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Sample records for integrated blood bank

  1. Integration of automated systems in blood-banking services.

    PubMed

    Pálffy, S

    1981-03-01

    The objectives, place and advantages of automation in blood-banking services are outlined with reference to the perennial need of blood services to achieve the optimum balance between fluctuating requirements for and supplies of blood while allowing for the brevity of most blood products' useful life-span. Regional, national and international integration of automated systems in blood services is then shown to depend upon mutual agreement concerning data definitions, formats and representations and the development of an internationally accepted standard blood data communication record is proposed.

  2. Cord-Blood Banking

    MedlinePlus

    ... Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy ... Cord Blood Is Important How Banking Works Private Banking Not Widely Recommended Is Banking Right for ...

  3. Virtual blood bank.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kit Fai

    2011-01-24

    Virtual blood bank is the computer-controlled, electronically linked information management system that allows online ordering and real-time, remote delivery of blood for transfusion. It connects the site of testing to the point of care at a remote site in a real-time fashion with networked computers thus maintaining the integrity of immunohematology test results. It has taken the advantages of information and communication technologies to ensure the accuracy of patient, specimen and blood component identification and to enhance personnel traceability and system security. The built-in logics and process constraints in the design of the virtual blood bank can guide the selection of appropriate blood and minimize transfusion risk. The quality of blood inventory is ascertained and monitored, and an audit trail for critical procedures in the transfusion process is provided by the paperless system. Thus, the virtual blood bank can help ensure that the right patient receives the right amount of the right blood component at the right time.

  4. Blood Bank Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Blood bank operations of various hospitals in the Monterey area and the Red Cross Center in San Jose were studied, and as a result a simulation model...is developed which is used to determine the effects on shortages and outdating of various operating policies in a given blood bank . Data from Fort

  5. Health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to umbilical cord blood banking and donation: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Peberdy, Lisa; Young, Jeanine; Kearney, Lauren

    2016-04-19

    Collection and storage of an infant's cord blood at birth is an option available to many new parents. Antenatal health care providers have an important role in providing non-biased and evidence based information to expectant parents about cord blood and tissue banking options. The aim of this paper was to identify and review studies of health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning cord blood banking and the sources by which healthcare professionals obtained their information on this topic. An integrative review was conducted using several electronic databases to identify papers on health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to cord blood banking. The CASP tool was used to determine validity and quality of the studies included in the review. The search of the international literature identified nine papers which met review inclusion criteria. The literature review identified that there was little focus placed on antenatal health care professionals' knowledge of cord blood banking options despite these health care professionals being identified by expectant parents as their preferred, key source of information. Limited high quality studies have investigated what health care professionals know and communicate to expectant parents regarding cord blood banking. Further research should focus on understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals and how they communicate with expectant parents about this issue. In addition, how this knowledge influences professional practice around birth is also important, as this may positively or negatively impact the information that is provided to expectant parents.

  6. [Cord blood banking].

    PubMed

    Cepulić, Branka Golubić; Bojanić, Ines; Mazić, Sanja

    2009-06-01

    Transplantation of cord blood stem cells is a new and rapidly developing area. It has been used as a treatment for many diseases such as hematologic malignancies, primary immune deficiencies and metabolic diseases. Recently, stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine, particularly in neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons interest has been growing in banking cord blood. To be able to find an acceptable donor for any recipient in need, it is necessary to have on stock a great diversity of cells with different genetic types from different populations. Networks of banks and registries have been created around the world in order to share and exchange transplants. Public banks organize collection for altruistic donor of cord blood for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and for directed donation in families at risk. But there are increasing numbers of families that are requesting storage of cord blood for possible future therapeutic use in the family. Establishment of cord blood banks has raised a number of important scientific, legal, ethical and political issues, which are discussed in this paper.

  7. Cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Ruth; Armitage, Sue

    2004-12-01

    Cord blood (CB) is a unique product, rich in haemopoietic stem cells (HSC), that is currently used in the transplantation setting to restore haemopoiesis. It restores haemopoietic stem cell function in patients suffering from malignancies, bone marrow (BM) failure disorders and inherited metabolic and immunological disorders. Related and unrelated CB donations have been successfully transplanted in both the paediatric and adult settings. CB, previously considered a waste product, can be collected from both vaginal deliveries and caesarean sections, either in utero or ex utero, at no risk to the donor, processed to remove excess plasma and red cells, cryopreserved, tested, HLA-typed and stored to provide an 'off-the-shelf' product. CB has a lower risk of some important viral infections and a lower incidence and severity of acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD) than BM. CB transplantation is under innovative development and international collaborative studies are investigating ways to improve transplant outcomes. Other uses for CB remain speculative and it is premature to speculate whether non-haemopoietic stem cells are present in cord blood in sufficient numbers for use against degenerative conditions, as is currently postulated by some commercial organisations. Cord blood banking in EU member countries is now regulated by an EU Directive, which provides a statutory basis for regulation safety to ensure efficacy. Compliance is required by 2006. It requires that all banking establishments are inspected and accredited by a Competent Authority. This includes public altruistic banking as well as directed banking activities.

  8. Military Blood Banking (Civil Disasters).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    number of casualties the hospital can accommodate and this information should be available to the professional staff and blood bank . This variable is...responsible for handling mass casualties are strongly recommended for the blood bank and hospital staff. (Author)

  9. [Cord blood banks].

    PubMed

    Buljan Culej, Jasminka

    2007-12-01

    Cord blood is an excellent source of stem cells which are universal for all other cells of the whole body. They have the ability to develop in any of the body cells, depending on stimulation by different growth factors. The ease of sampling, cryopreservation, and above all successful engraftment make placental blood a possible alternative for bone marrow donation. The advantages of cord blood cells over bone marrow stem cells in allogeneic transplants include their young age and immature status, which reduce the severity of graft versus host reaction. However, the number of cells is much more limited than with bone marrow (about ten time less); therefore, for the time being, the procedure is not equivalent to marrow donation. Cord blood banks would increase HLA diversity, and they are therefore expected to solve two sets of immunogenetic problems: (1) since less stringent compatibility is needed, children with a rare HLA group could benefit from a graft when the donor is not perfectly matched; and (2) HLA types infrequently represented in registries may be represented more readily in placental blood banks; although they occur repeatedly in certain ethnic groups or populations, they are only rarely donated to volunteer registries, while these populations are also concerned in transplantation. Many countries in the world have recognized the significance of collecting and preserving cord blood stem cells and their ability to heal or at least improve life.

  10. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the établissement francais du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding to recipients, blood products, blood supply of the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, the integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So, it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed to be a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks.

  11. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2011-04-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the Établissement français du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding recipients, blood products, blood supply for the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed at being a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks.

  12. Blood banking services in India.

    PubMed

    Sardana, V N

    1996-01-01

    India's health care sector has made impressive strides toward providing health for all by the year 2000. That progress, however, has not been supported by a modern transfusion services network which continues to improve itself. In India, blood collection, storage, and delivery occur mainly in blood banks attached to hospitals, most of which are under central and state government controls. A significant portion of blood banking activity is also done by voluntary agencies and private sector blood banks. A study found the blood transfusion services infrastructure to be highly decentralized and lacking of many critical resources; an overall shortage of blood, especially from volunteer donors; limited and erratic testing facilities; an extremely limited blood component production/availability/use; and a shortage of health care professionals in the field of transfusion services. Infrastructural modernization and the technical upgrading of skills in the blood banks would, however, provide India with a dynamic transfusion services network. The safety of blood transfusion, the national blood safety program, HIV testing facilities, modernization of blood banks, the rational use of blood, program management, manpower development, the legal framework, voluntary blood donation, and a 1996 Supreme Court judgement on the need to focus greater attention upon the blood program are discussed.

  13. Cord-Blood Banking

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma , aplastic anemia , severe sickle cell disease , and severe combined immunodeficiency . There are two types of banks that store ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services A Guide ...

  14. Cord blood banking: 'providing cord blood banking for a nation'.

    PubMed

    Querol, Sergio; Rubinstein, Pablo; Marsh, Steven G E; Goldman, John; Madrigal, Jose Alejandro

    2009-10-01

    Transplantation of cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as therapy for patients whose own marrow is affected by genetic mutations that prevent the development of normal cells of the blood or immune tissues, or for patients whose marrow has been destroyed in the course of treatment for leukaemia and other malignancies. CB is a rich source of haematopoietic stem cells, can be easily harvested and stored in frozen aliquots in a CB bank. The first public CB bank was established in 1993 allowing unrelated CB transplantation to become an option for patients lacking a suitable adult donor. Today, the results of CB transplantation are comparable to those of bone marrow transplants with several important advantages: the graft is available 'off the shelf', thereby reducing the waiting time, and the requirements of human lecucoyte antigen (HLA) matching are less restrictive than those of adult sources. The reduced requirement for HLA matching allows transplants between incompletely matched donors and recipients, thus reducing the size of the inventory required at the national level. This also mitigates the disadvantage encountered by persons of rare HLA genotypes or those who do not belong to populations of North Western European descent. Finally, national CB programmes can easily make available for research individual surplus units not meeting minimal criteria for clinical use.

  15. Experiences with "self service" electronic blood banking.

    PubMed

    Cheng, G

    1998-01-01

    Electronic verification of ABO compatibility (computer crossmatching) has been accepted as the crossmatching procedure for patients without clinically significant alloantibodies. Computer crossmatching offers several advantages over the immediate spin crossmatch and enables the setting up of a self service blood banking system. Self service blood banking saves manpower, improves crossmatch/transfusion(C/T) ratio and makes the maximum surgical blood ordering schedule (MSBOS) redundant. Blood banking service can also be provided at satellite hospitals without stationing blood banking staff there. We have also developed a novel self service system that does not require expensive computer hardware and networking.

  16. Umbilical cord blood banks. Ethical aspects. Public versus private banks.

    PubMed

    Aznar Lucea, Justo

    2012-01-01

    The creation of umbilical cord blood (UCB) banks raises interesting medical, social, economic and ethical issues. This paper reviews the ethical problems specifically. In this respect, it evaluates: a) whether there are advantages to the use of UCB compared to bone marrow, b) whether or not it is ethical to create UCB banks, c) whether their creation is ethically acceptable in terms of their clinical usefulness or d) the use made of them for therapeutic purposes, and finally e) whether their creation is ethically justified from a cost/profitability point of view. We focus primarily on evaluating the ethical controversy between public and private banks, particularly on whether it is ethical to bank autologous blood in private UCB banks, on the basis of its limited possibilities for use by the cord blood donor. We can conclude that, from an ethical point of view, autologous blood banks have limited acceptance among specialised researchers, scientific societies and other public institutions. Therefore, we believe that it is ethically more acceptable to support the creation of public UCB banks for medical and social reasons and, above all, based on the principle of justice and human solidarity. Nevertheless, there is no definitive ethical argument why a couple, according to their autonomy and freedom, cannot bank their child's UCB in a private bank. An equally acceptable solution could be the creation of mixed banks, such as that proposed by the Virgin Health Bank or like the Spanish system where autologous samples can be stored in public banks but with the proviso that if at any time the stored sample is required by any person other than the donor, it would have to be given to them.

  17. Banking on cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood gifted to non-profit public cord blood banks is now routinely used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation for children and adults with cancer, bone marrow failure syndromes, haemoglobinopathies and many genetic metabolic disorders. Because of the success and outcomes of public cord banking, many companies now provide private cord banking services. However, in the absence of any published transplant evidence to support autologous and non-directed family banking, commercial cord banks currently offer a superfluous service.

  18. Umbilical cord blood banking: an update.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; Menitove, Jay E

    2011-08-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a potential vast source of primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells available for clinical application to reconstitute the hematopoietic system and/or restore immunological function in affected individuals requiring treatment. Cord blood can be used as an alternative source for bone marrow transplantation and its use is developing into a new field of treatment for pediatric and adult patients presenting with hematological disorders, immunological defects and specific genetic diseases. More than 25,000 allogeneic cord blood transplantations have been performed worldwide since the first cord blood transplantation in 1988. There are two banking options for storing umbilical cord blood [private (family) and public]. Cord blood stored in private banks are used for either autologous or allogeneic transplants for the infant donor or related family members but private cord blood banks are not searchable or available to the public. More than 780,000 cord blood units are stored in over 130 private cord blood banks, worldwide, and over 400,000 units in more than 100 quality controlled public cord blood banks. Researchers continue to evaluate the usefulness of cord blood cells in treating human diseases or disorders for purposes other than hematological disorders including heart disease, strokes, brain or spinal cord injuries and cancer. This review summarizes the status of umbilical cord blood banking, its history and current and potential use in the treatment of human disease.

  19. Ethical considerations in umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nathan S; Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2008-01-01

    Pregnant patients have the option at delivery of having their cord blood collected and stored for future use. At many hospitals, they have the option of donating their cord blood to the public banking system for future use by anyone who is an appropriate match (public banking). Patients also have the option of having their cord blood stored for a fee with a commercial/private company for future use within their family (private banking). Currently, private banking is not recommended by major obstetric and pediatric professional organizations. We applied current evidence of the risks and benefits of private and public cord blood banking and accepted ethical principles to answer the following two related questions: 1) Do obstetricians have an ethical obligation to comply with a request for private banking? and 2) Do obstetricians have an ethical obligation to routinely offer private banking to women who do not request it? The only situation where there is a known benefit to private banking is when public banking is not available and the patient currently has an affected family member who may benefit from cord blood therapy. We conclude that when presented with a request for private banking, obstetricians have an ethical obligation to explain the lack of proven benefit of this procedure. If the patient still requests private banking, it would be appropriate to comply, because there is minimal or no risk to the procedure. However, obstetricians are not ethically obligated to offer private banking, even when public banking is not available, except in the limited circumstance when the patient currently has an affected family member who may benefit from cord blood therapy.

  20. Trends in cord blood banking

    PubMed Central

    Arrojo, Isidro Prat; Lamas, María del Carmen Hernández; Verdugo, Laura Ponce; Alfaro, Pascual Rizo; Pena, Rebeca Rodríguez; Gordo, Francisco Sánchez; Maldonado, Pilar Gómez; Gémar, Gracia García

    2012-01-01

    Background Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a source of hematopoietic precursor cells for transplantation. The creation of UCB banks in 1992 led to the possibility of storing units of UCB for unrelated transplants. The distribution of cell contents in historical inventories is not homogenous and many units are not, therefore, suitable for adults. The aim of this study was to analyse our UCB bank inventory, evaluate the units released for transplantation and calculate the cost of the current process per unit of UCB stored. Methods Three study periods were defined. In the first period, from January 1996 to January 2006, the total nucleated cell (TNC) count acceptable for processing was 4–6×108 and a manual processing system was used. In the second period, from October 2006 to July 2010, processing was automated and the acceptable TNC count varied from 8–10×108. In the third period, from January 2009 to June 2010, an automated Sepax-BioArchive procedure was used and the accepted initial TNC count was >10×108. Within each period the units were categorised according to various ranges of cryopreserved TNC counts in the units: A, >16.2×108; B1, from 12.5–16.1×108; B2, from 5.2–12.4×108; and C, <5.1×108. Results The third period is best representative of current practices, with homogenous TNC acceptance criteria and automated processing. In this period 15.7% of the units were category A and 25.5% were category B. Overall, the mean TNC count of units released for transplantation was 14×108 (range, 4.6×108 to 36.5×108). The cost of the processed UCB in 2009 was 720.41 euros per unit. Conclusion An UCB bank should store units of high-quality, in terms of the TNC count of units issued for transplantation, have a training programme to optimise the selection of donors prior to delivery, use similar volume reduction systems and homogenous recovery indices, express its indicators in the same units, use validated analytical techniques, and bear in mind ethnic

  1. An audit of blood bank services

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Sharma, Satish; Ingole, Narayan; Gangane, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Background: An audit is a written series of simple, direct questions, which when answered and reviewed, tell whether the laboratory is performing its procedures, activities, and policies correctly and on time. Aim: The aim of this study is to briefly highlight the importance of audit in blood bank services. Materials and Methods: An Audit of Blood Bank Services was carried out in a Blood bank of the tertiary care hospital, Central India by using the tool kit, (comprised of checklists) developed by Directorate General of Health Services, Dhaka WHO, July 2008. Results: After going through these checklists, we observed that there is no system for assessing the training needs of staff in the blood bank. There was no provision for duty doctor's room, expert room, medical technologist room and duty care service. There was no checklist for routine check for observation of hemolysis and deterioration of blood and plasma. There was no facility for separate private interview to exclude sexual disease in the donor. Requisition forms were not properly filled for blood transfusion indications. There was no facility for notification of donors who are permanently deferred. There were no records documented for donors who are either temporarily or permanently deferred on the basis of either clinical examination, history, or serological examination. It was found that wearing of apron, cap, and mask was not done properly except in serology laboratory. When the requisition forms for blood transfusions were audited, it was found that many requisition forms were without indications. Conclusion: Regular audit of blood bank services needs to be initiated in all blood banks and the results needs to be discussed among the managements, colleagues, and staffs of blood bank. These results will provide a good opportunity for finding strategies in improving the blood bank services with appropriate and safe use of blood. PMID:24741651

  2. An audit of blood bank services.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Sharma, Satish; Ingole, Narayan; Gangane, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    An audit is a written series of simple, direct questions, which when answered and reviewed, tell whether the laboratory is performing its procedures, activities, and policies correctly and on time. The aim of this study is to briefly highlight the importance of audit in blood bank services. An Audit of Blood Bank Services was carried out in a Blood bank of the tertiary care hospital, Central India by using the tool kit, (comprised of checklists) developed by Directorate General of Health Services, Dhaka WHO, July 2008. After going through these checklists, we observed that there is no system for assessing the training needs of staff in the blood bank. There was no provision for duty doctor's room, expert room, medical technologist room and duty care service. There was no checklist for routine check for observation of hemolysis and deterioration of blood and plasma. There was no facility for separate private interview to exclude sexual disease in the donor. Requisition forms were not properly filled for blood transfusion indications. There was no facility for notification of donors who are permanently deferred. There were no records documented for donors who are either temporarily or permanently deferred on the basis of either clinical examination, history, or serological examination. It was found that wearing of apron, cap, and mask was not done properly except in serology laboratory. When the requisition forms for blood transfusions were audited, it was found that many requisition forms were without indications. Regular audit of blood bank services needs to be initiated in all blood banks and the results needs to be discussed among the managements, colleagues, and staffs of blood bank. These results will provide a good opportunity for finding strategies in improving the blood bank services with appropriate and safe use of blood.

  3. Maintaining quality in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E; Hewison, C; Nevalainen, D E; Lloyd, H L

    1995-03-01

    Regulation of transfusion or blood banking facilities has followed, rather than preceded the regulation of the pharmaceutical industry and today we find, in Europe and the United States, the basic regulations developed for the pharmaceutical industry being extended to blood transfusion centres (BTC)*. In this article we explore the role of voluntary accreditation or registration to quality systems standards such as ISO 9000 and discuss how these can be used to advantage and how these standards can provide a substantial base for meeting legislative requirements. In the UK there is also a voluntary accreditation procedure available for all clinical laboratories, known as Clinical Pathology Accreditation (CPA). Comparisons between ISO 9000, CPA and other standards are made. We also discuss how voluntary registration, particularly to ISO 9000 can provide an excellent basis for moving into more extensive and progressive Total Quality Management (TQM) programmes which in turn bring a variety of benefits, not least of which is increased staff involvement in your organisation. Experience of the route to quality through voluntary accreditation suggests that external assessment delivers new insights into the organisation that cannot easily be supplanted by internal audit. In Europe legislation relating to pharmaceuticals has steadily increased in scope and in detailed requirements from those set out in the 1965 Directive 65/65/EEC. The legislative framework has steadily increased, bringing plasma and plasma products as well as others such as radiopharmaceuticals, into the product licensing requirements. The progression of legislation seems unlikely to cease and it is debatable how long the Medicines Control Agency (MCA) and its Inspectorate will accept that BTCs can operate at a level which is different from that of the majority of pharmaceutical manufacturers. The change in emphasis in legislation particularly in Europe means that harm that is caused to a patient by a blood

  4. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M

    2011-11-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available.

  5. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking

    PubMed Central

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  6. A Blood Bank Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized Blood Bank Management system is described. Features include product oriented data input, inventory control reports, product utilization reports, rapid retrieval of individual patient reports. Relative benefits of the system are discussed.

  7. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

  8. Volume reduction in routine cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Roig, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an alternative source of hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation in the treatment of haematological malignancies, marrow failure, immunodeficiencies, hemoglobinopathies and inherited metabolic diseases. It has greatly contributed to increase the feasibility to transplantation for many patients in need. To date, more than 20,000 UCB transplants have been performed on children and adults, and more than 400,000 UCB units are available in more than 50 public CB banks. One of the most important objectives of banks is to cryopreserve and store high quality UCB units. Volume reduction is a usual process in cord blood banking that has some advantages as reducing the storage space and the DMSO quantity in final product. Volume reduction methodology must guarantee high cell recovery and red blood cell (RBC) depletion by reducing the UCB units to a standard volume. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation was the first method developed for this purpose by the New York Cord Blood Bank and implemented in many banks worldwide. The semi-automated top and bottom system, usually used for blood fractionation was further developed to simplify and short the process. Later, automatic devices as SEPAX and AXP have been developed in last years specifically for UCB volume reduction purpose. This review critically analyses the advantages and disadvantages of the different procedures. All of them have been used in Valencia Cord Blood Bank along 10 years. In general, automatic devices are preferred because of compliance with cGTP, closed systems, higher reproducibility and less influence of technician.

  9. Virtual blood banking in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, K F; Kwan, Angela M Y; Wong, Michael L G; Lam, Clarence C K; Yip, S C

    2012-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To review our experience in virtual blood banking for intra-operative transfusion in Hong Kong. DESIGN. Retrospective study. SETTING. Three major acute hospitals and a specialised centre for joint replacement surgery with installation of an Operating Theatre Blood Transaction System. PATIENTS. Patients undergoing surgery under anaesthesia and requiring intra-operative transfusion for the period from the implementation of the system in individual institutes (Queen Elizabeth Hospital: June 1997; Princess Margaret Hospital: May 2001; Queen Mary Hospital: October 2009; and Hong Kong Buddhist Hospital: December 2010) till September 2011. RESULTS. Under the system, 58 923 units of red cells were released intra-operatively for 18 264 patients (11% of the total number of blood units issued by the blood banks in these institutes during the study period). About 1% of them (613 units) entailed unmatched red cells given to 183 patients for emergency transfusions during surgery. The mean time required for the issue of the first unit of red cells was less than 1 minute. A total of 1231 units of red cells were returned unused after being released. Among them, 95 units were deemed unfit for re-issue because they had left the temperature-monitored blood storage refrigerators in the operating theatres for more than 30 minutes. There was no delay in transfusion or postponement of surgery due to problems or downtime of the Operating Theatre Blood Transaction System. CONCLUSION. Our experience has shown that our virtual blood banking system was efficient and effective, and helped ensure that the right patient received the right amount of the right blood at the right time. The system can be implemented either locally in the same hospital with a central blood bank, or in a more remote and networked site without a nearby supporting blood bank.

  10. A quality system for placental blood banking.

    PubMed

    Sirchia, G; Rebulla, P; Mozzi, F; Lecchi, L; Lazzari, L; Ratti, I

    1998-06-01

    A Quality System for Placental Blood Banking aimed at the transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells to related and unrelated allogeneic recipients is described. It includes the organizational structure, procedures, processes and resources needed to implement quality management. The Quality System described in this article is based on ISO 9002, a model for quality assurance in production, installation and servicing developed in 1987 and revised in 1994 by the International Organization for Standardization. ISO 9002 includes 20 clauses that provide guidance for the implementation of the Quality System. The development of the Quality System is started by the Placental Blood Bank Medical Director with the definition of a General Quality Plan including: (1) the written description of the Mission, Objectives, Technical and Organizational Policies, and Staff Organization Chart; (2) the definition and acquisition of adequate financial, human and structural resources; (3) the appointment of a Quality System Head, who must identify the Placental Blood Banking process together with the Placental Blood Bank personnel; implement a documentation plan; identify quality indicators; start regular internal audit; report audit results to the Medical Director for review. Following staff training and qualification, the Quality System is launched. The Placental Blood Bank can then undergo audit by an external inspector and be finally certified for compliance to ISO 9002. The Quality System must be maintained and subjected to external audit at regular intervals so that certification is confirmed.

  11. [Quality Control in Umbilical Cord Blood Bank

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sheng-Li; Song, Dao-Gang; Shen, Bai-Jun; Pan, Jie

    2001-03-01

    Recent clinical reports have demonstrated that the use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) opened a new source of stem cell for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, leading to the development of cord blood banks world-wide. Prior to the large scale construction of UCB banks, quality control must be performed for health care providers and manufactures. With increasingly stringent regulatory requirement in blood industry, quality control is playing an important role in the operation of blood centers and stem cell laboratories. Reviewed the lectures in the biology of UCB and UCB banks published in recent years, our experiences were discussed in setting up Shandong blood bank to define process variables associated with the collection of UCB, to determine and optimize the procedures and materials used, to ascertain how UCB can be processed in clean room as mononucleated cell preparations, and to analyze using of long-term storage of UCB in research and clinic in the future. Our conclusions are: (1) the establishment of UCB banks for use in transplantation appears to be easy, effective and particularly suitable approach in China under cGMP conditions; (2) the procedures for volume reduction by closed and semi-automated blood processing system, SSP HLA typing, biocode and local computer net, microbiological tests and the 50 ml cryobags for storage constitute a cost efficient system for large-scale UCB banking; (3) the average of 60 ml UCB collection may contain sufficent marrow repopulating cells for children and most of adult recipients; and (4) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in cord blood have a more potent proliferative ability than those derived from bone marrow in cell expansion potentials.

  12. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards.

  13. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as “biological insurance” should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  14. Cord blood banking: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Cristina; Contreras, Marcela

    2009-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains stem and progenitor cells capable of restoring haematopoietic and immunological function in vivo. UCB is currently used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for transplantation in patients suffering from haematological malignancies, bone marrow failures and inherited metabolic disorders. In order to facilitate transplantation, large repositories of frozen cord blood units (CBUs) from altruistic donations have been established in many parts of the world and to date there are more than 300,000 units stored worldwide. These products have been banked under stringent quality conditions, in order to ensure their safety and efficacy. The development and evolution of the policies and procedures currently in use in cord blood banking have been largely influenced by the clinical results of cord blood transplantation. This review aims to provide a historical overview of the various developments in the field of cord blood banking from its inception, highlighting the relevant aspects in their collection, banking and release that are known to influence the clinical outcome of these transplants.

  15. Towards responsible cord blood banking models.

    PubMed

    Rebulla, P; Lecchi, L

    2011-04-01

    On 31 May 2010, 14 072 567 bone marrow/apheresis donors registered in 44 countries and 426 501 cord blood units banked in 26 countries for public use were available to treat candidates to haemopoietic stem cell transplant lacking a family related compatible donor. Despite these impressive numbers, additional efforts are required to ensure that all patients, including those from ethnic minorities, can promptly find a suitable donor. Governments, clinicians, scientists, patients and stakeholders should share the responsibility to develop haemopoietic stem cell donation and cord blood banking models able to fully match all patient needs. In this regard, current scientific evidence and prevalent opinions among expert clinicians support solidaristic cord blood donation for public use against the alternative option of commercial autologous cord blood storage.

  16. Management of a Community Hospital Blood Bank: A Descriptive Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The operational activities of a community hospital blood bank are described at all levels with special attention given to the inventory management of...the bank . A distinguishing feature of this blood bank is the use of a centrifuge-freezer system which, prior to the ten day age limit, breaks down...inventory management policies thus include regulating the input of blood into the bank , the transfer of blood from the refrigerator to the freezer and

  17. Cord blood banking for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, P

    2009-11-01

    Cord blood (CB) stem and progenitor cells from related donors have been transplanted for past 20 years and from unrelated donors issued by public CB banks for 16 years. This brief look at public CB banking highlights aspects of its current status to suggest that accomplishing the currently required tasks, though no small undertaking, is not enough: much remains to be contributed. CB banking started in the 1930s, collecting blood for transfusion and showed that CB could be effectively collected, stored and administered intravenously without negative consequences. The realization that it contains hematopoietic 'stem' cells (actually, colony-forming units) followed discoveries elsewhere in hematopoiesis research, while HLA and unrelated BMT were being investigated. Progress in the exploration of ethnically stratified HLA allele frequencies, together with plausible neonatal (partial) immunological tolerance, seemed to predict initially frequent, unavoidable, but sufficiently tolerable HLA mismatching with CB grafts. Gluckman et al. and Boyse et al. proved that HLA-identical sibling CB grafts led to definitive engraftment. Technical developments in processing and freezing enabled public banks to accumulate large inventories and to supply grafts that could succeed despite major HLA incompatibility and low cell doses and provide hope for universal access to unrelated-donor transplantation. Public CB banking has thrived worldwide. Regulation and accreditation defined Good Tissue Practice in the CB banking environment and provided accepted do's, don't's and how to's. Startling advances continue to be made, not only technical, but including the description of molecular regulation in the function of natural killer and other cells involved in allogeneic recognition that will have dramatic effects and will permit further improvement in CB selection and use.

  18. 27 CFR 22.105 - Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hospitals, blood banks... Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.105 Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums. (a) Tax-free alcohol withdrawn for use by hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums shall be used exclusively for medicinal,...

  19. 27 CFR 22.105 - Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hospitals, blood banks... Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.105 Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums. (a) Tax-free alcohol withdrawn for use by hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums shall be used exclusively for medicinal,...

  20. 27 CFR 22.105 - Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hospitals, blood banks... Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.105 Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums. (a) Tax-free alcohol withdrawn for use by hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums shall be used exclusively for medicinal,...

  1. 27 CFR 22.105 - Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hospitals, blood banks... Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.105 Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums. (a) Tax-free alcohol withdrawn for use by hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums shall be used exclusively for medicinal,...

  2. 27 CFR 22.105 - Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hospitals, blood banks... Tax-Free Alcohol § 22.105 Hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums. (a) Tax-free alcohol withdrawn for use by hospitals, blood banks, and sanitariums shall be used exclusively for medicinal,...

  3. Hemosoft: a new software for blood bank and apheresis management.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Onder

    2004-06-01

    Blood banks (BB) generate large volumes of information relating to patients and blood products sometimes stored indefinitely. Today computers are the main keys used to manage this task. BB information systems are developed mainly to assist BB specialists. We developed a new software, Hemosoft, in our blood bank. We have carried out a great deal of research into BB programs around the world in terms of program features. Using the latest technology, Hemosoft has been designed to run on a multi-user platform on the basis of a modular structure, and high security levels. Hemosoft's structural advantages are: (1) its modular structure and client/server architecture reduce initial hardware costs. (2) Relational database structure provides consistent and secure data access, (3) user-friendly graphical interface, (4) according to operational needs, Hemosoft can be expanded and transferred on to different platforms. As a MS Windows based program with graphical user interfacing, Hemosoft has all the functions and advantages of windows based applications. Barcode printing is available to ISBT 128 standard. Hemosoft's integrated modules are: blood donation, transfusion, product management, administrative follow-up, apheresis, stock management, staff-management, inter-center communication, statistics, archive, internet and video-conferencing systems, accounts, integration and security. It fulfills international transfusion medicine requirements, legislative measures and guidelines. We believe that Hemosoft is a high quality, competitive program developed to meet international standards. It is our hope that it will enforce transfusion medicine and blood banking nationwide.

  4. Military walking blood bank and the civilian blood service.

    PubMed

    Berséus, Olle; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2012-06-01

    In most countries whole blood transfusions have been replaced by component therapy. This has allowed for both better usage of the blood donations and better quality during storage. While this strategy was initially motivated by the commercial need for plasma the plasma reduction also reduced the levels of low grade proteases and sialidase, hence minimizing the cellular storage lesion/microvesiculation during prolonged storage. Plasma reduction also reduces transfusion reactions associated with plasma. During special military conditions, however, blood transfusion is urgently needed without corresponding access to blood components, in particular platelets. Accordingly, new focus on whole blood has aroused and added a new challenge to the blood transfusion services. This special issue of "what is happening" highlights the planed efforts by Swedish and Norwegian groups in the developments of military walking blood bank, which is applicable to civil blood services.

  5. 21 CFR 864.9050 - Blood bank supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... such as blood bank pipettes, blood grouping slides, blood typing tubes, blood typing racks, and cold... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood bank supplies. 864.9050 Section 864.9050...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture...

  6. 21 CFR 864.9050 - Blood bank supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... such as blood bank pipettes, blood grouping slides, blood typing tubes, blood typing racks, and cold... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood bank supplies. 864.9050 Section 864.9050...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9050 - Blood bank supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... such as blood bank pipettes, blood grouping slides, blood typing tubes, blood typing racks, and cold... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood bank supplies. 864.9050 Section 864.9050...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture...

  8. Cord blood banking activity in Iran National Cord Blood Bank: a two years experience.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mostafa; Atarodi, Kamran; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Abolghasemi, Hasan; Sadegh, Hosein; Faranoosh, Mohammad; Golzade, Khadije; Fadai, Razieh; Niknam, Fereshte; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2014-02-01

    Today umbilical cord blood (UCB) has known as a commonly used source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation and many cord blood banks have been established around the world for collection and cryopreservation of cord blood units. Herein, we describe our experience at Iran National Cord Blood Bank (INCBB) during 2 years of activity. From November 2010 to 2012, UCBs were collected from 5 hospitals in Tehran. All the collection, processing, testing, cryopreservation and storage procedures were done according to standard operation procedures. Total nucleated cells (TNC) count, viability test, CD34+ cell count, colony forming unit (CFU) assay, screening tests and HLA typing were done on all banked units. Within 3770 collected units, only 32.9% fulfilled banking criteria. The mean volume of units was 105.2 ml and after volume reduction the mean of TNC, viability, CD34+ cells and CFUs was 10.76×10(8), 95.2%, 2.99×10(6) and 7.1×10(5), respectively. One unit was transplanted at Dec 2012 to a 5-year old patient with five of six HLA compatibilities. In our country banking of UCB is new and high rate of hematopoietic stem cell transplants needs expanding CB banks capacity to find more matching units, optimization of methods and sharing experiences to improve biological characterization of units.

  9. Banking Integrity Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Cantwell, Maria [D-WA

    2009-12-16

    Senate - 12/16/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. [The banks of umbilical cord blood: biomedical and bioethical issues].

    PubMed

    Usanos, Rafael Amo

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the actuality of the Umbilical Cord Blood Banks (UCBB). Its aim is to offer the necessary notions for the understanding of their nature and of the ethical problems which they carry associated. In order to do this it will lean, on one hand, on the actual bibliography about blood of the umbilical cord and its present and future applications, and on the other hand, on the document of the European Group of Ethics where this issue is discussed. It is of special interest here the existence of the banks called "autologous" that, for some authors, seem to contradict the principle of solidarity. This work will examine, amidst others, this question, and it will suggest a solution articulating both "liberty" and "solidarity". Other topics such as respect to confidentiality, informed consent and integrity of the body will be approached.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Kaimal, Anjali J; Smith, Catherine C; Laros, Russell K; Caughey, Aaron B; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. A decision-analytic model was designed comparing private umbilical cord blood banking with no umbilical cord blood banking. Baseline assumptions included a cost of $3,620 for umbilical cord blood banking and storage for 20 years, a 0.04% chance of requiring an autologous stem cell transplant, a 0.07% chance of a sibling requiring an allogenic stem cell transplant, and a 50% reduction in risk of graft-versus-host disease if a sibling uses banked umbilical cord blood. Private cord blood banking is not cost-effective because it cost an additional $1,374,246 per life-year gained. In sensitivity analysis, if the cost of umbilical cord blood banking is less than $262 or the likelihood of a child needing a stem cell transplant is greater than 1 in 110, private umbilical cord blood banking becomes cost-effective. Currently, private umbilical cord blood banking is cost-effective only for children with a very high likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant. Patients considering private blood banking should be informed of the remote likelihood that a unit will be used for a child or another family member. III.

  12. Cord blood banking and quality issues.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Amanda; McKenna, David; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Food and Drug Administration guidelines are designed to assure the quality and safety of the cord blood product used for transplantation. It is valuable to determine whether the actions called for in these guidelines are effective. We applied our cell therapy quality system to all cord blood units shipped into our cellular therapy laboratory for transplant at the University of Minnesota between 2011 and 2013. The quality issues were categorized as likely, potentially, or unlikely to have a clinical impact. A total of 249 units of umbilical cord blood (UCB) were received from 16 cord blood banks. A total of 159 units (64%) had a total of 245 issues. Of these, 117 (48%) pertained to medical history, 120 (49%) to quality control, and eight (3%) to labeling and documentation. Units with quality issues were no more likely to fail to engraft, and no specific kind of quality issue was associated with failure to engraft. Compared to a similar study 10 years ago, there was a decrease in the number of issues per unit. The cost of collecting, testing, processing, and storing UCB is very high. However, there may be activities that do not contribute to the quality or safety of the cord blood. The guidelines could be reviewed to determine their value based on years of experience. © 2015 AABB.

  13. Private cord blood banking: current use and clinical future.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Peter; McCauley, Catherina

    2009-09-01

    International private umbilical cord blood banking has expanded rapidly in recent years since the first cord blood transplant which was 20 years ago. Private companies offer parents the opportunity to store umbilical cord blood for the possible future use by their child or other family members. The private cord blood industry has been criticised by a number of professional bodies including the EU Ethics Committee, the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the Royal College of Midwives and the US College of Paediatrics. This review presents the arguments from the opponents of private cord blood banking, and then makes the case for private cord banking based on the latest scientific and clinical evidence.

  14. Cord blood banking: what nurses and healthcare providers should know.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Yasmin

    2011-01-01

    Although the use of embryonic stem cells to treat disease has caused much controversy, one type of stem cell treatment has slowly and steadily shown promise but has not engendered negative ethical media attention: the use of umbilical stem cells. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains stem cells that have already successfully treated a variety of diseases, including leukemias, lymphomas, hemoglobinopathies, immunodeficiencies, and disorders of metabolism; ongoing research continues to explore additional diseases for potential treatment. Cord blood can be stored in private banks or public banks. Private cord blood banks save cord blood for use by the family only, at a cost. Public cord blood banks accept donations and the cord blood is then used for the general public and/or research. A review of the literature finds that public banking is the preferred recommendation over private unless there is a known family member with a disease that can currently be treated with cord blood. This article discusses cord blood banking options as well as the ethical issues and barriers facing both healthcare providers and patients when dealing with cord blood banking.

  15. Blood, Soy Milk, and Vitality: The Wartime Origins of Blood Banking in China, 1943-45.

    PubMed

    Soon, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the multiple meanings of blood transfusion and banking in modern China through the history of the first Chinese blood bank, established by the Overseas Chinese in 1943 to solicit blood for the war effort. Through investigating the attitudes of Chinese soldiers and civilians toward the blood bank, this article argues for the multiplicity of motivations underpinning society's attitudes toward blood banking and donation. Cultural notions of blood were an important but not the sole factor in their consideration. Ideas of nationalism and altruism played a role too. What eventually turned out to be most effective for most donors was the promise of eggs and soy milk for blood. Its economic value in the context of wartime scarcity was enough for many to abandon opposition to blood banking. By drawing attention to socioeconomic concerns in biomedical practices, this article provides an alternative examination of blood banking in modern societies.

  16. [Hospital blood bank: information system and immuno-hematology].

    PubMed

    Vaquier, C; Caldani, C

    2010-12-01

    Due to regulations, hospital blood banks have to equip them with a computer-based information system. This system facilitates the management of the blood bank and ensures the safety of the storage, issuing and traceability of the blood and blood components. It permits to create a medical file for each transfused patient, which contains the characteristics of the blood components transfused and the immunohematological status of the patient, received by electronic data interchange from the blood establishment. Thus, from the assistance to the prescription of blood transfusion to the issuing and traceability of the blood components, the computer-based information system is the guarantee of the transfusion security in a hospital blood bank. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Cord blood banking in France: reorganising the national network.

    PubMed

    Katz, Gregory; Mills, Antonia

    2010-06-01

    Paradoxically, France is one of the leading exporters of cord blood units worldwide, but ranks only 17th in terms of cord blood units per inhabitant, and imports 64% of cord blood grafts to meet national transplantation demands. With three operational banks in 2008, the French allogeneic cord blood network is now entering an important phase of development with the creation of seven new banks collecting from local clusters of maternities. Although the French network of public banks is demonstrating a strong commitment to reorganise and scale up its activities, the revision of France's bioethics law in 2010 has sparked a debate concerning the legalisation of commercial autologous banking. The paper discusses key elements for a comprehensive national plan that would strengthen the allogeneic banking network through which France could meet its national medical needs and guarantee equal access to healthcare. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Patients' knowledge of umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Perlow, Jordan H

    2006-08-01

    To determine patients' knowledge of umbilical cord blood banking (UCBB). A questionnaire was administered. Part 1 queried issues of familiarity with the term UCBB. Those patients with any awareness of UCBB were provided with part 2, asking more detailed questions that assessed knowledge. Four hundred twenty-five patients completed the survey; 37% had no knowledge of UCBB. Older patients and those with higher degrees of education were more aware of UCBB, and the greatest disparity of knowledge was noted among Native American patients (p < 0.001). Of patients indicating familiarity with UCBB, 2.6% felt "extremely knowledgeable," while 74% felt "minimally informed." Fifty percent of the patients were misinformed that UCBB was only for "the child that I will deliver." Seventy-one percent of patients were not planning UCBB, with "expense" and "insufficient knowledge" as the primary reasons cited. Only 14% of patients were educated about UCBB by their nurse or obstetrician, although 90% of patients expected their obstetrician to answer their questions on UCBB. Patients are poorly informed about UCBB, especially ethnic minorities, younger patients and those with lesser degrees of education. Few patients receive UCBB education from health care providers, yet most patients expect their obstetrician to be able to answer questions on UCBB. Lack of knowledge and expense remain barriers to UCBB. Opportunities to educate patients and obstetric providers on UCBB should be pursued.

  19. Umbilical cord blood banking: beyond the public-private divide.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michelle A C; Samuel, Gabrielle; Jordens, Christopher F C; Kerridge, Ian H

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a source of haematopoietic progenitor cells, which are used to treat a range of malignant, genetic, metabolic and immune disorders. Until recently, cord blood was either collected through donations to publicly funded cord blood banks for use in allogeneic transplantation, or stored in commercial cord blood banks for use in autologous transplantation. The line between public and private cord blood banking is being blurred by the emergence of "hybrid" models that combine aspects of both the public and private systems. The authors describe these hybrid models and argue that their emergence is explained by both market forces and public sector policy They propose that the future of the sector will depend heavily on several key developments that will differentially affect public, private and hybrid banking models.

  20. Fostering public cord blood banking and research in Canada.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Rosario; Dalpe, Gratien; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-12-01

    In June 2013, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) established the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB) accessible to Canadian and international patients and researchers. The NPCBB promotes efforts that contribute to research and improved clinical care by making units not suitable for banking or transplantation available for research. In the context of the NPCBB of the CBS, this article will focus on the practical tools (e.g., consent protocols) developed to optimize umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking and research while enabling ethical provenance of UCB stem cells. The Canadian approach represents an ideal model for comparison as it is a country in which the national public bank (and other regional/provincial public banks) coexists with private companies.

  1. Laboratory and blood bank needs of a perinatal center.

    PubMed

    Mannino, F L

    1976-09-01

    Prenatal and neonatal laboratory diagnostic tests are discussed in terms of purpose, technique, and evaluation of results. The need for quick access to fresh blood products must be appreciated by the blood bank, and the perinatologist must have a thorough understanding of blood products and the need for established procedures to guarantee safe transfusion.

  2. [Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking: current issues].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Minoko

    2016-03-01

    Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking are essential components of the infrastructure required for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. We now have a new law to support and regulate the Marrow Donor Coordination Agency, Cord Blood Banks and the Haematopoietic Stem Cell Provision Support Organization. We also need to have a specific goal for bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donor registration, a minimum cord blood bank size, and the demographic data to back the medical needs for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. To improve bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, we need to recruit younger adults for marrow registration and make greater efforts to shorten the coordinating period. For cord blood transplantations, uniting and empowering the cord blood collection sites is needed, to encourage and motivate obstetricians and other staff, as the quality of cord blood units is primarily determined during collection. Also, the cord blood banks must work cooperatively to provide cord blood internationally, which includes coordinating with international agencies and their regulations.

  3. Court upholds $405,000 award against blood banking industry.

    PubMed

    1995-06-30

    The New Jersey Superior Court has ruled that the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), the nation's largest blood bank trade group, was negligent during the early 1980s when it recommended that blood banks not screen and test donors to reduce the chance of HIV contamination of the nation's blood supply. [Name removed], who received HIV-contaminated blood in 1984 as a result of a transfusion at St. Joseph's Hospital in Paterson, sued and reached out-of-court settlements with his doctors and the Bergen Community Blood Center, which provided the blood. Only the AABB suit proceeded to trial, with the jury finding that one-third of the damages were attributable to the AABB's actions. In 1983, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested that blood banks might reduce the risk of AIDS entering the blood supply by using the surrogate hepatitis B test. The AABB, the American Red Cross, and the Council of Community Blood Centers recommended against testing, saying that evidence of transmission by blood was inconclusive and unproven. In March 1985, the AABB adopted the ELISA test. This is the first time the AABB has been held responsible; the AABB said it may appeal the decision. The court disagreed with AABB's claim that it was immune from liability because it was a charity, saying it also performs a critical governance function in respect of the operation of blood banks. The decision puts considerable liability for the U.S. cases of HIV contracted through tainted blood transfusions on the AABB.

  4. [Immuno-haematology and blood bank inventory and issue management].

    PubMed

    Madre, F; Benoist, F; Chandesris, C; Nicola, N

    2010-12-01

    Blood bank management must ensure the correct blood product issuance in the right time. For this purpose, patient clinical and immuno-haematological data have to be taken into consideration. Inventory composition, by blood group and phenotype, blood product providing possibilities and transport delays are determining factors. Finally, a good management relies also on the use of consensually written procedures and the monitoring of pertinent indicators. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Ethical issues in umbilical cord blood banking. Working Group on Ethical Issues in Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, J; Kaalund, V; Kodish, E; Marshall, M F; Reisner, E G; Wilfond, B S; Wolpe, P R

    1997-09-17

    Banking umbilical cord blood (UCB) to be used as a source of stem cells for transplantation is associated with a set of ethical issues. An examination of these issues is needed to inform public policy and to raise the awareness of prospective parents, clinicians, and investigators. Individuals with expertise in anthropology, blood banking, bone marrow transplantation, ethics, law, obstetrics, pediatrics, and the social sciences were invited to join the Working Group on Ethical Issues in Umbilical Cord Blood Banking. Members were assigned topics to present to the Working Group. Following independent reviews, background materials were sent to the Working Group. Individual presentations of topics at a 2-day meeting were followed by extensive group discussions in which consensus emerged. A writing committee then drafted a document that was circulated to the entire Working Group. After 3 rounds of comments over several months, all but 1 member of the Working Group agreed with the presentation of our conclusions. (1) Umbilical cord blood technology is promising although it has several investigational aspects; (2) during this investigational phase, secure linkage should be maintained of stored UCB to the identity of the donor; (3) UCB banking for autologous use is associated with even greater uncertainty than banking for allogeneic use; (4) marketing practices for UCB banking in the private sector need close attention; (5) more data are needed to ensure that recruitment for banking and use of UCB are equitable; and (6) the process of obtaining informed consent for collection of UCB should begin before labor and delivery.

  6. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  8. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  9. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood cells...

  10. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood cells...

  11. Committee Opinion No. 648 Summary: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended.

  12. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 648: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended.

  13. Cord blood banking and transplantation: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mervin C

    2014-04-01

    A review of articles published since January 2012 on the topic of cord blood banking and cord blood stem cell transplantation was conducted for this the 25th anniversary year of the first cord blood transplant performed in a human. Cord blood banking is performed throughout the world. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is recognized as an acceptable alternative stem cell source for paediatric and adults requiring a haematopoietic transplant, particularly for patients of racial and ethnic minorities. To further advance the use of UCB, methods to enhance UCB stem cell expansion, engraftment and maintenance may be required. Controversy on the most effective and economically sustainable model for banking and storing an optimal UCB product continues to persist. Cord blood banking and transplantation of cord blood stem cells has advanced rapidly over the initial 25 years, as more than 30 ,000 patients have benefited from the therapy. New concepts on the use of methods to expand UCB stem cells for transplantation and use for nonhaematopoietic indications may increase demand for UCB over the next few decades.

  14. Ethical aspects of banking placental blood for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, J; Reisner, E G; Kurtzberg, J

    1995-12-13

    Transplantation of blood cells harvested from the umbilical cord immediately after birth has been effective in repopulating the bone marrow. These placental blood transplantations may be safer than conventional bone marrow transplantations and may suspend the need to harvest bone marrow, a process fraught with difficulties. Further understanding and advancement of this emerging technology require developing large banks of placental blood. In this article, we examine some of the ethical issues associated with placental blood banking, including (1) questions about ownership of the tissue, (2) the necessity and nature of obtaining informed consent from parents for harvesting placental blood and the information-gathering process associated with it, (3) obligations to notify parents and children of the results of medical testing for infectious diseases and genetic information, (4) matters of privacy and confidentiality related to such information, and (5) the need for fair and equitable harvesting of and access to placental blood.

  15. ISO 9000 quality standards: a model for blood banking?

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, D E; Lloyd, H L

    1995-06-01

    The recent American Association of Blood Banks publications Quality Program and Quality Systems in the Blood Bank and Laboratory Environment, the FDA's draft guidelines, and recent changes in the GMP regulations all discuss the benefits of implementing quality systems in blood center and/or manufacturing operations. While the medical device GMPs in the United States have been rewritten to accommodate a quality system approach similar to ISO 9000, the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research of the FDA is also beginning to make moves toward adopting "quality systems audits" as an inspection process rather than using the historical approach of record reviews. The approach is one of prevention of errors rather than detection after the fact (Tourault MA, oral communication, November 1994). The ISO 9000 series of standards is a quality system that has worldwide scope and can be applied in any industry or service. The use of such international standards in blood banking should raise the level of quality within an organization, among organizations on a regional level, within a country, and among nations on a worldwide basis. Whether an organization wishes to become registered to a voluntary standard or not, the use of such standards to become ISO 9000-compliant would be a move in the right direction and would be a positive sign to the regulatory authorities and the public that blood banking is making a visible effort to implement world-class quality systems in its operations. Implementation of quality system standards such as the ISO 9000 series will provide an organized approach for blood banks and blood bank testing operations. With the continued trend toward consolidation and mergers, resulting in larger operational units with more complexity, quality systems will become even more important as the industry moves into the future.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. 21 CFR 864.9650 - Quality control kit for blood banking reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quality control kit for blood banking reagents... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9650 Quality control kit for blood banking reagents. (a) Identification. A quality control kit for blood banking reagents is a device that consists of sera, cells...

  17. 21 CFR 864.9650 - Quality control kit for blood banking reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quality control kit for blood banking reagents... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9650 Quality control kit for blood banking reagents. (a) Identification. A quality control kit for blood banking reagents is a device that consists of sera, cells...

  18. 21 CFR 864.9650 - Quality control kit for blood banking reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quality control kit for blood banking reagents... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9650 Quality control kit for blood banking reagents. (a) Identification. A quality control kit for blood banking reagents is a device that consists of sera, cells...

  19. 21 CFR 864.9650 - Quality control kit for blood banking reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Quality control kit for blood banking reagents... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9650 Quality control kit for blood banking reagents. (a) Identification. A quality control kit for blood banking reagents is a device that consists of sera, cells...

  20. 21 CFR 864.9650 - Quality control kit for blood banking reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quality control kit for blood banking reagents... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9650 Quality control kit for blood banking reagents. (a) Identification. A quality control kit for blood banking reagents is a device that consists of sera, cells...

  1. [Immunological blood transfusion safety and selection of red blood cells issued from hospital blood banks].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic red blood cells transfusion is always an immunological challenge and the choice of the blood products is crucial for the patient safety. But this choice may be hampered by the quality or the quantity of the available supply. In the end, the lack of transfusion may be more harmful than transfusion. The balance between patients' needs and blood centres supplying is always delicate. The conditions are not the same for all blood groups. Things are easier for the KEL1 phenotype, where the supply must ensure only 92.5% of KEL: -1 red blood cells instead of the 91% expected. More complicated is the situation for group O red blood cells with 47 versus 43%. But the major problem concerns RH: -1 red blood cells, for which the needs reach 20.1 versus 15%. These challenges require a lot of efforts from blood centres staffs to influence blood donors' recruitment and appointments. A justified and carefully selected blood products issuing may be of great help, especially for group O RH: -1 red blood cells. Therefore, hospital blood banks must have ad hoc procedures and a trained staff to put them into practice.

  2. Blood banking/immunohematology: special relevance to pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward C C

    2013-12-01

    Blood banking/immunohematology is an area of laboratory medicine that involves the preparation of blood and blood components for transfusion as well as the selection and monitoring of those components following transfusion. The preparation, modification, and indications of both traditional and newer products are described in this review, along with special considerations for neonates, patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, those with sickle cell disease, and others. Immunohematological techniques are critical in the provision of blood and blood products and are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Can cord blood banks transform into induced pluripotent stem cell banks?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyan; Rao, Mahendra S

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the rapid evolution of clinically compliant protocols to generate such lines from a variety of tissue sources has raised the possibility that personalized medicine may be achievable in the near future. Several strategies to deliver iPSCs for iPSC-derived cell-based therapy have been proposed: one such model has been the cell-banking model, using processes developed by the cord blood industry. The cord blood industry has evolved primarily as a banking model in which units of cord blood harvested from discarded placenta are stored either in a public or a private cord blood bank for future use. The consideration of a cord blood--like banking model has been further spurred by the realization that this population of cells is an ideal starting sample to generate pluripotent cells. Spurred by these technological advances, major efforts are underway to develop a current Good Manufacturing Practice--compliant protocol to generate iPSCs from cord blood and to develop a haplobanking strategy. In this article, we discuss the issues that may affect such an effort.

  4. Development of a district Cord Blood Bank: a model for cord blood banking in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Buchanan, R; Webster, J; Laundy, V; Horsley, H; Barron, C; Anderson, N; Bradley, B; Hows, J

    2000-04-01

    The Bristol Cord Blood Bank was established as a pilot project within existing health services to establish cost-effective recruitment, collection and processing suitable for use in the NHS should cord blood become a routine source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in the UK. An important aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a midwifery-based collection network, thus utilising expertise already in place. Collection was performed on the delivery suite immediately after the placenta was delivered. The clinical experience of the midwife collector/counsellors allowed rapid pre-collection assessment of the condition of the cord and placenta. This prevented collection attempts from diseased or otherwise damaged placentas, leading to conservation of resources by preventing collection of most small volume donations. The bank was established within the National Blood Service, Bristol Centre to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice standards and ensure that processing was subject to the same stringency required for other sources of haemopoietic stem cells. Cord blood is an expensive resource. By utilising existing expertise in district Obstetric and National Blood Services, the Bristol Cord Blood Bank may serve as a model for health economic evaluation of cord blood banking of volunteer donations within the NHS.

  5. Family cord blood banking for sickle cell disease: a twenty-year experience in two dedicated public cord blood banks

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Hanadi; Bernaudin, Françoise; Rouard, Helene; Vanneaux, Valérie; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Cavazzana, Marina; Gauthereau, Valerie; Stanislas, Aurélie; Benkerrou, Malika; De Montalembert, Mariane; Ferry, Christele; Girot, Robert; Arnaud, Cecile; Kamdem, Annie; Gour, Joelle; Touboul, Claudine; Cras, Audrey; Kuentz, Mathieu; Rieux, Claire; Volt, Fernanda; Cappelli, Barbara; Maio, Karina T.; Paviglianiti, Annalisa; Kenzey, Chantal; Larghero, Jerome; Gluckman, Eliane

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to implement family cord blood banking have been developed in the past decades for siblings requiring stem cell transplantation for conditions such as sickle cell disease. However, public banks are faced with challenging decisions about the units to be stored, discarded, or used for other endeavors. We report here 20 years of experience in family cord blood banking for sickle cell disease in two dedicated public banks. Participants were pregnant women who had a previous child diagnosed with homozygous sickle cell disease. Participation was voluntary and free of charge. All mothers underwent mandatory serological screening. Cord blood units were collected in different hospitals, but processed and stored in two public banks. A total of 338 units were stored for 302 families. Median recipient age was six years (11 months-15 years). Median collected volume and total nucleated cell count were 91 mL (range 23–230) and 8.6×108 (range 0.7–75×108), respectively. Microbial contamination was observed in 3.5% (n=12), positive hepatitis B serology in 25% (n=84), and homozygous sickle cell disease in 11% (n=37) of the collections. Forty-four units were HLA-identical to the intended recipient, and 28 units were released for transplantation either alone (n=23) or in combination with the bone marrow from the same donor (n=5), reflecting a utilization rate of 8%. Engraftment rate was 96% with 100% survival. Family cord blood banking yields good quality units for sibling transplantation. More comprehensive banking based on close collaboration among banks, clinical and transplant teams is recommended to optimize the use of these units. PMID:28302713

  6. Family cord blood banking for sickle cell disease: a twenty-year experience in two dedicated public cord blood banks.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Hanadi; Bernaudin, Françoise; Rouard, Helene; Vanneaux, Valérie; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Cavazzana, Marina; Gauthereau, Valerie; Stanislas, Aurélie; Benkerrou, Malika; De Montalembert, Mariane; Ferry, Christele; Girot, Robert; Arnaud, Cecile; Kamdem, Annie; Gour, Joelle; Touboul, Claudine; Cras, Audrey; Kuentz, Mathieu; Rieux, Claire; Volt, Fernanda; Cappelli, Barbara; Maio, Karina T; Paviglianiti, Annalisa; Kenzey, Chantal; Larghero, Jerome; Gluckman, Eliane

    2017-03-16

    Efforts to implement family cord blood banking have been developed in the past decades for siblings requiring stem cell transplantation for conditions such as sickle cell disease. However, public banks are faced with challenging decisions about the units to be stored, discarded, or used for other endeavors. We report here 20 years of experience in family cord blood banking for sickle cell disease in two dedicated public banks. Participants were pregnant women who had previous child diagnosed with homozygous sickle cell disease. Participation was voluntary and free of charge. All mothers underwent mandatory serologic screening. Cord blood units were collected in different hospitals, but processed and stored in two public banks. A total of 338 units were stored for 302 families. Median recipient's age was 6 years (11 months - 15 years). Median collected volume and total nucleated cell count were 91 ml (23 - 230) and 8.6 x108 (0.7 - 75 x108), respectively. Microbial contamination was observed in 3.5% (n=12), positive Hepatitis B serology in 25% (n=84) and homozygous sickle cell disease in 11% (n=37) of the collections. Forty-four units were HLA-identical to intended recipient, and 28 units were released for transplantation either alone (n=23) or in combination with the bone marrow from the same donor (n=5), reflecting a utilization rate of 8%. Engraftment rate was 96% with 100% survival. Family cord blood banking yields good quality units for sibling transplantation. More comprehensive banking based on close collaboration among banks, clinical and transplant teams is recommended for optimized utilization of these units.

  7. [How do I assess requirement of a blood bank and its kind for a healthcare establishment?].

    PubMed

    Lafeuillade, B; Tixier, A; Bliem, C; Meyer, F

    2014-12-01

    Access to blood components is required for healthcare establishments, particularly for emergency situation and hospital blood bank was often a response to this requirement. However, the complexity of regulation and economic pressures lead healthcare establishment to review regularly their need for a blood bank. This assessment requires analysis of need for transfusions in terms of delay, quantity and clinical situations to which they must respond. When a blood bank is required, three kinds could be under consideration: emergency blood bank, intermediate blood bank and issuance blood bank. According to requirements, advantages and disadvantages of each kind, healthcare establishments would select the most suitable one.

  8. [Cord blood banking: from theory to an application].

    PubMed

    Rouard, H; Birebent, B; Vaquer, G; Gautier, E

    2013-05-01

    Cord blood units are now routinely used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells from unrelated donors for allogeneic transplantation. In France, cord blood units are collected in a network of more than 70 maternity hospitals in relationship with 11 public cord blood banks part of the Réseau Français de Sang Placentaire. Unrelated cord blood unit donation is an altruistic act, anonymous and free. Donors are selected on medical criteria. Then, only cord blood unit containing more than 100 × 10(7) total nucleated cells and more than 1.8 × 10(6) CD34+ cells are cryopreserved according to Réseau Français de Sang Placentaire recommendations. Cord blood units qualification will be completed by viral and functional testings and the clinical outcome of the newborn child 6 weeks after the collection. Since the last 5 years, cord blood banking growing in France in order to enhance the French registry of volunteer donors by increasing both the number and diversity of the donors listed and make available cord blood banking for transplantation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Umbilical Cord Blood: Counselling, Collection, and Banking.

    PubMed

    Armson, B Anthony; Allan, David S; Casper, Robert F

    2015-09-01

    Objectif : Analyser les données probantes actuelles sur le counseling, le prélèvement et la mise en banque, en ce qui a trait au sang de cordon ombilical, et fournir des lignes directrices aux professionnels canadiens de la santé en ce qui concerne la sensibilisation des patientes, le consentement éclairé, les aspects techniques et les options pour la mise en banque de sang de cordon au Canada. Options : Prélèvement sélectif ou systématique et mise en banque du sang de cordon ombilical, en vue de futures greffes autologues (chez le patient même) ou allogéniques (lien de parenté ou non) de cellules souches visant la prise en charge de troubles malins et bénins chez les enfants et les adultes. Le sang de cordon peut être prélevé au moyen de techniques in utero ou ex utero. Issues : Counseling, prélèvement et mise en banque en ce qui a trait au sang de cordon ombilical, formation des professionnels de la santé, indications du prélèvement de sang de cordon, risques et avantages à court et à long terme, morbidité maternelle et périnatale, satisfaction parentale et coûts de santé. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline et PubMed à partir de septembre 2013, au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « fetal blood », « pregnancy », « transplantation », « ethics ») et de mots clés (p. ex. « umbilical cord blood », « banking », « collection », « pregnancy », « transplantation », « ethics », « public », « private ») MeSH appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs. Aucune limite n’a été imposée en matière de date, mais les résultats ont été limités aux articles publiés en anglais ou en français. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et int

  10. Banking or Bankrupting: Strategies for Sustaining the Economic Future of Public Cord Blood Banks

    PubMed Central

    Magalon, Jeremy; Maiers, Martin; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Navarrete, Cristina; Rubinstein, Pablo; Brown, Colin; Schramm, Catherine; Larghero, Jérome; Katsahian, Sandrine; Chabannon, Christian; Picard, Christophe; Platz, Alexander; Schmidt, Alexander; Katz, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background Cord blood is an important source of stem cells. However, nearly 90% of public cord blood banks have declared that they are struggling to maintain their financial sustainability and avoid bankruptcy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how characteristics of cord blood units influence their utilization, then use this information to model the economic viability and therapeutic value of different banking strategies. Methods Retrospective analysis of cord blood data registered between January 1st, 2009 and December 31st, 2011 in Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide. Data were collected from four public banks in France, Germany and the USA. Samples were eligible for inclusion in the analysis if data on cord blood and maternal HLA typing and biological characteristics after processing were available (total nucleated and CD34+ cell counts). 9,396 banked cord blood units were analyzed, of which 5,815 were Caucasian in origin. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed the influence of three parameters on the CBU utilization rate: ethnic background, total nucleated and CD34+ cell counts. From this model, we elaborated a Utilization Score reflecting the probability of transplantation for each cord blood unit. We stratified three Utilization Score thresholds representing four different banking strategies, from the least selective (scenario A) to the most selective (scenario D). We measured the cost-effectiveness ratio for each strategy by comparing performance in terms of number of transplanted cord blood units and level of financial deficit. Results When comparing inputs and outputs over three years, Scenario A represented the most extreme case as it delivered the highest therapeutic value for patients (284 CBUs transplanted) along with the highest financial deficit (USD 5.89 million). We found that scenario C resulted in 219 CBUs transplanted with a limited deficit (USD 0.98 million) that charities and public health could realistically finance over the long

  11. Banking or Bankrupting: Strategies for Sustaining the Economic Future of Public Cord Blood Banks.

    PubMed

    Magalon, Jeremy; Maiers, Martin; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Navarrete, Cristina; Rubinstein, Pablo; Brown, Colin; Schramm, Catherine; Larghero, Jérome; Katsahian, Sandrine; Chabannon, Christian; Picard, Christophe; Platz, Alexander; Schmidt, Alexander; Katz, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood is an important source of stem cells. However, nearly 90% of public cord blood banks have declared that they are struggling to maintain their financial sustainability and avoid bankruptcy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how characteristics of cord blood units influence their utilization, then use this information to model the economic viability and therapeutic value of different banking strategies. Retrospective analysis of cord blood data registered between January 1st, 2009 and December 31st, 2011 in Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide. Data were collected from four public banks in France, Germany and the USA. Samples were eligible for inclusion in the analysis if data on cord blood and maternal HLA typing and biological characteristics after processing were available (total nucleated and CD34+ cell counts). 9,396 banked cord blood units were analyzed, of which 5,815 were Caucasian in origin. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed the influence of three parameters on the CBU utilization rate: ethnic background, total nucleated and CD34+ cell counts. From this model, we elaborated a Utilization Score reflecting the probability of transplantation for each cord blood unit. We stratified three Utilization Score thresholds representing four different banking strategies, from the least selective (scenario A) to the most selective (scenario D). We measured the cost-effectiveness ratio for each strategy by comparing performance in terms of number of transplanted cord blood units and level of financial deficit. When comparing inputs and outputs over three years, Scenario A represented the most extreme case as it delivered the highest therapeutic value for patients (284 CBUs transplanted) along with the highest financial deficit (USD 5.89 million). We found that scenario C resulted in 219 CBUs transplanted with a limited deficit (USD 0.98 million) that charities and public health could realistically finance over the long term. We also found that

  12. Blood safety and availability: continuing challenges in China's blood banking system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jing-Xing; Stevens, Lori; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-02-01

    Social and economic development, along with increased health care coverage, has caused a sharp increase in the clinical demand for blood in China. Whole blood collection has increased rapidly in the past decade but has failed to keep pace with the ever-increasing demand. Overall, the country's blood safety has been improved with 99% of whole blood donations collected from voluntary unpaid donors. However, the unmet clinical demand for blood and the increasing incidence of human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis in the general population pose new challenges to China's blood banking system. To ensure a safe and adequate blood supply, continued efforts are required to recruit and retain a sufficient number of low-risk voluntary blood donors, improve donor prescreening and blood testing process, ease donor restrictions, and strengthen patient blood management. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. 21 CFR 864.9050 - Blood bank supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank supplies. 864.9050 Section 864.9050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture...

  14. Cord blood banking in London: the first 1000 collections.

    PubMed

    Armitage, S; Warwick, R; Fehily, D; Navarrete, C; Contreras, M

    1999-07-01

    The London Cord Blood Bank was established with the aim of collecting, processing and storing 10000 unrelated stem cell donations for the significant number of children in the UK requiring transplantation, for whom a matched unrelated bone marrow donor cannot be found. Collection is performed at two hospitals by dedicated cord blood bank staff after delivery of the placenta. Mothers are interviewed regarding medical, ethnic and behavioural history by nurse counsellors and sign a detailed consent form. Donations are returned to the bank for processing. Volume reduction is undertaken by a simple, closed, semi-automated blood processing system, with excellent recovery of progenitor cells. Units are cryopreserved and stored in the vapour phase of liquid nitrogen. Blood samples from mothers and cord blood donations are tested for the UK mandatory red cell and microbiology markers for blood donors. Donations are typed for HLA-A, B and DR at medium resolution (antigen split) level using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probing and sequence-specific priming techniques. The selection of collection hospitals on the basis of ethnic mix has proven effective, with 41.5% of donations derived from non-European caucasoid donors. Bacterial contamination of collections has been dramatically reduced by implementation of improved umbilical cord decontamination protocols.

  15. Umbilical cord blood banking: implications for perinatal care providers.

    PubMed

    Armson, B Anthony

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood banking for future stem cell transplantation and to provide guidelines for Canadian perinatal care providers regarding the counselling, procedural, and ethical implications of this potential therapeutic option. Selective or routine collection and storage of umbilical cord blood for future autologous (self) or allogenic (related or unrelated) transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells to treat malignant and nonmalignant disorders in children and adults. Maternal and perinatal morbidity, indications for umbilical cord blood transplantation, short- and long-term risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood transplantation, burden of umbilical cord blood collection on perinatal care providers, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. MEDLINE and PubMed searches were conducted from January 1970 to October 2003 for English-language articles related to umbilical cord blood collection, banking, and transplantation; the Cochrane library was searched; and committee opinions of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists were obtained. The evidence collected was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal/Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), and recommendations were made using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoietic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to bone marrow or peripheral stem cells for transplantation in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant conditions in children and adults. Umbilical cord blood transplantation provides a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells with several advantages, including prompt availability, decreased risk of transmissible viral infections and graft

  16. What is new in the blood bank for trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Dudaryk, Roman; Hess, Aaron S; Varon, Albert J; Hess, John R

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present review was to describe recent changes in blood banking thinking, practice, and products that affect trauma care. Prompt balanced hemostatic resuscitation of major hemorrhage from trauma improves outcome and reduces blood use. New blood processes and products can help deliver appropriate doses of procoagulant plasma and platelets quicker and more safely. New processes include holding larger inventories of thawed plasma with risk of wastage and rapid plasma thawers. New products in the blood bank include group A or group A low-titer B thawed plasma and AB or A liquid (never-frozen) plasma for resuscitation, prepooled cultured whole blood-derived platelets in plasma, and prepooled cryoprecipitate in varying pool sizes. Single-donor apheresis or pooled whole blood-derived platelets in additive solution, designed to reduce plasma-related transfusion reactions, are also increasingly available but are not an appropriate blood component for hemorrhage control resuscitation because they reduce the total amount of administered plasma coagulation factors by 10%. Early initiation of balanced massive transfusion protocols leading to hemostatic resuscitation is lifesaving. Changing blood product availability and composition will lead to higher complexity of massive transfusion. It is critical that anesthesiologists understand the composition of the available new blood products to use them correctly.

  17. Analyses of Blood Bank Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness and Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai Chen

    In view of the increasing costs of hospital care, it is essential to investigate methods to improve the labor efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the hospital technical core in order to control costs while maintaining the quality of care. This study was conducted to develop indices to measure efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and the quality of blood banks; to identify factors associated with efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality; and to generate strategies to improve blood bank labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Indices developed in this study for labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness were not affected by patient case mix and illness severity. Factors that were associated with labor efficiency were identified as managerial styles, and organizational designs that balance workload and labor resources. Medical directors' managerial involvement was not associated with labor efficiency, but their continuing education and specialty in blood bank were found to reduce the performance of unnecessary tests. Surprisingly, performing unnecessary tests had no association with labor efficiency. This suggested the existence of labor slack in blood banks. Cost -effectiveness was associated with workers' benefits, wages, and the production of high-end transfusion products by hospital-based donor rooms. Quality indices used in this study included autologous transfusion rates, platelet transfusion rates, and the check points available in an error-control system. Because the autologous transfusion rate was related to patient case mix, severity of illness, and possible inappropriate transfusion, it was not recommended to be used for quality index. Platelet-pheresis transfusion rates were associated with the transfusion preferences of the blood bank medical directors. The total number of check points in an error -control system was negatively associated with government ownership and workers' experience. Recommendations for improving labor efficiency and cost

  18. Umbilical cord blood banking: public good or private benefit?

    PubMed

    Samuel, Gabrielle N; Kerridge, Ian H; O'Brien, Tracey A

    2008-05-05

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an accepted curative therapy for many malignant and non-malignant conditions affecting children and adults. Where possible, stem cells for HSCT are provided by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched, related donors. Only 30% of patients have a suitable matched donor; for other patients, donors are sought from bone marrow registries or public umbilical cord blood (UCB) banks. While public UCB banks have been established to support transplant programs in Australia and internationally, parents also have the option of storing their child's UCB in a private commercial UCB bank for personal or family use. In contrast with public UCB banks, there is little social or medical justification for private UCB banking, as it provides no benefit to the community and little benefit to parents (other than reassurance and amelioration of regret), due to the very low likelihood of requiring autologous UCB later in life. Should UCB prove to be beneficial for tissue repair or replacement in the management of degenerative disorders, such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease, then a stronger case may be made in support of commercial banking of UCB for personal use. This may have a major impact on public UCB programs.

  19. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    PubMed Central

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  20. Knowledge about umbilical cord blood banking among Greek citizens.

    PubMed

    Karagiorgou, Louiza Z; Pantazopoulou, Maria-Nikoletta P; Mainas, Nikolaos C; Beloukas, Apostolos I; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood supplies in Greece are not sufficient to meet the high transfusion needs. This study was designed to determine Greeks' opinion about umbilical cord blood, identify the reasons for the lack of motivation to donate umbilical cord blood and allow experts to establish better recruitment campaigns to enrich the donor pool. The attitudes and knowledge about umbilical cord blood of randomly selected Greek citizens (n=1,019) were assessed by means of a standardised anonymous questionnaire. The results were analysed using the χ2 test and Spearman's correlation coefficient. Forty-eight percent of respondents knew about umbilical cord blood and had full knowledge about what storage/donation offers. Media (35%) and doctors (25%) were the main source of information. The information from the state was considered either inadequate or non-existent by 85% of the responders. Ninety-five percent of the people questioned would like further information regarding umbilical cord blood transplantation and umbilical cord blood storage/donation. Six percent of the respondents who had children and were in favour of umbilical cord blood transplantation, had stored/donated UCB. With regards to future decisions, 84% of the sample would store/donate umbilical cord blood, of whom 57% would keep the umbilical cord blood in a private bank. It was concluded that Greek citizens receive information about umbilical cord blood from both the state and advertising campaigns by the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity. A kind of cooperation between all hospitals and public umbilical cord blood banks would be advisable in order to facilitate access to umbilical cord blood donations.

  1. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors.

  2. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Focosi, Daniele; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. ©AlphaMed Press.

  3. Awareness of cord blood collection and the impact on banking.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Rusha; Lindley, Amy; Bhatla, Deepika; Babic, Aleksandar; Mueckl, Kathy; Rao, Rakesh; Brooks, Paula; Geiler, Vicki; Gross, Gilad; Al-Hosni, Mohamad; Shenoy, Shalini

    2017-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation especially in minority populations with limited chances of finding a histocompatible volunteer donor in the registry. UCB has the advantages of early availability, successful outcomes despite some histocompatibility mismatch, and low incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. Public cord blood banks that disseminate UCB products for transplant depend on voluntary donation at participating hospitals and obstetrical providers for collection. Using survey questionnaires, we evaluated attitudes toward UCB donation, the frequency of donation, and provider opinions on UCB collection in the greater St. Louis metropolitan area that caters to minority ethnicities in significant numbers. Our data suggest that nervousness and lack of information regarding the donation and utility of the product were ubiquitous reasons for not donating. Additionally, irrespective of age or level of education, women relied on healthcare providers for information regarding UCB donation. Providers reported primarily time constraints to discussing UCB donation at prenatal visits (54%). Of the interviewees, 62% donated UCB. Fallout due to refusal or preferring private banking was miniscule. These results suggest that dedicated personnel focused on disseminating information, obtaining consent, and collecting the UCB product at major hospitals can enrich cord blood banks especially with minority cords. Sustained and focused efforts could improve upon a relatively high wastage rate and ensure a robust supply of UCB products at local public banks. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cord blood banking and transplant in Europe. Eurocord.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, E; Rocha, V; Chastang, C

    1998-01-01

    The number of cord blood transplants has been increasing very quickly with more than 250 cases reported to Eurocord Registry and more than 500 patients transplanted via the New York Cord Blood Bank. Cord blood transplants have been performed either with related or unrelated cord blood. Several cord blood banks established a group called Netcord whose goal is the standardization of the procedures, the organization of internal audits for accreditation and qualification, and the communication and exchange by internet of donor search on an international basis. More than 15,000 units of frozen cord blood are currently available and this number is increasing rapidly worldwide. Analysis of the clinical results has shown that related cord blood transplants give better results than unrelated cord blood transplants. Factors associated with better survival in related and unrelated cord blood transplants were lower age, diagnosis, with better results in inborn errors and in good risk children with acute leukemia. A larger number of nucleated cells in the transplant and the recipient being negative for CMV serology were also favourable risk factors for survival. Engraftment was improved with higher numbers of cells and HLA identity. Graft versus Host disease was reduced when compared to transplants of adult allogeneic bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells. HLA disparities did not influence GVH; the only factor associated with increased GVH was positive CMV serology in the recipient. This study shows that cord blood is an alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation in children and in some adults. HLA disparity is not a limiting factor but the number of cells infused is important; currently the use of a number of nucleated cells inferior to 1 x 10(7)/kg is not recommended. Several questions remain including the criteria of choice of the donor, the indications in children and in adults, the comparison of cord blood transplants to other

  5. Sodium and potassium changes in blood bank stored human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wallas, C H

    1979-01-01

    Storage of red cells for three weeks at 4 C under blood bank conditions resulted in a rise in intracellular Na+ and a fall in intracellular K+ with concomitant opposite changes in Na+ and K+ levels in the suspending plasma. A decline in red blood cell ATP during the storage period did not appear to be contributing to the changes. Increasing red blood cell ATP to levels 2 to 3 times normal did not prevent the cation changes from occurring. When assayed at 37 C in the presence of added Mg++, ouabain-sensitive membrane ATPase activity and kinetics of activation by Na+ were unaffected by the three week period of cold storage. However, when assayed at 4 C without added Mg++, simulating the conditions of storage, ATPase activity was negligible. Sodium and potassium did not change when red blood cells with normal ATP content were stored at 20 to 24 C even in the absence of added Mg++. Thus, a major cause for the development of cation changes in the red blood cell during blood bank storage in the temperature which inhibits membrane ATPase, allowing cations to leak unopposed into and out of the red blood cells.

  6. Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Transplantation: A short review.

    PubMed

    Alkindi, Salam; Dennison, David

    2011-11-01

    It is more than 20 years since the first cord blood transplant (CBT) was performed, following the realisation that cord blood (CB), which is normally wasted, is rich in progenitor cells and capable of rescuing haematopoiesis. Since then it has been appreciated that CB is rich in stem cells, and has many other features not the least of which is its ability to rescue the transplanted patient without a rigid need for full human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility. Also it is easily accessible, relatively free from infections and poses no medical risk to the donor. However, the quantity of the stem cells is rather small, thus predominantly restricting its use to children or adults requiring double units. In Oman, we have taken a keen interest in stem cell research and also CBT. We see such activities as an avenue for our patients, for whom a compatible bone marrow (BM) or a peripheral blood donor cannot be found, to have an alternative in the form of CBT. This has encouraged us to establish a national voluntary cord blood bank (CBB) which is a valuable option open to a selected group of patients, as compared to the controversial private CBB. This national CBB will have a better representation of HLA-types common in the region, an improvement on relying on banks in other countries. Considering the need for stem cell transplant/therapy in this country, it is only appropriate that this sort of bank is established to cater for some of these requirements.

  7. Role of the blood transfusion service in tissue banking.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R M; Eastlune, T; Fehily, D

    1996-01-01

    Tissue transplantation and banking are rapidly growing services throughout the world reflecting the widening availability of transplantable cadaver tissue and the mounting clinical indications particularly in orthopaedic, plastic and cardiovascular surgery. In the US tissue banking is more established, yet continues to show a rapid growth profile. In the UK it is currently organised in a variety of different ways and by a number of different organisations. The risks of disease transmission by tissue transplantation are similar to those for blood transfusion and the majority of tissues are grafted during procedures that are not life saving. The danger of disease transmission has resulted in the introduction of legislation in the US which allows the FDA to inspect tissue banks and to recall and destroy tissues. In the UK, there is currently no regulation or inspection of tissue banks to demonstrate that donor selection, tissue processing and tracking are conducted to acceptable standards. Blood transfusion services in the UK, US, New Zealand, Australia and possibly other countries have extended their roles to include organ and tissue donation to varying degrees, with the collection, processing and distribution of bone and tendon allografts most commonly undertaken. They have readily available special capabilities and experience with an established infrastructure, compliant with Good Manufacturing Practice, placing them in an ideal position to provide this service safely and cost-effectively.

  8. Ethical and legal issues raised by cord blood banking - the challenges of the new bioeconomy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron L; Aparicio, Lorena C; Kerridge, Ian H

    2013-08-19

    • Cord blood banking raises ethical and legal issues which highlight the need for careful regulatory approaches to the emerging bioeconomy. • Consent processes for both private and public banking should be inclusive and representative of the different familial interests in the cord blood. • Property law is a potentially useful way of understanding the mechanisms for donation to both public and private banks. • Increasing tensions between public and private models of banking may require the adoption of hybrid forms of banking.

  9. Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm for Optimizing Assignment of Blood in Blood Banking System

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Micheal O.; Arasomwan, Martins A.; Adewumi, Aderemi O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the performance of particle swarm optimization (PSO) for the assignment of blood to meet patients' blood transfusion requests for blood transfusion. While the drive for blood donation lingers, there is need for effective and efficient management of available blood in blood banking systems. Moreover, inherent danger of transfusing wrong blood types to patients, unnecessary importation of blood units from external sources, and wastage of blood products due to nonusage necessitate the development of mathematical models and techniques for effective handling of blood distribution among available blood types in order to minimize wastages and importation from external sources. This gives rise to the blood assignment problem (BAP) introduced recently in literature. We propose a queue and multiple knapsack models with PSO-based solution to address this challenge. Simulation is based on sets of randomly generated data that mimic real-world population distribution of blood types. Results obtained show the efficiency of the proposed algorithm for BAP with no blood units wasted and very low importation, where necessary, from outside the blood bank. The result therefore can serve as a benchmark and basis for decision support tools for real-life deployment. PMID:25815046

  10. Particle swarm optimization algorithm for optimizing assignment of blood in blood banking system.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Micheal O; Arasomwan, Martins A; Adewumi, Aderemi O

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the performance of particle swarm optimization (PSO) for the assignment of blood to meet patients' blood transfusion requests for blood transfusion. While the drive for blood donation lingers, there is need for effective and efficient management of available blood in blood banking systems. Moreover, inherent danger of transfusing wrong blood types to patients, unnecessary importation of blood units from external sources, and wastage of blood products due to nonusage necessitate the development of mathematical models and techniques for effective handling of blood distribution among available blood types in order to minimize wastages and importation from external sources. This gives rise to the blood assignment problem (BAP) introduced recently in literature. We propose a queue and multiple knapsack models with PSO-based solution to address this challenge. Simulation is based on sets of randomly generated data that mimic real-world population distribution of blood types. Results obtained show the efficiency of the proposed algorithm for BAP with no blood units wasted and very low importation, where necessary, from outside the blood bank. The result therefore can serve as a benchmark and basis for decision support tools for real-life deployment.

  11. Related cord blood banking for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Screnci, M; Murgi, E; Carmini, D; Piro, L; Cinelli, N; Laurenti, L; Iori, A P; Simone, F; Massari, S; Girelli, G

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this single centre study were to assess the feasibility of related cord blood collecting, the appropriateness of storage and the final suitability for transplantation. Since September 1994, 63 families were enrolled in this study. Families were eligible if they were caring for a patient with a disorder treatable by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and were experiencing a pregnancy. A total of 72 cord blood units were collected and stored for 64 patients (both siblings and parents). We focussed on human leucocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility and cell content as critical requirements to unit's suitability for transplantation. HLA-typing was carried out for 34 donor-recipient couples and most units (72%) mismatched with the related patients. About 60% of collections had a minimum cell dose considered acceptable for transplantation. Only 21% of units had both compatibility degree and cell content suitable for transplantation. When applicable, information on the compatibility degree between the foetus and the patient should be obtained during pregnancy. Appropriateness of related cord blood banking for parents should be further investigated and cost-effective guidelines policies should be provided. Finally, as banking of related cord blood units is an important resource then, this public service should be supported and enhanced.

  12. Allogeneic unrelated cord blood banking worldwide: an update.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J

    2010-06-01

    Today Cord Blood (CB) Transplants are accepted as a therapeutic resource for the treatment of a variety of disorders, comparing in some cases, with transplants performed with other sources of progenitors. Unrelated Cord Blood Banks (CBBs) have significantly contributed to this improvement by the improvement on the knowledge of the CB biology and technical developments. Today, there are more than 100 active Cord Blood Banks (CBB), with an inventory of more than 400,000 units, which have generated more than 10000 cord blood transplants all around the world. Access to the world-wide CB inventory, as well as the hemopoietic progenitors inventory from adult donors, is a rather complex task which is continuously subject to improvements and consolidations. The growing numbers of CBBs and the search for efficiency has driven them to constitute or adapt consolidated data bases and access systems, and to develop a number of registries or networks to improved the access to inventories. The purpose of the present article is to provide a general overview on the number of CB units stored around the word, the quality accreditation systems and how the CB networks and their national and international inventories and registries are organized in order to support the, every time more efficient search for suitable CB units for patients lacking family donors.

  13. Factors affecting banking quality of umbilical cord blood for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyou; Loutfy, Mona R; Mayerhofer, Stephanie; Shuen, Paul

    2011-02-01

    The most important objective for cord blood banks is to store cord blood units of high quality, which is determined by total nucleated cells (TNCs) and CD34+ cells. Determining the factors affecting the stored life-saving cells would be beneficial to the field. A total of 4930 cord blood units were collected between January 2007 and October 2009 and processed using a double extraction technique to sediment red blood cells with variable centrifugation time determined by the formula CT = KL - M, where CT is centrifuge time, K is 7.7227, M is 29.742, and L is ln (volume of cord blood with anticoagulant). The recovery rate of TNCs and other relevant factors affecting banking quality were analyzed. The mean recovery rate of TNCs was 97.7 ± 2.5% with 0.04% (2/4930) units below 80% and 10.8% (532/4930) units below 95%. The TNCs per unit was affected by gestation duration (p < 0.01), sex of infant (p < 0.01), mode of delivery (p < 0.01), collection method (p < 0.01), and ethnicity (p < 0.001). The number of postprocessing CD34+ cells was affected only by sex of the infant (p < 0.05). The viability of nucleated cells after processing was 94.8 ± 4.8% and was affected by the number of hours between collection and processing (p < 0.01). In contrast, the viability of CD34+ cells was 99.5 ± 1.0% (n = 30) when samples with low viability of TNCs were assessed. The results did not reveal a significant correlation (r = 0.07, p = 0.38). The double extraction technique provides a high and consistent recovery of TNCs, which ensures that more life-saving cells will be banked for transplants. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  14. Integrated Learning with International Banking Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinke, Sabine; Briault, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The article describes an in-house executive development programme run by the authors in a leading banking group in the CEE region. The programme attempts to follow a systemic approach to learning and contains a mix of elements including action learning, classroom teaching, study, peer support and feedback and "learning visits" to…

  15. Role of Complement in Blood Preservation and Blood Banking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    ionic strength solutions (LISS), and characteriza- tion of the other related phenomena occurring under these conditions so that EC43 can be prepared in...or with IyG4, and some with both anti-IgG2, and anti- IgG4 , indicating that these antibodies did not crossreact with each other. Only rare blood group...IgG2, antl-IG3, anti- IgG4 , anti-IgA or anti-Ig4 was used (p ( .002 in all cases.) s* Speifaity of "!4gl GI 0 G G3 G4 A M Th5r UC:154 or W.Q 40- n-10

  16. Barcode technology in blood bank information systems: upgrade and its impact.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Nan; Chao, Sam; Dong, Ming Chui

    2006-12-01

    This paper desires to explore the role of barcode technology in blood bank information systems via addressing its upgrade and the consequent impact. Firstly, it briefs the application and effect of barcode technology in blood donation and transfusion service. In the second, the barcode paradigms of Macau Codabar and ISBT 128 are carefully examined and compared in accordance with the procedure and specifications of barcode upgrade. Then, the impact due to upgrade is assessed from the perspectives of blood bank information system, blood banks, and even blood donation and transfusion service. It finally discusses the considerations on implementing the upgrade of barcode technology in blood bank information systems.

  17. [Blood products delivery by hospital blood banks in emergency situations in France].

    PubMed

    Schlanger, S; Daurat, G

    2013-12-01

    In France, 13.5% of labile blood products (LBP) are delivered by 644 hospital blood banks, 472 being devoted to emergency only. A nation-wide survey aimed to describe their activity in emergency situations was carried out from September 12th to 26th, 2011. All of 26 French regions but two participated, 548 (85%) of their hospital blood banks answered a questionnaire, of which 56% had actually issued blood in emergency situations. A total of 5241 LBP were delivered, 24% for utmost vital emergencies (UVE), 25% for vital emergencies (VE) and 51% for relative emergencies (RE). In UVE and VE, 47% of the packed red blood cells (PRBC) delivered were O RH1. Females were half of the 2102 patients, mean age was 67 years. In UVE, banks devoted to emergency only, issued LBP for 228 patients (57%) and other banks for 169, acute digestive tract and surgical hemorrhage being the most frequent indications. The average number of PRBC transfused in 24 hours per patient varied with the criticality of the emergency: 2.3 for RE, 3.9 for VE and 6.1 for UVE. The mortality rate at 24 hours of first delivery was 1.2% in RE, 2.8% in VE and 10.1% in UVE. Time between prescription and start of transfusion of PRBC in UVE was within 15 minutes in 50% of cases and within 25 minutes in 75% of cases for emergency devoted banks but respectively 25% and less than 50% for others. The proportion of surviving patients having received more than three LBP in 24 hours was 58% in UVE, 33% in VE and 10% in RE. The proportion of over the limit waiting time for PRBC transfusion in UVE is critical, mainly for banks not only devoted to emergencies. The high proportion of UVE and VE patients receiving three PRBC or less in 24 hours may also be an indicator that some physicians do not comply with emergency prescription rules. An effort should be made to improve the activity, in emergencies, of a part of hospital blood banks and the way physicians use them.

  18. US public cord blood banking practices: recruitment, donation, and the timing of consent.

    PubMed

    Broder, Sherri M; Ponsaran, Roselle S; Goldenberg, Aaron J

    2013-03-01

    Cord blood has moved rapidly from an experimental stem cell source to an accepted and important source of hematopoietic stem cells. There has been no comprehensive assessment of US public cord blood banking practices since the Institute of Medicine study in 2005. Of 34 US public cord blood banks identified, 16 participated in our qualitative survey of public cord blood banking practices. Participants took part in in-depth telephone interviews in which they were asked structured and open-ended questions regarding recruitment, donation, and the informed consent process at these banks. Thirteen of 16 participants reported a variably high percentage of women who consented to public cord blood donation. Fifteen banks offered donor registration at the time of hospital admission for labor and delivery. Seven obtained full informed consent and medical history during early labor and eight conducted some form of phased consent and/or phased medical screening and history. Nine participants identified initial selection of the collection site location as the chief mode by which they recruited minority donors. Since 2005, more public banks offer cord blood donor registration at the time of admission for labor and delivery. That and the targeted location of cord blood collection sites are the main methods used to increase access to donation and HLA diversity of banked units. Currently, the ability to collect and process donations, rather than donor willingness, is the major barrier to public cord blood banking. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Private cord blood banking: experiences and views of pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Ian; Eapen, Mary; Sung, Lillian; Lee, Stephanie J; Davies, Stella M; Joffe, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Private cord blood banks are for-profit companies that facilitate storage of umbilical cord blood for personal or family use. Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians are currently best situated to use cord blood therapeutically. We sought to describe the experiences and views of these physicians regarding private cord blood banking. We e-mailed a cross-sectional survey to pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians in the United States and Canada; 93 of 152 potentially eligible physicians (93 of 130 confirmed survey recipients) from 57 centers responded. Questions addressed the number of transplants performed by using privately banked cord blood, willingness to use banked autologous cord blood in specific clinical settings, and recommendations to parents regarding private cord blood banking. Respondents reported having performed 9 autologous and 41 allogeneic transplants using privately banked cord blood. In 36 of 40 allogeneic cases for which data were available, the cord blood had been collected because of a known indication in the recipient. Few respondents would choose autologous cord blood over alternative stem cell sources for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission. In contrast, 55% would choose autologous cord blood to treat high-risk neuroblastoma, or to treat severe aplastic anemia in the absence of an available sibling donor. No respondent would recommend private cord blood banking for a newborn with 1 healthy sibling when both parents were of northern European descent; 11% would recommend banking when parents were of different minority ethnicities. Few transplants have been performed by using cord blood stored in the absence of a known indication in the recipient. Willingness to use banked autologous cord blood varies depending on disease and availability of alternative stem cell sources. Few pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians endorse private cord blood banking in the absence of an

  20. Private Cord Blood Banking: Experiences And Views Of Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Thornley, Ian; Eapen, Mary; Sung, Lillian; Lee, Stephanie J.; Davies, Stella M.; Joffe, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Objective Private cord blood banks are for-profit companies that facilitate storage of umbilical cord blood for personal or family use. Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) physicians are currently best situated to use cord blood therapeutically. We sought to describe the experiences and views of these physicians regarding private cord blood banking. Participants and Methods Emailed cross-sectional survey of pediatric HCT physicians in the United States and Canada. 93/152 potentially eligible physicians (93/130 confirmed survey recipients) from 57 centers responded. Questions addressed the number of transplants performed using privately banked cord blood, willingness to use banked autologous cord blood in specific clinical settings, and recommendations to parents regarding private cord blood banking. Results Respondents reported having performed 9 autologous and 41 allogeneic transplants using privately banked cord blood. In 36/40 allogeneic cases for which data were available, the cord blood had been collected because of a known indication in the recipient. Few respondents would choose autologous cord blood over alternative stem cell sources for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission. In contrast, 55% would choose autologous cord blood to treat high-risk neuroblastoma, or to treat severe aplastic anemia in the absence of an available sibling donor. No respondent would recommend private cord blood banking for a newborn with one healthy sibling when both parents were of Northern European descent; 11% would recommend banking when parents were of different minority ethnicities. Conclusions Few transplants have been performed using cord blood stored in the absence of a known indication in the recipient. Willingness to use banked autologous cord blood varies depending on disease and availability of alternative stem cell sources. Few pediatric HCT physicians endorse private cord blood banking in the absence of an identified recipient

  1. Operational effectiveness and quality assurance mechanisms with stochastic demand of blood supply: blood bank case study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan D

    2011-01-01

    A general overview of various blood products operational effectiveness and related strategies that can be utilised by service providers (in particular, healthcare providers) is presented in the present study. In terms of the massive volumes of blood products, the North American blood centres collect more than eight million units of whole blood, which represents appropriately 50% of the US and Quebec, Canada?s volunteer donor blood supply. A case study of the quality inspection and inventory control concerns of the Central Blood Bank, located in the metropolitan area of Pittsburgh, PA, is presented. Initially, brief introduction to its general operating environment is followed by sections describing its general situation, quality-service initiatives, and followed by a fairly detailed discussion of the practical applications of lessons learned from the case study.

  2. [Our experiences in the blood supply by means of a blood bank].

    PubMed

    Rajcić, E

    1975-01-01

    "GIVE US BLOOD TODAY, YOU'LL GET IT WHEN YOU NEED IT". Under this slogan the blood transfusion service gathers the blood donors offering, in return for the given blood the security that, any moment and in required quantities, the blood will be provided for every donor i.e. every member of any collective that acts on the request and "deposits" blood in so called blood banks", at least twice a year. Agitation among the prospective blood donors is completely confided to prominent people, social and medical workers, who do it permanently, and not from time to time, and who, if possible, are also blood donors, and owing to their own example, more convincing. The obligations between the blood transfusion service and "the investors" are regulated by oral agreement. It is noticed that the mutual moral obligation has more positive influence on the fulfillment of obligation than the administrative measure--a contract. According to this experience, individual work, a personal contact with prospective blood donors, and the feeling of personal security that is offered to them give the best results in motivating the people to become blood donors.

  3. Architecture. Intermediate ThemeWorks. An Integrated Activity Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Kelly

    This resource book offers an activity bank of learning experiences related to the theme of architecture. The activities, which are designed for use with students in grades 4-6, require active engagement of the students and integrate language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, and art experiences. Activities exploring the architectural…

  4. Architecture. Intermediate ThemeWorks. An Integrated Activity Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Kelly

    This resource book offers an activity bank of learning experiences related to the theme of architecture. The activities, which are designed for use with students in grades 4-6, require active engagement of the students and integrate language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, and art experiences. Activities exploring the architectural…

  5. 45 CFR 61.14 - Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Protection Data Bank information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON... and Protection Data Bank § 61.14 Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank...

  6. Cord Blood Transplantation Study (COBLT): cord blood bank standard operating procedures.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J K; Cairo, M S; Wagner, E L; McCurdy, P R; Baxter-Lowe, L A; Carter, S L; Kernan, N A; Lill, M C; Slone, V; Wagner, J E; Wallas, C H; Kurtzberg, J

    1998-12-01

    In 1995, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) solicited requests for a proposal (RFP) entitled "Transplant Centers for Clinical Research on Transplantation of Umbilical Cord Stem and Progenitor Cells." Three banks, six transplant centers, and one medical coordinating center (MCC) (Table 1) were funded with the overall goal of banking cord blood units (CBU) using a single manual of operations. Furthermore, the clinical protocols to evaluate the transplant outcome for adult and pediatric recipients of these well-characterized CBU would be analyzed in a uniform fashion. Because of the intense interest of the transplantation community in the policies and procedures for cord blood collection and processing, the principal investigators of the cord blood banks (CBB) and NHLBI elected to submit for publication the rationale and an abridged, but detailed, version of the standard operating procedures (SOP) developed between October 1996 and July 1998 prior to the initiation of the clinical protocols to be performed with these CBU. As the SOP will be refined over time, the complete SOP and subsequent amendments will be published and continually updated on the websites from the MCC-The EMMES Corporation (www.EMMES.com). All forms referred to in this document may be obtained from the EMMES website. It is hoped that the publication of this document will lay down a framework that will not only facilitate the development of other CBB but also help us more rapidly define what constitutes an "acceptable" CBU product.

  7. Banking cord blood stem cells: attitude and knowledge of pregnant women in five European countries.

    PubMed

    Katz, Gregory; Mills, Antonia; Garcia, Joan; Hooper, Karen; McGuckin, Colin; Platz, Alexander; Rebulla, Paolo; Salvaterra, Elena; Schmidt, Alexander H; Torrabadella, Marta

    2011-03-01

    This study explores pregnant women's awareness of cord blood stem cells and their attitude regarding banking options in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK. Questionnaires were distributed in six maternities. This anonymous and self-completed questionnaire included 29 multiple-choice questions based on: 1) sociodemographic factors, 2) awareness and access to information about cord blood banking, 3) banking option preferences, and 4) donating cord blood units (CBUs) to research. A total of 79% of pregnant women had little awareness of cord blood banking (n = 1620). A total of 58% of women had heard of the therapeutic benefits of cord blood, of which 21% received information from midwives and obstetricians. A total of 89% of respondents would opt to store CBUs. Among them, 76% would choose to donate CBUs to a public bank to benefit any patient in need of a cord blood transplant. Twelve percent would choose a mixed bank, and 12%, a private bank. A total of 92% would donate their child's CBU to research when it is not suitable for transplantation. The study reveals a strong preference for public banking in all five countries, based on converging values such as solidarity. Attitudes of pregnant women are not an obstacle to the rapid expansion of allogeneic banking in these EU countries. Banking choices do not appear to be correlated with household income. The extent of commercial marketing of cord blood banks in mass media highlights the importance for obstetric providers to play a central role in raising women's awareness early during their pregnancy with evidence-based medical information about banking options. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. 45 CFR 61.12 - Requesting information from the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Integrity and Protection Data Bank. 61.12 Section 61.12 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION... Integrity and Protection Data Bank § 61.12 Requesting information from the Healthcare Integrity and...

  9. Impact of ethnicity on human umbilical cord blood banking: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Akyurekli, Celine; Chan, Joshua Y S; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Tay, Jason; Allan, David S

    2014-08-01

    How ethnicity impacts characteristics of umbilical cord blood collected by cord blood banks remains unclear. After a systematic search, we identified 11 studies for analysis that reported on various variables of collected cord blood units. Non-Caucasian ethnicity of the cord blood donor was associated with a higher risk of failing to meet banking criteria, lower cord blood volume, reduced total nucleated cell count, fewer CD34+ cells, and reduced colony-forming units. Non-Caucasian ethnicity is associated with reductions in hematopoietic measures of collected cord blood units. Public banking efforts will have to balance issues related to building ethnic diversity within the bank and maintaining the characteristics of banked units that remain desirable by transplant centers. © 2014 AABB.

  10. Controversies in hybrid banking: attitudes of Swiss public umbilical cord blood donors toward private and public banking.

    PubMed

    Manegold, Gwendolin; Meyer-Monard, Sandrine; Tichelli, André; Granado, Christina; Hösli, Irene; Troeger, Carolyn

    2011-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) stored in public inventories has become an alternative stem cell source for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The potential use of autologous UCB from private banks is a matter of debate. In the face of the limited resources of public inventories, a discussion on "hybrid" public and private UCB banking has evolved. We aimed to explore the attitudes of the donating parents toward public and private UCB banking. A standardized, anonymous questionnaire was sent to the most recent 621 public UCB donors including items regarding satisfaction with recruitment process, the need for a second consent before release of the UCB unit for stem cell transplantation, and the donors' views on public and private UCB banking. Furthermore, we asked about their views on UCB research. Of the questionnaires, 48% were returned, and 16% were lost due to mail contact. Of our donors, 95% would donate to the public bank again. As much as 35% of them were convinced that public banking was useful. Whereas 27% had never heard about private UCB banking, 34% discussed both options. Nearly 70% of donors opted for public banking due to altruism and the high costs of private banking. Of our public UCB donors, 81% stated that they did not need a re-consent before UCB release for stem cell transplantation. In case of sample rejection, 53.5% wanted to know details about the particular research project. A total of 9% would not consent. Almost all donors would choose public banking again due to altruism and the high costs of private banking. Shortly after donation, mail contact with former UCB donors was difficult. This might be a relevant issue in any sequential hybrid banking.

  11. Prevalence of immediate vasovagal reaction in blood donors visiting two blood banks of Karachi.

    PubMed

    Rohra, D K; Juriasinghani, V; Rai, K; Azam, S I

    2010-06-01

    Vasovagal reaction (VVR) is a very common adverse event related to blood donation. No study has been conducted in Pakistan to estimate the prevalence of VVR in blood donors. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of immediate VVR in blood donors of Karachi, Pakistan. The study was conducted in two blood banks of Karachi. Data regarding the development of immediate VVR were documented. The effect of blood donation on vital parameters like pulse rate, blood pressure (BP), temperature and respiratory rate was also observed. Six hundred and seventy-four blood donors were recruited. All the donors who consented were males. Weakness and dizziness were two most common symptoms which were reported by 91 (13.5%) and 73 (10.8%) of the participants, respectively. Out of 91 donors in whom signs and symptoms of immediate VVR were observed, a significant drop in systolic BP (13.5 +/- 2.5 mmHg) and decrease in pulse rate (13.3 +/- 3.6) were concurrently noted in 55 donors (8.2% of all the participants). There was lack of association of age, body mass index (BMI), estimated blood volume, ethnicity, educational status, profession and first time donation status with the frequency of VVR. Only marital status was found to be significantly associated with higher frequency of immediate VVR, where married donors were having higher odds as compared to singles. The prevalence of VVR in the blood donors at two blood banks of Karachi is at least 8.2%. Furthermore, married men are at more risk of experiencing VVR in our population.

  12. Targeted quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of erythrocyte membranes during blood bank storage.

    PubMed

    Rinalducci, Sara; Longo, Valentina; Ceci, Luigi R; Zolla, Lello

    2015-02-01

    One of the hallmarks of blood bank stored red blood cells (RBCs) is the irreversible transition from a discoid to a spherocyte-like morphology with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton disorders. Therefore, identification of the storage-associated modifications in the protein-protein interactions between the cytoskeleton and the lipid bilayer may contribute to enlighten the molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations of mechanical properties of stored RBCs. Here we report the results obtained analyzing RBCs after 0, 21 and 35 days of storage under standard blood banking conditions by label free mass spectrometry (MS)-based experiments. We could quantitatively measure changes in the phosphorylation level of crucial phosphopeptides belonging to β-spectrin, ankyrin-1, α-adducin, dematin, glycophorin A and glycophorin C proteins. Data have been validated by both western blotting and pseudo-Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Although each phosphopeptide showed a distinctive trend, a sharp increase in the phosphorylation level during the storage duration was observed. Phosphopeptide mapping and structural modeling analysis indicated that the phosphorylated residues localize in protein functional domains fundamental for the maintenance of membrane structural integrity. Along with previous morphological evidence acquired by electron microscopy, our results seem to indicate that 21-day storage may represent a key point for the molecular processes leading to the erythrocyte deformability reduction observed during blood storage. These findings could therefore be helpful in understanding and preventing the morphology-linked mechanisms responsible for the post-transfusion survival of preserved RBCs.

  13. US Public Cord Blood Banking Practices: Recruitment, Donation, and the Timing of Consent

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Sherri; Ponsaran, Roselle; Goldenberg, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cord blood has moved rapidly from an experimental stem cell source to an accepted and important source of hematopoietic stem cells. There has been no comprehensive assessment of US public cord blood banking practices since the Institute of Medicine study in 2005. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Of 34 US public cord blood banks identified, 16 participated in our qualitative survey of public cord blood banking practices. Participants took part in in-depth telephone interviews in which they were asked structured and open-ended questions regarding recruitment, donation, and the informed consent process at these banks. RESULTS 13 of 16 participants reported a variably high percentage of women who consented to public cord blood donation. 15 banks offered donor registration at the time of hospital admission for labor and delivery. 7 obtained full informed consent and medical history during early labor and 8 conducted some form of phased consent and/or phased medical screening and history. 9 participants identified initial selection of the collection site location as the chief mode by which they recruited minority donors. CONCLUSION Since 2005, more public banks offer cord blood donor registration at the time of admission for labor and delivery. That, and the targeted location of cord blood collection sites, are the main methods used to increase access to donation and HLA diversity of banked units. Currently, the ability to collect and process donations, rather than donor willingness, is the major barrier to public cord blood banking. PMID:22803637

  14. Bacteriological safety of blood collected for transfusion at university of gondar hospital blood bank, northwest ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Hailegebriel; Addis, Zelalem; Moges, Feleke; Shiferaw, Yitayal

    2013-01-01

    Background. Transfusion associated bacterial infection has remained more frequent with a sever risk of morbidity and mortality. This study assessed the bacteriological safety of blood collected for transfusion. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar hospital blood bank from December 2011 to June 2012. Bacterial isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done as per the standard procedure. Chi-square test and P value were used to assess associations between risk factors and the bacterial isolation rate. Results. Twenty-one (15.33%) blood units were found contaminated with bacteria, and 95.24% contamination was due to external sources. The commonly isolated bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase negative Staphylococci, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, Streptococci species, Enterobacter species, and Citrobacter species. All of the bacteria isolated were 100% sensitive to Gentamicin, Chloramphenicol, Amoxicillin, and Doxycycline. Multiple antimicrobial resistances were observed in 66.7% of the isolates. Not using glove by phlebotomist, touching disinfected phlebotomy site and double puncture at the same hand or both hands of a donor were found to be risk factors for bacterial contamination. Conclusion. Bacterial contamination of blood to be transfused is a common problem in the hospital. So attention should be given to activities performed at the blood bank for safe transfusion practices.

  15. Blood-banking techniques for plateletpheresis in swine.

    PubMed

    Sondeen, Jill L; Prince, Malcolm D; Polykratis, Irene A; Hernandez, Orlando; Torres-Mendoza, Jaime; De Guzman, Rodolfo; Aden, James K; Dubick, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    During the past several years, trauma resuscitation in human patients has evolved from decreased use of crystalloids to increased use of blood products. Of high interest is the role of platelets in trauma resuscitation. Because conducting prehos- pital resuscitation in human trauma patients is very difficult, swine are often the animal model of choice for such studies because their coagulation and hemodynamic systems are similar to those in humans. However, consistent production of sufficient swine platelets for such studies has not previously been achieved. We developed a method for producing swine platelets by using standard human techniques and equipment. We assessed pH, pO2, pCO2, lactate, thromboelastography, and platelet aggregation over 5 d of storage to determine whether the swine platelet product met the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) standards for transfusion. Swine platelets met AABB standards at 24 h but not at later time points. In addition, we fluorescently labeled nonautologous platelets and then measured their percentage recovery over 5 h (the time used in subsequent experimental studies) when transfused into a recipient pig. We showed that 80% of the platelets stored for 24 h remained in the circulation and increased the recipient pigs' thromboelastographic responses, indicating that the platelets were viable and active. Therefore, swine platelets stored for 24 h by using standard human products met the AABB criteria and were functional.

  16. 45 CFR 61.1 - The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank... HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS General Provisions § 61.1 The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank....

  17. 45 CFR 61.1 - The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank... HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS General Provisions § 61.1 The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank....

  18. 45 CFR 61.1 - The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank... HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS General Provisions § 61.1 The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank....

  19. 21 CFR 607.7 - Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other firms manufacturing human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... blood banks and other firms manufacturing human blood and blood products. 607.7 Section 607.7 Food and... ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND PRODUCT LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS OF HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS General Provisions § 607.7 Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other...

  20. 21 CFR 607.7 - Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other firms manufacturing human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... blood banks and other firms manufacturing human blood and blood products. 607.7 Section 607.7 Food and... ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND PRODUCT LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS OF HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS General Provisions § 607.7 Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other...

  1. 21 CFR 607.7 - Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other firms manufacturing human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blood banks and other firms manufacturing human blood and blood products. 607.7 Section 607.7 Food and... ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND PRODUCT LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS OF HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS General Provisions § 607.7 Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other...

  2. 21 CFR 607.7 - Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other firms manufacturing human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... blood banks and other firms manufacturing human blood and blood products. 607.7 Section 607.7 Food and... ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND PRODUCT LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS OF HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS General Provisions § 607.7 Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other...

  3. 21 CFR 607.7 - Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other firms manufacturing human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood banks and other firms manufacturing human blood and blood products. 607.7 Section 607.7 Food and... ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND PRODUCT LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS OF HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS General Provisions § 607.7 Establishment registration and product listing of blood banks and other...

  4. Cord blood stem cell transplantation. Why it is necessary to establish a Bulgarian cord blood bank?

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Asen; Mihaylova, Anastasia; Baltadjieva, Daniela; Ivanova, Milena; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2008-12-01

    The allogenic transplantation of hemopoietic stem cell from bone marrow and peripheral blood is limited due to the necessity to identify HLA matched donor within the family or in bone marrow donor registries. Although, more than 10 million donors are available worldwide, completely HLA matched donors could be found only for 75% of the patients. It is well known that transplantations of hematopoietic stem cell from cord blood are characterized with a lower risk of GvHD and therefore do not require so strict criteria for HLA matching, and less time for search of matched donor is needed. The necessity to establish a National cord blood bank in Bulgaria is emphasized further by the heterogeneity of HLA allele and haplotype distribution in the Bulgarian population. That could be explained by the ethnic diversity of the population. As a result some alleles are more frequent in Bulgarians compared to other populations. The organization, accreditation, and development of a strategy for a National cord blood bank will be discussed.

  5. ACOG committee opinion number 399, February 2008: umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    Two types of banks have emerged for the collection and storage of umbilical cord blood--public banks and private banks. Public banks promote allogenic (related or unrelated) donation, analogous to the current collection of whole blood units in the United States. Private banks were initially developed to store stem cells from umbilical cord blood for autologous use (taken from an individual for subsequent use by the same individual) by a child if the child develops disease later in life. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public versus private banking should be provided. The remote chance of an autologous unit of umbilical cord blood being used for a child or a family member (approximately 1 in 2,700 individuals) should be disclosed. The collection should not alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. Physicians or other professionals who recruit pregnant women and their families for for-profit umbilical cord blood banking should disclose any financial interests or other potential conflicts of interest.

  6. Collection, processing, and banking of umbilical cord blood stem cells for transplantation and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Michael S; Harris, David T

    2012-01-01

    Collection and banking of umbilical cord blood can provide a virtually unlimited source of ethnically diverse stem cell donors. It can be used in place of bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells for hematologic transplants as well as in a variety of regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we review the latest developments in cord blood banking. We have banked over 300,000 collections at our facility, which were processed by either Ficoll or AXP methodologies. An average 95-99% processing efficiency was obtained. Processed samples can be frozen in either cryovials or bags and banked in the vapor phase of a liquid nitrogen dewar for prolonged periods of time. In conclusion, it is possible to simply and reproducibly harvest, process, and bank cord blood samples using currently available technology.

  7. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value <0.05. Erythropoietin, when added to red blood cell units, has a half-life >6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19±0.05μmol/L vs. 3.53±0.02μmol/L; p-value=0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77%±3.8% vs. 71%±2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4%±0.3% vs. 22%±0.8%; p-value <0.05). Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value <0.05. Results Erythropoietin, when added to red blood cell units, has a half-life >6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 μmol/L; p-value = 0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05). Conclusions Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. PMID:26969770

  9. Complications Associated with Blood Donations in a Blood Bank at an Indian Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood donation, though safe, has a few potentially avoidable complications associated with it. They are important reasons for the failure of the donors to return for repeat donations. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and identify the possible factors associated with increased risk of blood donation related complications so that they can be minimized. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done over a period of four months in the blood bank of an Indian tertiary care hospital to record the donation related complications. Results: Out of 7450 blood donations, total donation associated complications were 74, of which majority were vasovagal reactions (VVRs) (n=48), followed by venous hematomas (n=24) and arterial punctures (n=2). The incidence of VVRs was more, though not statistically significant, in females, replacement/repeat donors, donors between 21-30 y of age and who had a body-mass-index (BMI) of 18.5-24.9. VVRs were more common in April (p=0.002) and in those who donated 450ml of blood (p<0.001). Though hematomas were more frequent in females, voluntary donors, donors in age-group of 41-50, those with BMI<18.5 and in those who donated 350ml of blood, statistically significant association was seen only in repeat donors (p<0.001). Conclusion: Our study emphasizes that blood donation in our country has a complication rate of nearly 1%. PMID:25386464

  10. Age, Sex, and Religious Beliefs Impact the Attitude towards Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Sundell, Inger Birgitta; Setzer, Teddi J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a self-administered questionnaire was used to assess opinions about stem cell research and cord blood banking. Three attitudes were examined: willingness to accept cord blood banking, willingness to accept embryonic stem cell research, and religious belief system. A total of 90 Wayne State University students enrolled in the study in response to an invitation posted on a web page for the university. Sex distribution among study participants was 79 females and eight males; three declined to state their sex. Support for cord blood banking was high (> 70%) among students. Students over the age of 25 years of age were more (85%) positive than students 18 to 24 years old (57%). They prefered a public cord blood bank over a private cord blood bank. Atheist/agnostic or spiritual/not religious students (> 90%), Catholic students (78%) and Christian students (58%) support cord blood banking. Age, sex and religion seems influence the student's attitude towards stem cell research and cord blood banking.

  11. A Review of Factors Influencing the Banking of Collected Umbilical Cord Blood Units

    PubMed Central

    Allan, David; Petraszko, Tanya; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Smith, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood banking efforts have increased dramatically in the past two decades in response to increasing demand for alternative sources of blood stem cells to support patients requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Transplant centres have accumulated increasing expertise in their understanding of umbilical cord blood characteristics that are associated with improved outcome following transplantation. These characteristics and factors can assist transplant centres in selecting cord blood units from the worldwide inventory of banked units. Umbilical cord blood banks, therefore, need to remain agile in adjusting the inventory of the banks to address shifts or changes in the needs of transplant centres. Public umbilical cord blood banks face the challenge of building inventory while managing limited resources and are faced with decisions regarding which units can be stored and which units that have been collected should be discarded or used for other endeavours such as research. To this end, we sought to review parameters influencing the decision to bank a collected cord blood unit. In this paper, we will address parameters associated with graft potency and address other factors that guide the decision to bank collected units. PMID:23533442

  12. Untying the Gordian knot: policies, practices, and ethical issues related to banking of umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzberg, Joanne; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Since the first successful transplantation of umbilical cord blood in 1988, cord blood has become an important source of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for the treatment of blood and genetic disorders. Significant progress has been accompanied by challenges for scientists, ethicists, and health policy makers. With the recent recognition of the need for a national system for the collection, banking, distribution, and use of cord blood and the increasing focus on cord blood as an alternative to embryos as a source of tissue for regenerative medicine, cord blood has garnered significant attention. We review the development of cord blood banking and transplantation and then discuss the scientific and ethical issues influencing both established and investigational practices surrounding cord blood collection, banking, and use. PMID:16200191

  13. Guidelines on product liability for the hospital blood bank. The British Committee for Standards in Haematology.

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    This report aims to clarify the position of the hospital blood bank in the light of product liability legislation contained in the Consumer Protection Act of 1987. Blood has been defined a 'product' under this Act. The potential for the blood bank to be seen in the role of 'supplier', 'keeper' or even 'producer' in the chain of product supply to the patient is explained and advice given on the resulting implications for blood bank practice. It will be necessary to define, adopt and implement standard operating procedures (SOP) for all blood bank activities. Guidance is given on the format, preparation and content of SOPs and specimen examples offered. The fundamental importance of quality assurance is emphasized.

  14. Low usage rate of banked sibling cord blood units in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for children with hematological malignancies: implications for directed cord blood banking policies.

    PubMed

    Goussetis, Evgenios; Peristeri, Ioulia; Kitra, Vasiliki; Papassavas, Andreas C; Theodosaki, Maria; Petrakou, Eftichia; Spiropoulos, Antonia; Paisiou, Anna; Soldatou, Alexandra; Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine; Graphakos, Stelios

    2011-02-15

    Directed sibling cord blood banking is indicated in women delivering healthy babies who already have a sibling with a disease that is potentially treatable with an allogeneic cord blood transplant. We evaluated the effectiveness of a national directed cord blood banking program in sibling HLA-identical stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies and the factors influencing the usage rate of the stored cord blood units. Fifty families were enrolled from which, 48 cord blood units were successfully collected and 2 collections failed due to damaged cord/placenta at delivery. Among enrolled families 4 children needed transplantation; however, only one was successfully transplanted using the collected cord blood unit containing 2×10(7) nucleated cells/kg in conjunction with a small volume of bone marrow from the same HLA-identical donor. Two children received grafts from matched unrelated donors because their sibling cord blood was HLA-haploidentical, while the fourth one received bone marrow from his HLA-identical brother, since cord blood could not be collected due to damaged cord/placenta at delivery. With a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-12) for the 9 remaining HLA-matched cord blood units, none from the prospective recipients needed transplantation. The low utilization rate of sibling cord blood in the setting of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric hematological malignant diseases necessitates the development of directed cord blood banking programs that limit long-term storage for banked cord blood units with low probability of usage such as non-HLA-identical or identical to patients who are in long-term complete remission.

  15. 75 FR 26759 - Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) and National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-11368] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) and National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB... 1996. Government agencies that license or certify health care practitioners, providers or suppliers...

  16. Are hybrid umbilical cord blood banks really the best of both worlds?

    PubMed

    Guilcher, Gregory M T; Fernandez, Conrad V; Joffe, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Since the first use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as a medical therapy, the number of UCB banks worldwide has grown. Public UCB banks offer the option of altruistic donation, whereas private banks allow a product to be stored for the exclusive use of the paying client. With many more UCB products banked privately than publicly in countries such as the USA, hybrid models blending aspects of public and private banking have been proposed. One such bank is in operation in the UK. In this paper we review the hybrid UCB model and conclude that it offers limited benefit to the general public. Furthermore, compared with private banking, this model provides few advantages and potential disadvantages to private clients.

  17. 77 FR 38838 - Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 230.110-Registration of Blood Banks, Other Firms Collecting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 230.110--Registration of Blood Banks, Other Firms Collecting, Manufacturing, Preparing, or Processing Human Blood or Blood Products... Registration of Blood Banks, Other Firms Collecting, Manufacturing, Preparing, or Processing Human Blood...

  18. Signalment and blood types in cats being evaluated as blood donors at two italian university blood banks.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Miglio, Arianna; Proverbio, Daniela; Antognoni, Maria Teresa; Bagnagatti De Giorgi, Giada; Ferro, Elisabetta; Mangili, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Data from potential feline blood donors presented at two university blood banks in Italy were recorded. Blood typing was performed using an immunochromatographic method. Over the three years of the study 357 cats representing 15 breeds, 45.3% female and 54.7% male, with a mean age of 3.8 years were evaluated. Of these 90.5% were blood type A, 5.6% type B, and 3.9% type AB. The majority of the cats (54.6%) were European DSH (92.3% were type A, 5.1% type B, and 2.6% type AB), and 21% were Maine Coon (MCO) cats (100% blood type A). The estimated frequencies of transfusion reactions following an unmatched transfusion between DSH (donors and recipients), MCO (donor and recipients), DSH donors and MCO recipients, and MCO donors and DSH recipients were 4.8%, 0%, 0%, and 5.1% for major reactions and 7.2%, 0%, 7.7%, and 0% for minor transfusions reactions, respectively. In a population of blood donors that includes DSH and MCO the risk of transfusion reaction is between 5% and 8% if typing is not performed on donor and recipient blood. Blood typing should therefore be performed before transfusion to remove the risk of transfusion reactions due to blood type incompatibilities.

  19. An overview of a hierarchy of planning models for Regional Blood Bank Management.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M A; Pierskalla, W P; Sassetti, R J; Consolo, J

    1979-01-01

    Optimal regionalization of a blood banking system requires a hierarchical structure based on an analysis of preexisting elements in the region to determine at what level of activity economics of scale, cost effectiveness and efficiency will be greatest. We have applied operations research techniques to segments of the blood service complex. This paper is an overview of the general results of this research. From analysis of the data in each segment, a mathematical response function is developed for such managerial processes as demand forecasting, requirements computation, crossmatch and recycle control at each level of the hierarchy in a regional system. These processes in independent hospital blood banks are contrasted with those in hospital blood banks and transfusion services which are dependent on central blood banks for their supply. An example is presented of a model which is useful in the planning of a regional system. Implementation of these hierarchical models in hospital blood banks can reduce outdating, size of inventories and shortage. In central blood banks, these models can minimize shipment quantities, determine optimal transshipments and the most efficient routing.

  20. Effect of blood bank storage on the rheological properties of male and female donor red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daly, Amanda; Raval, Jay S; Waters, Jonathan H; Yazer, Mark H; Kameneva, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) deformability progressively decreases during storage along with other changes in RBC mechanical properties. Recently, we reported that the magnitude of changes in RBC mechanical fragility associated with blood bank storage in a variety of additive solutions was strongly dependent on the donor gender [15]. Yet, the potential dependence of changes in the deformability and relaxation time of stored blood bank RBCs on donor gender is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of donor gender and blood bank storage on RBC deformability and relaxation time through the measurement of RBC suspension viscoelasticity. Packed RBC units preserved in AS-5 solution from 12 male and 12 female donors (three from each ABO group) were obtained from the local blood center and tested at 1, 4 and 7 weeks of storage at 1-6°C. At each time point, samples were aseptically removed from RBC units and hematocrit was adjusted to 40% before assessment of cell suspension viscoelasticity. RBC suspensions from both genders demonstrated progressive increases (p < 0.05) in viscosity, elasticity and relaxation time at equivalent shear rates over seven weeks of storage indicating a decrease in RBC deformability. No statistically significant differences in RBC deformability or relaxation time were observed between male and female RBCs at any storage time. The decrease in RBC deformability during blood bank storage may reduce tissue perfusion and RBC lifespan in patients receiving blood bank RBCs.

  1. Managing Climate Risk. Integrating Adaptation into World Bank Group Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aalst, M.

    2006-08-15

    Climate change is already taking place, and further changes are inevitable. Developing countries, and particularly the poorest people in these countries, are most at risk. The impacts result not only from gradual changes in temperature and sea level but also, in particular, from increased climate variability and extremes, including more intense floods, droughts, and storms. These changes are already having major impacts on the economic performance of developing countries and on the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world. Climate change thus directly affects the World Bank Group's mission of eradicating poverty. It also puts at risk many projects in a wide range of sectors, including infrastructure, agriculture, human health, water resources, and environment. The risks include physical threats to the investments, potential underperformance, and the possibility that projects will indirectly contribute to rising vulnerability by, for example, triggering investment and settlement in high-risk areas. The way to address these concerns is not to separate climate change adaptation from other priorities but to integrate comprehensive climate risk management into development planning, programs, and projects. While there is a great need to heighten awareness of climate risk in Bank work, a large body of experience on climate risk management is already available, in analytical work, in country dialogues, and in a growing number of investment projects. This operational experience highlights the general ingredients for successful integration of climate risk management into the mainstream development agenda: getting the right sectoral departments and senior policy makers involved; incorporating risk management into economic planning; engaging a wide range of nongovernmental actors (businesses, nongovernmental organizations, communities, and so on); giving attention to regulatory issues; and choosing strategies that will pay off immediately under current

  2. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. Materials and methods RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. Results P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. Discussion RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3. PMID:26674824

  3. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3.

  4. Obstetricians and their role in cord blood banking: promoting a public model.

    PubMed

    Herlihy, Mary M; Delpapa, Ellen H

    2013-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood, the blood remaining in the umbilical cord at birth, can be collected at birth and be a source of stem cells for a patient in need of a bone marrow transplant. Obstetricians and other health care practitioners are recognized as a patient's primary source for medical information affecting the mother and her neonate and frequently are asked to provide education and guidance regarding options of private and public cord blood banking. As the use of cord blood continues to grow in medicine and research uncovers more potential for cord blood, cord blood banking has become an important resource. The Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act has provided funding to expand public banking initiatives in the United States and to create a more ethnically diverse inventory of units. Private storage is not advocated unless there is an identified need in the family such that banked cord blood would offer a benefit. A recent report outlined the challenges of increasing participation and inventory, particularly among minority groups. Obstetricians and other health care practitioners should have a primary role in efforts to increase awareness of umbilical cord blood donation and be involved in initiatives to expand current public banking activities.

  5. SIBAS: a blood bank information system and its 5-year implementation at Macau.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Nan; Chao, Sam; Chui Dong, Ming

    2007-05-01

    Automation systems and information technology can greatly help medical facilities to improve their working efficiency and optimize the whole workflow. This article surveys electronic information management in blood donation and transfusion service, and explores the rationale and archetype of blood bank information systems, then exemplifies a successful in-running system-Sistema Integrado de Bancos de Sangue (SIBAS), which is developed by the Institute of Systems and Computer Engineering of Macau (INESC-Macau) in cooperation with the Macau Blood Transfusion Center (CTS-Macau). Its implementation and the related lessons are briefly introduced too. In essence, this article is oriented to serve as a reference of contemporary blood bank information systems.

  6. High quality cord blood banking is feasible with delayed clamping practices. The eight-year experience and current status of the national Swedish Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Frändberg, Sofia; Waldner, Berit; Konar, Jan; Rydberg, Lennart; Fasth, Anders; Holgersson, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The National Swedish Cord Blood Bank (NS-CBB) is altruistic and publicly funded. Herein we describe the status of the bank and the impact of delayed versus early clamping on cell number and volume. Cord Blood Units (CBUs) were collected at two University Hospitals in Sweden. Collected volume and nucleated cell content (TNC) were investigated in 146 consecutive Cord Blood (CB) collections sampled during the first quarter of 2012 and in 162 consecutive CB collections done in the first quarter of 2013, before and after clamping practices were changed from immediate to late (60 s) clamping. NS-CBB now holds close to 5000 units whereof 30 % are from non-Caucasian or mixed origins. Delayed clamping had no major effect on collection efficiency. The volume collected was slightly reduced (mean difference, 8.1 ml; 95 % CI, 1.3-15.0 ml; p = 0.02), while cell recovery was not (p = 0.1). The proportion of CBUs that met initial total TNC banking criteria was 60 % using a TNC threshold of 12.5 × 10(8), and 47 % using a threshold of 15 × 10(8) for the early clamping group and 52 and 37 % in the late clamping group. Following implementation of delayed clamping practices at NS-CBB; close to 40 % of the collections in the late clamping group still met the high TNC banking threshold and were eligible for banking, implicating that that cord blood banking is feasible with delayed clamping practices.

  7. Benefits to blood banks of a sales and operations planning process.

    PubMed

    Keal, Donald A; Hebert, Phil

    2010-12-01

    A formal sales and operations planning (S&OP) process is a decision making and communication process that balances supply and demand while integrating all business operational components with customer-focused business plans that links high level strategic plans to day-to-day operations. Furthermore, S&OP can assist in managing change across the organization as it provides the opportunity to be proactive in the face of problems and opportunities while establishing a plan for everyone to follow. Some of the key outcomes from a robust S&OP process in blood banking would include: higher customer satisfaction (donors and health care providers), balanced inventory across product lines and customers, more stable production rates and higher productivity, more cooperation across the entire operation, and timely updates to the business plan resulting in better forecasting and fewer surprises that negatively impact the bottom line.

  8. Banking for the future: Prospects for integrated cyclical water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Integrated management of surface water and groundwater can provide efficient and flexible use of water by making the best use of the properties of different types of water resources. Integrated cyclical water management can help adaptation to climate variation and uncertainty by varying the proportion of surface water and groundwater allocations over time in response to changing water availability. Water use entitlements and rules specify conditions for the use, storage and exchange of surface water and groundwater. These entitlements and rules provide certainty for water users, investors and managers. Entitlements and rules also need to be flexible to enable users and managers to respond to changing water availability and knowledge. Arrangements to provide certainty and flexibility can conflict. For example guarantees of specific long-term allocations of water, or shares of allocations can conflict with arrangements to bank water underground during wet periods and then to use an increased amount of groundwater in dry periods. Systems of water entitlements and rules need to achieve a balance between certainty and flexibility. This article explores the effect of water entitlements and rules, and arrangements to provide certainty and flexibility for the integration of surface water and groundwater management over time. The analysis draws on case studies from the Namoi River basin in New South Wales and the South Platte River basin in Colorado. Integrated cyclical water management requires a comprehensive, flexible and balanced system of water entitlements and rules that allow extended water carryover, water banking, aquifer storage and recovery over the wet and dry climate cycle. Opportunities for extended carryover and aquifer storage and recovery over the wet and dry climate cycle merit further consideration in New South Wales, Colorado and other jurisdictions.

  9. A study of the noncompliance of blood banks on safety and quality parameters in blood donation camps in Bengaluru

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajat Kumar; Dhanya, Rakesh; Parmar, Lalith G.; Vaish, Arpit; Sedai, Amit; Periyavan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The compliance of safety and quality parameters laid out by national and international guidelines in outdoor blood donation camps has not been studied in India. Our study aimed at identifying, monitoring, analyzing, and developing preventive strategies for several key parameters associated with the quality and safety of outdoor voluntary blood donation camps (VBDC). Settings: The study covered a total of 424 VBDCs at various locations in Bengaluru, Karnataka (South India) from 2009 to 2013. Seven government hospitals based blood banks, three private hospitals based blood banks and two voluntary standalone blood banks participated in the VBDCs included in the study. Materials and Methods: At the onset, the quality and safety standards to be followed were discussed and agreed upon. During the study, noncompliance (NC) to the agreed upon standards were recorded and shared. Periodic trainings were also organized to help minimize NC. Results: One or more instances of NC in 73% of the VBDCs. Highest NC were observed associated with punctuality (34%), wearing gloves (16%), hemoglobin (Hb) estimation (11%) and donor screening and selection other than Hb check (8-9%). Conclusion: For all 16 parameters under study, significant NC was observed. As a whole private hospital based blood banks were more noncompliant. The high degree of NC to matters relating to quality and safety in VBDCs is high and warrants for urgent attention and further study. Our study also shows that regular monitoring and systematic and strategic intervention can decrease the rate of NC. PMID:25722568

  10. [Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated cord blood: report of three cases from the Chilean cord blood bank].

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás; Bertin, Pablo; Pizarro, Isabel; Carmona, Amanda; Guilof, Alejandro; Rojas, Iván; Oyarzún, Enrique

    2013-08-01

    Public cord blood banks are a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients with hematological diseases who lack a family donor and need allogeneic transplantation. In June 2007 we started a cord blood bank with units donated in three maternity wards in Santiago, Chile. We report the first three transplants done with cord blood units form this bank. Cord blood units were obtained by intrauterine collection at delivery. They were depleted of plasma and red cells and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tests for total nucleated cells, CD34 cell content, viral serology, bacterial cultures and HLA A, B and DRB1 were done. Six hundred cord blood units were stored by March 2012. Three patients received allogeneic transplant with cord blood from our bank, two with high risk lymphoblastic leukemia and one with severe congenital anemia. They received conditioning regimens according to their disease and usual supportive care for unrelated donor transplantation until full hematopoietic and immune reconstitution was achieved. The three patients had early engraftment of neutrophils and platelets. The child corrected his anemia and the leukemia patients remain in complete remission. The post-transplant course was complicated with Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and BK virus infection. Two patients are fully functional 24 and 33 months after transplant, the third is still receiving immunosuppression.

  11. Chagas Disease Screening in Maternal Donors of Publicly Banked Umbilical Cord Blood, United States

    PubMed Central

    Gilner, Jennifer B.; Hernandez, Jose; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Heine, R. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    To assess patterns of Chagas disease, we reviewed results of screening umbilical cord blood from a US public cord blood bank during 2007–2014. Nineteen maternal donors tested positive for Trypanosoma cruzi parasites (0.04%). Because perinatal transmission of Chagas disease is associated with substantial illness, targeted prenatal programs should screen for this disease. PMID:27433974

  12. Umbilical Cord Blood Banking for Transplantation in Morocco: Problems and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mazini, Loubna; Matar, Nourredine; Bouhya, Said; Marzouk, Diaa; Anwar, Wagida; Khyatti, Meriem

    2014-01-01

    Since the success of the first umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation in a child with Fanconi anaemia in 1989, great interests have emerged for this source of stem cells. UCB provides an unlimited source of ethnically diverse stem cells and is an alternative for bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Thus, UCB and manipulated stem cells are now collected and banked according to international accreditation standards for listing on registries allowing rapid search and accessibility worldwide. This work aims to identify problems limiting the creation of a Moroccan cord blood bank and to highlight opportunities and issues of a new legislation promoting additional applications of cell therapy.

  13. A matter of health? Legal aspects of private umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Vidalis, Takis

    2011-03-01

    Private umbilical cord blood banking raises a question of special legal regulation. This practice promises the safe storage of biological material on the assumption that it may be useful, at a certain moment in future, for its own donor (or for a donor's close family member) for curing serious blood diseases. Although currently the therapeutic value of umbilical cord blood is confirmed, there are strong scientific doubts and relevant controversies regarding its use in autologous transplantations. This fact produces conditions of legal uncertainty, since the benefit for those wanting to conclude contracts with private umbilical cord blood banks is not clear. The Greek example illustrates this situation of regulatory deficit well, which eventually creates a major problem, given the increasing number of private banks offering relevant services in the country.

  14. [Acceptance by blood donors of the public blood bank in Recife, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Fábia Michelle Rodrigues; Feliciano, Katia Virginia de Oliveira; Mendes, Marina Ferreira de Medeiros

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the acceptance of blood donors concerning the donation stages (attendance, medical and nursing selection and collection) at the Recife public blood bank with emphasis on the attendance. A sample of 527 donors was obtained: each 19th person sequentially was invited to answer a questionnaire. Chi-square (x2) was used in the analysis. Of those interviewed, 81.4% were men, 81% were repeat donors, 50.3% were dissatisfied regarding the time spent in donation and 36.4% had difficulties in reaching the service. The firm acceptance given to the attendance was due mainly to the communication and the quality of treatment. Of statistical significance were women donors of higher educational level who asked for more information and men who had a more positive perception towards the selection process. The best evaluation was attributed to the collection sector. However, mention was made of impersonal treatment, persistence of doubts and the cursory nature of the medical interview. Attention focused on the donor requires that ongoing education should concentrate on the humanitarian formation of the professionals involved.

  15. Phototherapies: photosensitized inactivation of viral and protozoan infectious agents and potential application in blood banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Newman, Joseph T.; Chanh, Tran C.; Marengo-Rowe, Alain J.

    1992-06-01

    More than 10 million units of human blood components are processed annually in the United States. Although donor screening and testing have greatly lowered the risk of transmission of viral and protozoan infectious agents, additional sterilization procedures which also preserve blood component function would be of significant value. Use of UV-A and visible-light-range photosensitizers for sterilization of blood platelets and red blood cells, respectively, is currently being aggressively investigated in laboratory-scale optical-mechanical systems. With successful demonstration of the efficacy and safety of these sterilization techniques, implementation in the blood bank setting will require scale-up to optical-mechanical systems capable of handling approximately 25,000 units daily in 500 - 1,000 blood banks in the United States.

  16. Short report: screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in the blood supply by the Red Cross blood bank in Quito, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, M J; Chiriboga, R; Racines, J R; Escalante, L; Rowland, E C

    1997-12-01

    The status of Chagas' disease in Ecuador is not clear. In response to reports suggesting the possibility of transfusion-associated transmission of Chagas' disease in the blood bank in Quito, the Ecuadorian Red Cross in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Higiene, Zona Norte and the Tropical Disease Institute of Ohio University implemented a pilot Chagas' disease screening of the donated blood in the Quito blood bank. The results of the screening showed a low incidence of seropositivity among the donors (0.01% in 1994, 0.04% in 1995, and 0.02% in 1996) to the Quito blood bank and a higher seropositivity in samples donated to smaller blood banks (0.4% in 1994, 0.28% in 1995, and 0.13% in 1996) located in areas considered endemic, as well as from at least two areas previously considered nonendemic for Chagas' disease. This report highlights the need for a comprehensive evaluation of the prevalence and distribution of Chagas' disease in Ecuador.

  17. Optimizing donor selection for public cord blood banking: influence of maternal, infant, and collection characteristics on cord blood unit quality.

    PubMed

    Page, Kristin M; Mendizabal, Adam; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Wease, Stephen; Shoulars, Kevin; Gentry, Tracy; Prasad, Vinod K; Sun, Jessica; Carter, Shelly; Balber, Andrew E; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Banked unrelated donor umbilical cord blood (CB) has improved access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients without a suitably matched donor. In a resource-limited environment, ensuring that the public inventory is enriched with high-quality cord blood units (CBUs) addressing the needs of a diverse group of patients is a priority. Identification of donor characteristics correlating with higher CBU quality could guide operational strategies to increase the yield of banked high-quality CBUs. Characteristics of 5267 CBUs donated to the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, a public bank participating in the National Cord Blood Inventory, were retrospectively analyzed. Eligible CBUs, collected by trained personnel, were processed using standard procedures. Routine quality and potency metrics (postprocessing total nucleated cell count [post-TNCC], CD34+, colony-forming units [CFUs]) were correlated with maternal, infant, and collection characteristics. High-quality CBUs were defined as those with higher post-TNCC (>1.25 × 10(9)) with CD34+ and CFUs in the upper quartile. Factors associated with higher CD34+ or CFU content included a shorter interval from collection to processing (<10 hr), younger gestational age (34-37 weeks; CD34+ and CFUs), Caucasian race, higher birthweight (>3500 g), and larger collection volumes (>80 mL). We describe characteristics identifying high-quality CBUs, which can be used to inform strategies for CBU collection for public banks. Efforts should be made to prioritize collections from larger babies born before 38 weeks of gestation. CBUs should be rapidly transported to the processing laboratory. The lower quality of CBUs from non-Caucasian donors highlights the challenges of building a racially diverse public CB inventory. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. [Blood system peculiarities in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) under chronic environmental pollution].

    PubMed

    Tarakhtiĭ, É A; Mukhacheva, S V

    2011-01-01

    The parameters of peripheral blood and hemopoietic organs in mature and immature bank voles inhabiting a chemically polluted area were studied. Variability of the blood system parameters depending on the level of toxic load and the animals' reproductive status was determined. Alteration of the cell composition of erythrocytes and leucocytes, the structure of erythrocytes, and the hemoglobin fractions and leucocyte functions describe the adaptive response to the factors of a changed environment more than the concentration of leucocytes, erythrocytes, and blood hemoglobin.

  19. Assessing women's knowledge and attitudes toward cord blood banking: policy and ethical implications for Jordan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Monica M; Dajani, Rana; Khader, Yousef; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2016-08-01

    Despite the global expansion of umbilical cord blood (CB) banking, little is known about public opinion and awareness, especially among Arab Muslim populations. CB banking raises policy questions about funding sustainability and quality standards, as well as ethical debates about profitability, informed consent, and medical justification. This study is the first of its kind in the Arab world, and Jordan has a unique, understudied, yet highly relevant setting, especially as a regional medical hub with advanced medical and health policy infrastructures. In addition, the first private and public CB banks are expected to open in 2016. The authors developed and administered, over a 5-month period, an anonymous survey to investigate public opinion and knowledge about CB banking in Jordan. The survey was administered to women in maternity outpatient clinic waiting rooms at five different hospitals. More than 75% of respondents indicated they knew nothing about CB banking in Jordan, and more than 50% had never heard of CB banking before. However, overall public opinion about CB storage is positive. Important factors related to public opinion were also identified, demonstrating that most women want more information on CB banking, especially from their obstetrician. This widespread lack of awareness is likely contributing to misinformation, lack of knowledge, and unfavorable perspectives toward CB donation and research. The results have important implications for the development of national and regional policies and educational campaigns on CB banking targeting both physicians and patients. © 2016 AABB.

  20. 21 CFR 864.9050 - Blood bank supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture Blood... Biologics Evaluation and Research of the Food and Drug Administration. (b) Classification. Class I...

  1. Implementation of a quality system (ISO 9000 series) for placental blood banking.

    PubMed

    Sirchia, G; Rebulla, P; Lecchi, L; Mozzi, F; Crepaldi, R; Parravicini, A

    1998-02-01

    Although placental blood has recently become a new source of hematopoietic progenitors for marrow replacement, limited attention has been given to systems suitable to ensure the short-term and long-term quality of placental blood units used for transplantation. In this article, we describe a quality system for placental blood banking developed in accord with ISO 9002 norms at Milano Cord Blood Bank. The quality system is the organizational structure, procedures, processes, and resources needed to implement quality management. ISO 9002 is a model for quality assurance in production, installation, and servicing, which includes a number of clauses providing guidance for the implementation of the quality system. The quality system was started by the bank medical director with step 1: the general quality plan, which included (a) the written description of mission, objectives, technical and organizational policies, and staff organization chart of the placental blood bank, (b) the definition and acquisition of adequate financial, human, and structural resources, (c) the appointment of a quality system head independent from the production laboratory and reporting directly to the medical director. Tasks of the quality system head were (a) to identify the placental blood banking process together with the placental blood bank personnel, (b) to implement a documentation plan finalized at the production and maintenance of (i) the quality manual, which provides a summary on how the bank operates with a quality system in compliance with the ISO 9002 clauses, (ii) the general procedures (or quality system procedures), which provide more detail on selected clauses, including at least those prescribed by the ISO 9002 standard, (iii) the operative procedures (or process procedures), which describe in detail the process of placental blood banking and how technical activities must be performed, (iv) the work instructions, which provide stepwise descriptions of individual activities, (v

  2. Studies on RBC lipid and protein phosphorylation during blood bank storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dumaswala, U.J.; Bryan, D.J.; Greenwalt, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that phosphoinositides play a significant role in maintaining membrane structure and function. Their importance during blood bank storage is not understood. They have performed preliminary studies of the phosphoinositide synthetic pathway enzymes of RBC during blood bank storage. At 0 and 35 days of storage leaky ghosts were prepared and incubated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP for 5 minutes at 30 C. One aliquot was subjected to acidified solvent extraction and thin layer chromatography. The labeled phosphoinositide -4,5 biphosphate (PIP/sub 2/), phosphoinositide-4 phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidic acid (PA) spots were scraped and counted by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Another aliquot was used for SDS-PAGE and the radioactivity associated with the ..beta..-spectrin was measured. These experiments suggest a decrease in RBC phosphoinositol and PIP-Kinases and ..beta..-spectrin kinase activities during blood bank storage. Further studies are being done to evaluate significance of these observations.

  3. The Accreditation Experience of Clinical Laboratories and Blood Banks in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    The accreditation of clinical laboratories and blood banks based on ISO 15189 is now being consolidated in Mexico, and is coordinated by the Mexican accreditation entity innovative strategies, A.C. (ema) and supported by the activities of the committee of clinical laboratories and blood banks. The active participation in working groups formed by the technical committee of clinical laboratories and blood banks in specific areas, has contributed to the formulation of technical documents and criteria of evaluation that strengthen the current accreditation scheme. The national registry of evaluation (PNE) consists of technical experts and evaluators from different disciplines of clinical laboratory; the evaluators actively participate in accreditation assessment, with an ultimate goal to receive training and feedback for continuous improvement of its own performance.

  4. The Accreditation Experience of Clinical Laboratories and Blood Banks in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation of clinical laboratories and blood banks based on ISO 15189 is now being consolidated in Mexico, and is coordinated by the Mexican accreditation entity innovative strategies, A.C. (ema) and supported by the activities of the committee of clinical laboratories and blood banks. The active participation in working groups formed by the technical committee of clinical laboratories and blood banks in specific areas, has contributed to the formulation of technical documents and criteria of evaluation that strengthen the current accreditation scheme. The national registry of evaluation (PNE) consists of technical experts and evaluators from different disciplines of clinical laboratory; the evaluators actively participate in accreditation assessment, with an ultimate goal to receive training and feedback for continuous improvement of its own performance. PMID:27683498

  5. Cord blood banking - bio-objects on the borderlands between community and immunity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nik; Williams, Rosalind

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has become the focus of intense efforts to collect, screen and bank haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in hundreds of repositories around the world. UCB banking has developed through a broad spectrum of overlapping banking practices, sectors and institutional forms. Superficially at least, these sectors have been widely distinguished in bioethical and policy literature between notions of the 'public' and the 'private', the commons and the market respectively. Our purpose in this paper is to reflect more critically on these distinctions and to articulate the complex practical and hybrid nature of cord blood as a 'bio-object' that straddles binary conceptions of the blood economies. The paper draws upon Roberto Esposito's reflections on biopolitics and his attempt to transcend the dualistic polarisations of immunity and community, or the private and the public. We suggest that his thoughts on immunitary hospitality resonate with many of the actual features and realpolitik of a necessarily internationalised and globally distributed UCB 'immunitary regime'.

  6. Effectiveness of confidential unit exclusion in screening blood donors of the regional blood bank in Londrina, Paraná State

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Ingridt Hildegard; Saito, Mariza; Spinosa, Adriana Aparecida; da Silva, Marilza Celina; Munhoz, Egberto; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2011-01-01

    Background For transfusion purposes, blood donors must be accepted both in clinical and serological evaluations and must not have excluded their own donation using the confidential unit exclusion. Aim The objective of this study was to verify whether blood donors who choose self exclusion are more likely to be positive in serological tests than donors who do not. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was carried out of 51,861 consecutive whole blood donations from January 2004 to December 2008 at a public blood bank in Londrina, Southern Brazil. Results Self exclusion was chosen in 1672 (3.2%) donations, most frequently by first-time blood donors (p-value < 0.0001), by blood donors from external collections (p-value < 0.0001), by men (p value < 0.0001) and by under 30-year-old donors (p-value < 0.0001). The frequency of positive serology was 5.3% in the group that chose self exclusion and 3.5% in the group that did not choose self exclusion (p-value < 0.0001). Conclusions These results show that confidential unit exclusion used in this blood bank is effective and is inexpensive. However, the diagnostic power to detect blood-borne infections was low and resulted in the discard of a high number of blood bags without any direct or indirect serologic markers of pathogens. The use of confidential unit exclusion could be replaced with molecular tests to screen blood donors. PMID:23049338

  7. Early, Prehospital Activation of the Walking Blood Bank Based on Mechanism of Injury Improves Time to Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Aaron K; Auten, Jonathan D; Zieber, Tara J; Lunceford, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Balanced component therapy (BCT) remains the mainstay in trauma resuscitation of the critically battle injured. In austere medical environments, access to packed red blood cells, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma is often limited. Transfusion of warm, fresh whole blood (FWB) has been used to augment limited access to full BCT in these settings. The main limitation of FWB is that it is not readily available for transfusion on casualty arrival. This small case series evaluates the impact early, mechanism-of-injury (MOI)-based, preactivation of the walking blood bank has on time to transfusion. We report an average time of 18 minutes to FWB transfusion from patient arrival. Early activation of the walking blood bank based on prehospital MOI may further reduce the time to FWB transfusion. 2016.

  8. Quality control measures in cord blood banking in India - critical appraisal and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anuradha; Singhania, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a potential source of primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) available for clinical application to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients lacking conventional stem cell donors. In the last decade because the frequency of UCB stem cell transplantation has increased, the quality of UCB available in banks has become an important criterion for the success of any UCB stem cell transplant. Moreover, with the growing numbers of cord blood banks there is not only a need to improvise quality issues but to also develop a more homogenous approach in setting standards and regulations for assessing them. The present article provides an insight on the importance of cord blood banking in India and the impending requirement to provide clarity on certain issues regarding UCB banking. Furthermore, the article discusses about certain practical approaches which could perhaps be referred to as guidelines (and by no means be solely adopted as the only measures) by cord blood banks in India for establishing or maintaining a standard for quality control (QC) measures.

  9. Survivability and Infectivity of Viscerotropic Leishmania Tropica from Operation Desert Storm Participants in Human Blood Products Maintained Under Blood Bank Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    IC. 1986. Leishmania donovani : an opportu- 6. Gupta I3MD, 1930. The diagnosis of kala-azar b,. nistic microbe associated with progressive dis...survival of Leishmania in blood products under blood bank storage conditions. We report that L. tropica- or L. donovani - contaminated transfusable blood...transfusion, we studied the survival of Leishmania in blood products under blood bank _ storage conditions. We report that L. tropica- or L. donovani

  10. [The experience of a blood-bank doctor in Chile].

    PubMed

    Martinez, C

    2006-09-01

    Director of a blood transfusion service in Concepción, Chili, Dr. Christina Martinez reports on her experience in this centre and the actions undertaken in order to find resources and supports, to guarantee the operation of the centre and to enhance voluntary blood donation.

  11. 45 CFR 61.15 - How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Integrity and Protection Data Bank information. 61.15 Section 61.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE... Integrity and Protection Data Bank § 61.15 How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare Integrity and...

  12. Does a liberal national transfusion law assure blood safety? A survey of blood bank directors' perspectives in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Antoine; Bou Assi, Tarek; Ammar, Walid; Baz, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    In transfusion medicine today, 'zero risk' has become a universal objective. Thus, we investigated whether the level of blood safety as defined by Lebanese legislation is satisfactory. Our work covered the period from September 2008 to June 2012. First, we studied each chapter in law and regulations, and compared them with the latest French regulations. The standards of Good Manufacturing Practice, characteristics of blood products and their storage, and the overall organization and haemovigilance for recipients and donors are not defined. Our analysis revealed numerous problems in today's blood safety situation. There is, for example, no clear definition or identification of the different blood safety components. Then, we conducted a national survey of blood bank directors to assess their perception of blood safety in Lebanon. Our survey revealed a negative perception (52.4 per cent) of the current blood safety situation, with more than 90 per cent of respondents in favor of national regulatory improvements.

  13. The Blood Bank as a Public Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Byron A.; Adashek, Eugene P.; Adashek, William H.

    1969-01-01

    The donation of blood is presented to the public as an altruistic service in which one human helps another. At the same time, the donor receives some help for himself. In the process of blood donation, a medical history is taken, an extremely short physical examination is done, and the donor's blood is studied by various tests. Although this is by no means the equivalent of a complete physical examination performed by a physician, it sometimes can be helpful in discovering early disease or other medical findings which could be pertinent to the donor's health. PMID:5798005

  14. Temporal sequence of major biochemical events during Blood Bank storage of packed red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Karon, Brad S.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Jaben, Elizabeth A.; Hoyer, James D.; Thomas, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. We used sensitive spectroscopic techniques to measure changes in Band 3 oligomeric state during storage of packed red blood cells (RBC); these changes were compared to metabolic changes, RBC morphology, cholesterol and membrane protein loss, phospholipid reorganisation of the RBC membrane, and peroxidation of membrane lipid. The aim of the study was to temporally sequence major biochemical events occurring during cold storage, in order to determine which changes may underlie the structural defects in stored RBC. Materials and methods. Fifteen RBC units were collected from normal volunteers and stored under standard blood bank conditions; both metabolic changes and lipid parameters were measured by multiple novel assays including a new mass spectrometric measurement of isoprostane (lipid peroxidation) and flow cytometric assessment of CD47 expression. Band 3 oligomeric state was assessed by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy, and RBC morphology by microscopy of glutaraldehyde-fixed RBC. Results. Extracellular pH decreased and extracellular potassium increased rapidly during cold storage. Band 3 on the RBC membrane aggregated into large oligomers early in the storage period and coincident with changes in RBC morphology. Membrane lipid changes, including loss of unesterified cholesterol, lipid peroxidation and expression of CD47, also changed early during the storage period. In contrast loss of acetylcholinesterase activity and haemolysis of RBC occurred late during storage. Discussion. Our results demonstrate that changes in the macromolecular organisation of membrane proteins on the RBC occur early in storage and suggest that lipid peroxidation and/or oxidative damage to the membrane are responsible for irreversible morphological changes and loss of function during red cell storage. PMID:22507860

  15. Utilizing Radiofrequency Identification Technology to Improve Safety and Management of Blood Bank Supply Chains.

    PubMed

    Coustasse, Alberto; Meadows, Pamela; Hall, Robert S; Hibner, Travis; Deslich, Stacie

    2015-11-01

    The importance of efficiency in the supply chain of perishable products, such as the blood products used in transfusion services, cannot be overstated. Many problems can occur, such as the outdating of products, inventory management issues, patient misidentification, and mistransfusion. The purpose of this article was to identify the benefits and barriers associated with radiofrequency identification (RFID) usage in improving the blood bank supply chain. The methodology for this study was a qualitative literature review following a systematic approach. The review was limited to sources published from 2000 to 2014 in the English language. Sixty-five sources were found, and 56 were used in this research study. According to the finding of the present study, there are numerous benefits and barriers to RFID utilization in blood bank supply chains. RFID technology offers several benefits with regard to blood bank product management, including decreased transfusion errors, reduction of product loss, and more efficient inventory management. Barriers to RFID implementation include the cost associated with system implementation and patient privacy issues. Implementation of an RFID system can be a significant investment. However, when observing the positive impact that such systems may have on transfusion safety and inventory management, the cost associated with RFID systems can easily be justified. RFID in blood bank inventory management is vital to ensuring efficient product inventory management and positive patient outcomes.

  16. Pregnant women's knowledge and attitudes about stem cells and cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Dinç, H; Sahin, N H

    2009-06-01

    This study was to determine pregnant women's knowledge and attitudes towards stem cells and cord blood banking in Istanbul, Turkey. Stem cell research is one of the most important and, at the same time, the most controversial topics of science and technology today. Nurses need to understand stem cell research so they can enter the debate on this issue. They can become important sources of information in order to help parents understand the issues. This exploratory descriptive study was conducted in two antenatal outpatient clinics in Istanbul. The sample consisted of 334 pregnant women during routine prenatal visits. Data were collected in interviews by using an interview form developed by the researchers according to the literature. The form included demographic characteristics of participants and 20 questions about stem cells, storing cord blood and banking and 10 independent attitude statements. The majority of the participants had a lack of knowledge about stem cells and cord blood banking and wanted more information. Before pregnancy, they received some information through the media (newspaper, Internet, television, etc.), but unintentionally. It was determined that they wanted information before becoming pregnant, more from their obstetrician but also from nurses and midwives. The majority also wanted to store their infants' cord blood and stated that they would be more likely to choose a public cord blood bank. Those giving ante- and perinatal care need to offer accurate and scientific counselling services on this subject to parents who need to be informed.

  17. Challenges in umbilical cord blood stem cell banking for stem cell reviews and reports.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Twenty years has passed since the first report of a successful cord blood transplant was reported in 1989 in a child with Fanconi's anemia. During these 20 years, the cord blood field has had dramatic growth, with over 400,000 cord blood units donated and stored worldwide for unrelated use. Approximately, 14,000 unrelated cord blood transplants have been performed to date for patients with hematologic malignancies and bone marrow disorders, and who do not have matched family or unrelated donors. In contrast, about 900,000 cord blood units have been stored privately for personal use, with about 100 autologous transplants performed. Twenty years ago, due to the low cell dose, cord blood transplants were only performed in children. Today, with the use of better banking techniques, reduced intensity transplants, and double cord blood transplantation, the majority of cord blood transplants are being performed in adults. In this chapter, we review the scientific basis for cord blood transplantation, and outcome data in both pediatric and adult transplantation. We will then focus on the recent concerns regarding private and public cord blood banking. Finally, we discuss the future of cord blood transplantation, and the exciting work beginning outside of oncology.

  18. Cord blood collection for banking and the risk of maternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Amat, Lluís; Sabrià, Joan; Martínez, Eva; Rodríguez, Núria L; Querol, Sergio; Lailla, Josep M

    2011-09-01

    We determined the effect of cord blood collection before placental expulsion on postpartum maternal blood loss in a retrospective study between a group of cord blood donors and a group of non-donors. The study was conducted in a university hospital blood bank and obstetric services and included Spanish women entered in a European study project (EUPHRATES) and who had consented to donate cord blood for public banking purposes. We measured blood volume lost during delivery by a bag collection method, as well as the need for transfusion and postpartum anemia symptoms. Deliveries at which cord blood was collected presented a significant increase in blood loss (321 ± 273 vs. 255 ± 237 ml, p=0.02). Instrumental deliveries were associated with higher postpartum blood loss than spontaneous deliveries. Cord blood collection can increase intrapartum blood loss, especially at instrumental deliveries. Additional staff who handle the collection are required to allow the leading clinician to focus on maternal care. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France: what has been done and what remains to be done].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y; Schlanger, S; Gorodetzky, D; Lapègue, R; Besse-Moreau, M; Herr, A-L; Renaudier, P; Daurat, G; Breton, P

    2012-11-01

    French regulation requires hospital blood banks to have data processing of their blood transfusion activities. In order to help them to achieve this goal, guidelines were published by an official working party. For their diffusion, a study was launched to assess current gaps between guidelines and reality. Analysis of the first forty responses shows: 1) computerization is already set up for main blood banks and is going well for the others; 2) most of guideline functionalities are now working in main blood banks; but some points need specific developments; 3) taken as a whole, other blood banks are further from guideline requirements, even if some have already reached the goal; 4) guidelines are able to point out to all hospital blood banks what remains to be done.

  20. Hematopoietic cell transplantation with autologous cord blood in patients with severe aplastic anemia: an opportunity to revisit the controversy regarding cord blood banking for private use.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joseph; Woolfrey, Ann E; Pawlowska, Anna; Thomas, Sandra H; Appelbaum, Frederick; Forman, Stephen

    2011-07-01

    The controversy surrounding private banking of umbilical cord blood units (CBU), as a safeguard against future malignancy or other life-threatening conditions, raises many questions in pediatric clinical practice. Recent favorable experiences with autologous transplantation for severe aplastic anemia using privately stored CBU, suggested a possible utility. While private banking is difficult to justify statistically or empirically, there may exist rare cases where autologous transplant of stored umbilical CBU could be beneficial. The reality of privately banked CBU and the possibility for future discovery of additional indications for autologous cord blood transplant, motivated us to re-examine our attitudes towards private cord blood banking. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Use of a pneumatic tube system for delivery of blood bank products and specimens.

    PubMed

    Tanley, P C; Wallas, C H; Abram, M C; Richardson, L D

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pneumatic tube transport on blood bank specimens and products. No important differences were found between aliquots transported in the tube system and those stored in the laboratory as controls. ABO, Rh, antibody detection or identification, direct antiglobulin testing, and elution were studied. Further, no differences in plasma hemoglobin and potassium concentration were found between units of whole blood and packed cells handled in either manner. Platelet counts in platelet concentrates were not decreased and coagulation factor levels in units of fresh-frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate did not decrease after pneumatic transport. The system tested is currently providing expeditious transport of specimens and blood between blood banks and patient care areas.

  2. Optimizing Donor Selection for Public Cord Blood Banking: Influence of Maternal, Infant and Collection Characteristics on Cord Blood Unit Quality

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kristin M.; Mendizabal, Adam; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Wease, Stephen; Shoulars, Kevin; Gentry, Tracy; Prasad, Vinod K.; Sun, Jessica; Carter, Shelly; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Banked unrelated donor umbilical cord blood (CB) has improved access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients without a suitably matched donor. In a resource-limited environment, ensuring that the public inventory is enriched with high-quality cord blood units (CBUs) addressing the needs of a diverse group of patients is a priority. Identification of donor characteristics correlating with higher CBU quality could guide operational strategies to increase the yield of banked high-quality CBUs. Methods Characteristics of 5267 CBUs donated to the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, a public bank participating in the National Cord Blood Inventory, were retrospectively analyzed. Eligible CBUs, collected by trained personnel, were processed using standard procedures. Routine quality and potency metrics [post-processing total nucleated cell count (post-TNCC), CD34+, colony-forming units (CFUs)] were correlated with maternal, infant, and collection characteristics. Results High-quality CBUs were defined as those with higher post-TNCC (>1.25×109), and CD34+ + CFU in the upper quartile. Factors associated with higher CD34+ or CFU content included a shorter interval from collection to processing (<10 hours), younger gestational age (34–37 weeks; CD34++CFU) Caucasian race, higher birth weight (>3500grams) and larger collection volumes (>80ml). Conclusions We describe characteristics identifying high-quality CBUs, which can be used to inform strategies for CBU collection for public banks. Efforts should be made to prioritize collections from larger babies born before 38 weeks of gestation. CBUs should be rapidly transported to the processing laboratory. The lower quality of CBUs from non-Caucasian donors highlights the challenges of building a racially diverse public CB inventory. PMID:23711284

  3. Ethical issues relating to the banking of umbilical cord blood in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Umbilical cord banks are a central component, as umbilical cord tissue providers, in both medical treatment and scientific research with stem cells. But, whereas the creation of umbilical cord banks is seen as successful practice, it is perceived as a risky style of play by others. This article examines and discusses the ethical, medical and legal considerations that arise from the operation of umbilical cord banks in Mexico. Discussion A number of experts have stated that the use of umbilical cord goes beyond the mere utilization of human tissues for the purpose of treatment. This tissue is also used in research studies: genetic studies, studies to evaluate the effectiveness of new antibiotics, studies to identify new proteins, etc. Meanwhile, others claim that the law and other norms for the functioning of cord banks are not consistent and are poorly defined. Some of these critics point out that the confidentiality of donor information is handled differently in different places. The fact that private cord banks offer their services as "biological insurance" in order to obtain informed consent by promising the parents that the tissue that will be stored insures the health of their child in the future raises the issue of whether the consent is freely given or given under coercion. Another consideration that must be made in relation to privately owned cord banks has to do with the ownership of the stored umbilical cord. Summary Conflicts between moral principles and economic interests (non-moral principles) cause dilemmas in the clinical practice of umbilical cord blood storage and use especially in privately owned banks. This article presents a reflection and some of the guidelines that must be followed by umbilical cord banks in order to deal with these conflicts. This reflection is based on the fundamental notions of ethics and public health and seeks to be a contribution towards the improvement of umbilical cord banks' performance. PMID:19678958

  4. Cord Blood Banking in the Arab World: Current Status and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Monica M; Dajani, Rana; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2015-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplants are now used to treat numerous types of immune- and blood-related disorders and genetic diseases. Cord blood (CB) banks play an important role in these transplants by processing and storing CB units. In addition to their therapeutic potential, these banks raise ethical and regulatory questions, especially in emerging markets in the Arab world. In this article, the authors review CB banking in five countries in the region, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates, selected for their different CB banking policies and initiatives. In assessing these case studies, the authors present regional trends and issues, including religious perspectives, policies, and demographic risk factors. This research suggests strong incentives for increasing the number of CB units that are collected from and available to Arab populations. In addition, the deficit in knowledge concerning public opinion and awareness in the region should be addressed to ensure educated decision-making. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Seroprevalence of markers of transfusion transmissible infections in blood bank in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Jair Alberto Patiño; Cortés Márquez, Mónica María; Cardona Arias, Jaiberth Antonio

    2012-12-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of markers of transfusion transmissible infections in donors of a blood bank in Medellin, Colombia, beteween 2007 and 2010. A cross-sectional secondary data source, based on the results of biological testing of donors to a blood bank in Medellin. We determined the seroprevalence of markers of infection and were compared by sex and type of donor through frequency analysis, chi square, Fisher and prevalence ratios. The base population was 65,535 donors, and 3.3% had at least one positive biological test. The most prevalent marker in the blood bank testing was syphilis (1,2%), followed by trypanosomiasis (1,0%), hepatitis C virus (HCV) (0,6%), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) 0,5% and hepatitis B virus (HBV) (0,2%). Based on the reference laboratory found a prevalence of 0.6% for syphilis, 0,1% for (HBV) and 0% for (HCV), (HIV) and Chagas. We found statistical differences in the prevalence of (HBV) and syphilis by sex and type of donor. The results are consistent with the prevalences given by Pan American Health Organization and can be correlated with the global prevalence of transfusion-transmitted infections. The results founds by the blood bank lead to a transfusion risk reduction but limit the optimization of resources by excluding donors classified as false positives.

  6. Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... But, tighter testing for a rare complication of transfusions makes the need for platelets even more urgent, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas say. Platelets are a component of blood that are essential for ... called transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), is the leading ...

  7. Legal issues in blood banking. Elements of informed consent.

    PubMed

    Sherman, L A

    1996-12-01

    In the past, informed consent in pathology was confined chiefly to autopsies. Changes in both consent law and pathology practice led to consent being important in a broader sense in the laboratory. Areas discussed in this article include blood transfusion, tissue specimens, fine needle aspiration, and phlebotomy.

  8. An Integrated Approach to the ATHAS Data Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyreva, E. V.; Buzin, A. I.; Pyda, M.; Wunderlich, B.

    2002-03-01

    The ATHAS Data Bank is a critically reviewed collection of data on heat capacities of amorphous and crystalline polymers, as well as a summary of transition parameters (temperatures, heats, and changes in heat capacity). It was created in the early 1980s and since was updated in 1990. At present a new structure is derived which allows not only easy access over the internet (see: web.utk.edu/ athas), but also offers calculations and continuous growth as new experimental results become available. A well-defined hierarchical structure and a new, integrated interface are being created. The following information and calculations will be available: 1. An improved access to the data. 2. Calculation of heat capacity over a wide temperature range, based on low temperature data fitted to an approximate vibrational frequency spectrum, using automated assignment of group vibrations based on the chemical structure and skeletal based on the Tarasov equation. 3. Calculation of the liquid heat capacities from experimental and addition-scheme information. 4. Calculation of the crystallinity and rigid-amorphous fraction for semicrystalline polymers. --- Supported by NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed by UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DOE-AC05-00OR22725.

  9. High acceptance rate of hybrid allogeneic-autologous umbilical cord blood banking among actual and potential Swiss donors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anna-Margaretha; Krenger, Werner; Suter, Eva; Ben Hassem, Dorra; Surbek, Daniel V

    2013-07-01

    Two competitive concepts of umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking are currently available: either allogeneic UCB is donated to a public bank or autologous cells are stored in a private bank. Allogeneic-autologous hybrid banking is a new concept that combines these two approaches. However, acceptance of hybrid UCB banking among potential donors is unknown to date. In a prospective survey, we aimed to establish the acceptance of the hybrid banking model among actual and potential UCB donors in Switzerland. The study groups consisted of parents and pregnant women with or without children. As control group, women at reproductive ages were investigated. The majority of participants agreed fundamentally with UCB donation, and overall acceptance of private banking was 47%. If a possibility for hybrid banking were to be made available, 49% would opt for such a public-private model and only 13% would choose private banking alone. Among the proponents of hybrid banking, a majority of participants chose donor cell splitting over the sequential banking mode. Fifty-six percent of responders wished prior notification before the release of their donated UCB to a foreign recipient. This is the first study which compared the acceptance of allogeneic, autologous, and hybrid allogeneic-autologous UCB banking in different target groups. We demonstrated that hybrid cord blood banking is the preferred model of banking among actual and potential UCB donors. With increasing demand for UCB in the future, health care providers should therefore consider offering hybrid banking as a viable storage option. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Trust, Nostalgia and Narrative Accounts of Blood Banking in England in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Helen Wynne

    2010-01-01

    Historically, cultural accounts and descriptions of blood banking in Britain have been associated with notions of altruism, national solidarity and imagined community. While these ideals have continued to be influential, the business of procuring and supplying blood has become increasingly complex. Drawing on interview data with donors in one blood centre in England, this article reports that these donors tend not to acknowledge the complex dynamics of production and exchange in modern blood systems. This, it is argued, is congruent with nostalgic narratives in both popular and official accounts of blood services, which tend to bracket these important changes. A shift to a more open institutional narrative about modern blood services is advocated, as blood services face current and future challenges. PMID:20603307

  11. Trust, nostalgia and narrative accounts of blood banking in England in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Wynne Busby, Helen

    2010-07-01

    Historically, cultural accounts and descriptions of blood banking in Britain have been associated with notions of altruism, national solidarity and imagined community. While these ideals have continued to be influential, the business of procuring and supplying blood has become increasingly complex. Drawing on interview data with donors in one blood centre in England, this article reports that these donors tend not to acknowledge the complex dynamics of production and exchange in modern blood systems. This, it is argued, is congruent with nostalgic narratives in both popular and official accounts of blood services, which tend to bracket these important changes. A shift to a more open institutional narrative about modern blood services is advocated, as blood services face current and future challenges.

  12. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time.

  13. Current status of cord blood banking during first two years of 'National Government-Assigned Public Cord Blood Banks Operation' in Korea.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun Youn; Lee, Jung Lim; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Song, Do Young; Kim, Tai Gyu; Shin, Sue

    2014-10-01

    Cord blood (CB) has become a viable stem cell source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and public cord blood banks (CBBs) have been established to manage donated cord blood units (CBUs) for unrelated HSCT. As the potential uses for CB continue to grow, there is a global tendency to encourage public CBBs. The aim of this study was to investigate the current status of public CBBs that were designated and supported by the Korean national government. We analyzed 6,168 CBUs preserved at the 3 Government-Assigned Public CBBs during their first two years of operation (2012-2013) and the standard operating procedures for CB processing at each CBB. CBU inventories at ALLCORD, Catholic HSC Bank and Fatima Public CBB were 4,022, 1,207 and 939 units, respectively. Total nucleated cell (TNC) counts per unit were 11.0 × 10(8) at ALLCORD, 10.7 × 10(8) at Fatima and 9.8 × 10(8) at Catholic, and all far exceeded the requirement for cryopreservation under the law (7.0 × 10(8)). CD34(+) cell counts and % were as follows: 3.5 × 10(6) (0.31 %) in ALLCORD, 2.2 × 10(6) (0.20 %) in Fatima and 2.2 × 10(6) (0.22 %) in Catholic. All the three banks observed the 'CB Act' in dealing with CBUs, including collection, processing, laboratory tests and cryopreservation. Government supported and strictly law-abiding public CBBs in Korea have considerable CBU inventories of high quality in terms of efficacy and safety. Legislation and accompanying government-support will be helpful for establishing CB standardization, vitalizing CBT and improving clinical outcomes.

  14. Audit of the red cell units supply of a busy hospital blood bank in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fasola, F A; Kotila, T R; Shokunbi, W A

    2009-06-01

    Blood bank audit embraces all procedures from blood procurement to the long -term consequences of transfusion which helps to identify opportunities for improvement. We have therefore looked at red cell transfusion in our hospital to identify areas that will require improvement. Data was collected retrospectively from the hard copy record of the blood bank for a period of one month. Request was made for 1210 red cell units; crossmatch was made for 64% of the request. All units crossmatched were issued, of these 4.15% were returned unutilized. 5.1% were issued as uncrossmatched. The Obstetrics/Gynaecology unit recorded the highest blood usage and the medical unit the least. The use of blood by the emergency and paediatric were the same. The crossmatch:transfusion ratio for the hospital was 0.9:1. This study has shown that the crossmatch and transfusion rates are almost equal and only a small percentage was returned unused. This showed that there is inadequate supply of blood. There is a need to assess the reason for transfusion and establishing a blood transfusion advisory committee by the hospital. This will ensure interaction and collaboration between blood suppliers and users to improve the quality of transfusion practice. The new policy establishing a national transfusion service will also improve the transfusion service but emphasis has to be put on donor recruitment and donor care.

  15. [Prevalence of human infections by Trypanosoma cruzi in blood banks in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Aché, A

    1993-01-01

    Primary investigations carried out in blood banks in Venezuela during the 1950s, indicated that overall seroprevalence for Trypanosoma cruzi infection was 12% amongst blood donors. In Venezuela, blood donation is free. All public and private blood banks are controlled by the Ministry of Health. As from 1988 the ELISA technique was uniformly used in blood banks for the detection of T. cruzi infections. Annual median seroprevalence, between 1988 to 1992, was 1.20% (1.09-1.94%), with geographical variations between localities in several States. States with higher prevalence rates are located in the western and central part of Venezuela: Portuguesa, Lara, Trujillo, Cojedes and Carabobo. Due to difficulties in obtaining incidence rates for Chagas disease, it seems proper to use prevalence rates due to its greater stability; and in the specific case of Venezuela, due to a lesser severity and a higher survival of this disease at present. Considering that there is little to be offered to the seropositive individual, repeatability is avowed for serological diagnosis. Specificity should be strived for in the light of lower prevalence rates at present.

  16. Umbilical Cord Blood Banking for Transplantation in Morocco: Problems and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Mazini, Loubna; Matar, Nourredine; Bouhya, Said; Marzouk, Diaa; Anwar, Wagida; Khyatti, Meriem

    2014-01-01

    Since the success of the first umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation in a child with Fanconi anaemia in 1989, great interests have emerged for this source of stem cells. UCB provides an unlimited source of ethnically diverse stem cells and is an alternative for bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Thus, UCB and manipulated stem cells are now collected and banked according to international accreditation standards for listing on registries allowing rapid search and accessibility worldwide. This work aims to identify problems limiting the creation of a Moroccan cord blood bank and to highlight opportunities and issues of a new legislation promoting additional applications of cell therapy. PMID:25705096

  17. Cord blood banks collect units with different HLA alleles and haplotypes to volunteer donor banks: a comparative report from Swiss Blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Monard, S; Passweg, J; Troeger, C; Eberhard, H-P; Roosnek, E; de Faveri, G Nicoloso; Chalandon, Y; Rovo, A; Kindler, V; Irion, O; Holzgreve, W; Gratwohl, A; Müller, C; Tichelli, A; Tiercy, J-M

    2009-05-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic SCT is a standard therapy for many patients with haematological diseases. A major aim of public umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking is to establish an inventory with a large HLA diversity. Few studies have compared HLA diversity between UCB banks and volunteer unrelated donor (VUD) registries and examined whether UCB banks indeed collect more units with rare alleles and haplotypes. This study compares HLA-A/B/DRB1 allele frequencies and inferred A/B/DRB1-haplotypes in 1602 UCB units and 3093 VUD from two centres in distinct recruitment areas in Switzerland. The results show that the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles as well as of the HLA-A/B/DRB1 haplotypes differ between UCB and VUD. Ten DRB1 alleles occurred at a 2- to 12-fold higher relative frequency in UCB than in VUD and 27 rare alleles were identified in UCB. Out of these 27 alleles, 15 were absent in the entire VUD data set of the national registry. This difference in allele frequencies was found only by intermediate/high-resolution typing. Targeted recruitment of UCB units from non-Caucasian donors could further increase HLA allele and haplotype diversity of available donors. Intermediate or high-resolution DNA typing is essential to identify rare alleles or allele groups.

  18. [Private umbilical cord blood banking does not reduce the number of samples for scientific stem cell research].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, V R; Niemeyer, M; Gottschalk, N; Schneider, K T; Kiechle, M

    2005-12-01

    Private umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking after delivery has increased over the last decade. For adult/somatic stem cell research UCB is an essential source of stem cells and researchers question if the number of UCB samples for research might be reduced by private banking. A survey among seven private blood banks in Germany and analysis and comparison of the number of UCB samples donated for research within the STEMMAT project with private blood banking were performed from 03/2003 to 06/2005 at the Frauenklinik (OB/GYN), Technical University Munich, Germany. Within 27.5 months 1,551 UCB samples were collected for research purposes; the effective recruitment rate was higher than expectations at an effective 66.2 %. Private UCB banking [n = 24] was distributed among three cord blood banks [n = 16, 6 and 4]. The rate of private blood banking was 0.99 % for all deliveries, thus reducing the effective rate for research purpose by only 1.5 %. Under the assumption of active and successful recruitment of scientific UCB samples, private blood banking does not significantly reduce this rate and therefore is a negligible rival in the competition for sufficient numbers of UCB samples for research.

  19. A standard blood bank donation alters the thermal and cardiovascular responses during subsequent exercise.

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Aguado-Jimenez, Roberto; Del Coso, Juan; Estevez, Emma

    2012-11-01

    The fear for adverse effects of blood donation on subsequent exercise may prevent physically active people from donating. We studied the impact of a standard blood bank donation (i.e., 450-mL blood withdrawal) on the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses to prolonged exercise in the heat. Eight moderately trained, heat-acclimated males cycled for 1 hour at 60% in a hot environment (34.9±0.6 °C) on four occasions: 1) 2 days before blood donation (CON), 2) 2 hours after donation (DON), 3) 2 days after donation (2 DAYS), and 4) 7 days after donation (7 DAYS). Two-thirds of the blood volume withdrawn was endogenously restored before exercise in the DON trial (p<0.05). DON started with increased preexercise rectal temperature (TRE; 0.42±0.1 °C above CON; p<0.05), which resulted in high levels of hyperthermia (i.e., 39.0±0.2 °C) after 1 hour of exercise. Skin temperature (34.5±0.1 °C) and sweat rate (1.15±0.1 L/h) were not affected by DON. However, DON lowered the skin blood flow:TRE relationship and elevated heart rate (HR) above CON (12±4 beats/min; p<0.05) maintaining cardiac output. After 2 DAYS, TRE and HR were restored to CON levels while cardiac output increased above CON (6%; p<0.05) in association with reduced hemoglobin concentration (i.e., peak hemodilution). A blood bank donation increases preexercise TRE. Subsequent exercise in a hot environment results in high levels of hyperthermia and HR. These thermoregulatory and cardiovascular perturbations observed during exercise disappear 2 days after donation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Developing Educational Resources to Advance Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Research: A Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pereira Beak, Carla; Chargé, Sophie B; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-05-01

    In 2013 Canadian Blood Services (CBS) launched the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB), a program to collect, process, test, and store cord blood units donated for use in transplantation. A key component of the creation of the NPCBB is the establishment of a program that enables cord blood not suitable for banking or transplantation to be used for biomedical research purposes. Along with the development of processes and policies to manage the NPCBB and the cord blood research program, CBS-in collaboration with researchers from the Stem Cell Network-have also developed educational tools to provide relevant information for target audiences to aid implementation and operation. We describe here one of these tools, the REB Primer on Research and Cord Blood Donation (the Primer), which highlights key ethical and legal considerations and identifies Canadian documents that are relevant to the use of cord blood in biomedical research. The Primer also introduces the NPCBB and describes the systems CBS is implementing to address ethical issues. The Primer is intended to assist research ethics boards in evaluating the ethical acceptability of research protocols, to facilitate harmonized decision-making by providing a common reference, and to highlight the role of research ethics boards in governance frameworks. With the Primer we hope to illustrate how the development of such educational tools can facilitate the ethical implementation and governance of programs related to stem cell research in Canada and abroad.

  1. Quality Control in Screening for Infectious Diseases at Blood Banks. Rationale and Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Alquezar, Amadeo; Albajar-Viñas, Pedro; Guimarães, André Valpassos; Corrêa, José Abol

    2015-11-01

    Quality control procedures are indispensable to ensure the reliability of the results provided by laboratories responsible for serological screening in blood banks. International recommendations on systems of quality management classify as a top component the inclusion of two types of control: (a) internal quality control (IQC) and (b) external quality control (EQC). In EQC it is essential to have, at least, a monthly frequency of laboratory assessment. On the other hand, IQC involves the daily use of low-reactivity control sera, which should be systematically added in all run, carried out in the laboratory for each parameter. Through the IQC analysis some variations in the criteria of run acceptance and rejection may be revealed, but it is of paramount importance to ensure the previous definition of these criteria and even more importantly, the adherence to them; and that corresponds to the validation of analytical runs of each test. Since 2010 this has been, for instance, the experience of the PNCQ*, developing external quality control programmes on serology for blood banks. These programmes use samples of lyophilized sera well-characterized for the reactivity related to the parameters used for the serological screening of blood donors. The programmes have used blind panels of six samples for monthly assessments. In the last 50 assessments, which involved 68 blood banks in Brazil, a significant number of instances of non-compliance were observed in all monthly assessments. These results provide strong support to the recommendation of systematic monthly assessments. (*) National Quality Control Programme (PNCQ).

  2. Quality Control in Screening for Infectious Diseases at Blood Banks. Rationale and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Albajar-Viñas, Pedro; Guimarães, André Valpassos; Corrêa, José Abol

    2015-01-01

    Quality control procedures are indispensable to ensure the reliability of the results provided by laboratories responsible for serological screening in blood banks. International recommendations on systems of quality management classify as a top component the inclusion of two types of control: (a) internal quality control (IQC) and (b) external quality control (EQC). In EQC it is essential to have, at least, a monthly frequency of laboratory assessment. On the other hand, IQC involves the daily use of low-reactivity control sera, which should be systematically added in all run, carried out in the laboratory for each parameter. Through the IQC analysis some variations in the criteria of run acceptance and rejection may be revealed, but it is of paramount importance to ensure the previous definition of these criteria and even more importantly, the adherence to them; and that corresponds to the validation of analytical runs of each test. Since 2010 this has been, for instance, the experience of the PNCQ*, developing external quality control programmes on serology for blood banks. These programmes use samples of lyophilized sera well-characterized for the reactivity related to the parameters used for the serological screening of blood donors. The programmes have used blind panels of six samples for monthly assessments. In the last 50 assessments, which involved 68 blood banks in Brazil, a significant number of instances of non-compliance were observed in all monthly assessments. These results provide strong support to the recommendation of systematic monthly assessments. (*) National Quality Control Programme (PNCQ) PMID:27683500

  3. [The cord blood bank at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    Peñaflor-Juárez, Karina; Guillén-Chan, Sonia Marilyn; Romero-Juárez, Yanín; Luna-Bautista, Fernando; Franco-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; Arellano-Ocampo, Jesús Salvador; Ibáñez-Sánchez, Rocío; de Lourdes Domínguez-Contreras, María; Guerra-Márquez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells have been used for over 50 years in the treatment of diverse diseases. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has proved to be a viable source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation purposes. The aim was to report the contribution of the umbilical cord blood bank over the past 9 years, in the treatment of various diseases. Since 2005 the number of units of blood from the umbilical cord and their use for transplantation in diverse disease were analyzed. A selection of volunteer pregnant women in labor was performed. Umbilical cord blood was obtained from them, which underwent processing, cryopreservation and validation, as well as compatibility test before using for transplantation. Ten thousand and ninety nine candidates to donation were assessed, from whom 2481 unit of UCB were collected. Of these, 893 unit were processed and cryopreserved for transplantation. In 65% of cases there was histocompatibility between the cord cell and the receptors. Transplantation was done in 87 patients, 67% had hematologic neoplasias, who have received 140 units of UCB in 102 transplants. This Bank of UCB ranks second in the world in productivity according to the rate of utility of units in transplantation (3.3%). Our bank of UCB has been able to develop a cell line (hematopoietic stem cells) with international quality standards and has been beneficial for patients served by our institution with need of a transplant mainly in hemato-oncologic patients.

  4. Analysis of the adequate size of a cord blood bank and comparison of HLA haplotype distributions between four populations.

    PubMed

    Haimila, Katri; Penttilä, Antti; Arvola, Anne; Auvinen, Marja-Kaisa; Korhonen, Matti

    2013-02-01

    The number of units and especially the number of different HLA haplotypes present in a cord blood (CB) bank is a crucial determinant of its usefulness. We generated data relevant to the development of our national CB in Finland. The HLA haplotype distribution was examined between specific populations. We developed graphical ways of data presentation that enable easy visualization of differences. First, we estimated the optimal size of a CB bank for Finland and found that approximately 1700 units are needed to provide a 5/6 HLA-matched donor for 80% of Finnish patients. Secondly, we evaluated HLA haplotype distributions between four locations, Finland, Japan, Sweden and Belgium. Our results showed that the Japanese Tokyo Cord Blood Bank differs in both the frequency and distribution of haplotypes from the European banks. The European banks (Finnish Cord Blood Registry, The Swedish National Cord Blood Bank, and Marrow Donor Program-Belgium) have similar frequencies of common haplotypes, but 26% of the haplotypes in the Finnish CB bank are unique, which justifies the existence of a national bank. The tendency to a homogenous HLA haplotype distribution in banks underlines the need for targeting recruitment at the poorly represented minority populations.

  5. 45 CFR 61.14 - Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and... GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information by the Healthcare Integrity...

  6. Collaboration between hematopoietic stem cell donor registry and cord blood banks.

    PubMed

    Raffoux, C

    2010-10-01

    Despite the huge number of volunteer donors registered worldwide, only a mean of 50% of patients not having a family donor are transplanted with an unrelated donor. Since 1990, a network has been implemented among some European registries. With the help of the European Community, a more sophisticated network has been developed, the European Marrow Donor Information System (EMDIS). A new project underwent development by registries and the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide: the EMDIS Cord Blood Registry. It will in the future permit to obtain after a search request, one report containing all of the best donors worldwide and best umbilic cord blood for each patient, taking into account possible double cord blood transplantations and other factors, such as number of nucleated cells, number of CD34+ cells, and methods of reduction. Only a strong collaboration between all hematopoietic stem cell registries and cord blood banks would allow a Registry to propose the best donor/cord blood unit for each patient in each country. Progress in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be obtained by the parallel development of cord blood banks worldwide and bone marrow donor registries among countries that include minorities.

  7. Giving to receive? The right to donate in umbilical cord blood banking for stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Machin, Laura L; Brown, Nik; McLeod, Danae

    2012-03-01

    To explore the views of lay and professional stakeholders about the donation of cord blood to public banks in England and the policies surrounding it. Qualitative in-depth interviews were undertaken between April 2009 and August 2010 with 62 participants based in England who play a key role in cord blood banking and therapy. All interviews were recorded, transcribed in full, and coded and analysed thematically. Participants claimed pregnant women had a right to know of the value of cord blood. This highlighted the flaws of the existing donation infrastructure, which was portrayed as playing a significant role in determining public health. Participants called for a right to donate cord blood to readdress the inequity in healthcare services for pregnant women and transplant recipients. Donors maintained a sense of right over their donation when they discussed cord blood donation as potentially benefiting their family as well as society. In order to keep receiving donated body parts, tissue and blood, there is a need to take into account the way in which donation operates within a prevalent 'rights' discourse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Knowledge of Cord Blood Banking in General Population and Doctors: A Questionnaire Based Survey.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Moni; Agarwal, Meenal; Phadke, Shubha R

    2016-03-01

    To assess the knowledge of the general population and the medical specialists about the purpose and utility of cord blood banking. One hundred individuals from the general population and 100 clinicians from various departments were enrolled in the study between August 2013 and November 2013. Fifty eight percent of the doctors and 82 % of the lay persons did not know any indication or were not aware of the correct indications of the use of cord blood for transplantation. Around half of the lay persons (42 %) and doctors (37 %) thought that umbilical cord blood can be used to treat any genetic disorder including Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mental retardation. Nineteen percent of the doctors thought that umbilical cord blood can be used to treat thalassemia in the same child. The propaganda done by cord blood banks that cord blood is a biological insurance for the child is misleading and should be discouraged. The obstetricians and the pediatricians should take a central role in providing the correct information to would be parents to help them in taking a correct decision.

  9. Emergency care necessity for sickle cell disease patients at Rio de Janeiro State Coordinating Blood Bank

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Mario Sant'Anna; de Matos, Haroldo José; Fidlarczyk, Delaine

    2011-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, in particular sickle cell disease, is the most prevalent group of genetically transmitted diseases in the Brazilian population and should thus be treated as a public health problem. Many of these patients frequently present with complications and require emergency care at the blood bank Coordinator in Rio de Janeiro. This study was developed with the aim of characterizing the emergency assistance required by sickle cell disease patients registered in the blood bank from January 2007 to December 2008. A retrospective study of medical records was made of 78, mostly children, patients from the date of their registration until December 2009. Most attendances (63.7%) were not considered emergency care. The use of specialized services for cases that do not require this level of complexity may saturate the capacity of these centers. However, delay of intervention for complications due to the transportation of patients to specialist centers may lead to deterioration in the clinical condition. PMID:23284258

  10. They're Here! How to Prepare Your Blood Bank for Inspection.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Karen M; Frank, Ernest G; Gedman, Lauren A; Ivey, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    The importance of an inspection ready blood bank cannot be overemphasized. Various agencies perform inspections to ensure that facilities are compliant with federal and state regulations, as well as with standards defined by professional organizations. Inspections may strike fear into the staff members of the organizations being inspected. When a laboratory is in a state of constant readiness, such anxiety is likely to be lessened. Facilities may differ in structure and size and yet be held to the same standards. This article discusses the who, when, and why of laboratory safety inspections. We share helpful information gathered from various resources, including interviews with a quality assurance specialist, a blood bank manager, and an assessor, to help facilities work towards an inspection ready state.

  11. Blood zinc levels in nursing women from different regions of the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Zyoud, Ahed; Jallad, Donia; Hadwan, Labebah; Ihssan, Neeran; Hilal, Hikmat

    2017-07-06

    Pregnant and nursing women are at higher risk of zinc deficiency which can have detrimental consequences on health. We assessed blood zinc levels in 72 nursing women from the West Bank of Palestine and investigated the association between sociodemographic variables and blood zinc levels. Blood samples were analyzed for their zinc contents using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Blood and data collection were performed between July and December 2016. The median blood zinc level was 4.53 mg/L (interquartile range of 0.38 mg/L). In unadjusted analyses, blood zinc levels were higher in nursing women who lived in cities (p-value <.001), had higher household income (p-value <.001), whose husbands had a white collar job (p-value <.05), were nonsmokers (p-value <.05), did not use hair dyes (p-value <.05), and consumed energy beverages (p-value <.001). Multiple linear analysis showed that living in cities and consuming energy beverages remained significantly associated with higher blood zinc levels (p-value <.05). Blood zinc levels were in the range previously reported for similar non-malnourished populations. Nursing women living in cities and those consuming energy beverages tended to have higher blood zinc levels. Urbanized lifestyle might have enhanced blood zinc levels in nursing women.

  12. Public banking of umbilical cord blood or storage in a private bank: testing social and ethical policy in northeastern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Parco, Sergio; Vascotto, Fulvia; Visconti, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    nontreponemal rapid plasma reagin VDRL (75.0%) tests (P < 0.05, χ2 test). The specificity link between the two automatic methods versus microscopes for WBC dosing and NRBC interference was r2 = 0.08 (ADVIA 120) and r2 = 0.94 (XE-2100). The public system does not include human T-cell lymphotropic virus testing; this is reserved for the population from endemic zones. Conclusion In northeastern Italy current legislation prevents the establishment of private fee-based banks for storage of CB-SC. The cryopreservation, for future autologous personal or family use, is possible only by sending to foreign private banks, with a further fee of €300. These regulations confirm that Italian legislation tries to increase the anonymous allogenic donations and the number of CB-CS bags stored in the free-cost public system, that are available to anyone with therapeutic needs. Private banking is used almost exclusively by the wealthier local population. In the public system, many physicians continue to use older Italian laws regarding syphilis diagnosis, and NRBC interference on WBC count may have an impact on cord blood harvesting. Our findings suggest that in the EU there is no consensus policy on donor management. The value of storage for potential use within the family is useful only with collaboration between the public and the private systems. PMID:23610532

  13. Organization and management of an accredited Specialist in Blood Bank (SBB) Technology program

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Karen M.; Sheldon, Sherry L.; Flegel, Willy A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Specialists in Blood Bank (SBB) Technology play important roles in blood banks, transfusion services, regulatory agencies, educational institutions and other facilities where expertise in blood banking, transfusion medicine, cellular therapy, and tissue transplantation is required. Study design Review of pathways that qualify applicants for a national examination administered by the American Society of Clinical Pathology (ASCP) to become a certified specialist and outcomes of accredited programs. Description of a face-to-face, accredited program including review of management topics included in curriculum. Results The first examination was administered in 1954. As of December 2009, the total number certified SBBs was 5,124. There are currently 16 accredited SBB programs in the United States. The programs vary in mode of delivery, length of program, number of students accepted and organization of program officials and faculty but all must follow specific standards and guidelines in order to be accredited. Conclusion Students who successfully complete SBB programs have a higher passing rate than those who attempt the certification examination and have not participated in a program. Students can choose among a variety of programs that differ widely in the way they are managed. The role of management in an SBB program ranges from attracting and retaining individuals, to maintaining an accredited program to finally graduating individuals who not only pass the certification examination but who also confidently contribute to the field. PMID:21175473

  14. Umbilical cord blood banking and the next generation of human tissue regulation: an agenda for research.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron; Kerridge, Ian

    2012-03-01

    The transformation of umbilical cord blood from being a waste product to being a valuable source of stem cells has led to the emergence of significant legal, ethical and social issues. This editorial proposes an agenda for research into the regulation of umbilical cord blood banking which focuses on issues of characterisation, consent, the interplay of public and private services, and the importance of applying property concepts. It concludes by stressing the need for reform to be based on well-informed public debate.

  15. Modern banking, collection, compatibility testing and storage of blood and blood components.

    PubMed

    Green, L; Allard, S; Cardigan, R

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice of blood transfusion has changed considerably over the last few decades. The potential risk of transfusion transmissible diseases has directed efforts towards the production of safe and high quality blood. All transfusion services now operate in an environment of ever-increasing regulatory controls encompassing all aspects of blood collection, processing and storage. Stringent donor selection, identification of pathogens that can be transmitted through blood, and development of technologies that can enhance the quality of blood, have all led to a substantial reduction in potential risks and complications associated with blood transfusion. In this article, we will discuss the current standards required for the manufacture of blood, starting from blood collection, through processing and on to storage. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. The quest for quality blood banking program in the new millennium the American way.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Un

    2002-08-01

    For an industry to succeed and satisfy its customers, "QUALITY" must be a primary goal. Quality has been central to blood banking from its inception, with the evolution of a Quality Program since the opening of the first blood bank in U.S. at the Cook County Hospital in 1937. Over the ensuing decades, continuous scientific progress in blood preservation, filters, viral and blood group testing, crossmatching, automation, and computerization including bar coding, etc. has contributed to the quality and safety of the blood products and transfusion service. However, with the advent of the AIDS era, an increasingly sensitized and informed public is continuously demanding that the highest level of quality be achieved and maintained in all processes involved in providing all blood products. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) introduced the concept of a "zero risk blood supply" as the industry goal. Furthermore, the cost containment and resource-constrained environment have changed the complexity of the quality practice. Both regulatory agencies such as the FDA, the Health Care Financing Administration [HCFA, which was recently renamed as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in July, 2001], and the State Department of Health, and accrediting agencies, such as the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), the College of American Pathologists (CAP), and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), require blood banks and transfusion services to establish and follow a Quality Control and Quality Assurance Program for their licensing, certification and accreditation. Every laboratory has to comply with the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA '88) quality requirements being implemented by the CMS. The FDA guidelines assist facilities in compliance with Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). The AABB's Quality System Essentials (QSE) are based on these specifications and provide additional guidance in

  17. The role of comprehensive check at the blood bank reception on blood requisitions in detecting potential transfusion errors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Kumari, Sonam; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Ratti Ram

    2015-06-01

    Pre-transfusion testing includes proper requisitions, compatibility testing and pre-release checks. Proper labelling of samples and blood units and accurate patient details check helps to minimize the risk of errors in transfusion. This study was aimed to identify requisition errors before compatibility testing. The study was conducted in the blood bank of a tertiary care hospital in north India over a period of 3 months. The requisitions were screened at the reception counter and inside the pre-transfusion testing laboratory for errors. This included checking the Central Registration number (C.R. No.) and name of patient on the requisition form and the sample label; appropriateness of sample container and sample label; incomplete requisitions; blood group discrepancy. Out of the 17,148 blood requisitions, 474 (2.76 %) requisition errors were detected before the compatibility testing. There were 192 (1.11 %) requisitions where the C.R. No. on the form and the sample were not tallying and in 70 (0.40 %) requisitions patient's name on the requisition form and the sample were different. Highest number of requisitions errors were observed in those received from the Emergency and Trauma services (27.38 %) followed by Medical wards (15.82 %) and the lowest number (3.16 %) of requisition errors were observed from Hematology and Oncology wards. C.R. No. error was the most common error observed in our study. Thus a careful check of the blood requisitions at the blood bank reception counter helps in identifying the potential transfusion errors.

  18. Fibrin glue from stored human plasma. An inexpensive and efficient method for local blood bank preparation.

    PubMed

    Spotnitz, W D; Mintz, P D; Avery, N; Bithell, T C; Kaul, S; Nolan, S P

    1987-08-01

    European surgeons have used fibrin glue extensively during thoracic, cardiovascular, and general surgical operations. Until now, however, it has been available only as a commercial preparation made from pooled human plasma, and it has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States because of a high associated risk of hepatitis and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Methods of obtaining fibrinogen, an essential component of fibrin glue, from cryoprecipitate or fresh frozen plasma have been published recently. However, the cryoprecipitate method results in relatively low concentrations of fibrinogen, which can reduce glue effectiveness. The fresh frozen plasma method is more expensive and does not meet the standards of the American Association of Blood Banks for the "closed" system required for safe handling and management of blood component products. Both the cryoprecipitate and the fresh frozen plasma methods result in waste of unstable clotting factors. These factors are necessary to replace human plasma clotting deficiencies but are not necessary for the production of fibrin glue. The authors have developed an efficient, high-concentration blood bank method for producing and maintaining a local supply of a safer and less expensive but equally effective material derived from stored human plasma. This material is produced using approved blood bank techniques for a "closed" system in blood component production, thus reducing the risks of contamination and infection, and its fibrinogen concentration is higher than that of standard cryoprecipitate. The cost of 1 unit of this fibrin glue is comparable to that for 1 unit of cryoprecipitate and less than that for 1 unit of fresh frozen plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Establishing an integrated human milk banking approach to strengthen newborn care.

    PubMed

    DeMarchis, A; Israel-Ballard, K; Mansen, Kimberly Amundson; Engmann, C

    2016-11-10

    The provision of donor human milk can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality among vulnerable infants and is recommended by the World Health Organization as the next best option when a mother's own milk is unavailable. Regulated human milk banks can meet this need, however, scale-up has been hindered by the absence of an appropriate model for resource-limited settings and a lack of policy support for human milk banks and for the operational procedures supporting them. To reduce infant mortality, human milk banking systems need to be scaled up and integrated with other components of newborn care. This article draws on current guidelines and best practices from human milk banks to offer a compilation of universal requirements that provide a foundation for an integrated model of newborn care that is appropriate for low- and high-resource settings alike.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 10 November 2016; doi:10.1038/jp.2016.198.

  20. Feasibility of hospital-based blood banking: a Tanzanian case study.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, B; Mercer, A

    1999-12-01

    The demand for blood transfusion is high in sub-Saharan Africa because of the high prevalence of anaemia and pregnancy related complications, but the practice is estimated to account for 10% of HIV infections in some regions. The main response to this problem by the international donor community is to establish vertically implemented blood transfusion services producing suitable (safe) blood at a cost of US$25-40 per unit. However, the economic sustainability of such interventions is questionable and it is argued here that hospital-based blood transfusion services operating at a basic adequate level are sufficient for low-income African countries. The results of a project aimed at improving such services in Tanzania are presented. The main findings are: (1) the cost per suitable blood unit produced was US$12.4; (2) at an HIV test sensitivity of 93.5% during the study period, discounted financial benefits of the interventions exceeded costs by a factor of between 17.2 and 37.1; (3) the cost per undiscounted year of life saved by use of these interventions was US$2.7-2.8; and (4) safe blood transfusion practices can be assured at an annual cost of US$0.07 per capita. Recommendations are made to ensure safe blood transfusion practices at hospital-based blood banks in Tanzania.

  1. Prevalence of Principal Rh Blood Group Antigens in Blood Donors at the Blood Bank of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Gundrajukuppam, Deepthi Krishna; Vijaya, Sreedhar Babu Kinnera; Rajendran, Arun; Sarella, Jothibai Dorairaj

    2016-05-01

    Rhesus (Rh) antigen was discovered in 1940 by Karl Landsteiner and Wiener. Due to its immunogenicity along with A, B antigens, Rh D antigen testing was made mandatory in pre-transfusion testing. Presently there are more than 50 antigens in Rh blood group system but major ones are D, C, E, c, and e. Very few reports are available regarding their prevalence in India and no reports are available from Andhra Pradesh. To study the prevalence of principal Rh blood group antigens like D, C, E, c & e in the voluntary blood donors attending our blood bank. A prospective cross-sectional non interventional study was carried out on 1000 healthy blood donors from August 2013 to July 2014 at our blood bank. Donors were grouped and typed for ABO and Rh major antigens using monoclonal blood grouping reagents as per the manufacturer's instructions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16. Comparison of categorical data between antigen positive and negative individuals was done using Chi-square test. Descriptive statistics for the categorical variables were performed by computing the frequencies (percentages) in each category. Incidence was given in proportion with 95% confidence interval. A total of 1000 blood samples from donors were phenotyped. Among Rh antigens, e was the most common antigen (98.4%), followed by D-94.1%, C-88%, c-54.9% and E-18.8% with DCe/DCe (R1R1) (43.4%) being the most common phenotype and the least common phenotype is r'r' (0.1%). Database for antigen frequency to at least Rh blood group system in local donors helps to provide antigen negative blood to patients with multiple alloantibodies, minimize alloimmunization rate, and thereby improve blood safety.

  2. Prevalence of Principal Rh Blood Group Antigens in Blood Donors at the Blood Bank of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, Sreedhar Babu Kinnera; Rajendran, Arun; Sarella, Jothibai Dorairaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rhesus (Rh) antigen was discovered in 1940 by Karl Landsteiner and Wiener. Due to its immunogenicity along with A, B antigens, Rh D antigen testing was made mandatory in pre-transfusion testing. Presently there are more than 50 antigens in Rh blood group system but major ones are D, C, E, c, and e. Very few reports are available regarding their prevalence in India and no reports are available from Andhra Pradesh. Aim To study the prevalence of principal Rh blood group antigens like D, C, E, c & e in the voluntary blood donors attending our blood bank. Materials and Methods A prospective cross-sectional non interventional study was carried out on 1000 healthy blood donors from August 2013 to July 2014 at our blood bank. Donors were grouped and typed for ABO and Rh major antigens using monoclonal blood grouping reagents as per the manufacturer’s instructions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16. Comparison of categorical data between antigen positive and negative individuals was done using Chi-square test. Descriptive statistics for the categorical variables were performed by computing the frequencies (percentages) in each category. Incidence was given in proportion with 95% confidence interval. Results A total of 1000 blood samples from donors were phenotyped. Among Rh antigens, e was the most common antigen (98.4%), followed by D-94.1%, C-88%, c-54.9% and E-18.8% with DCe/DCe (R1R1) (43.4%) being the most common phenotype and the least common phenotype is r’r’ (0.1%). Conclusion Database for antigen frequency to at least Rh blood group system in local donors helps to provide antigen negative blood to patients with multiple alloantibodies, minimize alloimmunization rate, and thereby improve blood safety. PMID:27437223

  3. 45 CFR 61.14 - Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and... GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information by the Healthcare...

  4. A brief history of the early years of blood transfusion at the Mayo Clinic: the first blood bank in the United States (1935).

    PubMed

    Moore, S Breanndan

    2005-07-01

    At the Mayo Clinic in 1914, Francis McGrath modified an existing aspiration-injection apparatus and adapted it for arm-to-arm blood transfusions. Separately, in 1919, both Pemberton and Sanford described in detail the Mayo Clinic experience with more than 1000 transfusions between January 1915 and January 1918. Most transfusions were by the indirect citrate method from freshly drawn blood. In 1935, John Lundy established a bank of refrigerated blood for transfusions at Mayo Clinic and reported on the activity in that and subsequent years. The functioning clinical blood bank established by Lundy at Mayo Clinic predated that of Bernard Fantus in Chicago by almost 2 years.

  5. Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after delivery and implications for public cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Allan, David S; Scrivens, Nicholas; Lawless, Tiffany; Mostert, Karen; Oppenheimer, Lawrence; Walker, Mark; Petraszko, Tanya; Elmoazzen, Heidi

    2016-03-01

    Public banking of umbilical cord blood units (CBUs) containing higher numbers of cells ensures timely engraftment after transplantation for increasing numbers of patients. Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth may benefit some infants by preventing iron deficiency. Implications of delayed cord clamping for public cord blood banking remains unclear. CBUs collected by Canadian Blood Services at one collection site between November 1, 2014, and March 17, 2015, were analyzed. The delay in cord clamping after birth was timed and classified as "no delay," 20 to 60 seconds, more than 60 seconds, or more than 120 seconds. Of 367 collections, 100 reported no delay in clamping while clamping was delayed by 20 to 60 seconds (n = 69), more than 60 seconds (n = 98), or more than 120 seconds (n = 100) in the remaining cases. The mean volume and total nucleated cells (TNCs) in units with no delay in clamping were significantly greater than mean volumes for all categories of delayed clamping (Tukey's test, p < 0.05 for each comparison). The proportion of units with more than 1.5 × 10(9) TNCs was significantly reduced when clamping was delayed (p = 5.5 × 10(-8) ). The difference was most marked for cords that were clamped more than 120 seconds after delivery (6.2% compared with 39%). Delayed cord clamping greatly diminishes the volume and TNC count of units collected for a public cord blood bank. Creating an inventory of CBUs with high TNC content may take more time than expected. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Cord blood banking activities at a university hospital in northeast Mexico: an 8-year experience.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Perez, Jose C; Monreal-Robles, Roberto; Colunga-Pedraza, Julia; Mancías-Guerra, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Romo, Laura; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2012-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents an alternative source of stem cells for transplantation for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and genetic disorders. There is scarce information detailing cord blood bank (CBB) collection and transplantation activities from developing countries. We documented our experience at a public university hospital in northeast Mexico. We carried out a retrospective and descriptive analysis of our CBB activity during an 8-year period from May 2002 to September 2010. Collection, processing, and cryopreservation of CB were carried out following standard operating procedures. The minimum volume and total nucleated cell (TNC) content for cryopreservation were 80 mL and 8.0 × 10(8) , respectively. A total of 1256 UCB units were collected; 428 (34%) were banked and 828 (66%) were discarded. The main reason for exclusion was biologic: low volume and/or low number of TNC accounted for 84% of the total discarded units. Cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) had a median volume of 113.8 mL (range, 80-213.2 mL) and 13.0 × 10(8) (range, 8 × 10(8) -36.6 × 10(8) ) TNCs. Cell viability was 99.3% (88-100%). The median CD34+ cell content was 4.0 × 10(6) (0.46 × 10(6) -19.38 × 10(6) ). Sixteen units have been released for transplantation, leading to a utilization rate of 3.7%. CBB demands considerable human and financial resources; it is then essential for centers at developing countries to share their experience, results, and databases to increase the probability of finding matching units for their patients. Efforts to create and maintain CBBs allow to offer this therapeutic option at an affordable cost. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Current Knowledge and Practice of Pediatric Providers in Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Fonstad, Rachel; Spellman, Stephen; Tullius, Zoe; Chaudhury, Sonali

    2017-03-01

    More than 35 000 umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplants have been performed worldwide, prompting the development of private and public banks to collect and store UCB cells. We hypothesized that pediatricians, who are uniquely poised to discuss UCB banking (UCBB) during prenatal or sibling visits, rarely do so. Through distribution of a 26-question electronic survey to general and subspecialty pediatric providers, we assessed baseline knowledge and conversations about UCBB. A total of 473 providers completed the survey; only 22% of physicians ever discussed UCBB with expectant parents. The majority responded that autologous UCB transplants were indicated in malignant (73%) and nonmalignant (61%) conditions; however, these are rare indications. Providers practicing >10 years were more likely to address UCBB ( P ≤ .001), whereas younger and female general pediatric providers were significantly less likely ( P < .001). Overall, pediatric providers rarely speak to families about UCBB, and we believe that they can be better informed to its current clinical utility.

  8. [Guidelines for Chagas disease: Part III. Chagas disease in donors to blood banks].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    In this chapter it is emphasized the importance to guarantee safety and high quality blood transfusions. Besides, the following topics are analyzed: the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection acquired by blood transfusions, the obligatory screening implemented in Chilean blood banks and serological diagnostic techniques used that for, the seroprevalence observed, the importance to confirm results and methods recommended in this purpose and, to notify the donor once the infection is confirmed. In addition a facsímil of a letter used to notify the positive donor is included as guidelines to make advice after, attaching a pro-forma of clinical-epidemiological registration to refer the donor to medical evaluation and treatment.

  9. Incidence of Cytomegaloviremia in Blood-Bank Donors and in Infants with Congenital Cytomegalic Inclusion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirkovic, R.; Werch, J.; South, M. A.; Benyesh-Melnick, M.

    1971-01-01

    During a 15-month period, cytomegalovirus (CMV) isolations were attempted from leukocytes derived from 290 healthy blood-bank donors. The major proportion of the specimens were tested 2 to 5 hr after donation. However, CMV was not recovered from any of the specimens examined. At the time of donation, 75% of donors had CMV complement-fixing antibodies demonstrable in titers of 10 to ≥320. The age of the study group ranged from 17 to 57 years. During the same time period and with the use of identical isolation techniques, postnatal cytomegaloviremia was demonstrated in four infants with cytomegalic inclusion disease. Failure to detect cytomegaloviremia in 290 normal blood donors questions its occurrence outside pathological conditions. These results do not support the concept that CMV infection, concurrent with post-transfusion mononucleosis syndrome, is transmitted through the blood donor's leukocytes. PMID:16557945

  10. The Need for Education in Molecular Immunohematology: A Survey of Specialists in Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Stephanie N; Slayten, Jayanna; Waxman, Dan A

    2016-11-01

    Within transfusion medicine, the education of molecular technologies lacks standardization. To address this problem, we surveyed specialist in blood bank technology (SBBT) programs, immunohematology reference laboratories, and SBBT graduates to define its current state. An anonymous online survey (SurveyMonkey) was emailed to the 15 American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) SBBT programs, 59 AABB IRLs, and 82 SBBT graduates. In the didactic portion of the SBBT curriculum, all programs incorporate knowledge base of blood groups, 13 incorporate molecular techniques, and 5 include case studies. Thirteen programs have intentions of expanding the knowledge base in molecular topics. Most IRLs (97%) think SBBT programs should continue to expand molecular knowledge base. Most graduates (94%) believe more molecular topics should be included in the SBBT curriculum; however, only 50% believe they currently apply their molecular knowledge in their post-graduate employment. We propose a more descriptive molecular diagnostics curriculum for SBBT programs to help standardize the education of molecular topics. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The prevalence of toxoplasmosis in Imam Reza Hospital blood bank samples, Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Shaddel, M; Mirzaii Dizgah, I; Sharif, F

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of toxoplasma gondii (T.g) infection in blood donors has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis in blood products. A total of 223 blood products (101 fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and 122 packed cells (PC)) in Imam Reza hospital blood bank, Tehran, Iran were tested for specific T.g antibodies (IgG and IgM) by ELISA method. Positive IgG anti-T.g samples were further tested for IgM anti-T.g. A positive IgG test with the negative and positive IgM test was interpreted as a chronic and acute toxoplasmosis respectively. Of 223 samples 38.6% and 0.45% were positive for IgG anti-T.g and IgM anti-T.g levels respectively. Therefore, one and 85 samples were involved acute and chronic toxoplasmosis respectively. Twenty-six of fresh frozen plasma samples were positive for IgG anti-T.g and one of them was positive for IgM anti-T.g. Sixty packed cell samples were positive for IgG anti-T.g. Our study showed that there were chronic and acute toxoplasmosis in blood products and the prevalence of toxoplasmosis especially chronic form was high. Therefore screening of blood for T.g antibodies may be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Blood bank protocols for large-scale civilian casualty events: experience from terrorist bombing in Israel.

    PubMed

    Dann, E J; Bonstein, L; Arbov, L; Kornberg, A; Rahimi-Levene, N

    2007-04-01

    Terrorist attacks in crowded places cause multiple casualties that are evacuated by quick succession to nearby hospitals. The study goals were to analyse the issues of patient misidentification and excessive blood request and to develop recommendations for the management of such episodes. A retrospective analysis of nine explosion attacks was performed. In nine consecutive events, 450 casualties were reported by the National Ambulance Service, 82 of whom (18%) died on the explosion site and 368 were admitted to nearby trauma centres. Red blood cell units were typed and cross-matched for 70 patients. Seventy-three per cent of the blood supplied over the first 24 h was administered during the first 2 h. The cross-matched/transfused ratio was 2.52 +/- 1.42, reflecting the overestimation of blood requirement in mass casualty episodes. In the mass casualty setup, blood bank personnel should be alert to a potential mistransfusion or a blood collection error. Unidentified patients are subjected to errors due to only one-digit difference in their temporary identification number. Application of the system using an additional sequential four-digit number printed in bold and large size font for patients at admission reduced the possibility of misidentification. Modern technologies, including error-reduction design wristbands, barcode-based system or radiofrequency identification tags may also increase reliability of patient identification in the mass casualty setup.

  14. Analysis of immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Neto, Adriana Lemos; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is imperative when treating certain patients; however, it is not risk free. In addition to the possible transmission of contagious infectious diseases, incidents can occur immediately after transfusion and at a later time. Aims This study aimed to examine the immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank in the state of Minas Gerais between December 2006 and December 2009. A retrospective quantitative epidemiological study was conducted. Data were obtained from 202 transfusion incident reports of 42 health institutions served by the blood bank. Data processing and analysis were carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results The rate of immediate transfusion incidents reported in the period was 0.24%; febrile non-hemolytic reactions were the most common type of incident (56.4%). The most frequent clinical manifestations listed in transfusion incident reports were chills (26.9%) and fever (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05) between the infusion of platelet concentrates and febrile non-hemolytic reactions and between fresh frozen plasma and febrile non-hemolytic reaction. The majority (73.3%) of transfused patients who suffered immediate transfusion incidents had already been transfused and 36.5% of the cases had previous transfusion incident reports. Conclusions Data from the present study corroborate the implementation of new professional training programs aimed at blood transfusion surveillance. These measures should emphasize prevention, identification and reporting of immediate transfusion incidents aiming to increase blood transfusion quality and safety. PMID:23049336

  15. Seroprevalence of transfusion transmissible infections among blood donors at the blood bank of a Medical College of Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Prasanta Ray; Shrivastava, Prabha; Ray, Tapobrata Guha

    2014-01-01

    Seroprevalence of transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs) among blood donors can be used to monitor the prevalence among apparently healthy adult population. The present study was conducted to determine the profile of blood donors and seroprevalence of TTI among them. Retrospective analysis of the donors of a blood bank attached with a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata in 2011 was carried out. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 17. Majority (85%) of the donors were male, two-third in the age group of 21-40 years. Among the donors 2.79% were positive for any of the screened TTIs. Seroprevalence was highest for hepatitis B (1.41%) followed by human immunodeficiency virus (0.60%) and hepatitis C (0.59%) and least for syphilis (0.23%). Seropositivity increased with age up to 50 years. There was no significant difference in seropositivity between male and female. Highly sensitive donor screening and public awareness program can make transfusion of blood products safe.

  16. A Need for Renewed and Cohesive US Policy on Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Monica M; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells obtained from umbilical cord blood (CB) are used to treat more than 80 different diseases and are a standard treatment for many types of leukemias, lymphomas, myelodysplasias, and inherited immune system disorders. CB transplants have been carried out in humans for over 25 years, and hundreds of clinical trials are currently underway investigating CB's therapeutic potential for a wide range of disorders, including autism, diabetes, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury. Extensive storage facilities have been established in the United States and around the world to collect, test, and freeze CB for later use in medical procedures. However, a divide between two different banking models-public versus private-has emerged, presenting several policy challenges. While the Food and Drug Administration currently regulates CB storage and use in the United States, other state and federal guidelines on CB education, awareness, and ethical considerations remain variable, and no mandatory international guidelines exist. In addition, federal funding for an important CB collection initiative that specifically targets minority populations is set to expire by the end of FY2015. To help organize and coordinate efforts across the United States and other nations, policymakers should implement regulations for: high quality standards for both private and public CB banks, a commitment to ethical practices, and an investment in educational campaigns and training programs for all steps of the CB banking process.

  17. Comprehensive banking of sibling donor cord blood for children with malignant and nonmalignant disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, William; Smith, Renée; Dekovic, Florinna; Lee, Joanna Y; Saba, Julie D; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Epstein, Joanna; Haaz, Steffany; Walters, Mark C; Lubin, Bertram H

    2003-01-01

    Banking of cord blood (CB) for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is well established. However, directed-donor banking of CB for siblings in a current good tissue practices (cGTP) environment has not previously been investigated. Families were eligible for the present study if they were caring for a child with a disorder treatable by HSC transplantation and expecting the birth of a full sibling. We devised standard operating procedures and policies to address eligibility, donor recruitment, donor and recipient evaluation, CB collection, shipping, graft characterization, storage, and release of CB from quarantine. Many of these policies are distinctly different from those established for unrelated-donor CB banks. We enrolled 540 families from 42 states. Collections occurred at several hundred different hospitals. No family was deferred on the basis of health history or infectious disease testing, but departures from standard donor suitability criteria were documented. Disease categories for sibling recipients included malignancy, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia major, nonmalignant hematological conditions, and metabolic errors. Mean CB volume (including anticoagulant) was 103.1 mL; mean nucleated cell count was 8.9 x 10(8). Cell dose exceeded 1.5 x 10(7) nucleated cells per kilogram for 90% of banked units. Seventeen units (3.4%) have been transplanted. Sixteen of the 17 CB allograft recipients had stable engraftment of donor cells. Remote-site collection of sibling donor CB can be accomplished with a high success rate and in a cGTP-guided environment. The cellular products have been used successfully for transplantation; their number and characteristics should be adequate to support the first prospective clinical investigations of sibling CB transplantation.

  18. Magnetic bead technology for viral RNA extraction from serum in blood bank screening.

    PubMed

    Albertoni, Guilherme Ambrozio; Arnoni, Carine Prisco; Araujo, Patricia Regina Barboza; Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Carvalho, Fabrício Oliveira; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Schor, Nestor; Barreto, José Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) was recently recommended by Brazilian legislation and has been implemented at some blood banks in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in an attempt to reduce blood-born transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus. Manual magnetic particle-based extraction methods for HIV and HCV viral nucleic acids were evaluated in combination with detection by reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) one-step. Blood donor samples were collected from January 2010 to September 2010, and minipools of them were submitted to testing. ELISA was used for the analysis of anti-HCV/HIV antibodies. Detection and amplification of viral RNA was performed using real-time PCR. Out of 20.808 samples screened, 53 samples (29 for HCV and 24 for HIV) were confirmed as positive by serological and NAT methods. The manual magnetic bead-based extraction in combination with real-time PCR detection can be used to routinely screen blood donation for viremic donors to further increase the safety of blood products.

  19. Renitrosylation of banked human red blood cells improves deformability and reduces adhesivity

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Daniel A.; Zhu, Hongmei; Foster, Matthew W.; Huang, Brendan; Hofmann, Christina L.; Palmer, Gregory M.; McMahon, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a frequent healthcare practice. However, unfavorable consequences may occur from transfusions of stored RBCs and are associated with RBC changes during storage. Loss of S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb) and other S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) during storage is implicated as a detriment to transfusion efficacy. It was hypothesized that restoring SNOs within banked RBCs would improve RBC functions relevant to successful transfusion outcomes, namely increased deformability and decreased adhesivity. Study Design and Methods Stored human RBCs were incubated with nitric oxide (NO) donors PROLI/NO and DEA/NO (disodium 1-[2-(carboxylato)-pyrrolidin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate and diethylammonium (Z)-1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate) under different experimental conditions (e.g., aerobic/anaerobic incubation, NO donor to RBC ratio). SNO restoration was evaluated in vitro and in vivo as a means to improve RBC function after storage. Results Incubation of RBCs with the NO donors resulted in tenfold greater levels of SNO-Hb versus untreated control or sham RBCs, with significantly higher Hb-bound NO yields from an NO dose delivered by DEA/NO. RBC incubation with DEA/NO at a stoichiometry of 1:62.5 NO:Hb significantly increased RBC deformabilty and reduced adhesion to cultured endothelial cells. RBC incubation with DEA/NO also increased S-nitrosylation of RBC cytoskeletal and membrane proteins, including the beta spectrin chain. Renitrosylation attenuated both RBC sequestration in the lung and the mild blood oxygen saturation impairments seen with banked RBCs in a mouse model of transfusion. Conclusions RBC renitrosylation using NO donors has promise for correcting deficient properties (e.g., adhesivity, rigidity, and SNO loss) of banked RBCs and in turn improving transfusion outcomes. PMID:26098062

  20. Sibling donor cord blood banking for children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, W; Walters, M; Trachtenberg, E; Smith, R; Lubin, B H

    2001-01-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has curative potential for selected patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), most patients who are eligible for transplantation do not have a suitable donor. Cord blood (CB) from a sibling could provide an alternative stem cell source that, while not as well established as marrow, may offer certain advantages for selected families. These potential advantages include low risk to the infant donor, the possibility that mismatched CB units from sibling donors may be acceptable for transplantation, prompt availability of a stored CB unit for transplant, and decreased risk of clinically significant graft-versus-host disease. When families with SCD (or other transplant-treatable condition) conceive a sibling, no comprehensive research resource exists to assist the family in collecting the new infant's CB. With support from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, we are developing a noncommercial research-based CB Banking Program specifically for medically indicated sibling donations. In preliminary experience, we have collected CB from 52 SCD families across 19 states. Of these, 2 CB units have thus far been used for transplantation and 9 others are HLA-identical. We conclude that a CB bank focusing on sibling-donations may be feasible, but further study is required to determine whether such a bank can collect CB units of sufficient quantity and quality to support controlled trials of sibling CB transplantation. Families with a specific medical need, such as those already caring for a child with SCD, should consider collecting sibling CB as part of comprehensive care if the opportunity becomes available.

  1. A new automatic device for routine cord blood banking: critical analysis of different volume reduction methodologies.

    PubMed

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Blanquer, Amando; Delgado-Rosas, Francisco; Planelles, Dolores; Andrade, Margarita; Carbonell-Uberos, Francisco; Soler, M Angeles; Roig, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Volume reduction is the usual process in cord blood banking that has some advantages regarding reducing the storage space and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) quantity in the final product. The volume reduction methodology must guarantee high cell recovery and red blood cell (RBC) depletion by reducing all the umbilical cord blood (UCB) units to a standard volume. We analyzed and compared critically three different volume reduction methods [hydroxyethylstarch (HES), top and bottom with Optipress II and Compomat G4, and AXP] used at the Valencia Cord Blood Bank over 10 years. The highest significant RBC depletion was achieved with the AXP system (P<0.001), while the top and bottom system with Compomat G4 and an adjusted buffy coat (BC) volume to 41 mL enabled the best total nucleated cell (TNC) recovery (P<0.001). TNC recovery and RBC depletion were similar for AXP and HES with an adjusted volume to 21 mL. In the multivariate analysis, when analyzing all cases, the BC volume set significantly influenced TNC, CD34+ and lymphocyte recoveries and RBC depletion (P<0.001). RBC depletion was significantly influenced by the initial volume and initial RBC content of UCB units (P<0.001). AXP is a highly efficient method for RBC depletion, providing the same TNC recovery as HES method with a final volume of 41 mL. AXP has the advantages of being an automatic and functionally closed system that shortens and better standardizes the proceedings. Top and bottom is a closed system that allows better TNC recoveries when the BC volume set is 41 mL.

  2. Ethnicity, equity and public benefit: a critical evaluation of public umbilical cord blood banking in Australia.

    PubMed

    Samuel, G N; Kerridge, I H; Vowels, M; Trickett, A; Chapman, J; Dobbins, T

    2007-10-01

    Over the past decade umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been increasingly used as a source of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for patients who require a HSC transplant but do not have an HLA-matched donor. It was anticipated that using UCB as an alternative source of HSCs would increase the chance of finding a donor, particularly for the otherwise underrepresented ethnic minority groups. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Australian public UCB banks to increase the ethnic diversity of available HSC donations, this paper analyses the ethnic diversity of the Sydney Cord Blood Bank (SCBB), comparing this diversity to that of the Australian Bone Marrow Donor Registry (ABMDR). It also examines the ethnic diversity of those patients who, after requesting a haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the 2-year period between 2003 and 2005, managed to find a suitably matched bone marrow or UCB donor. We show that the ethnic mix of donors to the SCBB has remained generally broad in source, is comparative to the Australian population, and is more diverse than the ABMDR. This, however, may still not be sufficient to substantially increase the likelihood of finding a donor for some ethnic minority groups.

  3. Umbilical cord blood banking in the worldwide hematopoietic stem cell transplantation system: perspectives for Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Kalynychenko, T O

    2017-09-01

    Significant progress in the promotion of procedural technologies associated with the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells caused a rapid increase in activity. The exchange of hematopoietic stem cells for unrelated donor transplantations is now much easier due to the relevant international professional structures and organizations established to support cooperation and standard setting, as well as rules for the functioning of both national donor registries and cord blood banks. These processes are increasing every year and are contributing to the outpacing rates of development in this area. Products within their country should be regulated by the competent government authorities. This study analyzes the work of international and national levels of support for transplantation activity in the field of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the standardization order of technologies, as well as data that justify the need to create a network of donated umbilical cord blood banks in Ukraine as a factor in the development of allogeneic transplantation. This will promote the accessibility of international standards for the treatment of serious diseases for Ukrainian citizens.

  4. Impact of selection of cord blood units from the United States and swiss registries on the cost of banking operations.

    PubMed

    Bart, Thomas; Boo, Michael; Balabanova, Snejana; Fischer, Yvonne; Nicoloso, Grazia; Foeken, Lydia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Passweg, Jakob; Tichelli, Andre; Kindler, Vincent; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Price, Thomas; Regan, Donna; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Schwabe, Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades, cord blood (CB) has become an important source of blood stem cells. Clinical experience has shown that CB is a viable source for blood stem cells in the field of unrelated hematopoietic blood stem cell transplantation. Studies of CB units (CBUs) stored and ordered from the US (National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and Swiss (Swiss Blood Stem Cells (SBSQ)) CB registries were conducted to assess whether these CBUs met the needs of transplantation patients, as evidenced by units being selected for transplantation. These data were compared to international banking and selection data (Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW), World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA)). Further analysis was conducted on whether current CB banking practices were economically viable given the units being selected from the registries for transplant. It should be mentioned that our analysis focused on usage, deliberately omitting any information about clinical outcomes of CB transplantation. A disproportionate number of units with high total nucleated cell (TNC) counts are selected, compared to the distribution of units by TNC available. Therefore, the decision to use a low threshold for banking purposes cannot be supported by economic analysis and may limit the economic viability of future public CB banking. We suggest significantly raising the TNC level used to determine a bankable unit. A level of 125 × 10(7) TNCs, maybe even 150 × 10(7) TNCs, might be a viable banking threshold. This would improve the return on inventory investments while meeting transplantation needs based on current selection criteria.

  5. Impact of Selection of Cord Blood Units from the United States and Swiss Registries on the Cost of Banking Operations

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Thomas; Boo, Michael; Balabanova, Snejana; Fischer, Yvonne; Nicoloso, Grazia; Foeken, Lydia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Passweg, Jakob; Tichelli, Andre; Kindler, Vincent; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Price, Thomas; Regan, Donna; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Schwabe, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last 2 decades, cord blood (CB) has become an important source of blood stem cells. Clinical experience has shown that CB is a viable source for blood stem cells in the field of unrelated hematopoietic blood stem cell transplantation. Methods Studies of CB units (CBUs) stored and ordered from the US (National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and Swiss (Swiss Blood Stem Cells (SBSQ)) CB registries were conducted to assess whether these CBUs met the needs of transplantation patients, as evidenced by units being selected for transplantation. These data were compared to international banking and selection data (Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW), World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA)). Further analysis was conducted on whether current CB banking practices were economically viable given the units being selected from the registries for transplant. It should be mentioned that our analysis focused on usage, deliberately omitting any information about clinical outcomes of CB transplantation. Results A disproportionate number of units with high total nucleated cell (TNC) counts are selected, compared to the distribution of units by TNC available. Therefore, the decision to use a low threshold for banking purposes cannot be supported by economic analysis and may limit the economic viability of future public CB banking. Conclusions We suggest significantly raising the TNC level used to determine a bankable unit. A level of 125 × 107 TNCs, maybe even 150 × 107 TNCs, might be a viable banking threshold. This would improve the return on inventory investments while meeting transplantation needs based on current selection criteria. PMID:23637645

  6. Detection of bacterial contamination and DNA quantification in stored blood units in 2 veterinary hospital blood banks.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Miglio, Arianna; Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Sgariglia, Elisa; Marenzoni, Maria L; Antognoni, Maria T; Coletti, Mauro; Mangili, Vittorio; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    Blood transfusions in veterinary medicine have become increasingly more common and are now an integral part of lifesaving and advanced treatment in small and large animals. Important risks associated with transfusion of blood products include the transmission of various infectious diseases. Several guidelines suggest what infectious agents to screen for in canine and feline transfusion medicine. However, while the risk of bacterial contamination of blood products during storage and administration has not been documented in veterinary medicine, it has emerged as a cause of morbidity and mortality in human transfusion medicine. Clinical experience shows that the majority of blood component bacterial contaminations are caused by only a few species. Unlike other types of bacteria, psychrotolerant species like Pseudomonas spp. and Serratia spp. can proliferate during the storage of blood units at 4°C from a very low titer at the time of blood collection to a clinically significant level (> 10(5) CFU/mL) causing clinical sepsis resulting from red blood cell concentrate transfusions in human medicine. The purpose of this report was to describe the detection and quantification procedures applied in 4 cases of bacterial contamination of canine and feline blood units, which suggest the need for further investigations to optimize patients' safety in veterinary transfusion medicine.

  7. 45 CFR 61.12 - Requesting information from the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requesting information from the Healthcare... SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information by the...

  8. Directed sibling cord blood banking for transplantation: the 10-year experience in the national blood service in England.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Jon; Armitage, Sue; McDonald, Dorothy; Pamphilon, Derwood; Guttridge, Martin; Brown, Juliette; Green, Ann; Brown, Colin; Warwick, Ruth M; Lankester, Alan; Fehily, Deirdre; Contreras, Marcela; Navarrete, Cristina; Watt, Suzanne M

    2007-08-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. Although UCB is often collected from unrelated donors, directed umbilical cord blood (DCB) from sibling donors also provides an important source of UCB for transplantation. This report summarizes the experience in collection, testing, storage, and transplantation of DCB units by the National Blood Service for England and North Wales over 10 years. Eligibility for collection was based on an existing sibling suffering from a disease that may be treated by stem cell transplantation or a family history that could result in the birth of a sibling with a disease that could be treated by stem cell transplantation. Collections were made on the provision that the sibling's clinician was willing to financially support the collection and to take responsibility for medical review of the mother and potential recipient. Given the high investment in UCB banking and the introduction of new regulations and mandatory licensing under the European Union Tissues and Cells Directive and those proposed in the U.S., this report details the procedures that we have used for DCB donations, the outcome data where donations have been used for transplantation, and it provides some timely recommendations for best practices. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  9. Changes in Band 3 oligomeric state precede cell membrane phospholipid loss during blood bank storage of red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Karon, Brad S.; Hoyer, James D.; Stubbs, James R.; Thomas, David D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipid loss in the form of vesicles contributes to the red blood cell (RBC) storage lesion, and this loss of lipid is correlated with changes in membrane protein function. Sensitive spectroscopic techniques were used to measure changes in Band 3 oligomeric state during storage of RBCs, compared to metabolic changes and phospholipid loss. The aim of the study was to determine whether changes in the macromolecular organization of membrane proteins occur before, coincident with, or after lipid loss during RBC storage. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Five RBC units were collected from normal volunteers and stored under standard blood bank conditions, and both metabolic changes and lipid loss were measured by multiple assays. Band 3 oligomeric state was assessed by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer of eosin-5-maleimide–labeled RBC ghosts. RESULTS Extracellular pH decreased and extracellular potassium increased rapidly during cold storage of blood. Band 3 on the RBC membrane exhibited a shift from small to large oligomers early in the storage period and before detectable loss of phospholipid from the RBC membrane. The immobilized fraction of Band 3, that which is tethered to the cytoskeletal network via spectrin and ankyrin, did not change during cold storage. CONCLUSION Our results demonstrate that changes in the macromolecular organization of membrane proteins on the RBC occur early in storage, and these changes may induce phospholipid loss, irreversible morphologic changes, and loss of function during RBC storage. PMID:19389033

  10. Lead levels in milk and blood from donors to the Breast Milk Bank in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Koyashiki, Gina Ayumi Kobayashi; Paoliello, Monica Maria Bastos; Matsuo, Tiemi; de Oliveira, Márcia Maria Benevenuto; Mezzaroba, Leda; Carvalho, Maria de Fátima; Sakuma, Alice Momoyo; Turini, Conceição; Vannuchi, Marli Terezinha Oliveira; Barbosa, Claudia Santiago Dias

    2010-04-01

    Brazilian scientific literature on the adverse effects of lead on the general population is still very limited. Lead, a potentially toxic substance, has become a public health problem due to its effects, mainly those affecting the central nervous system and on the synthesis of heme. The aim of this study is to evaluate the level of lead exposure of donors to the Breast Milk Bank in the city of Londrina, Parana, by estimating the levels of that metal in milk and blood samples. This is a cross-sectional study conducted during the period between January and July 2007. All mothers enrolled as donors in the Breast Milk Bank were included in this study. A total of 92 volunteers presenting the following inclusion criteria were evaluated in the project: volunteers who were healthy, without any chronic disease, full-term pregnancy, breastfeeding between the 15th and 210 th day after giving birth, and living in the city of the study. Lead in milk and blood was quantified using the inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) technique. All mothers signed a consent form approved by the Research Ethics Committee from Londrina State University. The median lead concentration in milk samples was 3.0 microg/L, varying from 1.0 to 8.0 microg/L. The median of lead in blood was of 2.7 microg/dl, varying from 1.0 to 5.5 microg/dl. In Spearman correlation analysis, significant but modest correlations could be observed between the concentration of lead in blood and in milk (r(s)=0.207, p=0.048), hemoglobin and ALAD activity (r(s)=-0.264, p=0.011), level of lead in blood and mother's age (r(s)=0.227, p=0.029). However, for hematocrit and hemoglobin, the correlation was higher (r(s)=0.837, p<0.001). No statistically significant associations were found between concentrations of lead in milk and blood and demographic variables studied, obtained through interviews and validated questionnaire. The mean of milk/blood lead ratio was equal to 0.11. In general, the values found in the

  11. Transfusion medicine in the Formosa Fun Coast water park explosion: The role of combined tissue and blood banking.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chun; Yeh, Chin-Chuan; Chu, Fang-Yeh

    2016-10-01

    The Formosa Fun Coast explosion, occurring in a recreational water park located in the Northern Taiwan on 27 June 2015, made 499 people burn-injured. For those who had severe burn trauma, surgical intervention and fluid resuscitation were necessary, and potential blood transfusion therapy could be initiated, especially during and after broad escharotomy. Here, we reviewed the literature regarding transfusion medicine and skin grafting as well as described the practicing experience of combined tissue and blood bank in the burn disaster in Taiwan. It was reported that patients who were severely burn-injured could receive multiple blood transfusions during hospitalization. Since the use of skin graft became a mainstay alternative for wound coverage after the early debridement of burn wounds at the beginning of the 20th century, the development of tissue banking program was initiated. In Taiwan, the tissue banking program was started in 2006. And the first combined tissue and blood bank was established in Far Eastern Memorial Hospital in 2010, equipped with the non-sterile, clean and sterile zones distinctly segregated with a unidirectional movement in the sterile area. The sterile zone was a class 10000 clean room equipped with high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPAF) and positive air pressure ventilation. The combined tissue and blood bank has been able to provide the assigned blood products and tissue graft timely and accurately, with the concepts of centralized management. In the future, the training of tissue and blood bank technicians would be continued and fortified, particularly on the regulation and quality control for further bio- and hemovigilance.

  12. [An integrated system of blood pressure measurement with bluetooth communication].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hongyang; Xu, Zuyang; Chai, Xinyu

    2012-07-01

    The development of the integrated blood pressure system with bluetooth communication function is introduced. Experimental results show that the system can complete blood pressure measurement and data transmission wireless effectively, which can be used in m-Health in future.

  13. Tissue banking: relationship with blood donor and organ donor card status.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Kenneth D; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E; Sheehan, John D

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours-donating blood and carrying an organ donor card-and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questionnaire in an outpatient setting. In addition to demographic details, details of known diagnosis of malignancy and family history of cancer; attitudes to tissue donation for research purposes were gauged using a 5-point Likert scale. Both blood donors and organ donor card carriers were more likely to be willing to donate tissue for research purposes. Blood donors were more likely want to know their overall results in comparison to nonblood donors and want their samples to be used for nonprofit research. Our hypothesis that being a blood donor would be a better predictor to donate urological tissue than being an organ donor card carrier borne out by the trends reported above.

  14. [Screening of infectious microorganisms in blood banks in Douala (1995-2004)].

    PubMed

    Mogtomo, Martin Luther Koanga; Fomekong, Sylvie Louandji; Kuate, Honoré Fotso; Ngane, Annie Ngono

    2009-01-01

    The infection of people with haemophilia by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through blood transfusions demonstrated the potential risks of infectious disease transmission by transfusions. The microorganisms that can be transmitted through transfusion include: hepatitis viruses B, C, D, and G, HIV, cytomegalovirus, human T lymphotrophic virus (HTLV I and II), Treponema pallidum, Brucella spp, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp and trypanosoma cruzi. We estimated the prevalence of transfusion-transmissible HIV, hepatitis B and C viruses, syphilis, and Plasmodium falciparum infection in two groups of blood donors at Douala city over the period of 1995 -2004. Our results for the donors at Douala University show that at points during that period the seroprevalence of HIV ranged from 2.20% to 8.12%, for HBV from 6.10% to 16%, for HCV from 0.80% to 1.65% and for syphilis from 1.10 to 22.81%. For the blood bank of Laquintinie Hospital we observed the following prevalences: 7.89%, for HIV, 6.91% for HBV, 2.32%, for HCV, 7.90% for syphilis, and 12.82% for P. falciparum infection. These results highlight the need for continuous monitoring for safe blood transfusion.

  15. Influence of maternal, infant, and collection characteristics on high-quality cord blood units in Guangzhou Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoqing; Xie, Guie; Wu, Jieying; Chen, Jingsong; Lu, Yan; Li, Yan; Tang, Xuewei; Liao, Can

    2015-09-01

    The operation of cord blood banks (CBBs) requires immense labor, material, and financial resources. Thus, increasing the ratio of high-quality cord blood units (HQCBUs) in storage that are qualified for clinical use is critical for the efficient use of limited resources. Understanding the factors that contribute to HQCBUs, including maternal, fetal, and processing conditions, may improve the number of HQCBUs in storage. The maternal, fetal, and processing conditions of 4613 CBUs at the Guangzhou Cord Blood Bank were analyzed retrospectively to determine their effect on HQCBUs. All CBUs were obtained following strict standard operation procedures. Several factors may contribute to HQCBUs: fetal age older than 37 gestational weeks, female fetus, large cord blood (CB) volume (>80 mL), high birthweight (>3500 g), vaginal delivery, and a shorter amount of time between CB collection and processing (12 hr). We report for the first time that α-thalassemia carriers exhibit a postprocessing total nucleated cell count (p-TNCC) increase to at least 1.25 × 10(9) and an increase of the CD34+ cell count to at least 6.01 × 10(6) . Meconium-stained amniotic fluid and mothers younger than 25 years of age exhibited increased p-TNCC to at least 1.25 × 10(9) , and colony-forming units increased to at least 23.24 × 10(5) . We identified several factors that affect HQCBUs. These results may be used as a reference for updating CB collection strategies, with priority given to collecting CBUs from female fetuses older than 37 gestational weeks, at high birthweight, and born by vaginal delivery from mothers younger than 25 years of age, especially newborns with one parent carrying the trait or with meconium-stained amniotic fluid. The collected CBUs should be sent to the laboratory as soon as possible for priority processing, which will help to increase the number and ratio of HQCBUs and the effective use of CBB resources. © 2015 AABB.

  16. Use of cost-effectiveness analysis to determine inventory size for a national cord blood bank.

    PubMed

    Howard, David H; Meltzer, David; Kollman, Craig; Maiers, Martin; Logan, Brent; Gragert, Loren; Setterholm, Michelle; Horowitz, Mary M

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation with stem cells from stored umbilical cord blood units is an alternative to living unrelated bone marrow transplantation. The larger the inventory of stored cord units, the greater the likelihood that transplant candidates will match to a unit, but storing units is costly. The authors present the results of a study, commissioned by the Institute of Medicine, as part of a report on the establishment of a national cord blood bank, examining the optimal inventory level. They emphasize the unique challenges of undertaking cost-effectiveness analysis in this field and the contribution of the analysis to policy. The authors estimate the likelihood that transplant candidates will match to a living unrelated marrow donor or a cord blood unit as a function of cord blood inventory and then calculate the life-years gained for each transplant type by match level using historical data. They develop a model of the cord blood inventory level to estimate total costs as a function of the number of stored units. The cost per life-year gained associated with increasing inventory from 50,000 to 100,000 units is $44,000 to $86,000 and from 100,000 to 150,000 units is $64,000 to $153,000, depending on the assumption about the degree to which survival rates for cord transplants vary by match quality. Expanding the cord blood inventory above current levels is cost-effective by conventional standards. The analysis helped shape the Institute of Medicine's report, but it is difficult to determine the extent to which the analysis influenced subsequent congressional legislation.

  17. Normative evaluation of blood banks in the Brazilian Amazon region in respect to the prevention of transfusion-transmitted malaria

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Daniel Roberto Coradi; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate blood banks in the Brazilian Amazon region with regard to structure and procedures directed toward the prevention of transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM). Methods This was a normative evaluation based on the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) Resolution RDC No. 153/2004. Ten blood banks were included in the study and classified as ‘adequate’ (≥80 points), ‘partially adequate’ (from 50 to 80 points), or ‘inadequate’ (<50 points). The following components were evaluated: ‘donor education’ (5 points), ‘clinical screening’ (40 points), ‘laboratory screening’ (40 points) and ‘hemovigilance’ (15 points). Results The overall median score was 49.8 (minimum = 16; maximum = 78). Five blood banks were classified as ‘inadequate’ and five as ‘partially adequate’. The median clinical screening score was 26 (minimum = 16; maximum = 32). The median laboratory screening score was 20 (minimum = 0; maximum = 32). Eight blood banks performed laboratory tests for malaria; six tested all donations. Seven used thick smears, but only one performed this procedure in accordance with Ministry of Health requirements. One service had a Program of External Quality Evaluation for malaria testing. With regard to hemovigilance, two institutions reported having procedures to detect cases of transfusion-transmitted malaria. Conclusion Malaria is neglected as a blood–borne disease in the blood banks of the Brazilian Amazon region. None of the institutions were classified as ‘adequate’ in the overall classification or with regard to clinical screening and laboratory screening. Blood bank professionals, the Ministry of Health and Health Surveillance service managers need to pay more attention to this matter so that the safety procedures required by law are complied with. PMID:25453648

  18. An integrated data envelopment analysis-artificial neural network approach for benchmarking of bank branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahpour, Elsa; Hosseinzadeh Lotfi, Farhad; Zandieh, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency and quality of services are crucial to today's banking industries. The competition in this section has become increasingly intense, as a result of fast improvements in Technology. Therefore, performance analysis of the banking sectors attracts more attention these days. Even though data envelopment analysis (DEA) is a pioneer approach in the literature as of an efficiency measurement tool and finding benchmarks, it is on the other hand unable to demonstrate the possible future benchmarks. The drawback to it could be that the benchmarks it provides us with, may still be less efficient compared to the more advanced future benchmarks. To cover for this weakness, artificial neural network is integrated with DEA in this paper to calculate the relative efficiency and more reliable benchmarks of one of the Iranian commercial bank branches. Therefore, each branch could have a strategy to improve the efficiency and eliminate the cause of inefficiencies based on a 5-year time forecast.

  19. Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation: the 20-year experience in the Rome Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Valle, Veronica; Tamburini, Anna; Pellegrini, Maria Grazia; Strano, Sabrina; Corona, Francesca; Ambrogi, Eleonora Barbacci; Girelli, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients lacking a suitably matched and readily available related or unrelated stem cell donor. As UCB transplantation from compatible sibling provides good results in children therefore directed sibling UCB collection and banking is indicated in family who already have a child with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Particularly, related UCB collection is recommended when the patients urgently need a transplantation. To provide access to all patients in need, we developed a "Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation". Here we report results of this project started 20years ago. To date, in this study a total of 194 families were enrolled, a total of 204 UCB samples were successfully collected and 15 pediatric patients have been transplanted. Recently, some authors have suggested novel role for UCB other than in the transplantation setting. Therefore, future studies in the immunotherapy and regenerative medicine areas could expand indication for sibling directed UCB collection.

  20. Microfluidic evaluation of red cells collected and stored in modified processing solutions used in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Giebink, Adam; Spence, Dana M

    2014-01-01

    The most recent American Association of Blood Banks survey found that 40,000 units of blood are required daily for general medicine, hematology/oncology, surgery, and for accident and trauma victims. While blood transfusions are an extremely important component of critical healthcare, complications associated with transfusion of blood components still exist. It is well-established that the red blood cell (RBC) undergoes many physical and chemical changes during storage. Increased oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation endproducts, and microparticle formation are all known to occur during RBC storage. Furthermore, it is also known that patients who receive a transfusion have reduced levels of available nitric oxide (NO), a major determinant in blood flow. However, the origin of this reduced NO bioavailability is not completely understood. Here, we show that a simple modification to the glucose concentration in the solutions used to process whole blood for subsequent RBC storage results in a remarkable change in the ability of these cells to stimulate NO. In a controlled in vitro microflow system, we discovered that storage of RBCs in normoglycemic versions of standard storage solutions resulted in RBC-derived ATP release values 4 weeks into storage that were significantly greater than day 1 release values for those RBCs stored in conventional solutions. During the same storage duration, microfluidic technologies enabled measurements of endothelium-derived NO that were stimulated by the ATP release from the stored RBCs. In comparison to currently accepted processing solutions, the NO production increased by more than 25% in the presence of the RBCs stored in the normoglycemic storage solutions. Control experiments using inhibitors of ATP release from the RBCs, or ATP binding to the endothelium, strongly suggest that the increased NO production by the endothelium is directly related to the ability of the stored RBCs to release ATP. We anticipate these

  1. Proteomics of the red blood cell carbonylome during blood banking of erythrocyte concentrates.

    PubMed

    Delobel, Julien; Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2016-03-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a daily medical procedure. Erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) can be stored up to 56 days at 4 °C in saline additive solution mainly composed of adenine and sugar. Such nonphysiological conditions induce the occurrence of storage lesions, such as alterations of metabolism, protein oxidation, and deterioration of rheological properties. Their accumulation tends to decrease the main EC therapeutic property, that is, the oxygenation capacity. Protein carbonylation is a marker of oxidative stress and aging, and its occurrence during RBC storage was earlier characterized as a time-dependent and cellular compartment dependent modification. Three ECs from independent donations were followed. The carbolynome was here characterized in soluble and membrane extracts (n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside-based extraction buffer) of RBCs stored for 6, 27, and 41 days, through biotin hydrazide derivatization, biotin-avidin affinity purification, SDS-PAGE separation, and LC-MS/MS analyses. A total of 142 and 20 proteins were identified as carbonylated in soluble and membrane extracts, respectively. Particularly, a time-dependent evolution of 26.8% of the soluble carbonylome was observed. Affected cellular mechanisms involve antioxidant defenses, metabolism pathways, and proteasomal degradation. To better store RBCs those functions have to be preserved, which opens new routes of investigation in transfusion medicine. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Integrated Framework for Information Security in Mobile Banking Service Based on Smart Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong-Nyuo; Chun, Myung Geun

    Since Apple launched the iPhone service in November 2009 in Korea, smartphone banking users are increasing dramatically, forcing lenders to develop new products to deal with such demand. The bank of korea took the lead in jointing together to create a mobile banking application that each bank can adapt for its own use. In providing smartphone services, it is of critical importance to take the proper security measures, because these services, while offering excellent mobility and convenience, can be easily exposed to various infringement threats. This paper proposes a security framework that should be taken into account by the joint smartphone-based mobile banking development project. The purpose of this paper lies in recognizing the value of smartphones as well as the security threats that are exposed when smartphones are introduced, and provides countermeasures against those threats, so that an integrated information security framework for reliable smartphone-based mobile financial services can be prepared, by explicitly presenting the difference between personal computers and smartphones from the perspective of security.

  3. [High blood pressure among bank employees in Rio de Janeiro. Life-style and treatment].

    PubMed

    Chor, D

    1998-11-01

    This study estimates the frequency of treatment of high blood pressure and compares life-styles among hypertensives and non-hypertensives. Cross-sectional study in a systematic sample of 1183 employees in a government-owned bank in the State of Rio de Janeiro, through a self-administered questionnaire. Direct measurements of arterial pressure, weight and height were also taken in a sub-sample. Those who had been informed more than once as having high blood pressure, by a health professional, were classified as hypertensives. There were no important differences among hypertensives and non-hypertensives with respect to the prevalence of smoking, alcohol and physical activities. Dieting was more frequent among overweight/obese hypertensives than overweight/obese non-hypertensives. Only 44.7% were under treatment. Subjects with high level of education were more likely to be treated as were those who quit smoking, presented overweight/obesity or family history of cerebrovascular diseases. Access to information and health care was not sufficient to guarantee high blood pressure treatment or a healthy life-style which contributes to hypertension control.

  4. Investigation of the immature stage of the cord blood banks and their regulation in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinliang

    2008-12-01

    Cord blood banks (CBBs) collect umbilical cord blood and isolate therefrom the stem cells which may be transplanted into patients serving treatment of many kinds of serious diseases. As one kind of health resource, CBBs need regulation to guarantee its fair development and safe application. During the past decade, several CBBs have been established in China and related measures have been administered to regulate their establishment and manipulation. How about the actual situation of CBBs in China, including, how are they regulated and what are the problems with the CBBs in practice? Upon introduction to cord blood and the CBBs, this paper investigates the practical situation of the CBBs in China and their regulation, and explores the corresponding problems which need to be dealt with. It is held that the CBB system in China is still at an initial stage, not only for its establishment and operation, but for its regulation as well; and, therefore, justification of a more sustainable CBB system for a better development is needed in China.

  5. Plasma selenium levels in healthy blood bank donors in the central-eastern part of Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenbergh, Rudy; Robberecht, Harry; Van Vlaslaer, Veerle; De Smet, Annie; Emonds, Marie-Paule; Hermans, Nina

    2007-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, with Zeeman background correction and after improved matrix modification, was used to measure the plasma selenium content of healthy blood bank donors in the central part of Belgium. The mean plasma selenium concentration of 80 men and 80 women was 79.7+/-4.4ng/mL with a range of 55.0-117.4ng/mL. There was no gender difference observed. Plasma selenium level was significantly highest for the adult group, aged 45-64 years, compared to the others, except the young adults (18-24 years). The mean plasma selenium concentration measured corresponded well with literature data for Belgium. The obtained values were found to be in the medium range, compared with recent literature values for the European countries.

  6. Cord blood collection and banking from a population with highly diverse geographic origins increase HLA diversity in the registry and do not lower the proportion of validated cord blood units: experience of the Marseille Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, C; Magalon, J; Gilbertas, C; Gamerre, M; Le Coz, P; Berthomieu, M; Chabannon, C; Di Cristofaro, J; Picard, C

    2015-04-01

    Several Cord Blood (CB) Bank studies suggested that ethnicity impaired CB unit (CBU) qualification. The Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide registries present an over-representation of unrelated donors (UD) from Northwestern European descent. This raises the question of equality of access to hematopoietic stem cells transplant, especially in the Mediterranean zone, which has taken in many waves of immigration. The aim of our study is to address whether, in the Marseille CB Bank, CBU qualification rate is impaired by geographic origin. The study compared biological characteristics of 106 CBU disqualified for total nucleated cell (TNC) count (dCBU) and 136 qualified CBU in relation to registry enrichment and haplotype origin. A high proportion (>80%) of both dCBU and CBU had at least one non-European haplotype and enrich CB and UD registries to a higher extent than those with two European haplotypes (P<0.001). No difference was observed between TNC count and volume according to geographic origin. Our study shows that diverse Mediterranean origins do not have an impact on the CBU qualification rate. Partnership with Mediterranean birth clinics with highly trained staff is a reasonable option to increase the HLA diversity of CB Bank inventories and to improve the representation of minorities.

  7. Tissue banking in a regional hospital: a promising future concept? First report on fresh frozen tissue banking in a hospital without an integrated institute of pathology.

    PubMed

    von Strauss und Torney, Marco; Güller, Ulrich; Rezaeian, Farid; Brosi, Philippe; Terracciano, Luigi; Zuber, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Vital tissue provided by fresh frozen tissue banking is often required for genetic tumor profiling and tailored therapies. However, the potential patient benefits of fresh frozen tissue banking are currently limited to university hospitals. The objective of the present pilot study--the first one in the literature--was to evaluate whether fresh frozen tissue banking is feasible in a regional hospital without an integrated institute of pathology. Patients with resectable breast and colon cancer were included in this prospective study. Both malignant and healthy tissue were sampled using isopentan-based snap-freezing 1 h after tumor resection and stored at -80 °C before transfer to the main tissue bank of a University institute of pathology. The initial costs to set up tissue banking were 35,662 US$. Furthermore, the running costs are 1,250 US$ yearly. During the first 13 months, 43 samples (nine samples of breast cancer and 34 samples of colon cancer) were collected from 41 patients. Based on the pathology reports, there was no interference with standard histopathologic analyses due to the sample collection. This is the first report in the literature providing evidence that tissue banking in a regional hospital without an integrated institute of pathology is feasible. The interesting findings of the present pilot study must be confirmed by larger investigations.

  8. The implementation of a multinational "walking blood bank" in a combat zone: The experience of a health service team deployed to a medical treatment facility in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Garcia Hejl, Carine; Martinaud, Christophe; Macarez, Remi; Sill, Joshua; Le Golvan, Armelle; Dulou, Renaud; Longin Roche, Celine; De Rudnicki, Stephane

    2015-05-01

    We present here a description of the experience in whole-blood transfusion of a health service team deployed to a medical treatment facility in Afghanistan from June 2011 to October 2011. The aim of our work was to show how a "walking blood bank" could provide a sufficient supply. We gathered the blood-group types of military personnel deployed to the theater of operations to evaluate our "potential walking blood bank," and we compared these data with our needs. Blood type frequencies among our "potential walking blood bank" were similar to those observed in European or American countries. Our resources could have been limited because of a low frequency of B blood type and negative rhesus in our "potential walking blood bank." Because of the large number of potential donors in the theater of operations, the risk of blood shortage was quite low and we did not face blood shortage despite significant transfusion requirements. Actually, 93 blood bags were collected, including rare blood types like AB and B blood types. In our experience, this international "walking blood bank" provided a quick, safe, and sufficient blood supply. More research in this area is needed, and our results should be confirmed by further prospective trials. Therapeutic study, level V.

  9. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Results Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. Conclusion The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required. PMID:23323064

  10. How Cell Number and Cellular Properties of Blood-Banked Red Blood Cells of Different Cell Ages Decline during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Wei-Wei; Wang, Di; Liang, Wen-Jing; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Aims Numerous studies have suggested that transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) stored over a long period of time may induce harmful effects due to storage-induced lesions. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this damage have not been identified. Furthermore, it is unclear why and how up to 30% of long-stored RBCs disappear from the circulation within 24 hours after transfusion. The aim of this study was to determine how the cell number of RBCs of different ages changes during storage and how these cells undergo cumulative structural and functional changes with storage time. Methods and Results We used Percoll centrifugation to fractionate the RBCs in blood bank stored RBC units into different aged sub-populations and then measured the number of intact cells in each sub-population as well the cells’ biomechanical and biochemical parameters as functions of the storage period. We found that the RBC units stored for ≤ 14 days could be separated into four fractions: the top or young cell fraction, two middle fractions, and the lower or old fraction. However, after 14 days of storage, the cell number and cellular properties declined rapidly whereby the units stored for 21 days only exhibited the three lower fractions and not the young fraction. The cell number within a unit stored for 21 days decreased by 23% compared to a fresh unit and the cells that were lost had hemolyzed into harmful membrane fragments, microparticles, and free hemoglobin. All remaining cells exhibited cellular properties similar to those of senescent cells. Conclusion In RBC units stored for greater than 14 days, there were fewer intact cells with no healthy cells present, as well as harmful membrane fragments, microparticles, and free hemoglobin. Therefore, transfusion of these stored units would not likely help patients and may induce a series of clinical problems. PMID:25167052

  11. The role of failure modes and effects analysis in showing the benefits of automation in the blood bank.

    PubMed

    Han, Tae Hee; Kim, Moon Jung; Kim, Shinyoung; Kim, Hyun Ok; Lee, Mi Ae; Choi, Ji Seon; Hur, Mina; St John, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a risk management tool used by the manufacturing industry but now being applied in laboratories. Teams from six South Korean blood banks used this tool to map their manual and automated blood grouping processes and determine the risk priority numbers (RPNs) as a total measure of error risk. The RPNs determined by each of the teams consistently showed that the use of automation dramatically reduced the RPN compared to manual processes. In addition, FMEA showed where the major risks occur in each of the manual processes and where attention should be prioritized to improve the process. Despite no previous experience with FMEA, the teams found the technique relatively easy to use and the subjectivity associated with assigning risk numbers did not affect the validity of the data. FMEA should become a routine technique for improving processes in laboratories. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out. PMID:27034840

  13. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out.

  14. [Prevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in blood bank donors from the IMSS General Hospital in Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ligonio, Angel; Ramírez-Sánchez, Michaía Elián; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; López-Monteon, Aracely

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in blood donors from Hospital General Regional (HGRO) of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS per its abbreviation in Spanish). Between October 2001 and January 2002, blood samples were collected from voluntary donors at the blood bank of the Hospital General Regional of IMSS in Orizaba; Veracruz, Mexico. The samples were assayed for anti-T. cruzi by ELISA, Western blot and IFI, using a recombinant protein (MBP::Hsp70), and crude extract from epimastigotes. A total of 420 blood donors were studied; two of them were seropositive for ELISA,Western blot and IFI, with a seroprevalence of 0.48%. Some blood donors at the HGRO hospital were seropositive for T. cruzi, showing the risk of contamination by blood transfusion. Routine serologic screening with highly sensitive and specific immunological techniques are needed.

  15. A new strategy for umbilical cord blood collection developed at the first Colombian public cord blood bank increases total nucleated cell content.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Diana; Triviño, Lady; Galindo, Cristian; Franco, Leidy; Salguero, Gustavo; Camacho, Bernardo; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana-María

    2017-09-01

    The total nucleated cell dosage of umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important factor in determining successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after a minimum human leukocyte antigen donor-recipient match. The northern South American population is in need of a new-generation cord blood bank that cryopreserves only units with high total nucleated cell content, thereby increasing the likelihood of use. Colombia set up a public cord blood bank in 2014; and, as a result of its research for improving high total nucleated cell content, a new strategy for UCB collection was developed. Data from 2933 collected and 759 cryopreserved cord blood units between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed. The correlation of donor and collection variables with cellularity was evaluated. Moreover, blood volume, cell content, CD34+ count, clonogenic capacity, and microbial contamination were assessed comparing the new method, which combines in utero and ex utero techniques, with the conventional strategies. Multivariate analysis confirmed a correlation between neonatal birth weight and cell content. The new collection method increased total nucleated cell content in approximately 26% and did not alter pre-cryopreservation and post-thaw cell recovery, viability, or clonogenic ability. Furthermore, it showed a remarkably low microbial contamination rate (1.2%). The strategy for UCB collection developed at the first Colombian public cord blood bank increases total nucleated cell content and does not affect unit quality. The existence of this bank is a remarkable breakthrough for Latin-American patients in need of this kind of transplantation. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  16. Integrative regulation of human brain blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Fisher, Joseph A; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we review mechanisms regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF), with specific focus on humans. We revisit important concepts from the older literature and describe the interaction of various mechanisms of cerebrovascular control. We amalgamate this broad scope of information into a brief review, rather than detailing any one mechanism or area of research. The relationship between regulatory mechanisms is emphasized, but the following three broad categories of control are explicated: (1) the effect of blood gases and neuronal metabolism on CBF; (2) buffering of CBF with changes in blood pressure, termed cerebral autoregulation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system in CBF regulation. With respect to these control mechanisms, we provide evidence against several canonized paradigms of CBF control. Specifically, we corroborate the following four key theses: (1) that cerebral autoregulation does not maintain constant perfusion through a mean arterial pressure range of 60–150 mmHg; (2) that there is important stimulatory synergism and regulatory interdependence of arterial blood gases and blood pressure on CBF regulation; (3) that cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular sensitivity to changes in arterial blood gases are not modulated solely at the pial arterioles; and (4) that neurogenic control of the cerebral vasculature is an important player in autoregulatory function and, crucially, acts to buffer surges in perfusion pressure. Finally, we summarize the state of our knowledge with respect to these areas, outline important gaps in the literature and suggest avenues for future research. PMID:24396059

  17. Convalescent transfusion for pandemic influenza: preparing blood banks for a new plasma product?

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Brunker, Patricia A R; Ness, Paul M

    2010-06-01

    Due to the potential of a severe pandemic to limit efficacy or availability of medical countermeasures, some researchers have begun a search for new interventions that could complement the planned antiviral- and vaccine-based response to an influenza pandemic. One such countermeasure-the transfusion of pandemic influenza-specific antibodies from surviving patients to the clinically ill-is the focus of this commentary. Passive immunotherapy, which includes the use of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), hyperimmune globulin, or convalescent plasma, had been used before the advent of antibiotics and has recently reentered the limelight due to the accelerating development of MoAb therapies against cancer, a number of microbes, allograft rejection, and a host of other conditions. After the plausible biologic mechanism and somewhat limited data supporting the efficacy for this modality against influenza are reviewed, safety and logistical concerns for utilization of this potential new product (fresh convalescent plasma against influenza [FCP-Flu]) are discussed. FCP-Flu could indeed prove useful in a response to a pandemic, but two necessary items must first be satisfied. Most importantly, more research should be conducted to establish FCP-Flu efficacy against the current and other pandemic strains. Second, and also importantly, blood banks and donor centers should examine whether offering this new product would be feasible in a pandemic and begin planning before a more severe pandemic forces us to respond without adequate preparation.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative cell recovery in umbilical cord blood processed by two automated devices in routine cord blood banking: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Solves, Pilar; Planelles, Dolores; Mirabet, Vicente; Blanquer, Amando; Carbonell-Uberos, Francisco

    2013-07-01

    Volume reduction is a widely used procedure in umbilical cord blood banking. It concentrates progenitor cells by reducing plasma and red blood cells, thereby optimising the use of storage space. Sepax and AXP are automated systems specifically developed for umbilical cord blood processing. These systems basically consist of a bag processing set into which cord blood is transferred and a device that automatically separates the different components during centrifugation. The aim of this study was to analyse and compare cell recovery of umbilical cord blood units processed with Sepax and AXP at Valencia Cord Blood Bank. Cell counts were performed before and after volume reduction with AXP and Sepax. When analysing all the data (n =1,000 for AXP and n= 670 for Sepax), the percentages of total nucleated cell recovery and red blood cell depletion were 76.76 ± 7.51% and 88.28 ± 5.62%, respectively, for AXP and 78.81 ± 7.25% and 88.32 ± 7.94%, respectively, for Sepax (P <0.005 for both variables). CD34(+) cell recovery and viability in umbilical cord blood units were similar with both devices. Mononuclear cell recovery was significantly higher when the Sepax system was used. Both the Sepax and AXP automated systems achieve acceptable total nucleated cell recovery and good CD34(+) cell recovery after volume reduction of umbilical cord blood units and maintain cell viability. It should be noted that total nucleated cell recovery is significantly better with the Sepax system. Both systems deplete red blood cells efficiently, especially AXP which works without hydroxyethyl starch.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative cell recovery in umbilical cord blood processed by two automated devices in routine cord blood banking: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Solves, Pilar; Planelles, Dolores; Mirabet, Vicente; Blanquer, Amando; Carbonell-Uberos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Background Volume reduction is a widely used procedure in umbilical cord blood banking. It concentrates progenitor cells by reducing plasma and red blood cells, thereby optimising the use of storage space. Sepax and AXP are automated systems specifically developed for umbilical cord blood processing. These systems basically consist of a bag processing set into which cord blood is transferred and a device that automatically separates the different components during centrifugation. Methods The aim of this study was to analyse and compare cell recovery of umbilical cord blood units processed with Sepax and AXP at Valencia Cord Blood Bank. Cell counts were performed before and after volume reduction with AXP and Sepax. Results When analysing all the data (n =1,000 for AXP and n= 670 for Sepax), the percentages of total nucleated cell recovery and red blood cell depletion were 76.76±7.51% and 88.28±5.62%, respectively, for AXP and 78.81±7.25% and 88.32±7.94%, respectively, for Sepax (P <0.005 for both variables). CD34+ cell recovery and viability in umbilical cord blood units were similar with both devices. Mononuclear cell recovery was significantly higher when the Sepax system was used. Discussion Both the Sepax and AXP automated systems achieve acceptable total nucleated cell recovery and good CD34+ cell recovery after volume reduction of umbilical cord blood units and maintain cell viability. It should be noted that total nucleated cell recovery is significantly better with the Sepax system. Both systems deplete red blood cells efficiently, especially AXP which works without hydroxyethyl starch. PMID:23058859

  20. Methodological Guidelines for Reducing the Complexity of Data Warehouse Development for Transactional Blood Bank Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takecian, Pedro L.; Oikawa, Marcio K.; Braghetto, Kelly R.; Rocha, Paulo; Lucena, Fred; Kavounis, Katherine; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Acker, Susan; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B. F.; Sabino, Ester C.; Custer, Brian; Busch, Michael P.; Ferreira, João E.

    2013-01-01

    Over time, data warehouse (DW) systems have become more difficult to develop because of the growing heterogeneity of data sources. Despite advances in research and technology, DW projects are still too slow for pragmatic results to be generated. Here, we address the following question: how can the complexity of DW development for integration of heterogeneous transactional information systems be reduced? To answer this, we proposed methodological guidelines based on cycles of conceptual modeling and data analysis, to drive construction of a modular DW system. These guidelines were applied to the blood donation domain, successfully reducing the complexity of DW development. PMID:23729945

  1. Methodological Guidelines for Reducing the Complexity of Data Warehouse Development for Transactional Blood Bank Systems.

    PubMed

    Takecian, Pedro L; Oikawa, Marcio K; Braghetto, Kelly R; Rocha, Paulo; Lucena, Fred; Kavounis, Katherine; Schlumpf, Karen S; Acker, Susan; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B F; Sabino, Ester C; Custer, Brian; Busch, Michael P; Ferreira, João E

    2013-06-01

    Over time, data warehouse (DW) systems have become more difficult to develop because of the growing heterogeneity of data sources. Despite advances in research and technology, DW projects are still too slow for pragmatic results to be generated. Here, we address the following question: how can the complexity of DW development for integration of heterogeneous transactional information systems be reduced? To answer this, we proposed methodological guidelines based on cycles of conceptual modeling and data analysis, to drive construction of a modular DW system. These guidelines were applied to the blood donation domain, successfully reducing the complexity of DW development.

  2. Blood Pressure Regulation: Every Adaptation is an Integration?

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Michael J.; Limberg, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    This focused review serves to explore relevant issues in regard to blood pressure regulation and by doing so, provides the initial stimulus paper for the Thematic Review series “Blood Pressure Regulation” to be published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology over the coming months. In this introduction, we highlight how variable normal blood pressure can be and challenge the reader to take another look at some key concepts related to blood pressure regulation. We point out that there is frequently an underappreciated balance between peripheral vasodilation and systemic blood pressure regulation and ask the question: Are changes in blood pressure, in effect, reasonable and integrated adaptations to the physiological challenge at hand? We conclude with the idea that blood pressure regulatory systems are both flexible and redundant; ensuring a wide variety of activities associated with life can be accompanied by a perfusion pressure that can serve multiple masters. PMID:23558925

  3. Organochlorine contaminants in blubber of four seal species: integrating biomonitoring and specimen banking.

    PubMed

    Krahn, M M; Becker, P R; Tilbury, K L; Stein, J E

    1997-05-01

    Blubber samples from four Alaska seal species (bearded seal, Erignathus barbatus, harbor seal, Phoca vitulina, northern fur seal, Callorhinus ursinus, ringed seal, P. hispida) were collected for inclusion in the US National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank, as well as for immediate analysis as part of the contaminant monitoring component of the US National Marine Fisheries Service's Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program. The blubber samples were analyzed for organochlorine (OC) contaminants (e.g., PCB congeners, pesticides, DDTs). Results for bearded and ringed seals from the Alaska Arctic revealed low blubber concentrations of OC contaminants. Harbor seals from Prince William Sound. Gulf of Alaska, had somewhat higher blubber concentrations of OC contaminants. In contrast, northern fur seals sampled from the Pribilof Islands had blubber concentrations of certain OC contaminants that were about an order of magnitude higher than those found in the other seal species. Differences in contaminant concentrations among the Alaska seals may be explained by differences in feeding habits and migratory patterns, age or gender did not appear to account for the differences observed. The highest concentrations of OCs were found in harbor seals stranded along the northwestern US mainland, which is consistent with higher concentrations of anthropogenic contaminants being found in urban coastal areas than in more remote Arctic environments. The integration of real-time contaminant monitoring with specimen banking provides important baseline data that can be used to plan and manage banking activities. This includes identifying appropriate specimens that are useful in assessing temporal trends and increasing the utility of the banked samples in assessing chemical contaminant accumulation and relationships to biological effects.

  4. Military Blood Banking. Immunohematology for the Reference and Forensic Testing Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    blood components and plasmapheresis, donor immunization and hyperimmunization, tissue transplantation, scientific treatises in blood group immunology, consumption coagulopathy, and blood group antigens stored over five months in

  5. Seroprevalence and trends in transfusion transmitted infections among blood donors in a university hospital blood bank: a 5 year study.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, P; Ganesh, C K; Jayashree, K; Manjunath, G V

    2011-03-01

    Blood is life. Transfusion of blood and blood components, as a specialized modality of patient management saves millions of lives worldwide each year and reduce morbidity. It is well known that blood transfusion is associated with a large number of complications, some are only trivial and others are potentially life threatening, demanding for meticulous pretransfusion testing and screening particularly for transfusion transmissible infections (TTI). These TTI are a threat to blood safety. The priority objective of BTS is thus to ensure safety, adequacy, accessibility and efficiency of blood supply at all levels. The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence and trend of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI) among voluntary and replacement donors in the Department of Blood bank and transfusion Medicine of JSS College Hospital, a teaching hospital of Mysore during the period from 2004 to 2008. A retrospective review of donors record covering the period between 2004 and 2008 at the blood bank, JSS Hospital, Mysore was carried out. All samples were screened for HIV, HBsAg, HCV, syphilis and malaria. Of the 39,060, 25,303 (64.78%) were voluntary donors and the remaining 13,757 (35.22%) were replacement donors. The overall prevalence of HIV, HbsAg, HCV and syphilis were 0.44, 1.27, 0.23 and 0.28%, respectively. No blood donor tested showed positivity for malarial parasite. Majority were voluntary donors with male preponderance. In all the markers tested there was increased prevalence of TTI among the replacement donors as compared to voluntary donors. With the implementation of strict donor criteria and use of sensitive screening tests, it may be possible to reduce the incidence of TTI in the Indian scenario.

  6. Banking Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Stem Cells: Awareness, Attitude and Expectations of Potential Donors from One of the Largest Potential Repository (India).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Deeksha; Kaur, Simar; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    The concept of Umbilical Cord blood (UCB) stem cells is emerging as a non-invasive, efficacious alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells to treat a variety of blood and bone marrow diseases, blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune deficiencies. Aim of the present study was to determine the level of awareness about banking UCB among pregnant women in India. We also assessed patient perception for banking of UCB and explored the patient expectations of banking UCB in future. This is the first study to assess current attitudes, in a sample population of potential donors from one of the largest potential UCB repository (India). Obtaining this information may help optimize recruitment efforts and improve patient education. Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 254 pregnant women in the final analysis. We established only 26.5% pregnant women in our study population knew what exactly is meant by UCB. A large proportion (55.1%) was undecided on whether they want to bank UCB or not. Women were more aware of the more advertised private cord blood banking compared to public banking. More than half of the pregnant women expected their obstetrician to inform them regarding UCB. One-third of the women in our population had undue expectations from banking of the UCB. Obstetricians should play a more active role in explaining the patients regarding pros and cons of UCB banking.

  7. Banking Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Stem Cells: Awareness, Attitude and Expectations of Potential Donors from One of the Largest Potential Repository (India)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Deeksha

    2016-01-01

    Background The concept of Umbilical Cord blood (UCB) stem cells is emerging as a non-invasive, efficacious alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells to treat a variety of blood and bone marrow diseases, blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune deficiencies. Aim of the present study was to determine the level of awareness about banking UCB among pregnant women in India. We also assessed patient perception for banking of UCB and explored the patient expectations of banking UCB in future. This is the first study to assess current attitudes, in a sample population of potential donors from one of the largest potential UCB repository (India). Obtaining this information may help optimize recruitment efforts and improve patient education. Material and Method Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 254 pregnant women in the final analysis. Results We established only 26.5% pregnant women in our study population knew what exactly is meant by UCB. A large proportion (55.1%) was undecided on whether they want to bank UCB or not. Women were more aware of the more advertised private cord blood banking compared to public banking. More than half of the pregnant women expected their obstetrician to inform them regarding UCB. One-third of the women in our population had undue expectations from banking of the UCB. Conclusion Obstetricians should play a more active role in explaining the patients regarding pros and cons of UCB banking. PMID:27228155

  8. Analysis of stored and transplanted cord blood units from KoreaCORD: reappraisal of banking guidelines and selection strategy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kwon, Young-Hee; Hwang, Kyoujung; Jun, Hyunju; Lee, Mi-Ae; Jang, Hyung-In; Nah, Jung-Hwa; Koo, Hong-Hoe; Hwang, Tai-Ju

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the characteristics of stored and transplanted cord blood (CB) units from the Korean network for public CB donation (KoreaCORD) to reassess the banking guidelines and optimize CB selection based on cell dose and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatching. We retrospectively reviewed data, with regard to total nucleated cell (TNC) count and HLA match in the KoreaCORD registry from August 2001 to December 2010. A total of 21,914 CB units have been registered, of which 904 units (4.1%) contained less than 5 × 10(8) TNCs, which did not meet the present storage criteria for public CB banking in Korea. Although the proportion of stored CBs providing TNC of 5 × 10(8) to 7.9 × 10(8) was 45.7%, only 22.0% of all transplanted CBs were derived from these stored CBs. In the single CB transplantation setting, 79% (85/108) of CB units provided 4 × 10(7) TNCs/kg or more in the transplanted one-mismatch (1-MM) CB units and 51% (19/37) of CBs provided 6 × 10(7) TNCs/kg or more in the transplanted 2-MM CB units. The minimal requirement of TNCs for banking of CB units for public banking should be evaluated and increased to support the selection of CB units with higher cell doses, especially for use in the 1- and 2-MM transplant settings. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. A prenatal prediction model for total nucleated cell count increases the efficacy of umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Manegold-Brauer, Gwendolin; Borner, Barbara; Bucher, Christoph; Hoesli, Irène; Passweg, Jakob; Girsberger, Sabine; Schoetzau, Andreas; Gisin, Simona; Visca, Eva

    2014-11-01

    The most important factor for the selection of an umbilical cord blood unit (CBU) for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the total nucleated cell (TNC) count as a surrogate marker for stem cell content in the CBU. At present, about one in five donors can provide a CBU with a sufficient TNC count for umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking. It is labor-intensive to obtain consent of all eligible donors and optimization of the selection is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate prenatal clinical predictors for TNC count that would help to identify successful UCB donors already on admission to the delivery unit. This study was a retrospective analysis of 758 cryopreserved CBUs, collected from 2002 to 2006. Maternal and fetal factors analyzed were maternal age, gravidity, parity, weight, height, diabetes, premature rupture of membranes, gestational age, fetal sex, and birthweight. The impact on a high TNC count (<150 × 10(7) vs. ≥ 150 × 10(7)) of the CBU was modeled in a multivariate analysis model. Fetal birthweight was the strongest predictor (p < 0.001) of TNC count of at least 150 × 10(7). With a composite score of parity, gestational week, maternal weight and height, fetal sex, and birthweight, a nomogram was developed that increased banking rates from 22.7% to 31.9% while decreasing the number of banked CBUs from 149 to 79. Our prenatal prediction model increases the efficacy of obtaining informed consent for UCB banking while still allowing relevant numbers of CBUs to be banked. © 2014 AABB.

  10. Business on hope: a case study on private cord blood stem cell banking.

    PubMed

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop

    2008-04-01

    Traditionally, medical practice has been recognized as one of the professional practices with high honors. The interaction between physicians and patients is to provide health care services without the profit orientation. In modernized economy and in today's world of business, the relationship between doctors and patients has been dramatically changed. This transformation is very obvious in the private sector. Health care providers sell their services. Patients have been approached as customers. Decisions to make an investment on new medical technologies or new services would accompany with careful consideration on cost-benefit ratio, on marketing and also on short and long term return of the investment. However most of the medical services available in the past were focusing on the "real" and "tangible" products. This means that the patients or the customers would obtain diagnosis, treatment, palliation or prevention for the fees they paid. They can at least obtain and can feel some direct or indirect health benefits from the services. With the advancement of science and technology, there is recently a new model of business that sells only the hope for future use. Private cord blood stem cell banking is a good example for this business model. Actually, business on hope is not the brand new business model. Insurance is a well-known classical prototype of business on hope. However, when this kind of business model is applied for medical services, there should be some precautions and also intervention including an oversight system from the government sector to make sure that all the information delivered to the clients and family is accurate and unbiased. From the public policy perspective, this business of hope should be appropriately regulated to preserve consumer rights while promoting the advancement of science and technology through sustainable business development.

  11. Family directed umbilical cord blood banking for acute leukemia: usage rate in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Screnci, M; Murgi, E; Tamburini, A; Pecci, M R; Ballatore, G; Cusanno, A; Valle, V; Luciani, P; Corona, F; Girelli, G

    2015-04-01

    Family-directed umbilical cord blood (UCB) collection and banking is indicated in women delivering healthy babies who already have a member of their own family with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) transplantation (HSCT). The rapid availability of UCB is an important issue in HSCs procurement particularly for recipients with acute leukemia who urgently need HSCT. The aims of this study were to assess the usage rate of family UCB collections directed to patients with acute leukemia and to investigate the factors influencing the usage rate. A total of 113 families were enrolled, 118 UCB units were successfully collected and one collection failed due to emergency occurred during delivery. Among these, 7 collections were required for children who were in urgent need of a transplant: three HLA-matched units were successfully transplanted, respectively after 2, 5 and 6 months from collection; three collections resulted HLA-mismatched, while HLA-typing is pending for one unit. The remaining collections were mostly required for potential future use, among these units only one was transplanted in a HLA compatible sibling after 3 years and 4 months from collection. After a median time of storage of 8.5 years (range 0.1-20 years) a total of 4/118 (3.4 %) collection has been transplanted. During this time interval, considering only patients who have had the need of a transplant, the main factor influencing low utilization rate of UCB collections was due to HLA disparity, indeed among typed UCB unit mostly (77 %) resulted HLA mismatched with the intended recipient.

  12. Reduction of hepatitis B seroprevalence in blood banking units by combined utilization of self-exclusion forms and clinical evaluation of blood donation candidates in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yenicesu, Idil; Dilsiz, Günter; Oztürk, Gülyüz

    2008-04-01

    In this retrospectively designed study, we evaluate the influence of the permanence and qualifications of health-care professionals on blood disposal rates due to hepatitis seropositivity. We observed a decrease of 44.2% in the number of blood units being rejected due to the donor's hepatitis B seropositivity in the second study period in which self-exclusion forms and where blood donation candidates were evaluated by a family physician. However, a similar decrease of the disposal rate due to hepatitis C seropositivity was not observed. This is especially important in countries which cannot afford many of the expensive modern laboratory tests. A comprehensive evaluation of self-exclusion forms and a brief examination prior to donation will greatly increase transfusion safety. Unfortunately, there are blood banks in Turkey which employ no physicians at all.

  13. An experience of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue Innova) in a regional acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuk Wah; Wilkinson, Jenny M

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova) in a hospital blood bank by considering the performance and workflow as compared with manual methods. The turnaround time was found to be 45% faster than the manual method. The concordance rate was found to be 100% for both ABO/Rh(D) typing and antibody screening in both of the systems and there was no significant difference in detection sensitivity for clinically significant antibodies. The Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova automated blood banking system streamlined the routine pre-transfusion testing in hospital blood bank with high throughput, equivalent sensitivity and reliability as compared with conventional manual method.

  14. Quality of care for obstetric emergencies in 4 general hospitals in Egypt: an observational study of delays in receiving care and blood bank services.

    PubMed

    Nada, K H; Barakat, A A; Gipson, R

    2011-01-01

    A lack of available blood contributes to 16% of all maternal deaths in Egypt. This study aimed to assess the quality of care for obstetric emergencies in 4 general hospitals in Egypt over a 6-month period with the focus on delays in receiving care and blood bank services. Observations were made of the processes and delays in the clinical setting, from the start of each patient's complaint until discharge, and the receipt and filling of orders for blood at the blood bank. Patients failed to recognize danger signs. Lack of transportation, incorrect choice of provider or facility and unclear referral systems added further delays. Delays occurred in hospital admission, assessment of patients, initiation of resuscitation, initiation of medical or surgical interventions, ordering blood, J receipt of blood and administration of blood to patients. The blood ordering procedures were substandard. Lack of blood availability had multidisciplinary causes.

  15. Predictive Modeling of Massive Transfusion Requirements During Liver Transplantation and Its Potential to Reduce Utilization of Blood Bank Resources.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Lesley, Maggie; Ariyo, Promise; Latif, Asad; Villamayor, April J; Frank, Steven M; Rizkalla, Nicole; Merritt, William; Cameron, Andrew; Dagher, Nabil; Philosophe, Benjamin; Gurakar, Ahmet; Gottschalk, Allan

    2017-05-01

    Patients undergoing liver transplantation frequently but inconsistently require massive blood transfusion. The ability to predict massive transfusion (MT) could reduce the impact on blood bank resources through customization of the blood order schedule. Current predictive models of MT for blood product utilization during liver transplantation are not generally applicable to individual institutions owing to variability in patient population, intraoperative management, and definitions of MT. Moreover, existing models may be limited by not incorporating cirrhosis stage or thromboelastography (TEG) parameters. This retrospective cohort study included all patients who underwent deceased-donor liver transplantation at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2010 and 2014. We defined MT as intraoperative transfusion of > 10 units of packed red blood cells (pRBCs) and developed a multivariable predictive model of MT that incorporated cirrhosis stage and TEG parameters. The accuracy of the model was assessed with the goodness-of-fit test, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and bootstrap resampling. The distribution of correct patient classification was then determined as we varied the model threshold for classifying MT. Finally, the potential impact of these predictions on blood bank resources was examined. Two hundred three patients were included in the study. Sixty (29.6%) patients met the definition for MT and received a median (interquartile range) of 19.0 (14.0-27.0) pRBC units intraoperatively compared with 4.0 units (1.0-6.0) for those who did not satisfy the criterion for MT. The multivariable model for predicting MT included Model for End-stage Liver Disease score, whether simultaneous liver and kidney transplant was performed, cirrhosis stage, hemoglobin concentration, platelet concentration, and TEG R interval and angle. This model demonstrated good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test P = .45) and good discrimination (c statistic: 0.835; 95

  16. Prothrombin activation fragment 1 + 2 as a marker of coagulation activation in cord blood collection for banking.

    PubMed

    Juutistenaho, S; Vahtera, E; Aranko, K; Kekomäki, R

    2010-08-01

    There have been efforts to increase the quality of cord blood (CB) collections aimed at banking and transplantation. Yet, the effect of CB collection techniques on haemostatic activation is scarcely studied, despite the unique nature of the neonatal haemostatic system. The aim of this study was to explore coagulation system and platelet (PLT) activation during CB collection at a national CB bank. At three time points over a 9-year period (in 1998, 2000 and 2006), CB collections were assessed to evaluate the collection process during bank setup and changes in procedures. Thrombin generation and PLT activation were assessed with prothrombin activation fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) and PLT factor 4 (PF4), respectively. The median F1 + 2 level was 2.8 nmol L(-1) in 1998 (n = 11), 0.7 nmol L(-1) in 2000 (n = 10) and 0.7 nmol L(-1) in 2006 (n = 6), the decrease being statistically significant (1998 vs 2000, P < 0.001; 1998 vs 2006, P = 0.01). The median PF4 level was 117 IU mL(-1) in 1998 and 104 IU mL(-1) in 2000. PF4 was not measured in 2006. The level of F1 + 2 correlated with that of PF4 (n = 21; Spearman's Rho = 0.59, P = 0.006). Haemostatic activation, assessed as a part of CB bank process control, decreased from the first to the subsequent sample series. F1 + 2 may be a candidate for quality control in CB banking; however, further studies are needed to optimise the analyses and to assess the effect of haemostatic activation on CB quality.

  17. Long-Term Quality Control Program Plan for Cord Blood Banks in Korea: A Pilot Study for Cryopreservation Stability.

    PubMed

    Seo, Soo Hyun; Shin, Sue; Roh, Eun Youn; Song, Eun Young; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Byoung Jae; Yoon, Jong Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Maintaining the quality of cryopreserved cord blood is crucial. In this pilot study, we describe the results of the internal quality control program for a cord blood bank thus far. Donated cord blood units unsuitable for transplantation were selected for internal quality control once a month. One unit of cord blood, aliquoted into 21 capillaries, was cryopreserved and thawed annually to analyze the total nucleated cell count, CD34⁺ cell count, cell viability test, and colony-forming units assay. No significant differences in the variables (total nucleated cell count, cell viability, CD34⁺ cell count) were observed between samples cryopreserved for one and two years. Upon comparing the variables before cryopreservation and post thawing with the capillaries of one year of storage, cell viability and CD34⁺ cell counts decreased significantly. The use of cord blood samples in capillaries, which can be easily stored for a long period, was similar to the methods used for testing segments attached to the cord blood unit. The results of this study may be useful for determining the period during which the quality of cryopreserved cord blood units used for transplantation is maintained.

  18. Long-Term Quality Control Program Plan for Cord Blood Banks in Korea: A Pilot Study for Cryopreservation Stability

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Soo Hyun; Shin, Sue; Roh, Eun Youn; Song, Eun Young; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Byoung Jae

    2017-01-01

    Background Maintaining the quality of cryopreserved cord blood is crucial. In this pilot study, we describe the results of the internal quality control program for a cord blood bank thus far. Methods Donated cord blood units unsuitable for transplantation were selected for internal quality control once a month. One unit of cord blood, aliquoted into 21 capillaries, was cryopreserved and thawed annually to analyze the total nucleated cell count, CD34+ cell count, cell viability test, and colony-forming units assay. Results No significant differences in the variables (total nucleated cell count, cell viability, CD34+ cell count) were observed between samples cryopreserved for one and two years. Upon comparing the variables before cryopreservation and post thawing with the capillaries of one year of storage, cell viability and CD34+ cell counts decreased significantly. The use of cord blood samples in capillaries, which can be easily stored for a long period, was similar to the methods used for testing segments attached to the cord blood unit. Conclusions The results of this study may be useful for determining the period during which the quality of cryopreserved cord blood units used for transplantation is maintained. PMID:28028998

  19. Development of stem cells from umbilical cord blood and blood banking: "non-controversial" and "free of political and ethical debate"?

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane

    2012-03-01

    Opponents of human embryo research have understandably welcomed pluripotent stem cells being derived from body cells including cells from umbilical cords after childbirth. The cord would otherwise be discarded and embryos are not destroyed. However, there are other ethical, legal and political issues in cord blood collection, whether for the child's future use, or a public blood bank. Information and consent procedures may be misleading. Some parents have false hopes about potential outcomes. The right of access to stored blood and other benefits is sometimes uncertain for children and their families. Private stem cell repositories may compete with public ones. People may want to impose conditions on donation. Quality control may be an issue.

  20. Establishing a public umbilical cord blood stem cell bank for South Africa: an enquiry into public acceptability.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    South Africa (SA) faces a large unmet need for bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which could be alleviated in part by establishing a public umbilical cord blood stem cell bank (UCB SCB). Umbilical cord blood is an increasingly utilised source of hematopoietic stem cells for BM transplantation in addition to BM or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. Establishing a public UCB SCB would therefore be a positive step towards improving the quality of health care in SA by providing for an important unmet need. This study takes the form of an enquiry into the acceptability of establishing a public bank through an interview with and questionnaire completed by mothers-to-be in the antenatal clinic of a large public hospital in SA. Initial results are positive, with 85 % of the participants in favour of establishing a public UCB SCB in SA. This initial probe will serve as a model for a more comprehensive national enquiry into public support and acceptability in different clinics, hospitals and provinces in SA.

  1. Isolation of three important types of stem cells from the same samples of banked umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Phuc, Pham Van; Ngoc, Vu Bich; Lam, Dang Hoang; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Viet, Pham Quoc; Ngoc, Phan Kim

    2012-06-01

    It is known that umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a rich source of stem cells with practical and ethical advantages. Three important types of stem cells which can be harvested from umbilical cord blood and used in disease treatment are hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Since these stem cells have shown enormous potential in regenerative medicine, numerous umbilical cord blood banks have been established. In this study, we examined the ability of banked UCB collected to produce three types of stem cells from the same samples with characteristics of HSCs, MSCs and EPCs. We were able to obtain homogeneous plastic rapidly-adherent cells (with characteristics of MSCs), slowly-adherent (with characteristics of EPCs) and non-adherent cells (with characteristics of HSCs) from the mononuclear cell fractions of cryopreserved UCB. Using a protocol of 48 h supernatant transferring, we successfully isolated MSCs which expressed CD13, CD44 and CD90 while CD34, CD45 and CD133 negative, had typical fibroblast-like shape, and was able to differentiate into adipocytes; EPCs which were CD34, and CD90 positive, CD13, CD44, CD45 and CD133 negative, adherent with cobble-like shape; HSCs which formed colonies when cultured in MethoCult medium.

  2. Ethical issues in umbilical cord blood banking: a comparative analysis of documents from national and international institutions.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    The issues of collection, storage, and use of cord blood (CB) stem cells have been addressed extensively in national and international guidelines, policies, and regulations. Many of these documents are not binding, but are nonetheless accorded considerable respect on account of the authority of the issuing organizations. Most discussion has to date focused on two topics: informed consent for collection, banking, and use and the debate between those who favor public storage for altruistic purposes and those who advocate private storage for autologous use. There is generally agreement or consensus in the guidelines that public storage for allogeneic transplants is preferable and that private storage should be discouraged. Given the consensus in national and international guidance on these two issues, it is time for other ethical issues to be examined in greater detail. These include additional uses of CB samples, for example, for research or for the production of blood-derived drugs, and the economic implications arising from the extensive international network for the exchange of CB for transplantation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Impact of cord blood banking technologies on clinical outcome: a Eurocord/Cord Blood Committee (CTIWP), European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and NetCord retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Saccardi, Riccardo; Tucunduva, Luciana; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Ionescu, Irina; Koegler, Gesine; Querol, Sergio; Grazzini, Giuliano; Lecchi, Lucilla; Nanni Costa, Alessandro; Navarrete, Cristina; Pouthiers, Fabienne; Larghero, Jerome; Regan, Donna; Freeman, Taryn; Bittencourt, Henrique; Kenzey, Chantal; Labopin, Myriam; Baudoux, Etienne; Rocha, Vanderson; Gluckman, Eliane

    2016-08-01

    Techniques for banking cord blood units (CBUs) as source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been developed over the past 20 years, aimed to improve laboratory efficiency without altering the biologic properties of the graft. A large-scale, registry-based assessment of the impact of the banking variables on the clinical outcome is currently missing. A total of 677 single cord blood transplants (CBTs) carried out for acute leukemia in complete remission in centers affiliated with the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation were selected. An extensive set of data concerning CBU banking were collected and correlations with clinical outcome were assessed. Clinical endpoints were transplant-related mortality, engraftment, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The median time between collection and CBT was 4.1 years (range, 0.2-16.3 years). Volume reduction (VR) of CBUs before freezing was performed in 59.2% of available reports; in half of these the frozen volume was less than 30 mL. Cumulative incidences of neutrophil engraftment on Day 60, 100-day acute GVHD (II-IV), and 4-year chronic GVHD were 87, 29, and 21 ± 2%. The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 100 days and 4-year NRM were, respectively, 16 ± 2 and 30 ± 2%. Neither the variables related to banking procedures nor the interval between collection and CBT influenced the clinical outcome. These findings indicate a satisfactory validation of the techniques associated with CBU VR across the banks. Cell viability assessment varied among the banks, suggesting that efforts to improve the standardization of CBU quality controls are needed. © 2016 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  4. 45 CFR 61.15 - How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information by the...

  5. 45 CFR 61.15 - How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information by the Healthcare...

  6. Utility of the microculture method for Leishmania detection in non-invasive samples obtained from a blood bank.

    PubMed

    Ates, Sezen Canim; Bagirova, Malahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kocazeybek, Bekir; Kosan, Erdogan

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the role of donor blood has taken an important place in epidemiology of Leishmaniasis. According to the WHO, the numbers of patients considered as symptomatic are only 5-20% of individuals with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. In this study for detection of Leishmania infection in donor blood samples, 343 samples from the Capa Red Crescent Blood Center were obtained and primarily analyzed by microscopic and serological methods. Subsequently, the traditional culture (NNN), Immuno-chromatographic test (ICT) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were applied to 21 samples which of them were found positive with at least one method. Buffy coat (BC) samples from 343 blood donors were analyzed: 15 (4.3%) were positive by a microculture method (MCM); and 4 (1.1%) by smear. The sera of these 343 samples included 9 (2.6%) determined positive by ELISA and 7 (2%) positive by IFAT. Thus, 21 of (6.1%) the 343 subjects studied by smear, MCM, IFAT and ELISA techniques were identified as positive for leishmaniasis at least one of the techniques and the sensitivity assessed. According to our data, the sensitivity of the methods are identified as MCM (71%), smear (19%), IFAT (33%), ELISA (42%), NNN (4%), PCR (14%) and ICT (4%). Thus, with this study for the first time, the sensitivity of a MCM was examined in blood donors by comparing MCM with the methods used in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. As a result, MCM was found the most sensitive method for detection of Leishmania parasites in samples obtained from a blood bank. In addition, the presence of Leishmania parasites was detected in donor bloods in Istanbul, a non-endemic region of Turkey, and these results is a vital importance for the health of blood recipients.

  7. Prevention of non-immune mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from blood bank to patient.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, Robin; de Korte, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a severe form of pulmonary insufficiency induced by transfusion. TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related death, and is caused by the infusion of either anti-leukocyte antibodies in plasma containing blood products or neutrophil priming substances that accumulate during storage of cellular blood products. Among these neutrophil priming substances are bioactive lipids, such as lyso-phosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs) and arachidonic acid, soluble CD40L (sCD40L) and possibly other, as yet unidentified substances. The accumulation of these substances during cellular blood product storage and their role in the induction of "non-immune mediated" TRALI pathogenesis are highly relevant for the current debate of the use of longer vs. shorter stored blood products. In this review, the accumulation of these different substances during storage, as well as their mode of action in inducing TRALI are discussed. In addition, different improvements in current blood banking procedures to prevent TRALI due to these non-immune mediators will be proposed.

  8. Portable blood extraction device integrated with biomedical monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumpuang, S.; Horade, M.; Fujioka, K.; Sugiyama, S.

    2006-01-01

    Painless and portable blood extraction device has been immersed in the world of miniaturization on bio-medical research particularly in manufacturing point-of-care systems. The fabrication of a blood extraction device integrated with an electrolyte-monitoring system is reported in this paper. The device has advantages in precise controlled dosage of blood extracted including the slightly damaged blood vessels and nervous system. The in-house blood diagnostic will become simple for the patients. Main components of the portable system are; the blood extraction device and electrolyte-monitoring system. The monitoring system consists of ISFET (Ion Selective Field Effect Transistor) for measuring the concentration level of minerals in blood. In this work, we measured the level of 3 ions; Na+, K+ and Cl-. The mentioned ions are frequently required the measurement since their concentration levels in the blood can indicate whether the kidney, pancreas, liver or heart is being malfunction. The fabrication of the whole system and experimentation on each ISM (Ion Sensitive Membrane) will be provided. Taking the advantages of LIGA technology, the 100 hollow microneedles fabricated by Synchrotron Radiation deep X-ray lithography through PCT (Plane-pattern to Cross-section Transfer) technique have been consisted in 5x5 mm2 area. The microneedle is 300 μm in base-diameter, 500 μm-pitch, 800 μm-height and 50 μm hole-diameter. The total size of the blood extraction device is 2x2x2 cm 3. The package is made from a plastic socket including slots for inserting microneedle array and ISFET connecting to an electrical circuit for the monitoring. Through the dimensional design for simply handling and selection of disposable material, the patients can self-evaluate the critical level of the body minerals in anywhere and anytime.

  9. Hemovigilance in Massachusetts and the adoption of statewide hospital blood bank reporting using the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Melissa; Osinski, Anthony; O'Hearn, Lynne; Waksmonski, Pamela; Herman, Michele; Gordon, Deborah; Griffiths, Elzbieta; Knox, Kim; McHale, Eileen; Quillen, Karen; Rios, Jorge; Pisciotto, Patricia; Uhl, Lynne; DeMaria, Alfred; Andrzejewski, Chester

    2017-02-01

    A collaboration that grew over time between local hemovigilance stakeholders and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) resulted in the change from a paper-based method of reporting adverse reactions and monthly transfusion activity for regulatory compliance purposes to statewide adoption of electronic reporting via the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). The NHSN is a web-based surveillance system that offers the capacity to capture transfusion-related adverse events, incidents, and monthly transfusion statistics from participating facilities. Massachusetts' hospital blood banks share the data they enter into NHSN with the MDPH to satisfy reporting requirements. Users of the NHSN Hemovigilance Module adhere to specified data entry guidelines, resulting in data that are comparable and standardized. Keys to successful statewide adoption of this reporting method include the fostering of strong partnerships with local hemovigilance champions and experts, engagement of regulatory and epidemiology divisions at the state health department, the leveraging of existing relationships with hospital NHSN administrators, and the existence of a regulatory deadline for implementation. Although limitations exist, successful implementation of statewide use of the NHSN Hemovigilance Module for hospital blood bank reporting is possible. The result is standardized, actionable data at both the hospital and state level that can facilitate interfacility comparisons, benchmarking, and opportunities for practice improvement. © 2016 AABB.

  10. A question of clarity: redesigning the American Association Of Blood Banks blood donor history questionnaire--a chronology and model for donor screening.

    PubMed

    Fridey, Joy L; Townsend, Mary J; Kessler, Debra A; Gregory, Kay R

    2007-07-01

    A new donor history questionnaire, introduced by the American Association of Blood Banks in 2004 and approved by Food and Drug Administration in 2006, is now in widespread use in the United States. The development of this questionnaire involved an in-depth look at the entire system of donor screening questions, and is notable for its use of survey design experts as well as blood banking experts, government agencies, and an ethicist who represented the public interest in developing the actual questions. The end result is a questionnaire that uses capture questions in a time bounded format, donor educational materials, and a medication deferral list. Detailed instructions for donor screeners include follow-up questions in easy-to-follow flow-charts. Most importantly, for the first time in the history of developing donor history questions, all materials were tested for donor comprehension using cognitive interview evaluation. This article discusses the development of the questionnaire, explains the methodology, and describes the thinking and rationale for decisions made during redesign of the questionnaire.

  11. Blood viscosity measurement: an integral method using Doppler ultrasonic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaud, P.; Bensalah, A.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new indirect and noninvasive method for the measurement of the Newtonian blood viscosity. Based on an integral form of the axial Navier-Stokes equation, this method is particularly suited for in vivo investigations using ultrasonic arterial blood velocity profiles. Its main advantage is that it is applicable to periodic as well as non periodic flows. Moreover it does not require classical filtering methods enhancing signal to noise ratio of the physiological signals. This method only requires the knowledge of the velocimetric data measured inside a spatially and temporally optimized zone of the Doppler velocity profiles. The results obtained using numerical simulation as well as in vitro or in vivo experiments prove the effectiveness of the method. It is then well adapted to the clinical environment as a systematic quasi on-line method for the measurement of the blood viscosity.

  12. NIR-integrating sphere spectroscopy to determine various blood properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Martina; Friebel, Moritz; Gersonde, Ingo H.; Muller, Gerhard J.

    2005-03-01

    Near infrared integrating sphere spectroscopy and chemometric multivariate calibration were applied to determine hematocrit (HCT) and oxygen saturation (O2Sat) of circulating human blood. The diffuse reflectance were measured and the partial least square method (PLS) was used for calibration considering different wavelength ranges. The HCT and the O2Sat could be predicted with a root mean square error (PRMSE) of 1.9% and 2.8% respectively, using PLS. Each parameter was adjusted to various levels, and three measurement series from blood of three different donors were carried out for the calibration with the PLS. The calibration includes changes in hemolysis and osmolarity as well as inter-individual differences in cell dimensions and hemoglobin content. Prediction of hemolysis was also possible for one blood sample with a PRMSE of 0.8%.

  13. Confidential unit exclusion at the regional blood bank in Montes Claros - Fundação Hemominas

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Caroline Nogueira; Ruas, Munic de Oliveira; Urias, Elaine Veloso Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at analyzing the rate of self-exclusion at the Regional Blood Bank in Montes Claros. Methods Data of self-excluding donors from August 2008 to August 2010 were analyzed. The following variables were considered: age, marital status, gender, ethnical background, blood group, Rh factor, number of donations, type of donation and serologic results. Results During the analyzed period, 34,778 individuals donated blood, 215 (0.62%) of which were self-excluded; 12% of donors did not answer, 6.3% ballots were spoilt and 13.6% of the responses were considered non-compliant. The profile of the donors was: male (81.9%), single (50.7%), aged between 19 and 29 years old (52.1%), Mulatto (48.3%), blood group O (32.1%) and positive Rh (32.1%). Most individuals were donating for the 2ndto 5th time (43.7%) and had negative serology (94.4%). Conclusion It was not evident that self-excluding donors had higher rates of seropositivity. PMID:23049378

  14. [Exploration of regulating blood lipids metabolism by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-shan; Wu, Wei; Qing, Li-jin

    2015-02-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an important risk factor of cardio-/cerebrovascular disease, and reducing lipids has become an important project for itsclinical preventing and treating. Western medicine, with its confirmative efficacy and clear mechanism, has played an irreplaceable role. Along with the development of modern medicine, integrative medicine has gradually become a growing trend in regulating blood lipids metabolism. It not only could make up the insufficient power for Chinese medicine in lowering lipids, but also could reduce adverse reactions and economic costs brought by long-term administration of Western medicine. As a modern practitioner of Chinese medicine, we should keep clear that integrative medicine regulating blood lipids metabolism does not mean a simple combination of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine. We should treat it guided by systematic theories. We combine disease identification and syndrome differentiation, guide lipids lowering by integrative medicine including selecting Western drugs for blood lipids lowering, Chinese medical prescriptions for syndrome typing, and effective Chinese herbs based on modern pharmacologies.

  15. Community monitoring of integrated pest management versus conventional pesticide use in a World Bank project in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ishii-Eiteman, Marcia J; Ardhianie, Nila

    2002-01-01

    Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA) collaborated with a local Indonesian nongovernmental organization (NGO), Yayasan Duta Awam (YDA), in monitoring impacts of the World Bank-financed Integrated Swamps Development Project (ISDP). This paper reports the results of the community-based investigation, which found wide disparities between the World Bank's policy on pest management and its implementation. Instead of reducing farmers' reliance on pesticides as required, the ISDP led to increased intensity and frequency of pesticide use and adverse health and environmental effects from pesticide exposures. YDA and PANNA presented the findings to the Indonesian government and World Bank officials, and farmers requested training in IPM among other recommendations. After NGOs undertook joint advocacy efforts to reduce pesticide dependence in the project, the World Bank withdrew hazardous pesticides from input packages, IPM training was initiated, and community monitors became local leaders in their villages. The study demonstrates the importance and efficacy of independent community-based monitoring in documenting pesticide problems and replacing pesticides with IPM in World Bank development projects.

  16. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking, and Immunohematology (AFSC 90470).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Joselyn H.

    This three-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for medical laboratory technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are hematology (the physiology of blood, complete blood counts and related studies, erythrocyte studies, leukocyte and thrombocyte maturation, and blood…

  17. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  18. Non-ABO blood group systems phenotyping in non-human primates for blood banking laboratory and xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcon, L; Quereda, J J; Mrowiec, A; Funes, C; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A; Majado, M J

    2013-04-01

    Some biomedical research procedures, such as organ xenotransplantation, usually require intensive hemotherapy. Knowledge of the whole phenotype of blood donor and graft could be useful in the field of xenotransplantation. Human and simian-type categories of blood groups have been established and they can be tested by standard methods used for human blood grouping. The aim of this work was to study the incidence of non-ABO blood group systems in different species of non-human primates, which are employed in biomedical research. The phenotype of Rh, Lewis, Kidd, Kell, MNSs, Lutheran, P and Duffy antigens was investigated in olive baboon (n = 48), chacma baboon (n = 9), Guinea baboon (n = 14), Rhesus macaque (n = 38) and squirrel monkey (n = 30) by using commercial microtyping cards. Kell, Lutheran, Kidd and Duffy antigens have been detected in all species, Rh in squirrel monkey, MNSs in rhesus macaque and squirrel monkey, and Lewis in baboon and rhesus macaque. There were differences in frequency and haemagglutination scores between species regardless of their gender and age. The main differences were found in squirrel monkey when compared with baboons and macaques. This typing system provides a tool to assess the presence of antigens in animals used for experimental procedures, such as xenotransplantation and xenotransfusion.

  19. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter W; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R; Christie, Cole H; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K

    2017-01-04

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a 'Structural View of Biology.' Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter W.; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R.; Christie, Cole H.; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M.; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S.; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S.; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D.; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y.; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a ‘Structural View of Biology.’ Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive. PMID:27794042

  1. MethBank: a database integrating next-generation sequencing single-base-resolution DNA methylation programming data.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dong; Sun, Shixiang; Li, Rujiao; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays crucial roles during embryonic development. Here we present MethBank (http://dnamethylome.org), a DNA methylome programming database that integrates the genome-wide single-base nucleotide methylomes of gametes and early embryos in different model organisms. Unlike extant relevant databases, MethBank incorporates the whole-genome single-base-resolution methylomes of gametes and early embryos at multiple different developmental stages in zebrafish and mouse. MethBank allows users to retrieve methylation levels, differentially methylated regions, CpG islands, gene expression profiles and genetic polymorphisms for a specific gene or genomic region. Moreover, it offers a methylome browser that is capable of visualizing high-resolution DNA methylation profiles as well as other related data in an interactive manner and thus is of great helpfulness for users to investigate methylation patterns and changes of gametes and early embryos at different developmental stages. Ongoing efforts are focused on incorporation of methylomes and related data from other organisms. Together, MethBank features integration and visualization of high-resolution DNA methylation data as well as other related data, enabling identification of potential DNA methylation signatures in different developmental stages and accordingly providing an important resource for the epigenetic and developmental studies.

  2. Approaches to minimize infection risk in blood banking and transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Paul F; Annen, Kyle; Ramsey, Glenn

    2011-02-01

    The use of blood donor history and state-of-the-art FDA-licensed serological and nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays have greatly reduced the "infectious window" for several transfusion-transmitted pathogens. Currently transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV), hepatitis viruses and West Nile Virus are rare events. The seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus in the donor population is high and cytomegalovirus infection can cause significant complications for immunocompromised recipients of blood transfusion. Careful use of CMV seronegative blood resources and leukoreduction of blood products are able to prevent most CMV infections in these patients. Currently, bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates is the greatest remaining infectious disease risk in blood transfusion. Specialized donor collection procedures reduce the risk of bacterial contamination of blood products; blood culture and surrogate testing procedures are used to detect potential bacterially contaminated platelet products prior to transfusion. A rapid quantitative immunoassay is now available to test for the presence of lipotechoic acid and lipopolysaccharide bacterial products prior to platelet transfusion. Attention has now turned to emerging infectious diseases including variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, dengue, babesiosis, Chagas' disease and malaria. Challenges are presented to identify and prevent transmission of these agents. Several methods are being used or in development to reduce infectivity of blood products, including solvent-detergent processing of plasma and nucleic acid cross-linking via photochemical reactions with methylene blue, riboflavin, psoralen and alkylating agents. Several opportunities exist to further improve blood safety through advances in infectious disease screening and pathogen inactivation methods.

  3. A spectral boundary integral method for flowing blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Olson, Luke N.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2010-05-01

    A spectral boundary integral method for simulating large numbers of blood cells flowing in complex geometries is developed and demonstrated. The blood cells are modeled as finite-deformation elastic membranes containing a higher viscosity fluid than the surrounding plasma, but the solver itself is independent of the particular constitutive model employed for the cell membranes. The surface integrals developed for solving the viscous flow, and thereby the motion of the massless membrane, are evaluated using an O(NlogN) particle-mesh Ewald (PME) approach. The cell shapes, which can become highly distorted under physiologic conditions, are discretized with spherical harmonics. The resolution of these global basis functions is, of course, excellent, but more importantly they facilitate an approximate de-aliasing procedure that stabilizes the simulations without adding any numerical dissipation or further restricting the permissible numerical time step. Complex geometry no-slip boundaries are included using a constraint method that is coupled into an implicit system that is solved as part of the time advancement routine. The implementation is verified against solutions for axisymmetric flows reported in the literature, and its accuracy is demonstrated by comparison against exact solutions for relaxing surface deformations. It is also used to simulate flow of blood cells at 30% volume fraction in tubes between 4.9 and 16.9 μm in diameter. For these, it is shown to reproduce the well-known non-monotonic dependence of the effective viscosity on the tube diameter.

  4. Data bank of optical properties of biological tissue and blood in the visible and near infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairullina, Alphiya Y.; Bui, Lilia; Oleinik, Tatiana V.; Artishevsky, Nelli; Prigoun, Natalia; Sevkovsky, Jakov; Mokhort, Tatiana

    1996-12-01

    The data bank contains optical, ordinary biochemical and biophysical information on 120 venous blood samples of donors, healthy persons, patients with high pathology, 60 tissue samples. The optical parameters include diffuse reflection R((lambda) ) and transmission T((lambda) ) coefficients for optically thick layers, the absorption K((lambda) ) and extinction (epsilon) ((lambda) ) spectra, oxygenation degree CO2, parameter p determined by sizes and shapes of cells and their aggregates, refractive index of a disperse phase relative to surrounding media, and cooperative effects at high relative concentration. The peculiarities in absorption K((lambda) spectra are connected with different pathologies. It is shown from K((lambda) ) that the grade of pathology connected with the concentration of hemoglobin and mithohondrion together with oxygenation degree of blood and tissues, with the pathological hemoglobin's forms and its decomposition products of different levels. Parameter p is an important diagnostic parameter. We consider that it is necessary to include the oxygenation degree and erythrocyte's aggregation parameter to extend the range of common diagnostic parameters of blood by the first rota.

  5. Integrated separation of blood plasma from whole blood for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Forouzan, Omid; Brown, Theodore P; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2012-01-21

    Many diagnostic tests in a conventional clinical laboratory are performed on blood plasma because changes in its composition often reflect the current status of pathological processes throughout the body. Recently, a significant research effort has been invested into the development of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) implementing these conventional laboratory tests for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings. This paper describes the use of red blood cell (RBC) agglutination for separating plasma from finger-prick volumes of whole blood directly in paper, and demonstrates the utility of this approach by integrating plasma separation and a colorimetric assay in a single μPAD. The μPAD was fabricated by printing its pattern onto chromatography paper with a solid ink (wax) printer and melting the ink to create hydrophobic barriers spanning through the entire thickness of the paper substrate. The μPAD was functionalized by spotting agglutinating antibodies onto the plasma separation zone in the center and the reagents of the colorimetric assay onto the test readout zones on the periphery of the device. To operate the μPAD, a drop of whole blood was placed directly onto the plasma separation zone of the device. RBCs in the whole blood sample agglutinated and remained in the central zone, while separated plasma wicked through the paper substrate into the test readout zones where analyte in plasma reacted with the reagents of the colorimetric assay to produce a visible color change. The color change was digitized with a portable scanner and converted to concentration values using a calibration curve. The purity and yield of separated plasma was sufficient for successful operation of the μPAD. This approach to plasma separation based on RBC agglutination will be particularly useful for designing fully integrated μPADs operating directly on small samples of whole blood.

  6. The Royan Public Umbilical Cord Blood Bank: Does It Cover All Ethnic Groups in Iran Based on HLA Diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimkhani, Saeideh; Farjadian, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells allow the transplantation of partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched grafts and are a valuable resource for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and heritable hematologic, immunologic and metabolic diseases, especially when a compatible bone marrow donor is unavailable. The aim of this study was to determine how many ethnic groups in Iran are covered by the available UCB units based on HLA diversity. Methods From 2009 until mid-2013, 4,981 (30.3%) of the 16,437 UCB samples collected met the storage criteria and were cryopreserved at a public cord blood bank (CBB) in Tehran, Iran. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 were typed in 1,793 samples. Results The mean volume of the cryopreserved samples was 81.25 ± 20.3 ml. The range of total nucleated cells per unit was 51 × 107-107 × 107. The most common HLA alleles were HLA-A*2 (17%) and HLA-A*24 (15.6%), HLA-B*35 (16.8%) and HLA-B*51 (13.9%), and HLA-DRB1*11 (20%) and HLA-DRB1*15 (14%). The predominant haplotypes were HLA-A*24-B*35-DRB1*11 (2%), HLA-A*02-B*50-DR*07 (1.8%), and HLA-A*02-B*51-DRB1*11 (1.5%). Conclusions Based on the HLA-DRB1 profiles, the UCB units available at the Royan public UCB bank are a potentially adequate resource for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Iranian recipients belonging to particular ethnic groups. Regular educational programs to improve the public knowledge of UCB for transplantation can enhance the public CBB stocks for all Iranian ethnic groups in the future. PMID:24847189

  7. Integration and Modulation of Intercellular Signaling Underlying Blood Flow Control

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular resistance networks control tissue blood flow in concert with regulating arterial perfusion pressure. In response to increased metabolic demand, vasodilation arising in arteriolar networks ascends to encompass proximal feed arteries. By reducing resistance upstream, ascending vasodilation (AVD) increases blood flow into the microcirculation. Once initiated [e.g., through local activation of K+ channels in endothelial cells (ECs)], hyperpolarization is conducted through gap junctions along the endothelium. Via EC projections through the internal elastic lamina, hyperpolarization spreads into the surrounding smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJs) to promote their relaxation. Intercellular signaling through electrical signal transmission (i.e., cell-to-cell conduction) can thereby coordinate vasodilation along and among the branches of microvascular resistance networks. Perivascular sympathetic nerve fibers course through the adventitia and release norepinephrine to stimulate SMCs via α-adrenoreceptors to produce contraction. In turn, SMCs can signal ECs through MEGJs to activate K+ channels and attenuate sympathetic vasoconstriction. Activation of K+ channels along the endothelium will dissipate electrical signal transmission and inhibit AVD, thereby restricting blood flow into the microcirculation while maintaining peripheral resistance and perfusion pressure. This review explores the origins and nature of intercellular signaling governing blood flow control in skeletal muscle with respect to the interplay between AVD and sympathetic innervation. Whereas these interactions are integral to physical daily activity and athletic performance, resolving the interplay between respective signaling events provides insight into how selective interventions can improve tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery during vascular disease. PMID:26368324

  8. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia. PMID:26925291

  9. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

  10. Cord blood banking: regulations, ethics and practice in a disputed Italian case.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2012-01-01

    Current Italian regulations allow the free storage in public biobanks within the Italian National Health Service (SSN) of voluntarily donated cord blood, which can then be made available for transplantation in Italian and foreign patients. The same regulations allow the free storage of cord blood for directed use (in other words, for all cases in which it can be used for a family member suffering from a disease that can be cured through the use of hematopoietic stem cells) and in cases where a family runs a high risk of genetic disorders. This article briefly describes and discusses an episode involving an Italian hospital: an appeal by a woman led to a court provision imposing the collection and storage of a cord blood unit outside the conditions established by law. The provision aroused controversy and led to a series of inappropriate actions.

  11. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Moreira-Nunes, Caroline de Fátima Aquino; Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions.

  12. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage

    PubMed Central

    Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions. PMID:26121269

  13. Cost-effectiveness of implementation methods for ELISA serology testing of Trypanosoma cruzi in California blood banks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Leslie S; Ramsey, Janine M; Koplowicz, Yelena B; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Motter, Christi; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Tobler, Leslie H

    2008-07-01

    The first U.S. ELISA test for T. cruzi antibodies was licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 13, 2006. Blood banks have begun screening in absence of FDA recommendations for best implementation methods. We surveyed 2,029 blood donors at five California sites with three risk-based Chagas risk-screening questions. Semi-Markov models compared the cost-effectiveness of three testing strategies. 30% of donors screened positively. Screening all dominated doing nothing, being less costly, and saving more lives. The choice to "screen and test" compared with "testing all" varied by Chagas prevalence, "screening and testing" being cost-effective for high (0.004) and low (0.00004) prevalences, and "testing all" cost-effective for moderate risk (0.0004). It is cost-effective to screen by ELISA rather than do nothing. The best strategy depends on site-specific risk. Census estimates of Hispanics do not predict donor risk well. We suggest using our screening questions to determine risk level and most cost-effective testing strategy.

  14. Development of cultured Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage malaria cell banks for early phase in vivo clinical trial assessment of anti-malaria drugs and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Stanisic, Danielle I; Liu, Xue Q; De, Sai Lata; Batzloff, Michael R; Forbes, Tanya; Davis, Christopher B; Sekuloski, Silvana; Chavchich, Marina; Chung, Wendy; Trenholme, Katharine; McCarthy, James S; Li, Tao; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Good, Michael F

    2015-04-07

    The ability to undertake controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies for preliminary evaluation of malaria vaccine candidates and anti-malaria drug efficacy has been limited by the need for access to sporozoite infected mosquitoes, aseptic, purified, cryopreserved sporozoites or blood-stage malaria parasites derived ex vivo from malaria infected individuals. Three different strategies are described for the manufacture of clinical grade cultured malaria cell banks suitable for use in CHMI studies. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)-grade Plasmodium falciparum NF54, clinically isolated 3D7, and research-grade P. falciparum 7G8 blood-stage malaria parasites were cultured separately in GMP-compliant facilities using screened blood components and then cryopreserved to produce three P. falciparum blood-stage malaria cell banks. These cell banks were evaluated according to specific criteria (parasitaemia, identity, viability, sterility, presence of endotoxin, presence of mycoplasma or other viral agents and in vitro anti-malarial drug sensitivity of the cell bank malaria parasites) to ensure they met the criteria to permit product release according to GMP requirements. The P. falciparum NF54, 3D7 and 7G8 cell banks consisted of >78% ring stage parasites with a ring stage parasitaemia of >1.4%. Parasites were viable in vitro following thawing. The cell banks were free from contamination with bacteria, mycoplasma and a broad panel of viruses. The P. falciparum NF54, 3D7 and 7G8 parasites exhibited differential anti-malarial drug susceptibilities. The P. falciparum NF54 and 3D7 parasites were susceptible to all anti-malaria compounds tested, whereas the P. falciparum 7G8 parasites were resistant/had decreased susceptibility to four compounds. Following testing, all defined release criteria were met and the P. falciparum cell banks were deemed suitable for release. Ethical approval has been obtained for administration to human volunteers. The production of cultured P

  15. Platonin preserves blood-brain barrier integrity in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chia-Tse; Kao, Ming-Chang; Chen, Cay-Huyen; Huang, Chun-Jen

    2015-03-01

    Platonin possesses potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidative capacities. Because systemic inflammation and oxidative stress are crucial in mediating sepsis-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity loss, this study elucidated the effects of platonin on preserving BBB integrity in septic rats. A total of 72 adult male rats (200-250 g) were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), CLP plus platonin, sham operation, or sham operation plus platonin (n = 18 in each group). Systemic inflammation and oxidation levels and BBB integrity in the surviving rats were determined after 24-hour monitoring. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and malondialdehyde (MDA)-markers of systemic inflammation and oxidation-and the grading of Evans blue staining of the brains, BBB permeability to Evans blue dye, and brain edema levels-markers of BBB integrity-in rats that received CLP were significantly higher than rats that received sham operation (all p < 0.001). By contrast, the plasma levels of IL-6 (p < 0.001) and MDA (p < 0.001), and the grading of Evans blue staining (p = 0.015), BBB permeability to Evans blue dye (p = 0.043), and brain edema levels (p = 0.034) in rats that received CLP plus platonin were significantly lower than rats that received CLP. Experimental data further revealed that the concentration of tight junction protein claudin-5, a major structural component of BBB, in rats that received CLP was significantly lower than rats that received CLP plus platonin (p = 0.023). Platonin could attenuate sepsis-induced BBB integrity loss in rats. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Seroprevalence, cost per donation and reduction in blood supply due to positive and indeterminate results for infectious markers in a blood bank in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Moya-Salazar, Jeel; Ubidia-Incio, Roberto; Incio-Grande, Maritza; Blejer, Jorgelina L; Gonzalez, Carlos A

    Safety in Transfusion Medicine is subject to regulations and government legislation within a total quality framework. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of seroprevalence and indeterminate results on lost units and cost per donation. A prospective cross-sectional study was performed in the Blood Bank and Transfusion Therapy Department of the Hospital Central de la Policia Nacional del Perú in Lima, Peru. All completed donations (replacement/voluntary) without complications were included in this study. Every donation met the institutional requirements and quality criteria of Programa Nacional de Hemoterapia y Bancos de Sangre (PRONAHEBAS). Data analysis was achieved using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. A total of 7723 donations were evaluated during 2014 and 2015 with 493 being seropositive (overall prevalence 5.25%) and 502 having indeterminate results (overall prevalence 5.35%). Thus total loss was 995units, 437.8L of blood and 49,750 US dollars. The most common seropositive infectious markers were the core antibody of hepatitis B virus (2.82%) and syphilis (1.02%), and the most common indeterminate results were Chagas disease (1.27%) and the core antibody of hepatitis B virus (1.26%). There was no significant change in the prevalence of seropositivity (p-value=0.243) or indeterminate results (p-value=0.227) over the two-year period of the study. A statistical correlation was found between the cost per lost donation and the most prevalent markers (rho=0.848; p-value=<0.001). Seroprevalence was lower than the regional mean, but the prevalence of indeterminate results was elevated causing a great impact on blood supply and economic losses to this institution. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Upgradation and modernization of eye banking services: Integrating tradition with innovative policies and current best practices.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Radhika; Singh, Archita; Gupta, Noopur; Vanathi, M; Gupta, Vivek

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the history and evolution of the National Eye Bank (NEB) and analyze the impact over the years and report the outcome of the invested resources. Review of archival material, records, project reports, policy and procedures' manuals, and publications was done. Descriptive and analytical processing of data obtained was undertaken. Parameters evaluated included total collection, transplantation, utilization rates of donor cornea, changing trends over time in terms of numbers and duration of recipients waiting, impactful research translated into changes in standard operating protocols, new facilities, and subsequent effects on numbers or quality assurance measures and overview of major achievements. Periodic situational analysis with contextual relevance and interpretation of outcomes was done pertaining to national goals and international standards. The NEB and cornea services have played a key leadership role in furthering the development of eye banking and corneal transplantation services. The contribution extends beyond routine patient care to education, training, generation of resources, advocacy, and policymaking. In quantifiable terms, the overall performance has steadily increased over the years. Major contributions include training of doctors, eye bank staff and corneal surgeons, introduction of innovative techniques for corneal transplantation, setting of national standards for eye banking and provision of preservation media, customized corneal, and ocular surface cell replacement therapy in collaboration with other departments and institutes. The eye banking and corneal transplantation facilities have evolved with time providing quality services, modernized as appropriate with updated knowledge and incorporating technological advances supported by the systematic evidence-based approach.

  18. Directed sibling donor cord blood banking for children with beta-thalassemia major in Greece: usage rate and outcome of transplantation for HLA-matched units.

    PubMed

    Goussetis, Evgenios; Petrakou, Eftichia; Theodosaki, Maria; Kitra, Vasiliki; Peristeri, Ioulia; Vessalas, George; Dimopoulou, Maria N; Spiropoulos, Antonia; Papassavas, Andreas C; Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine; Graphakos, Stelios

    2010-01-01

    Several cord blood banks store cord blood units from healthy siblings of patients, who are candidates for stem cell transplantation. We analyzed the quality characteristics of 50 cord blood units collected from families with beta-thalassemia major and the outcome of subsequent stem cell transplantations during a 15-year period. All cord blood units were found suitable for banking based on a minimum net volume of 40 ml. The mean volume of the units was 98.9 ml; the mean total nucleated cell count (NC) was 7.8 x 10(8) and the mean CD34+ cell count was 2.8 x 10(6). Eight out of twelve HLA matched collections were released for transplantation. All but one recipient belonged to Pesaro II-III risk classes. Three patients received a cord blood graft with >5 x 10(7) NC/kg . One of them with Pesaro class I disease engrafted, whereas the other two who failed to engraft, were re-transplanted with bone marrow from the same donor later. Cord blood grafts containing NCs <4 x 10(7)/kg combined with reduced volume bone marrow from the same donor were used in all 5 remaining cases and stable engraftment was achieved. All patients survived, 7/8 thalassemia-free. Cord blood banking from healthy siblings of children with beta-thalassemia major can result in a successful transplantation in cases in which there is HLA compatibility. However, in high-risk patients, the use of combined cord blood and bone marrow grafts seems necessary in order to ensure stable engraftment, especially when cord blood unit cell counts are low.

  19. Mapping Depositional Facies on Great Bahama Bank: An Integration of Groundtruthing and Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariss, M.; Purkis, S.; Ellis, J. M.; Swart, P. K.; Reijmer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Great Bahama Bank (GBB) has been used in many models to illustrate depositional facies variation across flat-topped, isolated carbonate platforms. Such models have served as subsurface analogs at a variety of scales. In this presentation we have integrated Landsat TM imagery, a refined bathymetric digital elevation model, and seafloor sample data compiled into ArcGIS and analyzed with eCognition to develop a depositional facies map that is more robust than previous versions. For the portion of the GBB lying to the west of Andros Island, the facies map was generated by pairing an extensive set of GPS-constrained field observations and samples (n=275) (Reijmer et al., 2009, IAS Spec Pub 41) with computer and manual interpretation of the Landsat imagery. For the remainder of the platform, which lacked such rigorous ground-control, the Landsat imagery was segmented into lithotopes - interpreted to be distinct bodies of uniform sediment - using a combination of edge detection, spectral and textural analysis, and manual editing. A map was then developed by assigning lithotopes to facies classes on the basis of lessons derived from the portion of the platform for which we had rigorous conditioning. The new analysis reveals that GBB is essentially a very grainy platform with muddier accumulations only in the lee of substantial island barriers; in this regard Andros Island, which is the largest island on GBB, exerts a direct control over the muddiest portion of GBB. Mudstones, wackestones, and mud-rich packstones cover 7%, 6%, and 15%, respectively, of the GBB platform top. By contrast, mud-poor packstones, grainstones, and rudstones account for 19%, 44%, and 3%, respectively. Of the 44% of the platform-top classified as grainstone, only 4% is composed of 'high-energy' deposits characterized by the development of sandbar complexes. The diversity and size of facies bodies is broadly the same on the eastern and western limb of the GBB platform, though the narrower eastern

  20. Umbilical cord blood banking: from personal donation to international public registries to global bioeconomy

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The procedures for collecting voluntarily and freely donated umbilical cord blood (UCB) units and processing them for use in transplants are extremely costly, and the capital flows thus generated form part of an increasingly pervasive global bioeconomy. To place the issue in perspective, this article first examines the different types of UCB biobank, the organization of international registries of public UCB biobanks, the optimal size of national inventories, and the possibility of obtaining commercial products from donated units. The fees generally applied for the acquisition of UCB units for transplantation are then discussed, and some considerations are proposed regarding the social and ethical implications raised by the international network for the importation and exportation of UCB, with a particular emphasis on the globalized bioeconomy of UCB and its commerciality or lack thereof. PMID:24971040

  1. Umbilical cord blood banking: from personal donation to international public registries to global bioeconomy.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The procedures for collecting voluntarily and freely donated umbilical cord blood (UCB) units and processing them for use in transplants are extremely costly, and the capital flows thus generated form part of an increasingly pervasive global bioeconomy. To place the issue in perspective, this article first examines the different types of UCB biobank, the organization of international registries of public UCB biobanks, the optimal size of national inventories, and the possibility of obtaining commercial products from donated units. The fees generally applied for the acquisition of UCB units for transplantation are then discussed, and some considerations are proposed regarding the social and ethical implications raised by the international network for the importation and exportation of UCB, with a particular emphasis on the globalized bioeconomy of UCB and its commerciality or lack thereof.

  2. Integrative network analysis reveals molecular mechanisms of blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tianxiao; Meng, Qingying; Saleh, Mohamed A; Norlander, Allison E; Joehanes, Roby; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Brian H; Zhang, Bin; Johnson, Andrew D; Ying, Saixia; Courchesne, Paul; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran; Munson, Peter J; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G; Yang, Xia; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with blood pressure (BP). The molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, however, remain unclear. We investigated BP-associated molecular mechanisms by integrating BP GWAS with whole blood mRNA expression profiles in 3,679 individuals, using network approaches. BP transcriptomic signatures at the single-gene and the coexpression network module levels were identified. Four coexpression modules were identified as potentially causal based on genetic inference because expression-related SNPs for their corresponding genes demonstrated enrichment for BP GWAS signals. Genes from the four modules were further projected onto predefined molecular interaction networks, revealing key drivers. Gene subnetworks entailing molecular interactions between key drivers and BP-related genes were uncovered. As proof-of-concept, we validated SH2B3, one of the top key drivers, using Sh2b3−/− mice. We found that a significant number of genes predicted to be regulated by SH2B3 in gene networks are perturbed in Sh2b3−/− mice, which demonstrate an exaggerated pressor response to angiotensin II infusion. Our findings may help to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension. PMID:25882670

  3. What is happening? The evolving role of the blood bank in the management of the bleeding patient: The impact of TEG as an early diagnostic predictor for bleeding.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Aurora; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding and treatment of coagulopathy, the management of the bleeding patient remains as a major challenge. Traditionally, the main task of the blood bank has been to guarantee the supply of high quality blood and blood components/products to the hospital. Decisions regarding the use of blood components have always been the clinicians' responsibility, with little active involvement of the transfusion service. In the last years, many hospitals have implemented the use of "acute transfusion packages" for massively bleeding patients and point-of-care (POC) instruments such as TEG and RoTEM for monitoring coagulation status in this patient group. This, in addition to the implementation of patient blood management programs in the hospitals, has led to an increasing involvement of transfusion medicine specialists in transfusion decision making, especially regarding strategies for monitoring and treatment of the massively bleeding patient. This new trend may contribute to a more optimal management and monitoring of the bleeding patient, as POC testing may be used as an early predictor for blood usage. The blood bank should optimise the use of POC testing to provide accurate information in a cost-effective way.

  4. Pilot social feasibility study for the establishment of a public human umbilical cord blood stem cell bank in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Young, Wendy; Rangaka, Isabella; Lombaard, Hennie; Dhai, Ames; Tsotsi, Norma; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-12-01

    There is a large unmet need in South Africa for bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of stem cells for the treatment of haematological and non-haematological diseases. Access to the two existing private umbilical cord blood stem cell banks (UCB SCBs) in South Africa is limited to individuals that can afford it, which further aggravates the ever increasing divide between families from different socio-economic classes. The problem is compounded by a severe global shortage of genetically compatible samples, representative of the South African demographics. Establishing a public human UCB SCB in South Africa would provide more South Africans with access to previously unavailable treatment in the form of affordable, genetically compatible stem cells for bone marrow transplantation. A public UCB SCB has many facets to consider, one of which is public preparedness and support for the bank. This was assessed in a social feasibility pilot study which is reported here. In addition to the findings of this social feasibility study, other important considerations for establishing a public human UCB SCB in SA include; (a) testing the samples for HIV and other infectious diseases (required for compliance with international regulatory standards); (b) flow cytometric analysis for enumeration of CD34+ UCB stem cells; (c) mapping of HLA genotypes/alleles; and (d) a study of the economic feasibility of this endeavour.The social feasibility study was conducted to gauge public preparedness and support for a public SCB through patient interviews and questionnaires. The process was dynamic due to its novel nature for interviewers and interviewees alike. Many obstacles were met and dealt with which lead to the compilation of results discussed here in the form of a pilot social feasibility study.In the South African context, we are faced with unique and rich challenges relating to cultural and religious differences that are further augmented by

  5. Scientific innovation's two Valleys of Death: how blood and tissue banks can help to bridge the gap.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sean D A

    2014-12-01

    Most biomedical basic research in the United States takes place at universities and research institutes and is funded by federal grants. Basic research is awarded billions of federal dollars every year, enabling new discoveries and greater understanding of the fundamental science that makes new innovations and therapies possible. However, when basic research yields an invention of practical use and the research evolves from basic to applied, the playing field changes. Pre-technology licensing federal dollars all but disappear, and innovations rely predominantly on private funding to support the full path from bench to bedside. It is along this path that the scientific advance faces two Valleys of Death. These sometimes insurmountable development stages are the product of the innovation's inherent financial, business and investment risks. Well-planned and executed in vivo studies using quality biological materials demonstrating proof-of-concept is often the key to bridging these gaps, and blood and tissue banks offer unique services and resources to enable this process.

  6. Scientific Innovation's Two Valleys of Death: How Blood and Tissue Banks Can Help to Bridge the Gap

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sean D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Most biomedical basic research in the United States takes place at universities and research institutes and is funded by federal grants. Basic research is awarded billions of federal dollars every year, enabling new discoveries and greater understanding of the fundamental science that makes new innovations and therapies possible. However, when basic research yields an invention of practical use and the research evolves from basic to applied, the playing field changes. Pre-technology licensing federal dollars all but disappear, and innovations rely predominantly on private funding to support the full path from bench to bedside. It is along this path that the scientific advance faces two Valleys of Death. These sometimes insurmountable development stages are the product of the innovation’s inherent financial, business and investment risks. Well-planned and executed in vivo studies using quality biological materials demonstrating proof-of-concept is often the key to bridging these gaps, and blood and tissue banks offer unique services and resources to enable this process. PMID:25457967

  7. How do we perform and bill for blood bank physician consultative services?

    PubMed

    Jhang, Jeffrey S; Francis, Richard O; Winkler, Anne; Tormey, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Transfusion medicine (TM) physicians provide medical services that benefit all patients such as providing 24-hour laboratory coverage, advising health care providers on test interpretation and selection, validating new methods, and supervising technical personnel. These services ensure delivery of accurate, reliable, and timely laboratory test results and blood products. TM physicians also provide consultations to individual patients by 1) interpreting and determining the clinical significance of test results (e.g., alloantibodies, direct antiglobulin tests), 2) recommending appropriate component therapy and approving deviations from laboratory policy, and 3) evaluating and recommending treatment of suspected transfusion reactions. The potential benefits of consultations are improved quality and cost of health care, enhanced provider education, and decreased inappropriate testing and product utilization. When physician services are delivered to individual patients, are appropriately requested, provide a diagnosis or recommendation, and are properly documented, TM physicians can receive professional reimbursement. While many TM physicians provide medical direction and oversight of apheresis procedures, billing in this area is sufficiently complex to be reviewed elsewhere. The objective of this article is for educational purposes to describe the 1) benefits of a consultative TM service, 2) development of reimbursement systems in the United States for professional component services and the current regulatory requirements, 3) current procedural terminology codes commonly used for TM physician services, and 4) examples of consultation documentation and daily workflow at tertiary care teaching hospitals. The information provided should help guide physicians to deliver and bill for these services. © 2017 AABB.

  8. Upgradation and modernization of eye banking services: Integrating tradition with innovative policies and current best practices

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Radhika; Singh, Archita; Gupta, Noopur; Vanathi, M; Gupta, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review the history and evolution of the National Eye Bank (NEB) and analyze the impact over the years and report the outcome of the invested resources. Methods: Review of archival material, records, project reports, policy and procedures' manuals, and publications was done. Descriptive and analytical processing of data obtained was undertaken. Parameters evaluated included total collection, transplantation, utilization rates of donor cornea, changing trends over time in terms of numbers and duration of recipients waiting, impactful research translated into changes in standard operating protocols, new facilities, and subsequent effects on numbers or quality assurance measures and overview of major achievements. Periodic situational analysis with contextual relevance and interpretation of outcomes was done pertaining to national goals and international standards. Results: The NEB and cornea services have played a key leadership role in furthering the development of eye banking and corneal transplantation services. The contribution extends beyond routine patient care to education, training, generation of resources, advocacy, and policymaking. In quantifiable terms, the overall performance has steadily increased over the years. Major contributions include training of doctors, eye bank staff and corneal surgeons, introduction of innovative techniques for corneal transplantation, setting of national standards for eye banking and provision of preservation media, customized corneal, and ocular surface cell replacement therapy in collaboration with other departments and institutes. Conclusion: The eye banking and corneal transplantation facilities have evolved with time providing quality services, modernized as appropriate with updated knowledge and incorporating technological advances supported by the systematic evidence-based approach. PMID:28345565

  9. Integrating research on thyroid cancer after Chernobyl--the Chernobyl Tissue Bank.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A; Bethel, J A; Galpine, A; Mathieson, W; Krznaric, M; Unger, K

    2011-05-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3 million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 21 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated co-operation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age.

  10. Integrating Research on Thyroid Cancer after Chernobyl — the Chernobyl Tissue Bank

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G.A.; Bethel, J.A.; Galpine, A.; Krznaric, M.; Unger, K.

    2011-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 21 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated cooperation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age. PMID:21345659

  11. Integrating genomic information with protein sequence and 3D atomic level structure at the RCSB protein data bank.

    PubMed

    Prlic, Andreas; Kalro, Tara; Bhattacharya, Roshni; Christie, Cole; Burley, Stephen K; Rose, Peter W

    2016-12-15

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) now contains more than 120,000 three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. To allow an interpretation of how PDB data relates to other publicly available annotations, we developed a novel data integration platform that maps 3D structural information across various datasets. This integration bridges from the human genome across protein sequence to 3D structure space. We developed novel software solutions for data management and visualization, while incorporating new libraries for web-based visualization using SVG graphics. The new views are available from http://www.rcsb.org and software is available from https://github.com/rcsb/. andreas.prlic@rcsb.orgSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Integrating genomic information with protein sequence and 3D atomic level structure at the RCSB protein data bank

    PubMed Central

    Prlić, Andreas; Kalro, Tara; Bhattacharya, Roshni; Christie, Cole; Burley, Stephen K.; Rose, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Protein Data Bank (PDB) now contains more than 120,000 three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. To allow an interpretation of how PDB data relates to other publicly available annotations, we developed a novel data integration platform that maps 3D structural information across various datasets. This integration bridges from the human genome across protein sequence to 3D structure space. We developed novel software solutions for data management and visualization, while incorporating new libraries for web-based visualization using SVG graphics. Availability and Implementation: The new views are available from http://www.rcsb.org and software is available from https://github.com/rcsb/. Contact: andreas.prlic@rcsb.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27551105

  13. Local, integrated control of blood flow: Professor Tudor Griffith Memorial.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David H

    2013-11-01

    Professor Tudor Griffith was one of the founding members of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, and hosted the 1st ESGCO Conference in Cardiff, Wales in 2000. Tudor was a passionate scientist, who managed to combine his enthusiasm for vascular biology with his background in physics, to make key and insightful advances to our knowledge and understanding of the integrated vascular control mechanisms that co-ordinate blood flow in tissue perfusion. He had a particular interest in the endothelium, the monolayer of cells that lines the entire cardiovascular system and which is in prime position to sense a wide variety of modulatory stimuli, both chemical and mechanical. Over the last 20 years Tudor produced a series of research papers in which he used chaos theory to analyse the behaviour of arteries that underpins vasomotion. The research led to the development of mathematical models that were able to predict calcium oscillations in vascular smooth muscle with a view to predicting events in a complete virtual artery. This article will review the field in which he worked, with an obvious emphasis on his contribution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of a portable microscopic cell counter for the counting of residual leukocytes in leukoreduced apheresis platelet concentrates in a hospital blood bank.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sejong; Kim, Eun-Young; Cha, Seung-Yeon; Seo, Ji-Young; Koo, Hong Hoe; Cho, Duck

    2017-06-01

    While a portable microscopic cell counter has been evaluated to enumerate residual white blood cells (WBCs) in red blood cells and platelet concentrates at blood centers, it has not yet been assessed in a hospital blood bank. We investigated the performance of this device and evaluated its accuracy, along with its benefits in time management. Residual WBCs from each of 100 apheresis platelet specimens were measured manually using a Nageotte chamber, along with flow cytometry methods and an ADAM-rWBC automated instrument (NanoEnTek, Seoul, South Korea). The efficiency was calculated by measuring the time required for the analysis of one specimen ten times consecutively. Flow cytometry and the ADAM-rWBC were able to detect four sporadic cases that had residual WBCs exceeding 1/μL that were not detected by the manual method. Analysis time was the shortest with the ADAM-rWBC, followed by flow cytometry and the manual method. Our data suggest that hospital blood banks require quality control of residual WBCs; among the methods evaluated in this study, the portable microscopic cell counter offers the best time efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimizing isolation culture and freezing methods to preserve Wharton's jelly's mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) properties: an MSC banking protocol validation for the Hellenic Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Chatzistamatiou, Theofanis K; Papassavas, Andreas C; Michalopoulos, Efstathios; Gamaloutsos, Christos; Mallis, Panagiotis; Gontika, Ioanna; Panagouli, Effrosyni; Koussoulakos, Stauros L; Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) are a heterogeneous population that can be isolated from many tissues including umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (UC-WJ). Although initially limited in studies such as a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation adjuvant, an increasing number of clinical trials consider MSCs as a potential anti-inflammatory or a regenerative medicine agent. It has been proposed that creating a repository of MSCs would increase their availability for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to assess the optimal isolation and cryopreservation procedures to facilitate WJ MSC banking. Cells were isolated from UC-WJ using enzymatic digestion or plastic adhesion methods. Their isolation efficacy, growth kinetics, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential were studied, as well as the effects of freezing. Flow cytometry for common MSC markers was performed on all cases and differentiation was shown with histocytochemical staining. Finally, the isolation efficacy on cryopreserved WJ tissue fragments was tested. MSC isolation was successful using both isolation methods on fresh UC-WJ tissue. However, UC-WJ MSC isolation from frozen tissue fragments was impossible. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that only MSC markers were expressed on the surface of the isolated cells while differentiation assays showed that they were capable of trilinear differentiation. All the above characteristics were also preserved in isolated UC-WJ MSCs over the cryopreservation study period. These data showed that viable MSCs can only be isolated from fresh UC-WJ tissue, setting the foundation for clinical-grade banking. © 2014 AABB.

  16. Updates on drug-target network; facilitating polypharmacology and data integration by growth of DrugBank database.

    PubMed

    Barneh, Farnaz; Jafari, Mohieddin; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Network pharmacology elucidates the relationship between drugs and targets. As the identified targets for each drug increases, the corresponding drug-target network (DTN) evolves from solely reflection of the pharmaceutical industry trend to a portrait of polypharmacology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potentials of DrugBank database in advancing systems pharmacology. We constructed and analyzed DTN from drugs and targets associations in the DrugBank 4.0 database. Our results showed that in bipartite DTN, increased ratio of identified targets for drugs augmented density and connectivity of drugs and targets and decreased modular structure. To clear up the details in the network structure, the DTNs were projected into two networks namely, drug similarity network (DSN) and target similarity network (TSN). In DSN, various classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with distinct therapeutic categories were linked together based on shared targets. Projected TSN also showed complexity because of promiscuity of the drugs. By including investigational drugs that are currently being tested in clinical trials, the networks manifested more connectivity and pictured the upcoming pharmacological space in the future years. Diverse biological processes and protein-protein interactions were manipulated by new drugs, which can extend possible target combinations. We conclude that network-based organization of DrugBank 4.0 data not only reveals the potential for repurposing of existing drugs, also allows generating novel predictions about drugs off-targets, drug-drug interactions and their side effects. Our results also encourage further effort for high-throughput identification of targets to build networks that can be integrated into disease networks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank: integrating research on radiation-induced thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A

    2012-03-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. Cancer is a complicated disease and it is unclear whether the mechanism by which radiation gives rise to cancer differs from that involved in the generation of cancers of the same type by other environmental stimuli. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established in response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl to address this question. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3 million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 23 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated co-operation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age.

  18. 'Two's company--Three's a crowd': the collection of umbilical cord blood for commercial stem cell banks in England and the midwifery profession.

    PubMed

    Machin, Laura L; Brown, Nik; McLeod, Danae

    2012-06-01

    to explore how lay and professional stakeholders within umbilical cord blood banking discussed midwives' and privately employed phlebotomists' roles in light of commercial UCB collection, and what insights this offers of midwifery authority and power. qualitative study using face-to-face, semi-structured interviews that were digitally recorded, transcribed and coded according to themes relating to the research aims. across England. 61 interviews were conducted between April 2009 and August 2010 with lay and professional stakeholders within umbilical cord blood banking. the space and access requirements for privately employed phlebotomists to conduct their work were discussed and highlighted the discursive and spatial boundary-work conducted by, or on behalf of, midwives to retain their authority over the umbilical cord blood and labour rooms. midwives were portrayed as accommodating privately employed phlebotomists to some extent. It was implied that midwives did so because phlebotomists conformed to implicit boundaries, which required respecting midwives' authority over the labour ward, room and the umbilical cord blood. In turn, midwives' power was protected. the findings highlight the important role of spatial boundaries and the significance of the organisation of spaces when implementing new services within health care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of an ergonomics-based job stress management program on job strain, psychological distress, and blood cortisol among employees of a national private bank in Denpasar Bali.

    PubMed

    Purnawati, Susy; Kawakami, Norito; Shimazu, Akihito; Sutjana, Dewa Putu; Adiputra, Nyoman

    2016-08-06

    The present work describes a newly developed ergonomics-based job stress management program - Ergo-JSI (Ergonomics-based Job Stress Intervention) - including a pilot study to ascertain the effects of the program on job strain, psychological distress, and blood cortisol levels among bank employees in Indonesia. A single-group, pre- and post-test experimental study was conducted in a sample of employees in a National Bank in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. The outcomes of the study focused on reductions in job strain index and psychological distress, measured by the Indonesian version of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), and improvement in blood cortisol levels following the study.A total of 25 male employees, with an average age of 39, received an eight-week intervention with the Ergo-JSI. Compared to baseline, the job strain index decreased by 46% (p<0.05), and psychological distress decreased by 28% (p<0.05). These changes were accompanied by a 24% reduction in blood cortisol levels (p<0.05). The newly developed Ergo-JSI program may hence be effective for decreasing job strain, psychosocial distress, and blood cortisol among employees in Indonesia.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: seroprevalence detected in the blood bank of the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, in the period 2004 through 2009.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Guerrero, Guillermo; Martínez-Gordillo, Mario Noé; Riverón-Negrete, Leticia; Aguilar-Escobar, Dinora Virginia; Bravo-Lindoro, Amalia; Cob-Sosa, Carlos; Ponce-Macotela, Martha

    2012-03-01

    The second most common mode of Trypanosoma cruzi or Chagas disease transmission is via therapeutic blood transfusion. In Mexico, control of T. cruzi is still in its initial phase; in fact, there are only 14 studies published covering 10 states on T. cruzi seroprevalence in donated blood in Mexico. Here we present the results of 5 years of trypanosomiasis screening in the blood bank of the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría. Samples from all blood donated in the period from 2004 to 2009 were analyzed. We screened for T. cruzi using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Seropositive samples were then processed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect a nuclear gene segment. A total of 37,333 samples were analyzed and a 0.17% (64 samples) T. cruzi seroprevalence was found. Donors were mostly from Mexico State and Mexico City, which is considered nonendemic for T. cruzi area. Of 64 seropositive samples, only two tested positive by PCR (3.12%), which amplified a 189-bp product from nuclear gene from the parasite. Although the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection was low, this surveillance program prevented the infection of more than 100 children because each unit of blood provides 2.6 to 3.5 blood products. The majority of the donors were from Mexico State and Mexico City, which is a nonendemic area. The serodetection of T. cruzi in this region is evidence that is necessary to increase our understanding of its distribution in the Mexico City and surrounding places. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Renoprotection, renin inhibition, and blood pressure control: the impact of aliskiren on integrated blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Haroon-Ur

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is an important factor in progressive loss of renal function. The kidney can be both a contributor to and a target of HTN. The functional integrity of the kidney is vital for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Chronic activation of the renin system causes HTN and, ultimately, end-organ damage. Direct renin inhibitors (DRIs) inhibit plasma renin activity (PRA), thereby preventing the conversion of angiotensinogen to angiotensin I; consequently, the levels of both Ang I and Ang II are reduced. There is no compensatory increase in PRA activity with DRIs as seen with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). There are reasons to speculate that renin inhibition might prove to be a superior strategy for blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system compared with ACEIs or ARBs. Evidence for the efficacy of aliskiren (a DRI) is considered to be relatively strong, based on published, short-term, double-blind, randomized, controlled trials showing that aliskiren is as effective as other antihypertensive agents in reducing blood pressure (BP), with no rebound effects on BP after treatment withdrawal. When combined with diuretics, fully additive BP reduction is seen. When given with an ACEI or ARB, aliskiren produces significant additional BP reduction indicative of complimentary pharmacology and more complete renin-angiotensin system blockade.

  2. [Detection of parvovirus B19 in patients of the Zulia State blood bank with different hematological alterations].

    PubMed

    González Rincón, M; Hassanhi, M; Rivera, S; León, M; Plumacher, Z; De Salvo, L; Salas, D; Novoa, E

    1998-10-01

    To assess the seroprevalence of IgG and IgM specific for parvovirus B19 (B19) and its association with aplastic crisis developing in patients with different haematological disorders. Fifty-three serum samples were evaluated, 24 from patients with aplastic crisis and 29 from others without such crises, all of them suffering from different haematological diseases diagnosed at the University Hospital of Maracaibo and the Zulia State Blood Bank, in Venezuela; 15 samples from healthy blood donors were examined as well. Indirect immunofluorescence technique was used in the study. Lymphocyte subsets were quantified in 10 of the patients with aplastic crisis by means of cytofluorometry. Serum proteins were assessed by electrophoresis in all samples. The statistical analysis was performed according to Student's t test and chi square, by applying the statix 4.0 and SAS programmes. Positive IgG was found in 20 of the 24 patients with aplastic crisis (83.3%), 20 of the 29 without crisis (68.9%) and 7 of the 15 healthy controls (46.6%). Positive IgM was found only in 2 of the 24 patients with aplastic crisis (8.3%). Both the patients without aplastic crises and the control groups were negative for PB19 IgM. The average CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte count and the CD4-CD8 index in the patients studied were 454 CD4 cells/microL, 1,006 CD8 cells/microL and 0.5%, significantly different from the control group, whose figures were 860 CD4 cells/microL, 546 CD8 cells/microL and 1.6%. The average B lymphocyte count of the patients (628 cells/microL) was higher than that of the control group (349 cells/microL). The average NK cell count in the patient was 174 cells/microL, slightly below the control group (221 cells/microL). Mild beta-globulin decrease was found in the electrophoretic study of the serum proteins of the patients, along with significant increase of the total protein and the gammaglobulin fraction with regard to the control group. Higher PB19 IgG seropositivity was seen in the

  3. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material.

  4. Seroprevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus in blood bank donors at Fundación Valle del Lili, Cali, Colombia, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Macía, Carmenza; Vargas, Sandra; Mora, Ana María; Sarmiento, Ashly Melissa; Pacheco, Robinson; Rosso, Fernando

    2016-02-11

    Human lymphotropic virus (HTLV I/II) is a retrovirus that is prevalent across the Colombian Pacific coast, and is potentially transmissible by transfusion. Blood bank screening has been regulated since 2004, in order to reduce transmission of HTLV I/II through donation. Information on the seroprevalence of the virus in southwestern Colombia is limited.  To determine the seroprevalence and the behavior of reactivity to HTLV I/II before and after the introduction of Western blot, and the comorbidity of HTLV and other infectious markers in donors from a blood bank in Cali, Colombia.  We conducted a cross-sectional study of 77,117 blood bank donors from the Fundación Valle del Lili by analyzing records of donors who had been tested with the reactive test for anti-HTLV I-II antibodies (IgG) between January, 2008, and December, 2014.  The cumulative seroprevalence during the study period was 0.24% (186/77,119). Reactivity was more common in women (61%), and the median age was 37 years (IQR: 24-48). The seroprevalence in the years before the introduction of Western blot was 0.13%, 0.19%, 0.31%, 0.32% and 0.18% (2008-2012), and thereafter it was 0.08% and 0.07% (2012-2014). Concomitant reactivity with other infectious markers was 11%: syphilis (57%), followed by HIV (19%), hepatitis B (14%) and hepatitis C (9%). The highest seroprevalence (0.38%) was reported in 2012.  We found a high prevalence of reactivity to HTLV I-II compared to that reported in other studies. The results of this study are a starting point for the development of population studies.

  5. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice.

    PubMed

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E; Barker, Juliet N

    2014-11-06

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34(+) cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34(+) cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P < .001). We then examined the determinants of infused viable CD34(+) cell dose (precryopreservation count, postthaw recovery, and postthaw viability) in 402 units thawed at our center. This revealed close correlation between precryopreservation and postthaw CD34(+) cell counts (r(2) = 0.73). Median CD34(+) cell recovery was 101%, although it ranged from 12% to 1480%. Notably, units from non-Netcord Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (Netcord-FACT)-accredited banks were more likely to have low recovery (P < .001). Furthermore, although median postthaw CD34(+) cell viability was 92%, 33 (8%) units had <75% viable CD34(+) cells. Units from non-Netcord-FACT-accredited banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34(+) cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection.

  6. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice

    PubMed Central

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M.; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A.; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34+ cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34+ cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P < .001). We then examined the determinants of infused viable CD34+ cell dose (precryopreservation count, postthaw recovery, and postthaw viability) in 402 units thawed at our center. This revealed close correlation between precryopreservation and postthaw CD34+ cell counts (r2 = 0.73). Median CD34+ cell recovery was 101%, although it ranged from 12% to 1480%. Notably, units from non–Netcord Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (Netcord-FACT)–accredited banks were more likely to have low recovery (P < .001). Furthermore, although median postthaw CD34+ cell viability was 92%, 33 (8%) units had <75% viable CD34+ cells. Units from non–Netcord-FACT–accredited banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34+ cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection. PMID:25185264

  7. Rural Poverty Alleviation in Brazil: Toward an Integrated Strategy. World Bank Country Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Alberto; Mistiaen, Johan A.

    This report constitutes a step toward designing an integrated strategy for rural poverty reduction in Brazil. The report contains an updated and detailed profile of the rural poor in the northeast and southeast regions of Brazil; identifies key components of rural poverty in those regions; and proposes a five-pronged strategic framework in which…

  8. Tissue banking in australia.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Lynette; McKelvie, Helen

    2003-01-01

    The legal structure for the regulation of tissue banking has existed for many years. In Australia, the donation of human tissue is regulated by legislation in each of the eight States and Territories. These substantially uniform Acts were passed in the late 1970's and early 1980's, based on model legislation and underpinned by the concept of consensual giving. However, it was not until the early 1990's that tissue banking came under the notice of regulatory authorities. Since then the Australian Government has moved quickly to oversee the tissue banking sector in Australia. Banked human tissue has been deemed to be a therapeutic good under the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989, and tissue banks are required to be licensed by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and are audited for compliance with the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice- Human Blood and Tissues. In addition, tissue banks must comply with a myriad of other standards, guidelines and recommendations.

  9. HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in 6384 umbilical cord blood units and transplantation matching and engraftment statistics in the Zhejiang cord blood bank of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; He, J; Chen, S; Qin, F; Dai, B; Zhang, W; Zhu, F M; Lv, H J

    2014-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a widely accepted source of progenitor cells, and now, many cord blood banks were established. Here, we analysed the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies, HLA matching possibilities for searching potential donors and outcome of UCB transplantations in Zhejiang cord blood bank of China. A total of 6384 UCB units were characterized for 17 HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles at the first field resolution level. Additionally, B*14, B*15 and B*40 were typed to the second field level. A total of 1372 distinct A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were identified. The frequencies of 7 haplotypes were more than 1%, and 439 haplotypes were <0.01%. A*02-B*46-DRB1*09, A*33-B*58-DRB1*03 and A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 were the most common haplotypes, with frequencies of 4.4%, 3.3%, and 2.9%, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium(LD) analysis showed that there were 83 A-B, 106 B-DRB1, 54 A-DRB1 haplotypes with positive LD, in which 51 A-B, 60 B-DRB1, 32 A-DRB1 haplotypes exhibited a significant LD (P < 0.05). In 682 search requests, 12.9%, 40.0% and 42.7% of patients were found to have 6 of 6, 5 of 6 and 4 of 6 HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 matching donors, respectively. A total of 30 UCB units were transplanted to 24 patients (3 patients not evaluated due to early death); 14 of 21 patients (66.7%) engrafted. This study reveals the HLA distribution and its transplantation application in the cord blood bank of Zhejiang province. These data can help to select potential UCB donors for transplantation and used to assess the scale of new cord blood banking endeavours.

  10. Effect of warming and flow rate conditions of blood warmers on red blood cell integrity.

    PubMed

    Poder, T G; Pruneau, D; Dorval, J; Thibault, L; Fisette, J-F; Bédard, S K; Jacques, A; Beauregard, P

    2016-11-01

    Fluid warmers are routinely used to reduce the risk of hypothermia and cardiac complications associated with the infusion of cold blood products. However, warming blood products could generate haemolysis. This study was undertaken to compare the impact of temperature of blood warmers on the per cent haemolysis of packed red blood cells (RBCs) heated at different flow rates as well as non-flow conditions. Infusion warmers used were calibrated at 41·5°C ± 0·5°C and 37·5°C ± 0·5°C. Cold RBC units stored at 4°C in AS-3 (n = 30), aged 30-39 days old, were divided into half units before being allocated under two different scenarios (i.e. infusion pump or syringe). Blood warmers were effective to warm cold RBCs to 37·5°C or 41·5°C when used in conjunction with an infusion pump at flow rate up to 600 ml/h. However, when the warmed blood was held in a syringe for various periods of time, such as may occur in neonatal transfusions, the final temperature was below the expected requirements with measurement as low as 33·1°C. Increasing the flow with an infusion pump increased haemolysis in RBCs from 0·2% to up to 2·1% at a flow rate of 600 ml/h regardless of the warming device used (P < 0·05). No relevant increase of haemolysis was observed using a syringe. The use of a blood warmer adjusted to 41·5°C is probably the best choice for reducing the risk of hypothermia for the patient without generating haemolysis. However, we should be cautious with the use of an infusion pump for RBC transfusion, particularly at high flow rates. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. [Who are the recipients of labile blood products? A multicenter nation-wide study--a "donation day." Blood banks, health facilities].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, J-F; Berthier, F; Courbil, R; Courtois, F; Chenais, F; Waller, C; Leconte des Floris, M-F; Andreu, G; Fontaine, O; Le Niger, C; Puntous, M; Mercadier, A; Nguyen, L; Pélissier, E; Gondrexon, G; Staccini, P

    2009-03-01

    During the years 1994-2001, a progressive decrease of the number of blood units transfused has been reported in France. In contrast, since 2002, there is an increasing number of blood units issuing (+7.6% between 2001 and 2006) and this must be investigated. On behalf of the French Society of Blood Transfusion, the "Recipients" working group promoted a nation wide survey with the support of the regional blood transfusion centres. This survey was aimed at describing the profiles of the transfused patients: socio-demographical patterns, and reasons of the blood transfusion (main and associated diagnoses). A cross-sectional survey was designed. All the patients who received a blood unit during a specific day were considered as the population of the study. They were identified by the regional transfusion centres by means of the "individual issuing form". Survey forms were fully filled for 90% of the patients. It has been considered as a good answer rate. Seven thousand four hundred and twenty-two blood units, delivered to 3450 patients were analyzed. Three groups of pathologies were found as a reason of transfusion: haematology-oncology (52.70% of the prescriptions) with 892 patients (27.8%) for haematological malignancies; surgical procedures (23.99%); intensive care and medicine procedures (21.92%). More than 50% of the recipients are 70 years old and more. This result is explained by the age distribution of inpatients. In a context of lack of donors and consequently difficulties to provide patients with optimal number of blood units, this study is helpful. Variability of blood unit issuings must be detected, analyzed and monitored in real time by the actors of the transfusion process, using computerized dashboards: the blood units provider (in order to adjust the strategy of blood units provision) and the health care establishment as well as care blood components prescribers (reasons of blood transfusion and evaluation of practices).

  12. Integrated national energy planning and management: methodology and application to Sri Lanka. World Bank technical paper

    SciTech Connect

    Munasinghe, M.; Meier, P.

    1988-01-01

    Given the importance of energy in modern economies, the first part of the volume is devoted to examining some of the key conceptual and analytical tools available for energy-policy analysis and planning. Policy tools and institutional frameworks that will facilitate better energy management are also discussed. Energy-policy analysis is explained, while effective energy management techniques are discussed to achieve desirable national objectives, using a selected set of policies and policy instruments. In the second part of the volume, the actual application of the principles set out earlier is explained through a case study of Sri Lanka. The monograph integrates the many aspects of the short-term programs already begun with the options for the medium to long term, and ends with the outline of a long-term strategy for Sri Lanka.

  13. Integration of Text- and Data-Mining Technologies for Use in Banking Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslankowski, Jacek

    Unstructured data, most of it in the form of text files, typically accounts for 85% of an organization's knowledge stores, but it's not always easy to find, access, analyze or use (Robb 2004). That is why it is important to use solutions based on text and data mining. This solution is known as duo mining. This leads to improve management based on knowledge owned in organization. The results are interesting. Data mining provides to lead with structuralized data, usually powered from data warehouses. Text mining, sometimes called web mining, looks for patterns in unstructured data — memos, document and www. Integrating text-based information with structured data enriches predictive modeling capabilities and provides new stores of insightful and valuable information for driving business and research initiatives forward.

  14. Impact of preanalytical handling and timing for peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolation and RNA studies: the experience of the Interinstitutional Multidisciplinary BioBank (BioBIM).

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Ludovici, Giorgia; Leone, Barbara; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ialongo, Cristiano; Spila, Antonella; De Angelis, Francesco; Ferroni, Patrizia; Della-Morte, David; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2012-07-19

    Multicenter studies and biobanking projects require blood transportation from the participating center to a central collection or diagnostic laboratory. The impact of time delays between venous blood collection and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolation prior to RNA extraction may affect the quality and quantity of isolated nucleic acids for genomic applications. Thus, standard operating procedure (SOP) optimization for the treatment of biological samples before RNA extraction is crucial in a biological repository. In order to define SOPs for whole blood preservation prior to RNA extraction, we sought to determine whether different blood storage times (0, 3, 6, 10, 24, and 30 hours) prior to PBMCs isolation and storage at -80°C, could affect the quality and quantity of extracted RNA. After spectrophotometric quantification, the quality and integrity of RNA were assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis, RNA integrity number and real time-PCR (RT-PCR).
Across the different time points we did not observe significant differences within the first 24 hours of blood storage at room temperature, while a significant loss in RNA yield and integrity was detected between 24 and 30 hours. We conclude that time delays before PBMCs isolation prior to RNA extraction may have a significant impact on downstream molecular biological applications.

  15. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Syphilis among Blood Donors at Jigjiga Blood Bank, Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abate, Melese; Wolde, Tesfaye

    2016-03-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Syphilis are among the greatest threats to blood safety for recipients. They are also the leading causes of death and chronic and life-threatening abnormalities. A retrospective analysis of consecutive blood donors' records covering the period between January 2010 and December 2014 was conducted to analyze for seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis among blood donors aged 17-65 years. The association of these infections with age group, blood group, their co-infection rate and year trends were analyzed. Linear regression analysis was used to determine trends of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections. Sterile venous anti-coagulated blood was collected from the donors and analyzed using highly sensitive and specific kits. From the total of 6827 consecutive blood donors, 963(14.1%) had serological evidence of infection with at least one pathogen and 73(1.07%) had multiple infections. The overall seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis was 3.16%, 9.48%, 0.73% and 0.73% respectively. Among those with multiple infections, the most common combinations were HIV-HBV 41/73(56.2%). Blood group "O positive" was the most common with 51.62% followed by "A positive". Moreover, significantly declining trends of HIV, HCV and syphilis seropositivity were observed over the study period. A substantial percentage of the blood donors harbour HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections. Strict selection of blood donors and comprehensive screening of donors' blood using standard methods are highly recommended to ensure the safety of blood for recipients.

  16. [Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Novelo-Garza, Bárbara Alicia; Benítez-Arvizu, Gamaliel; Peña-Benítez, América; Galván-Cervantes, Jorge; Morales-Rojas, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The American trypanosomiasis is the second parasitic disease in importance after paludism and one of the main mechanism of transmission is a blood transfusion. Our objective was to measure the effect the Tripanosoma Cruzi screening test in blood banks in the Mexican Institute of Social Security. Information was obtained from each unit of blood collected. The Tripanosoma cruzi prevalence was calculated only in samples with double reactivity in the blood banks. Of 71 blood banks, only 26 had been doing T. Cruzi screen; after implementation of integrated services 55 are doing the screening. There were 935 donors with double reactivity to the T. Cruzi test from 230,074 samples. The national prevalence was 0.406%. The seroprevalence was 0.013% to 3.118%. The screening of the T. cruzi improved the detection and increased the safety and the prevention of its transmission by blood transfusion.

  17. Umbilical cord blood donation: public or private?

    PubMed

    Ballen, K K; Verter, F; Kurtzberg, J

    2015-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a graft source for patients with malignant or genetic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but who do not have an appropriately HLA-matched family or volunteer unrelated adult donor. Starting in the 1990s, unrelated UCB banks were established, accepting donations from term deliveries and storing UCB units for public use. An estimated 730 000 UCB units have been donated and stored to date and ~35 000 UCB transplants have been performed worldwide. Over the past 20 years, private and family banks have grown rapidly, storing ~4 million UCB units for a particular patient or family, usually charging an up-front and yearly storage fee; therefore, these banks are able to be financially sustainable without releasing UCB units. Private banks are not obligated to fulfill the same regulatory requirements of the public banks. The public banks have released ~30 times more UCB units for therapy. Some countries have transitioned to an integrated banking model, a hybrid of public and family banking. Today, pregnant women, their families, obstetrical providers and pediatricians are faced with multiple choices about the disposition of their newborn's cord blood. In this commentary, we review the progress of UCB banking technology; we also analyze the current data on pediatric and adult unrelated UCB, including the recent expansion of interest in transplantation for hemoglobinopathies, and discuss emerging studies on the use of autologous UCB for neurologic diseases and regenerative medicine. We will review worldwide approaches to UCB banking, ethical considerations, criteria for public and family banking, integrated banking ideas and future strategies for UCB banking.

  18. Isolation of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells from small-volume umbilical cord blood units that do not qualify for the banking system.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Satoshi; Miura, Yasuo; Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya; Yao, Hisayuki; Miura, Masako; Fukuoka, Masaaki; Nakagawa, Yoko; Yokota, Asumi; Hirai, Hideyo; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Maekawa, Taira

    2015-08-01

    The clinical application of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) has been extensively explored. In this study, we examined the availability of freshly donated umbilical cord blood (UCB) units that do not qualify for the Japanese banking system for transplantation because of their small volume as a source of MSCs. Forty-five UCB units were used. The median volume of each UCB unit and number of nucleated cells per unit were 40 mL and 5.39 × 10(8), respectively. MSCs were successfully isolated from 18 of 45 units (40 %). The MSC isolation rate was not affected by cell processing method or the interval between delivery and cell processing. The volume of the UCB unit and the mononuclear cell count were predictive factors of the MSC isolation rate. MSCs were effectively isolated by selecting UCB units with a volume of ≥54 mL and containing ≥1.28 × 10(8) mononuclear cells, yielding a MSC isolation rate of >70 %. UCB-derived MSCs were similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs in terms of their morphology, surface marker expression, and differentiation potential, apart from adipogenesis. Our data indicate that UCB units that are currently discarded due to inadequate volume should be reconsidered as a source of MSCs using the well-established UCB banking system.

  19. Banking of pluripotent adult stem cells as an unlimited source for red blood cell production: potential applications for alloimmunized patients and rare blood challenges.

    PubMed

    Peyrard, Thierry; Bardiaux, Laurent; Krause, Claire; Kobari, Ladan; Lapillonne, Hélène; Andreu, Georges; Douay, Luc

    2011-07-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is now considered a well-settled and essential therapy. However, some difficulties and constraints still occur, such as long-term blood product shortage, blood donor population aging, known and yet unknown transfusion-transmitted infectious agents, growing cost of the transfusion supply chain management, and the inescapable blood group polymorphism barrier. Red blood cells can be now cultured in vitro from human hematopoietic, human embryonic, or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The highly promising hiPSC technology represents a potentially unlimited source of RBCs and opens the door to the revolutionary development of a new generation of allogeneic transfusion products. Assuming that in vitro large-scale cultured RBC production efficiently operates in the near future, we draw here some futuristic but realistic scenarios regarding potential applications for alloimmunized patients and those with a rare blood group. We retrospectively studied a cohort of 16,486 consecutive alloimmunized patients (10-year period), showing 1 to 7 alloantibodies with 361 different antibody combinations. We showed that only 3 hiPSC clones would be sufficient to match more than 99% of the 16,486 patients in need of RBC transfusions. The study of the French National Registry of People with a Rare Blood Phenotype/Genotype (10-year period) shows that 15 hiPSC clones would cover 100% of the needs in patients of white ancestry. In addition, one single hiPSC clone would meet 73% of the needs in alloimmunized patients with sickle cell disease for whom rare cryopreserved RBC units were required. As a result, we consider that a very limited number of RBC clones would be able to not only provide for the need for most alloimmunized patients and those with a rare blood group but also efficiently allow for a policy for alloimmunization prevention in multiply transfused patients.

  20. Blood banks meet the paradox of Gabriel's Horn: what are the options to maintain supply as demand decreases?

    PubMed

    Beckman, N; Yazer, M; Land, K; Chesneau, S; Caulfield, J

    2016-06-01

    Blood services worldwide have observed a decline in the demand for red blood cells (RBC). Despite this general decline, the demand profile has changed significantly with the demand for O D negative RBCs being maintained; whereas B D positive and AB D positive RBC demand has been reduced. In 2015, the blood type O D negative was seen in 6·3% of the combined first time donors among the five American Blood Centres involved in this study and 7·4% of first time Australian donors in 2014/2015, whereas O D negative distributions accounted for 10·5% of all red cell units issued by the American centres and 13·9% by the Australian centres. Inventory can therefore be of sufficient overall quantity but may not be adequate for the demand for units with specific blood types. Recruitment of new donors may need to become more targeted and/or financial or inventory control measures could also be required to ensure inventory matches demand. Blood Services will need to consider the available options in order to ensure that sufficiency of supply is secure and the donor panel is optimised to meet the new demand paradigm.

  1. Integration of detailed modules in a core model of body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alfredo I; Le Rolle, Virginie; Ojeda, David; Baconnier, Pierre; Fontecave-Jallon, Julie; Guillaud, François; Grosse, Thibault; Moss, Robert G; Hannaert, Patrick; Thomas, S Randall

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the definition of the interfaces required to perform heterogeneous model integration in the context of integrative physiology. A formalization of the model integration problem is proposed and a coupling method is presented. The extension of the classic Guyton model, a multi-organ, integrated systems model of blood pressure regulation, is used as an example of the application of the proposed method. To this end, the Guyton model has been restructured, extensive sensitivity analyses have been performed, and appropriate transformations have been applied to replace a subset of its constituting modules by integrating a pulsatile heart and an updated representation of the renin-angiotensin system. Simulation results of the extended integrated model are presented and the impacts of their integration within the original model are evaluated.

  2. Community Characteristics are Associated with Blood Pressure Levels in a Racially Integrated Community.

    PubMed

    Samuel, L J; Thorpe, R J; Bower, K M; LaVeist, T A

    2015-06-01

    Community problems have been associated with higher, and community resources and social cohesion with lower, blood pressure. However, prior studies have not accounted for potential confounding by residential racial segregation. This study tested associations between community characteristics and blood pressure levels and prevalent hypertension in a racially integrated community. The Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Study measured blood pressure in residents of two contiguous racially integrated and low-income US Census Tracts. Community characteristics included a standardized community problem score and binary indicators for community social cohesion, having a community leader available, and having at least one community resource observed on the participant's block. In adjusted models, greater community problems and proximity to resources were associated with lower systolic (β = -2.020, p = 0.028; β = -4.132, p = 0.010) and diastolic (β = -1.261, p = 0.038; β = -2.290, 0.031) blood pressure, respectively, among whites (n = 548). Social cohesion was associated with higher systolic (β = 4.905, p = 0.009) and diastolic blood pressure (β = 3.379, p = 0.008) among African Americans (n = 777). In one racially integrated low-income community, community characteristics were associated with blood pressure levels, and associations differed by race. Directions of associations for two findings differed from prior studies; greater community problem was associated with lower blood pressure in whites and community social cohesion was associated with higher blood pressure in African Americans. These findings may be due to exposure to adverse environmental conditions and hypertensive risk factors in this low-income community.

  3. Modeling and analysis of a density-dependent stochastic integral projection model for a disturbance specialist plant and its seed bank.

    PubMed

    Eager, Eric Alan; Rebarber, Richard; Tenhumberg, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    In many plant species dormant seeds can persist in the soil for one to several years. The formation of these seed banks is especially important for disturbance specialist plants, as seeds of these species germinate only in disturbed soil. Seed movement caused by disturbances affects the survival and germination probability of seeds in the seed bank, which subsequently affect population dynamics. In this paper, we develop a stochastic integral projection model for a general disturbance specialist plant-seed bank population that takes into account both the frequency and intensity of random disturbances, as well as vertical seed movement and density-dependent seedling establishment. We show that the probability measures associated with the plant-seed bank population converge weakly to a unique measure, independent of initial population. We also show that the population either persists with probability one or goes extinct with probability one, and provides a sharp criteria for this dichotomy. We apply our results to an example motivated by wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) populations, and explore how the presence or absence of a "storage effect" impacts how a population responds to different disturbance scenarios.

  4. Pre-donation screening of blood for transfusion transmissible infections: the gains and the pains - experience at a resource limited blood bank.

    PubMed

    Shittu, A O; Olawumi, H O; Adewuyi, J O

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether or not pre-donation testing of blood donors affords substantial cost savings without compromise to blood transfusion safety. Pre-donation testing of blood donors for Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) is done in most developing countries because substantial cost savings are made from resources, materials and man-hours which would have been spent to procure infected blood units. Simple rapid test kits used in pre-donation testing is not as sensitive as the Enzyme Linked Immuno-sorbent Assay (ELISA) method used in post-donation screening in a quality assured manner. It is a retrospective study where records of pre- and post-donation tests done in donor clinic of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, between January and December 2010 were retrieved. All processes and inputs were evaluated and costs calculated for pre-donation testing by simple rapid techniques and post donation screening by ELISA. 5000 prospective donors were tested in the study period. The cost of single rapid Pre-donation testing was less than that of single ELISA Post-donation screen. The cost of double rapid Pre-donation and Post donation ELISA screen exceeded the cost of single post donation ELISA screen. Substantial cost savings were made when single rapid Pre-donation testing is relied on. More blood units were found reactive for the TTIs with the more expensive Post-donation ELISA. Pre-donation testing of blood donors was not cost effective. Although, there is an apparent savings if pre-donation testing is not followed by post-donation ELISA testing, it is done at a compromise to blood transfusion safety.

  5. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  6. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates Integrity and Functionality of Tumor Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. PMID:22897853

  7. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates integrity and functionality of tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-08-14

    We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PHA-543613 preserves blood-brain barrier integrity after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Paul R; Caner, Basak; Klebe, Damon; Rolland, William B; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2013-06-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption and consequent vasogenic edema formation codetermine the clinical course of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This study examined the effect of PHA-543613, a novel α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, on blood-brain barrier preservation after ICH. Male CD-1 mice, subjected to intrastriatal blood infusion, received PHA-543613 alone or in combination with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. PHA-543613 alone, but not in combination with methyllycaconitine or wortmannin, inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β, thus, stabilizing β-catenin and tight junction proteins, which was paralleled by improved blood-brain barrier stability and ameliorated neurofunctional deficits in ICH animals. PHA-543613 preserved blood-brain barrier integrity after ICH, possibly through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and β-catenin stabilization.

  9. Disposable integrated microfluidic biochip for blood typing by plastic microinjection moulding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Sung; Lee, Se Hwan; Ahn, Chong H; Lee, Jae Y; Kwon, Tai Hun

    2006-06-01

    Blood typing is the most important test for both transfusion recipients and blood donors. In this paper, a low cost disposable blood typing integrated microfluidic biochip has been designed, fabricated and characterized. In the biochip, flow splitting microchannels, chaotic micromixers, reaction microchambers and detection microfilters are fully integrated. The loaded sample blood can be divided by 2 or 4 equal volumes through the flow splitting microchannel so that one can perform 2 or 4 blood agglutination tests in parallel. For the purpose of obtaining efficient reaction of agglutinogens on red blood cells (RBCs) and agglutinins in serum, we incorporated a serpentine laminating micromixer into the biochip, which combines two chaotic mixing mechanisms of splitting/recombination and chaotic advection. Relatively large area reaction microchambers were also introduced for the sake of keeping the mixture of the sample blood and serum during the reaction time before filtering. The gradually decreasing multi-step detection microfilters were designed in order to effectively filter the reacted agglutinated RBCs, which show the corresponding blood group. To achieve the cost-effectiveness of the microfluidic biochip for disposability, the biochip was realized by the microinjection moulding of COC (cyclic olefin copolymer) and thermal bonding of two injection moulded COC substrates in mass production with a total fabrication time of less than 20 min. Mould inserts of the biochip for the microinjection moulding were fabricated by SU-8 photolithography and the subsequent nickel electroplating process. Human blood groups of A, B and AB have been successfully determined with the naked eye, with 3 microl of the whole sample bloods, by means of the fabricated biochip within 3 min.

  10. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank — A Repository for Biomaterial and Data Used in Integrative and Systems Biology Modeling the Human Response to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geraldine; Unger, Kristian; Krznaric, Marko; Galpine, Angela; Bethel, Jackie; Tomlinson, Christopher; Woodbridge, Mark; Butcher, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer post Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB: www.chernobyltissuebank.com) was established in 1998. Thus far it is has collected biological samples from 3,861 individuals, and provided 27 research projects with 11,254 samples. The CTB was designed from its outset as a resource to promote the integration of research and clinical data to facilitate a systems biology approach to radiation related thyroid cancer. The project has therefore developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, dosimetrists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians and serves as a paradigm for tissue banking in the omics era. PMID:24704918

  11. The chernobyl tissue bank - a repository for biomaterial and data used in integrative and systems biology modeling the human response to radiation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Geraldine; Unger, Kristian; Krznaric, Marko; Galpine, Angela; Bethel, Jackie; Tomlinson, Christopher; Woodbridge, Mark; Butcher, Sarah

    2012-05-09

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer post Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB: www.chernobyltissuebank.com) was established in 1998. Thus far it is has collected biological samples from 3,861 individuals, and provided 27 research projects with 11,254 samples. The CTB was designed from its outset as a resource to promote the integration of research and clinical data to facilitate a systems biology approach to radiation related thyroid cancer. The project has therefore developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, dosimetrists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians and serves as a paradigm for tissue banking in the omics era.

  12. Comparison of Eleven Methods for Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Large-Scale Whole-Genome Genotyping and Long-Term DNA Banking Using Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I.; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L.; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  13. Comparison of eleven methods for genomic DNA extraction suitable for large-scale whole-genome genotyping and long-term DNA banking using blood samples.

    PubMed

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals.

  14. Very small embryonic-like stem cells with maximum regenerative potential get discarded during cord blood banking and bone marrow processing for autologous stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Shaikh, Ambreen; Nagvenkar, Punam; Kasiviswanathan, Sandhya; Pethe, Prasad; Pawani, Harsha; Mohanty, Sujata; Rao, S G Ananda; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are possibly lost during cord blood banking and bone marrow (BM) processing for autologus stem cell therapy mainly because of their small size. The present study was conducted on human umbilical cord blood (UCB, n=6) and discarded red blood cells (RBC) fraction obtained after separation of mononuclear cells from human BM (n=6), to test this hypothesis. The results show that VSELs, which are pluripotent stem cells with maximum regenerative potential, settle along with the RBCs during Ficoll-Hypaque density separation. These cells are very small in size (3-5 μm), have high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, and express nuclear Oct-4, cell surface protein SSEA-4, and other pluripotent markers such as Nanog, Sox-2, Rex-1, and Tert as indicated by immunolocalization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) studies. Interestingly, a distinct population of slightly larger, round hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with cytoplasmic Oct-4 were detected in the "buffy" coat, which usually gets banked or used during autologus stem cell therapy. Immunohistochemical studies on the umbilical cord tissue (UCT) sections (n=3) showed the presence of nuclear Oct-4-positive VSELs and many fibroblast-like mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with cytoplasmic Oct-4. These VSELs with nuclear Oct-4, detected in UCB, UCT, and discarded RBC fraction obtained after BM processing, may persist throughout life, maintain tissue homeostasis, and undergo asymmetric cell division to self-renew as well as produce larger progenitor stem cells, viz. HSCs or MSCs, which follow differentiation trajectories depending on the somatic niche. Hence, it can be concluded that the true stem cells in adult body tissues are the VSELs, whereas the HSCs and MSCs are actually progenitor stem cells that arise by asymmetric cell division of VSELs. The results of the present study may help explain low efficacy reported during adult autologous stem cell trials, wherein unknowingly

  15. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2008-01-01

    GenBank (R) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 260 000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  16. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 380,000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  17. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    GenBank is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 300,000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bi-monthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  18. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2007-01-01

    GenBank (R) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 240 000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the EMBL Data Library in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov).

  19. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2006-01-01

    GenBank (R) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available DNA sequences for more than 205 000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the Web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the EMBL Data Library in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI Homepage at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  20. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W

    2009-01-01

    GenBank is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 300,000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank(R) staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  1. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2005-01-01

    GenBank is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available DNA sequences for more than 165,000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the EMBL Data Library in the UK and the DNA Data Bank of Japan helps to ensure worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI Homepage at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  2. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for over 280 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assign accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI home page: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:24217914

  3. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Cavanaugh, Mark; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    GenBank® (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI home page: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:23193287

  4. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    GenBank® (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for over 340 000 formally described species. Recent developments include a new starting page for submitters, a shift toward using accession.version identifiers rather than GI numbers, a wizard for submitting 16S rRNA sequences, and an Identical Protein Report to address growing issues of data redundancy. GenBank organizes the sequence data received from individual laboratories and large-scale sequencing projects into 18 divisions, and GenBank staff assign unique accession.version identifiers upon data receipt. Most submitters use the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the nuccore, nucest, and nucgss databases of the Entrez retrieval system, which integrates these records with a variety of other data including taxonomy nodes, genomes, protein structures, and biomedical journal literature in PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. PMID:26590407

  5. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 300 000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bi-monthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:19910366

  6. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Clark, Karen; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 250 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI home page: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:22144687

  7. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 380 000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:21071399

  8. Excluding Anti-cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin M-Positive Cord Blood Units Has a Minimal Impact on the Korean Public Cord Blood Bank Inventory.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sue; Roh, Eun Youn; Oh, Sohee; Song, Eun Young; Kim, Eui Chong; Yoon, Jong Hyun

    2017-01-24

    Cord blood units (CBUs) for transplantation should be free of communicable disease and must contain a specific amount of total nucleated cells and CD34+ cells. Although posttransplantation cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are from latent infection in patients, ensuring CMV-free CBUs by performing CMV-specific IgM and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) is one of the mandatory procedures for the safety of CBUs. However, the exclusion policies (based on these test results) vary among nations and institutions. We tested 28,000 processed CBUs between May 2006 and June 2014. The cord blood leukocytes from CMV IgM-positive samples were then subjected to NAT. The total nucleated cell and CD34+ cell counts were measured for each CBU, and the results were compared to the CMV IgM and IgG results. The seroprevalence of CMV among pregnant women was 98.1% (18,459/18,818) for IgG and 1.7% (441/25,293) for IgM. The concentration and the total number of CD34+ cells were significantly higher in CBUs from IgM-negative mothers compared to those from IgM-positive mothers (72.4/μl vs. 57.2/μl, respectively, p < 0.0001; 1.45 × 106/unit vs. 1.15 × 106/unit, respectively, p < 0.0001). Among CBUs with positive CMV IgM in their mothers' plasma or cord blood plasma, only 0.58% of the samples (3/517) had a positive NAT. The number of excluded CBUs from inventory due to positive CMV IgM in the cord blood was 54 of 18,326 (0.3%). For inventory purposes, it is appropriate to remove CBUs with positive cord blood CMV IgM findings irrespective of the NAT status as well as positive maternal CMV IgM in South Korea.

  9. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  10. Noninherited maternal antigens identify acceptable HLA mismatches: benefit to patients and cost-effectiveness for cord blood banks.

    PubMed

    Van der Zanden, Henk G M; Van Rood, Jon J; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Bakker, Jack N A; Melis, Angelo; Brand, Anneke; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Rubinstein, Pablo

    2014-11-01

    Cord blood unit (CBU) transplantations to patients mismatched for only 1 HLA antigen, which is identical to the CBU noninherited maternal antigen (NIMA), are designated as having a 6/6 "virtual" NIMA-matched phenotype and have a prognosis similar to 6/6 inherited HLA-matched CBUs. Such virtual HLA phenotypes of CBUs can be created by replacing the inherited alleles with 1 or more NIMAs. Phenotypes of Dutch patients (n = 2020) were matched against the inherited and virtual HLA phenotypes of the National Cord Blood Program CBU file (with known NIMA, n = 6827). Inherited 6/6 matches were found for 11% of the patients. Including virtual phenotypes resulted in, overall, 19-fold more different phenotypes than were inherited, conferring 6/6 virtual matches for an additional 20% of the patients, whereas another 17% might benefit from CBUs with a 4/6 HLA match and 1 NIMA match (4/6 + 1NIMA or 5/6 virtual match). The elucidation of donors' maternal HLA phenotypes can provide significant numbers of 6/6 and 5/6 virtually matched CBUs to patients and is potentially cost effective.

  11. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells transdifferentiate in vitro and integrate into the retina in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Guan, Liping; Huang, Bing; Li, Weihua; Su, Qiao; Yu, Minbin; Xu, Xiaoping; Luo, Ting; Lin, Shaochun; Sun, Xuerong; Chen, Mengfei; Chen, Xigu

    2011-06-01

    Adult peripheral blood-derived cells are able to differentiate into a variety of cell types, including nerve cells, liver-like cells and epithelial cells. However, their differentiation into retina-like cells is controversial. In the present study, transdifferentiation potential of human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells into retina-like cells and integration into the retina of mice were investigated. Freshly isolated adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells were divided into two groups: cells in group I were cultured in neural stem cell medium, and cells in group II were exposed to conditioned medium from rat retinal tissue culture. After 5 days, several distinct cell morphologies were observed, including standard mononuclear, neurons with one or two axons and elongated glial-like cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of neural stem cell, neuron and retina cell markers demonstrated that cells in both groups were nestin-, MAP2 (microtubule-associated protein)- and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive. Flow cytometry results suggested a significant increase in nestin-, MAP2- and CD16-positive cells in group I and nestin-, GFAP-, MAP2-, vimentin- and rhodopsin-positive cells in group II. To determine survival, migration and integration in vivo, cell suspensions (containing group I or group II cells) were injected into the vitreous or the peritoneum. Tissue specimens were obtained and immunostained 4 weeks after transplantation. We found that cells delivered by intravitreal injection integrated into the retina. Labelled cells were not detected in the retina of mice receiving differentiated cells by intraperitoneal injection, but cells (groups I and II) were detected in the liver and spleen. Our findings revealed that human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells could be induced to transdifferentiate into neural precursor cells and retinal progenitor cells in vitro, and the differentiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells can migrate and integrate

  12. HIV-1 Integrates Widely throughout the Genome of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Victoria H.; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Yan, Hong-bin; Huckvale, Thomas; Protasio, Anna V.; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Bukrinsky, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is the most important helminthic disease of humanity in terms of morbidity and mortality. Facile manipulation of schistosomes using lentiviruses would enable advances in functional genomics in these and related neglected tropical diseases pathogens including tapeworms, and including their non-dividing cells. Such approaches have hitherto been unavailable. Blood stream forms of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of the hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, were infected with the human HIV-1 isolate NL4-3 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The appearance of strong stop and positive strand cDNAs indicated that virions fused to schistosome cells, the nucleocapsid internalized and the RNA genome reverse transcribed. Anchored PCR analysis, sequencing HIV-1-specific anchored Illumina libraries and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) of schistosomes confirmed chromosomal integration; >8,000 integrations were mapped, distributed throughout the eight pairs of chromosomes including the sex chromosomes. The rate of integrations in the genome exceeded five per 1,000 kb and HIV-1 integrated into protein-encoding loci and elsewhere with integration bias dissimilar to that of human T cells. We estimated ~ 2,100 integrations per schistosomulum based on WGS, i.e. about two or three events per cell, comparable to integration rates in human cells. Accomplishment in schistosomes of post-entry processes essential for HIV-1replication, including integrase-catalyzed integration, was remarkable given the phylogenetic distance between schistosomes and primates, the natural hosts of the genus Lentivirus. These enigmatic findings revealed that HIV-1 was active within cells of S. mansoni, and provided the first demonstration that HIV-1 can integrate into the genome of an invertebrate. PMID:27764257

  13. HIV-1 Integrates Widely throughout the Genome of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Tsai, Isheng J; Mann, Victoria H; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Yan, Hong-Bin; Holroyd, Nancy; Huckvale, Thomas; Durrant, Caroline; Protasio, Anna V; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Berriman, Matthew; Bukrinsky, Michael I; Brindley, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is the most important helminthic disease of humanity in terms of morbidity and mortality. Facile manipulation of schistosomes using lentiviruses would enable advances in functional genomics in these and related neglected tropical diseases pathogens including tapeworms, and including their non-dividing cells. Such approaches have hitherto been unavailable. Blood stream forms of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of the hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, were infected with the human HIV-1 isolate NL4-3 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The appearance of strong stop and positive strand cDNAs indicated that virions fused to schistosome cells, the nucleocapsid internalized and the RNA genome reverse transcribed. Anchored PCR analysis, sequencing HIV-1-specific anchored Illumina libraries and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) of schistosomes confirmed chromosomal integration; >8,000 integrations were mapped, distributed throughout the eight pairs of chromosomes including the sex chromosomes. The rate of integrations in the genome exceeded five per 1,000 kb and HIV-1 integrated into protein-encoding loci and elsewhere with integration bias dissimilar to that of human T cells. We estimated ~ 2,100 integrations per schistosomulum based on WGS, i.e. about two or three events per cell, comparable to integration rates in human cells. Accomplishment in schistosomes of post-entry processes essential for HIV-1replication, including integrase-catalyzed integration, was remarkable given the phylogenetic distance between schistosomes and primates, the natural hosts of the genus Lentivirus. These enigmatic findings revealed that HIV-1 was active within cells of S. mansoni, and provided the first demonstration that HIV-1 can integrate into the genome of an invertebrate.

  14. Routine screening of blood donations at Qingdao central blood bank, China, for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA with a real-time, multiplex nucleic acid test for HBV, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus Types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongsi; Xu, Lei; Liu, Li; Feng, Qiuxia; Zhang, Longmu; Ma, Weijuan; Saldanha, John; Wang, Mingmin; Zhao, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The Roche cobas TaqScreen MPX test was used to evaluate the rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donations that were hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA reactive from June 2010 to January 2011 in Qingdao, China. HBsAg-negative samples from 65,800 voluntary blood donors were tested with the cobas TaqScreen MPX test in pools of 6 on the Roche cobas s 201 blood screening platform. Samples positive for HBV DNA and negative for HBsAg were quantitated with the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HBV test. In addition, serologic tests for HBsAg, hepatitis B surface antibody, anti-hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), anti-hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe), and hepatitis B e antigen (HBe) were done using the Roche electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. A total of 80 nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) test-reactive pools were identified and 59 pools (74%) resolved to a reactive sample. All samples were HBV DNA reactive and the viral load in each sample was quantitated. The viral loads of the samples ranged from less than 20 to 34,600 IU/mL; 13 samples (22%) had viral loads of more than 20 IU/mL, 27 samples (45.8%) had viral loads of less than 20 IU/mL, and 19 samples (32.2%) had undetectable viral loads. Of the 59 NAT-reactive samples, 40 (67.8%) were anti-HBc positive. Fifteen of the 59 samples could not be confirmed as NAT reactive either by an alternative NAT test or by serology. The HBV NAT yield in blood donors in Qingdao is 0.06% (38/65,800). This study confirmed the value of NAT for interdicting HBV-positive donations and preventing transfusion-transmitted HBV infections. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Using GenBank.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David

    2007-01-01

    GenBank(R) is a comprehensive database of publicly available DNA sequences for more than 205,000 named organisms and for more than 60,000 within the embryophyta, obtained through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure, and domain information and the biomedical journal literature through PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available through FTP. GenBank usage scenarios ranging from local analyses of the data available through FTP to online analyses supported by the NCBI Web-based tools are discussed. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI Homepage at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  16. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    GenBank® (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for over 300 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assign accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. PMID:25414350

  17. Using GenBank.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Eric W; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    GenBank(®) is a comprehensive database of publicly available DNA sequences for 300,000 named organisms, more than 110,000 within the embryophyta, obtained through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, as well as the biomedical journal literature in PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. GenBank usage scenarios ranging from local analyses of the data available via FTP to online analyses supported by the NCBI web-based tools are discussed. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov .

  18. Novel methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus clone isolated from patients with haematological diseases at the Blood Bank Centre of Amazon, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristina Motta; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Ferreira, William Antunes; de Oliveira, Cíntia Mara Costa; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus remains a severe public health problem worldwide. This research was intended to identify the presence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci clones and their staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-type isolate from patients with haematologic diseases presenting bacterial infections who were treated at the Blood Bank of the state of Amazonas in Brazil. Phenotypic and genotypic tests, such as SCCmec types and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), were developed to detect and characterise methicillin-resistant isolates. A total of 26 Gram-positive bacteria were isolated, such as: Staphylococcus epidermidis (8/27), Staphylococcus intermedius (4/27) and Staphylococcus aureus (4/27). Ten methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were identified. MLST revealed three different sequence types: S. aureus ST243, S. epidermidis ST2 and a new clone of S. epidermidis, ST365. These findings reinforce the potential of dissemination presented by multi-resistant Staphylococcus and they suggest the introduction of monitoring actions to reduce the spread of pathogenic clonal lineages of S. aureus and S. epidermidis to avoid hospital infections and mortality risks. PMID:23579805

  19. The ethical, legal and social implications of umbilical cord blood banking: learning important lessons from the protection of human genetic information.

    PubMed

    Weisbrot, David

    2012-03-01

    Internationally networked umbilical cord blood banks hold great promise for better clinical outcomes, but also raise a host of potential ethical and legal concerns. There is now significant accumulated experience in Australia and overseas with regard to the establishment of human genetic research databases and tissue collections, popularly known as "biobanks". For example, clear lessons emerge from the controversies that surrounded, stalled or derailed the establishment of some early biobanks, such as Iceland's deCODE, Autogen's Tonga database, a proposed biobank in Newfoundland, Canada, and the proposed Taiwan biobank. More recent efforts in the United Kingdom, Japan, Quebec and Tasmania have been relatively more successful in generating public support, recognising the critical need for openness and transparency, and ample public education and debate, in order to build community acceptance and legitimacy. Strong attention must be paid to ensuring that other concerns--about privacy, discrimination, informed consent, governance, security, commercial fairness and financial probity--are addressed in structural terms and monitored thereafter, in order to maintain public confidence and avoid a backlash that inevitably would imperil such research. Once lost, credibility is very difficult to restore.

  20. Gender and chronological age affect erythrocyte membrane oxidative indices in citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-formula 1 (CPDA-1) blood bank storage condition.

    PubMed

    Erman, Hayriye; Aksu, Uğur; Belce, Ahmet; Atukeren, Pınar; Uzun, Duygu; Cebe, Tamer; Kansu, Ahmet D; Gelişgen, Remisa; Uslu, Ezel; Aydın, Seval; Çakatay, Ufuk

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that in vitro storage lesions lead to membrane dysfunction and decreased number of functional erythrocytes. As erythrocytes get older, in storage media as well as in peripheral circulation, they undergo a variety of biochemical changes. In our study, the erythrocytes with different age groups in citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-formula 1 (CPDA-1) storage solution were used in order to investigate the possible effect of gender factor on oxidative damage. Oxidative damage biomarkers in erythrocyte membranes such as ferric reducing antioxidant power, pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance, protein-bound advance glycation end products, and sialic acid were analyzed. Current study reveals that change in membrane redox status during blood-bank storage condition also depends on both gender depended homeostatic factors and the presence of CPDA-1. During the storage period in CPDA-1, erythrocytes from the male donors are mostly affected by free radical-mediated oxidative stress but erythrocytes obtained from females are severely affected by glyoxidative stress.

  1. Feasibility of implementing an automated culture system for bacteria screening in platelets in the blood bank routine.

    PubMed

    Castro, E; Bueno, J L; Barea, L; González, R

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood components is the principal infectious complication linked to transfusion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the applicability of an automated culture system for platelets. 10 141 platelet concentrates were cultured individually and in pools of five on storage days 1 and 7 using Bact/Alert system aerobic bottles. A modified collection bag was used for improved sampling. Five-millilitre samples were cultured at 37 degrees C for 7 days. Only those samples where the same bacteria were identified in reculture were considered true positives (TP). Homogeneity of proportions was tested by Fisher's exact test. The rate of TP was 30 per 100 000 (95% CI, 6.1-86.4) sampling on day 1; 33 per 100 000 (95% CI, 7-96) on day 7; and 40 per 100 000 (95% CI, 1.28-122.4) if the screening was based on taking both samples (day 1 and 7). Only one TP was detected in the pool testing. The time for detection among TPs on day 1 ranged between 30 and 134 h. The system is not considered practical for use as a routine screening method, as the time for detection is too long. Pool testing is insensitive. Faster screening methods or pathogen-inactivation systems are needed.

  2. Association of an In-House Blood Bank with Therapy and Outcome in Severely Injured Patients: An Analysis of 18,573 Patients from the TraumaRegister DGU®

    PubMed Central

    Debus, Florian; Lefering, Rolf; Lechler, Philipp; Schwarting, Tim; Bockmann, Benjamin; Strasser, Erwin; Mand, Carsten; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Frink, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemorrhagic shock remains one of the most common causes of death in severely injured patients. It is unknown to what extent the presence of a blood bank in a trauma center influences therapy and outcome in such patients. Material and Methods We retrospectively analyzed prospectively recorded data from the TraumaRegister DGU® and the TraumaNetzwerk DGU®. Inclusion criteria were Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥ 16, primarily treated patients, and hospital admission 2 years before or after the audit process. Results Complete data sets of 18,573 patients were analyzed. Of 457 hospitals included, 33.3% had an in-house blood bank. In trauma centers with a blood bank (HospBB), packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (21.0% vs. 17.4%, p < 0.001) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) (13.9% vs. 10.2%, p <0.001) were transfused significantly more often than in hospitals without a blood bank (Hosp0). However, no significant difference was found for in-hospital mortality (standard mortality ratio [SMR, 0.907 vs. 0.945; p = 0.25). In patients with clinically apparent shock on admission, no difference of performed transfusions were present between HospBB and Hosp0 (PRBCs, 51.4% vs. 50.4%, p = 0.67; FFP, 32.7% vs. 32.7%, p = 0.99), and no difference in in-hospital mortality was observed (SMR, 0.907 vs. 1.004; p = 0.21). Discussion In HospBB transfusions were performed more frequently in severely injured patients without positively affecting the 24h mortality or in-house mortality. Easy access may explain a more liberal transfusion concept. PMID:27812103

  3. Relocation of cryopreserved umbilical cord blood samples using a high-capacity dry shipper to a new laboratory: a cord blood banking experience.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Kalaivani; Wong, Chee-Yin; Vijayan, Vickneswary Veera; Ooi, Ghee-Chien; Ng, Mei-Theng; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Then, Kong-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Processed umbilical cord blood (UCB) must be stored at cryogenic temperature at all times to maintain the quality and viability of the cells. However, a challenge is presented in the form of moving a large number of cryopreserved UCB samples to a new location. In this report, we share our experience on relocating more than 100,000 units of cryopreserved UCB samples stored in 12 liquid nitrogen freezers (LNFs) to our new laboratory. For quality control purposes, 2 weeks before relocation, donor UCB samples were processed, cryopreserved, and stored in each LNF. On relocation day, half of the samples were retrieved to determine total nucleated cell count, percentage of CD34+ cells, and cell viability as controls for later comparison. UCB samples were transferred into dry shippers before being relocated to the new laboratory. Upon arrival, LNFs were serviced before transferring UCB samples back into its original location within the LNF. The remaining donor UCB samples were retrieved and analyzed for the same tests mentioned. We found no significant differences in pre- and postrelocation values of the tests performed. All UCB samples were successfully relocated into the new laboratory without affecting the quality. © 2014 AABB.

  4. Chronic systemic IL-1β exacerbates central neuroinflammation independently of the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Murta, Verónica; Farías, María Isabel; Pitossi, Fernando Juan; Ferrari, Carina Cintia

    2015-01-15

    Peripheral circulating cytokines are involved in immune to brain communication and systemic inflammation is considered a risk factor for flaring up the symptoms in most neurodegenerative diseases. We induced both central inflammatory demyelinating lesion, and systemic inflammation with an interleukin-1β expressing adenovector. The peripheral pro-inflammatory stimulus aggravated the ongoing central lesion independently of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This model allows studying the role of specific molecules and cells (neutrophils) from the innate immune system, in the relationship between central and peripheral communication, and on relapsing episodes of demyelinating lesions, along with the role of BBB integrity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiretroviral Treatment with Efavirenz Disrupts the Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Increases Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Luc; Dygert, Levi; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral drugs (ARVd) changed the prognosis of HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic disease. However, even with undetectable viral loads, patients still develop a wide range of pathologies, including cerebrovascular complications and stroke. It is hypothesized that toxic side effects of ARVd may contribute to these effects. To address this notion, we evaluated the impact of several non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI; Efavirenz, Etravirine, Rilpivirine and Nevirapine) on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and their impact on severity of stroke. Among studied drugs, Efavirenz, but not other NNRTIs, altered claudin-5 expression, increased endothelial permeability, and disrupted the blood-brain barrier integrity. Importantly, Efavirenz exposure increased the severity of stroke in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Taken together, these results indicate that selected ARVd can exacerbate HIV-associated cerebrovascular pathology. Therefore, careful consideration should be taken when choosing an anti-retroviral therapy regimen. PMID:28008980

  6. Microfluidic cytometers with integrated on-chip optical systems for red blood cell and platelet counting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Li, Qin; Hu, Xiaoming; Lo, Yuhwa

    2016-11-01

    A microfluidic cytometer with integrated on-chip optical systems was designed for red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) counting. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the microfluidic cytometer with on-chip optical signal detection were described. With process using only a single mask, the device that integrates optical fibers and on-chip microlens with microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane layer by standard soft photolithography. This compact structure increased the sensitivity of the device and eliminated time-consuming free-space optical alignments. The microfluidic cytometer was used to count red blood cells and platelets. Forward scatter and extinction were collected simultaneously for each cell. Experimental results indicated that the microfluidic cytometer exhibited comparable performance with a conventional cytometer and demonstrated superior capacity to detect on-chip optical signals in a highly compact, simple, truly portable, and low-cost format that is well suitable for point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  7. Research and fabrication of integrated bio-sensor for blood analysis based on µTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, De; Wei, Jianxia; Tong, Zhengrong; Chen, Caihe; Cui, Yuming; Xu, Kexin; Si, Qin; Li, Chao; Liu, Jie

    2007-01-01

    For simultaneously detecting multi-parameters of blood in the clinical diagnosis, the analysis apparatus should be smaller in size, more reliable and sensitive. So a kind of integrated bio-sensor for blood analysis based on Micro Total Analysis System (μTAS) is presented. It provides modern bio-sensor prospect with a novel technology. A multi-parameters of blood analysis integration sensor is μTAS bio-sensor based on 4 groups of interdigital array (IDA)microelectrodes. The IDA microelectrodes are fabricated on glass substrates by photography, film deposition and other microfabrication techniques. Thin-film gold microelectrode with a thickness of 250nm is deposited on a chromium-adhesion layer. The finger microelectrode width and space are both 10μm. The work space is 2×2cm2. The concentration of Blood sugar, Total Cholesterol, Acetone body and Lactic acid is measured by detecting steady-state limiting currents in IDA microelectrodes modified with enzymes on the "generate-collect" mode. Blood distribution structure is designed and fabricated, to distribute blood and isolate reaction areas. By contrasting two kinds of process flow based on lift-off and etching, etching is adopted to preparation method of microelectrode. A multi-channel apparatus for current measurement is accompleted. The system characteristics of the bio-sensor are tested. The curve of the apparatus time to current response is achieved by testing on real-time. The relationships between parameter concentration and current are analyzed in detail. The experimental data indicates: current measurement dimension 0~40μA, certainty of measurement 0.1μA, the performances of the bio-sensor meets design requirement.

  8. Control of muscle blood flow during exercise: local factors and integrative mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sarelius, I.; Pohl, U.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the control mechanisms of blood flow within the vasculature of skeletal muscle is clearly fascinating from a theoretical point of view due to the extremely tight coupling of tissue oxygen demands and blood flow. It also has practical implications as impairment of muscle blood flow and its prevention/reversal by exercise training has a major impact on widespread diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Here we analyse the role of mediators generated by skeletal muscle activity on smooth muscle relaxation in resistance vessels in vitro and in vivo. We summarize their cellular mechanisms of action and their relative roles in exercise hyperaemia with regard to early and late responses. We also discuss the consequences of interactions among mediators with regard to identifying their functional significance. We focus on (potential) mechanisms integrating the action of the mediators and their effects among the cells of the intact arteriolar wall. This integration occurs both locally, partly due to myoendothelial communication, and axially along the vascular tree, thus enabling the local responses to be manifest along an entire functional vessel path. Though the concept of signal integration is intriguing, its specific role on the control of exercise hyperaemia and the consequences of its modulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions still await additional analysis. PMID:20353492

  9. Cordycepin attenuates traumatic brain injury-induced impairments of blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Wang, Aihua; He, Yan; Si, Zhihua; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Shanchao; Wang, Kun; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Yiming

    2016-10-01

    Loss of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity is a downstream event caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). BBB integrity is affected by certain physiological conditions, including inflammation and oxidative stress. Cordycepin is a susbtance with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate whether cordycepin affects TBI-induced impairments of BBB integrity. Using TBI rats as the in vivo model and applying multiple techniques, including stroke severity evaluation, Evans blue assessment, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and ELISA, we investigated the dose-dependent protective effects of cordycepin on the TBI-induced impairments of BBB integrity. Cordycepin treatment attenuated the TBI-induced impairments in a dose-dependent manner, and played a role in protecting BBB integrity. Cordycepin was able to alleviate TBI-induced loss of tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which are important for BBB integrity. Moreover, cordycepin suppressed pro-inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, iNOS, MPO and MMP-9, and promoted anti-inflammation-associated factors arginase 1 and IL-10. Furthermore, cordycepin inhibited NADPH oxidase (NOX) expression and activity following TBI, probably through NOX1, but not NOX2 and NOX4. Cordycepin has protective effects against brain damages induced by TBI. The protection of cordycepin on BBB integrity was probably achieved through recovery of tight junction proteins, inhibition of local inflammation, and prevention of NOX activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Ethical aspects of human embryonic stem cell use and commercial umbilical cord blood stem cell banking. Ethical reflections on the occasion of the regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Virt, G

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products also includes therapies with human embryonic stem cells. The use of these stem cells is controversially and heavily discussed. Contrary to the use of adult stem cells, medical and ethical problems concerning the use of human embryonic stem cells persists, because this use is based on the destruction of human life at the very beginning. The regulation foresees, therefore, subsidiarity within the European Member States. Although there are no ethical problems in principle with the use of stem cells from the umbilical cord blood, there are social ethical doubts with the banking of these stem cells for autologous use without any currently foreseeable medical advantage by commercial blood banks. Also in this case subsidiarity is valid.

  11. Blood DNA Yield but Not Integrity or Methylation Is Impacted After Long-Term Storage.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Alexandre; De Witt, Brian; Ammerlaan, Wim; Betsou, Fay; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Collection of human whole blood for genomic DNA extraction is part of numerous clinical studies. Since DNA extraction cannot always be performed at the time of sample collection, whole blood samples may be stored for years before being processed. The use of appropriate storage conditions is then critical to obtain DNA in sufficient quantity and of adequate quality in order to obtain reliable results from the subsequent molecular biological analyses. In this study, EDTA whole blood samples were collected from 8 healthy volunteers, and different durations (up to 1 year) and temperatures (room temperature, 4°C, -20°C, and -80°C) of storage were compared. The effect of the addition of a DNA preservative agent was also assessed before and after storage. DNA concentrations measured by UV spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry were used to calculate DNA extraction yields and double-strand DNA ratios. DNA integrity was controlled by agarose gel electrophoresis and long-range polymerase chain reaction. The impact of storage conditions on DNA methylation was also evaluated. Results showed that certain storage conditions have a significant impact on the DNA extraction yield but little or no effect on DNA integrity and methylation. Storage of EDTA blood at -80°C guarantees high-quality DNA with a good yield. Higher DNA extraction yields were obtained with the addition of a DNA preservative agent before thawing EDTA blood stored at -20°C or -80°C. Long-term storage at room temperature in the presence of a DNA preservative agent also appeared to be a reliable procedure.

  12. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    PubMed

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  13. Baseline extracellular potassium level as an indicator of the rate of increase of the same on further storage in CPDA-1 whole blood units: a potential approach to complement FIFO system for prioritisation of blood bags for release from blood-banks.

    PubMed

    Baliarsingh, S; Jaiswal, M

    2014-02-01

    Potassium levels in stored blood bags increases as they age. Hyperkalemia in transfused blood has undesirable cardiac effects. Within a 19-month period, baseline and weekly samples from 15 CPDA-1 whole blood bags were collected till 28 days of storage and analysed for potassium, sodium, uric acid, albumin and whole blood haemoglobin. One unit increase in baseline (0 day) potassium in extracellular fluid of blood units was associated with the following increases in potassium levels on later days of storage: around two unit increase at 1 week (r2 = 0·50, P < 0·01) of storage; four units increase at 2 weeks (r2 = 0·64, P < 0·001) and 3 weeks (r2 = 0·51, P < 0·01) of storage; six units at 4 weeks (r2 = 0·53, P < 0·01) of storage. Baseline whole blood haemoglobin showed a moderate association with baseline potassium (r2 = 0·36, P < 0·05) and 2-week potassium (r2 = 0·35, P < 0·05) values. For CPDA-1 blood bags (i) low baseline potassium blood bags might be preferred for transfusion in cases demanding a low potassium load and (ii) coordinating the ‘first-in-first-out’ (FIFO) policy with ‘early release of blood-bags with high initial potassium’ might be helpful in improving the release of suitable blood units from blood-banks.

  14. An integrated chip for rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection of cardiac biomarkers from fingerprick blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jun; Luo, Zhan Hong Henry; Huang, Min Joon; Ang, Jun'an Jason; Kang, Tae Goo; Ji, Hongmiao

    2011-10-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of death among adults worldwide. Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a first test when a patient suffering from chest pain sees a doctor, however, it is lack of the required sensitivity. Standard assays to detect cardiac biomarkers, like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are sensitive, but suffer from important sample and reagent consumption in large-scale studies. Moreover they are performed in central laboratories of clinics and hospitals and take a long time, which is highly incompatible with the quick decisions needed to save a heart attack patient. Herein, we describe an integrated chip allowing rapid, sensitive, and simultaneous analysis of three cardiac biomarkers in fingerprick blood. The integrated chip is composed of a filtration chip for plasma separation from blood and a silicon nanowire (SiNW) array sensor chip for protein detection. These two chips are fabricated separately and bonded to form a single unit after alignment. The integrated chip is capable of reducing the dead volume of the sample by eliminating the tubing between the two chips. After the plasma is filtrated by the filtration chip, the SiNW sensor, spotted with three different antibodies, enabled us to detect three cardiac biomarkers, troponin T (cTnT), creatine kinase MM (CK-MM) and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), simultaneously. The integrated chip is able to attain a low detection limit of 1 pg/ml for the three cardiac biomarkers from 2 μl blood in 45 min. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid detection of single bacteria in unprocessed blood using Integrated Comprehensive Droplet Digital Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Ku; Ali, M. Monsur; Zhang, Kaixiang; Huang, Susan S.; Peterson, Ellena; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Zhao, Weian

    2014-01-01

    Blood stream infection or sepsis is a major health problem worldwide, with extremely high mortality, which is partly due to the inability to rapidly detect and identify bacteria in the early stages of infection. Here we present a new technology termed ‘Integrated Comprehensive Droplet Digital Detection’ (IC 3D) that can selectively detect bacteria directly from milliliters of diluted blood at single-cell sensitivity in a one-step, culture- and amplification-free process within 1.5–4 h. The IC 3D integrates real-time, DNAzyme-based sensors, droplet microencapsulation and a high-throughput 3D particle counter system. Using Escherichia coli as a target, we demonstrate that the IC 3D can provide absolute quantification of both stock and clinical isolates of E. coli in spiked blood within a broad range of extremely low concentration from 1 to 10,000 bacteria per ml with exceptional robustness and limit of detection in the single digit regime. PMID:25391809

  16. Apelin Inhibits Diet-Induced Obesity by Enhancing Lymphatic and Blood Vessel Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Sawane, Mika; Kajiya, Kentaro; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takagi, Masaya; Muramatsu, Fumitaka; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is tightly associated with the outgrowth of adipose tissue, leading to obesity, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, mainly because expanding adipose tissue requires an increased nutrient supply from blood vessels. Therefore, induction of vessel abnormality by adipokines has been well-studied, whereas how altered vascular function promotes obesity is relatively unexplored. Also, surviving Prox1 heterozygous mice have shown abnormal lymphatic patterning and adult-onset obesity, indicating that accumulation of adipocytes could be closely linked with lymphatic function. Here, we propose a new antiobesity strategy based on enhancement of lymphatic and blood vessel integrity with apelin. Apelin knockout (KO) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) showed an obese phenotype associated with abnormal lymphatic and blood vessel enlargement. Fatty acids present in the HFD induced hyperpermeability of endothelial cells, causing adipocyte differentiation, whereas apelin promoted vascular stabilization. Moreover, treatment of apelin KO mice with a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, that were fed an HFD improved vascular function and also attenuated obesity. Finally, apelin transgenic mice showed decreased subcutaneous adipose tissue attributable to inhibition of HFD-induced hyperpermeability of vessels. These results indicate that apelin inhibits HFD-induced obesity by enhancing vessel integrity. Apelin could serve as a therapeutic target for treating obesity and related diseases. PMID:23378608

  17. Higher Blood Pressure Partially Links Greater Adiposity to Reduced Brain White Matter Integrity.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ben; Muldoon, Matthew F; Gianaros, Peter J; Jennings, J Richard

    2016-09-01

    Adiposity and elevated blood pressure (BP) are associated with brain structure abnormalities, but whether these effects are independent is unknown. We tested whether associations between adiposity and white matter integrity were explained by elevated BP. A sample of 209 middle-aged adults underwent diffusion tensor imaging to quantify indirect metrics of white matter structural integrity. These included putative markers of global white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy (FA)), axonal integrity (axial diffusivity), and myelin integrity (radial diffusivity). Participants were either normotensive or prehypertensive. After adjusting for age and sex, regression analyses showed that waist circumference was associated with FA (β = -0.15, P < 0.05) and axial diffusivity (β = -0.24, P < 0.001), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was associated with FA (β = -0.21, P < 0.05). Direct and indirect effect analyses showed that waist circumference was indirectly associated with whole brain FA through MAP (β = -0.06), and directly related to whole brain axial diffusivity, independent of MAP (β = -0.24). Examination of specific white matter tracts yielded similar results; waist circumference was indirectly related to FA through MAP and radial diffusivity, and directly related to axial diffusivity, independent of MAP. Supplemental analyses using body mass index, systolic BP, and diastolic BP also yielded similar results. These findings suggest at least 2 mechanisms explain the adiposity and white matter association: one pathway through elevated BP impacting global white matter integrity and reducing integrity of the myelin sheath, and at least one other adiposity-specific pathway decreasing axonal integrity. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Preclinical characterization of DUOC-01, a cell therapy product derived from banked umbilical cord blood for use as an adjuvant to umbilical cord blood transplantation for treatment of inherited metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurtzberg, Joanne; Buntz, Susan; Gentry, Tracy; Noeldner, Pamela; Ozamiz, April; Rusche, Benjamin; Storms, Robert W; Wollish, Amy; Wenger, David A; Balber, Andrew E

    2015-06-01

    Cord blood (CB) transplantation slows neurodegeneration during certain inherited metabolic diseases. However, the number of donor cells in the brain of patients does not appear to be sufficient to provide benefit until several months after transplant. We developed the cell product DUOC-01 to provide therapeutic effects in the early post-transplant period. DUOC-01 cultures initiated from banked CB units were characterized by use of time-lapse photomicroscopy during the 21-day manufacturing process. Antigen expression was measured by means of flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry; transcripts for cytokines and enzymes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction; activities of lysosomal enzymes by direct biochemical analysis; alloreactivity of DUOC-01 and of peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells (MNC) to DUOC-01 by mixed lymphocyte culture methods; and cytokine secretion by Bioplex assays. DUOC-01 cultures contained highly active, attached, motile, slowly proliferating cells that expressed common (cluster of differentiation [CD]11b, CD14 and Iba1), M1 type (CD16, inducible nitric oxide synthase), and M2-type (CD163, CD206) macrophage or microglia markers. Activities of 11 disease-relevant lysosomal enzymes in DUOC-01 products were similar to those of normal PB cells. All DUOC-01 products secreted interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. Accumulation of transforming growth factor-β, IL-1β, interferon-γ and TNF-α in supernatants was variable. IL-12, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 were not detected at significant concentrations. Galactocerebrosidase, transforming growth factor-β and IL-10 transcripts were specifically enriched in DUOC-01 relative to CB cells. PB MNCs proliferated and released cytokines in response to DUOC-01. DUOC-01 did not proliferate in response to mismatched MNC. DUOC-01 has potential as an adjunctive cell therapy to myeloablative CB transplant for treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular

  19. Preclinical characterization of DUOC-01, a cell therapy product derived from banked umbilical cord blood for use as an adjuvant to umbilical cord blood transplantation for treatment of inherited metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    KURTZBERG, JOANNE; BUNTZ, SUSAN; GENTRY, TRACY; NOELDNER, PAMELA; OZAMIZ, APRIL; RUSCHE, BENJAMIN; STORMS, ROBERT W.; WOLLISH, AMY; WENGER, DAVID A.; BALBER, ANDREW E.

    2016-01-01

    Background aims Cord blood (CB) transplantation slows neurodegeneration during certain inherited metabolic diseases. However, the number of donor cells in the brain of patients does not appear to be sufficient to provide benefit until several months after transplant. We developed the cell product DUOC-01 to provide therapeutic effects in the early post-transplant period. Methods DUOC-01 cultures initiated from banked CB units were characterized by use of time-lapse photomicroscopy during the 21-day manufacturing process. Antigen expression was measured by means of flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry; transcripts for cytokines and enzymes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction; activities of lysosomal enzymes by direct biochemical analysis; alloreactivity of DUOC-01 and of peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells (MNC) to DUOC-01 by mixed lymphocyte culture methods; and cytokine secretion by Bioplex assays. Results DUOC-01 cultures contained highly active, attached, motile, slowly proliferating cells that expressed common (cluster of differentiation [CD]11b, CD14 and Iba1), M1 type (CD16, inducible nitric oxide synthase), and M2-type (CD163, CD206) macrophage or microglia markers. Activities of 11 disease-relevant lysosomal enzymes in DUOC-01 products were similar to those of normal PB cells. All DUOC-01 products secreted interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. Accumulation of transforming growth factor-β, IL-1β, interferon-γ and TNF-α in supernatants was variable. IL-12, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 were not detected at significant concentrations. Galactocerebrosidase, transforming growth factor-β and IL-10 transcripts were specifically enriched in DUOC-01 relative to CB cells. PB MNCs proliferated and released cytokines in response to DUOC-01. DUOC-01 did not proliferate in response to mismatched MNC. Conclusions DUOC-01 has potential as an adjunctive cell therapy to myeloablative CB transplant for treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. PMID:25770677

  20. Microfluidic cytometers with integrated on-chip optical components for blood cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yingying; Li, Qin; Hu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    In the last two decades, microfluidic technologies have shown the great potential in developing portable and point-of care testing blood cell analysis devices. It is challenging to integrate all free-space detecting components in a single microfluidic platform. In this paper, a microfluidic cytometer with integrated on-chip optical components was demonstrated. To facilitate on-chip detection, the device integrated optical fibers and on-chip microlens with microfluidic channels on one polydimethylsiloxane layer by standard soft photolithography. This compact design increased the sensitivity of the device and also eliminated time-consuming free-space optical alignments. Polystyrene particles, together with red blood cells and platelets, were measured in the microfluidic cytometer by small angle forward scatter. Experimental results indicated that the performance of the microfluidic device was comparable to a conventional cytometer. And it was also demonstrated its ability to detect on-chip optical signals in a highly compact, simple, truly portable and low cost format which was perfect suitable for point-of-care testing clinical hematology diagnostics.

  1. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Reduction of allogeneic red blood cell usage during cardiac surgery by an integrated intra- and postoperative blood salvage strategy: results of a randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Weltert, Luca; Nardella, Saverio; Rondinelli, Maria Beatrice; Pierelli, Luca; De Paulis, Ruggero

    2013-04-01

    The amount of allogeneic blood transfusion may relate to worse outcome in cardiac surgery. The reinfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) lost by patients, including those of chest drains, is a promising strategy to minimize allogeneic transfusions. To verify this hypotheis, 1047 cardiac surgery patients were randomly assigned to either traditional intraoperative blood salvage followed by chest drain insertion or intra- and postoperative strategy with the Haemonetics cardioPAT system. Allogeneic RBC transfusion rate (primary endpoint) and postoperative complications (secondary endpoint) were recorded at the time of discharge from the hospital and at first month follow-up visit, respectively. The cardioPAT arm received 1.20 units of allogeneic RBCs per patient, whereas the control group required 2.11 units per patient, and this difference proved to be highly significant (p=0.02). We observed a comparable 45-day mortality rate but a lower rate of deep vein thrombosis (p=0.04) and atrial fibrillation (p=0.04) in the cardioPAT arm. A significant reduction in patient exposure to allogeneic RBCs was observed in the cardioPAT system arm. Complications were slightly less frequent in the cardioPAT group. The use of the cardioPAT is a safe and effective strategy to reduce allogeneic RBC transfusions in cardiac surgery. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Impact of care management processes and integration of care on blood pressure control in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken; Boulanger, Luke; Smalarz, Amy; Wu, Ning; Fraser, Kimberly; Wogen, Jenifer

    2013-02-27

    Fragmentation within health care systems may negatively impact the quality of chronic disease patient care. We sought to evaluate the relationship between care management processes (CMP), integration of services, and blood pressure (BP) control among diabetic patients. Retrospective chart reviews were performed for a random sample of adult diabetic hypertensive patients (n = 2,162) from 28 physician organizations in the United States (US). A modified version of the Physician Practice Connection Readiness Survey (PPC-RS) was completed by the chief medical officer at each site. The PPC-RS measured health system organization, delivery system redesign, decision support, clinical information systems, and self-management support, and an integration scale measured structure, functions, and financial risk. Correlations between PPC and integration scores and BP outcomes were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Approximately 39.9% of diabetic patients had controlled BP. Mean total PPC score across sites was 55, with highest mean scores for health system organization (81), followed by design support (60), clinical information systems (57), self-management support (39), and delivery system redesign (39). Mean integration score was 46 (SD 27, range 4-93), and means of subscores were 64 for structure, 33 for financial risk, and 42 for function. Clinical information systems subscore was correlated with uncontrolled BP (r = -0.38, p < 0.05), while association with total PPC score was strong but not significant at p < 0.05 (r = -0.32). Total integration score and the structure subscore were significantly correlated with BP control (r = 0.38, p < 0.05, and r = 0.49, p < 0.01). This study suggests that CMP and service integration may be associated with better outcomes in diabetes, though results were mixed and limited by a small number of participating sites. Primary care implementation of integrated electronic medical records may have a beneficial effect on patient

  4. Statistics of the integrated backscatter estimate from a blood-mimicking fluid.

    PubMed

    Cakareski, E; Pedersen, P C

    2001-11-01

    This work evaluates the variance of the integrated backscatter (IBS) from moving blood [or blood-mimicking fluid (bmf)] as a way of determining the quality of the mean IBS estimate. The main motivation for this work comes from the fact that absolute IBS values from tissues adjacent to arterial blood can be found by normalizing the measured backscatter energy with the IBS of moving, deaggregated blood. The paper describes the parameters that control the statistics of the IBS estimate, which is calculated for the stochastic ultrasound backscatter signals from flowing blood. It further formulates how the measurement parameters should be specified so that an appropriately low blood IBS variance is ensured or, alternatively, a specified accuracy of the tissue IBS estimate is obtained. First, the paper provides an analytic formulation of the statistics of the IBS, based on a sequence of sampled echoes from a nonstationary Gaussian scattering medium. The analysis incorporates the correlation between the sample values as well as the correlation between the IBS of the individual echoes. The estimate of the mean IBS has been shown to be chi-squared distributed with a determinable order. With the degree of correlation between the samples and between the IBS of individual echoes specified, the number of measurements required to obtain an IBS estimate with a specified variance is readily calculated. Next, a sequence of synthetic echoes is produced and arranged as columns in a data matrix. The echoes are generated such that the second-order statistics along the rows and columns of the matrix match that of actually observed echoes. The actual variance of the mean IBS estimate for the synthetic echoes is calculated and compared with the variance determined from the analytic model, and a good agreement has been found. Finally, sequences of actual backscattered echoes from circulating blood-mimicking fluid are acquired and analyzed to determine the variance of their mean IBS

  5. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert A.; van Houwelingen, Marc J.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-12-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood pressure waveform monitoring based on following the arterial pressure with a counter pressure. Using the capacitive sensor, we demonstrate negligible hysteresis in the valve control characteristics. Fabrication of the valve requires only two mask steps for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and one release etch.

  6. Astrocytic laminin regulates pericyte differentiation and maintains blood brain barrier integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Zu-Lin; Norris, Erin H.; Strickland, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is not only a consequence of but also contributes to many neurological disorders, including stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. How the basement membrane (BM) contributes to the normal functioning of the BBB remains elusive. Here we use conditional knockout mice and an acute adenovirus-mediated knockdown model to show that lack of astrocytic laminin, a brain-specific BM component, induces BBB breakdown. Using functional blocking antibody and RNAi, we further demonstrate that astrocytic laminin, by binding to integrin α2 receptor, prevents pericyte differentiation from the BBB-stabilizing resting stage to the BBB-disrupting contractile stage, and thus maintains the integrity of BBB. Additionally, loss of astrocytic laminin decreases aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction protein expression. Altogether, we report a critical role for astrocytic laminin in BBB regulation and pericyte differentiation. These results indicate that astrocytic laminin maintains the integrity of BBB through, at least in part, regulation of pericyte differentiation.

  7. Integrated Bioinformatics Approach Reveals Crosstalk Between Tumor Stroma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Lang; Wang, Dan; Wei, Na; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Cancer progression is driven not only by cancer cell intrinsic alterations and interactions with tumor microenvironment, but also by systemic effects. Integration of multiple profiling data may provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of complex systemic processes. We performed a bioinformatic analysis of two public available microarray datasets for breast tumor stroma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, featuring integrated transcriptomics data, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and protein subcellular localization, to identify genes and biological pathways that contribute to dialogue between tumor stroma and the peripheral circulation. Genes of the integrin family as well as CXCR4 proved to be hub nodes of the crosstalk network and may play an important role in response to stroma-derived chemoattractants. This study pointed to potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target systemic signals travelling through the circulation and interdict tumor cell recruitment.

  8. Integration of repulsive guidance cues generates avascular zones that shape mammalian blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Stryder M; Fletcher, Peter J; Moran, Carlos; Xu, Ke; Neufeld, Gera; Chauvet, Sophie; Mann, Fanny; Krieg, Paul A; Cleaver, Ondine

    2012-01-06

    Positive signals, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, direct endothelial cells (ECs) to specific locations during blood vessel formation. Less is known about repulsive signal contribution to shaping vessels. Recently, "neuronal guidance cues" have been shown to influence EC behavior, particularly in directing sprouting angiogenesis by repelling ECs. However, their role during de novo blood vessel formation remains unexplored. To identify signals that guide and pattern the first mammalian blood vessels. Using genetic mouse models, we show that blood vessels are sculpted through the generation of stereotyped avascular zones by EC-repulsive cues. We demonstrate that Semaphorin3E (Sema3E) is a key factor that shapes the paired dorsal aortae in mouse, as sema3E(-/-) embryos develop an abnormally branched aortic plexus with a markedly narrowed avascular midline. In vitro cultures and avian grafting experiments show strong repulsion of ECs by Sema3E-expressing cells. We further identify the mouse notochord as a rich source of multiple redundant neuronal guidance cues. Mouse embryos that lack notochords fail to form cohesive aortic vessels because of loss of the avascular midline, yet maintain lateral avascular zones. We demonstrate that lateral avascular zones are directly generated by the lateral plate mesoderm, a critical source of Sema3E. These findings demonstrate that Sema3E-generated avascular zones are critical regulators of mammalian cardiovascular patterning and are the first to identify a repulsive role for the lateral plate mesoderm. Integration of multiple, and in some cases redundant, repulsive cues from various tissues is critical to patterning the first embryonic blood vessels.

  9. Performance Evaluation and Labeling Comprehension of a New Blood Glucose Monitoring System with Integrated Information Management

    PubMed Central

    List, Susan M; Starks, Nykole; Baum, John; Greene, Carmine; Pardo, Scott; Parkes, Joan L; Schachner, Holly C; Cuddihy, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluated performance and product labeling of CONTOUR® USB, a new blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) with integrated diabetes management software and a universal serial bus (USB) port, in the hands of untrained lay users and health care professionals (HCPs). Method Subjects and HCPs tested subject's finger stick capillary blood in parallel using CONTOUR USB meters; deep finger stick blood was tested on a Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) glucose analyzer for reference. Duplicate results by both subjects and HCPs were obtained to assess system precision. System accuracy was assessed according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2003 guidelines [within ±15 mg/dl of mean YSI results (samples <75 mg/dl) and ±20% (samples ≥75 mg/dl)]. Clinical accuracy was determined by Parkes error grid analysis. Subject labeling comprehension was assessed by HCP ratings of subject proficiency. Key system features and ease-of-use were evaluated by subject questionnaires. Results All subjects who completed the study (N = 74) successfully performed blood glucose measurements, connected the meter to a laptop computer, and used key features of the system. The system was accurate; 98.6% (146/148) of subject results and 96.6% (143/148) of HCP results exceeded ISO 15197:2003 criteria. All subject and HCP results were clinically accurate (97.3%; zone A) or associated with benign errors (2.7%; zone B). The majority of subjects rated features of the BGMS as “very good” or “excellent.” Conclusions CONTOUR USB exceeded ISO 15197:2003 system performance criteria in the hands of untrained lay users. Subjects understood the product labeling, found the system easy to use, and successfully performed blood glucose testing. PMID:22027308