncated Rutherford scattering cross section using a fast Fourier transform. The resulting MSDs for a wide range of particles, initial and final momenta, and scattering materials are found to be approximately represented by one-dimensional set of standard distributions symmetrized by a linear transformation in t- x-space.

  6. Dynamic 4-dimensional microscope system with automated background leveling.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Goldie; Creath, Katherine

    2012-09-13

    This paper describes recent advances in developing an automatic background leveling algorithm for a new, novel interference microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. "Label-free" measurements of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels are possible without the need for scanning and vibration isolation. This instrument utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns taking advantage of the polarization properties of light enabling phase image movies in real time at video rates to track dynamic motions and volumetric changes. Optical thickness data are derived from phase images. This data is processed with an automatic background leveling routine which separates the objects from the background by thresholding the calculated gradient magnitude of the optical thickness data. Low-order Zernike surfaces are fit to the unmasked background pixels and the resulting background shape is removed. This method effectively eliminates background shape for datasets containing both large and small objects. By applying this method to many sequential frames, it results in all the frames having the same mean background value across all frames which is essential for quantitatively montoring time-dependent processes. PMID:25309097

  7. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system.

    PubMed

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions. PMID:24357901

  8. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions.

  9. Progress in multidisciplinary sensing of the 4-dimensional ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Tommy

    2009-05-01

    Many luminaries of oceanography have articulated the problem of adequately sampling a multiplicity of interdisciplinary ocean processes. Progress has accelerated within the past two decades as societal and naval interests in monitoring and predicting the state of the ocean environment has heightened. Oceanographers are capitalizing on a host of new platform and sensing technologies. Some recent programs contributing to improved 4-dimensional open and coastal ocean multi-disciplinary observations are used to highlight the development of new integrated optical, chemical, and physical measurement systems that can be deployed from stationary and mobile platforms to telemeter data in near real-time or real-time. For example, the NOPP O-SCOPE and MOSEAN projects have developed and tested several optical and chemical sensors in deep waters off Bermuda and Hawaii, at OWS 'P' in the North Pacific Ocean, and in coastal waters off Santa Barbara and Monterey, California. Most of the testing for these projects has been conducted using moorings; however, NOPP instrumentation is also being used on mobile platforms including AUVs, profiling floats, and gliders. Progress in adequately sampling the temporal and spatial variability of selected ocean 'sampling volumes' using multi-platform, multi-disciplinary sampling is described using examples from selected recent programs.

  10. Concerted evolution and developmental integration in modular butterfly wing patterns.

    PubMed

    Beldade, Patrícia; Brakefield, Paul M

    2003-01-01

    Developing organisms are thought to be modular in organization so that traits in different modules evolve independently whereas traits within a module change in a concerted manner. The eyespot pattern in Bicyclus anynana butterflies provides an ideal system where morphological modularity can be dissected and different levels of genetic integration analyzed. Several lines of evidence show that all eyespots in an individual butterfly are genetically integrated, suggesting that the whole pattern, rather than the separate eyespots, should be considered as a single character. However, despite the strong genetic correlations between the two eyespots on the dorsal forewing of B. anynana, there is great potential for independent changes. Here we use laboratory lines selected in different directions for the size of those eyespots to study correlated responses in the whole eyespot pattern. We show clear changes in eyespot size across all wing surfaces, which depend on eyespot position along the anterior-posterior axis. There are also changes in the number of extra eyespots and in eyespot color composition but no changes in eyespot position relative to wing margin. Our analysis of eyespot pattern modularity is discussed in the light of what is known about the cellular and genetic mechanisms of eyespot formation and the great potential for evolutionary diversification in butterfly wing patterns. PMID:12622734

  11. Concerted evolution and developmental integration in modular butterfly wing patterns.

    PubMed

    Beldade, Patrícia; Brakefield, Paul M

    2003-01-01

    Developing organisms are thought to be modular in organization so that traits in different modules evolve independently whereas traits within a module change in a concerted manner. The eyespot pattern in Bicyclus anynana butterflies provides an ideal system where morphological modularity can be dissected and different levels of genetic integration analyzed. Several lines of evidence show that all eyespots in an individual butterfly are genetically integrated, suggesting that the whole pattern, rather than the separate eyespots, should be considered as a single character. However, despite the strong genetic correlations between the two eyespots on the dorsal forewing of B. anynana, there is great potential for independent changes. Here we use laboratory lines selected in different directions for the size of those eyespots to study correlated responses in the whole eyespot pattern. We show clear changes in eyespot size across all wing surfaces, which depend on eyespot position along the anterior-posterior axis. There are also changes in the number of extra eyespots and in eyespot color composition but no changes in eyespot position relative to wing margin. Our analysis of eyespot pattern modularity is discussed in the light of what is known about the cellular and genetic mechanisms of eyespot formation and the great potential for evolutionary diversification in butterfly wing patterns.

  12. Stories as integrated patterns of knowing in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Linda A

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of this qualitative study was to explore the scholarly benefits of storytelling as a means to promote students' understanding and integration of both the art and science of nursing. As one of the oldest methods of communication, storytelling has been used in a variety of ways in nursing education. Despite this myriad of literature, there were no studies found that analyzed the actual content of students' stories. Using Carper's (1978) Fundamental Patterns of Knowing as a guiding framework for narrative analysis, twenty-five personal stories written by junior level nursing students were examined for evidence of empirics, ethics, esthetics, and personal knowing. Results indicated students were able to not only integrate art and science within their experiences but were also able to see themselves one day as caring nurses. Moreover, Carper's patterns add credibility to storytelling as a worthwhile teaching strategy with benefits to both students and faculty.

  13. A new concept of vertically integrated pattern recognition associative memory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ted; Hoff, Jim; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Hardware-based pattern recognition for fast triggering on particle tracks has been successfully used in high-energy physics experiments for some time. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the Fermilab Tevatron is an excellent example. The method used there, developed in the 1990's, is based on algorithms that use a massively parallel associative memory architecture to identify patterns efficiently at high speed. However, due to much higher occupancy and event rates at the LHC, and the fact that the LHC detectors have a much larger number of channels in their tracking detectors, there is an enormous challenge in implementing fast pattern recognition for a track trigger, requiring about three orders of magnitude more associative memory patterns than what was used in the original CDF SVT. Scaling of current technologies is unlikely to satisfy the scientific needs of the future, and investments in transformational new technologies need to be made. In this paper, we will discuss a new concept of using the emerging 3D vertical integration technology to significantly advance the state-of-the-art for fast pattern recognition within and outside HEP. A generic R and D proposal based on this new concept, with a few institutions involved, has recently been submitted to DOE with the goal to design and perform the ASIC engineering necessary to realize a prototype device. The progress of this R and D project will be reported in the future. Here we will only focus on the concept of this new approach.

  14. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  15. Human midsagittal brain shape variation: patterns, allometry and integration

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Emiliano; Martin-Loeches, Manuel; Colom, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Midsagittal cerebral morphology provides a homologous geometrical reference for brain shape and cortical vs. subcortical spatial relationships. In this study, midsagittal brain shape variation is investigated in a sample of 102 humans, in order to describe and quantify the major patterns of correlation between morphological features, the effect of size and sex on general anatomy, and the degree of integration between different cortical and subcortical areas. The only evident pattern of covariation was associated with fronto-parietal cortical bulging. The allometric component was weak for the cortical profile, but more robust for the posterior subcortical areas. Apparent sex differences were evidenced in size but not in brain shape. Cortical and subcortical elements displayed scarcely integrated changes, suggesting a modular separation between these two areas. However, a certain correlation was found between posterior subcortical and parietal cortical variations. These results should be directly integrated with information ranging from functional craniology to wiring organization, and with hypotheses linking brain shape and the mechanical properties of neurons during morphogenesis. PMID:20345859

  16. Integration and macroevolutionary patterns in the pollination biology of conifers.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Crane, Peter R; Knopf, Patrick; Donoghue, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Integration influences patterns of trait evolution, but the relationship between these patterns and the degree of trait integration is not well understood. To explore this further, we study a specialized pollination mechanism in conifers whose traits are linked through function but not development. This mechanism depends on interactions among three characters: pollen that is buoyant, ovules that face downward at pollination, and the production of a liquid droplet that buoyant grains float through to enter the ovule. We use a well-sampled phylogeny of conifers to test correlated evolution among these characters and specific sequences of character change. Using likelihood models of character evolution, we find that pollen morphology and ovule characters evolve in a concerted manner, where the flotation mechanism breaks down irreversibly following changes in orientation or drop production. The breakdown of this functional constraint, which may be facilitated by the lack of developmental integration among the constituent traits, is associated with increased trait variation and more diverse pollination strategies. Although this functional "release" increases diversity in some ways, the irreversible way in which the flotation mechanism is lost may eventually result in its complete disappearance from seed plant reproductive biology.

  17. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in 4-dimensional heterotic string

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, J.

    1989-07-01

    The evolution of a 4-dimensional heterotic string is considered in the background of its massless excitations such as graviton, antisymmetric tensor, gauge fields and scalar bosons. The compactified bosonic coordinates are fermionized. The world-sheet supersymmetry requirement enforces Thirring-like four fermion coupling to the background scalar fields. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is exhibited through the Ward identities of the S-matrix elements. The spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism is exhibited through the broken Ward identities. An effective 4-dimensional action is constructed and the consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking is envisaged for the effective action. 19 refs.

  18. Optical and SAR data integration for automatic change pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Automatic change pattern mapping in urban and sub-urban area is important but challenging due to the diversity of urban land use pattern. With multi-sensor imagery, it is possible to generate multidimensional unique information of Earth surface features that allow developing a relationship between a response of each feature to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors to track the change automatically. Thus, a SAR and optical data integration framework for change detection and a relationship for automatic change pattern detection were developed. It was carried out in three steps: (i) Computation of indicators from SAR and optical images, namely: normalized difference ratio (NDR) from multi-temporal SAR images and the normalized difference vegetation index difference (NDVI) from multi-temporal optical images, (ii) computing the change magnitude image from NDR and ΔNDVI and delineating the change area and (iii) the development of an empirical relationship, for automatic change pattern detection. The experiment was carried out in an outskirts part of Ho Chi Minh City, one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The empirical relationship between the response of surface feature to optical and SAR imagery has successfully delineated six changed classes in a very complex urban sprawl area that was otherwise impossible with multi-spectral imagery. The improvement of the change detection results by making use of the unique information on both sensors, optical and SAR, is also noticeable with a visual inspection and the kappa index was increased by 0.13 (0.75 to 0.88) in comparison to only optical images.

  19. Multiscale Patterning of a Biomimetic Scaffold Integrated with Composite Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Minardi, Silvia; Sandri, Monica; Martinez, Jonathan O.; Yazdi, Iman K.; Liu, Xeuwu; Ferrari, Mauro; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tampieri, Anna; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    The ideal scaffold for regenerative medicine should concurrently mimic the structure of the original tissue from the nano- up to the macro-scale and recapitulate the biochemical composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in space and time. In this study, a multiscale approach is followed to selectively integrate different types of nanostructured composite microspheres loaded with reporter proteins, in a multi-compartment collagen scaffold. Through the preservation of the structural cues of the functionalized collagen scaffold at the nano- and micro-scale, its macroscopic features (pore size, porosity and swelling) are not altered. Additionally, the spatial confinement of the microspheres allows the release of the reporter proteins in each of the layers of the scaffold. Finally, the staged and zero-order release kinetics enables the temporal biochemical patterning of the scaffold. The versatile manufacturing of each component of the scaffold results in the ability to customize it to better mimic the architecture and composition of the tissues and biological systems. PMID:24867543

  20. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance nɛ. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using {Z}_2-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor ["On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction," in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259-273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  1. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-15

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ε}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  2. A Lie based 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We present and study a model of 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory, special Chern-Simons (SCS) theory, instances of which have appeared in the string literature, whose symmetry is encoded in a skeletal semistrict Lie 2-algebra constructed from a compact Lie group with non discrete center. The field content of SCS theory consists of a Lie valued 2-connection coupled to a background closed 3-form. SCS theory enjoys a large gauge and gauge for gauge symmetry organized in an infinite dimensional strict Lie 2-group. The partition function of SCS theory is simply related to that of a topological gauge theory localizing on flat connections with degree 3 second characteristic class determined by the background 3-form. Finally, SCS theory is related to a 3-dimensional special gauge theory whose 2-connection space has a natural symplectic structure with respect to which the 1-gauge transformation action is Hamiltonian, the 2-curvature map acting as moment map.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Dynamics: Integrability, Chaos and Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammaticos, B.

    2004-02-01

    When the editorial office of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General of the Institute of Physics Publishing asked me to review a book on nonlinear dynamics I experienced an undeniable apprehension. Indeed, the domain is a rapidly expanding one and writing a book aiming at a certain degree of completeness looks like an almost impossible task. My uneasiness abated somewhat when I saw the names of the authors, two well-known specialists of the nonlinear domain, but it was only when I held the book in my hands that I felt really reassured. The book is not just a review of the recent (and less so) findings on nonlinear systems. It is also a textbook. The authors set out to provide a detailed, step by step, introduction to the domain of nonlinearity and its various subdomains: chaos, integrability and pattern formation (although this last topic is treated with far less detail than the other two). The public they have in mind is obviously that of university students, graduate or undergraduate, who are interested in nonlinear phenomena. I suspect that a non-negligible portion of readers will be people who have to teach topics which figure among those included in the book: they will find this monograph an excellent companion to their course. The book is written in a pedagogical way, with a profusion of examples, detailed explanations and clear diagrams. The point of view is that of a physicist, which to my eyes is a major advantage. The mathematical formulation remains simple and perfectly intelligible. Thus the reader is not bogged down by fancy mathematical formalism, which would have discouraged the less experienced ones. A host of exercises accompanies every chapter. This will give the novice the occasion to develop his/her problem-solving skills and acquire competence in the use of nonlinear techniques. Some exercises are quite straightforward, like `verify the relation 14.81'. Others are less so, such as `prepare a write-up on a) frequency-locking and b) devil

  4. Integrated Insect Control May Alter Pesticide Use Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of predators, parasites, bacteria, viruses, hormones, pheromones, and sterile-male release and insect-resistance imparting techniques in pest control. Concludes with comments from chemical pesticide companies as popular attitudes toward the integrated pest management. (CC)

  5. Exploring Student Integration Patterns in Two-Way Immersion Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Martha I.

    2011-01-01

    Two-way immersion (TWI) programs teach English Learners (ELs) and native English speakers in the same classroom using both languages in an immersion approach. Studies suggest that TWI programs result in greater student integration, thus providing a promising alternative for Spanish speaking ELs, who are frequently concentrated in high poverty,…

  6. Internet Integration in High Schools: Patterns, Opportunities, and Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ruth; Adams, Marilyn; Meghani, Naheed; Smith, Maria

    Internet integration in high schools on a schoolwide scale was examined through case studies of five high schools in inner city, urban, suburban, and rural communities across the United States. A total of 322 teachers, 19 administrators, 19 counselors, 7 technology coordinators, and 3,822 students were surveyed, and 219 staff and students were…

  7. Proposal for the development of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Gregory; Hoff, Jim; Kwan, Simon; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Ted; Ramberg, Erik; Todri, Aida; Yarema, Ray; Demarteua, Marcel,; Drake, Gary; Weerts, Harry; /Argonne /Chicago U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2010-10-01

    Future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have no choice but to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare process. The authors propose to develop a 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM) chip for HEP applications, to advance the state-of-the-art for pattern recognition and track reconstruction for fast triggering.

  8. An integrated pattern recognition approach for intrusion detection.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Amod; Stanley, R Joe; McMillin, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Intrusion detection systems (IDS) attempt to address the vulnerability of computer-based systems for abuse by insiders and to penetration by outsiders. An IDS is required to examine an enormous amount of data generated by computer networks to assist in the abuse detection process. Thus, there is a need to develop automated tools that address these requirements to assist system operators in the detection of violations of existing security policies. In this research, an automated IDS is proposed for insider threats in a distributed system. The proposed IDS functions as an anomaly detector for insider system operations based on the analysis of the system's log files. The approach integrates dynamic programming and adaptive resonance theory (ART1) clustering. The integrated approach aligns sequences of log events with prototypical sequences of events for performing tasks and classifies the aligned sequences for intrusion detection. The system examined for this research is a Boots System for controlling the movement of boots from one place to another under specific security restrictions related to the boot orders. We present the proposed model, the results achieved and the analysis of an implemented prototype.

  9. Automatic Authorship Detection Using Textual Patterns Extracted from Integrated Syntactic Graphs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Adorno, Helena; Sidorov, Grigori; Pinto, David; Vilariño, Darnes; Gelbukh, Alexander

    2016-08-29

    We apply the integrated syntactic graph feature extraction methodology to the task of automatic authorship detection. This graph-based representation allows integrating different levels of language description into a single structure. We extract textual patterns based on features obtained from shortest path walks over integrated syntactic graphs and apply them to determine the authors of documents. On average, our method outperforms the state of the art approaches and gives consistently high results across different corpora, unlike existing methods. Our results show that our textual patterns are useful for the task of authorship attribution.

  10. Automatic Authorship Detection Using Textual Patterns Extracted from Integrated Syntactic Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Adorno, Helena; Sidorov, Grigori; Pinto, David; Vilariño, Darnes; Gelbukh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We apply the integrated syntactic graph feature extraction methodology to the task of automatic authorship detection. This graph-based representation allows integrating different levels of language description into a single structure. We extract textual patterns based on features obtained from shortest path walks over integrated syntactic graphs and apply them to determine the authors of documents. On average, our method outperforms the state of the art approaches and gives consistently high results across different corpora, unlike existing methods. Our results show that our textual patterns are useful for the task of authorship attribution. PMID:27589740

  11. Automatic Authorship Detection Using Textual Patterns Extracted from Integrated Syntactic Graphs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Adorno, Helena; Sidorov, Grigori; Pinto, David; Vilariño, Darnes; Gelbukh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We apply the integrated syntactic graph feature extraction methodology to the task of automatic authorship detection. This graph-based representation allows integrating different levels of language description into a single structure. We extract textual patterns based on features obtained from shortest path walks over integrated syntactic graphs and apply them to determine the authors of documents. On average, our method outperforms the state of the art approaches and gives consistently high results across different corpora, unlike existing methods. Our results show that our textual patterns are useful for the task of authorship attribution. PMID:27589740

  12. Retroviral Infection of hES Cells Produces Random-like Integration Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integration provides us with a powerful tool to realize prolonged gene expressions that are often critical to gene therapy. However, the perturbation of gene regulations in host cells by viral genome integration can lead to detrimental effects, yielding cancer. The oncogenic potential of retroviruses is linked to the preference of retroviruses to integrate into genomic regions that are enriched in gene regulatory elements. To better navigate the double-edged sword of retroviral integration we need to understand how retroviruses select their favored genomic loci during infections. In this study I showed that in addition to host proteins that tether retroviral pre-integration complexes to specific genomic regions, the epigenetic architecture of host genome might strongly affect retroviral integration patterns. Specifically, retroviruses showed their characteristic integration preference in differentiated somatic cells. In contrast, retroviral infections of hES cells, which are known to display decondensed chromatin, produced random-like integration patterns lacking of strong preference for regulatory-element-rich genomic regions. Better identification of the cellular and viral factors that determine retroviral integration patterns will facilitate the design of retroviral vectors for safer use in gene therapy. PMID:22526396

  13. Limbic Tract Integrity Contributes to Pattern Separation Performance Across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ilana J; Huffman, Derek J; Stark, Craig E L

    2015-09-01

    Accurate memory for discrete events is thought to rely on pattern separation to orthogonalize the representations of similar events. Previously, we reported that a behavioral index of pattern separation was correlated with activity in the hippocampus (dentate gyrus, CA3) and with integrity of the perforant path, which provides input to the hippocampus. If the hippocampus operates as part of a broader neural network, however, pattern separation would likely also relate to integrity of limbic tracts (fornix, cingulum bundle, and uncinate fasciculus) that connect the hippocampus to distributed brain regions. In this study, healthy adults (20-89 years) underwent diffusion tensor imaging and completed the Behavioral Pattern Separation Task-Object Version (BPS-O) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). After controlling for global effects of brain aging, exploratory skeleton-wise and targeted tractography analyses revealed that fornix integrity (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and radial diffusivity; but not mode) was significantly related to pattern separation (measured using BPS-O and RAVLT tasks), but not to recognition memory. These data suggest that hippocampal disconnection, via individual- and age-related differences in limbic tract integrity, contributes to pattern separation performance. Extending our earlier work, these results also support the notion that pattern separation relies on broad neural networks interconnecting the hippocampus.

  14. Development of the pattern recognition and the spatial integration filtering methods for analyzing satellite altimeter data

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X.H.; Zheng, Q.; Ho, C.R. . Center for Remote Sensing); Tai, C.K.; Cheney, R.E. )

    1994-05-01

    A pattern recognition method and a spatial integration filtering method have been developed to analyze satellite altimeter sea surface elevation anomaly (SSEA) data for the tropical Pacific Ocean. The pattern recognition method treats SSEA as an independent variable of the ocean, and SSEA map, its two-dimensional distribution image, as similar to a normal satellite image. The results of the pattern recognition processing of the SSEA maps quantitatively reveal the information of the measurement of SSEA patterns. The spatial integration filtering method is used as low-pass filtering to detect the equatorial Kelvin waves from Geosat SSEA time series data. The wave patterns and the frequency spectra are derived from SSEA data. This article describes these two methods, including an overview of the algorithms used and the results derived. Further applications of the methods are then suggested.

  15. Multilevel integration of patternable low-κ material into advanced Cu BEOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinghuang; Chen, S. T.; Nelson, A.; Brock, P.; Cohen, S.; Davis, B.; Fuller, N.; Kaplan, R.; Kwong, R.; Liniger, E.; Neumayer, D.; Patel, J.; Shobha, H.; Sooriyakumaran, R.; Purushothaman, S.; Spooner, T.; Miller, R.; Allen, R.; Wisnieff, R.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we wish to report, for the first time, on a simple, low-cost, novel way to form dual-damascene copper (Cu) on-chip interconnect or Back-End-Of-the-Line (BEOL) structures using a patternable low dielectric constant (low-κ) dielectric material concept. A patternable low-κ dielectric material combines the functions of a traditional resist and a dielectric material into one single material. It acts as a traditional resist during patterning and is subsequently converted to a low-κ dielectric material during a post-patterning curing process. No sacrificial materials (separate resists or hardmasks) and their related deposition, pattern transfer (etch) and removal (strip) are required to form dual-damascene BEOL patterns. We have successfully demonstrated multi-level dual-damascene integration of a novel patternable low-κ dielectric material into advanced Cu BEOL. This κ=2.7 patternable low-κ material is based on the industry standard SiCOH-based (silsesquioxane polymer) material platform and is compatible with 248 nm optical lithography. Multilevel integration of this patternable low-κ material at 45 nm node Cu BEOL fatwire levels has been demonstrated with very high electrical yields using the current manufacturing infrastructure.

  16. Photolithography-Based Patterning of Liquid Metal Interconnects for Monolithically Integrated Stretchable Circuits.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Woo; Moon, Yu Gyeong; Seong, Hyejeong; Jung, Soon Won; Oh, Ji-Young; Na, Bock Soon; Park, Nae-Man; Lee, Sang Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Koo, Jae Bon

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate a new patterning technique for gallium-based liquid metals on flat substrates, which can provide both high pattern resolution (∼20 μm) and alignment precision as required for highly integrated circuits. In a very similar manner as in the patterning of solid metal films by photolithography and lift-off processes, the liquid metal layer painted over the whole substrate area can be selectively removed by dissolving the underlying photoresist layer, leaving behind robust liquid patterns as defined by the photolithography. This quick and simple method makes it possible to integrate fine-scale interconnects with preformed devices precisely, which is indispensable for realizing monolithically integrated stretchable circuits. As a way for constructing stretchable integrated circuits, we propose a hybrid configuration composed of rigid device regions and liquid interconnects, which is constructed on a rigid substrate first but highly stretchable after being transferred onto an elastomeric substrate. This new method can be useful in various applications requiring both high-resolution and precisely aligned patterning of gallium-based liquid metals. PMID:27250997

  17. Photolithography-Based Patterning of Liquid Metal Interconnects for Monolithically Integrated Stretchable Circuits.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Woo; Moon, Yu Gyeong; Seong, Hyejeong; Jung, Soon Won; Oh, Ji-Young; Na, Bock Soon; Park, Nae-Man; Lee, Sang Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Koo, Jae Bon

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate a new patterning technique for gallium-based liquid metals on flat substrates, which can provide both high pattern resolution (∼20 μm) and alignment precision as required for highly integrated circuits. In a very similar manner as in the patterning of solid metal films by photolithography and lift-off processes, the liquid metal layer painted over the whole substrate area can be selectively removed by dissolving the underlying photoresist layer, leaving behind robust liquid patterns as defined by the photolithography. This quick and simple method makes it possible to integrate fine-scale interconnects with preformed devices precisely, which is indispensable for realizing monolithically integrated stretchable circuits. As a way for constructing stretchable integrated circuits, we propose a hybrid configuration composed of rigid device regions and liquid interconnects, which is constructed on a rigid substrate first but highly stretchable after being transferred onto an elastomeric substrate. This new method can be useful in various applications requiring both high-resolution and precisely aligned patterning of gallium-based liquid metals.

  18. Hox11 genes are required for regional patterning and integration of muscle, tendon and bone.

    PubMed

    Swinehart, Ilea T; Schlientz, Aleesa J; Quintanilla, Christopher A; Mortlock, Douglas P; Wellik, Deneen M

    2013-11-01

    Development of the musculoskeletal system requires precise integration of muscles, tendons and bones. The molecular mechanisms involved in the differentiation of each of these tissues have been the focus of significant research; however, much less is known about how these tissues are integrated into a functional unit appropriate for each body position and role. Previous reports have demonstrated crucial roles for Hox genes in patterning the axial and limb skeleton. Loss of Hox11 paralogous gene function results in dramatic malformation of limb zeugopod skeletal elements, the radius/ulna and tibia/fibula, as well as transformation of the sacral region to a lumbar phenotype. Utilizing a Hoxa11eGFP knock-in allele, we show that Hox11 genes are expressed in the connective tissue fibroblasts of the outer perichondrium, tendons and muscle connective tissue of the zeugopod region throughout all stages of development. Hox11 genes are not expressed in differentiated cartilage or bone, or in vascular or muscle cells in these regions. Loss of Hox11 genes disrupts regional muscle and tendon patterning of the limb in addition to affecting skeletal patterning. The tendon and muscle defects in Hox11 mutants are independent of skeletal patterning events as disruption of tendon and muscle patterning is observed in Hox11 compound mutants that do not have a skeletal phenotype. Thus, Hox genes are not simply regulators of skeletal morphology as previously thought, but are key factors that regulate regional patterning and integration of the musculoskeletal system.

  19. Support vector machines for spike pattern classification with a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron

    PubMed Central

    Ambard, Maxime; Rotter, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Spike pattern classification is a key topic in machine learning, computational neuroscience, and electronic device design. Here, we offer a new supervised learning rule based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) to determine the synaptic weights of a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron model for spike pattern classification. We compare classification performance between this algorithm and other methods sharing the same conceptual framework. We consider the effect of postsynaptic potential (PSP) kernel dynamics on patterns separability, and we propose an extension of the method to decrease computational load. The algorithm performs well in generalization tasks. We show that the peak value of spike patterns separability depends on a relation between PSP dynamics and spike pattern duration, and we propose a particular kernel that is well-suited for fast computations and electronic implementations. PMID:23181017

  20. System integration and radiation pattern measurements of a phased array antenna employing an integrated photonic beamformer for radio astronomy applications.

    PubMed

    Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Zhuang, Leimeng; Marpaung, David; Khan, Muhammad Rezaul; Maat, Peter; Dijkstra, Klaas; Leinse, Arne; Hoekman, Marcel; Heideman, René

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we describe the system integration and the experimental demonstration of a photonically beamformed four-element receiving array antenna for radio astronomy applications. To our knowledge, the work described here is the first demonstration of the squint-free, continuously tunable beamsteering capability offered by an integrated photonic beamformer based on optical ring resonator true-time-delay units, with measured radiation patterns. The integrated beamformer is realized in a low loss, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible optical waveguide technology. The measurements show a wideband, continuous beamsteering operation over a steering angle of 23.5 degrees and an instantaneous bandwidth of 500 MHz limited only by the measurement setup.

  1. A new 4-dimensional imaging system for jaw tracking.

    PubMed

    Lauren, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive 4D imaging system that produces high resolution time-based 3D surface data has been developed to capture jaw motion. Fluorescent microspheres are brushed onto both tooth and soft-tissue areas of the upper and lower arches to be imaged. An extraoral hand-held imaging device, operated about 12 cm from the mouth, captures a time-based set of perspective image triplets of the patch areas. Each triplet, containing both upper and lower arch data, is converted to a high-resolution 3D point mesh using photogrammetry, providing the instantaneous relative jaw position. Eight 3D positions per second are captured. Using one of the 3D frames as a reference, a 4D model can be constructed to describe the incremental free body motion of the mandible. The surface data produced by this system can be registered to conventional 3D models of the dentition, allowing them to be animated. Applications include integration into prosthetic CAD and CBCT data. PMID:24791467

  2. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2003-11-03

    This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

  3. Servo-integrated patterned media by hybrid directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuaigang; Yang, Xiaomin; Steiner, Philip; Hsu, Yautzong; Lee, Kim; Wago, Koichi; Kuo, David

    2014-11-25

    A hybrid directed self-assembly approach is developed to fabricate unprecedented servo-integrated bit-patterned media templates, by combining sphere-forming block copolymers with 5 teradot/in.(2) resolution capability, nanoimprint and optical lithography with overlay control. Nanoimprint generates prepatterns with different dimensions in the data field and servo field, respectively, and optical lithography controls the selective self-assembly process in either field. Two distinct directed self-assembly techniques, low-topography graphoepitaxy and high-topography graphoepitaxy, are elegantly integrated to create bit-patterned templates with flexible embedded servo information. Spinstand magnetic test at 1 teradot/in.(2) shows a low bit error rate of 10(-2.43), indicating fully functioning bit-patterned media and great potential of this approach for fabricating future ultra-high-density magnetic storage media.

  4. Patterns of morphological integration in the appendicular skeleton of mammalian carnivores.

    PubMed

    Martín-Serra, Alberto; Figueirido, Borja; Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We investigated patterns of evolutionary integration in the appendicular skeleton of mammalian carnivores. The findings are discussed in relation to performance selection in terms of organismal function as a potential mechanism underlying integration. Interspecific shape covariation was quantified by two-block partial least-squares (2B-PLS) analysis of 3D landmark data within a phylogenetic context. Specifically, we compared pairs of anatomically connected bones (within-limbs) and pairs of both serially homologous and functional equivalent bones (between-limbs). The statistical results of all the comparisons suggest that the carnivoran appendicular skeleton is highly integrated. Strikingly, the main shape covariation relates to bone robustness in all cases. A bootstrap test was used to compare the degree of integration between specialized cursorial taxa (i.e., those whose forelimbs are primarily involved in locomotion) and noncursorial species (i.e., those whose forelimbs are involved in more functions than their hindlimb) showed that cursors have a more integrated appendicular skeleton than noncursors. The findings demonstrate that natural selection can influence the pattern and degree of morphological integration by increasing the degree of bone shape covariation in parallel to ecological specialization.

  5. Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-08-03

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  6. Fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensors on flexible sensing skin substrates for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Kurata, Masahiro; Nishino, Hiromichi; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    New advances in nanotechnology and material processing is creating opportunities for the design and fabrication of a new generation of thin film sensors that can used to assess structural health. In particular, thin film sensors attached to large areas of the structure surface has the potential to provide spatially rich data on the performance and health of a structure. This study focuses on the development of a fully integrated strain sensor that is fabricated on a flexible substrate for potentially use in sensing skins. This is completed using a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material that is patterned on a flexible polyimide substrate using optical lithography. The piezoresistive carbon nanotube elements are integrated into a complete sensing system by patterning copper electrodes and integrating off-the-shelf electrical components on the flexible film for expanded functionality. This diverse material utilization is realized in a versatile process flow to illustrate a powerful toolbox for sensing severity, location, and failure mode of damage on structural components. The fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensor is tested on a quarter-scale, composite beam column connection. The results and implications for future structural damage detection are discussed.

  7. Pattern scaling with directed self assembly through lithography and etch process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Benjamen; Somervell, Mark; Hooge, Josh; Muramatsu, Makoto; Tanouchi, Keiji; Kitano, Takahiro; Nishimura, Eiichi; Yatsuda, Koichi; Nagahara, Seiji; Hiroyuki, Iwaki; Akai, Keiji; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) has the potential to extend scaling for both line/space and hole patterns. DSA has shown the capability for pitch reduction (multiplication), hole shrinks, CD self-healing as well as a pathway towards line edge roughness (LER) and pattern collapse improvement [1-4]. The current challenges for industry adoption are materials maturity, practical process integration, hardware capability, defect reduction and design integration. Tokyo Electron (TEL) has created close collaborations with customers, consortia and material suppliers to address these challenges with the long term goal of robust manufacturability. This paper provides a wide range of DSA demonstrations to accommodate different device applications. In collaboration with IMEC, directed line/space patterns at 12.5 and 14 nm HP are demonstrated with PS-b-PMMA (poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate)) using both chemo and grapho-epitaxy process flows. Pre-pattern exposure latitudes of >25% (max) have been demonstrated with 4X directed self-assembly on 300 mm wafers for both the lift off and etch guide chemo-epitaxy process flows. Within TEL's Technology Development Center (TDC), directed selfassembly processes have been applied to holes for both CD shrink and variation reduction. Using a PS-b-PMMA hole shrink process, negative tone developed pre-pattern holes are reduced to below 30 nm with critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of 0.9 nm (3s) and contact edge roughness (CER) of 0.8 nm. To generate higher resolution beyond a PS-b-PMMA system, a high chi material is used to demonstrate 9 nm HP line/ space post-etch patterns. In this paper, TEL presents process solutions for both line/space and hole DSA process integrations.

  8. Spike Train Dynamics Underlying Pattern Formation in Integrate-and-Fire Oscillator Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, P. C.; Coombes, S.

    1998-09-01

    A dynamical mechanism underlying pattern formation in a spatially extended network of integrate-and-fire oscillators with synaptic interactions is identified. It is shown how in the strong coupling regime the network undergoes a discrete Turing-Hopf bifurcation of the firing times from a synchronous state to a state with periodic or quasiperiodic variations of the interspike intervals on closed orbits. The separation of these orbits in phase space results in a spatially periodic pattern of mean firing rate across the network that is modulated by deterministic fluctuations of the instantaneous firing rate.

  9. Patterns of HIV and mental health service integration in New York State.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhee; Ades, Marc; Pinho, Veronica; Cournos, Francine; McKinnon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) creates incentives to coordinate primary care, mental health (MH) care, and addiction services. Integration of clinical HIV and MH services has been shown to improve quality of life and physical and MH of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, few studies have investigated the practice of service integration systematically. We examined the practice patterns of 515 direct service providers in New York State who received training about HIV MH between May 2010 and July 2012. We sought to identify provider and treatment setting characteristics associated with an integrated spectrum of care. Using factor analysis and linear modeling, we found that patterns of service integration varied by type of health-care setting, service setting location, providers' HIV caseload, and the discipline of the provider describing the direct services. Understanding the existing capacities of clinicians providing care in a variety of settings throughout New York will help to guide staffing and linkage to enhance HIV MH service integration as significant shifts in the organization of health care occur.

  10. [Establishment of diagnosis and treatment patterns of holistic integrated medicine for neuro-ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanling

    2014-12-01

    Neuro-ophthalmology, as an interdisciplinary, covers at least three disciplines- ophthalmology, neurology and neurosurgery. With limited knowledge in each discipline, doctors often make misdiagnoses for neuro-ophthalmology diseases. Therefore, it is imperative to abandon the distinction between disciplines and combine all the knowledge to diagnose and treat patients in patterns of holistic integrated medicine in order to effectively improve the diagnosis and treatment of neuro-ophthalmology.

  11. The 4-Dimensional Plant: Effects of Wind-Induced Canopy Movement on Light Fluctuations and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alexandra J.; Retkute, Renata; Preston, Simon P.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Pound, Michael P.; Pridmore, Tony P.; Murchie, Erik H.

    2016-01-01

    accurate modeling of mechanical canopy excitation (here coined the 4-dimensional plant) and some associated biological and applied implications of such techniques. We hypothesize that biomechanical plant properties are a specific adaptation to achieve wind-induced photosynthetic enhancement and we outline how traits facilitating canopy excitation could be used as a route for improving crop yield. PMID:27708654

  12. Patterning, integration and characterisation of polymer optical oxygen sensors for microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Nock, Volker; Blaikie, Richard J; David, Tim

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes a process for the layer-by-layer fabrication and integration of luminescent dye-based optical oxygen sensors into microfluidic devices. Application of oxygen-sensitive platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone fluorescent dye dissolved in polystyrene onto glass substrates by spin-coating was studied. Soft lithography with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps and reactive ion etching in oxygen plasma were used to produce sensor patterns with a minimum feature size of 25 microm. Sensors patterns were integrated into a PDMS microfluidic device by plasma bonding. No degradation of the sensor response as a result of the lithography and pattern-transfer processes was detected. Gaseous and dissolved oxygen (DO) detection was characterised using fluorescence microscopy. The intensity signal ratio of the sensor films was found to increase almost two-fold from 3.6 to 6.8 by reducing film thickness from 1.3 microm to 0.6 microm. Calibration of DO measurement showed linear Stern-Volmer behaviour that was constant for flow rates from 0.5 to 2 mL min(-1). The calibrated sensors were subsequently used to demonstrate laterally resolved detection of oxygen inside a microfluidic channel. The fabrication process provides a novel, easy to use method for the repeatable integration of optical oxygen sensors into cell-culture and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  13. Zipper encodes a putative integral membrane protein required for normal axon patterning during Drosophila neurogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, D B; Côté, S; Jähnig, F; Haller, J; Jäckle, H

    1988-01-01

    During the development of the central nervous system, Drosophila embryo axons become organized in a stereo-typed fasciculation pattern. We have found that the zipper (zip) gene, initially identified on the basis of a defective larval cuticle in zip mutant embryos, is possibly involved in the establishment or maintenance of the axon pattern during the late stages of neurogenesis. The zip wild-type gene is expressed in the developing nervous system. It codes for a putative integral membrane protein. Both the molecular features of zipper and its biological effect in the nervous system of mutants suggest that zipper is an essential component for cell surface interactions involved in axon patterning, and that the cuticle phenotype of zip mutants is dependent on the primary defects observed in the nervous system. Images PMID:3402433

  14. Integration of Spectral Reflectance across the Plumage: Implications for Mating Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Laczi, Miklós; Török, János; Rosivall, Balázs; Hegyi, Gergely

    2011-01-01

    Background In complex sexual signaling systems such as plumage color, developmental or genetic links may occur among seemingly distinct traits. However, the interrelations of such traits and the functional significance of their integration rarely have been examined. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the parallel variation of two reflectance descriptors (brightness and UV chroma) across depigmented and melanized plumage areas of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis), and the possible role of integrated color signals in mate acquisition. We found moderate integration in brightness and UV chroma across the plumage, with similar correlation structures in the two sexes despite the strong sexual dichromatism. Patterns of parallel color change across the plumage were largely unrelated to ornamental white patch sizes, but they all showed strong assortative mating between the sexes. Comparing different types of assortative mating patterns for individual spectral variables suggested a distinct role for plumage-level color axes in mate acquisition. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the plumage-level, parallel variation of coloration might play a role in mate acquisition. This study underlines the importance of considering potential developmental and functional integration among apparently different ornaments in studies of sexual selection. PMID:21853088

  15. Integrative Inferences on Pattern Geometries of Grapes Grown under Water Stress and Their Resulting Wines

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Fushing; Hsueh, Chih-Hsin; Heitkamp, Constantin; Matthews, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple datasets of two consecutive vintages of replicated grape and wines from six different deficit irrigation regimes are characterized and compared. The process consists of four temporal-ordered signature phases: harvest field data, juice composition, wine composition before bottling and bottled wine. A new computing paradigm and an integrative inferential platform are developed for discovering phase-to-phase pattern geometries for such characterization and comparison purposes. Each phase is manifested by a distinct set of features, which are measurable upon phase-specific entities subject to the common set of irrigation regimes. Throughout the four phases, this compilation of data from irrigation regimes with subsamples is termed a space of media-nodes, on which measurements of phase-specific features were recoded. All of these collectively constitute a bipartite network of data, which is then normalized and binary coded. For these serial bipartite networks, we first quantify patterns that characterize individual phases by means of a new computing paradigm called “Data Mechanics”. This computational technique extracts a coupling geometry which captures and reveals interacting dependence among and between media-nodes and feature-nodes in forms of hierarchical block sub-matrices. As one of the principal discoveries, the holistic year-factor persistently surfaces as the most inferential factor in classifying all media-nodes throughout all phases. This could be deemed either surprising in its over-arching dominance or obvious based on popular belief. We formulate and test pattern-based hypotheses that confirm such fundamental patterns. We also attempt to elucidate the driving force underlying the phase-evolution in winemaking via a newly developed partial coupling geometry, which is designed to integrate two coupling geometries. Such partial coupling geometries are confirmed to bear causal and predictive implications. All pattern inferences are performed with

  16. Toward sub-20nm pitch Fin patterning and integration with DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayan, Safak; Marzook, Taisir; Chan, BT; Vandenbroeck, Nadia; Singh, Arjun; Laidler, David; Sanchez, Efrain A.; Leray, Philippe; R. Delgadillo, Paulina; Gronheid, Roel; Vandenberghe, Geert; Clark, William; Juncker, Aurelie

    2016-03-01

    Directed Self Assembly (DSA) has gained increased momentum in recent years as a cost-effective means for extending lithography to sub-30nm pitch, primarily presenting itself as an alternative to mainstream 193i pitch division approaches such as SADP and SAQP. Towards these goals, IMEC has excelled at understanding and implementing directed self-assembly based on PS-b-PMMA block co-polymers (BCPs) using LiNe flow [1]. These efforts increase the understanding of how block copolymers might be implemented as part of HVM compatible DSA integration schemes. In recent contributions, we have proposed and successfully demonstrated two state-of-the-art CMOS process flows which employed DSA based on the PS-b-PMMA, LiNe flow at IMEC (pitch = 28 nm) to form FinFET arrays via both a `cut-last' and `cut-first' approach [2-4]. Therein, we described the relevant film stacks (hard mask and STI stacks) to achieve robust patterning and pattern transfer into IMEC's FEOL device film stacks. We also described some of the pattern placement and overlay challenges associated with these two strategies. In this contribution, we will present materials and processes for FinFET patterning and integration towards sub-20 nm pitch technology nodes. This presents a noteworthy challenge for DSA using BCPs as the ultimate resolution for PS-b-PMMA may not achieve such dimensions. The emphasis will continue to be towards patterning approaches, wafer alignment strategies, the effects of DSA processing on wafer alignment and overlay.

  17. Integrative Inferences on Pattern Geometries of Grapes Grown under Water Stress and Their Resulting Wines.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fushing; Hsueh, Chih-Hsin; Heitkamp, Constantin; Matthews, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple datasets of two consecutive vintages of replicated grape and wines from six different deficit irrigation regimes are characterized and compared. The process consists of four temporal-ordered signature phases: harvest field data, juice composition, wine composition before bottling and bottled wine. A new computing paradigm and an integrative inferential platform are developed for discovering phase-to-phase pattern geometries for such characterization and comparison purposes. Each phase is manifested by a distinct set of features, which are measurable upon phase-specific entities subject to the common set of irrigation regimes. Throughout the four phases, this compilation of data from irrigation regimes with subsamples is termed a space of media-nodes, on which measurements of phase-specific features were recoded. All of these collectively constitute a bipartite network of data, which is then normalized and binary coded. For these serial bipartite networks, we first quantify patterns that characterize individual phases by means of a new computing paradigm called "Data Mechanics". This computational technique extracts a coupling geometry which captures and reveals interacting dependence among and between media-nodes and feature-nodes in forms of hierarchical block sub-matrices. As one of the principal discoveries, the holistic year-factor persistently surfaces as the most inferential factor in classifying all media-nodes throughout all phases. This could be deemed either surprising in its over-arching dominance or obvious based on popular belief. We formulate and test pattern-based hypotheses that confirm such fundamental patterns. We also attempt to elucidate the driving force underlying the phase-evolution in winemaking via a newly developed partial coupling geometry, which is designed to integrate two coupling geometries. Such partial coupling geometries are confirmed to bear causal and predictive implications. All pattern inferences are performed with

  18. Preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas using 4-dimensional computed tomography: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Ellika, Shehanaz; Patel, Suresh; Aho, Todd; Marin, Horia

    2013-08-01

    Accurate preoperative localization is the key to successful parathyroid surgery in the era of minimally invasive parathyroid surgery. This article presents and discusses the embryologic basis of parathyroid gland and ectopic location and different imaging modalities helpful in diagnosing and localizing parathyroid adenomas and/or hyperplasia. We also aim to review the current surgical concepts in treatment of parathyroid adenomas and/or hyperplasia, the utility of 4-dimensional computed tomography for accurate preoperative localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands, imaging classification of adenomas and/or hyperplasia, and, finally, present some of the limitations of 4-dimensional computed tomography.

  19. Integrated routing and fill for self-aligned double patterning (SADP) using grid-based design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youngsoo; Lee, Jeemyung; Lee, Seongmin; Shin, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) has been proposed as an alternative patterning solution for sub-10nm technology because of delay of advanced lithography beyond 193nm ArF. In conventional SADP, line and space style of dummy metal fills are inserted once main design is complete. A large buffer distance is required around the main design because no further verification of main design (in presence of fills) is performed. This causes irregular pattern density, which becomes a source of process variations. We propose integrated-fill, in which main design and dummy fill insertion are performed together. This requires a change in overall design flow, which we discuss. Integrated-fill is demonstrated in M2 layer of SADP process; M2 density increases by 15.7% with 2.3% reduction in standard deviation of density distribution; metal thickness variation is also reduced by 24%. More dummy fills cause increased coupling capacitance, which however is shown to be insignificant.

  20. An integrative framework of the skin receptors activation: mechanoreceptors activity patterns versus "labeled lines".

    PubMed

    Zeveke, Alexander V; Efes, Ekaterina D; Polevaya, Sofia A

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents a review of electrophysiological data which indicate the integrative mechanisms of information coded in the human and animal peripheral skin receptors. The activity of the skin sensory receptors was examined by applying various natural stimuli. It was revealed that numerous identical receptors respond to various stimuli (mechanical, temperature, and pain ones), but the spike patterns of these receptors were found to be specific for each stimulus. The description of characteristic structures of spike patterns in the cutaneous nerve fibers in response to five major modalities, namely: "touch", "pain", "vibration/breath", "cold", and "heat", is being presented. The recordings of the cutaneous physical state revealed a correlation between the patterns of spatiotemporal skin deformation and the receptors activity. A rheological state of the skin can be changed either in response to external temperature variation or by the sympathetic pilomotor activation. These results indicate that the skin sensory receptors activity may be considered as an integrative process. It depends not only on the receptors themselves, but also on the changes in the surrounding tissue and on the adaptive influence of the central nervous system. A new framework for the sensory channel system related to the skin is proposed on the basis of experimental results.

  1. Integrating Entropy and Closed Frequent Pattern Mining for Social Network Modelling and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Muhaimenul; Alhajj, Reda; Rokne, Jon

    The recent increase in the explicitly available social networks has attracted the attention of the research community to investigate how it would be possible to benefit from such a powerful model in producing effective solutions for problems in other domains where the social network is implicit; we argue that social networks do exist around us but the key issue is how to realize and analyze them. This chapter presents a novel approach for constructing a social network model by an integrated framework that first preparing the data to be analyzed and then applies entropy and frequent closed patterns mining for network construction. For a given problem, we first prepare the data by identifying items and transactions, which arc the basic ingredients for frequent closed patterns mining. Items arc main objects in the problem and a transaction is a set of items that could exist together at one time (e.g., items purchased in one visit to the supermarket). Transactions could be analyzed to discover frequent closed patterns using any of the well-known techniques. Frequent closed patterns have the advantage that they successfully grab the inherent information content of the dataset and is applicable to a broader set of domains. Entropies of the frequent closed patterns arc used to keep the dimensionality of the feature vectors to a reasonable size; it is a kind of feature reduction process. Finally, we analyze the dynamic behavior of the constructed social network. Experiments were conducted on a synthetic dataset and on the Enron corpus email dataset. The results presented in the chapter show that social networks extracted from a feature set as frequent closed patterns successfully carry the community structure information. Moreover, for the Enron email dataset, we present an analysis to dynamically indicate the deviations from each user's individual and community profile. These indications of deviations can be very useful to identify unusual events.

  2. Tonic synaptic inhibition modulates neuronal output pattern and spatiotemporal synaptic integration.

    PubMed

    Häusser, M; Clark, B A

    1997-09-01

    Irregular firing patterns are observed in most central neurons in vivo, but their origin is controversial. Here, we show that two types of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar cortex fire spontaneously and regularly in the absence of synaptic input but generate an irregular firing pattern in the presence of tonic synaptic inhibition. Paired recordings between synaptically connected neurons revealed that single action potentials in inhibitory interneurons cause highly variable delays in action potential firing in their postsynaptic cells. Activity in single and multiple inhibitory interneurons also significantly reduces postsynaptic membrane time constant and input resistance. These findings suggest that the time window for synaptic integration is a dynamic variable modulated by the level of tonic inhibition, and that rate coding and temporal coding strategies may be used in parallel in the same cell type. PMID:9331356

  3. Health spending in the 1980's: Integration of clinical practice patterns with management

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol E.

    1984-01-01

    Health care spending in the United States more than tripled between 1972 and 1982, increasing from $94 billion to $322 billion. This growth substantially outpaced overall growth in the economy. National health expenditures are projected to reach approximately $690 billion in 1990 and consume roughly 12 percent of the gross national product. Government spending for health care is projected to reach $294 billion by 1990, with the Federal Government paying 72 percent. The Medicare prospective payment system and increasing competition in the health services sector are providing incentives to integrate clinical practice patterns with improved management practices. PMID:10310595

  4. A genomic DNA segment from Petunia hybrida leads to increased transformation frequencies and simple integration patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, P; Kartzke, S; Niedenhof, I; Heidmann, I; Bussmann, K; Saedler, H

    1988-01-01

    A 2-kilobase (kb) genomic fragment was selected from Petunia hybrida that increased transformation efficiencies by at least a factor of 20 after direct DNA transfer to petunia and tobacco protoplasts when supercoiled plasmid DNA was used. Because of this effect this fragment was named transformation booster sequence (TBS). Increased transformation frequencies were observed for plasmids that contained either the 2-kb fragment in dimeric or monomeric form or an internal 1.1-kb fragment of TBS. Analysis of transformants revealed that preferentially one copy of foreign DNA is integrated. Thus, TBS improves the poor transformation frequencies of direct gene transfer using circular plasmids, while it conserves the simple integration pattern that is important for practical applications. Possible mechanisms of TBS action are discussed. Images PMID:3186747

  5. Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomic and Epigenomic Data to Reveal Regulation Patterns for BMD Variation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Gang; Tan, Li-Jun; Xu, Chao; He, Hao; Tian, Qing; Zhou, Yu; Qiu, Chuan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Integration of multiple profiling data and construction of functional gene networks may provide additional insights into the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Osteoporosis is a worldwide public health problem, but the complex gene-gene interactions, post-transcriptional modifications and regulation of functional networks are still unclear. To gain a comprehensive understanding of osteoporosis etiology, transcriptome gene expression microarray, epigenomic miRNA microarray and methylome sequencing were performed simultaneously in 5 high hip BMD (Bone Mineral Density) subjects and 5 low hip BMD subjects. SPIA (Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis) and PCST (Prize Collecting Steiner Tree) algorithm were used to perform pathway-enrichment analysis and construct the interaction networks. Through integrating the transcriptomic and epigenomic data, firstly we identified 3 genes (FAM50A, ZNF473 and TMEM55B) and one miRNA (hsa-mir-4291) which showed the consistent association evidence from both gene expression and methylation data; secondly in network analysis we identified an interaction network module with 12 genes and 11 miRNAs including AKT1, STAT3, STAT5A, FLT3, hsa-mir-141 and hsa-mir-34a which have been associated with BMD in previous studies. This module revealed the crosstalk among miRNAs, mRNAs and DNA methylation and showed four potential regulatory patterns of gene expression to influence the BMD status. In conclusion, the integration of multiple layers of omics can yield in-depth results than analysis of individual omics data respectively. Integrative analysis from transcriptomics and epigenomic data improves our ability to identify causal genetic factors, and more importantly uncover functional regulation pattern of multi-omics for osteoporosis etiology. PMID:26390436

  6. Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomic and Epigenomic Data to Reveal Regulation Patterns for BMD Variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Gang; Tan, Li-Jun; Xu, Chao; He, Hao; Tian, Qing; Zhou, Yu; Qiu, Chuan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Integration of multiple profiling data and construction of functional gene networks may provide additional insights into the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Osteoporosis is a worldwide public health problem, but the complex gene-gene interactions, post-transcriptional modifications and regulation of functional networks are still unclear. To gain a comprehensive understanding of osteoporosis etiology, transcriptome gene expression microarray, epigenomic miRNA microarray and methylome sequencing were performed simultaneously in 5 high hip BMD (Bone Mineral Density) subjects and 5 low hip BMD subjects. SPIA (Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis) and PCST (Prize Collecting Steiner Tree) algorithm were used to perform pathway-enrichment analysis and construct the interaction networks. Through integrating the transcriptomic and epigenomic data, firstly we identified 3 genes (FAM50A, ZNF473 and TMEM55B) and one miRNA (hsa-mir-4291) which showed the consistent association evidence from both gene expression and methylation data; secondly in network analysis we identified an interaction network module with 12 genes and 11 miRNAs including AKT1, STAT3, STAT5A, FLT3, hsa-mir-141 and hsa-mir-34a which have been associated with BMD in previous studies. This module revealed the crosstalk among miRNAs, mRNAs and DNA methylation and showed four potential regulatory patterns of gene expression to influence the BMD status. In conclusion, the integration of multiple layers of omics can yield in-depth results than analysis of individual omics data respectively. Integrative analysis from transcriptomics and epigenomic data improves our ability to identify causal genetic factors, and more importantly uncover functional regulation pattern of multi-omics for osteoporosis etiology.

  7. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreement between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0 mm vs 2

  8. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dongsu; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  9. Clinical Validation of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Pulmonary Function Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Douglas; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.; Linderman, Derek; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: A new form of functional imaging has been proposed in the form of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care for lung cancer patients, calculating ventilation maps from 4DCTs provides spatial lung function information without added dosimetric or monetary cost to the patient. Before 4DCT-ventilation is implemented it needs to be clinically validated. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) provide a clinically established way of evaluating lung function. The purpose of our work was to perform a clinical validation by comparing 4DCT-ventilation metrics with PFT data. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight lung cancer patients with pretreatment 4DCT and PFT data were included in the study. Pulmonary function test metrics used to diagnose obstructive lung disease were recorded: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity. Four-dimensional CT data sets and spatial registration were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation images using a density change–based and a Jacobian-based model. The ventilation maps were reduced to single metrics intended to reflect the degree of ventilation obstruction. Specifically, we computed the coefficient of variation (SD/mean), ventilation V20 (volume of lung ≤20% ventilation), and correlated the ventilation metrics with PFT data. Regression analysis was used to determine whether 4DCT ventilation data could predict for normal versus abnormal lung function using PFT thresholds. Results: Correlation coefficients comparing 4DCT-ventilation with PFT data ranged from 0.63 to 0.72, with the best agreement between FEV1 and coefficient of variation. Four-dimensional CT ventilation metrics were able to significantly delineate between clinically normal versus abnormal PFT results. Conclusions: Validation of 4DCT ventilation with clinically relevant metrics is essential. We demonstrate good global agreement between PFTs and 4DCT-ventilation, indicating that 4DCT

  10. Design and testing of the first 2D Prototype Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Deptuch, G.; Hoff, J.; Jindariani, S.; Joshi, S.; Olsen, J.; Tran, N.; Trimpl, M.

    2015-02-01

    An associative memory-based track finding approach has been proposed for a Level 1 tracking trigger to cope with increasing luminosities at the LHC. The associative memory uses a massively parallel architecture to tackle the intrinsically complex combinatorics of track finding algorithms, thus avoiding the typical power law dependence of execution time on occupancy and solving the pattern recognition in times roughly proportional to the number of hits. This is of crucial importance given the large occupancies typical of hadronic collisions. The design of an associative memory system capable of dealing with the complexity of HL-LHC collisions and with the short latency required by Level 1 triggering poses significant, as yet unsolved, technical challenges. For this reason, an aggressive R&D program has been launched at Fermilab to advance state of-the-art associative memory technology, the so called VIPRAM (Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory) project. The VIPRAM leverages emerging 3D vertical integration technology to build faster and denser Associative Memory devices. The first step is to implement in conventional VLSI the associative memory building blocks that can be used in 3D stacking, in other words, the building blocks are laid out as if it is a 3D design. In this paper, we report on the first successful implementation of a 2D VIPRAM demonstrator chip (protoVIPRAM00). The results show that these building blocks are ready for 3D stacking.

  11. Patterned Photostimulation with Digital Micromirror Devices to Investigate Dendritic Integration Across Branch Points

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M. Daniel; Tang, Cha-Min

    2011-01-01

    Light is a versatile and precise means to control neuronal excitability. The recent introduction of light sensitive effectors such as channel-rhodopsin and caged neurotransmitters have led to interests in developing better means to control patterns of light in space and time that are useful for experimental neuroscience. One conventional strategy, employed in confocal and 2-photon microscopy, is to focus light to a diffraction limited spot and then scan that single spot sequentially over the region of interest. This approach becomes problematic if large areas have to be stimulated within a brief time window, a problem more applicable to photostimulation than for imaging. An alternate strategy is to project the complete spatial pattern on the target with the aid of a digital micromirror device (DMD). The DMD approach is appealing because the hardware components are relatively inexpensive and is supported by commercial interests. Because such a system is not available for upright microscopes, we will discuss the critical issues in the construction and operations of such a DMD system. Even though we will be primarily describing the construction of the system for UV photolysis, the modifications for building the much simpler visible light system for optogenetic experiments will also be provided. The UV photolysis system was used to carryout experiments to study a fundamental question in neuroscience, how are spatially distributed inputs integrated across distal dendritic branch points. The results suggest that integration can be non-linear across branch points and the supralinearity is largely mediated by NMDA receptors. PMID:21403635

  12. Acquisition and Generalization of Word Decoding in Students with Reading Disabilities by Integrating Vowel Pattern Analysis and Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, E. Judith; Brady, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a reading intervention that integrated vowel pattern analysis and children's literature on the word decoding performance of second graders with reading disabilities. The intervention evaluated students' abilities to decode a set of training words using 3 common vowel patterns (syllable types), in isolation…

  13. Developement of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Deputch, G.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Olsen, J.; Ramberg, E.; Wu, Jin-Yuan; Yarema, R.; Shochet, M.; Tang, F.; Demarteau, M.; /Argonne /INFN, Padova

    2011-04-13

    Many next-generation physics experiments will be characterized by the collection of large quantities of data, taken in rapid succession, from which scientists will have to unravel the underlying physical processes. In most cases, large backgrounds will overwhelm the physics signal. Since the quantity of data that can be stored for later analysis is limited, real-time event selection is imperative to retain the interesting events while rejecting the background. Scaling of current technologies is unlikely to satisfy the scientific needs of future projects, so investments in transformational new technologies need to be made. For example, future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare processes. In this proposal, we intend to develop hardware-based technology that significantly advances the state-of-the-art for fast pattern recognition within and outside HEP using the 3D vertical integration technology that has emerged recently in industry. The ultimate physics reach of the LHC experiments will crucially depend on the tracking trigger's ability to help discriminate between interesting rare events and the background. Hardware-based pattern recognition for fast triggering on particle tracks has been successfully used in high-energy physics experiments for some time. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the Fermilab Tevatron is an excellent example. The method used there, developed in the 1990's, is based on algorithms that use a massively parallel associative memory architecture to identify patterns efficiently at high speed. However, due to much higher occupancy and event rates at the LHC, and the fact that the LHC detectors have a much larger number of channels in their tracking detectors, there is an enormous challenge in implementing pattern recognition

  14. Integrated β-catenin, BMP, PTEN, and Notch signalling patterns the nephron

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Nils O; Lawrence, Melanie L; Burn, Sally F; Johansson, Jeanette A; Bakker, Elvira RM; Ridgway, Rachel A; Chang, C-Hong; Karolak, Michele J; Oxburgh, Leif; Headon, Denis J; Sansom, Owen J; Smits, Ron; Davies, Jamie A; Hohenstein, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The different segments of the nephron and glomerulus in the kidney balance the processes of water homeostasis, solute recovery, blood filtration, and metabolite excretion. When segment function is disrupted, a range of pathological features are presented. Little is known about nephron patterning during embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that the early nephron is patterned by a gradient in β-catenin activity along the axis of the nephron tubule. By modifying β-catenin activity, we force cells within nephrons to differentiate according to the imposed β-catenin activity level, thereby causing spatial shifts in nephron segments. The β-catenin signalling gradient interacts with the BMP pathway which, through PTEN/PI3K/AKT signalling, antagonises β-catenin activity and promotes segment identities associated with low β-catenin activity. β-catenin activity and PI3K signalling also integrate with Notch signalling to control segmentation: modulating β-catenin activity or PI3K rescues segment identities normally lost by inhibition of Notch. Our data therefore identifies a molecular network for nephron patterning. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04000.001 PMID:25647637

  15. Integrated β-catenin, BMP, PTEN, and Notch signalling patterns the nephron.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Nils O; Lawrence, Melanie L; Burn, Sally F; Johansson, Jeanette A; Bakker, Elvira R M; Ridgway, Rachel A; Chang, C-Hong; Karolak, Michele J; Oxburgh, Leif; Headon, Denis J; Sansom, Owen J; Smits, Ron; Davies, Jamie A; Hohenstein, Peter

    2015-02-03

    The different segments of the nephron and glomerulus in the kidney balance the processes of water homeostasis, solute recovery, blood filtration, and metabolite excretion. When segment function is disrupted, a range of pathological features are presented. Little is known about nephron patterning during embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that the early nephron is patterned by a gradient in β-catenin activity along the axis of the nephron tubule. By modifying β-catenin activity, we force cells within nephrons to differentiate according to the imposed β-catenin activity level, thereby causing spatial shifts in nephron segments. The β-catenin signalling gradient interacts with the BMP pathway which, through PTEN/PI3K/AKT signalling, antagonises β-catenin activity and promotes segment identities associated with low β-catenin activity. β-catenin activity and PI3K signalling also integrate with Notch signalling to control segmentation: modulating β-catenin activity or PI3K rescues segment identities normally lost by inhibition of Notch. Our data therefore identifies a molecular network for nephron patterning.

  16. The Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration (SADI) Web service Design-Pattern, API and Reference Implementation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The complexity and inter-related nature of biological data poses a difficult challenge for data and tool integration. There has been a proliferation of interoperability standards and projects over the past decade, none of which has been widely adopted by the bioinformatics community. Recent attempts have focused on the use of semantics to assist integration, and Semantic Web technologies are being welcomed by this community. Description SADI - Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration - is a lightweight set of fully standards-compliant Semantic Web service design patterns that simplify the publication of services of the type commonly found in bioinformatics and other scientific domains. Using Semantic Web technologies at every level of the Web services "stack", SADI services consume and produce instances of OWL Classes following a small number of very straightforward best-practices. In addition, we provide codebases that support these best-practices, and plug-in tools to popular developer and client software that dramatically simplify deployment of services by providers, and the discovery and utilization of those services by their consumers. Conclusions SADI Services are fully compliant with, and utilize only foundational Web standards; are simple to create and maintain for service providers; and can be discovered and utilized in a very intuitive way by biologist end-users. In addition, the SADI design patterns significantly improve the ability of software to automatically discover appropriate services based on user-needs, and automatically chain these into complex analytical workflows. We show that, when resources are exposed through SADI, data compliant with a given ontological model can be automatically gathered, or generated, from these distributed, non-coordinating resources - a behaviour we have not observed in any other Semantic system. Finally, we show that, using SADI, data dynamically generated from Web services can be explored in a manner

  17. Directed self-assembly process integration: Fin patterning approaches and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayan, Safak; Chan, B. T.; Gronheid, Roel; Van Roey, Frieda; Kim, Min-Soo; Williamson, Lance; Nealey, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Resolution requirements for photolithography have reached beyond the wavelength of light. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly complicated and expensive to further minimize feature dimensions as required to push the limits of Moore's law. EUV lithography has been the much anticipated solution; however, its insertion timing for High Volume Manufacturing is still an uncertainty due to source power and EUV mask infrastructure limitations. Extending the limits of 193nm immersion lithography requires pitch division using either Double Patterning Pitch Division (DPPD), and/or Spacer Based Pitch Division (SBPD) schemes (e.g. Hard mask image transfer methods (Double, Triple, Quadruple)). While these approaches reduce pitch, there is an associated risk/compromise of process complexity, and overlay accuracy budget issues. Directed Self Assembly (DSA) processes offer the promise of providing alternative ways to extend optical lithography cost-effectively for sub-10nm nodes and present itself as an alternative pitch division approach. As a result, DSA has gained increased momentum in recent years, as a means for extending optical lithography past its current limits. The availability of a DSA processing line can enable to further push the limits of 193nm immersion lithography and overcome some of the critical concerns for EUV lithography. Robust etch transfer of DSA patterns into commonly used device integration materials such as silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide had been previously demonstrated [1,2]. However DSA integration to CMOS process flows, including cut/keep structures to form fin arrays, is yet to be demonstrated on relevant film stacks (front-end-of-line device integration such as hard mask stacks, and STI stacks). Such a demonstration will confirm and reinforce its viability as a candidate for sub-10nm technology nodes.

  18. Incorporating pattern identification of Chinese medicine into precision medicine: An integrative model for individualized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-gen; Xu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    On 20 January, 2015, U.S. President Obama announced an ambitious plan called "Precision Medicine (PM) Initiative", aiming to deliver genetics-based medical treatments. PM has shown a promising prospect by tailoring disease treatments and preventions to individuals. However, a predominantly genetics-based method restricts its benefit and applicability in most chronic and complex diseases. Pattern identification (PI) is one of the representative characteristics of Chinese medicine implying the concept of holism and individualized treatment. It is another classification method taking environmental, psychosocial and other individual factors into account. Integrating PI with disease diagnosis of Western medicine will provide a strong complement to genetics-based PM, thus establish an integrative model for individualized medicine. PI provides new perspectives for PM, not only in clinical practice, but also in new drug development and clinical trial design. It is for sure that the integrative approach will ultimately lead to a safer, more convenient and effective patient-centered healthcare and most patients will benefit in the era of PM.

  19. Incorporating pattern identification of Chinese medicine into precision medicine: An integrative model for individualized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-gen; Xu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    On 20 January, 2015, U.S. President Obama announced an ambitious plan called "Precision Medicine (PM) Initiative", aiming to deliver genetics-based medical treatments. PM has shown a promising prospect by tailoring disease treatments and preventions to individuals. However, a predominantly genetics-based method restricts its benefit and applicability in most chronic and complex diseases. Pattern identification (PI) is one of the representative characteristics of Chinese medicine implying the concept of holism and individualized treatment. It is another classification method taking environmental, psychosocial and other individual factors into account. Integrating PI with disease diagnosis of Western medicine will provide a strong complement to genetics-based PM, thus establish an integrative model for individualized medicine. PI provides new perspectives for PM, not only in clinical practice, but also in new drug development and clinical trial design. It is for sure that the integrative approach will ultimately lead to a safer, more convenient and effective patient-centered healthcare and most patients will benefit in the era of PM. PMID:26519373

  20. Integration of Photo-Patternable Low-κ Material into Advanced Cu Back-End-Of-The-Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinghuang; Nelson, Alshakim; Chen, Shyng-Tsong; Brock, Philip; Cohen, Stephan A.; Davis, Blake; Kaplan, Richard; Kwong, Ranee; Liniger, Eric; Neumayer, Debra; Patel, Jyotica; Shobha, Hosadurga; Sooriyakumaran, Ratnam; Purushothaman, Sampath; Miller, Robert; Spooner, Terry; Wisnieff, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We report herein the demonstration of a simple, low-cost Cu back-end-of-the-line (BEOL) dual-damascene integration using a novel photo-patternable low-κ dielectric material concept that dramatically reduces Cu BEOL integration complexity. This κ=2.7 photo-patternable low-κ material is based on the SiCOH-based material platform and has sub-200 nm resolution capability with 248 nm optical lithography. Cu/photo-patternable low-κ dual-damascene integration at 45 nm node BEOL fatwire levels has been demonstrated with very high electrical yields using the current manufacturing infrastructure. The photo-patternable low-κ concept is, therefore, a promising technology for highly efficient semiconductor Cu BEOL manufacturing.

  1. Time-Resolved 4-Dimensional Computed-Tomography Angiography Can Correctly Identify Carotid Pseudo-Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felix C; Datta, Mineesh; Choi, Philip M C

    2016-04-01

    Correct identification of symptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis from low-grade or total chronic occlusion is critical for patient selection for urgent carotid endarterectomy. Carotid pseudo-occlusion is a flow-related artifact on noninvasive imaging that can lead to an incorrect diagnosis of total internal carotid artery occlusion, thereby denying an eligible patient for appropriate surgical treatment. We present an 82-year-old man with a symptomatic critical internal carotid artery, which was detected on time-resolved 4-dimensional computed-tomography angiography, whereas single-phase computed-tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasonography suggested apparent occlusion. To our understanding, the use of 4-dimensional computed-tomography angiography to identify carotid pseudo-occlusion has not been previously reported.

  2. Pattern of social interactions after group integration: a possibility to keep stallions in group.

    PubMed

    Briefer Freymond, Sabrina; Briefer, Elodie F; Von Niederhäusern, Rudolf; Bachmann, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Horses are often kept in individual stables, rather than in outdoor groups, despite such housing system fulfilling many of their welfare needs, such as the access to social partners. Keeping domestic stallions in outdoor groups would mimic bachelor bands that are found in the wild. Unfortunately, the high level of aggression that unfamiliar stallions display when they first encounter each other discourages owners from keeping them in groups. However, this level of aggression is likely to be particularly important only during group integration, when the dominance hierarchy is being established, whereas relatively low aggression rates have been observed among stable feral bachelor bands. We investigated the possibility of housing breeding stallions owned by the Swiss National Stud in groups on a large pasture (5 stallions in 2009 and 8 stallions in 2010). We studied the pattern of agonistic, ritual and affiliative interactions after group integration (17-23 days), and the factors influencing these interactions (time after group integration, dominance rank, age or experience of group housing). We found that stallions displayed generally more ritual than agonistic and than affiliative interactions. The frequency of agonistic and ritual interactions decreased quickly within the first three to four days. The frequency of affiliative interactions increased slowly with time before decreasing after 9-14 days. A stable hierarchy could be measured after 2-3 months. The highest-ranking males had less ritual interactions than the lowest-ranking. Males had also less agonistic, ritual and affiliative interactions if they had already been housed in a group the previous year. Therefore, we found that breeding stallions could be housed together on a large pasture, because the frequency of agonistic interactions decreased quickly and remained at a minimal level from the fourth day following group integration. This housing system could potentially increase horse welfare and reduce

  3. Pattern of Social Interactions after Group Integration: A Possibility to Keep Stallions in Group

    PubMed Central

    Niederhäusern, Rudolf Von; Bachmann, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Horses are often kept in individual stables, rather than in outdoor groups, despite such housing system fulfilling many of their welfare needs, such as the access to social partners. Keeping domestic stallions in outdoor groups would mimic bachelor bands that are found in the wild. Unfortunately, the high level of aggression that unfamiliar stallions display when they first encounter each other discourages owners from keeping them in groups. However, this level of aggression is likely to be particularly important only during group integration, when the dominance hierarchy is being established, whereas relatively low aggression rates have been observed among stable feral bachelor bands. We investigated the possibility of housing breeding stallions owned by the Swiss National Stud in groups on a large pasture (5 stallions in 2009 and 8 stallions in 2010). We studied the pattern of agonistic, ritual and affiliative interactions after group integration (17–23 days), and the factors influencing these interactions (time after group integration, dominance rank, age or experience of group housing). We found that stallions displayed generally more ritual than agonistic and than affiliative interactions. The frequency of agonistic and ritual interactions decreased quickly within the first three to four days. The frequency of affiliative interactions increased slowly with time before decreasing after 9–14 days. A stable hierarchy could be measured after 2–3 months. The highest-ranking males had less ritual interactions than the lowest-ranking. Males had also less agonistic, ritual and affiliative interactions if they had already been housed in a group the previous year. Therefore, we found that breeding stallions could be housed together on a large pasture, because the frequency of agonistic interactions decreased quickly and remained at a minimal level from the fourth day following group integration. This housing system could potentially increase horse welfare and

  4. Integrated memristor-MOS (M2) sensor for basic pattern matching applications.

    PubMed

    Kavehei, Omid; Cho, Kyoung-Rok; Lee, Sang-Jin; Al-Sarawi, Said; Eshraghian, Kamran; Abbott, Derek

    2013-05-01

    This paper introduces an integrated sensor circuit based on an analog Memristor-MOS (M2) pattern matching building block that calculates the similarity/dissimilarity between two analog values. A new approach for a pulse-width modulation pixel image sensor compatible with the memristive-MOS matching structure is introduced allowing direct comparison between incoming and stored images. The pulsed-width encoded information from the pixels is forwarded to a matching circuitry that provides an anti-Gaussian-like comparison between the states of memristors. The non-volatile and multi-state memory characteristics of memristor, together with the related ability to be programmed at any one of the intermediate states between logic '1' and logic '0' brings us closer to the implementation of bio-machines that can eventually emulate human-like sensory functions. PMID:23858918

  5. Visual Inquiry Toolkit – An Integrated Approach for Exploring and Interpreting Space-Time, Multivariate Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; MacEachren, Alan M.; Guo, Diansheng

    2011-01-01

    While many datasets carry geographic and temporal references, our ability to analyze these datasets lags behind our ability to collect them because of the challenges posed by both data complexity and scalability issues. This study develops a visual analytics approach that integrates human knowledge and judgments with visual, computational, and cartographic methods to support the application of visual analytics to relatively large spatio-temporal, multivariate datasets. Specifically, a variety of methods are employed for data clustering, pattern searching, information visualization and synthesis. By combining both human and machine strengths, this approach has a better chance to discover novel, relevant and potentially useful information that is difficult to detect by any method used in isolation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by applying the Visual Inquiry Toolkit we developed to analysis of a dataset containing geographically referenced, time-varying and multivariate data for U.S. technology industries. PMID:26566543

  6. Integrated memristor-MOS (M2) sensor for basic pattern matching applications.

    PubMed

    Kavehei, Omid; Cho, Kyoung-Rok; Lee, Sang-Jin; Al-Sarawi, Said; Eshraghian, Kamran; Abbott, Derek

    2013-05-01

    This paper introduces an integrated sensor circuit based on an analog Memristor-MOS (M2) pattern matching building block that calculates the similarity/dissimilarity between two analog values. A new approach for a pulse-width modulation pixel image sensor compatible with the memristive-MOS matching structure is introduced allowing direct comparison between incoming and stored images. The pulsed-width encoded information from the pixels is forwarded to a matching circuitry that provides an anti-Gaussian-like comparison between the states of memristors. The non-volatile and multi-state memory characteristics of memristor, together with the related ability to be programmed at any one of the intermediate states between logic '1' and logic '0' brings us closer to the implementation of bio-machines that can eventually emulate human-like sensory functions.

  7. Integration considerations for 130-nm device patterning using ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Levinson, Harry J.; Yang, Chih-Yuh; Pangrle, Suzette K.; Schefske, Jeff A.; Kent, Eric

    2000-07-01

    With the delivery of ful field ArF steppers and scanners to the leading edge IC manufacturers in 1999 for process development work, the industry is poised to implement ArF lithography in volume production in a few years from now. The introduction of ArF lithography in large volume deice manufacturing will be at the 130-nm technology node, with a k1-factor of roughly 0.4. This will represent the first time in the history of the semiconductor industry when the critical feature size of first generation devices for a given technology node is significantly smaller than the lithographic wavelength used in the patterning. Accordingly, there are a number of integration issues that must be resolved to ensure the successful implement of this technology. Such issues include antireflection coatings issues like reflectivity control and thickness, and the tradeoffs between using organic and inorganic ARCs; resist material issues like optical absorption, feature profile, CD uniformity and line edge roughness; and etch issues like resist loss, line edge roughening, endcap pullback, etc. For instance, one of the major problems with most currently available 193-nm resists is their high optical absorption at the exposure wavelength. This necessitates the use of significantly thinner 193-nm resist films than have been the case in earlier lithographic regimes, but etch considerations preclude this option as these materials do not have bey good etch stability. A balance between absorption and etch requirements must therefore be struck to ensure the successful implementation of this lithography. The above outlined integration issues involved in striking this balance are the subject of this paper, and they will be presented from a patterning perspective. Our exposures are made with ASML/900 full field scanner.

  8. Associative memory of phase-coded spatiotemporal patterns in leaky Integrate and Fire networks.

    PubMed

    Scarpetta, Silvia; Giacco, Ferdinando

    2013-04-01

    We study the collective dynamics of a Leaky Integrate and Fire network in which precise relative phase relationship of spikes among neurons are stored, as attractors of the dynamics, and selectively replayed at different time scales. Using an STDP-based learning process, we store in the connectivity several phase-coded spike patterns, and we find that, depending on the excitability of the network, different working regimes are possible, with transient or persistent replay activity induced by a brief signal. We introduce an order parameter to evaluate the similarity between stored and recalled phase-coded pattern, and measure the storage capacity. Modulation of spiking thresholds during replay changes the frequency of the collective oscillation or the number of spikes per cycle, keeping preserved the phases relationship. This allows a coding scheme in which phase, rate and frequency are dissociable. Robustness with respect to noise and heterogeneity of neurons parameters is studied, showing that, since dynamics is a retrieval process, neurons preserve stable precise phase relationship among units, keeping a unique frequency of oscillation, even in noisy conditions and with heterogeneity of internal parameters of the units. PMID:23053861

  9. Phenotypic integration between antipredator behavior and camouflage pattern in juvenile sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sin-Yeon; Velando, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Predation is a strong selective force that promotes the evolution of antipredator behaviors and camouflage in prey animals. However, the independent evolution of single traits cannot explain how observed phenotypic variations of these traits are maintained within populations. We studied genetic and phenotypic correlations between antipredator behaviors (shoaling and risk-taking) and morphology traits (pigmentation and size) in juvenile three-spined sticklebacks by using pedigree-based quantitative genetic analysis to test phenotypic integration (or complex phenotype) as an evolutionary response to predation risk. Individuals with strongly melanized (i.e., camouflaged) phenotype and genotype were less sociable to conspecifics, but bolder during foraging under predation risk. Individuals with faster growing phenotype and genotype were bolder, and those with lager eyes were more fearful. These phenotypic integrations were not confounded with correlated plastic responses to predation risk because the phenotypes were measured in naïve fish born in the laboratory, but originated from a natural population with predation pressure. Consistent selection for particular combinations of traits under predation pressure or pleiotropic genes might influence the maintenance of the genetic (co)variations and polymorphism in melanin color, growth trajectory, and behavior patterns. PMID:25572122

  10. Application of pattern recognition tools for classifying acute coronary syndrome: an integrated medical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The classification of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), using artificial intelligence (AI), has recently drawn the attention of the medical researchers. Using this approach, patients with myocardial infarction can be differentiated from those with unstable angina. The present study aims to develop an integrated model, based on the feature selection and classification, for the automatic classification of ACS. Methods A dataset containing medical records of 809 patients suspected to suffer from ACS was used. For each subject, 266 clinical factors were collected. At first, a feature selection was performed based on interviews with 20 cardiologists; thereby 40 seminal features for classifying ACS were selected. Next, a feature selection algorithm was also applied to detect a subset of the features with the best classification accuracy. As a result, the feature numbers considerably reduced to only seven. Lastly, based on the seven selected features, eight various common pattern recognition tools for classification of ACS were used. Results The performance of the aforementioned classifiers was compared based on their accuracy computed from their confusion matrices. Among these methods, the multi-layer perceptron showed the best performance with the 83.2% accuracy. Conclusion The results reveal that an integrated AI-based feature selection and classification approach is an effective method for the early and accurate classification of ACS and ultimately a timely diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:24044669

  11. Groundwater flow pattern and related environmental phenomena in complex geologic setting based on integrated model construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ádám; Havril, Tímea; Simon, Szilvia; Galsa, Attila; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Müller, Imre; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater flow, driven, controlled and determined by topography, geology and climate, is responsible for several natural surface manifestations and affected by anthropogenic processes. Therefore, flowing groundwater can be regarded as an environmental agent. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow could reveal the flow pattern and explain the observed features. In complex geologic framework, where the geologic-hydrogeologic knowledge is limited, the groundwater flow model could not be constructed based solely on borehole data, but geophysical information could aid the model building. The integrated model construction was presented via the case study of the Tihany Peninsula, Hungary, with the aims of understanding the background and occurrence of groundwater-related environmental phenomena, such as wetlands, surface water-groundwater interaction, slope instability, and revealing the potential effect of anthropogenic activity and climate change. The hydrogeologic model was prepared on the basis of the compiled archive geophysical database and the results of recently performed geophysical measurements complemented with geologic-hydrogeologic data. Derivation of different electrostratigraphic units, revealing fracturing and detecting tectonic elements was achieved by systematically combined electromagnetic geophysical methods. The deduced information can be used as model input for groundwater flow simulation concerning hydrostratigraphy, geometry and boundary conditions. The results of numerical modelling were interpreted on the basis of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and validated by field mapping of groundwater-related phenomena. The 3D model clarified the hydraulic behaviour of the formations, revealed the subsurface hydraulic connection between groundwater and wetlands and displayed the groundwater discharge pattern, as well. The position of wetlands, their vegetation type, discharge features and induced landslides were explained as

  12. Sensory processing patterns predict the integration of information held in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Matthew X; Stevenson, Ryan A; Wilson, Kristin E; Ouslis, Natasha E; Barense, Morgan D; Cant, Jonathan S; Ferber, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Given the limited resources of visual working memory, multiple items may be remembered as an averaged group or ensemble. As a result, local information may be ill-defined, but these ensemble representations provide accurate diagnostics of the natural world by combining gist information with item-level information held in visual working memory. Some neurodevelopmental disorders are characterized by sensory processing profiles that predispose individuals to avoid or seek-out sensory stimulation, fundamentally altering their perceptual experience. Here, we report such processing styles will affect the computation of ensemble statistics in the general population. We identified stable adult sensory processing patterns to demonstrate that individuals with low sensory thresholds who show a greater proclivity to engage in active response strategies to prevent sensory overstimulation are less likely to integrate mean size information across a set of similar items and are therefore more likely to be biased away from the mean size representation of an ensemble display. We therefore propose the study of ensemble processing should extend beyond the statistics of the display, and should also consider the statistics of the observer. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Integrated Analysis of Alzheimer's Disease and Schizophrenia Dataset Revealed Different Expression Pattern in Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Xing; Dai, Shao-Xing; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and schizophrenia (SZ) are both accompanied by impaired learning and memory functions. This study aims to explore the expression profiles of learning or memory genes between AD and SZ. We downloaded 10 AD and 10 SZ datasets from GEO-NCBI for integrated analysis. These datasets were processed using RMA algorithm and a global renormalization for all studies. Then Empirical Bayes algorithm was used to find the differentially expressed genes between patients and controls. The results showed that most of the differentially expressed genes were related to AD whereas the gene expression profile was little affected in the SZ. Furthermore, in the aspects of the number of differentially expressed genes, the fold change and the brain region, there was a great difference in the expression of learning or memory related genes between AD and SZ. In AD, the CALB1, GABRA5, and TAC1 were significantly downregulated in whole brain, frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and hippocampus. However, in SZ, only two genes CRHBP and CX3CR1 were downregulated in hippocampus, and other brain regions were not affected. The effect of these genes on learning or memory impairment has been widely studied. It was suggested that these genes may play a crucial role in AD or SZ pathogenesis. The different gene expression patterns between AD and SZ on learning and memory functions in different brain regions revealed in our study may help to understand the different mechanism between two diseases. PMID:26890750

  14. Podoplanin and CLEC-2 drive cerebrovascular patterning and integrity during development

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kate L.; Finney, Brenda A.; Deppermann, Carsten; Hägerling, René; Gazit, Salomé L.; Frampton, Jon; Buckley, Christopher; Camerer, Eric; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Mice with a constitutive or platelet-specific deletion of the C-type-lectin-like receptor (CLEC-2) exhibit hemorrhaging in the brain at mid-gestation. We sought to investigate the basis of this defect, hypothesizing that it is mediated by the loss of CLEC-2 activation by its endogenous ligand, podoplanin, which is expressed on the developing neural tube. To induce deletion of podoplanin at the 2-cell stage, we generated a podoplaninfl/fl mouse crossed to a PGK-Cre mouse. Using 3-dimensional light-sheet microscopy, we observed cerebral vessels were tortuous and aberrantly patterned at embryonic (E) day 10.5 in podoplanin- and CLEC-2-deficient mice, preceding the formation of large hemorrhages throughout the fore-, mid-, and hindbrain by E11.5. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy revealed defective pericyte recruitment and misconnections between the endothelium of developing blood vessels and surrounding pericytes and neuro-epithelial cells. Nestin-Cre-driven deletion of podoplanin on neural progenitors also caused widespread cerebral hemorrhaging. Hemorrhaging was also seen in the ventricles of embryos deficient in the platelet integrin subunit glycoprotein IIb or in embryos in which platelet α-granule and dense granule secretion is abolished. We propose a novel role for podoplanin on the neuro-epithelium, which interacts with CLEC-2 on platelets, mediating platelet adhesion, aggregation, and secretion to guide the maturation and integrity of the developing vasculature and prevent hemorrhage. PMID:25908104

  15. Scaling Limits and Critical Behaviour of the 4 -Dimensional n -Component |\\varphi |^4 Spin Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2014-08-01

    We consider the n -component |\\varphi |^4 spin model on {mathbb {Z}}^4 , for all n ge 1 , with small coupling constant. We prove that the susceptibility has a logarithmic correction to mean field scaling, with exponent n+2/n+8 for the logarithm. We also analyse the asymptotic behaviour of the pressure as the critical point is approached, and prove that the specific heat has fractional logarithmic scaling for n =1,2,3 ; double logarithmic scaling for n=4 ; and is bounded when n>4 . In addition, for the model defined on the 4 -dimensional discrete torus, we prove that the scaling limit as the critical point is approached is a multiple of a Gaussian free field on the continuum torus, whereas, in the subcritical regime, the scaling limit is Gaussian white noise with intensity given by the susceptibility. The proofs are based on a rigorous renormalisation group method in the spirit of Wilson, developed in a companion series of papers to study the 4-dimensional weakly self-avoiding walk, and adapted here to the |\\varphi |^4 model.

  16. Recovery patterns, histological observations and genetic integrity in Malus shoot tips cryopreserved using droplet vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A droplet-vitrification procedure is described for cryopreservation of Malus shoot tips. Survival patterns, recovery types, histological observations, and genetic integrity were compared for Malus shoot tips cryopreserved using this droplet-vitrification procedure and an encapsulation-dehydration pr...

  17. Integration and optimization of the DUV ALTA pattern generation system using a CAR process with the Tetra photomask etch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxbaum, Alex H.; Fuller, Scott E.; Montgomery, Warren; Ungureit, Michael E.

    2003-12-01

    Etec Systems, the Mask Business Group of Applied Materials, is in a unique position within the mask making industry - Etec has the opportunity to integrate individual parts of the overall mask manufacturing process to provide a more complete solution. Here we present the integration of the DUV ALTA laser pattern generator and the TetraTM photomask etch system with advanced CAR resist processes. Dry etch process effects of flow, overetch, and oxygen content (in a Cl2/O2/He plasma) are discussed for the baseline POR resist in terms of etch rate, selectivity, etch bias, CD uniformity and micro-loading; the optimized etch process space was then implemented for advanced CAR resists. Iso-dense bias, football pattern loading and other pattern transfer results influencing mask manufactureability are also presented. Within the synthesis and optimization of the pattern generation system, process, and dry etch sub 13 nm range process uniformity has been achieved. The integrated ALTA / Tetra / Advanced-CAR solution set is characterized on both Etec test patterns and customer demonstrations.

  18. Evaluation of 4-dimensional Computed Tomography to 4-dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, Salim; Weiss, Elisabeth; Jan, Nuzhat; Roman, Nicholas; Sleeman, William C.; Fatyga, Mirek; Christensen, Gary E.; Zhang, Cheng; Murphy, Martin J.; Lu, Jun; Keall, Paul; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image-guided adaptive radiation therapy with 4-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods and Materials: One planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and 7 weekly 4DCBCT scans were acquired for 10 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients. The gross tumor volume was delineated by a physician in all 4D images. End-of-inspiration phase planning 4DFBCT was registered to the corresponding phase in weekly 4DCBCT images for day-to-day registrations. For phase-to-phase registration, the end-of-inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to the end-of-expiration phase. Two DIR algorithms—small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) and Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS)—were evaluated. Physician-delineated contours were compared with the warped contours by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric distance, and false-positive and false-negative indices. The DIR results are compared with rigid registration of tumor. Results: For day-to-day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.75 ± 0.09 with SICLE, 0.70 ± 0.12 with DEMONS, 0.66 ± 0.12 with rigid-tumor registration, and 0.60 ± 0.14 with rigid-bone registration. Results were comparable to intraobserver variability calculated from phase-to-phase registrations as well as measured interobserver variation for 1 patient. SICLE and DEMONS, when compared with rigid-bone (4.1 mm) and rigid-tumor (3.6 mm) registration, respectively reduced the average symmetric distance to 2.6 and 3.3 mm. On average, SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC to 0.80 and 0.79, respectively, compared with rigid-tumor (0.78) registrations for 4DCBCT phase-to-phase registrations. Conclusions: Deformable image registration achieved comparable accuracy to reported interobserver delineation variability and higher accuracy than rigid-tumor registration. Deformable image registration

  19. Temperature and Energy of 4-Dimensional Axisymmetric Black Holes from Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Li-Chun; Wu, Yue-Qin; Li, Huai-Fan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the temperature and energy on holographic screens for 4-dimensional axisymmetric black holes with the entropic force idea proposed by Verlinde. According to the principle of thermal equilibrium, the location of holographic screen outside the axisymmetric black hole horizon is not a equivalent radius surface. The location of isothermal holographic screen outside the axisymmetric black hole horizon is obtained. Using the equipartition rule, we derive the correction expression of energy of isothermal holographic screen. When holographic screens are far away the black hole horizon, the entropic force of charged rotating particles can be expressed as Newton's law of gravity. When the screen crosses the event horizon, the temperature of the screen agrees with the Hawking temperature and the entropic force gives rise to the surface gravity for both of the black holes.

  20. Patterns of EEG coherence, power, and contingent negative variation characterize the integration of transcendental and waking states.

    PubMed

    Travis, Fred; Tecce, Joe; Arenander, Alarik; Wallace, R Keith

    2002-11-01

    Long-term meditating subjects report that transcendental experiences (TE), which first occurred during their Transcendental Meditation (TM) practice, now subjectively co-exist with waking and sleeping states. To investigate neurophysiological correlates of this integrated state, we recorded EEG in these subjects and in two comparison groups during simple and choice contingent negative variation (CNV) tasks. In individuals reporting the integration of the transcendent with waking and sleeping, CNV was higher in simple but lower in choice trials, and 6-12 Hz EEG amplitude and broadband frontal EEG coherence were higher during choice trials. Increased EEG amplitude and coherence, characteristic of TM practice, appeared to become a stable EEG trait during CNV tasks in these subjects. These significant EEG differences may underlie the inverse patterns in CNV amplitude seen between groups. An 'Integration Scale,' constructed from these cortical measures, may characterize the transformation in brain dynamics corresponding to increasing integration of the transcendent with waking and sleeping.

  1. Determination of Internal Target Volume for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer by Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaojian; Lu, Haijun; Tai, An; Johnstone, Candice; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To determine an efficient strategy for the generation of the internal target volume (ITV) for radiation treatment planning for esophageal cancer using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: 4DCT sets acquired for 20 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analyzed. Each of the 4DCT sets was binned into 10 respiratory phases. For each patient, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4DCT set at each phase. Various strategies to derive ITV were explored, including the volume from the maximum intensity projection (MIP; ITV{sub M}IP), unions of the GTVs from selected multiple phases ITV2 (0% and 50% phases), ITV3 (ITV2 plus 80%), and ITV4 (ITV3 plus 60%), as well as the volumes expanded from ITV2 and ITV3 with a uniform margin. These ITVs were compared to ITV10 (the union of the GTVs for all 10 phases) and the differences were measured with the overlap ratio (OR) and relative volume ratio (RVR) relative to ITV10 (ITVx/ITV10). Results: For all patients studied, the average GTV from a single phase was 84.9% of ITV10. The average ORs were 91.2%, 91.3%, 94.5%, and 96.4% for ITV{sub M}IP, ITV2, ITV3, and ITV4, respectively. Low ORs were associated with irregular breathing patterns. ITV3s plus 1 mm uniform margins (ITV3+1) led to an average OR of 98.1% and an average RVR of 106.4%. Conclusions: The ITV generated directly from MIP underestimates the range of the respiration motion for esophageal cancer. The ITV generated from 3 phases (ITV3) may be used for regular breathers, whereas the ITV generated from 4 phases (ITV4) or ITV3 plus a 1-mm uniform margin may be applied for irregular breathers.

  2. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  3. [Impact of the Infrared Monitor Signal Pattern on Accuracy of Target Imaging in 4-dimensional Cone-beam Computed Tomography].

    PubMed

    Usui, Keisuke; Hara, Naoya; Isobe, Akira; Inoue, Tatsuya; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Sasai, Keisuke; Ogawa, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    To realize the high precision radiotherapy, localized radiation field of the moving target is very important, and visualization of a temporal location of the target can help to improve the accuracy of the target localization. However, conditions of the breathing and the patient's own motion differ from the situation of the treatment planning. Therefore, positions of the tumor are affected by these changes. In this study, we implemented a method to reconstruct target motions obtained with the 4D CBCT using the sorted projection data according to the phase and displacement of the extracorporeal infrared monitor signal, and evaluated the proposed method with a moving phantom. In this method, motion cycles and positions of the marker were sorted to reconstruct the image, and evaluated the image quality affected by changes in the cycle, phase, and positions of the marker. As a result, we realized the visualization of the moving target using the sorted projection data according to the infrared monitor signal. This method was based on the projection binning, in which the signal of the infrared monitor was surrogate of the tumor motion. Thus, further major efforts are needed to ensure the accuracy of the infrared monitor signal.

  4. Design strategy for integrating DSA via patterning in sub-7 nm interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageorgos, Ioannis; Ryckaert, Julien; Tung, Maryann C.; Wong, H.-S. P.; Gronheid, Roel; Bekaert, Joost; Karageorgos, Evangelos; Croes, Kris; Vandenberghe, Geert; Stucchi, Michele; Dehaene, Wim

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, major advancements have been made in the directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs). As a result, the insertion of DSA for IC fabrication is being actively considered for the sub-7nm nodes. At these nodes the DSA technology could alleviate costs for multiple patterning and limit the number of litho masks that would be required per metal layer. One of the most straightforward approaches for DSA implementation would be for via patterning through templated DSA, where hole patterns are readily accessible through templated confinement of cylindrical phase BCP materials. Our in-house studies show that decomposition of via layers in realistic circuits below the 7nm node would require at least many multi-patterning steps (or colors), using 193nm immersion lithography. Even the use of EUV might require double patterning in these dimensions, since the minimum via distance would be smaller than EUV resolution. The grouping of vias through templated DSA can resolve local conflicts in high density areas. This way, the number of required colors can be significantly reduced. For the implementation of this approach, a DSA-aware mask decomposition is required. In this paper, our design approach for DSA via patterning in sub-7nm nodes is discussed. We propose options to expand the list of DSA-compatible via patterns (DSA letters) and we define matching cost formulas for the optimal DSA-aware layout decomposition. The flowchart of our proposed approach tool is presented.

  5. Design and implementation of integrated solid wastes management pattern in industrial zones, case study of Shahroud, Iran

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to design and implementation of integrated solid wastes management pattern in Shahroud industrial zone, evaluates the results and determine possible performance problems. This cross - sectional study was carried out for 4 years in Shahroud industrial zone and the implementation process included:1- Qualitative and quantitative analysis of all solid waste generated in the city, 2- determine the current state of solid waste management in the zone and to identify programs conducted, 3- Design and implementation of integrated solid wastes management pattern including design and implementation of training programs, laws, penalties and incentives and explain and implement programs for all factories and 4- The monitoring of the implementation process and determine the results. Results Annually, 1,728 tons of solid wastes generated in the town including 1603 tons of industrial wastes and 125 tons of municipal wastes. By implementing this pattern, the two separated systems of collection and recycling of domestic and industrial wastes was launched in this zone. Also consistent with the goals, the amount of solid wastes generated and disposed in 2009 was 51.5 and 28.6 kg per 100 million Rials production, respectively. Conclusion Results showed that implementation of pattern of separated collection, training programs, capacity building, providing technical services, completing chain of industries and strengthening the cooperation between industrial estate management and industrial units could greatly reduce the waste management problems. PMID:24423020

  6. Integrated reactive ion etching to pattern cross-linked hydrophilic polymer structures for protein immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Strickland, Aaron D.; Kim, Il; Malliaras, George G.; Batt, Carl A.

    2007-04-01

    Patterning of cross-linked hydrophilic polymer features using reactive ion etching (RIE) capable of covalently immobilizing proteins has been achieved. Projection photolithography was used to pattern photoresist to create micromolds. Vapor phase molecular self-assembly of polymerizable monolayer in molds allowed covalent binding of hydrogel on surface during free-radical polymerization. Excess hydrogel blanket film was consumed with oxygen RIE resulting into hydrogel pattern of 1μm size aligned to prefabricated silicon oxide structures. Proteins were finally coupled through their primary amine groups selectively to acid functionalized hydrogel features through stable amide linkages using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide.

  7. Integrated Remote Sensing and Wavelet Analyses for Screening Short-term Teleconnection Patterns in Northeast America

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies have a demonstrable effect on vegetation dynamics and precipitation patterns throughout the continental U.S. SST variations have been correlated with greenness (vegetation densities) and precipitation via ocean-atmospheric interactio...

  8. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  9. 4-dimensional model of carbon dioxide seasonal deposition on Mars based on HEND/Odyssey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.

    The carbon dioxide seasonal cycle has been studied on Mars using data from High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard mission Mars Odyssey. The primary task of the HEND experiment is measuring of martian neutron albedo from orbit around Mars. The neutron spectroscopy can be easily used not only for detection of subsurface water bearing layers but also for following up time history of CO2 deposit seasonally condensed from atmosphere down to martian surface. Condensation and sublimation of atmospheric CO2 is happened in vicinity of Mars near polar regions (>60N and >60S) which are characterized by presence of enormous amount of subsurface water ice (20-80% by mass). Atmospheric CO2 deposit covered the surface by relative thick layer with thickness 30-100cm. It effectively hides underlying water ice layers from orbit observations causing significant changes of neutron leakage flux. Detection of these changes allows to deconvolve CO2 cycle time history and estimate column density (g/cm2) and mass (kg) of CO2 deposit. Observations of particular regions on south and north may be combined in 4-dimensional model of CO2 deposit showing how its thickness/mass changes at different regions with time. The primary goal of this study is to present our estimations of CO2 condensed mass on north and south as function of martian seasons during entire martian year. We also add comparison between estimation from HEND data and predictions of AMES climate models.

  10. A novel hybrid patterning technique for micro and nanochannel fabrication by integrating hot embossing and inverse UV photolithography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhifu; Cheng, E; Zou, Helin

    2014-05-01

    Nanofluidic devices with micro and nanostructures are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present fabrication methods suffer from a low pattern transfer quality during the simultaneous embossing of the microscale and nanoscale patterns into a thermoplastic polymer due to insufficient polymer flow. In this work, a novel hybrid patterning technique, integrating hot embossing and inverse ultraviolet (UV) photolithography, is developed to fabricate micro and nanochannels with a high replication precision of the SU-8 layer. The influence of embossing temperature and time on the replication precision was investigated. The effect of UV lithography parameters on the micro and nanochannel pattern was analyzed. To improve the SU-8 bonding strength, the influence of the O2 plasma treatment parameters on the water contact angles of the exposed and unexposed SU-8 layer were studied. A complete SU-8 nanofluidic chip with 130 nm wide and 150 nm deep nanochannels was successfully fabricated with a replication precision of 99.5%. Compared with most of the current processing methods, this fabrication technique has great potential due to its low cost and high pattern transfer quality of the SU-8 micro and nanochannels.

  11. Integrative analysis of lung development-cancer expression associations reveals the roles of signatures with inverse expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Chunquan; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Shang, Desi; Yang, Xinmiao; Han, Junwei; Sun, Zeguo; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have focused on exploring the associations between organ development and malignant tumors; however, the clinical relevance of the development signatures was inadequately addressed in lung cancer. In this study, we explored the associations between lung development and lung cancer progression by analyzing a total of two development and seven cancer datasets. We identified representative expression patterns (continuously up- and down-regulated) from development and cancer profiles, and inverse pattern associations were observed at both the gene and functional levels. Furthermore, we dissected the biological processes dominating the associations, and found that proliferation and immunity were respectively involved in the two inverse development-cancer expression patterns. Through sub-pathway analysis of the signatures with inverse expression patterns, we finally identified a 13-gene risk signature from the cell cycle sub-pathway, and evaluated its predictive performance for lung cancer patient clinical outcome using independent cohorts. Our findings indicated that the integrative analysis of development and cancer expression patterns provided a framework for identifying effective molecular signatures for clinical utility.

  12. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups. PMID:26177535

  13. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups. PMID:26177535

  14. Manipulation of micro-particles through optical interference patterns generated by integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Chung; Chen, Te-Chang; Yang, Yao-Tsu; Huang, Chieh-Yang; Shen, Da-Wei; Chen, Ya-Tzu; Lee, Ming-Chang M

    2013-03-21

    Micro-particle transport and switch governed by guided-wave optical interference are presented. The optical interference, occurring in a directional coupler and a multi-mode interferometer made by inverted rib waveguides, results in a specific evanescent field dependent on wavelength. Through a detailed theoretical analysis, the field of induced optical force shows a correlative pattern associated with the evanescent field. Experimental results demonstrate that 10 μm polystyrene beads are propelled with a trajectory subject to the interference pattern accordingly. By launching different wavelengths, the polystyrene beads can be delivered to different output waveguide ports. Massive micro-particle manipulation is applicable.

  15. Profiling the substitution pattern of xyloglucan derivatives by integrated enzymatic hydrolysis, hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Kisonen, Victor; Willför, Stefan; Xu, Chunlin; Vilaplana, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Plant polysaccharides constitute arguably the most complex family of biomacromolecules in terms of the stereochemistry and regiochemistry of their intramolecular linkages. The chemical modification of such polysaccharides introduces an additional level of complexity for structural determinations. We have developed an integrated analytical procedure combining selective enzymatic hydrolysis, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), and mass spectrometry (MS) to describe the substitution pattern of xyloglucan (XyG) and its chemo-enzymatic derivatives (cationic, anionic, and benzyl aminated). Enzymatic hydrolysis of XyG derivatives by a xyloglucan-specific endoglucanase (XEG) generates oligosaccharides amenable for mass spectrometric identification with distinct structures, based on enzymatic substrate recognition and hydrolytic pattern. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS) and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) offer qualitative mass profiling of the chemical derivatives. Separation and identification of the complex oligosaccharide profiles released by enzymatic hydrolysis is achieved by hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS). Further fragmentation by tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) in positive mode enables the structural sequencing of modified XyG oligosaccharides and the identification of the substituent position without further derivatisation. This integrated approach can be used to obtain semi-quantitative information of the substitution pattern of hemicellulose derivatives, with fundamental implications for their modification mechanisms and performance. PMID:27524300

  16. An integrative approach for modeling and simulation of heterocyst pattern formation in cyanobacteria filaments.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Falo, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model. PMID:25816286

  17. Centrally patterned rhythmic activity integrated by a peripheral circuit linking multiple oscillators.

    PubMed

    Jellies, John; Kueh, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    The central pattern generator for heartbeat in the medicinal leech, Hirudo generates rhythmic activity conveyed by heart excitor motor neurons in segments 3-18 to coordinate the bilateral tubular hearts and side vessels. We focus on behavior and the influence of previously un-described peripheral nerve circuitry. Extracellular recordings from the valve junction (VJ) where afferent vessels join the heart tube were combined with optical recording of contractions. Action potential bursts at VJs occurred in advance of heart tube and afferent vessel contractions. Transections of nerves were performed to reduce the output of the central pattern generator reaching the heart tube. Muscle contractions persisted but with a less regular rhythm despite normal central pattern generator rhythmicity. With no connections between the central pattern generator and heart tube, a much slower rhythm became manifest. Heart excitor neuron recordings showed that peripheral activity might contribute to the disruption of centrally entrained contractions. In the model presented, peripheral activity would normally modify the activity actually reaching the muscle. We also propose that the fundamental efferent unit is not a single heart excitor neuron, but rather is a functionally defined unit of about three adjacent motor neurons and the peripheral assembly of coupled peripheral oscillators.

  18. Accessibility patterns and community integration among previously homeless adults: a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dara V; Gopal, Sucharita; Helfrich, Christine A

    2014-11-01

    Although a desired rehabilitation goal, research continues to document that community integration significantly lags behind housing stability success rates for people of a variety of ages who used to be homeless. While accessibility to resources is an environmental factor that may promote or impede integration activity, there has been little empirical investigation into the impact of proximity of community features on resource use and integration. Using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach, the current study examines how accessibility or proximity to community features in Boston, United States related to the types of locations used and the size of an individual's "activity space," or spatial presence in the community. Significant findings include an inverse relationship between activity space size and proximity to the number and type of community features in one's immediate area. Specifically, larger activity spaces were associated with neighborhoods with less community features, and smaller activity spaces corresponded with greater availability of resources within one's immediate area. Activity space size also varied, however, based on proximity to different types of resources, namely transportation and health care. Greater community function, or the ability to navigate and use community resources, was associated with better accessibility and feeling part of the community. Finally, proximity to a greater number of individual identified preferred community features was associated with better social integration. The current study suggests the ongoing challenges of successful integration may vary not just based on accessibility to, but relative importance of, specific community features and affinity with one's surroundings. Community integration researchers and housing providers may need to attend to the meaning attached to resources, not just presence or use in the community.

  19. Hydrologic Sensitivity to Climate Change of Precipitation Patterns via Integrated Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, B. K.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the impacts of climate change on water resources is critical to ecosystems and to human well being. Most previous work has involved coupling hydrologic models to global and regional climate models. While there is impressive agreement among climate models on temperature increase, unfortunately precipitation estimates present "wildly diverging pictures" [Schiermeier, Nature 2010]. In the IPCC AR4 WG1 SPM on page 16 one sees for most of the mid-latitudes that more than 1/3 of the models disagree with the majority on even the sign of any precipitation change and significant agreement of 90% is typically only found in the polar reaches [Oreskes, Philosophy of Science 2010]. Since precipitation is the primary driver of hydrology, therefore coupling of these climate models to hydrology can only yield projections that are highly uncertain. This work instead offers basic insight into the connections between all sorts of climate possibilities and hydrology. The observational climate inputs to GSFLOW basin models have been tweaked to compute the sensitivity of hydrological components to change in many climate variables. Impacts were evaluated from individual changes from a precipitation pattern such as total amounts, event intensities, event rates, durations, frequencies, and season lengths. By considering each precipitation pattern separately, we separate the confounding factors when all are changing at the same time and can then observe the impact of each factor by itself. Sensitivities have been computed for some 20 hydrologic flow components, such as runoff, infiltration, soil ET, interflow, recharge, baseflow, and streamflows. This hydrological system is highly non-linear and so a single set of computed hydrologic sensitivity values only describes the hydrologic partitioning for a single environmental condition. For a more complete picture, hydrological sensitivities have been computed over wide ranges of climate variables, such as a warmer to a colder

  20. Persistence or loss of preimposed methylation patterns and de novo methylation of foreign DNA integrated in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lettmann, C; Schmitz, B; Doerfler, W

    1991-01-01

    In cultured mammalian cells, foreign DNA can be integrated into the host genome. Foreign DNA is frequently de novo methylated in specific patterns with successive cell generations. The sequence-specific methylation of promoter sequences in integrated foreign DNA is associated with the long-term inactivation of eukaryotic genes. We have now extended these experiments to studies on transgenic mice. As in previous work, a construct (pAd2E2AL-CAT) has been used which consists of the late E2A promoter of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) DNA fused to the prokaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). This construct has been integrated in the non-methylated in the 5'-CCGG-3' premethylated form in the genomes of transgenic mice. DNA from various organs was analyzed by HpaII/MspI cleavage to assess the state of methylation in 5'-CCGG-3' sequences. The results demonstrate that the transgenic construct is in general stable. Non-methylated constructs have remained partly non-methylated for four generations or can become de novo methylated at all or most 5'-CCGG-3' sequences in the founder animal. Preimposed patterns of 5'-CCGG-3' methylation have been preserved for up to four generations beyond the founder animal. In the testes of two different founder animals and two F1 males, the transgenic DNA has become demethylated by an unknown mechanism. In all other organs, the transgenic DNA preserves the preimposed 5'-CCGG-3' methylation pattern. In the experiments performed so far we have not observed differences in the transmission of methylation patterns depending on whether the transgene has been maternally or paternally inherited. The 5'-CCGG-3' premethylated transgene does not catalyze CAT activity in several organs, except in one example of the testes of an animal in which the transgenic construct has become demethylated. In contrast, when the nonmethylated construct has been integrated and remained largely non-methylated, CAT activity has been detected in extracts from

  1. Transformation of haploid Datura innoxia protoplasts and analysis of the plasmid integration pattern in regenerated transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Rogge, T; Meixner, M; Srivastava, V; Guha-Mukherjee, S; Schieder, O

    1993-05-01

    We developed a highly efficient transformation protocol for the PEG-mediated direct transfer of plasmid DNA into protoplasts of haploid Datura innoxia. Vectors harbouring a neomycin phosphotransferase II gene or a hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene under the control of different promoters were used in the transformation experiments. Various amounts of plasmid DNA were applied without any carrier DNA to show the direct influence of the plasmid DNA concentration on the transformation efficiency. Approximately 95% of the selected calli were regenerated to plants; 20% of them remained haploid. Total DNA of different transgenic plants was analysed with regard to the integration pattern of the plasmid DNA. Plants carrying only one or two copies of the vector DNA were observed as well as individuals with multi-copy integration (up to ten or more copies).

  2. Patterns of movement for youth within an integrated continuum of residential services

    PubMed Central

    Huefner, Jonathan C.; James, Sigrid; Ringle, Jay; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns of movement for youth receiving services within a continuum of intensive and restrictive residentially-based programs. Data were collected for 701 completed episodes of care within a three-program residential continuum of care over a 5 year period, and examined time within program, movement between programs, in-program disruptive behavior, and discharge status. Results showed that most youth either remained in a stable placement in the least restrictive of the programs, or followed a pattern of placements that systematically moved them from more restrictive to less restrictive settings. Of note, transitions from more restrictive to less restrictive programs correspond to deescalating levels of problem behavior; and over 80% of the youth were stepped down to either family-based or independent living situations at the time of departure. Findings support the notion that a continuum of intensive residential services can serve the needs of youth with significant emotional and behavioral needs. PMID:24273361

  3. From spinal central pattern generators to cortical network: integrated BCI for walking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Duvinage, M; De Saedeleer, C; Castermans, T; Bengoetxea, A; Petieau, M; Seetharaman, K; Hoellinger, T; Dan, B; Dutoit, T; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y

    2012-01-01

    Success in locomotor rehabilitation programs can be improved with the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Although a wealth of research has demonstrated that locomotion is largely controlled by spinal mechanisms, the brain is of utmost importance in monitoring locomotor patterns and therefore contains information regarding central pattern generation functioning. In addition, there is also a tight coordination between the upper and lower limbs, which can also be useful in controlling locomotion. The current paper critically investigates different approaches that are applicable to this field: the use of electroencephalogram (EEG), upper limb electromyogram (EMG), or a hybrid of the two neurophysiological signals to control assistive exoskeletons used in locomotion based on programmable central pattern generators (PCPGs) or dynamic recurrent neural networks (DRNNs). Plantar surface tactile stimulation devices combined with virtual reality may provide the sensation of walking while in a supine position for use of training brain signals generated during locomotion. These methods may exploit mechanisms of brain plasticity and assist in the neurorehabilitation of gait in a variety of clinical conditions, including stroke, spinal trauma, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy.

  4. Ontology Design Patterns: Bridging the Gap Between Local Semantic Use Cases and Large-Scale, Long-Term Data Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Adam; Arko, Robert; Krisnadhi, Adila; Hitzler, Pascal; Janowicz, Krzysztof; Chandler, Cyndy; Narock, Tom; Cheatham, Michelle; Schildhauer, Mark; Jones, Matt; Raymond, Lisa; Mickle, Audrey; Finin, Tim; Fils, Doug; Carbotte, Suzanne; Lehnert, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Integrating datasets for new use cases is one of the common drivers for adopting semantic web technologies. Even though linked data principles enables this type of activity over time, the task of reconciling new ontological commitments for newer use cases can be daunting. This situation was faced by the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) as it sought to integrate its existing linked data with other data repositories to address newer scientific use cases as a partner in the GeoLink Project. To achieve a successful integration with other GeoLink partners, BCO-DMO's metadata would need to be described using the new ontologies developed by the GeoLink partners - a situation that could impact semantic inferencing, pre-existing software and external users of BCO-DMO's linked data. This presentation describes the process of how GeoLink is bridging the gap between local, pre-existing ontologies to achieve scientific metadata integration for all its partners through the use of ontology design patterns. GeoLink, an NSF EarthCube Building Block, brings together experts from the geosciences, computer science, and library science in an effort to improve discovery and reuse of data and knowledge. Its participating repositories include content from field expeditions, laboratory analyses, journal publications, conference presentations, theses/reports, and funding awards that span scientific studies from marine geology to marine ecology and biogeochemistry to paleoclimatology. GeoLink's outcomes include a set of reusable ontology design patterns (ODPs) that describe core geoscience concepts, a network of Linked Data published by participating repositories using those ODPs, and tools to facilitate discovery of related content in multiple repositories.

  5. Influences of upland and riparian land use patterns on stream biotic integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, C.D.; Young, J.A.; Villella, R.; Lemarie, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    We explored land use, fish assemblage structure, and stream habitat associations in 20 catchments in Opequon Creek watershed, West Virginia. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of urban and agriculture land use on stream biotic integrity, and to evaluate the spatial scale (i.e., whole-catchment vs riparian buffer) at which land use effects were most pronounced. We found that index of biological integrity (IBI) scores were strongly associated with extent of urban land use in individual catchments. Sites that received ratings of poor or very poor based on IBI scores had > 7% of urban land use in their respective catchments. Habitat correlations suggested that urban land use disrupted flow regime, reduced water quality, and altered stream channels. In contrast, we found no meaningful relationship between agricultural land use and IBI at either whole-catchment or riparian scales despite strong correlations between percent agriculture and several important stream habitat measures, including nitrate concentrations, proportion of fine sediments in riffles, and the abundance of fish cover. We also found that variation in gradient (channel slope) influenced responses of fish assemblages to land use. Urban land use was more disruptive to biological integrity in catchments with steeper channel slopes. Based on comparisons of our results in the topographically diverse Opequon Creek watershed with results from watersheds in flatter terrains, we hypothesize that the potential for riparian forests to mitigate effects of deleterious land uses in upland portions of the watershed is inversely related to gradient.

  6. SU-E-T-267: Proton Pencil Beam Scanning for Mediastinal Lymphoma: 4-Dimensional Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C; Plastaras, J; Tochner, Z; Hill-Kayser, C; Hahn, S; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) for the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma. Methods: A group of 6 patients were planned using an anterior field with PBS. Spots with ∼5 mm σ were used for all patients, while large spots (∼10 mm σ) were employed for patients with motion perpendicular to the beam (≥5 mm). We considered volumetric repainting such that, in each fraction, the same field would be delivered twice. Four-dimensional dose was calculated on initial and verification 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans (2—3) based on respiratory trace and beam delivery sequence. This was implemented by binning the spots into separate plans on each 4D-CT phase respectively. Four starting phases were sampled for each painting and 4 energy switching times (0.5 s, 1 s, 3 s, and 5 s) were tested, resulting in 2560 dose distributions for the cohort. Plan robustness was measured for target and critical structures in terms of the percentage difference between delivered dose and planned dose. Results: For 5 of the 6 patients, the ITV (internal target volume) D98% was degraded by <3% (standard deviations ∼ 0.1%) when averaged over the whole course (up to 5% per fraction). Deviations of mean lung dose, heart maximum dose, and cord maximum dose were within 5% of prescribed dose. For one patient with motion perpendicular to the beam (up to 5 mm), the degradation of ITV D98% was 9% over the whole course (12% per fraction), which was mitigated to 1% (3% per fraction) by employing large spots and repainting. No significant difference in coverage was observed for different energy switching times. Conclusion: This feasibility study demonstrates that, for mediastinal lymphoma, the PBS plan robustness can be maintained during delivery when target motion is measured and volumetric repainting and/or large spots are employed. This work was supported by Ion Beam Application.

  7. Management of Respiration-Induced Motion With 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) for Pancreas Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, An; Liang, Zhiwen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to quantify respiration-induced organ motions for pancreatic cancer patients and to explore strategies to account for these motions. Methods and Materials: Both 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans were acquired sequentially for 15 pancreatic cancer patients, including 10 randomly selected patients and 5 patients selected from a subgroup of patients with large tumor respiratory motions. 3DCTs were fused with 2 sets of 4DCT data at the end of exhale phase (50%) and the end of inhale phase (0%). The target was delineated on the 50% and 0% phase CT sets, and the organs at risk were drawn on the 3DCT. These contours were populated to the CT sets at other respiratory phases based on deformable image registration. Internal target volumes (ITV) were generated by tracing the target contours of all phases (ITV{sub 10}), 3 phases of 0%, 20% and 50% (ITV{sub 3}), and 2 phases of 0% and 50% (ITV{sub 2}). ITVs generated from phase images were compared using percentage of volume overlap, Dice coefficient, geometric centers, and average surface distance. Results: Volume variations of pancreas, kidneys, and liver as a function of respiratory phases were small (<5%) during respiration. For the 10 randomly selected patients, peak-to-peak amplitudes of liver, left kidney, right kidney, and the target along the superior-inferior (SI) direction were 7.9 ± 3.2 mm, 7.1 ± 3.1 mm, 5.7 ± 3.2 mm, and 5.9 ± 2.8 mm, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap and Dice coefficient were 92% ± 1% and 96% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 2} and 96% ± 1% and 98% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3}, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3} was 93.6 ± 1.1 for patients with tumor motion >8 mm. Conclusions: Appropriate motion management strategies are proposed for radiation treatment planning of pancreatic tumors based on magnitudes of tumor

  8. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  9. Exploring the Genetic Patterns of Complex Diseases via the Integrative Genome-Wide Approach.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ben; Yang, Can; Liu, Jiming; Cai, Zhipeng; Wan, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs), which assay more than a million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in thousands of individuals, have been widely used to identify genetic risk variants for complex diseases. However, most of the variants that have been identified contribute relatively small increments of risk and only explain a small portion of the genetic variation in complex diseases. This is the so-called missing heritability problem. Evidence has indicated that many complex diseases are genetically related, meaning these diseases share common genetic risk variants. Therefore, exploring the genetic correlations across multiple related studies could be a promising strategy for removing spurious associations and identifying underlying genetic risk variants, and thereby uncovering the mystery of missing heritability in complex diseases. We present a general and robust method to identify genetic patterns from multiple large-scale genomic datasets. We treat the summary statistics as a matrix and demonstrate that genetic patterns will form a low-rank matrix plus a sparse component. Hence, we formulate the problem as a matrix recovering problem, where we aim to discover risk variants shared by multiple diseases/traits and those for each individual disease/trait. We propose a convex formulation for matrix recovery and an efficient algorithm to solve the problem. We demonstrate the advantages of our method using both synthesized datasets and real datasets. The experimental results show that our method can successfully reconstruct both the shared and the individual genetic patterns from summary statistics and achieve comparable performances compared with alternative methods under a wide range of scenarios. The MATLAB code is available at: http://www.comp.hkbu.edu.hk/~xwan/iga.zip. PMID:27295639

  10. Blood microcirculation monitoring by use of spatial filtering of time-integrated speckle patterns: potentialities to improve the depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, Dmitry A.; Misnin, Alexander B.

    2001-06-01

    Statistical analysis of images of time-integrated dynamic speckle patterns is considered as the tool for diagnostics and imaging of in vivo tissue dynamics such as blood microcirculation in superficial layers of human tissues and organs. Basic approach for blood microcirculation monitoring using the contrast analysis of time-averaged speckle images is known as LASCA (Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis) technique. This paper presents the modified version of LASCA, which is based on application of the localized probe light source and the spatial filtration of analyzed speckle pattern in the object plane. Being compared with classical LASCA technique, this method has the certain disadvantage as the necessity of scanning procedure to provide the reconstruction of maps of blood microcirculation parameters, but it gives the additional possibilities for the analysis of depth distributions of these parameters. Theoretical background for the depth-resolved analysis of blood microcirculation parameters on the basis of the concept of effective optical path distributions for multiply scattered probe light is considered. The effect of non-zero residual contrast even in the case of large integration times is also discussed.

  11. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Xing; Hossain, Md. Faruk; Park, Jae Yeong

    2016-09-01

    For this paper, a fully integrated and highly miniaturized electrochemical sensor was designed and fabricated on a silicon substrate. A solvothermal-assisted reduced graphene oxide named “TRGO” was then successfully micro-patterned using a lithography technique, followed by the electrodeposition of bismuth (Bi) on the surface of the micro-patterned TRGO for the electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for the detection of cadmium and lead-heavy metal ions in an acetic-acid buffered solution using the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) technique. The fabricated micro-sensor exhibited a linear detection range of 1.0 μg L‑1 to 120.0 μg L‑1 for both of the metal ions, and detection limits of 0.4 μg L‑1 and 1.0 μg L‑1 were recorded for the lead and cadmium (S/N = 3), respectively. Drinking-water samples were used for the practical assessment of the fabricated micro-sensor, and it showed an acceptable detection performance regarding the metal ions.

  12. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xing; Hossain, Md Faruk; Park, Jae Yeong

    2016-09-12

    For this paper, a fully integrated and highly miniaturized electrochemical sensor was designed and fabricated on a silicon substrate. A solvothermal-assisted reduced graphene oxide named "TRGO" was then successfully micro-patterned using a lithography technique, followed by the electrodeposition of bismuth (Bi) on the surface of the micro-patterned TRGO for the electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for the detection of cadmium and lead-heavy metal ions in an acetic-acid buffered solution using the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) technique. The fabricated micro-sensor exhibited a linear detection range of 1.0 μg L(-1) to 120.0 μg L(-1) for both of the metal ions, and detection limits of 0.4 μg L(-1) and 1.0 μg L(-1) were recorded for the lead and cadmium (S/N = 3), respectively. Drinking-water samples were used for the practical assessment of the fabricated micro-sensor, and it showed an acceptable detection performance regarding the metal ions.

  13. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Xing; Hossain, Md. Faruk; Park, Jae Yeong

    2016-01-01

    For this paper, a fully integrated and highly miniaturized electrochemical sensor was designed and fabricated on a silicon substrate. A solvothermal-assisted reduced graphene oxide named “TRGO” was then successfully micro-patterned using a lithography technique, followed by the electrodeposition of bismuth (Bi) on the surface of the micro-patterned TRGO for the electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for the detection of cadmium and lead-heavy metal ions in an acetic-acid buffered solution using the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) technique. The fabricated micro-sensor exhibited a linear detection range of 1.0 μg L−1 to 120.0 μg L−1 for both of the metal ions, and detection limits of 0.4 μg L−1 and 1.0 μg L−1 were recorded for the lead and cadmium (S/N = 3), respectively. Drinking-water samples were used for the practical assessment of the fabricated micro-sensor, and it showed an acceptable detection performance regarding the metal ions. PMID:27616629

  14. A Fully Integrated and Miniaturized Heavy-metal-detection Sensor Based on Micro-patterned Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xing; Hossain, Md Faruk; Park, Jae Yeong

    2016-01-01

    For this paper, a fully integrated and highly miniaturized electrochemical sensor was designed and fabricated on a silicon substrate. A solvothermal-assisted reduced graphene oxide named "TRGO" was then successfully micro-patterned using a lithography technique, followed by the electrodeposition of bismuth (Bi) on the surface of the micro-patterned TRGO for the electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. The fully integrated electrochemical micro-sensor was then measured and evaluated for the detection of cadmium and lead-heavy metal ions in an acetic-acid buffered solution using the square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) technique. The fabricated micro-sensor exhibited a linear detection range of 1.0 μg L(-1) to 120.0 μg L(-1) for both of the metal ions, and detection limits of 0.4 μg L(-1) and 1.0 μg L(-1) were recorded for the lead and cadmium (S/N = 3), respectively. Drinking-water samples were used for the practical assessment of the fabricated micro-sensor, and it showed an acceptable detection performance regarding the metal ions. PMID:27616629

  15. Lithographically patterned magnetic calorimeter X-ray detectors with integrated SQUID readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, B. L.; Irwin, K. D.; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P.; Ullom, J. N.; Huber, M. E.

    2004-03-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and performance of a fully lithographically patterned magnetic microcalorimeter X-ray detector. The detector is fabricated on the same chip as a low-noise SQUID that measures the change in the magnetic sensor film's magnetization as the film is heated by absorbed X-rays. Our proof-of-principle detectors use a 100 μm×100 μm-2 μm paramagnetic Au:Er film coupled to a low-noise on-chip SQUID via a meandering superconducting pickup loop that also provides the magnetic field bias to the film. Absorption of 6 keV X-rays in the film causes heating on the order of 1 mK with a decay time of 1 ms or less, the fastest reported using a magnetic calorimeter. However, the resolution is currently poor due to poor Au:Er film properties and non-optimized coupling to the SQUID. We describe the design and fabrication of this device and present measurements of the heat capacity, decay time constant and effective thermal conductance of the microcalorimeter as a function of temperature. Because the SQUID and calorimeter are lithographically patterned on the same substrate, this technology can be readily applied to the fabrication of arrays of multiplexed magnetic microcalorimeter detectors.

  16. Enhancement of deep-UV patterning integrity and process control using antireflective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Bruce W.; Jones, Susan K.; Peters, Charles R.; Koester, David A.; Barnes, Gregg A.; Flaim, Tony D.; Lamb, James E., III

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the results of experiments performed using wafers having either phosphorous (POCl3) doped polysilicon, LPCVD silicon nitride, LPCVD silicon dioxide, LPCVD silicon dioxide over POCl3 doped polysilicon, evaporated aluminum, or CVD tungsten thin films, patterned with and without the use of deep UV anti-reflective coatings. The parameters of reflectance control, critical dimension control, focus/exposure latitude, and resist profiles were studied for line/space gratings and contacts. Incorporation of anti-reflective coatings was shown to be very beneficial for reducing the impact of highly reflective substrates, grainy surfaces, and topographical features encountered during deep UV imaging. The ARC process is independent of the substrate's reflectivity, allowing the same exposure dose for all substrates studied. Without ARC the optimum exposure dose for the same substrates varied over a 35% range. ARC also provides slightly increased exposure and focus windows for some substrates, and was shown to significantly improve linewidth control on rough substrates such as POCl3 doped polysilicon and tungsten. The grainy surface of the tungsten wafers was nearly impossible to pattern without the use of an anti-reflective coating; without ARC, there was virtually no process window (approximately 2 mJ/cm2) for retention of 0.50 micrometers features.

  17. Salivary gland determination in Drosophila: a salivary-specific, fork head enhancer integrates spatial pattern and allows fork head autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, B; Bagri, A; Beckendorf, S K

    2001-09-01

    In the early Drosophila embryo, a system of coordinates is laid down by segmentation genes and dorsoventral patterning genes. Subsequently, these coordinates must be interpreted to define particular tissues and organs. To begin understanding this process for a single organ, we have studied how one of the first salivary gland genes, fork head (fkh), is turned on in the primordium of this organ, the salivary placode. A placode-specific fkh enhancer was identified 10 kb from the coding sequence. Dissection of this enhancer showed that the apparently homogeneous placode is actually composed of at least four overlapping domains. These domains appear to be developmentally important because they predict the order of salivary invagination, are evolutionarily conserved, and are regulated by patterning genes that are important for salivary development. Three dorsoventral domains are defined by EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling, while stripes located at the anterior and posterior edges of the placode depend on wingless signaling. Further analysis identified sites in the enhancer that respond either positively to the primary activator of salivary gland genes, SEX COMBS REDUCED (SCR), or negatively to EGFR signaling. These results show that fkh integrates spatial pattern directly, without reference to other early salivary gland genes. In addition, we identified a binding site for FKH protein that appears to act in fkh autoregulation, keeping the gene active after SCR has disappeared from the placode. This autoregulation may explain how the salivary gland maintains its identity after the organ is established. Although the fkh enhancer integrates information needed to define the salivary placode, and although fkh mutants have the most extreme effects on salivary gland development thus far described, we argue that fkh is not a selector gene for salivary gland development and that there is no master, salivary gland selector gene. Instead, several genes independently sense spatial

  18. Integrated remote sensing and wavelet analyses for screening short-term teleconnection patterns in northeast America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullon, Lee; Chang, Ni-Bin; Jeffrey Yang, Y.; Weiss, Jason

    2013-08-01

    Global sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies have an inherent effect on vegetation dynamics and precipitation processes throughout the continental United States (U.S.). SST variations have been correlated with precipitation patterns via ocean-atmospheric interactions known as climate teleconnections. Prior research has demonstrated that understanding excitation mechanisms of the teleconnection patterns can be instrumental for climate prediction across a wide region at sub-continental scales, yet these studies tend to have large uncertainties in estimates by assuming linearity when examining teleconnection signals. The co-existence of non-stationary and nonlinear signals embedded in SST anomalies makes the identification of the teleconnection patterns difficult at the local scale. This study explores the short-term (10-year) frequencies (i.e., interannual and seasonal ) embedded in the non-stationary teleconnection signals between SST at the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans and the responses of terrestrial greenness and precipitation along multiple pristine sites in northeast U.S., including (1) White Mountain National Forest - Pemigewasset Wilderness, (2) Green Mountain National Forest - Lye Brook Wilderness, and (3) Adirondack State Park - Siamese Ponds Wilderness. Each site was selected to avoid anthropogenic influences that may otherwise mask climate teleconnection signals. Lagged pixel-wise linear teleconnection analysis based on remote sensing satellite images across anomalous global SST datasets found significant correlation regions between SST and these terrestrial sites. With the aid of wavelet analyses including continuous wavelet transform, cross-wavelet analysis, and wavelet coherency analysis, nonlinear and non-stationary signals exhibit salient covariations at biennial and triennial frequencies between terrestrial responses and SST anomalies across oceanic regions in agreement with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic

  19. The DebugIT core ontology: semantic integration of antibiotics resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    Schober, Daniel; Boeker, Martin; Bullenkamp, Jessica; Huszka, Csaba; Depraetere, Kristof; Teodoro, Douglas; Nadah, Nadia; Choquet, Remy; Daniel, Christel; Schulz, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics resistance development poses a significant problem in today's hospital care. Massive amounts of clinical data are being collected and stored in proprietary and unconnected systems in heterogeneous format. The DebugIT EU project promises to make this data geographically and semantically interoperable for case-based knowledge analysis approaches aiming at the discovery of patterns that help to align antibiotics treatment schemes. The semantic glue for this endeavor is DCO, an application ontology that enables data miners to query distributed clinical information systems in a semantically rich and content driven manner. DCO will hence serve as the core component of the interoperability platform for the DebugIT project. Here we present DCO and an approach thet uses the semantic web query language SPARQL to bind and ontologically query hospital database content using DCO and information model mediators. We provide a query example that indicates that ontological querying over heterogeneous information models is feasible via SPARQL construct- and resource mapping queries.

  20. Ecological hierarchies and self-organisation - Pattern analysis, modelling and process integration across scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reuter, H.; Jopp, F.; Blanco-Moreno, J. M.; Damgaard, C.; Matsinos, Y.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    A continuing discussion in applied and theoretical ecology focuses on the relationship of different organisational levels and on how ecological systems interact across scales. We address principal approaches to cope with complex across-level issues in ecology by applying elements of hierarchy theory and the theory of complex adaptive systems. A top-down approach, often characterised by the use of statistical techniques, can be applied to analyse large-scale dynamics and identify constraints exerted on lower levels. Current developments are illustrated with examples from the analysis of within-community spatial patterns and large-scale vegetation patterns. A bottom-up approach allows one to elucidate how interactions of individuals shape dynamics at higher levels in a self-organisation process; e.g., population development and community composition. This may be facilitated by various modelling tools, which provide the distinction between focal levels and resulting properties. For instance, resilience in grassland communities has been analysed with a cellular automaton approach, and the driving forces in rodent population oscillations have been identified with an agent-based model. Both modelling tools illustrate the principles of analysing higher level processes by representing the interactions of basic components.The focus of most ecological investigations on either top-down or bottom-up approaches may not be appropriate, if strong cross-scale relationships predominate. Here, we propose an 'across-scale-approach', closely interweaving the inherent potentials of both approaches. This combination of analytical and synthesising approaches will enable ecologists to establish a more coherent access to cross-level interactions in ecological systems. ?? 2010 Gesellschaft f??r ??kologie.

  1. Optimized holographic femtosecond laser patterning method towards rapid integration of high-quality functional devices in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenchu; Hu, Yanlei; Du, Wenqiang; Wu, Peichao; Rao, Shenglong; Cai, Ze; Lao, Zhaoxin; Xu, Bing; Ni, Jincheng; Li, Jiawen; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Dong; Chu, Jiaru; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Rapid integration of high-quality functional devices in microchannels is in highly demand for miniature lab-on-a-chip applications. This paper demonstrates the embellishment of existing microfluidic devices with integrated micropatterns via femtosecond laser MRAF-based holographic patterning (MHP) microfabrication, which proves two-photon polymerization (TPP) based on spatial light modulator (SLM) to be a rapid and powerful technology for chip functionalization. Optimized mixed region amplitude freedom (MRAF) algorithm has been used to generate high-quality shaped focus field. Base on the optimized parameters, a single-exposure approach is developed to fabricate 200 × 200 μm microstructure arrays in less than 240 ms. Moreover, microtraps, QR code and letters are integrated into a microdevice by the advanced method for particles capture and device identification. These results indicate that such a holographic laser embellishment of microfluidic devices is simple, flexible and easy to access, which has great potential in lab-on-a-chip applications of biological culture, chemical analyses and optofluidic devices.

  2. Optimized holographic femtosecond laser patterning method towards rapid integration of high-quality functional devices in microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenchu; Hu, Yanlei; Du, Wenqiang; Wu, Peichao; Rao, Shenglong; Cai, Ze; Lao, Zhaoxin; Xu, Bing; Ni, Jincheng; Li, Jiawen; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Dong; Chu, Jiaru; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Rapid integration of high-quality functional devices in microchannels is in highly demand for miniature lab-on-a-chip applications. This paper demonstrates the embellishment of existing microfluidic devices with integrated micropatterns via femtosecond laser MRAF-based holographic patterning (MHP) microfabrication, which proves two-photon polymerization (TPP) based on spatial light modulator (SLM) to be a rapid and powerful technology for chip functionalization. Optimized mixed region amplitude freedom (MRAF) algorithm has been used to generate high-quality shaped focus field. Base on the optimized parameters, a single-exposure approach is developed to fabricate 200 × 200 μm microstructure arrays in less than 240 ms. Moreover, microtraps, QR code and letters are integrated into a microdevice by the advanced method for particles capture and device identification. These results indicate that such a holographic laser embellishment of microfluidic devices is simple, flexible and easy to access, which has great potential in lab-on-a-chip applications of biological culture, chemical analyses and optofluidic devices. PMID:27619690

  3. Optimized holographic femtosecond laser patterning method towards rapid integration of high-quality functional devices in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenchu; Hu, Yanlei; Du, Wenqiang; Wu, Peichao; Rao, Shenglong; Cai, Ze; Lao, Zhaoxin; Xu, Bing; Ni, Jincheng; Li, Jiawen; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Dong; Chu, Jiaru; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Rapid integration of high-quality functional devices in microchannels is in highly demand for miniature lab-on-a-chip applications. This paper demonstrates the embellishment of existing microfluidic devices with integrated micropatterns via femtosecond laser MRAF-based holographic patterning (MHP) microfabrication, which proves two-photon polymerization (TPP) based on spatial light modulator (SLM) to be a rapid and powerful technology for chip functionalization. Optimized mixed region amplitude freedom (MRAF) algorithm has been used to generate high-quality shaped focus field. Base on the optimized parameters, a single-exposure approach is developed to fabricate 200 × 200 μm microstructure arrays in less than 240 ms. Moreover, microtraps, QR code and letters are integrated into a microdevice by the advanced method for particles capture and device identification. These results indicate that such a holographic laser embellishment of microfluidic devices is simple, flexible and easy to access, which has great potential in lab-on-a-chip applications of biological culture, chemical analyses and optofluidic devices. PMID:27619690

  4. The Self-Made Puzzle: Integrating Self-Assembly and Pattern Formation Under Non-Random Genetic Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doursat, René

    On the one hand, research in self-assembling systems, whether natural or artificial, has traditionally focused on pre-existing components endowed with fixed shapes. Biological development, by contrast, dynamically creates new cells that acquire selective adhesion properties through differentiation induced by their neighborhood. On the other hand, pattern formation phenomena are generally construed as orderly states of activity on top of a continuous 2-D or 3-D substrate. Yet, again, the spontaneous patterning of an organism into domains of gene expression arises within a multicellular medium in perpetual expansion and reshaping. Finally, both phenomena are often thought in terms of stochastic events, whether mixed components that randomly collide in self-assembly, or spots and stripes that occur unpredictably from instabilities in pattern formation. Here too, these notions need significant revision if they are to be extended and applied to embryogenesis. Cells are not randomly mixed but pre-positioned where cell division occurs. Genetic identity domains are not randomly distributed but highly regulated in number and position. In this work, I present a computational model of program-mable and reproducible artificial morphogenesis that integrates self-assembly and pattern formation under the control of a nonrandom gene regulatory network. The specialized properties of cells (division, adhesion, migration) are determined by the gene expression domains to which they belong, while at the same time these domains further expand and segment into subdomains due to the self-assembly of specialized cells. Through this model, I also promote a new discipline, embryomorphic engineering to solve the paradox of "meta-designing" decentralized, autonomous systems.

  5. Integration of nanoimprint lithography with block copolymer directed self-assembly for fabrication of a sub-20 nm template for bit-patterned media.

    PubMed

    Yang, XiaoMin; Xiao, Shuaigang; Hu, Wei; Hwu, Justin; van de Veerdonk, René; Wago, Koichi; Lee, Kim; Kuo, David

    2014-10-01

    We propose a novel strategy to integrate the nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique with directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymer (BCP) for providing a robust, high-yield, and low-defect-density path to sub-20 nm dense patterning. Through this new NIL-DSA method, UV nanoimprint resist is used as the DSA copolymer pre-pattern to expedite the DSA process. This method was successfully used to fabricate a 1.0 Td in(-2) servo-integrated nanoimprint template for bit-patterned media (BPM) application. The fabricated template was used for UV-cure NIL on a 2.5-inch disk. The imprint resist patterns were further transferred into the underlying CoCrPt magnetic layer through a carbon hard mask using ion beam etching. The successful integration of the NIL technique with the DSA process provides us with a new route to BPM nanofabrication, which includes the following three major advantages: (1) a simpler and faster way to implement DSA for high-density BPM patterning; (2) a novel method for fabricating a high-quality dot pattern template through an iterative imprint-DSA-template procedure; and (3) an uncomplicated integration scheme for implementing non-periodic servo features with BCP patterns, thus accelerating the transition of moving the DSA technique from laboratory research to the BPM manufacturing environment.

  6. Integration of nanoimprint lithography with block copolymer directed self-assembly for fabrication of a sub-20 nm template for bit-patterned media.

    PubMed

    Yang, XiaoMin; Xiao, Shuaigang; Hu, Wei; Hwu, Justin; van de Veerdonk, René; Wago, Koichi; Lee, Kim; Kuo, David

    2014-10-01

    We propose a novel strategy to integrate the nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique with directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymer (BCP) for providing a robust, high-yield, and low-defect-density path to sub-20 nm dense patterning. Through this new NIL-DSA method, UV nanoimprint resist is used as the DSA copolymer pre-pattern to expedite the DSA process. This method was successfully used to fabricate a 1.0 Td in(-2) servo-integrated nanoimprint template for bit-patterned media (BPM) application. The fabricated template was used for UV-cure NIL on a 2.5-inch disk. The imprint resist patterns were further transferred into the underlying CoCrPt magnetic layer through a carbon hard mask using ion beam etching. The successful integration of the NIL technique with the DSA process provides us with a new route to BPM nanofabrication, which includes the following three major advantages: (1) a simpler and faster way to implement DSA for high-density BPM patterning; (2) a novel method for fabricating a high-quality dot pattern template through an iterative imprint-DSA-template procedure; and (3) an uncomplicated integration scheme for implementing non-periodic servo features with BCP patterns, thus accelerating the transition of moving the DSA technique from laboratory research to the BPM manufacturing environment. PMID:25189432

  7. Integrating molecular, phenotypic and environmental data to elucidate patterns of crocodile hybridization in Belize

    PubMed Central

    Hekkala, Evon R.; Platt, Steven G.; Thorbjarnarson, John B.; Rainwater, Thomas R.; Tessler, Michael; Cunningham, Seth W.; Twomey, Christopher; Amato, George

    2015-01-01

    The genus Crocodylus comprises 12 currently recognized species, many of which can be difficult to differentiate phenotypically. Interspecific hybridization among crocodiles is known to occur in captivity and has been documented between some species in the wild. The identification of hybrid individuals is of importance for management and monitoring of crocodilians, many of which are Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) listed. In this study, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers were evaluated for their use in confirming a suspected hybrid zone between American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) and Morelet’s crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) populations in southern Belize where individuals and nests exhibiting atypical phenotypic features had previously been observed. Patterns observed in both phenotypic and molecular data indicate possible behavioural and ecological characteristics associated with hybridization events. The results of the combined analyses found that the majority of suspected hybrid samples represent crosses between female C. acutus and male C. moreletii. Phenotypic data could statistically identify hybrids, although morphological overlap between hybrids and C. moreletii reduced reliability of identification based solely on field characters. Ecologically, C. acutus was exclusively found in saline waters, whereas hybrids and C. moreletii were largely absent in these conditions. A hypothesized correlation between unidirectional hybridization and destruction of C. acutus breeding habitats warrants additional research. PMID:26473062

  8. Integrating molecular, phenotypic and environmental data to elucidate patterns of crocodile hybridization in Belize.

    PubMed

    Hekkala, Evon R; Platt, Steven G; Thorbjarnarson, John B; Rainwater, Thomas R; Tessler, Michael; Cunningham, Seth W; Twomey, Christopher; Amato, George

    2015-09-01

    The genus Crocodylus comprises 12 currently recognized species, many of which can be difficult to differentiate phenotypically. Interspecific hybridization among crocodiles is known to occur in captivity and has been documented between some species in the wild. The identification of hybrid individuals is of importance for management and monitoring of crocodilians, many of which are Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) listed. In this study, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers were evaluated for their use in confirming a suspected hybrid zone between American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) and Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) populations in southern Belize where individuals and nests exhibiting atypical phenotypic features had previously been observed. Patterns observed in both phenotypic and molecular data indicate possible behavioural and ecological characteristics associated with hybridization events. The results of the combined analyses found that the majority of suspected hybrid samples represent crosses between female C. acutus and male C. moreletii. Phenotypic data could statistically identify hybrids, although morphological overlap between hybrids and C. moreletii reduced reliability of identification based solely on field characters. Ecologically, C. acutus was exclusively found in saline waters, whereas hybrids and C. moreletii were largely absent in these conditions. A hypothesized correlation between unidirectional hybridization and destruction of C. acutus breeding habitats warrants additional research. PMID:26473062

  9. Influence of Broad Auditory Tuning on Across-Frequency Integration of Speech Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Eric W.; Carson, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to assess whether diminished tolerance for disruptions to across-frequency timing in listeners with hearing impairment can be attributed to broad auditory tuning. Method In 2 experiments in which random assignment was used, sentences were represented as 3 noise bands centered at 530, 1500, and 4243 Hz, which were amplitude modulated by 3 corresponding narrow speech bands. To isolate broad tuning from other influences of hearing impairment, listeners with normal hearing (45 in Experiment 1 and 30 in Experiment 2) were presented with these vocoder stimuli, having carrier band filter slopes of 12, 24, and 192 dB/octave. These speech patterns were presented in synchrony and with between-band asynchronies up to 40 ms. Results Mean intelligibility scores were reduced in conditions of severe, but not moderate, simulated broadening. Although scores fell as asynchrony increased, the steeper drop in performance characteristic of listeners with hearing impairment tested previously was not observed in conditions of simulated broadening. Conclusions The intolerance for small across-frequency asynchronies observed previously does not appear attributable to broad tuning. Instead, the present data suggest that the across-frequency processing mechanism in at least some listeners with hearing impairment might be less robust to this type of degradation. PMID:20689025

  10. The multi-spacer patterning technique: a non-lithographic technique for terascale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Amato, P.; Romano, E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the pioneering paper of Aviram and Ratner it has become progressively clearer and clearer that molecules can perform electrical functions so sophisticated as to mimic the behavior of electronic devices, hence the idea of exploiting them for molecular electronics. The practical exploitation of the electronic properties of molecules for computing (i.e., the transformation of a collection of molecules into a device) is, however, a major problem not yet solved. In the last few years the expertise in molecular design and synthesis combined with (i) the identification of a new structure, the crossbar, able to replace those based on a planar arrangement of field effect transistors, and (ii) the development of sub-lithographic techniques for the definition of a random or ordered planar arrangement of nanometre-sized features, has nonetheless led to consider as realistic the hypothesis that molecular devices might replace silicon-based devices when the basic element of the integrated circuit, the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor, will no longer admit further shrinking. This work is addressed to identify in which ways features (i) and (ii) can be exploited for application in molecular electronics.

  11. Laser trapping and patterning of protein microcrystals: Toward highly integrated protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Matsumura, Satoshi; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Shimo-oka, Ai; Mori, Hajime

    2004-09-01

    Some insect virus infections occlude into a crystalline matrix consisting of a protein named polyhedrin. The shape of the matrix is a cubic polyhedron of the size of a few micrometers. Recently it was shown that these polyhedra could immobilize various functional proteins within them. Therefore, the polyhedron is interesting as an element in a protein chip. In this work, individual polyhedra were arrayed and bonded under a microscope by focused laser beams, with the aim of fabricating a highly integrated protein chip. The polyhedron was trapped and transferred to a suitable position on a polymer substrate by optical trapping with a 1064nmNd3+:YAG (YAG, yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. To bond the polyhedron on the substrate, the polymer surface was mechanically and chemically modified by multiphoton absorption of a 120fs, 800nm femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser, which results in strong adhesion of the polyhedron to the substrate. The arraying and bonding of polyhedra were successful, to a precision of about 1μm, with this procedure. The biological activity of polyhedra after these laser irradiations was confirmed by the fluorescence of green fluorescent protein occluded in the polyhedrin matrix.

  12. HIV Transmission Patterns Among Immigrant Latinos Illuminated by the Integration of Phylogenetic and Migration Data

    PubMed Central

    Hué, Stéphane; Pasquale, Dana; Napravnik, Sonia; Sebastian, Joseph; Miller, William C.; Eron, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Latinos represent a growing proportion of HIV cases in North Carolina (NC). Understanding how immigrants are involved in local HIV transmission is important to guide interventions. We used phylogenetics to characterize Latino involvement in local HIV transmission chains. Transmission clusters were identified from maximum-likelihood phylogenies constructed with HIV pol sequences from 177 Latinos and 1,496 non-Latinos receiving care in NC. Highly supported clusters involving one or more Latinos were characterized. Migration data were obtained from interviews and chart review. Factors associated with cluster membership were identified using log-binomial regression. Most Latinos were male (76%), immigrants (83%), and had HIV-1B (99%). Immigrants were more likely to report heterosexual risk (67% vs. 23%) than U.S.-born Latinos (p < 0.01). We identified 32 clusters that included one or more Latinos; these involved 53 Latinos (30%) and 41 non-Latinos. Immigrant and U.S.-born Latinos were equally likely to be in clusters, but immigrants were more likely to be in clusters with another Latino (78% vs. 29%; p = 0.02). Cluster composition by ethnicity and risk behavior varied by cluster size; larger clusters contained fewer immigrants and more men who have sex with men (MSM). Factors associated with immigrant membership in local transmission clusters included age <30 years [RR 2.34 (95% CI 1.47–3.73)], Mexican origin [RR 2.55 (95% CI 1.29–6.88)], and residing in the United States longer before diagnosis [RR 1.53 (95% CI 1.09–2.15), per 10 years]. While some Latinos immigrate with HIV infection, many immigrants are involved in transmission networks after arrival, particularly MSM. HIV testing and prevention interventions must consider this heterogeneity and may be better targeted by integrating phylogenetic analyses. PMID:26214548

  13. HIV Transmission Patterns Among Immigrant Latinos Illuminated by the Integration of Phylogenetic and Migration Data.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Ann M; Hué, Stéphane; Pasquale, Dana; Napravnik, Sonia; Sebastian, Joseph; Miller, William C; Eron, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    Latinos represent a growing proportion of HIV cases in North Carolina (NC). Understanding how immigrants are involved in local HIV transmission is important to guide interventions. We used phylogenetics to characterize Latino involvement in local HIV transmission chains. Transmission clusters were identified from maximum-likelihood phylogenies constructed with HIV pol sequences from 177 Latinos and 1,496 non-Latinos receiving care in NC. Highly supported clusters involving one or more Latinos were characterized. Migration data were obtained from interviews and chart review. Factors associated with cluster membership were identified using log-binomial regression. Most Latinos were male (76%), immigrants (83%), and had HIV-1B (99%). Immigrants were more likely to report heterosexual risk (67% vs. 23%) than U.S.-born Latinos (p < 0.01). We identified 32 clusters that included one or more Latinos; these involved 53 Latinos (30%) and 41 non-Latinos. Immigrant and U.S.-born Latinos were equally likely to be in clusters, but immigrants were more likely to be in clusters with another Latino (78% vs. 29%; p = 0.02). Cluster composition by ethnicity and risk behavior varied by cluster size; larger clusters contained fewer immigrants and more men who have sex with men (MSM). Factors associated with immigrant membership in local transmission clusters included age <30 years [RR 2.34 (95% CI 1.47-3.73)], Mexican origin [RR 2.55 (95% CI 1.29-6.88)], and residing in the United States longer before diagnosis [RR 1.53 (95% CI 1.09-2.15), per 10 years]. While some Latinos immigrate with HIV infection, many immigrants are involved in transmission networks after arrival, particularly MSM. HIV testing and prevention interventions must consider this heterogeneity and may be better targeted by integrating phylogenetic analyses.

  14. Cryptic Speciation Patterns in Iranian Rock Lizards Uncovered by Integrative Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Faraham; Flecks, Morris; Carretero, Miguel A.; Mozaffari, Omid; Böhme, Wolfgang; Harris, D. James; Freitas, Susana; Rödder, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    While traditionally species recognition has been based solely on morphological differences either typological or quantitative, several newly developed methods can be used for a more objective and integrative approach on species delimitation. This may be especially relevant when dealing with cryptic species or species complexes, where high overall resemblance between species is coupled with comparatively high morphological variation within populations. Rock lizards, genus Darevskia, are such an example, as many of its members offer few diagnostic morphological features. Herein, we use a combination of genetic, morphological and ecological criteria to delimit cryptic species within two species complexes, D. chlorogaster and D. defilippii, both distributed in northern Iran. Our analyses are based on molecular information from two nuclear and two mitochondrial genes, morphological data (15 morphometric, 16 meristic and four categorical characters) and eleven newly calculated spatial environmental predictors. The phylogeny inferred for Darevskia confirmed monophyly of each species complex, with each of them comprising several highly divergent clades, especially when compared to other congeners. We identified seven candidate species within each complex, of which three and four species were supported by Bayesian species delimitation within D. chlorogaster and D. defilippii, respectively. Trained with genetically determined clades, Ecological Niche Modeling provided additional support for these cryptic species. Especially those within the D. defilippii-complex exhibit well-differentiated niches. Due to overall morphological resemblance, in a first approach PCA with mixed variables only showed the separation between the two complexes. However, MANCOVA and subsequent Discriminant Analysis performed separately for both complexes allowed for distinction of the species when sample size was large enough, namely within the D. chlorogaster-complex. In conclusion, the results

  15. Statistical monitoring of spatial patterns of environmental indices for integrated ecosystem assessment: Application to the Bay of Biscay pelagic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, Mathieu; Petitgas, Pierre; Huret, Martin; Struski, Caroline; Léger, Fabien

    2010-10-01

    Monitoring the environment of fish is a key component of the ecosystem approach to fisheries management. Here, we propose a methodology to statistically monitor time series of maps of environmental indices. These maps were derived from a 37-year hindcast of a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The space-time variability in the maps was decomposed using empirical orthogonal functions into time-invariant spatial patterns and time-varying amplitudes for these patterns. A statistical process control chart was then applied to the time series of the amplitudes. In that way, changes were detected with known statistical performance. The monitoring system also specified how long the changes lasted and which years, seasons and zones were affected. Results for all indices were assembled in an integrative dashboard of the detected deviations. For illustration, the procedure was applied to the Bay of Biscay pelagic zone. The selected environmental indices characterized the evolution of hydrological structures such as fronts and river plumes, as well as changes in temperature, water column stratification, horizontal current flow and primary production. A major result was that, in the last decade, sea surface temperature showed repeated significant shifts towards warming, which were largest in the northern half of the Bay, while the spatial extension of river plumes over the shelf alternated between wet and dry years. From 2005, several other indices showed repeated significant deviations: increase in sea bottom temperature, increase in the depth of the pycnocline and changes in coastal currents. The procedure provided an integrated view of ecosystem variability and change for all its components and their spatial organization.

  16. Real-time fMRI pattern decoding and neurofeedback using FRIEND: an FSL-integrated BCI toolbox.

    PubMed

    Sato, João R; Basilio, Rodrigo; Paiva, Fernando F; Garrido, Griselda J; Bramati, Ivanei E; Bado, Patricia; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration that humans can learn to modulate their own brain activity based on feedback of neurophysiological signals opened up exciting opportunities for fundamental and applied neuroscience. Although EEG-based neurofeedback has been long employed both in experimental and clinical investigation, functional MRI (fMRI)-based neurofeedback emerged as a promising method, given its superior spatial resolution and ability to gauge deep cortical and subcortical brain regions. In combination with improved computational approaches, such as pattern recognition analysis (e.g., Support Vector Machines, SVM), fMRI neurofeedback and brain decoding represent key innovations in the field of neuromodulation and functional plasticity. Expansion in this field and its applications critically depend on the existence of freely available, integrated and user-friendly tools for the neuroimaging research community. Here, we introduce FRIEND, a graphic-oriented user-friendly interface package for fMRI neurofeedback and real-time multivoxel pattern decoding. The package integrates routines for image preprocessing in real-time, ROI-based feedback (single-ROI BOLD level and functional connectivity) and brain decoding-based feedback using SVM. FRIEND delivers an intuitive graphic interface with flexible processing pipelines involving optimized procedures embedding widely validated packages, such as FSL and libSVM. In addition, a user-defined visual neurofeedback module allows users to easily design and run fMRI neurofeedback experiments using ROI-based or multivariate classification approaches. FRIEND is open-source and free for non-commercial use. Processing tutorials and extensive documentation are available.

  17. TU-C-17A-03: An Integrated Contour Evaluation Software Tool Using Supervised Pattern Recognition for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Tan, J; Kavanaugh, J; Dolly, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Anastasio, M; Altman, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) contours delineated either manually or semiautomatically require verification before clinical usage. Manual evaluation is very time consuming. A new integrated software tool using supervised pattern contour recognition was thus developed to facilitate this process. Methods: The contouring tool was developed using an object-oriented programming language C# and application programming interfaces, e.g. visualization toolkit (VTK). The C# language served as the tool design basis. The Accord.Net scientific computing libraries were utilized for the required statistical data processing and pattern recognition, while the VTK was used to build and render 3-D mesh models from critical RT structures in real-time and 360° visualization. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for system self-updating geometry variations of normal structures based on physician-approved RT contours as a training dataset. The inhouse design of supervised PCA-based contour recognition method was used for automatically evaluating contour normality/abnormality. The function for reporting the contour evaluation results was implemented by using C# and Windows Form Designer. Results: The software input was RT simulation images and RT structures from commercial clinical treatment planning systems. Several abilities were demonstrated: automatic assessment of RT contours, file loading/saving of various modality medical images and RT contours, and generation/visualization of 3-D images and anatomical models. Moreover, it supported the 360° rendering of the RT structures in a multi-slice view, which allows physicians to visually check and edit abnormally contoured structures. Conclusion: This new software integrates the supervised learning framework with image processing and graphical visualization modules for RT contour verification. This tool has great potential for facilitating treatment planning with the assistance of an automatic contour evaluation module in avoiding

  18. Real-Time fMRI Pattern Decoding and Neurofeedback Using FRIEND: An FSL-Integrated BCI Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Sato, João R.; Basilio, Rodrigo; Paiva, Fernando F.; Garrido, Griselda J.; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Bado, Patricia; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration that humans can learn to modulate their own brain activity based on feedback of neurophysiological signals opened up exciting opportunities for fundamental and applied neuroscience. Although EEG-based neurofeedback has been long employed both in experimental and clinical investigation, functional MRI (fMRI)-based neurofeedback emerged as a promising method, given its superior spatial resolution and ability to gauge deep cortical and subcortical brain regions. In combination with improved computational approaches, such as pattern recognition analysis (e.g., Support Vector Machines, SVM), fMRI neurofeedback and brain decoding represent key innovations in the field of neuromodulation and functional plasticity. Expansion in this field and its applications critically depend on the existence of freely available, integrated and user-friendly tools for the neuroimaging research community. Here, we introduce FRIEND, a graphic-oriented user-friendly interface package for fMRI neurofeedback and real-time multivoxel pattern decoding. The package integrates routines for image preprocessing in real-time, ROI-based feedback (single-ROI BOLD level and functional connectivity) and brain decoding-based feedback using SVM. FRIEND delivers an intuitive graphic interface with flexible processing pipelines involving optimized procedures embedding widely validated packages, such as FSL and libSVM. In addition, a user-defined visual neurofeedback module allows users to easily design and run fMRI neurofeedback experiments using ROI-based or multivariate classification approaches. FRIEND is open-source and free for non-commercial use. Processing tutorials and extensive documentation are available. PMID:24312569

  19. Patterning organic/inorganic hybrid Bragg stacks by integrating one-dimensional photonic crystals and macrocavities through photolithography: toward tunable colorful patterns as highly selective sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhua; Zhang, Junhu; Xie, Jing; Yin, Yushu; Wang, Zhaoyi; Shen, Huaizhong; Li, Yunfeng; Li, Jiaxin; Liang, Sen; Cui, Liying; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2012-03-01

    Herein, we report a simple method to fabricate patterned organic/inorganic hybrid 1DPCs by top-down assisted photolithography. Versatile colorful pattern with different size and shape can be produced by selectively exposing the 1DPCs under UV light with predesigned photomask directly. The period change, especially the thickness variation of the top polymer layer, is the main reason for the colorful pattern generation. Because of the swelling property of the polymer layers, the pattern color can be modulated by introducing or taking off organic solvents, leading the as-prepared patterned 1DPCs to be effective sensors with high selectivity.

  20. Gene Set-Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-08-05

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis.

  1. On the way to building an integrated computational environment for the study of developmental patterns and genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Turinsky, Andrei L; Sensen, Christoph W

    2006-01-01

    Genetic diseases and developmental patterns should be studied on several levels: from macroscale (organs and tissues) to nanoscale (cells, genes, proteins). Due to the overwhelming complexity of the life science data, it is common that disparate data pieces are meticulously stored but never fully analyzed or correlated. We have begun to develop a novel methodology based on virtual reality techniques for the study of these phenomena. Our key approach to knowledge integration is a top-down mapping of data onto visual contexts. For each organism that we want to study, a structural model is created and used as a visual "wireframe" onto which other data types are superimposed in a top-down assembly. Data analysis tools, visual controls, and queries are enabled so that users can interactively explore data. Our visualization technology gives users an opportunity to map disparate data onto a common model, and search visually for hitherto unknown patterns and correlations contained within the data. It is our goal to eventually transform genomics research from measuring various data pieces analytically into a fully interactive exploration of combined data in a 4D immersive visual environment that best matches a researcher's intuition.

  2. Gene Set−Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:27527159

  3. Properties and application of a multichannel integrated circuit for low-artifact, patterned electrical stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hottowy, Paweł; Skoczeń, Andrzej; Gunning, Deborah E.; Kachiguine, Sergei; Mathieson, Keith; Sher, Alexander; Wiącek, Piotr; Litke, Alan M.; Dąbrowski, Władysław

    2012-01-01

    Objective Modern multielectrode array (MEA) systems can record the neuronal activity from thousands of electrodes, but their ability to provide spatio-temporal patterns of electrical stimulation is very limited. Furthermore, the stimulus-related artifacts significantly limit the ability to record the neuronal responses to the stimulation. To address these issues, we designed a multichannel integrated circuit for patterned MEA-based electrical stimulation and evaluated its performance in experiments with isolated mouse and rat retina. Approach The Stimchip includes 64 independent stimulation channels. Each channel comprises an internal digital-to-analog converter that can be configured as a current or voltage source. The shape of the stimulation waveform is defined independently for each channel by the real-time data stream. In addition, each channel is equipped with circuitry for reduction of the stimulus artifact. Main results Using a high-density MEA stimulation/recording system, we effectively stimulated individual retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and recorded the neuronal responses with minimal distortion, even on the stimulating electrodes. We independently stimulated a population of RGCs in rat retina and, using a complex spatio-temporal pattern of electrical stimulation pulses, we replicated visually-evoked spiking activity of a subset of these cells with high fidelity. Significance Compared with current state-of-the-art MEA systems, the Stimchip is able to stimulate neuronal cells with much more complex sequences of electrical pulses and with significantly reduced artifacts. This opens up new possibilities for studies of neuronal responses to electrical stimulation, both in the context of neuroscience research and in the development of neuroprosthetic devices. PMID:23160018

  4. 4-Dimensional Insights into Silicic Magma Reservoir Assembly from Late Miocene Southern Andean Plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaen, A. J.; Garibaldi, N.; Singer, B. S.; Schoene, B.; Cottle, J. M.; Tikoff, B.; Gutiérrez, F. J.; Jicha, B. R.; Payacán, I. J.

    2015-12-01

    Linking the development of magmatic flow fabrics to the T-X-t history of intraplutonic domains using modern structural and petrochronologic methods offers a frontier along which to explore for eruptability in plutonic rocks and better understand how shallow magma systems are assembled. The ~6.2 Ma Risco Bayo and Huemul plutons in the Chilean Andes (~36°S) exhibit a similar compositional spectrum and footprint to the active Laguna del Maule rhyolitic volcanic field nearby. The plutons comprise distinct lithological domains-each on the order of a few km3: gabbro to granite in Risco Bayo and granodiorite to leucogranite in Huemul. Whole rock variations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios highlight the importance of AFC processes during pluton assembly. Mixing and mingling of magma batches is observed geochemically and in the field as abundant mafic enclaves. U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS zircon ages of 6.36 to 6.18 Ma in Risco Bayo granodiorite and Huemul miarolitic leucogranite overlap with their 40Ar/39Ar biotite ages of ~6.24 Ma, suggesting coeval zircon saturation, emplacement, and rapid cooling of two compositionally and structurally distinct domains. A granodiorite domain within Huemul has a more protracted crystallization history and zircons with lower REE than in the adjacent miarolitic leucogranite, suggesting pluton construction by pulses on 10 to 100 kyr timescales. Al-in-hornblende barometry constrains emplacement to 3-4 km depth. Observations from Laguna del Maule (extrusion/intrusion rates, spatio-temporal pattern of mafic/rhyolitic volcanism, etc.) provide volcanic parallels with which to help interpret pluton assembly. AMS fabrics suggest possible upward migration of magma associated with decompression. Late Miocene silicic ignimbrites nearby are also being investigated to determine if they represent erupted products from the Risco Bayo-Huemul plutonic system.

  5. Patterns of sperm damage in Chernobyl passerine birds suggest a trade-off between sperm length and integrity.

    PubMed

    Hermosell, Ignacio G; Laskemoen, Terje; Rowe, Melissah; Møller, Anders P; Mousseau, Timothy A; Albrecht, Tomás; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-10-23

    Interspecific variation in sperm size is enigmatic, but generally assumed to reflect species-specific trade-offs in selection pressures. Among passerine birds, sperm length varies sevenfold, and sperm competition risk seems to drive the evolution of longer sperm. However, little is known about factors favouring short sperm or constraining the evolution of longer sperm. Here, we report a comparative analysis of sperm head abnormalities among 11 species of passerine bird in Chernobyl, presumably resulting from chronic irradiation following the 1986 accident. Frequencies of sperm abnormalities varied between 15.7 and 77.3% among species, more than fourfold higher than in uncontaminated areas. Nonetheless, species ranked similarly in sperm abnormalities in unpolluted areas as in Chernobyl, pointing to intrinsic factors underlying variation in sperm damage among species. Scanning electron microscopy of abnormal spermatozoa revealed patterns of acrosome damage consistent with premature acrosome reaction. Sperm length, but not sperm competition risk explained variation in sperm damage among species. This suggests that longer spermatozoa are more susceptible to premature acrosome reaction. Therefore, we hypothesize a trade-off between sperm length and sperm integrity affecting sperm evolution in passerine birds.

  6. Patterns of sperm damage in Chernobyl passerine birds suggest a trade-off between sperm length and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Hermosell, Ignacio G.; Laskemoen, Terje; Rowe, Melissah; Møller, Anders P.; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Lifjeld, Jan T.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific variation in sperm size is enigmatic, but generally assumed to reflect species-specific trade-offs in selection pressures. Among passerine birds, sperm length varies sevenfold, and sperm competition risk seems to drive the evolution of longer sperm. However, little is known about factors favouring short sperm or constraining the evolution of longer sperm. Here, we report a comparative analysis of sperm head abnormalities among 11 species of passerine bird in Chernobyl, presumably resulting from chronic irradiation following the 1986 accident. Frequencies of sperm abnormalities varied between 15.7 and 77.3% among species, more than fourfold higher than in uncontaminated areas. Nonetheless, species ranked similarly in sperm abnormalities in unpolluted areas as in Chernobyl, pointing to intrinsic factors underlying variation in sperm damage among species. Scanning electron microscopy of abnormal spermatozoa revealed patterns of acrosome damage consistent with premature acrosome reaction. Sperm length, but not sperm competition risk explained variation in sperm damage among species. This suggests that longer spermatozoa are more susceptible to premature acrosome reaction. Therefore, we hypothesize a trade-off between sperm length and sperm integrity affecting sperm evolution in passerine birds. PMID:24088561

  7. 3D Rheological Modeling of NW Intraplate Europe, Deciphering Spatial Integrated strength patterns, Mechanical Strong Layering and EET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, F.; Hardebol, N.; Cloetingh, S.; Tesauro, M.

    2006-12-01

    Better understanding of 3D rheological heterogeneity of the European Lithosphere provide the key to tie the recorded intraplate deformation pattern to stress fields transmitted into plate interior from plate boundary forces. The first order strain patterns result from stresses transmitted through the European lithosphere that is marked by a patchwork of high strength variability from inherited structural and compositional heterogeneities and upper mantle thermal perturbations. As the lithospheric rheology depends primarily on its spatial structure, composition and thermal estate, the 3D strength model for the European lithosphere relies on a 3D compositional model that yields the compositional heterogeneities and an iteratively calculated thermal cube using Fouriers law for heat conduction. The accurate appraisal of spatial strength variability results from proper mapping and integration of the geophysical compositional and thermal input parameters. Therefore, much attention has been paid to a proper description of first order structural and tectonic features that facilitate compilation of the compositional and thermal input models. As such, the 3D strength model reflects the thermo-mechanical structure inherited from the Europeans polyphase deformation history. Major 3D spatial mechanical strength variability has been revealed. The East-European and Fennoscandian Craton to the NE exhibit high strength (30-50 1012 N/m) from low mantle temperatures and surface heatflow of 35-60 mW/m2 while central and western Europe reflect a polyphase Phanerozoic thermo- tectonic history. Here, regions with high rigidity are formed primarily by patches of thermally stabilized Variscan Massifs (e.g. Rhenish, Armorican, Bohemian, and Iberian Massif) with low heatflow and lithospheric thickness values (50-65 mW/m2; 110-150 km) yielding strengths of ~15-25 1012 N/m. In contrast, major axis of weakened lithosphere coincides with Cenozoic Rift System (e.g. Upper and Lower Rhine Grabens

  8. [Assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on water environment based on the integration of soil erosion process and landscape pattern].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Bing-Fang; Zeng, Yuan; Zhang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The integration of the effects of landscape pattern to the assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on eco-environmental is of practical significance in methodological prospect, being able to provide an approach for identifying water body's sediment source area, assessing the potential risks of sediment export of on-site soil erosion to the target water body, and evaluating the capacity of regional landscape pattern in preventing soil loss. In this paper, the RUSLE model was applied to simulate the on-site soil erosion rate. With the consideration of the soil retention potential of vegetation cover and topography, a quantitative assessment was conducted on the impacts of soil erosion in the water source region of the middle route for South-to-North Water Transfer Project on rivers and reservoirs by delineating landscape pattern at point (or cell) scale and sub-watershed level. At point (or grid cell) scale, the index of soil erosion impact intensity (I) was developed as an indicator of the potential risk of sediment export to the water bodies. At sub-watershed level, the landscape leakiness index (LI) was employed to indicate the sediment retention capacity of a given landscape pattern. The results revealed that integrating the information of landscape pattern and the indices of soil erosion process could spatially effectively reflect the impact intensity of in situ soil erosion on water bodies. The LI was significantly exponentially correlated to the mean sediment retention capacity of landscape and the mean vegetation coverage of watershed, and the sediment yield at sub-watershed scale was significantly correlated to the LI in an exponential regression. It could be concluded that the approach of delineating landscape pattern based on soil erosion process and the integration of the information of landscape pattern with its soil retention potential could provide a new approach for the risk evaluation of soil erosion.

  9. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The properties of a cell’s microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  10. Sensitivity comparison of fast integrated die-to-die T+R pattern inspection, standard database inspection, and STARlight2 contamination mode for application in mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalfuss, Heiko; Schulmeyer, Thomas; Heumann, Jan; Lang, Michael; Sier, Jean-Paul

    2007-10-01

    'Fast Integrated Die-to-Die T+R' pattern inspection (DDTR), reflected tritone database inspection (DBRt) and STARlight2 TM (SL2) contamination inspection are employed by mask makers in order to detect pattern defects and contamination defects on photomasks for in process inspection steps. In this paper we compare the detection capabilities of these modes on real production masks with a representative set of contamination and pattern defects. Currently, SL2 inspection is used to find contamination defects and die-to-die and die-to-database are used for pattern defects. In this paper we will show that the new introduced 'Fast Integrated Die-to-Die T+R' pattern inspection (DDTR)1 in combination with the DBRt can be used in production environment, instead of SL2 without any loss in the sensitivity. During the study, we collected and analyzed inspection data on critical layers such as lines & spaces and contact holes. Besides, performance of the modes on product plates characterization was done using a test mask with programmed defects.

  11. Enhancing light extraction mechanisms of GaN-based light-emitting diodes through the integration of imprinting microstructures, patterned sapphire substrates, and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeeu-Chang; Ni, Ching-Huai; Chen, Chih-Yeeu

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of the various light extraction efficiency enhancement mechanisms for the GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated. Experiments utilized the imprinting technique to fabricate pyramid and inverted pyramid microstructures. Roughness treatment was then integrated with these imprinting structures on patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) LEDs. An approximate 33% improvement in light output power was obtained using the pyramid profile when compared with the planar LED. This was nearly 15% higher than that of the inverted pyramid profile. The roughness effect provided an approximate 5% efficiency enhancement. The total light enhanced efficiency increased to 85.9% by integrating the imprinting pyramid structure, PSS, and surface roughness.

  12. Multistability, local pattern formation, and global collective firing in a small-world network of nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Rothkegel, Alexander; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2009-03-01

    We investigate numerically the collective dynamical behavior of pulse-coupled nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons that are arranged on a two-dimensional small-world network. To ensure ongoing activity, we impose a probability for spontaneous firing for each neuron. We study network dynamics evolving from different sets of initial conditions in dependence on coupling strength and rewiring probability. Besides a homogeneous equilibrium state for low coupling strength, we observe different local patterns including cyclic waves, spiral waves, and turbulentlike patterns, which-depending on network parameters-interfere with the global collective firing of the neurons. We attribute the various network dynamics to distinct regimes in the parameter space. For the same network parameters different network dynamics can be observed depending on the set of initial conditions only. Such a multistable behavior and the interplay between local pattern formation and global collective firing may be attributable to the spatiotemporal dynamics of biological networks. PMID:19335013

  13. Patterns and trends of postpartum family planning in Ethiopia, Malawi, and Nigeria: evidence of missed opportunities for integration

    PubMed Central

    Hounton, Sennen; Winfrey, William; Barros, Aluisio J. D.; Askew, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background The first 12 months following childbirth are a period when a subsequent pregnancy holds the greatest risk for mother and baby, but also when there are numerous contacts with the healthcare system for postnatal care for mother and baby (immunisation, nutrition, etc.). The benefits and importance of postpartum family planning are well documented. They include a reduction in risk of miscarriage, as well as mitigation of (or protection against) low birth weight, neonatal and maternal death, preterm birth, and anaemia. Objectives The objectives of this paper are to assess patterns and trends in the use of postpartum family planning at the country level, to determine whether postpartum family planning is associated with birth interval and parity, and to identify the health services most closely associated with postpartum family planning after adjusting for socio-economic characteristics. Design Data were used from Demographic and Health Surveys that contain a reproductive calendar, carried out within the last 10 years, from Ethiopia, Malawi, and Nigeria. All women for whom the calendar was completed and who gave birth between 57 and 60 months prior to data collection were included in the analysis. For each of the births, we merged the reproductive calendar with the birth record into a survey for each country reflecting the previous 60 months. The definition of the postpartum period in this paper is based on a period of 3 months postpartum. We used this definition to assess early adoption of postpartum family planning. We assessed variations in postpartum family planning according to demographic and socio-economic variables, as well as its association with various contact opportunities with the health system [antenatal care (ANC), childbirth in facilities, immunisation, etc.]. We did simple descriptive analysis with tabular, graphic, and ‘equiplot’ displays and a logistic regression controlling for important background characteristics. Results Overall

  14. HPVbase--a knowledgebase of viral integrations, methylation patterns and microRNAs aberrant expression: As potential biomarkers for Human papillomaviruses mediated carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kumar Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are extremely associated with different carcinomas. Despite consequential accomplishments, there is still need to establish more promising biomarkers to discriminate cancerous progressions. Therefore, we have developed HPVbase (http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/hpvbase/), a comprehensive resource for three major efficacious cancer biomarkers i.e. integration and breakpoint events, HPVs methylation patterns and HPV mediated aberrant expression of distinct host microRNAs (miRNAs). It includes clinically important 1257 integrants and integration sites from different HPV types i.e. 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 associated with distinct histological conditions. An inclusive HPV integrant and breakpoints browser was designed to provide easy browsing and straightforward analysis. Our study also provides 719 major quantitative HPV DNA methylation observations distributed in 5 distinct HPV genotypes from higher to lower in numbers namely HPV 16 (495), HPV 18 (113), HPV45 (66), HPV 31 (34) and HPV 33 (11). Additionally, we have curated and compiled clinically significant aberrant expression profile of 341 miRNAs including their target genes in distinct carcinomas, which can be utilized for miRNA therapeutics. A user-friendly web interface has been developed for easy data retrieval and analysis. We foresee that HPVbase an integrated and multi-comparative platform would facilitate reliable cancer diagnostics and prognosis. PMID:26205472

  15. HPVbase--a knowledgebase of viral integrations, methylation patterns and microRNAs aberrant expression: As potential biomarkers for Human papillomaviruses mediated carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kumar Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-07-24

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are extremely associated with different carcinomas. Despite consequential accomplishments, there is still need to establish more promising biomarkers to discriminate cancerous progressions. Therefore, we have developed HPVbase (http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/hpvbase/), a comprehensive resource for three major efficacious cancer biomarkers i.e. integration and breakpoint events, HPVs methylation patterns and HPV mediated aberrant expression of distinct host microRNAs (miRNAs). It includes clinically important 1257 integrants and integration sites from different HPV types i.e. 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 associated with distinct histological conditions. An inclusive HPV integrant and breakpoints browser was designed to provide easy browsing and straightforward analysis. Our study also provides 719 major quantitative HPV DNA methylation observations distributed in 5 distinct HPV genotypes from higher to lower in numbers namely HPV 16 (495), HPV 18 (113), HPV45 (66), HPV 31 (34) and HPV 33 (11). Additionally, we have curated and compiled clinically significant aberrant expression profile of 341 miRNAs including their target genes in distinct carcinomas, which can be utilized for miRNA therapeutics. A user-friendly web interface has been developed for easy data retrieval and analysis. We foresee that HPVbase an integrated and multi-comparative platform would facilitate reliable cancer diagnostics and prognosis.

  16. Mutation of the zebrafish glass onion locus causes early cell-nonautonomous loss of neuroepithelial integrity followed by severe neuronal patterning defects in the retina.

    PubMed

    Pujic, Z; Malicki, J

    2001-06-15

    Mutation of the glass onion locus causes drastic neuronal patterning defects in the zebrafish retina and brain. The precise stratified appearance of the wild-type retina is absent in the mutants. The glass onion phenotype is first visible shortly after the formation of optic primordia and is characterized by the rounding of cells and disruption of the ventricular surface in the eye and brain neuroepithelia. With exception of the dorsal- and ventral-most regions of the brain, neuroepithelial cells lose their integrity and begin to distribute ectopically. At later stages, the laminar patterning of retinal neurons is severely disrupted. Despite the lack of lamination, individual retinal cell classes differentiate in the glass onion retina. Mosaic analysis reveals that the glass onion mutation acts cell nonautonomously within the retina and brain, as neuroepithelial cell morphology and polarity in these tissues are normal when mutant cells develop in wild-type hosts. We conclude that the glass onion mutation affects cell-cell signaling event(s) involved in the maintenance of the neuroepithelial cell layer shortly after its formation. The disruption of neuroepithelial integrity may be the cause of the neuronal patterning defects following neurogenesis. In addition, the expression of the glass onion phenotype in a subset of neuroepithelial cells as well as its onset following the initial formation of the neuroepithelial sheets indicate the presence of genetically distinct temporal and spatial subdivisions in the development of this histologically uniform tissue. PMID:11397013

  17. Comparative Assessment of Liver Tumor Motion Using Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M.; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior–inferior, anterior–posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Results: Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior–inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior–posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Conclusions: Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior–inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study.

  18. Identification of Gene Expression Pattern Related to Breast Cancer Survival Using Integrated TCGA Datasets and Genomic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin

    2015-01-01

    Several large-scale human cancer genomics projects such as TCGA offered huge genomic and clinical data for researchers to obtain meaningful genomics alterations which intervene in the development and metastasis of the tumor. A web-based TCGA data analysis platform called TCGA4U was developed in this study. TCGA4U provides a visualization solution for this study to illustrate the relationship of these genomics alternations with clinical data. A whole genome screening of the survival related gene expression patterns in breast cancer was studied. The gene list that impacts the breast cancer patient survival was divided into two patterns. Gene list of each of these patterns was separately analyzed on DAVID. The result showed that mitochondrial ribosomes play a more crucial role in the cancer development. We also reported that breast cancer patients with low HSPA2 expression level had shorter overall survival time. This is widely different to findings of HSPA2 expression pattern in other cancer types. TCGA4U provided a new perspective for the TCGA datasets. We believe it can inspire more biomedical researchers to study and explain the genomic alterations in cancer development and discover more targeted therapies to help more cancer patients. PMID:26576432

  19. Migration patterns in Central America seen in the context of economic integration and the need for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Stein, E

    1993-08-01

    This exploratory discussion of migration policy in Central America focuses on actual procedures in a multisectoral framework that assumes economic integration and sustainable development. The article follows the following format: the author's perspective and general approach to the problems of migration policy and integrated development, an analysis and review of the inadequacies of concepts and methodologies and the need for strengthening Central America's policies, arguments for changing present development strategies, and suggestions for regional economic integration. New policies must be equitable, sustainable, and suitable for agricultural frontier areas at the present level of economic integration. The further development of practical and concrete solutions in the region is based on the current groundwork. New policies should emphasize community participation, a grassroots approach rather than a top-down one, and an alternative model. An alternative system which promotes and facilitates the vertical development of small and medium farmers needs both a Rural Communal Financing System and a System for Communal Marketing to eliminate all speculative economic practices which impede small farmers from making a profit. Buffer zones in the frontier agricultural areas are required. Small farms need to gradually improve farming practices rather than to transfer miraculous technologies. A number of forest products could be collected and commercialized for various purposes, if the knowledgeable indigenous population is informed and involved in participatory research on the technical and ethnological culture and action programs. Many sectors are involved, problems are complex, and the speed of change is very rapid in the region. An approach that seeks to relate sustainable development, economic integration, and migration policy must incorporate the perspective of integrated development and a structural analysis of poverty. The approach suggested in this article would

  20. Reduction of a grid moire pattern by integrating a carbon-interspaced high precision x-ray grid with a digital radiographic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Young-Guk; Park, Chun-Joo; Kim, Do-Il; Lee, Jin-Ho; Chung, Nag-Kun; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Hyoung-Koo

    2007-11-15

    The stationary grid commonly used with a digital x-ray detector causes a moire interference pattern due to the inadequate sampling of the grid shadows by the detector pixels. There are limitations with the previous methods used to remove the moire such as imperfect electromagnetic interference shielding and the loss of image information. A new method is proposed for removing the moire pattern by integrating a carbon-interspaced high precision x-ray grid with high grid line uniformity with the detector for frequency matching. The grid was aligned to the detector by translating and rotating the x-ray grid with respect to the detector using microcontrolled alignment mechanism. The gap between the grid and the detector surface was adjusted with micrometer precision to precisely match the projected grid line pitch to the detector pixel pitch. Considering the magnification of the grid shadows on the detector plane, the grids were manufactured such that the grid line frequency was slightly higher than the detector sampling frequency. This study examined the factors that affect the moire pattern, particularly the line frequency and displacement. The frequency of the moire pattern was found to be sensitive to the angular displacement of the grid with respect to the detector while the horizontal translation alters the phase but not the moire frequency. The frequency of the moire pattern also decreased with decreasing difference in frequency between the grid and the detector, and a moire-free image was produced after complete matching for a given source to detector distance. The image quality factors including the contrast, signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity in the images with and without the moire pattern were investigated.

  1. Integrating a hive triangle pattern with subpixel analysis for noncontact measurement of structural dynamic response by using a novel image processing scheme.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yung-Chi; Hung, Shih-Lin; Lin, Tzu-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a digital image processing approach with a unique hive triangle pattern by integrating subpixel analysis for noncontact measurement of structural dynamic response data. Feasibility of proposed approach is demonstrated based on numerical simulation of a photography experiment. According to those results, the measured time-history displacement of simulated image correlates well with the numerical solution. A small three-story frame is then mounted on a small shaker table, and a linear variation differential transformation (LVDT) is set on the second floor. Experimental results indicate that the relative error between data from LVDT and analyzed data from digital image correlation is below 0.007%, 0.0205 in terms of frequency and displacement, respectively. Additionally, the appropriate image block affects the estimation accuracy of the measurement system. Importantly, the proposed approach for evaluating pattern center and size is highly promising for use in assigning the adaptive block for a digital image correlation method. PMID:24955396

  2. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  3. On Darboux's approach to R-separability of variables. Classification of conformally flat 4-dimensional binary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szereszewski, A.; Sym, A.

    2015-09-01

    are binary metrics. In this paper we solve the following problem: to classify all conformally flat (of arbitrary signature) 4-dimensional binary metrics. Among them there are 1) those that are separable in the sense of SRE metrics Kalnins-Miller (1978 Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 244 241-61 1982 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 15 2699-709 1984 Adv. Math. 51 91-106 1983 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 14 126-37) and 2) new examples of non-Stäckel R-separability in 4 dimensions.

  4. Foam patterns

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  5. Monolithic integration of optical grade GaAs on Si (001) substrates deeply patterned at a micron scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bietti, Sergio; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Bonera, Emiliano; Miglio, Leo; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Frigeri, Cesare; Falub, Claudiu V.; Känel, Hans von

    2013-12-23

    Dense arrays of micrometric crystals, with areal filling up to 93%, are obtained by depositing GaAs in a mask-less molecular beam epitaxy process onto Si substrates. The substrates are patterned into tall, micron sized pillars. Faceted high aspect ratio GaAs crystals are achieved by tuning the Ga adatom for short surface diffusion lengths. The crystals exhibit bulk-like optical quality due to defect termination at the sidewalls. Simultaneously, the thermal strain induced by different thermal expansion parameters of GaAs and Si is fully relieved. This opens the route to thick film applications without crack formation and wafer bowing.

  6. Comparing Integrated and Disciplinary Clinical Training Patterns for Dental Interns: Advantages, Disadvantages, and Effect on Students' Self-Confidence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junrong; Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Qi; Shao, Longquan

    2016-03-01

    In China, the five-year program of undergraduate education for stomatology consists of four years of lecture courses and one year of internship focused on clinical training. Dental schools provide this clinical training either in their own clinics (referred to as the one-stage pattern because all forms of practice are completed together) or by placing students in external clinics usually at non-affiliated hospitals (referred to as the three-stage program because the three primary areas are taught separately). The aims of this study were to investigate differences in teaching effect between the one-stage and the three-stage patterns and to evaluate advantages and disadvantages of the two patterns. A three-section, 31-item questionnaire was designed to assess basic and clinic information about the interns' training and their self-confidence in performing clinical procedures. The survey was administered to graduates who finished the fifth-year internship in 2012-14. Of the 356 individuals invited to participate, 303 graduates who spent their intern years in 43 academic dental institutions returned completed surveys (response rate of 85%). The one-stage group (n=121) reported longer independent operation time than the three-stage group (n=182) (p<0.01). No significant difference was found between the groups for assessment of clinic infrastructure (p=0.121). The interns were most confident in oral hygiene instruction and scale and polish (overall median=5), but showed low confidence in rubber dam placement and four other procedures (overall median=2). The one-stage group rated their confidence level higher than the three-stage group on comprehensive skills such as arranging appointments and managing patients and procedures needing long treatment periods such as molar endodontics. The three-stage group showed higher confidence on more specialized procedures such as surgical extractions and suturing. This study found that both of the two intern patterns had advantages and

  7. Evaluating the effect of human activity patterns on air pollution exposure using an integrated field-based and agent-based modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Beelen, Rob M. J.; de Bakker, Merijn P.; Karssenberg, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Constructing spatio-temporal numerical models to support risk assessment, such as assessing the exposure of humans to air pollution, often requires the integration of field-based and agent-based modelling approaches. Continuous environmental variables such as air pollution are best represented using the field-based approach which considers phenomena as continuous fields having attribute values at all locations. When calculating human exposure to such pollutants it is, however, preferable to consider the population as a set of individuals each with a particular activity pattern. This would allow to account for the spatio-temporal variation in a pollutant along the space-time paths travelled by individuals, determined, for example, by home and work locations, road network, and travel times. Modelling this activity pattern requires an agent-based or individual based modelling approach. In general, field- and agent-based models are constructed with the help of separate software tools, while both approaches should play together in an interacting way and preferably should be combined into one modelling framework, which would allow for efficient and effective implementation of models by domain specialists. To overcome this lack in integrated modelling frameworks, we aim at the development of concepts and software for an integrated field-based and agent-based modelling framework. Concepts merging field- and agent-based modelling were implemented by extending PCRaster (http://www.pcraster.eu), a field-based modelling library implemented in C++, with components for 1) representation of discrete, mobile, agents, 2) spatial networks and algorithms by integrating the NetworkX library (http://networkx.github.io), allowing therefore to calculate e.g. shortest routes or total transport costs between locations, and 3) functions for field-network interactions, allowing to assign field-based attribute values to networks (i.e. as edge weights), such as aggregated or averaged

  8. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  9. Within-team Patterns of Communication and Referral in Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients by an Integrative Care Team

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Bonnie B.; Eisenberg, David M.; Buring, Julie E.; Liang, Catherine L.; Osypiuk, Kamila; Levy, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a highly prevalent and costly public health problem with few treatment options that provide consistent and greater than modest benefits. Treatment of CLBP is shifting from unimodal to multimodal and multidisciplinary approaches, including biopsychosocially-based complementary and integrative care. Multidisciplinary approaches require unique levels of communication and coordination amongst clinicians; however, to date few studies have evaluated patterns of communication and decision making amongst clinicians collaborating in the care of challenging patients with CLBP. Methods: As part of an observational study evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an integrative, team-based care model for the treatment of CLBP, we used multiple qualitative research methods to characterize within-team cross-referral and communication amongst jointly-trained practitioners representing diverse biomedical and complementary disciplines. Patterns of communication and coordinated care are summarized for 3 cases of CLBP treated by multiple members (≥3) of an integrative medical team embedded within an academic hospital. Results: Patients were aged from 36 to 88 years with varied comorbidities. Qualitative content analysis revealed 5 emergent themes regarding integrative patient care and treatment decision in this clinic: (1) the fundamental importance of the clinic's formal teamwork training; (2) the critical communicative and collaborative function of regular team meetings; (3) the importance to patient care goals of having the varied disciplines practicing “under one roof”; (4) a universal commitment to understanding and treating patients as whole persons; and (5) a shared philosophy of helping patients to help themselves. These key themes are all interconnected and form the foundation of the clinic's culture. Conclusions: Our qualitative findings provide context for current trends in enhancing patient

  10. Oasis dynamics change and its influence on landscape pattern on Jinta oasis in arid China from 1963a to 2010a: Integration of multi-source satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuchu; Gong, Jie; Sun, Peng; Gou, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    As one of the vital research highlights of global land use and cover change, oasis change and its interaction with landscape pattern have been regarded as an important content of regional environmental change research in arid areas. Jinta oasis, a typical agricultural oasis characterized by its dramatic exploitation and use of water and land resources in Hexi corridor, northwest arid region in China, was selected as a case to study the spatiotemporal oasis change and its effects on oasis landscape pattern. Based on integration of Keyhole satellite photographs, KATE-200 photographs, Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+ images, we evaluated and analyzed the status, trend and spatial pattern change of Jinta oasis and the characteristics of landscape pattern change by a set of mathematical models and combined this information with landscape metrics and community surveys. During the period of 1963a-2010a, Jinta oasis expanded gradually with an area increase of 219.15 km2, and the conversion between oasis and desert was frequent with a state of “imbalance-balance-extreme imbalance conditions”. Moreover, most of the changes took place in the ecotone between oasis and desert and the interior of oasis due to the reclamation of abandoned land, such as Yangjingziwan and Xiba townships. Furthermore, the area, size and spatial distribution of oasis were influenced by human activities and resulted in fundamental changes of oasis landscape pattern. The fractal characteristics, dispersion degree and fragmentation of Jinta oasis decreased and the oasis landscape tended to be simple and uniform. Oasis change trajectories and its landscape pattern were mainly influenced by water resource utilization, policies (especially land policies), demographic factors, technological advancements, as well as regional economic development. We found that time series analysis of multi-source remote sensing images and the application of an oasis change model provided a useful approach to monitor oasis change

  11. Biodegradation pattern and tissue integration of native and cross-linked porcine collagen soft tissue augmentation matrices – an experimental study in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Within the last decades, collagen types I and III have been established as a sufficient biomaterial for GBR and GTR procedures. They might also be an adequate matrix for soft tissue augmentations. However, collagen materials differ significantly regarding resorption time, biodegradation pattern and the invasion of inflammatory cells. The aim of the present study was to compare the biodegradation and tissue integration of native, differently processed and cross-linked collagen scaffolds in rats. Methods Four experimental porcine collagen matrices of 1.0 mm thickness, developed for soft tissue augmentation procedures, were tested. Based on the same native dermal Type I and III collagen, native (ND, Mucoderm® prototype), specifically defatted (DD), ethylene dioxide cross-linked (ECL) and dehydrothermally cross-linked (DCL) dermis collagen (AAP/Botiss Biomaterials, Berlin, Germany) were evaluated. Two specimens of 1 × 1 cm were fixed around a non-absorbable spacer using non-absorbable sutures. After rehydration, specimens (N = 8) were randomly allocated in unconnected subcutaneous pouches on the back of 40 Wistar rats. Rats were divided into five groups (1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks), including eight animals each. After each period, eight rats were sacrificed and explanted specimens were prepared for histological analysis. The following parameters were evaluated: membrane thickness as a sign of biodegradation and volume stability, cell ingrowth, vascularization, tissue integration and foreign body reaction. Results Biodegradation pattern of the non cross-linked collagen scaffolds differed only slightly in terms of presence of inflammatory cells and cell invasion into the matrix. In terms of biodegradation, ECL displayed a considerable slower resorption than ND, DCL and DD. Chemical cross-linking using ethylene dioxide showed a significant higher invasion of inflammatory cells. Conclusion Within the limits of the present study it was concluded that the

  12. An integrative approach to phylogeny reveals patterns of environmental distribution and novel evolutionary relationships in a major group of ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping; Clamp, John; Xu, Dapeng; Huang, Bangqin; Shin, Mann Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Peritrichs are a major group of ciliates with worldwide distribution. Yet, its internal phylogeny remains unresolved owing to limited sampling. Additionally, ecological distributions of peritrichs are poorly known. We performed substantially expanded phylogenetic analyses of peritrichs that incorporated SSU rDNA sequences of samples collected from three continents, revealing a number of new relationships between and within major lineages that greatly challenged the classic view of the group. Interrogation of a dataset comprising new environmental sequences from an estuary and the open ocean generated with high throughput sequencing and clone libraries plus putative environmental peritrich sequences at Genbank, produced a comprehensive tree of peritrichs from a variety of habitats and revealed unique ecological distribution patterns of several lineages for the first time. Also, evidence of adaptation to extreme environments in the Astylozoidae clade greatly broadened the phylogenetic range of peritrichs capable of living in extreme environments. Reconstruction of ancestral states revealed that peritrichs may have transitioned repeatedly from freshwater to brackish/marine/hypersaline environments. This work establishes a phylogenetic framework for more mature investigations of peritrichs in the future, and the approach used here provides a model of how to elucidate evolution in the context of ecological niches in any lineage of microbial eukaryotes. PMID:26880590

  13. Using fuzzy logic to confirm the integrity of a pattern recognition algorithm for long genomic sequences: the W-curve.

    PubMed

    Cork, Douglas J; Toguem, Andre

    2002-12-01

    The W-curve is a numerical mapping algorithm that provides tertiary information content of long and short genomic sequences. The most popular genomic pattern recognition algorithms depend on string matching of the primary information content of short genomic sequences. Herein, we describe a way to define the fuzzy properties of the W-curve. This approach improves a distance (dissimilarity) between two or more homologous long genomic sequences. Fourier analysis of W-curves delivers a smoother function for gap-stripped regions. Calculation of respective Fourier energies may improve the accuracy of the distance metric used to generate a phylogenetic tree of analyzed genomic sequences. This is especially the case for long genomic sequences that have been gap-stripped and aligned with the aid of previously published heuristic methods. These previous methods involved W-curve alignments used in concert with such programs as Clustal that use linear dynamic programming to align multiple gap-stripped W-curves. PMID:12594080

  14. NeuroCa: integrated framework for systematic analysis of spatiotemporal neuronal activity patterns from large-scale optical recording data

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Jee; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Optical recording facilitates monitoring the activity of a large neural network at the cellular scale, but the analysis and interpretation of the collected data remain challenging. Here, we present a MATLAB-based toolbox, named NeuroCa, for the automated processing and quantitative analysis of large-scale calcium imaging data. Our tool includes several computational algorithms to extract the calcium spike trains of individual neurons from the calcium imaging data in an automatic fashion. Two algorithms were developed to decompose the imaging data into the activity of individual cells and subsequently detect calcium spikes from each neuronal signal. Applying our method to dense networks in dissociated cultures, we were able to obtain the calcium spike trains of ∼1000 neurons in a few minutes. Further analyses using these data permitted the quantification of neuronal responses to chemical stimuli as well as functional mapping of spatiotemporal patterns in neuronal firing within the spontaneous, synchronous activity of a large network. These results demonstrate that our method not only automates time-consuming, labor-intensive tasks in the analysis of neural data obtained using optical recording techniques but also provides a systematic way to visualize and quantify the collective dynamics of a network in terms of its cellular elements. PMID:26229973

  15. Feedbacks between managed irrigation and water availability: Diagnosing temporal and spatial patterns using an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, Laura E.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-03-01

    Groundwater-fed irrigation has been shown to deplete groundwater storage, decrease surface water runoff, and increase evapotranspiration. Here we simulate soil moisture-dependent groundwater-fed irrigation with an integrated hydrologic model. This allows for direct consideration of feedbacks between irrigation demand and groundwater depth. Special attention is paid to system dynamics in order to characterized spatial variability in irrigation demand and response to increased irrigation stress. A total of 80 years of simulation are completed for the Little Washita Basin in Southwestern Oklahoma, USA spanning a range of agricultural development scenarios and management practices. Results show regionally aggregated irrigation impacts consistent with other studies. However, here a spectral analysis reveals that groundwater-fed irrigation also amplifies the annual streamflow cycle while dampening longer-term cyclical behavior with increased irrigation during climatological dry periods. Feedbacks between the managed and natural system are clearly observed with respect to both irrigation demand and utilization when water table depths are within a critical range. Although the model domain is heterogeneous with respect to both surface and subsurface parameters, relationships between irrigation demand, water table depth, and irrigation utilization are consistent across space and between scenarios. Still, significant local heterogeneities are observed both with respect to transient behavior and response to stress. Spatial analysis of transient behavior shows that farms with groundwater depths within a critical depth range are most sensitive to management changes. Differences in behavior highlight the importance of groundwater's role in system dynamics in addition to water availability.

  16. An Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Divergent Evolutionary Pattern of Oil Biosynthesis in High- and Low-Oil Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Shi-Bo; Li, Qi-Gang; Song, Jian; Hao, Yu-Qi; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Huan-Quan; Dunwell, Jim M; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Seed oils provide a renewable source of food, biofuel and industrial raw materials that is important for humans. Although many genes and pathways for acyl-lipid metabolism have been identified, little is known about whether there is a specific mechanism for high-oil content in high-oil plants. Based on the distinct differences in seed oil content between four high-oil dicots (20~50%) and three low-oil grasses (<3%), comparative genome, transcriptome and differential expression analyses were used to investigate this mechanism. Among 4,051 dicot-specific soybean genes identified from 252,443 genes in the seven species, 54 genes were shown to directly participate in acyl-lipid metabolism, and 93 genes were found to be associated with acyl-lipid metabolism. Among the 93 dicot-specific genes, 42 and 27 genes, including CBM20-like SBDs and GPT2, participate in carbohydrate degradation and transport, respectively. 40 genes highly up-regulated during seed oil rapid accumulation period are mainly involved in initial fatty acid synthesis, triacylglyceride assembly and oil-body formation, for example, ACCase, PP, DGAT1, PDAT1, OLEs and STEROs, which were also found to be differentially expressed between high- and low-oil soybean accessions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct differences of oleosin in patterns of gene duplication and loss between high-oil dicots and low-oil grasses. In addition, seed-specific GmGRF5, ABI5 and GmTZF4 were predicted to be candidate regulators in seed oil accumulation. This study facilitates future research on lipid biosynthesis and potential genetic improvement of seed oil content. PMID:27159078

  17. An Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Divergent Evolutionary Pattern of Oil Biosynthesis in High- and Low-Oil Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Shi-Bo; Li, Qi-Gang; Song, Jian; Hao, Yu-Qi; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Huan-Quan; Dunwell, Jim M.; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Seed oils provide a renewable source of food, biofuel and industrial raw materials that is important for humans. Although many genes and pathways for acyl-lipid metabolism have been identified, little is known about whether there is a specific mechanism for high-oil content in high-oil plants. Based on the distinct differences in seed oil content between four high-oil dicots (20~50%) and three low-oil grasses (<3%), comparative genome, transcriptome and differential expression analyses were used to investigate this mechanism. Among 4,051 dicot-specific soybean genes identified from 252,443 genes in the seven species, 54 genes were shown to directly participate in acyl-lipid metabolism, and 93 genes were found to be associated with acyl-lipid metabolism. Among the 93 dicot-specific genes, 42 and 27 genes, including CBM20-like SBDs and GPT2, participate in carbohydrate degradation and transport, respectively. 40 genes highly up-regulated during seed oil rapid accumulation period are mainly involved in initial fatty acid synthesis, triacylglyceride assembly and oil-body formation, for example, ACCase, PP, DGAT1, PDAT1, OLEs and STEROs, which were also found to be differentially expressed between high- and low-oil soybean accessions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct differences of oleosin in patterns of gene duplication and loss between high-oil dicots and low-oil grasses. In addition, seed-specific GmGRF5, ABI5 and GmTZF4 were predicted to be candidate regulators in seed oil accumulation. This study facilitates future research on lipid biosynthesis and potential genetic improvement of seed oil content. PMID:27159078

  18. Contrasting patterns of population connectivity between regions in a commercially important mollusc Haliotis rubra: integrating population genetics, genomics and marine LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; van Rooyen, A; Rašić, G; Ierodiaconou, D A; Gorfine, H K; Day, R; Wong, C; Hoffmann, A A; Weeks, A R

    2016-08-01

    Estimating contemporary genetic structure and population connectivity in marine species is challenging, often compromised by genetic markers that lack adequate sensitivity, and unstructured sampling regimes. We show how these limitations can be overcome via the integration of modern genotyping methods and sampling designs guided by LiDAR and SONAR data sets. Here we explore patterns of gene flow and local genetic structure in a commercially harvested abalone species (Haliotis rubra) from southeastern Australia, where the viability of fishing stocks is believed to be dictated by recruitment from local sources. Using a panel of microsatellite and genomewide SNP markers, we compare allele frequencies across a replicated hierarchical sampling area guided by bathymetric LiDAR imagery. Results indicate high levels of gene flow and no significant genetic structure within or between benthic reef habitats across 1400 km of coastline. These findings differ to those reported for other regions of the fishery indicating that larval supply is likely to be spatially variable, with implications for management and long-term recovery from stock depletion. The study highlights the utility of suitably designed genetic markers and spatially informed sampling strategies for gaining insights into recruitment patterns in benthic marine species, assisting in conservation planning and sustainable management of fisheries. PMID:27322873

  19. Contrasting patterns of population connectivity between regions in a commercially important mollusc Haliotis rubra: integrating population genetics, genomics and marine LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; van Rooyen, A; Rašić, G; Ierodiaconou, D A; Gorfine, H K; Day, R; Wong, C; Hoffmann, A A; Weeks, A R

    2016-08-01

    Estimating contemporary genetic structure and population connectivity in marine species is challenging, often compromised by genetic markers that lack adequate sensitivity, and unstructured sampling regimes. We show how these limitations can be overcome via the integration of modern genotyping methods and sampling designs guided by LiDAR and SONAR data sets. Here we explore patterns of gene flow and local genetic structure in a commercially harvested abalone species (Haliotis rubra) from southeastern Australia, where the viability of fishing stocks is believed to be dictated by recruitment from local sources. Using a panel of microsatellite and genomewide SNP markers, we compare allele frequencies across a replicated hierarchical sampling area guided by bathymetric LiDAR imagery. Results indicate high levels of gene flow and no significant genetic structure within or between benthic reef habitats across 1400 km of coastline. These findings differ to those reported for other regions of the fishery indicating that larval supply is likely to be spatially variable, with implications for management and long-term recovery from stock depletion. The study highlights the utility of suitably designed genetic markers and spatially informed sampling strategies for gaining insights into recruitment patterns in benthic marine species, assisting in conservation planning and sustainable management of fisheries.

  20. Identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds in chemical ionization GC-MS using a mass-to-structure (MTS) Search Engine with integral isotope pattern ranking.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenta; Draper, William M

    2013-02-21

    The mass-to-structure or MTS Search Engine is an Access 2010 database containing theoretical molecular mass information for 19,438 compounds assembled from common sources such as the Merck Index, pesticide and pharmaceutical compilations, and chemical catalogues. This database, which contains no experimental mass spectral data, was developed as an aid to identification of compounds in atmospheric pressure ionization (API)-LC-MS. This paper describes a powerful upgrade to this database, a fully integrated utility for filtering or ranking candidates based on isotope ratios and patterns. The new MTS Search Engine is applied here to the identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds including pesticides, nitrosoamines and other pollutants. Methane and isobutane chemical ionization (CI) GC-MS spectra were obtained from unit mass resolution mass spectrometers to determine MH(+) masses and isotope ratios. Isotopes were measured accurately with errors of <4% and <6%, respectively, for A + 1 and A + 2 peaks. Deconvolution of interfering isotope clusters (e.g., M(+) and [M - H](+)) was required for accurate determination of the A + 1 isotope in halogenated compounds. Integrating the isotope data greatly improved the speed and accuracy of the database identifications. The database accurately identified unknowns from isobutane CI spectra in 100% of cases where as many as 40 candidates satisfied the mass tolerance. The paper describes the development and basic operation of the new MTS Search Engine and details performance testing with over 50 model compounds.

  1. Enabling Data Analysis on High-Throughput Data in Large Data Depository Using Web-Based Analysis Platform – A Case Study on Integrating QUEST with GenePattern in Epigenetics Research

    PubMed Central

    Camerlengo, Terry; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Yan, Pearlly; Parvin, Jeffrey; Huang, Tim; Huang, Kun; Perez, Francisco; Teng, Mingxiang; Li, Lang; Liu, Yunlong; Kurc, Tahsin

    2010-01-01

    Enabling data analysis in large data depositories for high throughput experimental data such as gene microarrays and ChIP-seq is challenging. In this paper, we discuss three methods for integrating QUEST, a data depository for epigenetic experiments, with a web-based data analysis platform GenePattern. These methods are universal and can serve as an exemplary implementation resolving the dilemma facing many similar database systems in integrating data analysis tools. PMID:21151835

  2. Integration of Remote Sensing with Ground-Based Measurements to Identify Year-Independent Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Snow Cover and their Potential Applications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, R. J.; Arogundade, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover products have been used successfully and are still appealing for a variety of hydrological applications due to their high spatial and temporal resolution coupled with the products' high accuracy based on comparisons with point ground-based measurements. Several researchers have observed that snow accumulation and ablation occur in reasonably regular patterns from one year to the next. Thus, snow cover information from satellite imagery across different years could be integrated with ground-based measurements with the aim of discovering general information about the temporal and spatial character of snowmelt and runoff processes over watersheds that can be used to answer both short-term questions, such as what are the stream flows likely to be over the next two weeks or month and what is the seasonal runoff likely to be, as well as long-term questions such as what are the likely impacts of various climate change scenarios on biome succession or streamflow and water supply from a basin given the discovered behavior of spatio-temporal snowmelt processes. In this study we utilized a collection of snow cover maps produced from MODIS data across multiple years (2001 to 2011) coupled with the melt-out date of a collection of Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations within a region of study to synthesize the interannually repeatable pattern of snow depletion from the beginning to the end of melt seasons. The accuracy of this method has been evaluated over the headwaters of the Upper Snake River in Western Wyoming with very good results. This method has many applications including cloud removal, reconstruction of historical snow depletion curves, generation of snow cover maps for times predating the launch of the MODIS sensor, within-season snow cover ablation forecasting, climate change impacts on snow and runoff, and modeling climatology of snow. These applications can be extended for use in water management and

  3. The division abnormally delayed (dally) gene: a putative integral membrane proteoglycan required for cell division patterning during postembryonic development of the nervous system in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nakato, H; Futch, T A; Selleck, S B

    1995-11-01

    We have devised a genetic screen to obtain mutants affecting cell division patterning in the developing central nervous system of Drosophila. The division abnormally delayed (dally) locus was identified using a combination of "enhancer trap" and behavioral screening methods. The ordered cell cycle progression of lamina precursor cells, which generate synaptic target neurons for photoreceptors, is disrupted in dally mutants. The first of two lamina precursor cell divisions shows a delayed entry into mitosis. The second division, one that is triggered by an intercellular signal from photoreceptor axons, fails to take place. Similar to lamina precursors, cells that generate the ommatidia of the adult eye show two synchronized divisions found along the morphogenetic furrow in the eye disc and the first division cycle in dally mutants displays a delayed progression into M phase like that found in the first lamina precursor cell division. dally mutations also affect viability and produce morphological defects in several adult tissues, including the eye, antenna, wing and genitalia. Sequencing of a dally cDNA reveals a potential open reading frame of 626 amino acids with homology to a family of Glypican-related integral membrane proteoglycans. These heparan sulfate-containing proteins are attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans may serve as co-receptors for a variety of secreted proteins including fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and members of the Wnt, TGF-beta and Hedgehog families. The cell division defects found in dally mutants implicate the Glypican group of integral membrane proteoglycans in the control of cell division during development.

  4. Translating Response During Therapy into Ultimate Treatment Outcome: A Personalized 4-Dimensional MRI Tumor Volumetric Regression Approach in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A.; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Zhang Dongqing; Grecula, John C.; Lu Lanchun; Montebello, Joseph F.; Fowler, Jeffrey M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To assess individual volumetric tumor regression pattern in cervical cancer during therapy using serial four-dimensional MRI and to define the regression parameters' prognostic value validated with local control and survival correlation. Methods and Materials: One hundred and fifteen patients with Stage IB{sub 2}-IVA cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) underwent serial MRI before (MRI 1) and during RT, at 2-2.5 weeks (MRI 2, at 20-25 Gy), and at 4-5 weeks (MRI 3, at 40-50 Gy). Eighty patients had a fourth MRI 1-2 months post-RT. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years. Tumor volume was measured by MRI-based three-dimensional volumetry, and plotted as dose(time)/volume regression curves. Volume regression parameters were correlated with local control, disease-specific, and overall survival. Results: Residual tumor volume, slope, and area under the regression curve correlated significantly with local control and survival. Residual volumes >=20% at 40-50 Gy were independently associated with inferior 5-year local control (53% vs. 97%, p <0.001) and disease-specific survival rates (50% vs. 72%, p = 0.009) than smaller volumes. Patients with post-RT residual volumes >=10% had 0% local control and 17% disease-specific survival, compared with 91% and 72% for <10% volume (p <0.001). Conclusion: Using more accurate four-dimensional volumetric regression analysis, tumor response can now be directly translated into individual patients' outcome for clinical application. Our results define two temporal thresholds critically influencing local control and survival. In patients with >=20% residual volume at 40-50 Gy and >=10% post-RT, the risk for local failure and death are so high that aggressive intervention may be warranted.

  5. Comparison of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Nuclear Medicine Ventilation-Perfusion Imaging: A Clinical Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Koo, Phillip J.; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-05-01

    on a regional level. Our study presents an important step for the integration of 4DCT-ventilation into thoracic clinical practice.

  6. Combining temporally-integrated heat stress duration and frequency with multi-dimensional vulnerability characteristics to derive local-level risk patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özceylan, Dilek; Aubrecht, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    The observed changing in the nature of climate related events and the increase in the number and severity of extreme weather events has been changing risk patterns and puts more people at risk. In recent years extreme heat events caused excess mortality and public concerns in many regions of the world (e.g., 2003 and 2006 Western European heat waves, 2007 and 2010 Asian heat waves, 2006 and most recent 2010-2012 North American heat waves). In the United States extreme heat events have been consistently reported as the leading cause of weather- related mortality and have attracted the attention of the international scientific community regarding the critical importance of risk assessment and decoding its components for risk reduction. In order to understand impact potentials and analyze risk in its individual components both the spatially and temporally varying patterns of heat stress and the multidimensional characteristics of vulnerability have to be considered. In this study we present a composite risk index aggregating these factors and implement that for the U.S. National Capital Region on a high level of spatial detail. The applied measure of assessing heat stress hazard is a novel approach of integrating magnitude, duration, and frequency over time in the assessment and is opposed to the study of single extreme events and the analysis of mere absolute numbers of heat waves that are independent of the length of the respective events. On the basis of heat related vulnerability conceptualization, we select various population and land cover characteristics in our study area and define a composite vulnerability index based on aggregation of three groups of indicators related to demographic, socio-economic, and environmental factors. The study reveals how risk patterns seem to be driven by the vulnerability distribution, generally showing a clear difference between high-risk urban areas and wide areas of low risk in the sub-urban and rural environments. This is

  7. Integrated Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Integrated Science program that integrates biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics over a three-year, spiraling sequence arranged around broad themes such as cycles, changes, patterns, and waves. Includes weekly telecasts via public television and satellite, teacher manuals, student handbooks, e-mail connections, staff…

  8. Observations and Modeling of Low Level Moisture Convergence Patterns in the Southern Appalachians during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) Extended Observing Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Anna M.; Barros, Ana P.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate fields of precipitation accumulations and intensity at high spatial resolution in regions of complex terrain are largely unavailable. This is due to first, a lack of existing in situ observations, both because of the challenge in having high enough density in the instrument placement to represent the large spatial heterogeneity in rainfall patterns in these regions and because of the remote, harsh nature of the terrain that makes it difficult to install and maintain instrumentation and second, obstacles to remote sensing such as beam blockage and ground clutter that are caused by the complex orography. In this study we leverage observations from two sources: 1) a high-elevation, high-density tipping bucket rain gauge network that has been recording precipitation observations for over six years along ridgelines in the Pigeon River Basin, a small watershed in the Southern Appalachians, and 2) the 4-D database of observations collected in 2014 in support of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) during the first field campaign after the launch of the GPM satellite, the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), to learn about formation and maintenance mechanisms for fog and low cloud in this region and the resulting impact on the precipitation regime. The observations focused on here are those at the near surface, within 2 kilometers of the ground level. This presentation will focus on process-based modeling studies using the Advanced Research Weather and Forecasting Model conducted based upon observations made during this campaign. Case studies will be presented for real events simulated during the IPHEx campaign. These case studies occurred with different synoptic conditions, but include observational evidence of orographic enhancement. The case studies are simulated and analyzed in order to investigate how the topography modulates the regional, diurnal patterns of moisture convergence and fog and low cloud formation, as well as the mid

  9. Taming the Mighty Mississippi: Integrating paleo-flood data and modeling to understand the patterns and causes of extreme floods on a major river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Samuel; Giosan, Liviu; Jeffrey, Donnelly; Dee, Sylvia; Shen, Zhixiong

    2016-04-01

    The Mississippi River is an economic artery of the United States that is heavily managed to provide flood control and maintain a navigable shipping channel. The current system of levees and spillway structures was conceived in the early 20th century, but the ability of this system to withstand the altered hydroclimatic conditions projected for the next century is poorly understood. Here, we present initial results from a project that integrates new sedimentary records from floodplain lakes with analyses of sediment geochemistry and climate model simulations to better understand the causes of extreme floods on the lower Mississippi River. In our sedimentary paleoflood records, flood event beds are characterized by an upward fining sequence from deposition of the bedload and suspended load during overbank floods, identified here using high-resolution laser particle-size analysis and elemental composition (XRF), and dated using radioisotopes (137Cs, 210Pb, 14C) and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz. Grain-size descriptors and elemental ratios of Zr/Fe and Fe/Rb are highly correlated, and are used alongside historical discharge records to develop a statistical model for reconstructing flood magnitude in prehistoric contexts. Geochemical analyses of sediments from the floodplains of major tributaries of the Mississippi are used to assess the systematics of 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb across the basin, enabling identification of the synoptic patterns of individual paleo-flood events. We investigate the dynamical drivers of past floods on the lower Mississippi using both reanalysis data and the last millennium simulation from NCAR model CESM1 to find that increased likelihoods of extreme floods on the lower Mississippi River are associated with enhanced moisture flux over midcontinental North America that is controlled by the interaction of seasonally variable soil moisture over major tributaries with inter-annual (e.g., ENSO) and

  10. Transcriptional Profiling of Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells Using TU Tagging Reveals Pattern Shifts in Gene Expression during Circuit Integration1,2

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Shen, Rongkun; Goodman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite representing only a small fraction of hippocampal granule cells, adult-generated newborn granule cells have been implicated in learning and memory (Aimone et al., 2011). Newborn granule cells undergo functional maturation and circuit integration over a period of weeks. However, it is difficult to assess the accompanying gene expression profiles in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution using traditional methods. Here we used a novel method [“thiouracil (TU) tagging”] to map the profiles of nascent mRNAs in mouse immature newborn granule cells compared with mature granule cells. We targeted a nonmammalian uracil salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, to newborn neurons and mature granule cells using retroviral and lentiviral constructs, respectively. Subsequent injection of 4-TU tagged nascent RNAs for analysis by RNA sequencing. Several hundred genes were significantly enhanced in the retroviral dataset compared with the lentiviral dataset. We compared a selection of the enriched genes with steady-state levels of mRNAs using quantitative PCR. Ontology analysis revealed distinct patterns of nascent mRNA expression, with newly generated immature neurons showing enhanced expression for genes involved in synaptic function, and neural differentiation and development, as well as genes not previously associated with granule cell maturation. Surprisingly, the nascent mRNAs enriched in mature cells were related to energy homeostasis and metabolism, presumably indicative of the increased energy demands of synaptic transmission and their complex dendritic architecture. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our modified TU-tagging method provides a foundation for comparison with steady-state RNA analyses by traditional transcriptomic approaches in defining the functional roles of newborn neurons. PMID:27011954

  11. Recovery patterns, histological observations and genetic integrity in Malus shoot tips cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration procedures.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Quan; Feng, Chao-Hong; Wang, Min-Rui; Hu, Ling-Yun; Volk, Gayle; Wang, Qiao-Chun

    2015-11-20

    A droplet-vitrification procedure is described for cryopreservation of Malus shoot tips. Survival patterns, recovery types, histological observations, and genetic integrity were compared for Malus shoot tips cryopreserved using this droplet-vitrification procedure and an encapsulation-dehydration procedure that was previously reported by us. In both procedures, three types of shoot tip recovery were observed following cryopreservation: callus formation without shoot regrowth, leaf formation without shoot regrowth, and shoot regrowth. Three categories of histological observations were also identified in cross-sections of shoot tips recovered after cryopreservation using the two cryogenic procedures. In category 1, almost all of the cells (94-95%) in the apical dome (AD) were damaged or killed and only some cells (30-32%) in the leaf primordia (LPs) survived. In category 2, only a few cells (18-20%) in the AD and some cells (30-31%) in the LPs survived. In category 3, majority of the cells (60-62%) in the AD and some cells (30-33%) in the LPs survived. These data suggest that shoot regrowth is correlated to the presence of a majority of surviving cells in the AD after liquid nitrogen exposure. No polymorphic bands were detected by inter-simple sequence repeats or by random amplified polymorphic DNA assessments, and ploidy levels analyzed by flow cytometry were unchanged when plants recovered after cryoexposure were compared to controls. The droplet-vitrification procedure appears to be robust since seven genotypes representing four Malus species and one hybrid recovered shoots following cryopreservation. Mean shoot regrowth levels of these seven genotypes were 48% in the droplet-vitrification method, which were lower than those (61%) in the encapsulation-dehydration procedure reported in our previous study, suggesting the latter may be preferred for routine cryobanking applications for Malus shoot tips.

  12. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  13. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Kimura, Tomoki; Nakashima, Takeo; Ochi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ippei; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ozawa, Syuichi; Murakami, Yuji; Wadasaki, Koichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generated from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.

  14. Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite profiles from pepper and tomato ripening and development stages uncovers species-specific patterns of network regulatory behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite levels from climacteric and nonclimacteric fruits can be employed to unravel the similarities and differences of the underlying regulatory processes. To this end, we conducted combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and heterologou...

  15. Verification of Planning Target Volume Settings in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy by Using In-Treatment 4-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using “pre-3D” CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Results: Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. Conclusions: With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target.

  16. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  17. Do Fourth Graders Integrate Text and Picture in Processing and Learning from an Illustrated Science Text? Evidence from Eye-Movement Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lucia; Tornatora, Maria Caterina; Pluchino, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    This study used eye-tracking methodology in the school setting to examine fourth graders' online processing of text and graphics while reading an illustrated science text. We were interested in identifying patterns of visual behavior, which was examined considering individual differences in reading comprehension, prior knowledge, and spatial…

  18. Finite element model of surface acoustic wave method for mechanical characterization of patterned thin films of the ultra-large scaled integrated interconnect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Shan, Xingmeng; Tao, Ye; Sun, Yuan; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2013-02-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) technique is a promising method to determine the mechanical properties of thin low dielectric constant (low-k) dielectrics by matching the experimental dispersion curve with the theoretical dispersion curves. However, it is difficult to calculate the dispersion curves when SAWs propagate along patterned structure. In this paper, finite element method (FEM) is applied to obtain the numerical dispersion results of SAWs propagating on patterned film. Periodic boundary condition and plane-strain model is used to improve the computation speed. Four structures of bulk silicon, single layered low-k film, two layered Cu and SiO2 film, and patterned film, are simulated in this paper. The dispersion curves of single low-k films derived from the FEM simulation agree very well with those calculated by traditional method, which verifies the correct employment of the FEM approach. Dispersion curves of two patterned film structure of Cu and SiO2 with difference metal wire width are obtained. Effective Young's moduli are achieved by fitting the FEM simulated results with those of traditional theoretical calculation through least square error method.

  19. Is it important to characterize complex patterns of riverbed hydraulic conductivities for assessing river-aquifer exchange fluxes? An evaluation with an integrated fully coupled hydrological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Schilling, Oliver; Brunner, Philip; Vereecken, Harry; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Riverbed hydraulic conductivity is a critical parameter for the prediction of exchange fluxes between groundwater and surface water bodies. It was found in previous studies that it is important to characterize heterogeneity of riverbed hydraulic conductivity. In this context, we also investigated in the past whether the heterogeneity pattern of riverbed hydraulic conductivities (i.e., multiGaussian, different types of non-multiGaussian patterns) plays an important role. It was found that the heterogeneity pattern does not matter so much. However, these past studies were conducted with the subsurface hydrological model SPRING which only considers one way coupling and only vertical fluxes through the river-aquifer interface. In this study, the role of patterns was further explored using the fully coupled hydrological model HydroGeoSphere. A synthetic 3-D river-aquifer model was set up with a heterogeneous riverbed showing non-multiGaussian patterns in the form of meandering channels as the reference field. Data assimilation experiments were carried out with help of the Ensemble Kalman Filter to characterize the heterogeneous riverbed. The data assimilation experiments were conducted for four types of riverbed hydraulic conductivity (K) fields: (i) spatially homogeneous, (ii) heterogeneous with multiGaussian distribution, (iii) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (channelized structures) and (iv) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (elliptic structures). For all the data assimilation scenarios, state variables and riverbed K were updated by assimilating piezometric heads. The experiments were repeated for ten reference fields. Results show that for all prior geostatistical models data assimilation was able to reduce the difference between simulated and measured hydraulic heads, and to improve the characterization of riverbed hydraulic conductivities and river-aquifer exchange fluxes. Results were slightly better for non-multiGaussian fields

  20. Integration of hydrologic and water allocation models in basin-scale water resources management considering crop pattern and climate change: Karkheh River Basin in Iran

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The paradigm of integrated water resources management requires coupled analysis of hydrology and water resources in a river basin. Population growth and uncertainties due to climate change make historic data not a reliable source of information for future planning of water resources, hence necessit...

  1. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  2. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah; Huang, Xuan; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

  3. Marangoni patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagu, N. Nirmal; Strombom, Evelyn; Palumbo, Daniel; Caicedo, Carlos; Shinbrot, Troy

    2010-11-01

    We study Marangoni patterns that emerge when common food dye is dropped into a dish of shallow water. These patterns consist of tendrils and spots that sharpen over time before eventually fading. We demonstrate that the patterns can be modeled using coupled reaction-diffusion equations, where the "reaction" terms appear due to a nonlinear dependence of surface tension on dye concentration. We show using a spatio-temporal metric that these patterns are distinct from previously described Turing patterns.

  4. Integrative Comparative Analyses of Transcript and Metabolite Profiles from Pepper and Tomato Ripening and Development Stages Uncovers Species-Specific Patterns of Network Regulatory Behavior[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Sonia; Alba, Rob; Nikoloski, Zoran; Kochevenko, Andrej; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Giovannoni, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite levels from climacteric and nonclimacteric fruits can be employed to unravel the similarities and differences of the underlying regulatory processes. To this end, we conducted combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and heterologous microarray hybridization assays in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; climacteric) and pepper (Capsicum chilense; nonclimacteric) fruits across development and ripening. Computational methods from multivariate and network-based analyses successfully revealed the difference between the covariance structures of the integrated data sets. Moreover, our results suggest that both fruits have similar ethylene-mediated signaling components; however, their regulation is different and may reflect altered ethylene sensitivity or regulators other than ethylene in pepper. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis were not induced in pepper fruits. Nevertheless, genes downstream of ethylene perception such as cell wall metabolism genes, carotenoid biosynthesis genes, and the never-ripe receptor were clearly induced in pepper as in tomato fruit. While signaling sensitivity or actual signals may differ between climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit, the evidence described here suggests that activation of a common set of ripening genes influences metabolic traits. Also, a coordinate regulation of transcripts and the accumulation of key organic acids, including malate, citrate, dehydroascorbate, and threonate, in pepper fruit were observed. Therefore, the integrated analysis allows us to uncover additional information for the comprehensive understanding of biological events relevant to metabolic regulation during climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit development. PMID:22685169

  5. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition. PMID:27565868

  6. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Benjamin M.; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A.; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  7. Net primary productivity, allocation pattern and carbon use efficiency in an apple orchard assessed by integrating eddy-covariance, biometric and continuous soil chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotelli, D.; Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Tagliavini, M.

    2012-10-01

    Carbon use efficiency (CUE) is a functional parameter that could possibly link the current increasingly accurate global estimates of gross primary production with those of net ecosystem exchange, for which global predictors are still unavailable. Nevertheless, CUE estimates are actually available for only a few ecosystem types, while information regarding agro-ecosystems is scarce, in spite of the simplified spatial structure of these ecosystems that facilitates studies on allocation patterns and temporal growth dynamics. We combined three largely deployed methods, eddy covariance, soil respiration and biometric measurements, to assess monthly values of CUE, net primary production (NPP) and allocation patterns in different plant organs in an apple orchard during a complete year (2010). We applied a~measurement protocol optimized for quantifying monthly values of carbon fluxes in this ecosystem type, which allows for a cross-check between estimates obtained from different methods. We also attributed NPP components to standing biomass increments, detritus cycle feeding and lateral exports. We found that in the apple orchard both net ecosystem production and gross primary production on yearly basis, 380 ± 30 g C m-2 and 1263 ± 189 g C m-2 respectively, were of a magnitude comparable to those of natural forests growing in similar climate conditions. The largest differences with respect to forests are in the allocation pattern and in the fate of produced biomass. The carbon sequestered from the atmosphere was largely allocated to production of fruits: 49% of annual NPP was taken away from the ecosystem through apple production. Organic material (leaves, fine root litter, pruned wood and early fruit falls) contributing to the detritus cycle was 46% of the NPP. Only 5% was attributable to standing biomass increment, while this NPP component is generally the largest in forests. The CUE, with an annual average of 0.71 ± 0.09, was higher than the previously suggested

  8. Net primary productivity, allocation pattern and carbon use efficiency in an apple orchard assessed by integrating eddy covariance, biometric and continuous soil chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotelli, D.; Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Tagliavini, M.

    2013-05-01

    Carbon use efficiency (CUE), the ratio of net primary production (NPP) over gross primary production (GPP), is a functional parameter that could possibly link the current increasingly accurate global GPP estimates with those of net ecosystem exchange, for which global predictors are still unavailable. Nevertheless, CUE estimates are actually available for only a few ecosystem types, while information regarding agro-ecosystems is scarce, in spite of the simplified spatial structure of these ecosystems that facilitates studies on allocation patterns and temporal growth dynamics. We combined three largely deployed methods, eddy covariance, soil respiration and biometric measurements, to assess monthly values of CUE, NPP and allocation patterns in different plant organs in an apple orchard during a complete year (2010). We applied a measurement protocol optimized for quantifying monthly values of carbon fluxes in this ecosystem type, which allows for a cross check between estimates obtained from different methods. We also attributed NPP components to standing biomass increments, detritus cycle feeding and lateral exports. We found that in the apple orchard, both net ecosystem production and gross primary production on a yearly basis, 380 ± 30 g C m-2 and 1263 ± 189 g C m-2 respectively, were of a magnitude comparable to those of natural forests growing in similar climate conditions. The largest differences with respect to forests are in the allocation pattern and in the fate of produced biomass. The carbon sequestered from the atmosphere was largely allocated to production of fruit: 49% of annual NPP was taken away from the ecosystem through apple production. Organic material (leaves, fine root litter, pruned wood and early fruit falls) contributing to the detritus cycle was 46% of the NPP. Only 5% was attributable to standing biomass increment, while this NPP component is generally the largest in forests. The CUE, with an annual average of 0.71 ± 0.12, was higher

  9. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting. PMID:26439164

  10. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting.

  11. Twigs on the tree of life? Neutral and selective models for integrating macroevolutionary patterns with microevolutionary processes in the analysis of asexuality.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    Neutral models characterize evolutionary or ecological patterns expected in the absence of specific causal processes, such as natural selection or ecological interactions. In this study, we describe and evaluate three neutral models that can, in principle, help to explain the apparent 'twigginess' of asexual lineages on phylogenetic trees without involving the negative consequences predicted for the absence of recombination and genetic exchange between individuals. Previously, such phylogenetic twiggyness of asexual lineages has been uncritically interpreted as evidence that asexuality is associated with elevated extinction rates and thus represents an evolutionary dead end. Our first model uses simple phylogenetic simulations to illustrate that, with sexual reproduction as the ancestral state, low transition rates to stable asexuality, or low rates of ascertained 'speciation' in asexuals, can generate twiggy distributions of asexuality, in the absence of high extinction rates for asexual lineages. The second model, developed by Janko et al. (2008), shows that a dynamic equilibrium between origins and neutral losses of asexuals can, under some conditions, generate a relatively low mean age of asexual lineages. The third model posits that the risk of extinction for asexual lineages may be higher than that of sexuals simply because asexuals inhabit higher latitudes or altitudes, and not due to effects of their reproductive systems. Such neutral models are useful in that they allow quantitative evaluation of whether empirical data, such as phylogenetic and phylogeographic patterns of sex and asexuality, indeed support the idea that asexually reproducing lineages persist over shorter evolutionary periods than sexual lineages, due to such processes as mutation accumulation, slower rates of adaptive evolution, or relatively lower levels of genetic variability.

  12. Summation of spatiotemporal input patterns in leaky integrate-and-fire neurons: application to neurons in the cochlear nucleus receiving converging auditory nerve fiber input.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Burkitt, Anthony N; Paolini, Antonio; Clark, Graeme M

    2002-01-01

    The response of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons is analyzed for periodic inputs whose phases vary with their spatial location. The model gives the relationship between the spatial summation distance and the degree of phase locking of the output spikes (i.e., locking to the periodic stochastic inputs, measured by the synchronization index). The synaptic inputs are modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process, and the analysis is carried out in the Gaussian approximation. The model has been applied to globular bushy cells of the cochlear nucleus, which receive converging inputs from auditory nerve fibers that originate at neighboring sites in the cochlea. The model elucidates the roles played by spatial summation and coincidence detection, showing how synchronization decreases with an increase in both frequency and spatial spread of inputs. It also shows under what conditions an enhancement of synchronization of the output relative to the input takes place. PMID:11932560

  13. Very Large Scale Integration of Nano-Patterned YBa2Cu3O7-delta Josephson Junctions in a Two-Dimensional Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane A; Anton, Steven; Wu, Stephen; Clarke, John; Dynes, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Very large scale integration of Josephson junctions in a two-dimensional series-parallel array has been achieved by ion irradiating a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} film through slits in a nano-fabricated mask created with electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The mask consisted of 15,820 high-aspect ratio (20:1), 35-nm wide slits that restricted the irradiation in the film below to form Josephson junctions. Characterizing each parallel segment k, containing 28 junctions, with a single critical current I{sub ck} we found a standard deviation in I{sub ck} of about 16%.

  14. Wnt5a Deficiency Leads to Anomalies in Ureteric Tree Development, Tubular Epithelial Cell Organization and Basement Membrane Integrity Pointing to a Role in Kidney Collecting Duct Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Kaisto, Susanna; Tika, Elisavet; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Salo, Antti M.; Garma, Leonardo; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Feitz, Wout F.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Juffer, André; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Renkema, Kirsten Y.; Myllyharju, Johanna; Vainio, Seppo J.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnts can be considered as candidates for the Congenital Anomaly of Kidney and Urinary Tract, CAKUT diseases since they take part in the control of kidney organogenesis. Of them Wnt5a is expressed in ureteric bud (UB) and its deficiency leads to duplex collecting system (13/90) uni- or bilateral kidney agenesis (10/90), hypoplasia with altered pattern of ureteric tree organization (42/90) and lobularization defects with partly fused ureter trunks (25/90) unlike in controls. The UB had also notably less tips due to Wnt5a deficiency being at E15.5 306 and at E16.5 765 corresponding to 428 and 1022 in control (p<0.02; p<0.03) respectively. These changes due to Wnt5a knock out associated with anomalies in the ultrastructure of the UB daughter epithelial cells. The basement membrane (BM) was malformed so that the BM thickness increased from 46.3 nm to 71.2 nm (p<0.01) at E16.5 in the Wnt5a knock out when compared to control. Expression of a panel of BM components such as laminin and of type IV collagen was also reduced due to the Wnt5a knock out. The P4ha1 gene that encodes a catalytic subunit of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase I (C-P4H-I) in collagen synthesis expression and the overall C-P4H enzyme activity were elevated by around 26% due to impairment in Wnt5a function from control. The compound Wnt5a+/-;P4ha1+/- embryos demonstrated Wnt5a-/- related defects, for example local hyperplasia in the UB tree. A R260H WNT5A variant was identified from renal human disease cohort. Functional studies of the consequence of the corresponding mouse variant in comparison to normal ligand reduced Wnt5a-signalling in vitro. Together Wnt5a has a novel function in kidney organogenesis by contributing to patterning of UB derived collecting duct development contributing putatively to congenital disease. PMID:26794322

  15. Wnt5a Deficiency Leads to Anomalies in Ureteric Tree Development, Tubular Epithelial Cell Organization and Basement Membrane Integrity Pointing to a Role in Kidney Collecting Duct Patterning.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Kaisto, Susanna; Tika, Elisavet; van Eerde, Albertien M; Salo, Antti M; Garma, Leonardo; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Feitz, Wout F; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Juffer, André; Knoers, Nine V A M; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Myllyharju, Johanna; Vainio, Seppo J

    2016-01-01

    The Wnts can be considered as candidates for the Congenital Anomaly of Kidney and Urinary Tract, CAKUT diseases since they take part in the control of kidney organogenesis. Of them Wnt5a is expressed in ureteric bud (UB) and its deficiency leads to duplex collecting system (13/90) uni- or bilateral kidney agenesis (10/90), hypoplasia with altered pattern of ureteric tree organization (42/90) and lobularization defects with partly fused ureter trunks (25/90) unlike in controls. The UB had also notably less tips due to Wnt5a deficiency being at E15.5 306 and at E16.5 765 corresponding to 428 and 1022 in control (p<0.02; p<0.03) respectively. These changes due to Wnt5a knock out associated with anomalies in the ultrastructure of the UB daughter epithelial cells. The basement membrane (BM) was malformed so that the BM thickness increased from 46.3 nm to 71.2 nm (p<0.01) at E16.5 in the Wnt5a knock out when compared to control. Expression of a panel of BM components such as laminin and of type IV collagen was also reduced due to the Wnt5a knock out. The P4ha1 gene that encodes a catalytic subunit of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase I (C-P4H-I) in collagen synthesis expression and the overall C-P4H enzyme activity were elevated by around 26% due to impairment in Wnt5a function from control. The compound Wnt5a+/-;P4ha1+/- embryos demonstrated Wnt5a-/- related defects, for example local hyperplasia in the UB tree. A R260H WNT5A variant was identified from renal human disease cohort. Functional studies of the consequence of the corresponding mouse variant in comparison to normal ligand reduced Wnt5a-signalling in vitro. Together Wnt5a has a novel function in kidney organogenesis by contributing to patterning of UB derived collecting duct development contributing putatively to congenital disease. PMID:26794322

  16. Changes in Characteristics and Treatment Patterns of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in a Large United States Integrated Health System between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pantalone, Kevin M.; Hobbs, Todd M.; Wells, Brian J.; Kong, Sheldon X.; Kattan, Michael W.; Bouchard, Jonathan; Chagin, Kevin M.; Yu, Changhong; Sakurada, Brian; Milinovich, Alex; Weng, Wayne; Bauman, Janine M.; Zimmerman, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    To assess changes in the clinical characteristics and treatment patterns of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D), the electronic health record system at Cleveland Clinic was used to create cross-sectional summaries of all patients with new-onset T2D in 2008 and 2013. Differences between the 2008 and 2013 data sets were assessed after adjusting for age, gender, race, and income. Approximately one-third of patients with newly diagnosed T2D in 2008 and 2013 had an A1C ≥8%, suggesting the continued presence of a delayed recognition of the disease. Patients with newly diagnosed T2D in 2008 were older than those in 2013. Hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and neuropathy were highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with T2D. The prevalence of neuropathy, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral vascular disease increased from 2008 to 2013. Metformin was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication. Sulfonylurea usage remained unchanged, while use of thiazolidinediones decreased considerably. PMID:27398040

  17. Integrating geologic and satellite radar data for mapping dome-and-basin patterns in the In Ouzzal Terrane, Western Hoggar, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroin, Jean-Paul; Djemai, Safouane; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Brahmi, Boualem; Ouzegane, Khadidja; Kienast, Jean-Robert

    2014-11-01

    The In Ouzzal Terrane (IOT) located in the north-western part of the Tuareg Shield forms an elongated N-S trending block, more than 400 km long and 80 km wide. It involves an Archaean crust remobilized during a very high-temperature metamorphic event related to the Palaeoproterozoic orogeny. The IOT largely crops out in the rocky and sandy desert of Western Hoggar. It corresponds mainly to a flat area with some reliefs composed of Late Panafrican granites, dyke networks or Cambrian volcanic rocks. These flat areas are generally covered by thin sand veneers. They are favorable for discriminating bedrock geological units using imaging radar, backscattering measurements, and field checking, because the stony desert is particularly sensitive to the radar parameters such as wavelength or polarization. The main radar data used are those obtained with the ALOS-PALSAR sensor (L-band), in ScanSAR mode (large swath) and Fine Beam modes. The PALSAR sensor has been also compared to ENVISAT-ASAR and to optical imagery. Detailed mapping of some key areas indicates extensive Archaean dome-and-basin patterns. In certain parts, the supracrustal synforms and orthogneiss domes exhibit linear or circular features corresponding to shear zones or rolling structures, respectively. The geological mapping of these dome-and-basin structures, and more generally of the Archaean and Proterozoic lithological units, is more accurate with the SAR imagery, particularly when using the L-band, than with the optical imagery. A quantitative approach is carried out in order to estimate the backscatter properties of the main rock types. Due to the large variety of configurations, radar satellite imagery such as ALOS PALSAR represents a key tool for geological mapping in arid region at different scales from the largest (e.g., 1:500,000) to the smallest (e.g., 1:50,000).

  18. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  19. Evaluation of effects of changes in canal management and precipitation patterns on salinity in Biscayne Bay, Florida, using an integrated surface-water/groundwater model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohmann, Melinda A.; Swain, Eric D.; Wang, John D.; Dixon, Joann

    2012-01-01

    Biscayne National Park, located in Biscayne Bay in southeast Florida, is one of the largest marine parks in the country and sustains a large natural marine fishery where numerous threatened and endangered species reproduce. In recent years, the bay has experienced hypersaline conditions (salinity greater than 35 practical salinity units) of increasing magnitude and duration. Hypersalinity events were particularly pronounced during April to August 2004 in nearshore areas along the southern and middle parts of the bay. Prolonged hypersaline conditions can cause degradation of water quality and permanent damage to, or loss of, brackish nursery habitats for multiple species of fish and crustaceans as well as damage to certain types of seagrasses that are not tolerant of extreme changes in salinity. To evaluate the factors that contribute to hypersalinity events and to test the effects of possible changes in precipitation patterns and canal flows into Biscayne Bay on salinity in the bay, the U.S. Geological Survey constructed a coupled surface-water/groundwater numerical flow model. The model is designed to account for freshwater flows into Biscayne Bay through the canal system, leakage of salty bay water into the underlying Biscayne aquifer, discharge of fresh and salty groundwater from the Biscayne aquifer into the bay, direct effects of precipitation on bay salinity, indirect effects of precipitation on recharge to the Biscayne aquifer, direct effects of evapotranspiration (ET) on bay salinity, indirect effects of ET on recharge to the Biscayne aquifer, and maintenance of mass balance of both water and solute. The model was constructed using the Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density Dependent System (FTLOADDS) simulator, version 3.3, which couples the two-dimensional, surface-water flow and solute-transport simulator SWIFT2D with the density-dependent, groundwater flow an solute-transport simulator SEAWAT. The model was calibrated by a trial

  20. Pattern formation today

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Richardson, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Patterns are orders embedded in randomness. They may appear as spatial arrangements or temporal series, and the elements may appear identical or with variations. Patterns exist in the physical world as well as in living systems. In the biological world, patterns can range from simple to complex, forming the basic building blocks of life. The process which generates this ordering in the biological world was termed pattern formation. Since Wolpert promoted this concept four decades ago, scientists from molecular biology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, theoretical modeling and other disciplines have made remarkable progress towards understanding its mechanisms. It is time to review and re-integrate our understanding. Here, we explore the origin of pattern formation, how the genetic code is translated into biological form, and how complex phenotypes are selected over evolutionary time. We present four topics: Principles, Evolution, Development, and Stem Cells and Regeneration. We have interviewed several leaders in the field to gain insight into how their research and the field of pattern formation have shaped each other. We have learned that both molecular process and physico-chemical principles are important for biological pattern formation. New understanding will emerge through integration of the analytical approach of molecular-genetic manipulation and the systemic approach of model simulation. We regret that we could not include every major investigator in the field, but hope that this Special Issue of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. represents a sample of our knowledge of pattern formation today, which will help to stimulate more research on this fundamental process. PMID:19557673

  1. Developing Linguistic Auditory Memory Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valett, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    For learning handicapped children with impaired language associations, patterns, and expressions, this paper summarizes relevant linguistic research and instructional strategies. Linguistic auditory memory pattern exercises and examples are then presented as an integrated multisensory approach which has been found useful by special educators.…

  2. Evaluation of effects of changes in canal management and precipitation patterns on salinity in Biscayne Bay, Florida, using an integrated surface-water/groundwater model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohmann, Melinda A.; Swain, Eric D.; Wang, John D.; Dixon, Joann

    2012-01-01

    Biscayne National Park, located in Biscayne Bay in southeast Florida, is one of the largest marine parks in the country and sustains a large natural marine fishery where numerous threatened and endangered species reproduce. In recent years, the bay has experienced hypersaline conditions (salinity greater than 35 practical salinity units) of increasing magnitude and duration. Hypersalinity events were particularly pronounced during April to August 2004 in nearshore areas along the southern and middle parts of the bay. Prolonged hypersaline conditions can cause degradation of water quality and permanent damage to, or loss of, brackish nursery habitats for multiple species of fish and crustaceans as well as damage to certain types of seagrasses that are not tolerant of extreme changes in salinity. To evaluate the factors that contribute to hypersalinity events and to test the effects of possible changes in precipitation patterns and canal flows into Biscayne Bay on salinity in the bay, the U.S. Geological Survey constructed a coupled surface-water/groundwater numerical flow model. The model is designed to account for freshwater flows into Biscayne Bay through the canal system, leakage of salty bay water into the underlying Biscayne aquifer, discharge of fresh and salty groundwater from the Biscayne aquifer into the bay, direct effects of precipitation on bay salinity, indirect effects of precipitation on recharge to the Biscayne aquifer, direct effects of evapotranspiration (ET) on bay salinity, indirect effects of ET on recharge to the Biscayne aquifer, and maintenance of mass balance of both water and solute. The model was constructed using the Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density Dependent System (FTLOADDS) simulator, version 3.3, which couples the two-dimensional, surface-water flow and solute-transport simulator SWIFT2D with the density-dependent, groundwater flow an solute-transport simulator SEAWAT. The model was calibrated by a trial

  3. Single Particle-Photon Imaging Detector With 4-Dimensional Output: Absolute Time-of-hit, X-Y Position, and PHA: Applications in Space Science Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, N. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.

    2006-12-01

    A detector that can simultaneously measure time, position, and pulse high analysis (PHA) of single particle/photons with high resolutions and speeds, is a strong enabling technology for many space science instruments such as: energetic neutral atom imagers, low energy neutrals, energetic particle spectrometers, ion/electron plasma analyzers, UV spectrographs, mass spectrometers, laser range finding imagers, X-ray imagers. This presentation describes one such 4-dimentional detector based on micro-channel plates (MCPs), delay line anodes, and precise time of flight, and charge integration electronics for PHA. More specifically the detector includes: a) An MCP in 2-stack or Z-stack configuration for the particle/photon detection. b) Option for a thin foil or photo-cathode in front of the MCP to increase the detection efficiency of particles or photons respectively. c) Novel 1D or 2D delay line anode adaptable to almost any geometry and physical size of common instruments mentioned above. d) Fast time of flight (TOF) electronics for the absolute time of hit and the X-Y position determination. e) Fast charge integration electronics for PHA of the total charge released by the MCP. Under certain circumstances the PHA gives information about the particle mass such as for protons, He and Oxygen, cross calibrated against UV light which typically gives a single electron distribution. f) FPGA electronics for digital data acquisition and handling. e) Standard mat lab SW for data analysis and visualization in a stand alone application. The detector achieves time of hit accuracy <50ps, X-Y position resolution <20um in a field of 2048 x 2048 pixels (2048 for 1D) and adjustable speeds of: 10MHz at 256 x 256 pixels to 1MHz at 2048 x 2048 pixels. The total-charge analysis is at 10-bits. The detector can be used in its full 4D configuration such as in TOF imaging particle analyzer (i.e ENA), or in a reduced configuration such as in a UV spectrograph with X-Y position only. Typical

  4. Integrating Activity Patterns into Destination Choice Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fesenmaier, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Factors affecting decision-making on where to go for recreation, specifically state park choice, were analyzed in a study based on data, collected via a telephone survey, from 452 Oklahoma households. The relative accuracy of various models for predicting individual destination choices were also examined. (IAH)

  5. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  6. Teaching Design Patterns through Computer Game Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gestwicki, Paul; Sun, Fu-Shing

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach for teaching design patterns that emphasizes object-orientation and patterns integration. The context of computer game development is used to engage and motivate students, and it is additionally rich with design patterns. A case study is presented based on "EEClone," an arcade-style computer game implemented in Java. Our…

  7. Effect of an integrated community-based package for maternal and newborn care on feeding patterns during the first 12 weeks of life: a cluster-randomized trial in a South African township

    PubMed Central

    Ijumba, Petrida; Doherty, Tanya; Jackson, Debra; Tomlinson, Mark; Sanders, David; Swanevelder, Sonja; Persson, Lars-Åke

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the effect of community-based counselling on feeding patterns during the first 12 weeks after birth, and to study whether the effect differs by maternal HIV status, educational level or household wealth. Design Cluster-randomized trial with fifteen clusters in each arm to evaluate an integrated package providing two pregnancy and five postnatal home visits delivered by community health workers. Infant feeding data were collected using 24 h recall of nineteen food and fluid items. Setting A township near Durban, South Africa. Subjects Pregnant women (1894 intervention and 2243 control) aged 17 yearsor more. Results Twelve weeks after birth, 1629 (intervention) and 1865 (control) mother–infant pairs were available for analysis. Socio-economic conditions differed slightly across intervention groups, which were considered in the analyses. There was no effect on early initiation of breast-feeding. At 12 weeks of age the intervention doubled exclusive breast-feeding (OR=2·29; 95 % CI 1·80, 2·92), increased exclusive formula-feeding (OR=1·70; 95 % CI 1·28, 2·27), increased predominant breast-feeding (OR=1·71; 95 % CI 1·34, 2·19), decreased mixed formula-feeding (OR=0·68; 95 % CI 0·55, 0·83) and decreased mixed breast-feeding (OR=0·54; 95 % CI 0·44, 0·67). The effect on exclusive breast-feeding at 12 weeks was stronger among HIV-negative mothers than HIV-positive mothers (P=0·01), while the effect on mixed formula feeding was significant only among HIV-positive mothers (P=0·03). The effect on exclusive feeding was not different by household wealth or maternal education levels. Conclusions A perinatal intervention package delivered by community health workers was effective in increasing exclusive breast-feeding, exclusive formula feeding and decreasing mixed feeding. PMID:25660465

  8. Experimental investigation of 4-dimensional superspace crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Janner, A.

    1983-09-01

    The symmetry of incommensurate crystals can be described by higher dimensional space groups in the so called superspace approach. The basic ideas are explained and used for showing that superspace groups provide an adequate frame for analyzing experimental results on incommensurate crystals.

  9. Understanding taxi travel patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hua; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhu, Ji; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Taxis play important roles in modern urban transportation systems, especially in mega cities. While providing necessary amenities, taxis also significantly contribute to traffic congestion, urban energy consumption, and air pollution. Understanding the travel patterns of taxis is thus important for addressing many urban sustainability challenges. Previous research has primarily focused on examining the statistical properties of passenger trips, which include only taxi trips occupied with passengers. However, unoccupied trips are also important for urban sustainability issues because they represent potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the transportation system. Therefore, we need to understand the travel patterns of taxis as an integrated system, instead of focusing only on the occupied trips. In this study we examine GPS trajectory data of 11,880 taxis in Beijing, China for a period of three weeks. Our results show that taxi travel patterns share similar traits with travel patterns of individuals but also exhibit differences. Trip displacement distribution of taxi travels is statistically greater than the exponential distribution and smaller than the truncated power-law distribution. The distribution of short trips (less than 30 miles) can be best fitted with power-law while long trips follow exponential decay. We use radius of gyration to characterize individual taxi's travel distance and find that it does not follow a truncated power-law as observed in previous studies. Spatial and temporal regularities exist in taxi travels. However, with increasing spatial coverage, taxi trips can exhibit dual high probability density centers.

  10. Patterning and templating for nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Ozkan, Mihri; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Huang, Yu; Chang, Jane P; Monbouquette, Harold G; Chen, Yong; Nealey, Paul; Botros, Youssry

    2010-02-01

    The semiconductor industry will soon be launching 32 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology node using 193 nm lithography patterning technology to fabricate microprocessors with more than 2 billion transistors. To ensure the survival of Moore's law, alternative patterning techniques that offer advantages beyond conventional top-down patterning are aggressively being explored. It is evident that most alternative patterning techniques may not offer compelling advantages to succeed conventional top-down lithography for silicon integrated circuits, but alternative approaches may well indeed offer functional advantages in realising next-generation information processing nanoarchitectures such as those based on cellular, bioinsipired, magnetic dot logic, and crossbar schemes. This paper highlights and evaluates some patterning methods from the Center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics in Los Angeles and discusses key benchmarking criteria with respect to CMOS scaling.

  11. Integrated spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dong X.; Storti, George M.; Wrigley, Charles Y.

    1992-08-01

    We described here an integrated spatial light modulator (SLM) employing Quantex electron trapping (ET) materials. The light modulation is accomplished by emission of ET material, upon incident coherent infrared light, where a pattern is written to by previous visible light excitation. The ET based spatial light modulators offer unique advantages over other SLM devices, such as capability of converting incoherent input to coherent light output and of integrating the modulator, the photodetector, and the memory into a single, rugged unit.

  12. Integrated Means Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odegard, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the operation of the Cessna Pilot Center (CPC) flight training systems. The program is based on a series of integrated activities involving stimulus, response, reinforcement and association components. Results show that the program can significantly reduce in-flight training time. (CP)

  13. Integrating Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These articles focus on art as a component of interdisciplinary integration. (1) "Integrated Curriculum and the Visual Arts" (Anna Kindler) considers various aspects of integration and implications for art education. (2) "Integration: The New Literacy" (Tim Varro) illustrates how the use of technology can facilitate cross-curricular integration.…

  14. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    DOEpatents

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  15. Pattern, Growth and Control

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    The view of biology as goal-directed engineering has deep historical roots in developmental biology, a field currently benefitting from an influx of ideas and methods from systems biology. Systems biology draws on non-biological paradigms to explain developmental mechanisms of control, the specific type of regulation that achieves or maintains a desired end. This review highlights some of the current efforts designed to elucidate basic design principles underlying the engineering objectives of robustness, precision, and scaling that are required during developmental control of growth and pattern formation. Examples from vertebrate and invertebrate development are used to illustrate general principles including the value of integral feedback in achieving set-point control; the usefulness of self-organizing behavior; the importance of recognizing and appropriately handling noise; and the No Free Lunch theory. Through the examination of such principles, systems biology offers a functional framework to make sense of the mechanistic complexity of organismal development. PMID:21414486

  16. Integrating Technology with Architectural Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmasry, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Center of High Performance Learning Technologies (CHPLE), Virginia Tech, conducted a study investigating issues related to integration of learning technologies with architectural systems in contemporary learning environments. The study is qualitative in nature, and focuses on integration patterns of learning technologies with…

  17. DNA pattern recognition using canonical correlation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, B K; Chakraborty, Chiranjib

    2015-10-01

    We performed canonical correlation analysis as an unsupervised statistical tool to describe related views of the same semantic object for identifying patterns. A pattern recognition technique based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was proposed for finding required genetic code in the DNA sequence. Two related but different objects were considered: one was a particular pattern, and other was test DNA sequence. CCA found correlations between two observations of the same semantic pattern and test sequence. It is concluded that the relationship possesses maximum value in the position where the pattern exists. As a case study, the potential of CCA was demonstrated on the sequence found from HIV-1 preferred integration sites. The subsequences on the left and right flanking from the integration site were considered as the two views, and statistically significant relationships were established between these two views to elucidate the viral preference as an important factor for the correlation. PMID:26564973

  18. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  19. Associative Pattern Recognition In Analog VLSI Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Winner-take-all circuit selects best-match stored pattern. Prototype cascadable very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chips built and tested to demonstrate concept of electronic associative pattern recognition. Based on low-power, sub-threshold analog complementary oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) VLSI circuitry, each chip can store 128 sets (vectors) of 16 analog values (vector components), vectors representing known patterns as diverse as spectra, histograms, graphs, or brightnesses of pixels in images. Chips exploit parallel nature of vector quantization architecture to implement highly parallel processing in relatively simple computational cells. Through collective action, cells classify input pattern in fraction of microsecond while consuming power of few microwatts.

  20. Morphological Integration of the Modern Human Mandible during Ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial integration is prevalent in anatomical modernity research. Little investigation has been done on mandibular integration. Integration patterns were quantified in a longitudinal modern human sample of mandibles. This integration pattern is one of modularization between the alveolar and muscle attachment regions, but with age-specific differences. The ascending ramus and nonalveolar portions of the corpus remain integrated throughout ontogeny. The alveolar region is dynamic, becoming modularized according to the needs of the mandible at a particular developmental stage. Early in ontogeny, this modularity reflects the need for space for the developing dentition; later, modularity is more reflective of mastication. The overall pattern of modern human mandibular integration follows the integration pattern seen in other mammals, including chimpanzees. Given the differences in craniofacial integration patterns between humans and chimpanzees, but the similarities in mandibular integration, it is likely that the mandible has played the more passive role in hominin skull evolution. PMID:21716741

  1. Capacitance enhancement via electrode patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan A.; Striolo, Alberto

    2013-11-28

    The necessity of increasing the energy density in electric double layer capacitors to meet current demand is fueling fundamental and applied research alike. We report here molecular dynamics simulation results for aqueous electrolytes near model electrodes. Particular focus is on the effect of electrode patterning on the structure of interfacial electrolytes, and on the potential drop between the solid electrodes and the bulk electrolytes. The latter is estimated by numerically integrating the Poisson equation using the charge densities due to water and ions accumulated near the interface as input. We considered uniform and patterned electrodes, both positively and negatively charged. The uniformly charged electrodes are modeled as graphite. The patterned ones are obtained by removing carbon atoms from the top-most graphene layer, yielding nanoscopic squares and stripes patterns. For simplicity, the patterned electrodes are effectively simulated as insulators (the charge remains localized on the top-most layer of carbon atoms). Our simulations show that the patterns alter the structure of water and the accumulation of ions at the liquid-solid interfaces. Using aqueous NaCl solutions, we found that while the capacitance calculated for three positively charged electrodes did not change much, that calculated for the negatively charged electrodes significantly increased upon patterning. We find that both water structure and orientation, as well as ion accumulation affect the capacitance. As electrode patterning affects differently water structure and ion accumulation, it might be possible to observe ion-specific effects. These results could be useful for advancing our understanding of electric double layer capacitors, capacitive desalination processes, as well as of fundamental interfacial electrolytes properties.

  2. Capacitance enhancement via electrode patterning.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tuan A; Striolo, Alberto

    2013-11-28

    The necessity of increasing the energy density in electric double layer capacitors to meet current demand is fueling fundamental and applied research alike. We report here molecular dynamics simulation results for aqueous electrolytes near model electrodes. Particular focus is on the effect of electrode patterning on the structure of interfacial electrolytes, and on the potential drop between the solid electrodes and the bulk electrolytes. The latter is estimated by numerically integrating the Poisson equation using the charge densities due to water and ions accumulated near the interface as input. We considered uniform and patterned electrodes, both positively and negatively charged. The uniformly charged electrodes are modeled as graphite. The patterned ones are obtained by removing carbon atoms from the top-most graphene layer, yielding nanoscopic squares and stripes patterns. For simplicity, the patterned electrodes are effectively simulated as insulators (the charge remains localized on the top-most layer of carbon atoms). Our simulations show that the patterns alter the structure of water and the accumulation of ions at the liquid-solid interfaces. Using aqueous NaCl solutions, we found that while the capacitance calculated for three positively charged electrodes did not change much, that calculated for the negatively charged electrodes significantly increased upon patterning. We find that both water structure and orientation, as well as ion accumulation affect the capacitance. As electrode patterning affects differently water structure and ion accumulation, it might be possible to observe ion-specific effects. These results could be useful for advancing our understanding of electric double layer capacitors, capacitive desalination processes, as well as of fundamental interfacial electrolytes properties.

  3. Visual pattern recognition based on spatio-temporal patterns of retinal ganglion cells’ activities

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Wei; Liu, Wen-Zhong; Gong, Xin-Wei; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Neural information is processed based on integrated activities of relevant neurons. Concerted population activity is one of the important ways for retinal ganglion cells to efficiently organize and process visual information. In the present study, the spike activities of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to three different visual patterns (checker-board, vertical gratings and horizontal gratings) were recorded using multi-electrode arrays. A measurement of subsequence distribution discrepancy (MSDD) was applied to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of retinal ganglion cells’ activities in response to different stimulation patterns. The results show that the population activity patterns were different in response to different stimulation patterns, such difference in activity pattern was consistently detectable even when visual adaptation occurred during repeated experimental trials. Therefore, the stimulus pattern can be reliably discriminated according to the spatio-temporal pattern of the neuronal activities calculated using the MSDD algorithm. PMID:21886670

  4. Teaching Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sue; Butts, Jennifer Lease

    2011-01-01

    Integrity is one of those essential yet highly ambiguous concepts. For the purpose of this chapter, integrity is defined as that combination of both attributes and actions that makes entities appear to be whole and ethical, as well as consistent. Like the concepts of leadership or wisdom or community or collaboration, integrity is a key element of…

  5. Patterned when wet: environment-dependent multifunctional patterns within amphiphilic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Brozell, Adrian M; Muha, Michelle A; Abed-Amoli, Arian; Bricarello, Daniel; Parikh, Atul N

    2007-12-01

    A simple integration of molecular and colloidal self-assembly approaches with photopatterning is shown to produce multifunctional patterns of amphiphilic colloidal crystals. These crystals display binary spatial patterns of wettability by water and a single photonic stop-band in air. Upon exposure to water, the uniform stop-band is replaced by a pattern of coexisting stop-bands that reflect the underlying pattern of surface wetting. These hydration-dependent photonic patterns within single colloidal crystals form because of near-complete water rejection from the three-dimensionally disposed nanoscale interstices in hydrophobic regions and its exclusive permeation within the hydrophilic regions. This water permeation pattern is further structured by the three-dimensional (3D) distribution and contiguity of the nanoscale interstices between individual colloids, allowing 3D patterned organization of functional units in secondary self-assembly processes, as illustrated using quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, and fluorescent probes.

  6. Systematic physical verification with topological patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Vito; Lai, Ya-Chieh; Gennari, Frank; Teoh, Edward; Capodieci, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Design rule checks (DRC) are the industry workhorse for constraining design to ensure both physical and electrical manufacturability. Where DRCs fail to fully capture the concept of manufacturability, pattern-based approaches, such as DRC Plus, fill the gap using a library of patterns to capture and identify problematic 2D configurations. Today, both a DRC deck and a pattern matching deck may be found in advanced node process development kits. Major electronic design automation (EDA) vendors offer both DRC and pattern matching solutions for physical verification; in fact, both are frequently integrated into the same physical verification tool. In physical verification, DRCs represent dimensional constraints relating directly to process limitations. On the other hand, patterns represent the 2D placement of surrounding geometries that can introduce systematic process effects. It is possible to combine both DRCs and patterns in a single topological pattern representation. A topological pattern has two separate components: a bitmap representing the placement and alignment of polygon edges, and a vector of dimensional constraints. The topological pattern is unique and unambiguous; there is no code to write, and no two different ways to represent the same physical structure. Furthermore, markers aligned to the pattern can be generated to designate specific layout optimizations for improving manufacturability. In this paper, we describe how to do systematic physical verification with just topological patterns. Common mappings between traditional design rules and topological pattern rules are presented. We describe techniques that can be used during the development of a topological rule deck such as: taking constraints defined on one rule, and systematically projecting it onto other related rules; systematically separating a single rule into two or more rules, when the single rule is not sufficient to capture manufacturability constraints; creating test layout which

  7. Correlation, functional analysis and optical pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Lee, M.L.; Stalker, K.T.

    1994-03-01

    Correlation integrals have played a central role in optical pattern recognition. The success of correlation, however, has been limited. What is needed is a mathematical operation more complex than correlation. Suitably complex operations are the functionals defined on the Hilbert space of Lebesgue square integrable functions. Correlation is a linear functional of a parameter. In this paper, we develop a representation of functionals in terms of inner products or equivalently correlation functions. We also discuss the role of functionals in neutral networks. Having established a broad relation of correlation to pattern recognition, we discuss the computation of correlation functions using acousto-optics.

  8. Pattern, growth, and control.

    PubMed

    Lander, Arthur D

    2011-03-18

    Systems biology seeks not only to discover the machinery of life but to understand how such machinery is used for control, i.e., for regulation that achieves or maintains a desired, useful end. This sort of goal-directed, engineering-centered approach also has deep historical roots in developmental biology. Not surprisingly, developmental biology is currently enjoying an influx of ideas and methods from systems biology. This Review highlights current efforts to elucidate design principles underlying the engineering objectives of robustness, precision, and scaling as they relate to the developmental control of growth and pattern formation. Examples from vertebrate and invertebrate development are used to illustrate general lessons, including the value of integral feedback in achieving set-point control; the usefulness of self-organizing behavior; the importance of recognizing and appropriately handling noise; and the absence of "free lunch." By illuminating such principles, systems biology is helping to create a functional framework within which to make sense of the mechanistic complexity of organismal development. PMID:21414486

  9. Assuring structural integrity in Army systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

  10. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  11. Pattern Formation without Patterning Proteins in Cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Jun; Rutenberg, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Filaments of cyanobacteria respond to nitrogen starvation by differentiating one cell in ten into a heterocyst, which is devoted to fixing atmospheric nitrogen. This is an example of self-organized pattern formation. We present a dynamical model explaining the initial selection of heterocysts in mutated cyanobacteria that are effectively without normal patterning proteins. Our simulations of this model produce distributions of heterocyst spacings that are consistent with experimental data, and lead to new qualitative predictions on the mechanisms of pattern formation in filamentous cyanobacteria. We discuss possible experimental tests of our results.

  12. Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnanakan, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This book upholds the idea of learning and education as a means to individual development and social empowerment. It presents a holistic picture, looking at learning as an integral part of one's social and physical life. Strongly differing from existing classroom perspectives, the book analyses integrated learning at its broadest possible…

  13. Integrative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Dean

    1995-01-01

    In contrast with subject-bound education, integrative education promotes the construction of broad "mental programs" that require students to use skills and information in new, realistic contexts. Early childhood education has long been a model of integrative education, emphasizing the whole child and offering a wide range of experiences that…

  14. Discriminative Chemical Patterns: Automatic and Interactive Design.

    PubMed

    Bietz, Stefan; Schomburg, Karen T; Hilbig, Matthias; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-08-24

    The classification of molecules with respect to their inhibiting, activating, or toxicological potential constitutes a central aspect in the field of cheminformatics. Often, a discriminative feature is needed to distinguish two different molecule sets. Besides physicochemical properties, substructures and chemical patterns belong to the descriptors most frequently applied for this purpose. As a commonly used example of this descriptor class, SMARTS strings represent a powerful concept for the representation and processing of abstract chemical patterns. While their usage facilitates a convenient way to apply previously derived classification rules on new molecule sets, the manual generation of useful SMARTS patterns remains a complex and time-consuming process. Here, we introduce SMARTSminer, a new algorithm for the automatic derivation of discriminative SMARTS patterns from preclassified molecule sets. Based on a specially adapted subgraph mining algorithm, SMARTSminer identifies structural features that are frequent in only one of the given molecule classes. In comparison to elemental substructures, it also supports the consideration of general and specific SMARTS features. Furthermore, SMARTSminer is integrated into an interactive pattern editor named SMARTSeditor. This allows for an intuitive visualization on the basis of the SMARTSviewer concept as well as interactive adaption and further improvement of the generated patterns. Additionally, a new molecular matching feature provides an immediate feedback on a pattern's matching behavior across the molecule sets. We demonstrate the utility of the SMARTSminer functionality and its integration into the SMARTSeditor software in several different classification scenarios.

  15. Integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Gröne, Oliver; Garcia-Barbero, Mila

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The WHO European Office for Integrated Health Care Services in Barcelona is an integral part of the World Health Organizations' Regional Office for Europe. The main purpose of the Barcelona office is within the integration of services to encourage and facilitate changes in health care services in order to promote health and improve management and patient satisfaction by working for quality, accessibility, cost-effectiveness and participation. This position paper outlines the need for Integrated Care from a European perspective, provides a theoretical framework for the meaning of Integrated Care and its strategies and summarizes the programmes of the office that will support countries in the WHO European Region to improve health services. PMID:16896400

  16. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  17. Formalising Interaction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, Paolo; Guerra, Esther; de Lara, Juan

    The use of patterns as a way to refer to common solutions in the field of interface design is becoming widespread. However, contrary to the situation for software patterns, definitions of interaction patterns do not enjoy a common standard yet. Moreover, patterns are developed for design aspects as diverse as: user experience, layout, action coordination, or specification of entire widgets, reflecting the complexity of the field. As a consequence, research on formalisation of interaction patterns is not developed, and few attempts have been made to extend techniques developed for design pattern formalisation. We show here how an extension to an approach to pattern formalisation recently proposed by the authors can be usefully employed to formalize some classes of interaction patterns, to express relations like subtyping and composition, and to detect conflicts.

  18. Male pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  19. Integrative psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    The main purposes of the article are to present the history of integration in psychotherapy, the reasons of the development integrative approaches, and the approaches to integration in psychotherapy. Three approaches to integration in psychotherapy exist: theoretical integration, theoretical eclecticism, and common factors in different psychotherapeutic trends. In integrative psychotherapy, the basic epistemology, theory, and clinical practice are based on the phenomenology, field theory, holism, dialogue, and co-creation of dialogue in the therapeutic relationship. The main criticism is that integrative psychotherapy suffers from confusion and many unresolved controversies. It is difficult to theoretically and methodologically define the clinically applied model that is based on such a different epistemological and theoretical presumptions. Integrative psychotherapy is a synthesis of humanistic psychotherapy, object relations theory, and psychoanalytical self psychology. It focuses on the dynamics and potentials of human relationships, with a goal of changing the relations and understanding internal and external resistances. The process of integrative psychotherapy is primarily focused on the developmental-relational model and co-creation of psychotherapeutic relationship as a single interactive event, which is not unilateral, but rather a joint endeavor by both the therapist and the patient/client. The need for a relationship is an important human need and represents a process of attunement that occurs as a response to the need for a relationship, a unique interpersonal contact between two people. If this need is not met, it manifests with the different feelings and various defenses. To meet this need, we need to have another person with whom we can establish a sensitive, attuned relationship. Thus, the therapist becomes this person who tries to supplement what the person did not receive. Neuroscience can be a source of integration through different therapies. We

  20. Mathematical Pattern Hunters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitin, Phyllis; Whitin, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The habit of looking for patterns, the skills to find them, and the expectation that patterns have explanations is an essential mathematical habit of mind for young children (Goldenberg, Shteingold, & Feurzeig 2003, 23). Work with patterns leads to the ability to form generalizations, the bedrock of algebraic thinking, and teachers must nurture…

  1. Patterns of Change: Forces and Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Marianne; Jeffery, Tonya D.

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of Change: Forces and Motion is an integrated science lesson that uses the 5E lesson cycle to tie together science with language arts, mathematics, literature, technology, engineering and social studies in an engaging format applicable for young learners. This lesson has been uniquely designed for the purpose of providing elementary…

  2. Functional Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, Pierre; DeWitt-Morette, Cecile

    2010-06-01

    Acknowledgements; List symbols, conventions, and formulary; Part I. The Physical and Mathematical Environment: 1. The physical and mathematical environment; Part II. Quantum Mechanics: 2. First lesson: gaussian integrals; 3. Selected examples; 4. Semiclassical expansion: WKB; 5. Semiclassical expansion: beyond WKB; 6. Quantum dynamics: path integrals and operator formalism; Part III. Methods from Differential Geometry: 7. Symmetries; 8. Homotopy; 9. Grassmann analysis: basics; 10. Grassmann analysis: applications; 11. Volume elements, divergences, gradients; Part IV. Non-Gaussian Applications: 12. Poisson processes in physics; 13. A mathematical theory of Poisson processes; 14. First exit time: energy problems; Part V. Problems in Quantum Field Theory: 15. Renormalization 1: an introduction; 16. Renormalization 2: scaling; 17. Renormalization 3: combinatorics; 18. Volume elements in quantum field theory Bryce DeWitt; Part VI. Projects: 19. Projects; Appendix A. Forward and backward integrals: spaces of pointed paths; Appendix B. Product integrals; Appendix C. A compendium of gaussian integrals; Appendix D. Wick calculus Alexander Wurm; Appendix E. The Jacobi operator; Appendix F. Change of variables of integration; Appendix G. Analytic properties of covariances; Appendix H. Feynman's checkerboard; Bibliography; Index.

  3. Functional Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, Pierre; DeWitt-Morette, Cecile

    2006-11-01

    Acknowledgements; List symbols, conventions, and formulary; Part I. The Physical and Mathematical Environment: 1. The physical and mathematical environment; Part II. Quantum Mechanics: 2. First lesson: gaussian integrals; 3. Selected examples; 4. Semiclassical expansion: WKB; 5. Semiclassical expansion: beyond WKB; 6. Quantum dynamics: path integrals and operator formalism; Part III. Methods from Differential Geometry: 7. Symmetries; 8. Homotopy; 9. Grassmann analysis: basics; 10. Grassmann analysis: applications; 11. Volume elements, divergences, gradients; Part IV. Non-Gaussian Applications: 12. Poisson processes in physics; 13. A mathematical theory of Poisson processes; 14. First exit time: energy problems; Part V. Problems in Quantum Field Theory: 15. Renormalization 1: an introduction; 16. Renormalization 2: scaling; 17. Renormalization 3: combinatorics; 18. Volume elements in quantum field theory Bryce DeWitt; Part VI. Projects: 19. Projects; Appendix A. Forward and backward integrals: spaces of pointed paths; Appendix B. Product integrals; Appendix C. A compendium of gaussian integrals; Appendix D. Wick calculus Alexander Wurm; Appendix E. The Jacobi operator; Appendix F. Change of variables of integration; Appendix G. Analytic properties of covariances; Appendix H. Feynman's checkerboard; Bibliography; Index.

  4. Integrative neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Evian

    2003-07-01

    A fundamental impediment to an "Integrative Neuroscience" is the sense that scientists building models at one particular scale often see that scale as the epicentre of all brain function. This fragmentation has begun to change in a very distinctive way. Multidisciplinary efforts have provided the impetus to break down the boundaries and encourage a freer exchange of information across disciplines and scales. Despite huge deficits of knowledge, sufficient facts about the brain already exist, for an Integrative Neuroscience to begin to lift us clear of the jungle of detail, and shed light upon the workings of the brain as a system. Integrations of brain theory can be tested using judicious paradigm designs and measurement of temporospatial activity reflected in brain imaging technologies. However, to test realistically these new hypotheses requires consistent findings of the normative variability in very large numbers of control subjects, coupled with high sensitivity and specificity of findings in psychiatric disorders. Most importantly, these findings need to be analyzed and modeled with respect to the fundamental mechanisms underlying these measures. Without this convergence of theory, databases, and methodology (including across scale physiologically realistic numerical models), the clinical utility of brain imaging technologies in psychiatry will be significantly impeded. The examples provided in this paper of integration of theory, temporospatial integration of neuroimaging technologies, and a numerical simulation of brain function, bear testimony to the ongoing conversion of an Integrative Neuroscience from an exemplar status into reality.

  5. Patterning via optical saturable transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Precious

    For the past 40 years, optical lithography has been the patterning workhorse for the semiconductor industry. However, as integrated circuits have become more and more complex, and as device geometries shrink, more innovative methods are required to meet these needs. In the far-field, the smallest feature that can be generated with light is limited to approximately half the wavelength. This, so called far-field diffraction limit or the Abbe limit (after Prof. Ernst Abbe who first recognized this), effectively prevents the use of long-wavelength photons >300nm from patterning nanostructures <100nm. Even with a 193nm laser source and extremely complicated processing, patterns below ˜20nm are incredibly challenging to create. Sources with even shorter wavelengths can potentially be used. However, these tend be much more expensive and of much lower brightness, which in turn limits their patterning speed. Multi-photon reactions have been proposed to overcome the diffraction limit. However, these require very large intensities for modest gain in resolution. Moreover, the large intensities make it difficult to parallelize, thus limiting the patterning speed. In this dissertation, a novel nanopatterning technique using wavelength-selective small molecules that undergo single-photon reactions, enabling rapid top-down nanopatterning over large areas at low-light intensities, thereby allowing for the circumvention of the far-field diffraction barrier is developed and experimentally verified. This approach, which I refer to as Patterning via Optical Saturable Transitions (POST) has the potential for massive parallelism, enabling the creation of nanostructures and devices at a speed far surpassing what is currently possible with conventional optical lithographic techniques. The fundamental understanding of this technique goes beyond optical lithography in the semiconductor industry and is applicable to any area that requires the rapid patterning of large-area two or three

  6. Natural patterns of energy dispersal.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Teemu; Annila, Arto

    2010-12-01

    Universal patterns such as power-law dependences, skewed distributions, tree-like structures, networks and spirals are associated with energy dispersal processes using the principle of least action. Also ubiquitous temporal courses such as sigmoid growth, bifurcations and chaos are ascribed to the decrease of free energy in the least time. Moreover, emergence of natural standards such as the common genetic code and chirality consensus of amino acids are understood to follow from the quest to maximize the dispersal of energy. Many mathematical functions that model natural patterns and processes are found as approximations of the evolutionary equation of motion that has been derived from statistical physics of open systems. The evolutionary processes can be described as flows of energy that run from high energy sources to low energy sinks in the least time. However, the equation of evolution cannot be solved in general because the flows of energy and their driving forces are inseparable. Since the energy of the system keeps changing, the paths of evolution cannot be integrated from a given initial state to a final state. Although evolutionary courses of these non-Hamiltonian systems with two or more alternative ways of dissipation cannot be predicted, the flows of energy will search and naturally select paths of least action, known as geodesics, to consume free energy in the least time. The scale-invariant natural patterns follow from this natural law that impinges on processes at all scales of space and time.

  7. Ramadan Major Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Results: We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). Conclusions: This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest. PMID:25593728

  8. Harnessing vocal patterns for social communication

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Lora B.; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2014-01-01

    Work on vocal communication, influenced by a drive to understand the evolution of language, has focused on auditory processing and forebrain control of learned vocalizations. The actual hindbrain neural mechanisms used to create communication signals are understudied, in part because of the difficulty of experimental studies in species that rely on respiration for vocalization. In these experimental systems – including those that embody vocal learning – vocal behaviors have rhythmic qualities. Recent studies using molecular markers and “fictive” patterns produced by isolated brains are beginning to reveal how hindbrain circuits generate vocal patterns. Insights from central pattern generators for respiration and locomotion are illuminating common neural and developmental mechanisms. Choice of vocal patterns is responsive to socially salient input. Studies of the vertebrate social brain network suggest mechanisms used to integrate socially salient information and produce an appropriate vocal response. PMID:24995669

  9. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin–Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand–Levitan–Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  10. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  11. Characterizations of natural patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Hoffman, David K.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1998-05-01

    Labyrinthine patterns are observed in systems as diverse as animal coats, slime mold colonies, fish scales, and cloud streets. However, even under well-controlled conditions, repetition of an experiment gives structures with vastly different details. A theoretical analysis of ``universal'' aspects of patterns requires a quantitative description that gives similar values for distinct configurations. We introduce a function to characterize the ``disorder'' of labyrinthine patterns that is the same for structures generated under identical control parameters. Furthermore, patterns with different visual characteristics are described by distinct functions.

  12. Chemically functionalized surface patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaozhu; Boey, Freddy; Huo, Fengwei; Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hua

    2011-08-22

    Patterning substrates with versatile chemical functionalities from micro- to nanometer scale is a long-standing and interesting topic. This review provides an overview of a range of techniques commonly used for surface patterning. The first section briefly introduces conventional micropatterning tools, such as photolithography and microcontact printing. The second section focuses on the currently used nanolithographic techniques, for example, scanning probe lithography (SPL), and their applications in surface patterning. Their advantages and disadvantages are also demonstrated. In the last section, dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is emphatically illustrated, with a particular stress on the patterning and applications of biomolecules.

  13. The Integrated Hazard Analysis Integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry; Massie, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Hazard analysis addresses hazards that arise in the design, development, manufacturing, construction, facilities, transportation, operations and disposal activities associated with hardware, software, maintenance, operations and environments. An integrated hazard is an event or condition that is caused by or controlled by multiple systems, elements, or subsystems. Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is especially daunting and ambitious for large, complex systems such as NASA s Constellation program which incorporates program, systems and element components that impact others (International Space Station, public, International Partners, etc.). An appropriate IHA should identify all hazards, causes, controls and verifications used to mitigate the risk of catastrophic loss of crew, vehicle and/or mission. Unfortunately, in the current age of increased technology dependence, there is the tendency to sometimes overlook the necessary and sufficient qualifications of the integrator, that is, the person/team that identifies the parts, analyzes the architectural structure, aligns the analysis with the program plan and then communicates/coordinates with large and small components, each contributing necessary hardware, software and/or information to prevent catastrophic loss. As viewed from both Challenger and Columbia accidents, lack of appropriate communication, management errors and lack of resources dedicated to safety were cited as major contributors to these fatalities. From the accident reports, it would appear that the organizational impact of managers, integrators and safety personnel contributes more significantly to mission success and mission failure than purely technological components. If this is so, then organizations who sincerely desire mission success must put as much effort in selecting managers and integrators as they do when designing the hardware, writing the software code and analyzing competitive proposals. This paper will discuss the necessary and

  14. Individual Differences in Consumer Buying Patterns: A Behavioral Economic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalcanti, Paulo R.; Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M.; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have identified several regularities in buying behavior, no integrated view of individual differences related to such patterns has been yet proposed. The present research examined individual differences in patterns of buying behavior of fast-moving consumer goods, using panel data with information concerning purchases of…

  15. Construction of integrated case environments.

    PubMed

    Losavio, Francisca; Matteo, Alfredo; Pérez, María

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology is to improve the entire software system development process. The CASE approach is not merely a technology; it involves a fundamental change in the process of software development. The tendency of the CASE approach, technically speaking, is the integration of tools that assist in the application of specific methods. In this sense, the environment architecture, which includes the platform and the system's hardware and software, constitutes the base of the CASE environment. The problem of tools integration has been proposed for two decades. Current integration efforts emphasize the interoperability of tools, especially in distributed environments. In this work we use the Brown approach. The environment resulting from the application of this model is called a federative environment, focusing on the fact that this architecture pays special attention to the connections among the components of the environment. This approach is now being used in component-based design. This paper describes a concrete experience in civil engineering and architecture fields, for the construction of an integrated CASE environment. A generic architectural framework based on an intermediary architectural pattern is applied to achieve the integration of the different tools. This intermediary represents the control perspective of the PAC (Presentation-Abstraction-Control) style, which has been implemented as a Mediator pattern and it has been used in the interactive systems domain. In addition, a process is given to construct the integrated CASE. PMID:15916171

  16. Female-pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Female-pattern baldness is a pattern of hair loss (alopecia) caused by hormones, aging and genetics. Unlike male-pattern baldness, female-pattern baldness is an over-all thinning which maintains the normal ...

  17. Standard Transistor Array (STAR). Volume 2: Test pattern generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Testing of large scale integrated logic circuits is considered from the point-of-view of automatic test pattern generation. A logic simulator based approach for automatic test pattern generation is taken and is described. The logic model and the timing model used in the simulator are also described. Two methods are presented for generating test patterns from the output of the simulator. Recommendations for future study are also presented.

  18. Communication patterns for interconnecting and composing medical systems.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Venkatesh-Prasad; Kim, Yu Jin; Hatcliff, John; Robby

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a set of communication patterns to enable the construction of medical systems by composing devices and apps in Integrated Clinical Environments (ICE). These patterns abstract away the details of communication tasks, reduce engineering overhead, and ease compositional reasoning of the system. The proposed patterns have been successfully implemented on top of two distinct platforms (i.e., RTI Connext and Vert.x) to allow for experimentation. PMID:26736607

  19. Information Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation introduces the concept of Information Integrity, which is the detection and possible correction of information manipulation by any intermediary node in a communication system. As networks continue to grow in complexity, information theoretic security has failed to keep pace. As a result many parties whom want to communicate,…

  20. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  1. Adaptive pattern for autonomous UAV guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Chen-Ko; Segor, Florian

    2013-09-01

    The research done at the Fraunhofer IOSB in Karlsruhe within the AMFIS project is focusing on a mobile system to support rescue forces in accidents or disasters. The system consists of a ground control station which has the capability to communicate with a large number of heterogeneous sensors and sensor carriers and provides several open interfaces to allow easy integration of additional sensors into the system. Within this research we focus mainly on UAV such as VTOL (Vertical takeoff and Landing) systems because of their ease of use and their high maneuverability. To increase the positioning capability of the UAV, different onboard processing chains of image exploitation for real time detection of patterns on the ground and the interfacing technology for controlling the UAV from the payload during flight were examined. The earlier proposed static ground pattern was extended by an adaptive component which admits an additional visual communication channel to the aircraft. For this purpose different components were conceived to transfer additive information using changeable patterns on the ground. The adaptive ground pattern and their application suitability had to be tested under external influence. Beside the adaptive ground pattern, the onboard process chains and the adaptations to the demands of changing patterns are introduced in this paper. The tracking of the guiding points, the UAV navigation and the conversion of the guiding point positions from the images to real world co-ordinates in video sequences, as well as use limits and the possibilities of an adaptable pattern are examined.

  2. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  3. Engaging with Islamic Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Islamic patterns were a regular feature in mathematics classrooms, and probably still feature in many wall displays. However, as part of the learning process, these ancient designs appear to have lost any significant contemporary appeal. Here, the power of software is engaged to bring the construction of Islamic type patterns up to date. Forget…

  4. Patterns in Multiples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robold, Alice I.

    1982-01-01

    Activities that allow students to represent patterns concretely before showing the patterns in color on paper are presented. Three basic activities are described, with suggestions made for extensions that allow further pupil exploration of multiples. Student discovery of relationships not found by the teacher is expected. (MP)

  5. Patterned Personality Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surrena, Michelle Flandera

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project she developed for her students. The project emphasizes personality and pattern as the main objectives through a series of steps that include drawing exercises, observation skills, stream-of-color, intense patterning and texturizing, and colored pencil techniques. By drawing down the…

  6. Is It a Pattern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how in early mathematics learning, young children are often asked to recognize and describe visual patterns in their environment--perhaps on their clothing, a toy, or the carpet; around a picture frame; or in the playground equipment. Exploring patterns in the early years is seen as an important introduction to algebraic…

  7. Choreographing Patterns and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Finch, Heather; Katz, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin with a description of an algebraic dance--the translation of composite linear growing patterns into choreographed movement--which was the last component of a research-based instructional unit that focused on fostering an understanding of linear functional rules through geometric growing patterns and…

  8. Places with Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Matisse's use of bright colors and strong pattern is an instant motivator for elementary students. He effectively balances colors and simple shapes. This lesson, designed for 3rd graders, is an example of how art studio experiences for young students can draw upon art history. Sections include: (1) Discovering Patterns; (2) Planning Special…

  9. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  10. Solar cell grid patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A grid pattern is described for a solar cell of the type which includes a semiconductive layer doped to a first polarity and a top counter-doped layer. The grid pattern comprises a plurality of concentric conductive grids of selected geometric shapes which are centered about the center of the exposed active surface of the counter-doped layer. Connected to the grids is one or more conductors which extend to the cell's periphery. For the pattern area, the grids and conductors are arranged in the pattern to minimize the maximum distance which any injected majority carriers have to travel to reach any of the grids or conductors. The pattern has a multiaxes symmetry with respect to the cell center to minimize the maximum temperature differentials between points on the cell surface and to provide a more uniform temperature distribution across the cell face.

  11. Active element pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    This review article will discuss the use of the active element pattern for prediction of the scan performance of large phased array antennas. The introduction and application of the concept of the active element pattern goes back at least 30 years (1) -(6) , but the subject is generally not covered in modern antenna engineering textbooks or handbooks, and many contemporary workers are unfamiliar with this simple but powerful idea. In addition, early references on this subject do not provide a rigorous discussion or derivation of the active element pattern, relying instead on a more qualitative interpretation. The purpose of this communication is to make the technique of active element patterns more accessible to antenna engineers, and to provide a new derivation of the basic active element pattern relations in terms of scattering parameters.

  12. Respiratory Patterns and Strategies during Feeding in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vice, Frank L.; Gewolb, Ira H.

    2008-01-01

    Because patterns of integration of respiration into rhythmic suck-swallow efforts are highly variable, we examined the vagaries of respiratory efforts as they evolve from the first tentative attempts at integration through more complex rhythmic interactions, with a focus on several strategies in which breathing and suck-swallow are coordinated.…

  13. Integrating maps requires integrated data

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenbach, J.; Bentolila, S.

    1996-06-01

    The molecular genetics movement has proceeded admirably thanks to new technologies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing. However, the integration of mapping data has not yet been achieved. This article discussing several problem areas and serves as a reminder of the urgency of such concerns.

  14. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K. A.; Ikeda, Y.; Zabbarova, I.; Schaefer, C. M.; Bushnell, D.; De Groat, W. C.; Kanai, A.

    2015-01-01

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2BM−/−). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2BM−/− bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2BM−/− bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2BM−/− bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  15. RADIATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Glass, F.M.; Wilson, H.N.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation detecting and measuring systems, particularly a compact, integrating, background monitor, are discussed. One of the principal features of the system is the use of an electrometer tube where the input of the tube is directly connected to an electrode of the radiation detector and a capacitor is coupled to the tube input. When a predetermined quantity of radiation has been integrated, a trigger signal is fed to a recorder and a charge is delivered to the capacitor to render the tube inoperative. The capacitor is then recharged for the next period of operation. With this arrangement there is a substantial reduction in lead lengths and the principal components may be enclosed and hermetically sealed to insure low leakage.

  16. Patterns from drying drops.

    PubMed

    Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this review is to investigate different deposition patterns from dried droplets of a range of fluids: paints, polymers and biological fluids. This includes looking at mechanisms controlling the patterns and how they can be manipulated for use in certain applications such as medical diagnostics and nanotechnology. This review introduces the fundamental properties of droplets during evaporation. These include profile evolution (constant contact angle regime (CCAR) and constant radius regime (CRR)) and the internal flow (Marangoni and Capillary flow (Deegan et al. [22])). The understanding of these processes and the basic physics behind the phenomenon are crucial to the understanding of the factors influencing the deposition patterns. It concludes with the applications that each of these fluids can be used in and how the manipulation of the deposition pattern is useful. The most commonly seen pattern is the coffee-ring deposit which can be seen frequently in real life from tea/coffee stains and in water colour painting. This is caused by an outward flow known as capillary flow which carries suspended particles out to the edge of the wetted area. Other patterns that were found were uniform, central deposits and concentric rings which are caused by inward Marangoni flow. Complex biological fluids displayed an array of different patterns which can be used to diagnose patients.

  17. Patterns from drying drops.

    PubMed

    Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this review is to investigate different deposition patterns from dried droplets of a range of fluids: paints, polymers and biological fluids. This includes looking at mechanisms controlling the patterns and how they can be manipulated for use in certain applications such as medical diagnostics and nanotechnology. This review introduces the fundamental properties of droplets during evaporation. These include profile evolution (constant contact angle regime (CCAR) and constant radius regime (CRR)) and the internal flow (Marangoni and Capillary flow (Deegan et al. [22])). The understanding of these processes and the basic physics behind the phenomenon are crucial to the understanding of the factors influencing the deposition patterns. It concludes with the applications that each of these fluids can be used in and how the manipulation of the deposition pattern is useful. The most commonly seen pattern is the coffee-ring deposit which can be seen frequently in real life from tea/coffee stains and in water colour painting. This is caused by an outward flow known as capillary flow which carries suspended particles out to the edge of the wetted area. Other patterns that were found were uniform, central deposits and concentric rings which are caused by inward Marangoni flow. Complex biological fluids displayed an array of different patterns which can be used to diagnose patients. PMID:23746427

  18. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  19. Integrated structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  20. Prolegomenon to patterns in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    Despite Darwin, we remain children of Newton and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow prediction of the evolution of the biosphere. The main purpose of this article is to show that this dream is false, and bears on studying patterns of evolution. To do so, I must justify the use of the word "function" in biology, when physics has only happenings. The concept of "function" lifts biology irreducibly above physics, for as we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, I propose a post-entailing law explanatory framework in which Actuals arise in evolution that constitute new boundary conditions that are enabling constraints that create new, typically unprestatable, adjacent possible opportunities for further evolution, in which new Actuals arise, in a persistent becoming. Evolution flows into a typically unprestatable succession of adjacent possibles. Given the concept of function, the concept of functional closure of an organism making a living in its world becomes central. Implications for patterns in evolution include historical reconstruction, and statistical laws such as the distribution of extinction events, or species per genus, and the use of formal cause, not efficient cause, laws. PMID:24704211

  1. Prolegomenon to patterns in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    Despite Darwin, we remain children of Newton and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow prediction of the evolution of the biosphere. The main purpose of this article is to show that this dream is false, and bears on studying patterns of evolution. To do so, I must justify the use of the word "function" in biology, when physics has only happenings. The concept of "function" lifts biology irreducibly above physics, for as we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, I propose a post-entailing law explanatory framework in which Actuals arise in evolution that constitute new boundary conditions that are enabling constraints that create new, typically unprestatable, adjacent possible opportunities for further evolution, in which new Actuals arise, in a persistent becoming. Evolution flows into a typically unprestatable succession of adjacent possibles. Given the concept of function, the concept of functional closure of an organism making a living in its world becomes central. Implications for patterns in evolution include historical reconstruction, and statistical laws such as the distribution of extinction events, or species per genus, and the use of formal cause, not efficient cause, laws.

  2. Patterns of gender development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Ruble, Diane N

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive theory of gender development must describe and explain long-term developmental patterning and changes and how gender is experienced in the short term. This review considers multiple views on gender patterning, illustrated with contemporary research. First, because developmental research involves understanding normative patterns of change with age, several theoretically important topics illustrate gender development: how children come to recognize gender distinctions and understand stereotypes, and the emergence of prejudice and sexism. Second, developmental researchers study the stability of individual differences over time, which elucidates developmental processes. We review stability in two domains-sex segregation and activities/interests. Finally, a new approach advances understanding of developmental patterns, based on dynamic systems theory. Dynamic systems theory is a metatheoretical framework for studying stability and change, which developed from the study of complex and nonlinear systems in physics and mathematics. Some major features and examples show how dynamic approaches have been and could be applied in studying gender development.

  3. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  4. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  5. Patterns of Gender Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Ruble, Diane N.

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive theory of gender development must describe and explain long-term developmental patterning and changes and how gender is experienced in the short term. This review considers multiple views on gender patterning, illustrated with contemporary research. First, because developmental research involves understanding normative patterns of change with age, several theoretically important topics illustrate gender development: how children come to recognize gender distinctions and understand stereotypes, and the emergence of prejudice and sexism. Second, developmental researchers study the stability of individual differences over time, which elucidates developmental processes. We review stability in two domains—sex segregation and activities/interests. Finally, a new approach advances understanding of developmental patterns, based on dynamic systems theory. Dynamic systems theory is a metatheoretical framework for studying stability and change, which developed from the study of complex and nonlinear systems in physics and mathematics. Some major features and examples show how dynamic approaches have been and could be applied in studying gender development. PMID:19575615

  6. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  7. Female Pattern Alopecia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cyproterone acetate (not available in the US). Finasteride, also an oral medication, is approved for male ... show no effect for female pattern hair loss. Finasteride, spironolactone, and cyproterone should not be used in ...

  8. VLSI Microsystem for Rapid Bioinformatic Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Lue, Jaw-Chyng

    2009-01-01

    A system comprising very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits is being developed as a means of bioinformatics-oriented analysis and recognition of patterns of fluorescence generated in a microarray in an advanced, highly miniaturized, portable genetic-expression-assay instrument. Such an instrument implements an on-chip combination of polymerase chain reactions and electrochemical transduction for amplification and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

  9. How Neighborhood Poverty Structures Types and Levels of Social Integration.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Andrea Fleisch; Echeverria, Sandra E; Holland, Bart K; Abraido-Lanza, Ana F; Passannante, Marian R

    2015-09-01

    Social integration is fundamental to health and well-being. However, few studies have explored how neighborhood contexts pattern types and levels of social integration that individuals experience. We examined how neighborhood poverty structures two dimensions of social integration: integration with neighbors and social integration more generally. Using data from the United States Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we linked study participants to percent poverty in their neighborhood of residence (N = 16,040). Social integration was assessed using a modified Social Network Index and neighborhood integration based on yearly visits with neighbors. We fit multivariate logistic regression models that accounted for the complex survey design. Living in high poverty neighborhoods was associated with lower social integration but higher visits with neighbors. Neighborhood poverty distinctly patterns social integration, demonstrating that contexts shape the extent and quality of social relationships.

  10. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid numerical technique is developed for electrically large pyramidal horn antennas radiating in free space. A stepped-waveguide method is used to analyze the interior surfaces of the horn transition. The Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE) is employed on the outer surfaces of the pyramidal horn including the radiating aperture. Meanwhile, the Magnetic Field Integral Equation (MFIE) is used on the aperture to relate the aperture fields and those in the horn transition. The resultant hybrid field integral equation (HFIE) is solved numerically by the method of moments. This formulation is both accurate and numerically stable so that high-gain microwave pyramidal horns can be analyzed rigorously. Far-field radiation patterns, both computed and measured, are presented for three electrically-large x-band horn antennas. The comparisons demonstrate that this method is accurate enough to predict the fine pattern structure at wide angles and in the back region. Computed far-field patterns and aperture field distribution of two smaller x-band horns are also presented along with a discussion on the validity of the approximate aperture field distributions routinely used in the analysis and design of pyramidal horns.

  11. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  12. Integrating ecology into macroevolutionary research

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Lynsey; Baker, William J.; Barraclough, Timothy G.; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Goswami, Anjali; Harmon, Luke J.; Morlon, Hélène; Purvis, Andy; Rosindell, James; Thomas, Gavin H.; Turvey, Samuel T.; Phillimore, Albert B.

    2011-01-01

    On 9 March, over 150 biologists gathered in London for the Centre for Ecology and Evolution spring symposium, ‘Integrating Ecology into Macroevolutionary Research’. The event brought together researchers from London-based institutions alongside others from across the UK, Europe and North America for a day of talks. The meeting highlighted methodological advances and recent analyses of exemplar datasets focusing on the exploration of the role of ecological processes in shaping macroevolutionary patterns. PMID:21527505

  13. MSU Antenna Pattern Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Kleespies, Thomas J.; Green, J. Philip

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) antenna pattern data for nine MSU Flight Models (FMs) have been successfully rescued from 22-year old 7-track and 9-track magnetic tapes and cartridges. These antenna pattern data were unpacked into user-friendly ASCII format, and are potentially useful for making antenna pattern corrections to MSU antenna temperatures in retrieving the true brightness temperatures. We also properly interpreted the contents of the data and show how to convert the measured antenna signal amplitude in volts into relative antenna power in dB with proper normalization. It is found that the data are of high quality with a 60-dB drop in the co-polarized antenna patterns from the central peak value to its side-lobe regions at scan angles beyond 30 deg. The unpacked antenna pattern data produced in this study provide a useful database for data users to correct the antenna side-lobe contribution to MSU measurements. All of the data are available to the scientific community on a single CD-ROM.

  14. Intensity patterns in eastern Asia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evernden, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the intensity patterns of earthquakes of E Asia indicates a strong regional pattern of attenuation parameter k and systematic correlation of this pattern with topography, P residuals, and level of seismicity as in the USA.-Author

  15. Pattern classification approach to rocket engine diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Tulpule, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a systems level approach to integrate state-of-the-art rocket engine technology with advanced computational techniques to develop an integrated diagnostic system (IDS) for future rocket propulsion systems. The key feature of this IDS is the use of advanced diagnostic algorithms for failure detection as opposed to the current practice of redline-based failure detection methods. The paper presents a top-down analysis of rocket engine diagnostic requirements, rocket engine operation, applicable diagnostic algorithms, and algorithm design techniques, which serve as a basis for the IDS. The concepts of hierarchical, model-based information processing are described, together with the use uf signal processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence techniques which are an integral part of this diagnostic system. 27 refs.

  16. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Dimitrios; Lazaridou, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss, or female pattern androgenetic alopecia, is a nonscarring alopecia with a multi-factorial etiology that mostly affects postmenopausal women and is characterized by a reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp. The clinical picture is characterized by a diffuse rarefaction of scalp hair over the mid-frontal scalp and a more-or-less intact frontal hairline without any signs of inflammation or scarring. Although the disease poses only a cosmetic concern, it is chronic and may have a significant negative psychological impact on the affected person. The aim of treating female pattern hair loss is to reduce hair loss and, to a certain extent, succeed in promoting hair regrowth. Various treatment methods are available, but it remains unclear which are the most effective. Early initiation of treatment and the combination of various modalities seem to be more efficacious than monotherapy. PMID:26370643

  17. Design Patterns - Past, Present & Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamma, Erich

    Design Patterns are now a 15 year old thought experiment. And today, for many, Design Patterns have become part of the standard development lexicon. This talk looks back to the origin of Design Patterns and how they evolved since their initial description. I will then show patterns in action in the context of the Eclipse and Jazz platforms. Finally, I will discuss how the Design Patterns from the book can be refactored towards a Design Pattern 2.0 version.

  18. Diapiric spoke patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, C. J.; Rönnlund, P.; Schmeling, H.; Koyi, H.; Jackson, M. P. A.

    1991-03-01

    Not all finger-like diapirs evolve from or into linear walls as previously supposed. That would imply that all contemporaneous finger diapirs lie in rows and many do not. Physical models demonstrate that diapiric linear walls or rows of fingers have to be forced by lateral forces, lateral boundaries, or internal edge effects. By contrast, the kinematics of the simplest isothermal gravity overturns responsible for finger-like diapirs are geometrically, kinematically and dynamically similar to the "spoke patterns" of vigorous thermal convection. This is because Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) diapirism and Rayleigh-Bènard (RB) thermal convection are end members of a continuous dynamic spectrum due to any combination of compositional or thermally induced density inversions. All simple RT overturns are dynamically similar, but the vigour of thermal convection varies with the heat flow. The kinematics of spoke patterns are difficult to study in rapid, multiple overturns of thermal convection in low viscosity fluids. However, spoke patterns in slow, isothermal diapiric analogues can be analysed at any stage during their single overturn. Such studies indicate that two sets of spokes conduct fluids of different densities horizontally along the top and bottom boundaries to finger-like diapiric stems or plumes where they rise or sink to spread in polygonal bulbs at the opposite boundary. Spokes converge to hubs at the bottom boundary beneath stems feeding diapiric bulbs at the top boundary and vice versa. If the movement cells are considered centred on rising plumes, the cell corners are mapped by sinking plumes. The differences between spoke patterns and previously understood diapiric patterns are illustrated by geological examples with emphasis on relevance to the search for oil and gas. Physical arguments suggest that spoke patterns are probably the most common geometries of gravity-driven overturns in layered rocks of both the crust and the mantle.

  19. Design friendly double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    2012-03-01

    Double patterning using 193nm immersion has been adapted as the solution to enable 2x nm technology nodes until the arrival of EUV tools. As a result the past few years have seen a huge effort in creating double patterning friendly design flows. These flows have so far proposed a combination of decomposition rules at cell level and/or at placement level as well as sophisticated decomposition tools with varying density, design iteration and decomposition complexity penalties. What is more, designers have to familiarize themselves with double patterning challenges and decomposition tools. In this paper an alternative approach is presented that allows the development of dense standard cells with minimal impact on design flow due to double patterning. A real case study is done on 20nm node first metal layer where standard cells are designed without considering decomposition restrictions. The resulting layout is carefully studied in order to establish decomposition or color rules that can map the layout into two masks required for double patterning but without the need of complex coloring algorithms. Since the rules are derived from a decomposition unaware design they do not in return impose heavy restrictions on the design at the cell or placement level and show substantial density gains compared to previously proposed methods. Other key advantages are a simplified design flow without complex decomposition tools that can generate a faster time to market solution all at the same time keeping designers isolated from the challenges of the double patterning. The derived design rules highlight process development path required for design driven manufacturing.

  20. Congruent reduction and mode conversion in 4-dimensional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, L.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1987-04-01

    Standard eikonal theory reduces, to N=1, the order of the system of equations underlying wave propagation in inhomogeneous plasmas. The condition for this remarkable reducibility is that only one eigenvalue of the unreduced NxN dispersion matrix D(k,x) vanishes at a time. If, however, two or more eigenvalues of D become simultaneously small, the geometric optics reduction scheme becomes singular. These regions are associated with linear mode conversion, and are described by higher order systems. A new reduction scheme based on congruent transformations of D is developed, and it is shown that, in ''degenerate'' plasma regions, a partial reduction of order is possible. The method comprises a constructive step-by-step procedure, which, in the most frequent (doubly) degenerate case, yields a second order system, describing the pairwise mode conversion problems, the solution of which in general geometry has been found recently.

  1. Build 4-dimensional myocardial model for dynamic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixun; Liu, Songtao; Lardo, Albert C.; Schuleri, Karl; Nacif, Marcelo S.; Bluemke, David A.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2013-03-01

    4D (3D + time) model is valuable in comprehensive assessment of cardiac functions. Usually, the generation of the 4D myocardial models involves myocardium segmentation, mesh generation and non-rigid registration (to build mesh node correspondence). In this paper, we present a method to simultaneously perform the above tasks. This method begins from a triangular surface model of the myocardium at the first phase of a cardiac cycle. Then, the myocardial surface is simulated as a linear elastic membrane, and evolves toward the next phase governed by an energy function while maintaining the mesh quality. Our preliminary experiments performed on dynamic CT images of the dog demonstrated the effectiveness of this method on both segmentation and mesh generation. The minimum average surface distance between the segmentation results of the proposed method and the ground truth can reach 0.72 +/- 0.55 mm, and the mesh quality measured by the aspect ratio of the triangle was less than 11.57 +/- 1.18.

  2. Metal hierarchical patterning by direct nanoimprint lithography

    PubMed Central

    Radha, Boya; Lim, Su Hui; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional hierarchical patterning of metals is of paramount importance in diverse fields involving photonics, controlling surface wettability and wearable electronics. Conventionally, this type of structuring is tedious and usually involves layer-by-layer lithographic patterning. Here, we describe a simple process of direct nanoimprint lithography using palladium benzylthiolate, a versatile metal-organic ink, which not only leads to the formation of hierarchical patterns but also is amenable to layer-by-layer stacking of the metal over large areas. The key to achieving such multi-faceted patterning is hysteretic melting of ink, enabling its shaping. It undergoes transformation to metallic palladium under gentle thermal conditions without affecting the integrity of the hierarchical patterns on micro- as well as nanoscale. A metallic rice leaf structure showing anisotropic wetting behavior and woodpile-like structures were thus fabricated. Furthermore, this method is extendable for transferring imprinted structures to a flexible substrate to make them robust enough to sustain numerous bending cycles. PMID:23446801

  3. Pitch-based pattern splitting for 1D layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ryo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Smayling, Michael C.; Axelrad, Valery

    2015-07-01

    The pattern splitting algorithm for 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) for sub-10 nm node logic devices is shown. It is performed with integer linear programming (ILP) based on the conflict graph created from a grid map for each designated pitch. The relation between the number of times for patterning and the minimum pitch is shown systematically with a sample pattern of contact layer for each node. From the result, the number of times for patterning for 1D layout is fewer than that for conventional 2D layout. Moreover, an experimental result including SMO and total integrated process with hole repair technique is presented with the sample pattern of contact layer whose pattern density is relatively high among critical layers (fin, gate, local interconnect, contact, and metal).

  4. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  5. Turing Patterns Inside Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strier, Damián E.; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2007-01-01

    Concentration gradients inside cells are involved in key processes such as cell division and morphogenesis. Here we show that a model of the enzymatic step catalized by phosphofructokinase (PFK), a step which is responsible for the appearance of homogeneous oscillations in the glycolytic pathway, displays Turing patterns with an intrinsic length-scale that is smaller than a typical cell size. All the parameter values are fully consistent with classic experiments on glycolytic oscillations and equal diffusion coefficients are assumed for ATP and ADP. We identify the enzyme concentration and the glycolytic flux as the possible regulators of the pattern. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first closed example of Turing pattern formation in a model of a vital step of the cell metabolism, with a built-in mechanism for changing the diffusion length of the reactants, and with parameter values that are compatible with experiments. Turing patterns inside cells could provide a check-point that combines mechanical and biochemical information to trigger events during the cell division process. PMID:17940616

  6. Experiments with Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a hands-on experiment that covers many areas of high school mathematics. Included are the notions of patterns, proof, triangular numbers and various aspects of problem solving. The problem involves the arrangements of a school of fish using split peas or buttons to represent the fish. (Contains 4 figures.)

  7. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  8. Nutritional Patterns of Centenarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mary Ann; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared dietary patterns of 165 older adults. Compared to younger cohorts, centenarians (n=24) consumed breakfast more regularly, avoided weight loss diets and large fluctuation in body weight, consumed slightly more vegetables, and relied on doctors and family for nutrition information. Centenarians were less likely to consume low-fat diets and…

  9. Bumblebees Learn Polarization Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Foster, James J.; Sharkey, Camilla R.; Gaworska, Alicia V.A.; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Whitney, Heather M.; Partridge, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Foraging insect pollinators such as bees must find and identify flowers in a complex visual environment. Bees use skylight polarization patterns for navigation [1–3], a capacity mediated by the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area (DRA) of their eye [4, 5]. While other insects use polarization sensitivity to identify appropriate habitats [6], oviposition sites, and food sources [7], to date no nonnavigational functions of polarization vision have been identified in bees. Here we investigated the ability of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to learn polarization patterns on artificial “flowers” in order to obtain a food reward. We show that foraging bumblebees can learn to discriminate between two differently polarized targets, but only when the target artificial “flower” is viewed from below. A context for these results is provided by polarization imaging of bee-pollinated flowers, revealing the potential for polarization patterns in real flowers. Bees may therefore have the ability to use polarization vision, possibly mediated by their polarization-sensitive DRA, both for navigation and to learn polarization patterns on flowers, the latter being the first nonnavigational function for bee polarization vision to be identified. PMID:24909321

  10. A Passion for Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venola, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    Popular culture is a relatively new area of study in the artroom, and combining it with the demands of a rigorous curriculum requires some thought. Combining threads from several sources was the key to an exciting exploration of pattern inspired by a newspaper headline. In 2006, a landmark case was settled in Austria, which repatriated five famous…

  11. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  12. Computational Thinking Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  13. Spider Web Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A delicate pattern, like that of a spider web, appears on top of the Mars residual polar cap, after the seasonal carbon-dioxide ice slab has disappeared. Next spring, these will likely mark the sites of vents when the carbon-dioxide ice cap returns. This Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  14. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  15. Algebraic Reasoning through Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.; Becker, Joanne Rossi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a three-year study that explores students' performance on patterning tasks involving prealgebra and algebra. The findings, insights, and issues drawn from the study are intended to help teach prealgebra and algebra. In the remainder of the article, the authors take a more global view of the three-year study on…

  16. Northern Plains Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-513, 14 October 2003

    Patterns are common on the northern plains of Mars. Like their terrestrial counterparts in places like Siberia, Alaska, and northern Canada, patterned ground on Mars might be an indicator of the presence of ground ice. Whether it is true that the patterns on Mars are related to ground ice and whether the ice is still present beneath the martian surface are unknown. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example of patterned ground on the martian northern plains near 72.4oN, 252.6oW. The dark dots and lines are low mounds and chains of mounds. The circular feature near the center of the image is the location of a buried meteor impact crater; its presence today is marked only by the dark boulders on its rim and ejecta blanket that have managed to remain uncovered at the martian surface. The area shown is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  17. Pattern recognition in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Dick; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2013-09-01

    Pattern recognition is concerned with the development of systems that learn to solve a given problem using a set of example instances, each represented by a number of features. These problems include clustering, the grouping of similar instances; classification, the task of assigning a discrete label to a given instance; and dimensionality reduction, combining or selecting features to arrive at a more useful representation. The use of statistical pattern recognition algorithms in bioinformatics is pervasive. Classification and clustering are often applied to high-throughput measurement data arising from microarray, mass spectrometry and next-generation sequencing experiments for selecting markers, predicting phenotype and grouping objects or genes. Less explicitly, classification is at the core of a wide range of tools such as predictors of genes, protein function, functional or genetic interactions, etc., and used extensively in systems biology. A course on pattern recognition (or machine learning) should therefore be at the core of any bioinformatics education program. In this review, we discuss the main elements of a pattern recognition course, based on material developed for courses taught at the BSc, MSc and PhD levels to an audience of bioinformaticians, computer scientists and life scientists. We pay attention to common problems and pitfalls encountered in applications and in interpretation of the results obtained.

  18. Storyboards for Meaningful Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubon, Lucille P.; Shafer, Kathryn G.

    2010-01-01

    The initial focus of this kindergarten-level action research project was on identifying which students could create a pattern. The focus then shifted to helping all students successfully achieve this goal. The intervention uses a storyboard where students select colored cubes to represent objects and then snap the cubes together as indicated on…

  19. Species integrity in trees.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Baack, Eric J

    2014-09-01

    From California sequoia, to Australian eucalyptus, to the outstanding diversity of Amazonian forests, trees are fundamental to many processes in ecology and evolution. Trees define the communities that they inhabit, are host to a multiplicity of other organisms and can determine the ecological dynamics of other plants and animals. Trees are also at the heart of major patterns of biodiversity such as the latitudinal gradient of species diversity and thus are important systems for studying the origin of new plant species. Although the role of trees in community assembly and ecological succession is partially understood, the origin of tree diversity remains largely opaque. For instance, the relative importance of differing habitats and phenologies as barriers to hybridization between closely related species is still largely uncharacterized in trees. Consequently, we know very little about the origin of trees species and their integrity. Similarly, studies on the interplay between speciation and tree community assembly are in their infancy and so are studies on how processes like forest maturation modifies the context in which reproductive isolation evolves. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Lindtke et al. (2014) and Lagache et al. (2014) overcome some traditional difficulties in studying mating systems and sexual isolation in the iconic oaks and poplars, providing novel insights about the integrity of tree species and on how ecology leads to variation in selection on reproductive isolation over time and space. PMID:25155715

  20. Anastomosing Rivers are Disequilibrium Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavooi, E.; de Haas, T.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Makaske, B.; Smith, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    Anastomosing rivers have multiple interconnected channels that enclose floodbasins. Various theories have been proposed to explain this pattern, including an increased discharge conveyance and sediment transport capacity of multiple channels, or, alternatively, a tendency to avulse due to upstream sediment overloading. The former implies an equilibrium pattern whereas the latter implies a temporary increase of the number of channels. Our objective was to test these hypotheses on a well-documented case: the upper Columbia River. We combined a geological approach with physics-based morphological modelling. Three geological sections across the entire valley were constructed based on hand auger data, covering a depth up to 8.6 m corresponding to the last 4000 years, corroborated by 14C dating. The sections were integrated with surface mapping to derive proportions of channel and floodplain sediment volumes and sedimentation rates along the river. Existing sediment transport measurements at a location upstream and downstream of the study area were re-analysed and time-integrated for comparison. A network model was built based on gradually varied flow equations, sediment transport prediction, mass conservation and detailed transverse slope and spiral meander flow effects at the bifurcations. The geological sections show a clear downstream trend of decreasing number of channels and decreasing bed sediment deposition in channels and crevasses, indicating bed sediment overloading from upstream and subsequent avulsions. The measured suspended sediment is much larger than the amount captured in the floodplains, indicating that this is not limiting the aggradation in the valley. Extensive crevasse splays in the upstream section and an increased bed elevation and gradient demonstrate a tendency to avulse due to overloading of bed sediment. The measured bedload transport indeed indicates bed material overloading. The 14C dating confirms that long-term average floodplain

  1. Fixture for forming evaporative pattern (EPC) process patterns

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Paul C.; Jordan, Ronald R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of casting metal using evaporative pattern casting process patterns in combination with a fixture for creating and maintaining a desired configuration in flexible patterns. A pattern is constructed and gently bent to the curvature of a suitable fixture. String or thin wire, which burns off during casting, is used to tie the pattern to the fixture. The fixture with pattern is dipped in a commercially available refractory wash to prevent metal adherence and sticking to the fixture. When the refractory wash is dry, the fixture and pattern are placed in a flask, and sand is added and compacted by vibration. The pattern remains in position, restrained by the fixture. Metal that is poured directly into the pattern replaces the pattern exactly but does not contact or weld to the fixture due to the protective refractory layer. When solid, the casting is easily separated from the fixture. The fixture can be cleaned for reuse in conventional casting cleaning equipment.

  2. Pattern recognition with "materials that compute".

    PubMed

    Fang, Yan; Yashin, Victor V; Levitan, Steven P; Balazs, Anna C

    2016-09-01

    Driven by advances in materials and computer science, researchers are attempting to design systems where the computer and material are one and the same entity. Using theoretical and computational modeling, we design a hybrid material system that can autonomously transduce chemical, mechanical, and electrical energy to perform a computational task in a self-organized manner, without the need for external electrical power sources. Each unit in this system integrates a self-oscillating gel, which undergoes the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, with an overlaying piezoelectric (PZ) cantilever. The chemomechanical oscillations of the BZ gels deflect the PZ layer, which consequently generates a voltage across the material. When these BZ-PZ units are connected in series by electrical wires, the oscillations of these units become synchronized across the network, where the mode of synchronization depends on the polarity of the PZ. We show that the network of coupled, synchronizing BZ-PZ oscillators can perform pattern recognition. The "stored" patterns are set of polarities of the individual BZ-PZ units, and the "input" patterns are coded through the initial phase of the oscillations imposed on these units. The results of the modeling show that the input pattern closest to the stored pattern exhibits the fastest convergence time to stable synchronization behavior. In this way, networks of coupled BZ-PZ oscillators achieve pattern recognition. Further, we show that the convergence time to stable synchronization provides a robust measure of the degree of match between the input and stored patterns. Through these studies, we establish experimentally realizable design rules for creating "materials that compute."

  3. Pattern recognition with "materials that compute".

    PubMed

    Fang, Yan; Yashin, Victor V; Levitan, Steven P; Balazs, Anna C

    2016-09-01

    Driven by advances in materials and computer science, researchers are attempting to design systems where the computer and material are one and the same entity. Using theoretical and computational modeling, we design a hybrid material system that can autonomously transduce chemical, mechanical, and electrical energy to perform a computational task in a self-organized manner, without the need for external electrical power sources. Each unit in this system integrates a self-oscillating gel, which undergoes the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, with an overlaying piezoelectric (PZ) cantilever. The chemomechanical oscillations of the BZ gels deflect the PZ layer, which consequently generates a voltage across the material. When these BZ-PZ units are connected in series by electrical wires, the oscillations of these units become synchronized across the network, where the mode of synchronization depends on the polarity of the PZ. We show that the network of coupled, synchronizing BZ-PZ oscillators can perform pattern recognition. The "stored" patterns are set of polarities of the individual BZ-PZ units, and the "input" patterns are coded through the initial phase of the oscillations imposed on these units. The results of the modeling show that the input pattern closest to the stored pattern exhibits the fastest convergence time to stable synchronization behavior. In this way, networks of coupled BZ-PZ oscillators achieve pattern recognition. Further, we show that the convergence time to stable synchronization provides a robust measure of the degree of match between the input and stored patterns. Through these studies, we establish experimentally realizable design rules for creating "materials that compute." PMID:27617290

  4. Nonplanar integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Warren; de Mello Koch, Robert; Lin, Hai

    2011-03-01

    In this article we study operators with a dimension Δ ˜ O( N) and show that simple analytic expressions for the action of the dilatation operator can be found. The operators we consider are restricted Schur polynomials. There are two distinct classes of operators that we consider: operators labeled by Young diagrams with two long columns or two long rows. The main complication in working with restricted Schur polynomials is in building a projector from a given S n+ m irreducible representation to an S n × S m irreducible representation (both specified by the labels of the restricted Schur polynomial). We give an explicit construction of these projectors by reducing it to the simple problem of addition of angular momentum in ordinary non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The diagonalization of the dilatation operator reduces to solving three term recursion relations. The fact that the recursion relations have only three terms is a direct consequence of the weak mixing at one loop of the restricted Schur polynomials. The recursion relations can be solved exactly in terms of symmetric Kravchuk polynomials or in terms of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. This proves that the dilatation operator reduces to a decoupled set of harmonic oscillators and therefore it is integrable.

  5. Endogenous patterns of mechanical stress are required for branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterning of cell behaviors establishes the regional differences within tissues that collectively develop branched organs into their characteristic treelike shapes. Here we show that the pattern of branching morphogenesis of three-dimensional (3D) engineered epithelial tissues is controlled in part by gradients of endogenous mechanical stress. We used microfabrication to build model mammary epithelial tissues of defined geometry that branched in a stereotyped pattern when induced with growth factors. Branches initiated from sites of high mechanical stress within the tissues, as predicted numerically and measured directly using 3D traction force microscopy. Branch sites were defined by activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), inhibition of which disrupted morphogenesis. Stress, FAK activation, and branching were all altered by manipulating cellular contractility, matrix stiffness, intercellular cohesion and tissue geometry. These data suggest that the pattern and magnitude of mechanical stress across epithelial tissues cooperate with biochemical signals to specify branching pattern. Insight, innovation, integration Morphogenesis is ultimately a physical process wherein tissues are sculpted into their final three-dimensional (3D) patterns. Mechanical stresses from the microenvironment can also play regulatory roles, but their influence on pattern is difficult to ascertain in 3D systems in vivo. Here we integrate 3D microscale engineered tissues with insight from biological mechanics to understand the role of endogenous mechanical stresses in patterning tissue development. The innovation lies in the use of numerical modeling to design experiments that can predict the stress distribution and resulting morphogenesis of model tissues. PMID:20717570

  6. Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit (FIIAT) is a C library that provides image analysis functions in a single, portable package. It provides basic low-level filtering, texture analysis, and subwindow descriptor for applications dealing with image interpretation and object recognition. Designed with spaceflight in mind, it addresses: Ease of integration (minimal external dependencies) Fast, real-time operation using integer arithmetic where possible (useful for platforms lacking a dedicated floatingpoint processor) Written entirely in C (easily modified) Mostly static memory allocation 8-bit image data The basic goal of the FIIAT library is to compute meaningful numerical descriptors for images or rectangular image regions. These n-vectors can then be used directly for novelty detection or pattern recognition, or as a feature space for higher-level pattern recognition tasks. The library provides routines for leveraging training data to derive descriptors that are most useful for a specific data set. Its runtime algorithms exploit a structure known as the "integral image." This is a caching method that permits fast summation of values within rectangular regions of an image. This integral frame facilitates a wide range of fast image-processing functions. This toolkit has applicability to a wide range of autonomous image analysis tasks in the space-flight domain, including novelty detection, object and scene classification, target detection for autonomous instrument placement, and science analysis of geomorphology. It makes real-time texture and pattern recognition possible for platforms with severe computational restraints. The software provides an order of magnitude speed increase over alternative software libraries currently in use by the research community. FIIAT can commercially support intelligent video cameras used in intelligent surveillance. It is also useful for object recognition by robots or other autonomous vehicles

  7. Expendable Pattern Casting Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The expendable pattern casting (EPC) process is a potential casting process breakthrough which could dramatically improve the competitiveness of the U.S. foundry industry. Cooperatively supported by U.S. Industry and the Department of Energy and managed by the American Foundrymen's Society, a project was started in May 1989 to develop and optimize expendable pattern casting technology. Four major tasks were conducted in the first phase of the project. Those tasks involved: (1) reviewing published literature to determine the major problems in the EPC process; (2) evaluating factors influencing sand flow and compaction; (3) evaluating and comparing casting precision obtained in the EPC process with that obtained in other processes; and (4) identifying critical parameters that control dimensional precision and defect formation in EP castings.

  8. Expandable pattern casting research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  9. Hidden patterns of reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Syi

    2014-03-21

    Reciprocity can help the evolution of cooperation. To model both types of reciprocity, we need the concept of strategy. In the case of direct reciprocity there are four second-order action rules (Simple Tit-for-tat, Contrite Tit-for-tat, Pavlov, and Grim Trigger), which are able to promote cooperation. In the case of indirect reciprocity the key component of cooperation is the assessment rule. There are, again, four elementary second-order assessment rules (Image Scoring, Simple Standing, Stern Judging, and Shunning). The eight concepts can be formalized in an ontologically thin way we need only an action predicate and a value function, two agent concepts, and the constant of goodness. The formalism helps us to discover that the action and assessment rules can be paired, and that they show the same patterns. The logic of these patterns can be interpreted with the concept of punishment that has an inherent paradoxical nature.

  10. Patterns of sleep behaviour.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the electroencephalogram as the critical measurement procedure for sleep research, and survey of major findings that have emerged in the last decade on the presence of sleep within the twenty-four-hour cycle. Specifically, intrasleep processes, frequency of stage changes, sequence of stage events, sleep stage amounts, temporal patterns of sleep, and stability of intrasleep pattern in both man and lower animals are reviewed, along with some circadian aspects of sleep, temporal factors, and number of sleep episodes. It is felt that it is particularly critical to take the presence of sleep into account whenever performance is considered. When it is recognized that responsive performance is extremely limited during sleep, it is easy to visualize the extent to which performance is controlled by sleep itself.

  11. Hidden patterns of reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Syi

    2014-03-21

    Reciprocity can help the evolution of cooperation. To model both types of reciprocity, we need the concept of strategy. In the case of direct reciprocity there are four second-order action rules (Simple Tit-for-tat, Contrite Tit-for-tat, Pavlov, and Grim Trigger), which are able to promote cooperation. In the case of indirect reciprocity the key component of cooperation is the assessment rule. There are, again, four elementary second-order assessment rules (Image Scoring, Simple Standing, Stern Judging, and Shunning). The eight concepts can be formalized in an ontologically thin way we need only an action predicate and a value function, two agent concepts, and the constant of goodness. The formalism helps us to discover that the action and assessment rules can be paired, and that they show the same patterns. The logic of these patterns can be interpreted with the concept of punishment that has an inherent paradoxical nature. PMID:24368125

  12. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  13. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  14. Labyrinthine dissipative patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeu, I.

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of physical systems exhibit labyrinthine patterns as transient or steady states. One of the routes by which labyrinths emerge is through the destabilization of a localized structure through a curvature instability. In this work, we will study the emergence of labyrinths through this mechanism in different physical contexts, including nonlinear cavity optics, vegetation dynamics and chemical reactions. Furthermore, it is shown that the resulting labyrinths can be classified depending on their connectivities.

  15. Patterns of Emphysema Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Valipour, Arschang; Shah, Pallav L.; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Eberhardt, Ralf; Snell, Greg; Strange, Charlie; Barry, Robert; Gupta, Avina; Henne, Erik; Bandyopadhyay, Sourish; Raffy, Philippe; Yin, Youbing; Tschirren, Juerg; Herth, Felix J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although lobar patterns of emphysema heterogeneity are indicative of optimal target sites for lung volume reduction (LVR) strategies, the presence of segmental, or sublobar, heterogeneity is often underappreciated. Objective The aim of this study was to understand lobar and segmental patterns of emphysema heterogeneity, which may more precisely indicate optimal target sites for LVR procedures. Methods Patterns of emphysema heterogeneity were evaluated in a representative cohort of 150 severe (GOLD stage III/IV) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from the COPDGene study. High-resolution computerized tomography analysis software was used to measure tissue destruction throughout the lungs to compute heterogeneity (≥ 15% difference in tissue destruction) between (inter-) and within (intra-) lobes for each patient. Emphysema tissue destruction was characterized segmentally to define patterns of heterogeneity. Results Segmental tissue destruction revealed interlobar heterogeneity in the left lung (57%) and right lung (52%). Intralobar heterogeneity was observed in at least one lobe of all patients. No patient presented true homogeneity at a segmental level. There was true homogeneity across both lungs in 3% of the cohort when defining heterogeneity as ≥ 30% difference in tissue destruction. Conclusion Many LVR technologies for treatment of emphysema have focused on interlobar heterogeneity and target an entire lobe per procedure. Our observations suggest that a high proportion of patients with emphysema are affected by interlobar as well as intralobar heterogeneity. These findings prompt the need for a segmental approach to LVR in the majority of patients to treat only the most diseased segments and preserve healthier ones. PMID:26430783

  16. [Electrocardiograph beat pattern recognition].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qunyi; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huiling

    2005-02-01

    It is very important to recognize arrhythmia in clinical electrocardiography (ECG) analysis. The fundamental of beat pattern recognition is presented in this paper. Various prevalent methods for arrhythmia recognitiion are categorized and summarized, based on which the advantages and disadvantages among the methods are compared, and the main problems are discussed in depth. At last, the development trend of arrhythmia recognition technology is pointed out.

  17. Australopithecine enamel prism patterns.

    PubMed

    Vrba, E S; Grine, F E

    1978-11-24

    Following a recent suggestion that tooth enamel prism shape differs within Hominoidea, the teeth of a number of extinct and extant hominoid species were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The enamel prism patterns of some gracile and robust australopithecine specimens from Sterkfontein, Swartkrans, and Kromdraai are recorded. The characteristic arrangements of enamel prisms in all modern and extinct hominoid species were found to be essentially similar. The implications of enamel prisms for phylogenetic deduction in Hominoidea are discussed. PMID:102032

  18. LANL application communication patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Pakiin, Scott

    2011-01-10

    This brief presentation describes the communication patterns used by a set of unclassified applications developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory: XNobel/XRAGE/RAGE/SAGE, Krak, Sweep3D, and Partisn. It mentions which processes communicate with which other processes, whether the application is typically run in a strong-scaling mode or a weak-scaling mode, what message sizes are commonly used, and how the application's performance changes at scale.

  19. Tooth patterning and evolution.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2012-12-01

    Teeth are a good system for studying development and evolution. Tooth development is largely independent of the rest of the body and teeth can be grown in culture to attain almost normal morphology. Their development is not affected by the patterns of movement or sensorial perception in the embryo. Teeth are hard and easily preserved. Thus, there is plenty of easily accessible information about the patterns of morphological variation occurring between and within species. This review summarises recent work and describes how tooth development can be understood as the coupling between a reaction-diffusion system and differential growth produced by diffusible growth factors: which growth factors are involved, how they affect each other's expression and how they affect the spatial patterns of proliferation that lead to final morphology. There are some aspects of tooth development, however, that do not conform to some common assumptions in many reaction-diffusion models. Those are discussed here since they provide clues about how reaction-diffusion systems may work in actual developmental systems. Mathematical models implementing what we know about tooth development are discussed.

  20. Pattern Driven Stress Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, Andrew; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of patterns from isotropic initial states is a major driver of modern soft-matter research. This avenue of study is directed by the desire to understand the complex physics of the varied structures found in Nature, and by technological interest in functional materials that may be derived through biomimicry. In this work we show how a simple striped phase can respond with significant complexity to an appropriately chosen perturbation. In particular, we show how a buckled elastic plate transitions into a state of stress localization using a simple, self-assembled variation in surface topography. The collection of topographic boundaries act in concert to change the state from isotropic sinusoidal wrinkles, to sharp folds or creases separated by relatively flat regions. By varying the size of the imposed topographic pattern or the wavelength of the wrinkles, we construct a state diagram of the system. The localized state has implications for both biological systems, and for the control of non-linear pattern formation.

  1. Gardosian Patterns in Tribology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The following paper is a memorial retrospective on selected research of Dr. Michael N. Gardos. Dr. Gardos spent his professional career engaged in tribological research which often extended the scientific boundaries of the field. Several of the concepts he put forth into the tribology community were initially met with grave skepticism but over time his views have been largely embraced but not widely acknowledged. His approach to new research topics was often characterized by these qualities: 1) pioneering points of view, 2) the use of the model experiment, and 3) the presence of multiple research agendas for each single experiment. I have chosen to name his research approach as "Gardosian Patterns" in honor of his contributions to Tribology. Three specific examples of these patterns will be reviewed. One is the concept of atomic level tailoring of materials to control macroscopic properties. A second is the use of a model ball polishing experiment to identify high fracture toughness ceramics for use in rolling element bearings. A third Gardosian Pattern example is his pioneering work with the tribology of diamond and diamond films in which he proposed controlling friction via surface bond tailoring. In these examples, Gardos utilized conventional research tools in unconventional ways and, at times, even developed new tools which have become part of the mainstream. His remarkable career has left a positive and lasting mark on Tribology.

  2. Blood stain pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Peschel, O; Kunz, S N; Rothschild, M A; Mützel, E

    2011-09-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) refers to the collection, categorization and interpretation of the shape and distribution of bloodstains connected with a crime. These kinds of stains occur in a considerable proportion of homicide cases. They offer extensive information and are an important part of a functional, medically and scientifically based reconstruction of a crime. The following groups of patterns can essentially be distinguished: dripped and splashed blood, projected blood, impact patterns, cast-off stains, expirated and transferred bloodstains. A highly qualified analysis can help to estimate facts concerning the location, quality and intensity of an external force. A sequence of events may be recognized, and detailed questions connected with the reconstruction of the crime might be answered. In some cases, BPA helps to distinguish between accident, homicide and suicide or to identify bloodstains originating from a perpetrator. BPA is based on systematic training, a visit to the crime scene or alternatively good photographic documentation, and an understanding and knowledge of autopsy findings or statements made by the perpetrator and/or victim. A BPA working group has been established within the German Society of Legal Medicine aiming to put the knowledge and practical applications of this subdiscipline of forensic science on a wider basis. PMID:21069481

  3. Elliptic integrals: Symmetry and symbolic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.C. |

    1997-12-31

    Computation of elliptic integrals, whether numerical or symbolic, has been aided by the contributions of Italian mathematicians. Tricomi had a strong interest in iterative algorithms for computing elliptic integrals and other special functions, and his writings on elliptic functions and elliptic integrals have taught these subjects to many modern readers (including the author). The theory of elliptic integrals began with Fagnano`s duplication theorem, a generalization of which is now used iteratively for numerical computation in major software libraries. One of Lauricella`s multivariate hypergeometric functions has been found to contain all elliptic integrals as special cases and has led to the introduction of symmetric canonical forms. These forms provide major economies in new integral tables and offer a significant advantage also for symbolic integration of elliptic integrals. Although partly expository the present paper includes some new proofs and proposes a new procedure for symbolic integration.

  4. Integrated Information and State Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, William; Gomez-Ramirez, Jaime; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Integrated information (Φ) is a measure of the cause-effect power of a physical system. This paper investigates the relationship between Φ as defined in Integrated Information Theory and state differentiation (D), the number of, and difference between potential system states. Here we provide theoretical justification of the relationship between Φ and D, then validate the results using a simulation study. First, we show that a physical system in a state with high Φ necessarily has many elements and specifies many causal relationships. Furthermore, if the average value of integrated information across all states is high, the system must also have high differentiation. Next, we explore the use of D as a proxy for Φ using artificial networks, evolved to have integrated structures. The results show a positive linear relationship between Φ and D for multiple network sizes and connectivity patterns. Finally we investigate the differentiation evoked by sensory inputs and show that, under certain conditions, it is possible to estimate integrated information without a direct perturbation of its internal elements. In concluding, we discuss the need for further validation on larger networks and explore the potential applications of this work to the empirical study of consciousness, especially concerning the practical estimation of Φ from neuroimaging data. PMID:27445896

  5. Integrated Information and State Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, William; Gomez-Ramirez, Jaime; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Integrated information (Φ) is a measure of the cause-effect power of a physical system. This paper investigates the relationship between Φ as defined in Integrated Information Theory and state differentiation ([Formula: see text]), the number of, and difference between potential system states. Here we provide theoretical justification of the relationship between Φ and [Formula: see text], then validate the results using a simulation study. First, we show that a physical system in a state with high Φ necessarily has many elements and specifies many causal relationships. Furthermore, if the average value of integrated information across all states is high, the system must also have high differentiation. Next, we explore the use of [Formula: see text] as a proxy for Φ using artificial networks, evolved to have integrated structures. The results show a positive linear relationship between Φ and [Formula: see text] for multiple network sizes and connectivity patterns. Finally we investigate the differentiation evoked by sensory inputs and show that, under certain conditions, it is possible to estimate integrated information without a direct perturbation of its internal elements. In concluding, we discuss the need for further validation on larger networks and explore the potential applications of this work to the empirical study of consciousness, especially concerning the practical estimation of Φ from neuroimaging data. PMID:27445896

  6. Waves and patterning in developmental biology: vertebrate segmentation and feather bud formation as case studies

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ruth E.; Schnell, Santiago; Maini, Philip K.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we will discuss the integration of developmental patterning mechanisms with waves of competency that control the ability of a homogeneous field of cells to react to pattern forming cues and generate spatially heterogeneous patterns. We base our discussion around two well known patterning events that take place in the early embryo: somitogenesis and feather bud formation. We outline mathematical models to describe each patterning mechanism, present the results of numerical simulations and discuss the validity of each model in relation to our example patterning processes. PMID:19557684

  7. Study on far field wave patterns and their characteristics of Havelock form green function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Dong, Wen-cai; Xiao, Wen-bin

    2013-06-01

    A new mathematical integral representation including five integrals about the far field wave shape function of Havelock form translating-pulsating source is obtained by performing variable substitution. Constant-phase curves and propagation wave patterns are investigated by applying stationary phase analysis method to the new representation. Some findings are summarized as follows: (1) when 0< τ <0.25 (where τ is the Strouhal number), three types of stationary phase curves corresponding to three propagation wave patterns such as fan wave pattern, inner V and outer V wave patterns, are found in the integral representation. (2) When τ>0.25, besides three types of wave patterns such as a ring-faning wave pattern, a fan wave pattern and an inner V wave pattern, a new one called parallel wave pattern is also found which not only exists in the integrals about the ring-fan wave and fan wave, but also in the integrals whose interval is [0, γ] In addition, Characteristics about these parallel waves such as mathematical expressions, existence conditions, propagation directions and wave lengths are obtained, and cancellation relationships between these parallel waves are stated, which certificates the fact that there are no parallel waves existing in the far field.

  8. Patterns and Processes of Vertebrate Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Robert Lynn

    1997-04-01

    This new text provides an integrated view of the forces that influence the patterns and rates of vertebrate evolution from the level of living populations and species to those that resulted in the origin of the major vertebrate groups. The evolutionary roles of behavior, development, continental drift, and mass extinctions are compared with the importance of variation and natural selection that were emphasized by Darwin. It is extensively illustrated, showing major transitions between fish and amphibians, dinosaurs and birds, and land mammals to whales. No book since Simpson's Major Features of Evolution has attempted such a broad study of the patterns and forces of evolutionary change. Undergraduate students taking a general or advanced course on evolution, and graduate students and professionals in evolutionary biology and paleontology will find the book of great interest.

  9. Interspecies modeling of inhaled particle deposition patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxic effects of ambient contaminants or therapeutic effects of airborne drugs, inhalation exposure experiments can be performed with surrogate laboratory animals. Herein, an interspecies particle deposition theory is presented for physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. It is derived to improve animal testing protocols. The computer code describes the behavior and fate of particles in the lungs of human subjects and a selected surrogate, the laboratory rat. In the simulations CO2 is integrated with exposure chamber atmospheres, and its concentrations regulated to produce rat breathing profiles corresponding to selected levels of human physical activity. The dosimetric model is used to calculate total, compartmental (i.e., tracheobronchial and pulmonary), and localized distribution patterns of inhaled particles in rats and humans for comparable ventilatory conditions. It is demonstrated that the model can be used to predetermine the exposure conditions necessary to produce deposition patterns in rats that are equivalent to those in humans at prescribed physical activities.

  10. Sepsis: From Pattern to Mechanism and Back

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Namas, Rami A.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical entity in which complex inflammatory and physiological processes are mobilized, not only across a range of cellular and molecular interactions, but also in clinically relevant physiological signals accessible at the bedside. There is a need for a mechanistic understanding that links the clinical phenomenon of physiologic variability with the underlying patterns of the biology of inflammation, and we assert that this can be facilitated through the use of dynamic mathematical and computational modeling. An iterative approach of laboratory experimentation and mathematical/computational modeling has the potential to integrate cellular biology, physiology, control theory, and systems engineering across biological scales, yielding insights into the control structures that govern mechanisms by which phenomena, detected as biological patterns, are produced. This approach can represent hypotheses in the formal language of mathematics and computation, and link behaviors that cross scales and domains, thereby offering the opportunity to better explain, diagnose, and intervene in the care of the septic patient. PMID:23140124

  11. Particle dynamics simulations of Turing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziekan, P.; Lemarchand, A.; Nowakowski, B.

    2012-08-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is used to reproduce Turing patterns at the microscopic level in reaction-diffusion systems. In order to satisfy the basic condition for the development of such a spatial structure, we propose a model involving a solvent, which allows for disparate diffusivities of individual reactive species. One-dimensional structures are simulated in systems of various lengths. Simulation results agree with the macroscopic predictions obtained by integration of the reaction-diffusion equations. Additional effects due to internal fluctuations are observed, such as temporal transitions between structures of different wavelengths in a confined system. For a structure developing behind a propagating wave front, the fluctuations suppress the induction period and accelerate the formation of the Turing pattern. These results support the ability of reaction-diffusion models to robustly reproduce axial segmentation including the formation of early vertebrae or somites in noisy biological environments.

  12. Conditional entropy of ordinal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unakafov, Anton M.; Keller, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we investigate a quantity called conditional entropy of ordinal patterns, akin to the permutation entropy. The conditional entropy of ordinal patterns describes the average diversity of the ordinal patterns succeeding a given ordinal pattern. We observe that this quantity provides a good estimation of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy in many cases. In particular, the conditional entropy of ordinal patterns of a finite order coincides with the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for periodic dynamics and for Markov shifts over a binary alphabet. Finally, the conditional entropy of ordinal patterns is computationally simple and thus can be well applied to real-world data.

  13. Automation for pattern library creation and in-design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Rock; Zou, Elain; Hong, Sid; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Yifan; Sweis, Jason; Lai, Ya-Chieh; Ding, Hua; Huang, Jason

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing technologies are becoming increasingly complex with every passing node. Newer technology nodes are pushing the limits of optical lithography and requiring multiple exposures with exotic material stacks for each critical layer. All of this added complexity usually amounts to further restrictions in what can be designed. Furthermore, the designs must be checked against all these restrictions in verification and sign-off stages. Design rules are intended to capture all the manufacturing limitations such that yield can be maximized for any given design adhering to all the rules. Most manufacturing steps employ some sort of model based simulation which characterizes the behavior of each step. The lithography models play a very big part of the overall yield and design restrictions in patterning. However, lithography models are not practical to run during design creation due to their slow and prohibitive run times. Furthermore, the models are not usually given to foundry customers because of the confidential and sensitive nature of every foundry's processes. The design layout locations where a model flags unacceptable simulated results can be used to define pattern rules which can be shared with customers. With advanced technology nodes we see a large growth of pattern based rules. This is due to the fact that pattern matching is very fast and the rules themselves can be very complex to describe in a standard DRC language. Therefore, the patterns are left as either pattern layout clips or abstracted into pattern-like syntax which a pattern matcher can use directly. The patterns themselves can be multi-layered with "fuzzy" designations such that groups of similar patterns can be found using one description. The pattern matcher is often integrated with a DRC tool such that verification and signoff can be done in one step. The patterns can be layout constructs that are "forbidden", "waived", or simply low-yielding in nature. The patterns can also

  14. Evaluating Simultaneous Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwong, Harris

    2012-01-01

    Many integrals require two successive applications of integration by parts. During the process, another integral of similar type is often invoked. We propose a method which can integrate these two integrals simultaneously. All we need is to solve a linear system of equations.

  15. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  16. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  17. Patterns across multiple memories are identified over time.

    PubMed

    Richards, Blake A; Xia, Frances; Santoro, Adam; Husse, Jana; Woodin, Melanie A; Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2014-07-01

    Memories are not static but continue to be processed after encoding. This is thought to allow the integration of related episodes via the identification of patterns. Although this idea lies at the heart of contemporary theories of systems consolidation, it has yet to be demonstrated experimentally. Using a modified water-maze paradigm in which platforms are drawn stochastically from a spatial distribution, we found that mice were better at matching platform distributions 30 d compared to 1 d after training. Post-training time-dependent improvements in pattern matching were associated with increased sensitivity to new platforms that conflicted with the pattern. Increased sensitivity to pattern conflict was reduced by pharmacogenetic inhibition of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). These results indicate that pattern identification occurs over time, which can lead to conflicts between new information and existing knowledge that must be resolved, in part, by computations carried out in the mPFC.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Tidal Dissipation in Synchronous Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Bruce G.; Aharonson, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Tidal heating is an important energy source for several solar system bodies, and there is a wide-spread perception that the pattern of surface heat flow is diagnostic of internal structure. We wish to clarify that situation. Our analysis depends upon two important assumptions: First, that heat transport is dominated by conduction. Second, that the body can be modeled by a sequence of spherically symmetric layers, each with a linear visco-elastic rheology. Under these assumptions, surface heat flow patterns in tidally dominated satellites will reflect radially integrated dissipation patterns. For synchronously rotating satellites with zero obliquity, this pattern depends quite strongly on orbital eccentricity but relatively little on purely radial variations in internal structure. The total amount of heat generated within the body does depend sensitively on internal structure, but the spatial pattern is rather insensitive to structure, especially at low orbital eccentricities.

  19. Cortical correlate of pattern backward masking.

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, G; Vogels, R; Orban, G A

    1995-01-01

    The perception of a briefly presented shape is strongly impaired when it is followed by another pattern, a phenomenon called backward masking. We found that the vast majority of a sample of shape-selective neurons in the macaque inferior temporal cortex respond selectively to backward-masked shapes, although these shapes could not be discriminated by human and monkey subjects. However, this selective response was brief, since it was either interrupted by the mask or overridden by a response to the mask itself. We show that reliable discrimination of briefly presented shapes by single neurons depends on the temporal integration of the response. Presentation of the mask, however, reduces the number of spikes available for integration, explaining backward masking. These results also provide direct neurophysiological evidence for the "interruption theory" of backward masking. PMID:7777553

  20. THE SHEARING H I SPIRAL PATTERN OF NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect

    Speights, Jason C.; Westpfahl, David J.

    2011-07-20

    The Tremaine-Weinberg equations are solved for a pattern speed that is allowed to vary with radius. The solution method transforms an integral equation for the pattern speed to a least-squares problem with well-established procedures for statistical analysis. The method applied to the H I spiral pattern of the barred, grand-design galaxy NGC 1365 produces convincing evidence for a radial dependence in the pattern speed. The pattern speed behaves approximately as 1/r and is very similar to the material speed. There are no clear indications of corotation or Lindblad resonances. Tests show that the results are not selection biased, and that the method is not measuring the material speed. Other methods of solving the Tremaine-Weinberg equations for shearing patterns are found to produce results in agreement with those obtained using the current method. Previous estimates that relied on the assumptions of the density-wave interpretation of spiral structure are inconsistent with the results obtained using the current method. The results are consistent with spiral structure theories that allow for shearing patterns, and contradict fundamental assumptions in the density-wave interpretation that are often used for finding spiral arm pattern speeds. The spiral pattern is winding on a characteristic timescale of {approx}500 Myr.

  1. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  2. Patterns of public participation.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Jean; Tumilty, Emma; Max, Catherine; Lu, Lanting; Tantivess, Sripen; Hauegen, Renata Curi; Whitty, Jennifer A; Weale, Albert; Pearson, Steven D; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Wang, Hufeng; Staniszewska, Sophie; Weerasuriya, Krisantha; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cubillos, Leonardo

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of this paper is to exhibit cross-national patterns in respect of public participation, linking those differences to institutional features of the countries concerned. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is an example of case-orientated qualitative assessment of participation practices. It derives its data from the presentation of country case studies by experts on each system. The country cases are located within the historical development of democracy in each country. Findings - Patterns of participation are widely variable. Participation that is effective through routinized institutional processes appears to be inversely related to contestatory participation that uses political mobilization to challenge the legitimacy of the priority setting process. No system has resolved the conceptual ambiguities that are implicit in the idea of public participation. Originality/value - The paper draws on a unique collection of country case studies in participatory practice in prioritization, supplementing existing published sources. In showing that contestatory participation plays an important role in a sub-set of these countries it makes an important contribution to the field because it broadens the debate about public participation in priority setting beyond the use of minipublics and the observation of public representatives on decision-making bodies. PMID:27468773

  3. Evolutionary pattern search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.

    1995-09-19

    This paper defines a class of evolutionary algorithms called evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAs) and analyzes their convergence properties. This class of algorithms is closely related to evolutionary programming, evolutionary strategie and real-coded genetic algorithms. EPSAs are self-adapting systems that modify the step size of the mutation operator in response to the success of previous optimization steps. The rule used to adapt the step size can be used to provide a stationary point convergence theory for EPSAs on any continuous function. This convergence theory is based on an extension of the convergence theory for generalized pattern search methods. An experimental analysis of the performance of EPSAs demonstrates that these algorithms can perform a level of global search that is comparable to that of canonical EAs. We also describe a stopping rule for EPSAs, which reliably terminated near stationary points in our experiments. This is the first stopping rule for any class of EAs that can terminate at a given distance from stationary points.

  4. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology.

  5. Patterns of Negotiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Suresh; Pattinson, Hugh

    Traditionally, face-to-face negotiations in the real world have not been looked at as a complex systems interaction of actors resulting in a dynamic and potentially emergent system. If indeed negotiations are an outcome of a dynamic interaction of simpler behavior just as with a complex system, we should be able to see the patterns contributing to the complexities of a negotiation under study. This paper and the supporting research sets out to show B2B (business-to-business) negotiations as complex systems of interacting actors exhibiting dynamic and emergent behavior. This paper discusses the exploratory research based on negotiation simulations in which a large number of business students participate as buyers and sellers. The student interactions are captured on video and a purpose built research method attempts to look for patterns of interactions between actors using visualization techniques traditionally reserved to observe the algorithmic complexity of complex systems. Students are videoed negotiating with partners. Each video is tagged according to a recognized classification and coding scheme for negotiations. The classification relates to the phases through which any particular negotiation might pass, such as laughter, aggression, compromise, and so forth — through some 30 possible categories. Were negotiations more or less successful if they progressed through the categories in different ways? Furthermore, does the data depict emergent pathway segments considered to be more or less successful? This focus on emergence within the data provides further strong support for face-to-face (F2F) negotiations to be construed as complex systems.

  6. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology. PMID:19531123

  7. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Context: Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) also known as female androgenetic alopecia is a common condition afflicting millions of women that can be cosmetically disrupting. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for obtaining optimal outcome. This review addresses the clinical presentation of female pattern hair loss, its differential diagnosis and treatment modalities. Evidence Acquisition: A) Diffuse thinning of the crown region with preservation of the frontal hairline (Ludwig’s type) B) The “Christmas tree pattern” where the thinning is wider in the frontal scalp giving the alopecic area a triangular shaped figure resembling a christmas tree. C) Thinning associated with bitemporal recession (Hamilton type). Generally, FPHL is not associated with elevated androgens. Less commonly females with FPHL may have other skin or general signs of hyperandrogenism such as hirsutism, acne, irregular menses, infertility, galactorrhea and insulin resistance. The most common endocrinological abnormality associated with FPHL is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Results: The most important diseases to consider in the differential diagnosis of FPHL include Chronic Telogen Effluvium (CTE), Permanent Alopecia after Chemotherapy (PAC), Alopecia Areata Incognito (AAI) and Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia (FFA). This review describes criteria for distinguishing these conditions from FPHL. Conclusions: The only approved treatment for FPHL, which is 2% topical Minoxidil, should be applied at the dosage of 1ml twice day for a minimum period of 12 months. This review will discuss off-label alternative modalities of treatment including 5-alfa reductase inhibitors, antiandrogens, estrogens, prostaglandin analogs, lasers, light treatments and hair transplantation. PMID:24719635

  8. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  9. Fractal dynamics of bioconvective patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Biologically generated cellular patterns, sometimes called bioconvective patterns, are found to cluster into aggregates which follow fractal growth dynamics akin to diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) models. The pattern formed is self-similar with fractal dimension of 1.66 +/-0.038. Bioconvective DLA branching results from thermal roughening which shifts the balance between ordering viscous forces and disordering cell motility and random diffusion. The phase diagram for pattern morphology includes DLA, boundary spokes, random clusters, and reverse clusters.

  10. Integrated wetlands for food production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ray Zhuangrui; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-07-01

    The widespread use of compound pelleted feeds and chemical fertilizers in modern food production contribute to a vast amount of residual nutrients into the production system and adjacent ecosystem are major factors causing eutrophication. Furthermore, the extensive development and application of chemical compounds (such as chemical pesticides, disinfectants and hormones used in enhancing productivity) in food production process are hazardous to the ecosystems, as well as human health. These unsustainable food production patterns cannot sustain human living in the long run. Wetlands are perceived as self-decontamination ecosystems with high productivities. This review gives an overview about wetlands which are being integrated with food production processes, focusing on aquaculture. PMID:27131797

  11. Imaging by integrating stitched spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Teale, Carson; Adams, Dan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Kane, Daniel J

    2013-03-25

    A new diffractive imaging technique called Imaging By Integrating Stitched Spectrograms (IBISS) is presented. Both the data collection and phase retrieval algorithm used in IBISS are direct extensions of frequency resolved optical gating to higher dimensions. Data collection involves capturing an array of diffraction patterns generated by scanning a sample across a coherent beam of light. Phase retrieval is performed using the Principal Components Generalized Projections Algorithm (PCGPA) by reducing the four dimensional data set of images to two remapped two-dimensional sets. The technique is successfully demonstrated using a Helium Neon laser to image a 350μm wide sample with 12μm resolution. PMID:23546061

  12. The Dissemination of Pedagogical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogical patterns have been around since 1995, but several authors claim their impact is limited. However, these claims are based on authors' own observations and not on methodical evaluations of the use and dissemination of pedagogical patterns. This claim is in contrast to the vision of the creators of pedagogical patterns--they think…

  13. Patterns to Develop Algebraic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    What is the role of patterns in developing algebraic reasoning? This important question deserves thoughtful attention. In response, this article examines some differing views of algebraic reasoning, discusses a controversy regarding patterns, and describes how three types of patterns--in contextual problems, in growing geometric figures, and in…

  14. Global Patterns of Drought Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, C.; Anderegg, W.; Biondi, F.; Koch, G. W.; Litvak, M. E.; Shaw, J.; Wolf, A.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Michalak, A. M.; Schaefer, K. M.; Fisher, J. B.; Cook, R. B.; Wei, Y.; Fang, Y.; Hayes, D. J.; Huang, M.; Jain, A. K.; Tian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the impacts of drought on carbon metabolism is crucial to elucidate how global environmental change will alter the climate regulation ecosystem service provided by terrestrial vegetation. Notwithstanding past and anticipated future changes in drought regime the interplay between hydrologic (amelioration of precipitation deficit) and functional (return to pre-drought levels of carbon metabolism) post-drought recovery is not well understood. Recovery time is however a prime determinant of whether ecosystems revert to their initial state or transition to a new equilibrium. Here we quantify post-drought recovery time of gross primary productivity (GPP) at grid cell (0.5° spatial resolution) to global scales using three reconstructions: MODIS, upscaled FLUXNET, and an ensemble of state-of-the-art standardized land surface model runs taken from MsTMIP (Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project). Drought is tracked using the multiscalar Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index drought metric where the integration period (the retrospective window used to calculate the metric) is varied from 1 to 24-months. We define recovery time as a function of both hydrologic and GPP recovery, i.e., both must attain pre-drought levels for recovery to occur. Despite the diverse provenance of the reconstructions, different reconstruction periods, and variable integration lengths several consistent patterns emerge across the c. 4 000 000 drought events and subsequent recovery times cataloged. Recovery time scales with drought severity and drought length. Biological productivity and biodiversity exhibit response surfaces with large amplitudes and clear thresholds whereas soil fertility is a weak constraint. In general, GPP-based descriptors of drought events serve as key boundary conditions for drought recovery. The longest recovery times occur on marginal lands--non-forested, mixed tree-grass, and boreal systems--with a slight uptick for

  15. An Early Mathematical Patterning Assessment: identifying young Australian Indigenous children's patterning skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papic, Marina

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an Early Mathematical Patterning Assessment (EMPA) tool that provides early childhood educators with a valuable opportunity to identify young children's mathematical thinking and patterning skills through a series of hands-on and drawing tasks. EMPA was administered through one-to-one assessment interviews to children aged 4 to 5 years in the year prior to formal school. Two hundred and seventeen assessments indicated that the young low socioeconomic and predominantly Australian Indigenous children in the study group had varied patterning and counting skills. Three percent of the study group was able to consistently copy and draw an ABABAB pattern made with coloured blocks. Fifty percent could count to six by ones and count out six items with 4 % of the total group able to identify six items presented in regular formations without counting. The integration of patterning into early mathematics learning is critical to the abstraction of mathematical ideas and relationships and to the development of mathematical reasoning in young children. By using the insights into the children's thinking that the EMPA tool provides, early childhood educators can better inform mathematics teaching and learning and so help close the persistent gap in numeracy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children.

  16. Elliptic integral evaluations of Bessel moments

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Broadhurst, David; Glasser, M.L.

    2008-01-06

    We record what is known about the closed forms for variousBessel function moments arising in quantum field theory, condensed mattertheory and other parts of mathematical physics. More generally, wedevelop formulae for integrals of products of six or fewer Besselfunctions. In consequence, we are able to discover and prove closed formsfor c(n,k) := Int_0 inf tk K_0 n(t) dt, with integers n = 1, 2, 3, 4 andk greater than or equal to 0, obtaining new results for the even momentsc3,2k and c4,2k . We also derive new closed forms for the odd momentss(n,2k+1) := Int_0 inf t(2k+1) I_0(t) K_0n(t) dt,with n = 3, 4 and fort(n,2k+1) := Int_0 inf t(2k+1) I_02(t) K_0(n-2) dt, with n = 5, relatingthe latter to Green functions on hexagonal, diamond and cubic lattices.We conjecture the values of s(5,2k+1), make substantial progress on theevaluation of c(5,2k+1), s(6,2k+1) and t(6,2k+1) and report more limitedprogress regarding c(5,2k), c(6,2k+1) and c(6,2k). In the process, weobtain 8 conjectural evaluations, each of which has been checked to 1200decimal places. One of these lies deep in 4-dimensional quantum fieldtheory and two are probably provable by delicate combinatorics. Thereremains a hard core of five conjectures whose proofs would be mostinstructive, to mathematicians and physicists alike.

  17. Fabrication of Nanoscale Circuits on Inkjet-Printing Patterned Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuoran; Su, Meng; Zhang, Cong; Gao, Meng; Bao, Bin; Yang, Qiang; Su, Bin; Song, Yanlin

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale circuits are fabricated by assembling different conducting materials (e.g., metal nanoparticles, metal nano-wires, graphene, carbon nanotubes, and conducting polymers) on inkjet-printing patterned substrates. This non-litho-graphy strategy opens a new avenue for integrating conducting building blocks into nanoscale devices in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:26011403

  18. Injury patterns and biomechanics of the athlete's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Lintner, Dave; Noonan, Thomas J; Kibler, W Ben

    2008-10-01

    Although shoulder injury patterns vary by sport and position, overhead sports, such as baseball, swimming, tennis, and volleyball, share a common dependence on the integrity of the kinetic chain. Disruption of this critical mechanism predisposes to injury and deserves attention as the most important of the biomechanical principles required to help evaluate and manage problems of the athlete's shoulder. PMID:19064144

  19. Injury patterns and biomechanics of the athlete's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Lintner, Dave; Noonan, Thomas J; Kibler, W Ben

    2008-10-01

    Although shoulder injury patterns vary by sport and position, overhead sports, such as baseball, swimming, tennis, and volleyball, share a common dependence on the integrity of the kinetic chain. Disruption of this critical mechanism predisposes to injury and deserves attention as the most important of the biomechanical principles required to help evaluate and manage problems of the athlete's shoulder.

  20. [Normal myelination patterns].

    PubMed

    González Alenda, F J; Pérez-Romero, M; Sánchez, I; Frutos, R; Fraile, E; Romero, J; Carrasco, E G

    1991-12-01

    The MR images obtained of brain during the process of myelination taking place from birth to 2 years of age are analyzed. Basically, the study focuses on the changes in signal intensity experienced by the elements of the brain in the different sequences, consisting in an increase (T1 weighted sequence) or decrease (T2 sequences) in the signal. The chronological evolution of these changes is compared with the classic myelination pattern, described prior to the development of MR, based on necropsies. Also assessed were the progressive changes in the signals of the gray and white matter, reflecting their hydric contents, throughout the period of maturation of the brain structures. It is concluded that MR imaging is presently the diagnostic method of choice in the monitoring of myelination. MR spectroscopy studies offer important perspectives for assessment and follow up of this process from the metabolic point of view.

  1. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  2. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  3. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Singal, Archana; Sonthalia, Sidharth; Verma, Prashant

    2013-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common cause of hair loss in women characterized by diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. Its prevalence increases with advancing age and is associated with significant psychological morbidity. The pathophysiology of FPHL is still not completely understood and seems to be multifactorial. Although androgens have been implicated, the involvement of androgen-independent mechanisms is evident from frequent lack of clinical or biochemical markers of hyperandrogenism in affected women. The role of genetic polymorphisms involving the androgen and estrogen receptors is being increasingly recognized in its causation and predicting treatment response to anti-androgens. There are different clinical patterns and classifications of FPHL, knowledge of which facilitates patient management and research. Chronic telogen effluvium remains as the most important differential diagnosis. Thorough history, clinical examination, and evaluation are essential to confirm diagnosis. Patients with clinical signs of androgen excess require assessment of biochemical parameters and imaging studies. It is prudent to screen the patients for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. The treatment comprises medical and/or surgical modalities. Medical treatment should be initiated early as it effectively arrests hair loss progression rather than stimulating regrowth. Minoxidil continues to be the first line therapy whereas anti-androgens form the second line of treatment. The progressive nature of FPHL mandates long-term treatment for sustained effect. Medical therapy may be supplemented with cosmetic concealment in those desirous of greater hair density. Surgery may be worthwhile in some carefully selected patients. PMID:23974580

  4. Smart pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Alam, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test correlation methods for pattern recognition applications. A broad overview of the main correlation architectures is first given. Many correlation data are compared with those obtained from standard pattern recognition methods. We used our simulations to predict improved decisional performance from correlation methods. More specifically, we are focused on the POF filter and composite filter family. We present an optimized composite correlation filter, called asymmetric segmented phase-only filter (ASPOF) for mobile target recognition applications. The main objective is to find a compromise between the number of references to be merged in the correlation filter and the time needed for making a decision. We suggest an all-numerical implementation of a VanderLugt (VLC) type composite filter. The aim of this all-numerical implementation is to take advantage of the benefits of the correlation methods and make the correlator easily reconfigurable for various scenarios. The use of numerical implementation of the optical Fourier transform improves the decisional performance of the correlator. Further, it renders the correlator less sensitive to the saturation phenomenon caused by the increased number of references used for fabricating the composite filter. Different tests are presented making use of the peak-to-correlation energy criterion and ROC curves. These tests confirm the validity ofour technique. Elderly fall detection and underwater mine detection are two applications which are considered for illustrating the benefits of our approach. The present work is motivated by the need for detailed discussions of the choice of the correlation architecture for these specific applications, pre-processing in the input plane and post processing in the output plane techniques for such analysis.

  5. Patterned wafer inspection using spatial filtering for the cluster environment.

    PubMed

    Taubenblatt, M A; Batchelder, J S

    1992-06-10

    Automated-process tool clusters are becoming increasingly prevalent in advanced semiconductor manufacturing plants, necessitating integrated inspection of patterned semiconductor wafers for defects and particulates. Integrated inspection tools must be small, sensitive, inexpensive, and fast in order to be compatible with the cluster environment. We show that intensity spatial filtering, with some refinements, can provide the required sensitivity and speed in a small, inexpensive package. By using dark-field illumination and a nonrectangular azimuthal orientation (e.g., 45 degrees ) to the primarily rectangular pattern, we show that the strongest diffraction from the pattern can be made to bypass the optical system entirely. This technique alleviates stringent scatter and antireflection requirements on the optics, and it permits the use of off-the-shelf components.

  6. 3-D laser patterning process utilizing horizontal and vertical patterning

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process which vastly improves the 3-D patterning capability of laser pantography (computer controlled laser direct-write patterning). The process uses commercially available electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) to pattern 3-D surfaces. The EDPR covers the surface of a metal layer conformally, coating the vertical as well as horizontal surfaces. A laser pantograph then patterns the EDPR, which is subsequently developed in a standard, commercially available developer, leaving patterned trench areas in the EDPR. The metal layer thereunder is now exposed in the trench areas and masked in others, and thereafter can be etched to form the desired pattern (subtractive process), or can be plated with metal (additive process), followed by a resist stripping, and removal of the remaining field metal (additive process). This improved laser pantograph process is simpler, faster, move manufacturable, and requires no micro-machining.

  7. TIPs for Technology Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Susan; Sorge, Dennis H.; Russell, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of the teacher in effectively using technology in education based on the Technology Integration Project (TIP). Topics include why use technology; types of computer software; how to select software; software integration strategies; and effectively planning lessons that integrate the chosen software and integration strategy. (LRW)

  8. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-05-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. Here we present the “slimplectic” integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to a newly developed principle of stationary nonconservative action (Galley, 2013, Galley et al 2014). As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting–Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  9. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-01-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. In this Letter, we develop the "slimplectic" integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to the principle of stationary nonconservative action developed in Galley et al. As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting-Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  10. Design implications of extremely restricted patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Kaushik; Liu, Renzhi; Liebmann, Lars; Lai, Kafai; Strojwas, Andzrej J.; Pileggi, Larry

    2014-07-01

    Escalating manufacturing cost and complexity is challenging the premise of affordable scaling. With lithography accounting for a large fraction of wafer costs, researchers are actively exploring several cost-effective alternative lithographic techniques, such as directed self-assembly, self-aligned multiple patterning, etc. However, most of the alternative lithographic techniques are restrictive, and it is important to understand the impact of such pattering restrictions on system-on-chip (SoC) design. To this end, we artificially restricted all layers in a 14 nm process to be pure gratings and observed that the pure gratings approach results in an inefficient SoC design with several process integration concerns. To come up with a technology definition that is mindful of designer requirements, it is essential to undertake a holistic design technology co-optimization (DTCO) considering several SoC design elements, such as standard cell logic, static random access memory bitcells, analog blocks, and physical synthesis. Our DTCO on the IBM 14 nm process with additional 10- and 7-nm node-like pattern restrictions leads us to converge on a set of critical pattern constructs that are required for an efficient and affordable SoC design.

  11. The logical model for pattern representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnarova, Zdenka; Schenk, Jiri

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are mentioned usually in the extraction context. Little stress is posed in their representation and management. This paper is focused on representation of the patterns, manipulation with patterns and query patterns. Crucial issue can be seen in systematic approach to pattern management and specific pattern query language which takes into consideration semantics of patterns..

  12. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  13. Multinomial pattern matching revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Multinomial pattern matching (MPM) is an automatic target recognition algorithm developed for specifically radar data at Sandia National Laboratories. The algorithm is in a family of algorithms that first quantizes pixel value into Nq bins based on pixel amplitude before training and classification. This quantization step reduces the sensitivity of algorithm performance to absolute intensity variation in the data, typical of radar data where signatures exhibit high variation for even small changes in aspect angle. Our previous work has focused on performance analysis of peaky template matching, a special case of MPM where binary quantization is used (Nq = 2). Unfortunately references on these algorithms are generally difficult to locate and here we revisit the MPM algorithm and illustrate the underlying statistical model and decision rules for two algorithm interpretations: the 1-of-K vector form and the scalar. MPM can also be used as a detector and specific attention is given to algorithm tuning where "peak pixels" are chosen based on their underlying empirical probabilities according to a reward minimization strategy aimed at reducing false alarms in the detection scenario and false positives in a classification capacity. The algorithms are demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations on the AFRL civilian vehicle dataset for variety of choices of Nq.

  14. Brugada ECG patterns in athletes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eugene H

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is responsible for up to 4% of all sudden cardiac deaths worldwide and up to 20% of sudden cardiac deaths in patients with structurally normal hearts. Heterogeneity of repolarization and depolarization, particularly over the right ventricle and the outflow tract, is responsible for the arrhythmogenic substrate. The coved Type I ECG pattern is considered diagnostic of the syndrome but its prevalence is very low. Distinguishing between a saddle back Type 2 Brugada pattern and one of many "Brugada-like" patterns presents challenges especially in athletes. A number of criteria have been proposed to assess Brugada ECG patterns. Proper precordial ECG lead placement is paramount. This paper reviews Brugada syndrome, Brugada ECG patterns, and recently proposed criteria. Recommendations for evaluating a Brugada ECG pattern are provided.

  15. Pattern formation with proportionate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Deepak

    It is a common observation that as baby animals grow, different body parts grow approximately at same rate. This property, called proportionate growth is remarkable in that it is not encountered easily outside biology. The models of growth that have been studied in Physics so far, e.g diffusion -limited aggregation, surface deposition, growth of crystals from melt etc. involve only growth at the surface, with the inner structure remaining frozen. Interestingly, patterns formed in growing sandpiles provide a very wide variety of patterns that show proportionate growth. One finds patterns with different features, with sharply defined boundaries. In particular, even with very simple rules, one can produce patterns that show striking resemblance to those seen in nature. We can characterize the asymptotic pattern exactly in some special cases. I will discuss in particular the patterns grown on noisy backgrounds. Supported by J. C. Bose fellowship from DST (India).

  16. Dissociation Patterns in Evolving Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F. J.; Hernández, J. A.; Sánchez, F.

    2011-09-01

    The recent explosion and availability of mobility based technologies such as geographic information systems, cell phones equipped with built-in GPS, among others, are a valuable source of spatio-temporal data. However, only recently there have been works focused on identifying movement patterns in groups of moving entities. We focus on a particular movement pattern: dissociation. A dissociation pattern occurs when an entity that was once associated to a population, eventually separated from it and subsequently reintegrated it again. The backwarding and forwarding patterns are a type of dissociation where an entity stays behind or ahead of another entity, respectively. Dissociation really is a diversity generator, so instead avoiding it, taking advantage could be better to prevent premature convergence in evolutionary algorithms. In this work, we present formal mathematical definitions for these patterns. A discussion of how to use dissociation patterns as a mean to preserve diversity in evolutionary algorithms is also shown.

  17. Communication patterns and allocation strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Mache, Jens Wolfgang; Bunde, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by observations about job runtimes on the CPlant system, we use a trace-driven microsimulator to begin characterizing the performance of different classes of allocation algorithms on jobs with different communication patterns in space-shared parallel systems with mesh topology. We show that relative performance varies considerably with communication pattern. The Paging strategy using the Hilbert space-filling curve and the Best Fit heuristic performed best across several communication patterns.

  18. Computational design of patterned interfaces using reduced order models

    PubMed Central

    Vattré, A. J.; Abdolrahim, N.; Kolluri, K.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Patterning is a familiar approach for imparting novel functionalities to free surfaces. We extend the patterning paradigm to interfaces between crystalline solids. Many interfaces have non-uniform internal structures comprised of misfit dislocations, which in turn govern interface properties. We develop and validate a computational strategy for designing interfaces with controlled misfit dislocation patterns by tailoring interface crystallography and composition. Our approach relies on a novel method for predicting the internal structure of interfaces: rather than obtaining it from resource-intensive atomistic simulations, we compute it using an efficient reduced order model based on anisotropic elasticity theory. Moreover, our strategy incorporates interface synthesis as a constraint on the design process. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the design of interfaces with rapid, 1-D point defect diffusion. Patterned interfaces may be integrated into the microstructure of composite materials, markedly improving performance. PMID:25169868

  19. Cancer patterns in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Mao, Y; Semenciw, R; Morrison, H I

    1986-01-01

    Cancer is diagnosed in about 70 000 Canadians each year and is the leading cause of the loss of potential years of life before age 75 among women. Life-threatening forms of cancer will develop in at least one of every three Canadian newborns during their lifetimes if current cancer risks are not reduced. Lung and breast cancers are, respectively, the leading causes of premature death due to cancer among men and women. Compared with other countries Canada has low death rates for stomach cancer but high rates for certain smoking-related cancers (those of the lung and of the mouth and throat), leukemia and cancers of the colon, breast and lymphatic tissues. Newfoundland has the highest rates of death from stomach cancer and the lowest rates of death from prostatic cancer, whereas the western provinces have the opposite pattern. The rates of death from lung cancer among men are highest in Quebec, the province with the highest prevalence of smoking. In Canada the overall rates of death from cancer increased by 32% among men from 1951 to 1983. However, among women they declined by 12% from 1951 to 1976 and increased from 1976 to 1983, particularly among those aged 55 to 74. The rising rates of death due to lung cancer were primarily responsible for these increases. Lung cancer will likely displace breast cancer as the leading cancer killer of Canadian women by 1990. Given the relatively low survival rates for cancers caused by smoking and the lack of substantial improvement in rates for the most frequent types of cancer, preventive strategies that include effective measures to reduce tobacco consumption are urgently required. PMID:3942929

  20. Stochastic Simulation of Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zheng-Ping; Xu, Xin-Hang; Wang, Hong-Li; Ouyang, Qi

    2008-04-01

    We investigate the effects of intrinsic noise on Turing pattern formation near the onset of bifurcation from the homogeneous state to Turing pattern in the reaction-diffusion Brusselator. By performing stochastic simulations of the master equation and using Gillespie's algorithm, we check the spatiotemporal behaviour influenced by internal noises. We demonstrate that the patterns of occurrence frequency for the reaction and diffusion processes are also spatially ordered and temporally stable. Turing patterns are found to be robust against intrinsic fluctuations. Stochastic simulations also reveal that under the influence of intrinsic noises, the onset of Turing instability is advanced in comparison to that predicted deterministically.

  1. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  2. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  3. Integrator for qualitative and quantitative unit activity.

    PubMed

    Woods, T E; Dafny, N

    1975-01-01

    A simple device constructed from inexpensive components enables spike activity to be integrated and displayed in a convenient scale (spikes/sec) on a pen recorder. An input voltage threshold detection circuit is employed to eliminate any random baseline noise from being integrated. A pulse output is provided to drive a counter or accumulator so that quantitative as well as qualitative results may be obtained. A monostable multivibrator is used to insure that the integrated output is a function of the frequency of spike activity and not the amplitude or pattern of the spikes. An output isolation and buffer stage is provided to eliminate any loading effect on the filter section and also provide a gain or scaling adjustment so that the integrator may be used with practically any pen recorder. PMID:1153530

  4. Integrating an object system into CLIPS: Language design and implementation issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auburn, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the reasons why an object system with integrated pattern-matching and object-oriented programming facilities is desirable for CLIPS and how it is possible to integrate such a system into CLIPS while maintaining the run-time performance and the low memory usage for which CLIPS is known. The requirements for an object system in CLIPS that includes object-oriented programming and integrated pattern-matching are discussed and various techniques for optimizing the object system and its integration with the pattern-matcher are presented.

  5. Dietary Patterns: Challenges and Opportunities in Dietary Patterns Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, increasing numbers of researchers have used dietary patterns to characterize the population’s diet and to examine associations between diet and disease outcomes. Many methods, primarily data-driven and index-based approaches, are available for characterizing dietary patterns in a p...

  6. Molecular patterning of the mammalian dentition.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yu; Jia, Shihai; Jiang, Rulang

    2014-01-01

    Four conserved signaling pathways, including the bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmp), fibroblast growth factors (Fgf), sonic hedgehog (Shh), and wingless-related (Wnt) pathways, are each repeatedly used throughout tooth development. Inactivation of any of these resulted in early tooth developmental arrest in mice. The mutations identified thus far in human patients with tooth agenesis also affect these pathways. Recent studies show that these signaling pathways interact through positive and negative feedback loops to regulate not only morphogenesis of individual teeth but also tooth number, shape, and spatial pattern. Increased activity of each of the Fgf, Shh, and canonical Wnt signaling pathways revitalizes development of the physiologically arrested mouse diastemal tooth germs whereas constitutive activation of canonical Wnt signaling in the dental epithelium is able to induce supernumerary tooth formation even in the absence of Msx1 and Pax9, two transcription factors required for normal tooth development beyond the early bud stage. Bmp4 and Msx1 act in a positive feedback loop to drive sequential tooth formation whereas the Osr2 transcription factor restricts Msx1-mediated expansion of the mesenchymal odontogenic field along both the buccolingual and anteroposterior axes to pattern mouse molar teeth in a single row. Moreover, the ectodermal-specific ectodysplasin (EDA) signaling pathway controls tooth number and tooth shape through regulation of Fgf20 expression in the dental epithelium, whereas Shh suppresses Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop to regulate spatial patterning of teeth. In this article, we attempt to integrate these exciting findings in the understanding of the molecular networks regulating tooth development and patterning.

  7. Integrative vs. Non-Integrative Citations among Native and Nonnative English Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb; Al-Marshadi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates citation practices among native and nonnative English writers. Five Master EFL theses written by Arab EFL learners were compared to 5 Master EFL theses written by native speakers of English. Adopting Swales' (1990) categorization, the employed citation patterns were analyzed and categorized into two types: integral and…

  8. Promoting Repeating Patterns with Young Children--More than Just Alternating Colours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papic, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Patterning is an essential skill in early mathematics learning, particularly in the development of spatial awareness, sequencing and ordering, comparison, and classification. This includes the ability to identify and describe attributes of objects and similarities and differences between them. Patterning is also integral to the development of…

  9. LAMP: 100+ Systematic Exercise Lessons for Developing Linguistic Auditory Memory Patterns in Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valett, Robert E.

    Research findings on auditory sequencing and auditory blending and fusion, auditory-visual integration, and language patterns are presented in support of the Linguistic Auditory Memory Patterns (LAMP) program. LAMP consists of 100 developmental lessons for young students with learning disabilities or language problems. The lessons are included in…

  10. Design Patterns for Educational Facilities: Translating Research into Prototypical School Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackney, Jeffery A.; Moore, Gary T.

    This paper describes findings of a study that integrated design patterns to illustrate prototypical school designs. The present work is part of a more comprehensive study conducted on the impact of school facilities on educational performance. The paper focuses on the third part of the study, which developed 27 design patterns to create integrated…

  11. Field theory of pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agu, Masahiro

    1988-06-01

    Based on the psychological experimental fact that images in mental space are transformed into other images for pattern identification, a field theory of pattern identification of geometrical patterns is developed with the use of gauge field theory in Euclidean space. Here, the ``image'' or state function ψ[χ] of the brain reacting to a geometrical pattern χ is made to correspond to the electron's wave function in Minkowski space. The pattern identification of the pattern χ with the modified pattern χ+Δχ is assumed to be such that their images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] in the brain are transformable with each other through suitable transformation groups such as parallel transformation, dilatation, or rotation. The transformation group is called the ``image potential'' which corresponds to the vector potential of the gauge field. An ``image field'' derived from the image potential is found to be induced in the brain when the two images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] are not transformable through suitable transformation groups or gauge transformations. It is also shown that, when the image field exists, the final state of the image ψ[χ] is expected to be different, depending on the paths of modifications of the pattern χ leading to a final pattern. The above fact is interpreted as a version of the Aharonov and Bohm effect of the electron's wave function [A. Aharonov and D. Bohm, Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)]. An excitation equation of the image field is also derived by postulating that patterns are identified maximally for the purpose of minimizing the number of memorized standard patterns.

  12. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than

  13. Layout pattern analysis using the Voronoi diagram of line segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sandeep Kumar; Cheilaris, Panagiotis; Gabrani, Maria; Papadopoulou, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of problematic patterns in very large scale integration (VLSI) designs is of great value as the lithographic simulation tools face significant timing challenges. To reduce the processing time, such a tool selects only a fraction of possible patterns which have a probable area of failure, with the risk of missing some problematic patterns. We introduce a fast method to automatically extract patterns based on their structure and context, using the Voronoi diagram of line-segments as derived from the edges of VLSI design shapes. Designers put line segments around the problematic locations in patterns called "gauges," along which the critical distance is measured. The gauge center is the midpoint of a gauge. We first use the Voronoi diagram of VLSI shapes to identify possible problematic locations, represented as gauge centers. Then we use the derived locations to extract windows containing the problematic patterns from the design layout. The problematic locations are prioritized by the shape and proximity information of the design polygons. We perform experiments for pattern selection in a portion of a 22-nm random logic design layout. The design layout had 38,584 design polygons (consisting of 199,946 line segments) on layer Mx, and 7079 markers generated by an optical rule checker (ORC) tool. The optical rules specify requirements for printing circuits with minimum dimension. Markers are the locations of some optical rule violations in the layout. We verify our approach by comparing the coverage of our extracted patterns to the ORC-generated markers. We further derive a similarity measure between patterns and between layouts. The similarity measure helps to identify a set of representative gauges that reduces the number of patterns for analysis.

  14. Recognition by variance: learning rules for spatiotemporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Barak, Omri; Tsodyks, Misha

    2006-10-01

    Recognizing specific spatiotemporal patterns of activity, which take place at timescales much larger than the synaptic transmission and membrane time constants, is a demand from the nervous system exemplified, for instance, by auditory processing. We consider the total synaptic input that a single readout neuron receives on presentation of spatiotemporal spiking input patterns. Relying on the monotonic relation between the mean and the variance of a neuron's input current and its spiking output, we derive learning rules that increase the variance of the input current evoked by learned patterns relative to that obtained from random background patterns. We demonstrate that the model can successfully recognize a large number of patterns and exhibits a slow deterioration in performance with increasing number of learned patterns. In addition, robustness to time warping of the input patterns is revealed to be an emergent property of the model. Using a leaky integrate-and-fire realization of the readout neuron, we demonstrate that the above results also apply when considering spiking output. PMID:16907629

  15. Determining regional water quality patterns and their ecological relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Tim W.; Hunsaker, Carolyn T.; Beauchamp, John J.

    1987-08-01

    A multivariate statistical method for analyzing spatial patterns of water quality in Georgia and Kansas was tested using data in the US Environmental Protection Agency's STORET data system. Water quality data for Georgia and Kansas were organized by watersheds. We evaluated three questions: (a) can distinctive regional water quality patterns be detected and predicted using only a few water quality variables, (b) are regional water quality patterns correlated with terrestrial biotic regions, and (c) are regional water quality patterns correlated with fish distributions? Using existing data, this method can distinguish regions with water quality very different from the average conditions (as in Georgia), but it does not discriminate well between regions that do not have diverse water quality conditions (as in Kansas). Data that are spatially and temporally adequate for representing large regions and for multivariate statistical analysis are available for only a few common water quality parameters. Regional climate, lithology, and biotic regimes all have the potential to affect water quality, and terrestrial biotic regions and fish distributions do compare with regional water quality patterns, especially in a state like Georgia, where watershed characteristics are diverse. Thus, identifiable relationships between watershed characteristics and water quality should allow the development of an integrated landaquatic classification system that would be a valuable tool for resource management. Because geographical distributions of species may be limited by Zoogeographic and environmental factors, the recognition of patterns in fish distributions that correlate with regional water quality patterns could influence management strategies and aid regional assessments.

  16. Injury Patterns in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Presents statistics on injury patterns in youth sports, recommending that physicians who care for young athletes understand the kinds of injuries likely to be sustained. Awareness of injury patterns helps medical professionals identify variables associated with injury, anticipate or prevent injuries, plan medical coverage, and compare individual…

  17. Patterns of Personal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    The use of design patterns is now well established as an approach within the field of software systems as well as within the field of architecture. An initial effort was made to harness patterns as a tool for elaborating the design of the elements of personal learning environments as part of the University of Bolton's Personal Learning Environment…

  18. Adult Reading Habits and Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Alice M.; Rhee, Ock

    2001-01-01

    Examines the reading habits and patterns of White and Asian American adults. Hypothesizes that when grouped by demographic variables, participants' responses about their reading habits and patterns would not differ. Concludes that gender, race, and education were predictors for participants' reading habits; education and race were predictors for…

  19. Retirement Patterns and Income Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasang, Anette Eva

    2012-01-01

    How do social policies shape life courses, and which consequences do different life course patterns hold for individuals? This article engages the example of retirement in Germany and Britain to analyze life course patterns and their consequences for income inequality. Sequence analysis is used to measure retirement trajectories. The liberal…

  20. Capillarity Guided Patterning of Microliquids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myeongwoo; Park, Woohyun; Na, Sangcheol; Paik, Sang-Min; Lee, Hyunjae; Park, Jae Woo; Kim, Ho-Young; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-06-01

    Soft lithography and other techniques have been developed to investigate biological and chemical phenomena as an alternative to photolithography-based patterning methods that have compatibility problems. Here, a simple approach for nonlithographic patterning of liquids and gels inside microchannels is described. Using a design that incorporates strategically placed microstructures inside the channel, microliquids or gels can be spontaneously trapped and patterned when the channel is drained. The ability to form microscale patterns inside microfluidic channels using simple fluid drain motion offers many advantages. This method is geometrically analyzed based on hydrodynamics and verified with simulation and experiments. Various materials (i.e., water, hydrogels, and other liquids) are successfully patterned with complex shapes that are isolated from each other. Multiple cell types are patterned within the gels. Capillarity guided patterning (CGP) is fast, simple, and robust. It is not limited by pattern shape, size, cell type, and material. In a simple three-step process, a 3D cancer model that mimics cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions is engineered. The simplicity and robustness of the CGP will be attractive for developing novel in vitro models of organ-on-a-chip and other biological experimental platforms amenable to long-term observation of dynamic events using advanced imaging and analytical techniques.

  1. The overall patterns of burns

    PubMed Central

    Almoghrabi, A.; Abu Shaban, N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Burn patterns differ across the whole world and not only in relation to lack of education, overcrowding, and poverty. Cultures, habits, traditions, psychiatric illness, and epilepsy are strongly correlated to burn patterns. However, burns may also occur because of specific religious beliefs and activities, social events and festivals, traditional medical practices, occupational activities, and war. PMID:22639565

  2. Verbal Patterns in Dyadic Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Joe; Ivie, Robert L.

    Selected aspects of Kenneth Burke's "dramatistic" model of symbolic interaction were operationalized to describe and compare verbal patterns in transactions between five pairs of friends and five pairs of strangers. Based on Altman and Taylor's social penetration theory, it was predicted that interactants would display verbal patterns unique to…

  3. Patterned Growth in Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnutt, J.; Gomez, E.; Schubert, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, cellular automata are used to model patterned growth of organisms in extreme environments. A brief introduction to cellular automaton modeling is given to assist the reader. Patterned growth of soil surface cyanobacteria and biovermiculation microbial mats in sulfuric acid caves are modeled and simulations conducted. Simulations are compared with actual systems, and future directions are discussed.

  4. Pattern Identification Exercise. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Norm

    Career exploration typically involves the investigation of personal factors: interests, aptitudes, values, and personal style. This digest outlines one counseling method, pattern identification exercise (PIE). PIE starts with past experiences and identifies personal patterns which are relevant to career decisions. A premise of PIE is that…

  5. Growing Patterns: Seeing beyond Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, mathematical patterns have been acknowledged as important early components of children's development of algebraic reasoning (NCTM 2000). In particular, growing patterns have attracted significant attention as a context that helps students develop an understanding of functional relationships (Lee and Freiman 2006; Moss et…

  6. Capillarity Guided Patterning of Microliquids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myeongwoo; Park, Woohyun; Na, Sangcheol; Paik, Sang-Min; Lee, Hyunjae; Park, Jae Woo; Kim, Ho-Young; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-06-01

    Soft lithography and other techniques have been developed to investigate biological and chemical phenomena as an alternative to photolithography-based patterning methods that have compatibility problems. Here, a simple approach for nonlithographic patterning of liquids and gels inside microchannels is described. Using a design that incorporates strategically placed microstructures inside the channel, microliquids or gels can be spontaneously trapped and patterned when the channel is drained. The ability to form microscale patterns inside microfluidic channels using simple fluid drain motion offers many advantages. This method is geometrically analyzed based on hydrodynamics and verified with simulation and experiments. Various materials (i.e., water, hydrogels, and other liquids) are successfully patterned with complex shapes that are isolated from each other. Multiple cell types are patterned within the gels. Capillarity guided patterning (CGP) is fast, simple, and robust. It is not limited by pattern shape, size, cell type, and material. In a simple three-step process, a 3D cancer model that mimics cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions is engineered. The simplicity and robustness of the CGP will be attractive for developing novel in vitro models of organ-on-a-chip and other biological experimental platforms amenable to long-term observation of dynamic events using advanced imaging and analytical techniques. PMID:25678019

  7. Biomolecular Patterning via Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Hiddessen, A L; Wu, K J; Christian, A T; Dugan, L C; Stone, G; Camarero, J; Hinz, A K; Hubbell, J A

    2005-02-18

    We have developed a novel method for patterning surface chemistry: Photocatalytic Lithography. This technique relies on inexpensive stamp materials and light; it does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, and the wavelength of light should not limit feature resolution. We have demonstrated the utility of this technique through the patterning of proteins, single cells and bacteria.

  8. Test Structures For Bumpy Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Sayah, Hoshyar R.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-bridge resistors added to comb and serpentine patterns. Improved combination of test structures built into integrated circuit used to evaluate design rules, fabrication processes, and quality of interconnections. Consist of meshing serpentines and combs, and cross bridge. Structures used to make electrical measurements revealing defects in design or fabrication. Combination of test structures includes three comb arrays, two serpentine arrays, and cross bridge. Made of aluminum or polycrystalline silicon, depending on material in integrated-circuit layers evaluated. Aluminum combs and serpentine arrays deposited over steps made by polycrystalline silicon and diffusion layers, while polycrystalline silicon versions of these structures used to cross over steps made by thick oxide layer.

  9. Integrated fuses for OLED lighting device

    DOEpatents

    Pschenitzka, Florian

    2007-07-10

    An embodiment of the present invention pertains to an electroluminescent lighting device for area illumination. The lighting device is fault tolerant due, in part, to the patterning of one or both of the electrodes into strips, and each of one or more of these strips has a fuse formed on it. The fuses are integrated on the substrate. By using the integrated fuses, the number of external contacts that are used is minimized. The fuse material is deposited using one of the deposition techniques that is used to deposit the thin layers of the electroluminescent lighting device.

  10. Method of patterning an aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott T.

    2012-07-24

    A method for producing a pattern in an aerogel disposed as a coating on a substrate comprises exposing the aerogel coating to the vapors of a hydrophobic silane compound, masking the aerogel coating with a shadow photomask and irradiating the aerogel coating with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The exposure to UV through the shadow mask creates a pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the aerogel coating. Etching away the hydrophilic regions of the aerogel coating, preferably with a 1 molar solution of sodium hydroxide, leaves the unwetted and unetched hydrophobic regions of the aerogel layer on the substrate, replicating the pattern of the photomask. The hydrophobic aerogel pattern can be further exposed to UV irradiation if desired, to create a hydrophilic aerogel pattern.

  11. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  12. Two Related Parametric Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, T.

    2007-01-01

    Two related sequences of definite integrals are considered. By mixing hand-work, computer algebra system assistance and websurfing, fine connections can be studied between integrals and a couple of interesting sequences of integers. (Contains 4 tables.)

  13. Integration in action.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2012-09-01

    The workshop on 'Integration in Biology and Biomedicine' was held in May 2012 at the University of Sydney. It brought together scientists and philosophers to discuss the need for, and practice of, integration in the life sciences.

  14. Quality Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazziel, William

    1978-01-01

    Integrated education as it exists in many communities is actually harmful to black children and works to devastate rather than develop black talent; proponents of school integration must put effort into improving the quality of all schools. (JD)

  15. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  16. Lithographic imaging-driven pattern edge placement errors at 10nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Renwick, Stephen P.; Palmer, Shane R.; Sakamoto, Julia A.; Slonaker, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Demand for ever increasing level of microelectronics integration continues unabated, driving the reduction of the integrated circuit critical dimensions, and escalating requirements for image overlay and pattern dimension control. The challenges to meet these demands are compounded by requirement that pattern edge placement errors be at single nanometer levels. Layout design together with the patterning tools performance play key roles in determining location of the pattern edges at different device layers. However, complexities of the layout design often lead to stringent tradeoffs for viable optical proximity correction and imaging strategy solutions. As a result, in addition to scanner overlay performance, pattern imaging plays a key role in the pattern edge placement. The imaging contributes to edge displacement by impacting the image dimensions and by shifting the images relative to their target locations. In this report we discuss various aspects of advanced image control at 10 nm integrated circuit design rules. We analyze the impact of pattern design and scanner performance on pattern edges. We present an example of complex, three step litho-etch patterning involving immersion scanners. We draw conclusion on edge placement control when complex images interact with wafer topography.

  17. Patterning process exploration of metal 1 layer in 7nm node with 3D patterning flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weimin; Ciofi, Ivan; Saad, Yves; Matagne, Philippe; Bachmann, Michael; Oulmane, Mohamed; Gillijns, Werner; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In 7mn node (N7), the logic design requires the critical poly pitch (CPP) of 42-45nm and metal 1 (M1) pitch of 28- 32nm. Such high pattern density pushes the 193 immersion lithography solution toward its limit and also brings extremely complex patterning scenarios. The N7 M1 layer may require a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) with triple litho-etch (LE3) block process. Therefore, the whole patterning process flow requires multiple exposure+etch+deposition processes and each step introduces a particular impact on the pattern profiles and the topography. In this study, we have successfully integrated a simulation tool that enables emulation of the whole patterning flow with realistic process-dependent 3D profile and topology. We use this tool to study the patterning process variations of N7 M1 layer including the overlay control, the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) budget and the lithographic process window (PW). The resulting 3D pattern structure can be used to optimize the process flow, verify design rules, extract parasitics, and most importantly, simulate the electric field and identify hot spots for dielectric reliability. As an example application, we will report extractions of maximum electric field at M1 tipto- tip which is one of the most critical patterning locations and we will demonstrate the potential of this approach for investigating the impact of process variations on dielectric reliability. We will also present simulations of an alternative M1 patterning flow, with a single exposure block using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and analyze its advantages compared to the LE3 block approach.

  18. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  19. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  20. Boolean integral calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.; Tapia, Moiez A.; Bennett, A. Wayne

    1988-01-01

    The concept of Boolean integration is developed, and different Boolean integral operators are introduced. Given the changes in a desired function in terms of the changes in its arguments, the ways of 'integrating' (i.e. realizing) such a function, if it exists, are presented. The necessary and sufficient conditions for integrating, in different senses, the expression specifying the changes are obtained. Boolean calculus has applications in the design of logic circuits and in fault analysis.

  1. Decoding neural representational spaces using multivariate pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Haxby, James V; Connolly, Andrew C; Guntupalli, J Swaroop

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for systems neuroscience is to break the neural code. Computational algorithms for encoding information into neural activity and extracting information from measured activity afford understanding of how percepts, memories, thought, and knowledge are represented in patterns of brain activity. The past decade and a half has seen significant advances in the development of methods for decoding human neural activity, such as multivariate pattern classification, representational similarity analysis, hyperalignment, and stimulus-model-based encoding and decoding. This article reviews these advances and integrates neural decoding methods into a common framework organized around the concept of high-dimensional representational spaces.

  2. Integrated Education. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Jennifer, Ed.; Vandercook, Terri, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This "feature issue" provides various perspectives on a number of integrated education topics, including successful integration practices and strategies, the changing roles of teachers, the appropriate role of research, the history and future of integrated education, and the realization of dreams of life in the mainstream for children with severe…

  3. Sledge-Hammer Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahner, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Integration (here visualized as a pounding process) is mathematically realized by simple transformations, successively smoothing the bounding curve into a straight line and the region-to-be-integrated into an area-equivalent rectangle. The relationship to Riemann sums, and to the trapezoid and midpoint methods of numerical integration, is…

  4. Social Integration and Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Longitudinal data on over 1,300 married persons suggest that divorce was deterred by absence of divorce in reference group (normative integration) and was deterred for shorter marriages by more friends and organizational affiliations (communicative integration). Sharing friends and organization affiliations with spouse (functional integration) may…

  5. Analyzing simulated patterns of land use change

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, V.H.; O`Neill, R.V.; Southworth, F.; Loureiro, F.

    1992-07-01

    Land use change is one of major factors affecting global environmental conditions. Modeling land use change requires combining spatially-explicit ecological information with socioeconomic factors. A modeling system is being developed that integrates sub-models of human colonization with submodels of ecological interactions to estimate patterns and rates of deforestation under different immigration and land management scenarios. The model projects maps of land use change that can be compared to remote sensing measures using spatial statistics. The simulation modeling system is being applied to the Brazilian state of Rondonia where deforestation has increased at a faster rate over the past two decades than anywhere else in the world. The model projections suggest that land management can both reduce carbon release and improve the length of time farmers are able to remain on the land. The model provides a tool to evaluate the spatial and temporal implications of various land management options.

  6. Analyzing simulated patterns of land use change

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, V.H.; O'Neill, R.V.; Southworth, F. ); Loureiro, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Land use change is one of major factors affecting global environmental conditions. Modeling land use change requires combining spatially-explicit ecological information with socioeconomic factors. A modeling system is being developed that integrates sub-models of human colonization with submodels of ecological interactions to estimate patterns and rates of deforestation under different immigration and land management scenarios. The model projects maps of land use change that can be compared to remote sensing measures using spatial statistics. The simulation modeling system is being applied to the Brazilian state of Rondonia where deforestation has increased at a faster rate over the past two decades than anywhere else in the world. The model projections suggest that land management can both reduce carbon release and improve the length of time farmers are able to remain on the land. The model provides a tool to evaluate the spatial and temporal implications of various land management options.

  7. Pattern recognition and control in manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Tomovic, R.

    1976-01-01

    A new approach to the use of sensors in manipulator or robot control is discussed. The concept addresses the problem of contact or near-contact type of recognition of three-dimensional forms of objects by proprioceptive and/or exteroceptive sensors integrated with the terminal device. This recognition of object shapes both enhances and simplifies the automation of object handling. Several examples have been worked out for the 'Belgrade hand' and for a parallel jaw terminal device, both equipped with proprioceptive (position) and exteroceptive (proximity) sensors. The control applications are discussed in the framework of a multilevel man-machine system control. The control applications create interesting new issues which, in turn, invite novel theoretical considerations. An important issue is the problem of stability in control when the control is referenced to patterns.

  8. Polar convection patterns under quiet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1985-10-01

    Convection electric field patterns at high latitudes appropriate to periods of low geomagnetic activity are presented. The postulate that the global Joule dissipation rate is a minimum is employed to derive characteristic field distributions for the situation when ring current ohmic losses are negligible and the auroral oval enhancement of height-integrated Hall conductivity is small. The fast Fourier transform is introduced to compute Fourier coefficients of discrete field-aligned current data, and the method is shown to be quite useful in this context as a least squares fitting routine. The model calculations demonstrate the approach of the high-latitude ionosphere toward the perfect shielding configuration predicted by the theory for quiet times.

  9. Viewing Integrated-Circuit Interconnections By SEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Russel A.; Gauldin, Robert E.; Ruiz, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    Back-scattering of energetic electrons reveals hidden metal layers. Experiment shows that with suitable operating adjustments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used to look for defects in aluminum interconnections in integrated circuits. Enables monitoring, in situ, of changes in defects caused by changes in temperature. Gives truer picture of defects, as etching can change stress field of metal-and-passivation pattern, causing changes in defects.

  10. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  11. Modularity of a leaf moth-wing pattern and a versatile characteristic of the wing-pattern ground plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the most intriguing questions in evolutionary developmental biology is how an insect acquires a mimicry pattern within its body parts. A striking example of pattern mimicry is found in the pattern diversity of moth and butterfly wings, which is thought to evolve from preexisting elements illustrated by the nymphalid ground plan (NGP). Previous studies demonstrated that individuality of the NGP facilitates the decoupling of associated common elements, leading to divergence. In contrast, recent studies on the concept of modularity have argued the importance of a combination of coupling and decoupling of the constituent elements. Here, we examine the modularity of a mimicry wing pattern in a moth and explore an evolvable characteristic of the NGP. Results This study examined the wings of the noctuid moth Oraesia excavata, which closely resemble leaves with a leaf venation pattern. Based on a comparative morphological procedure, we found that this leaf pattern was formed by the NGP common elements. Using geometric morphometrics combined with network analysis, we found that each of the modules in the leaf pattern integrates the constituent components of the leaf venation pattern (i.e., the main and lateral veins). Moreover, the detected modules were established by coupling different common elements and decoupling even a single element into different modules. The modules of the O. excavata wing pattern were associated with leaf mimicry, not with the individuality of the NGP common elements. For comparison, we also investigated the modularity of a nonmimetic pattern in the noctuid moth Thyas juno. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that the modules of the T. juno wing pattern regularly corresponded to the individuality of the NGP common elements, unlike those in the O. excavata wing pattern. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence for modularity in a leaf mimicry pattern. The results suggest that the evolution of this pattern involves coupling

  12. Thermography pattern analysis and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Bai, Libing; Woo, W. L.; Tian, Guiyun

    2014-06-01

    Analysis of thermography spatial-transient patterns has considerable potential to enable automatic identification and quantification of defects in non-destructive testing and evaluation. This Letter proposes a non-negative pattern separation model for eddy current pulsed thermography to automatically extract important spatial and time patterns according to the transient thermal sequences without any pre-training or prior knowledge. In particular, the method is scale-invariant, such that large differences in surface emissivity, hot spots, and cool areas with dynamic range of thermal contrast can be extracted. Finally, an artificial slot in a steel sample with shining, black strip on the surface is tested to validate the proposed method.

  13. Temporal pattern processing in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Comins, Jordan A; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how the brain perceives, organizes and uses patterned information is directly related to the neurobiology of language. Given the present limitations, such knowledge at the scale of neurons, neural circuits and neural populations can only come from non-human models, focusing on shared capacities that are relevant to language processing. Here we review recent advances in the behavioral and neural basis of temporal pattern processing of natural auditory communication signals in songbirds, focusing on European starlings. We suggest a general inhibitory circuit for contextual modulation that can act to control sensory representations based on patterning rules. PMID:25201176

  14. Turing patterns in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2014-10-01

    The theory of patterns formation for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a multiplex is developed by means of a perturbative approach. The interlayer diffusion constants act as a small parameter in the expansion and the unperturbed state coincides with the limiting setting where the multiplex layers are decoupled. The interaction between adjacent layers can seed the instability of a homogeneous fixed point, yielding self-organized patterns which are instead impeded in the limit of decoupled layers. Patterns on individual layers can also fade away due to cross-talking between layers. Analytical results are compared to direct simulations.

  15. Process for Patterning Indium for Bump Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    An innovation was created for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor for integration of low-temperature detector chips with a silicon backshort and a silicon photonic choke through flipchip bonding. Indium bumps are typically patterned using liftoff processes, which require thick resist. In some applications, it is necessary to locate the bumps close to high-aspect-ratio structures such as wafer through-holes. In those cases, liftoff processes are challenging, and require complicated and time-consuming spray coating technology if the high-aspect-ratio structures are delineated prior to the indium bump process. Alternatively, processing the indium bumps first is limited by compatibility of the indium with subsequent processing. The present invention allows for locating bumps arbitrarily close to multiple-level high-aspect-ratio structures, and for indium bumps to be formed without liftoff resist. The process uses the poor step coverage of indium deposited on a silicon wafer that has been previously etched to delineate the location of the indium bumps. The silicon pattern can be processed through standard lithography prior to adding the high-aspect-ratio structures. Typically, high-aspectratio structures require a thick resist layer so this layer can easily cover the silicon topography. For multiple levels of topography, the silicon can be easily conformally coated through standard processes. A blanket layer of indium is then deposited onto the full wafer; bump bonding only occurs at the high points of the topography.

  16. A Pattern Theory of Self

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a pattern theory of self as a useful way to organize an interdisciplinary approach to discussions of what constitutes a self. According to the pattern theory, a self is constituted by a number of characteristic features or aspects that may include minimal embodied, minimal experiential, affective, intersubjective, psychological/cognitive, narrative, extended, and situated aspects. A pattern theory of self helps to clarify various interpretations of self as compatible or commensurable instead of thinking them in opposition, and it helps to show how various aspects of self may be related across certain dimensions. I also suggest that a pattern theory of self can help to adjudicate (or at least map the differences) between the idea that the self correlates to self-referential processing in the cortical midline structures of the brain and other narrower or wider conceptions of self. PMID:23914173

  17. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  18. Detection of Patterns Within Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Ruedi; Christen, Markus

    The identification of jittered regular signals (="patterns#) embedded in a noisy background is an important and difficult task, particularly in the neurosciences. Traditional methods generally fail to capture such signals. Staircase-like structures in the log-log correlation plot, however, are reliable indicators of such signal components.We provide a number of applications of this method and derive an analytic relationship between the length of the pattern n and the maximal number of steps s(n,m) that are observable at a chosen embedding dimension m. For integer linearly independent patterns and small jitter and noise, the length of the embedded pattern can be calculated from the number of steps. The method is demonstrated to have a huge potential for experimental applications.

  19. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves an interaction between solar heating, thermal instability, atmospheric turbulence, wind strength, and surface threshold conditions. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convect...

  20. Casting Using A Polystyrene Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael

    1993-01-01

    New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model cast by use of polystyrene pattern.