Science.gov

Sample records for integrated demonstration configuration

  1. Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, P.G.

    1992-02-01

    This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

  2. Buried waste integrated demonstration configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, P.G.

    1992-02-01

    This document defines plans for the configuration management requirements for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program. Since BWID is managed programmatically by the Waste Technology Development Department (WTDD), WTDD Program Directive (PD) 1.5 (Document Preparation, Review, Approval, Publication, Management and Change Control) is to be followed for all internal EG&G Idaho, Inc., BWID programmatic documentation. BWID documentation generated by organizations external to EG&G Idaho is not covered by this revision of the Configuration Management Plan (CMP), but will be addressed in subsequent revisions.

  3. Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat Configuration

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated video shows the process of transporting, assembling and testing the Habitat Demonstration Unit - Deep Space Habitat (HDU DSH) configuration, which will be deployed during the 2011 Des...

  4. International Space Station Configuration Analysis and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious engineering projects, such as NASA's International Space Station (ISS), require dependable modeling, analysis, visualization, and robotics to ensure that complex mission strategies are carried out cost effectively, sustainably, and safely. Learn how Booz Allen Hamilton's Modeling, Analysis, Visualization, and Robotics Integration Center (MAVRIC) team performs engineering analysis of the ISS Configuration based primarily on the use of 3D CAD models. To support mission planning and execution, the team tracks the configuration of ISS and maintains configuration requirements to ensure operational goals are met. The MAVRIC team performs multi-disciplinary integration and trade studies to ensure future configurations meet stakeholder needs.

  5. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  6. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  7. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-02-05

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  8. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    ScienceCinema

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-07-12

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  9. Integrated powerhead demonstration full flow cycle development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. Mathew; Nichols, James T.; Sack, William F.; Boyce, William D.; Hayes, William A.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Powerhead Demonstration (IPD) is a 1,112,000 N (250,000 lbf) thrust (at sea level) LOX/LH2 demonstration of a full flow cycle in an integrated system configuration. Aerojet and Rocketdyne are on contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory to design, develop, and deliver the required components, and to provide test support to accomplish the demonstration. Rocketdyne is on contract to provide a fuel and oxygen turbopump, a gas-gas injector, and system engineering and integration. Aerojet is on contract to provide a fuel and oxygen preburner, a main combustion chamber, and a nozzle. The IPD components are being designed with Military Spaceplane (MSP) performance and operability requirements in mind. These requirements include: lifetime >=200 missions, mean time between overhauls >=100 cycles, and a capability to throttle from 20% to 100% of full power. These requirements bring new challenges both in designing and testing the components. This paper will provide some insight into these issues. Lessons learned from operating and supporting the space shuttle main engine (SSME) have been reviewed and incorporated where applicable. The IPD program will demonstrate phase I goals of the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program while demonstrating key propulsion technologies that will be available for MSP concepts. The demonstration will take place on Test Stand 2A at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB. The component tests will begin in 1999 and the integrated system tests will be completed in 2002.

  10. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology`s threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report.

  11. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology's threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report.

  12. Integrating configuration workflows with project management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Dimitri; Weber, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    The complexity of the heterogeneous computing resources, services and recurring infrastructure changes at the GridKa WLCG Tier-1 computing center require a structured approach to configuration management and optimization of interplay between functional components of the whole system. A set of tools deployed at GridKa, including Puppet, Redmine, Foreman, SVN and Icinga, provides the administrative environment giving the possibility to define and develop configuration workflows, reduce the administrative effort and improve sustainable operation of the whole computing center. In this presentation we discuss the developed configuration scenarios implemented at GridKa, which we use for host installation, service deployment, change management procedures, service retirement etc. The integration of Puppet with a project management tool like Redmine provides us with the opportunity to track problem issues, organize tasks and automate these workflows. The interaction between Puppet and Redmine results in automatic updates of the issues related to the executed workflow performed by different system components. The extensive configuration workflows require collaboration and interaction between different departments like network, security, production etc. at GridKa. Redmine plugins developed at GridKa and integrated in its administrative environment provide an effective way of collaboration within the GridKa team. We present the structural overview of the software components, their connections, communication protocols and show a few working examples of the workflows and their automation.

  13. Integration Process for the Habitat Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy; Merbitz, Jerad; Kennedy, Kriss; Tn, Terry; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott; Smitherman, David

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) is an experimental exploration habitat technology and architecture test platform designed for analog demonstration activities. The HDU previously served as a test bed for testing technologies and sub-systems in a terrestrial surface environment. in 2010 in the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) configuration. Due to the amount of work involved to make the HDU project successful, the HDU project has required a team to integrate a variety of contributions from NASA centers and outside collaborators The size of the team and number of systems involved With the HDU makes Integration a complicated process. However, because the HDU shell manufacturing is complete, the team has a head start on FY--11 integration activities and can focus on integrating upgrades to existing systems as well as integrating new additions. To complete the development of the FY-11 HDU from conception to rollout for operations in July 2011, a cohesive integration strategy has been developed to integrate the various systems of HDU and the payloads. The highlighted HDU work for FY-11 will focus on performing upgrades to the PEM configuration, adding the X-Hab as a second level, adding a new porch providing the astronauts a larger work area outside the HDU for EVA preparations, and adding a Hygiene module. Together these upgrades result in a prototype configuration of the Deep Space Habitat (DSH), an element under evaluation by NASA's Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT) Scheduled activates include early fit-checks and the utilization of a Habitat avionics test bed prior to installation into HDU. A coordinated effort to utilize modeling and simulation systems has aided in design and integration concept development. Modeling tools have been effective in hardware systems layout, cable routing, sub-system interface length estimation and human factors analysis. Decision processes on integration and use of all new subsystems will be defined early in the project to

  14. Integrated Payload Data Handling Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGeorge, T.; Wishart, A.; Hann, M.; Phan, N.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Fox, P.; Oddy, T.; McGregor, A.; Marshall, A.; Waltham, N.

    2013-09-01

    An integrated Payload Data Handling System (IPDHS) is one in which multiple instruments share a central payload processor for their on-board data processing tasks. This offers a number of advantages over the conventional decentralised architecture. Savings in payload mass and power can be realised because the total processing resource is matched to the requirement, as opposed to the decentralised architecture where the processing resource is in effect the sum of all the applications. Overall development cost can be reduced using a common processor. At individual instrument level the potential benefits include a standardised application development environment, and the opportunity to run the instrument data handling application on a fully redundant and more powerful processor. This paper describes a joint programme by Astrium Ltd, SCISYS UK Limited, Imperial College London and RAL Space to implement a realistic demonstration of an I-PDHS using engineering models of flight instruments (a magnetometer and a camera) and a laboratory demonstrator of a central payload processor which is functionally representative of a flight design. The objective is to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the centralised data processing technique by addressing the key areas of task partitioning to prevent fault propagation and the use of a common development process for the instrument applications. The project is supported by a UK Space Agency grant awarded under the National Space Technology Programme SpaceCITI scheme. The demonstration system is set up at the UK Space Agency's International Space Innovation Centre (ISIC) at Harwell and makes use of the ISIC Concurrent Design Facility (CDF).

  15. ICAROUS: Integrated Configurable Architecture for Unmanned Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Traffic Management (UTM) project aims at enabling near-term, safe operations of small UAS vehicles in uncontrolled airspace, i.e., Class G airspace. A far-term goal of UTM research and development is to accommodate the expected rise in small UAS traffic density throughout the National Airspace System (NAS) at low altitudes for beyond visual line-of-sight operations. This video describes a new capability referred to as ICAROUS (Integrated Configurable Algorithms for Reliable Operations of Unmanned Systems), which is being developed under the auspices of the UTM project. ICAROUS is a software architecture comprised of highly assured algorithms for building safety-centric, autonomous, unmanned aircraft applications. Central to the development of the ICAROUS algorithms is the use of well-established formal methods to guarantee higher levels of safety assurance by monitoring and bounding the behavior of autonomous systems. The core autonomy-enabling capabilities in ICAROUS include constraint conformance monitoring and autonomous detect and avoid functions. ICAROUS also provides a highly configurable user interface that enables the modular integration of mission-specific software components.

  16. BMDS/SSA Integrated Sensing Demonstration (BISD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, T.; Springford, K.; Grimaldi, L.

    2011-09-01

    This demonstration is intended to provide a near-term prototype, leave-behind capability for integrating Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) ground sensors for use in the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) mission. Closed-loop tasking and cueing capability will be implemented, and a demonstration of net-centric space data dissemination using the BMDS sensors will be undertaken using various SSA mission threads. The demonstration is designed to highlight the implications of modifying software and/or hardware at the BMDS command and control node so that cost, risk, and schedule for an operational implementation can be fully understood. Additionally, this demonstration is intended to assess the impacts to both mission areas as a multi-mission, non-traditional sensor capability is integrated into the SSA mission. A successful demonstration will have many leave-behind capabilities and first-of-its-kind achievements to include: a) an extensible SSA operational prototype configuration for BMDS X-Band radars such as AN/TPY-2 and Sea-Based X-Band (SBX) b) a prototype SSA tasking and cueing capability between the Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC Space) Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) and the Command, Control, Battle Management, and Communications (C2BMC) Experimental Laboratory (X-Lab), extensible to the Combatant Commands (COCOMS), and out to BMDS sensors c) a capability for a twoway, net-centric, interface for JSpOC space operations, to include translation from net-centric communications to legacy systems and d) processing of BMDS X-Band Radar tracks in the Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC).

  17. Integrated Flight and Propulsion Controls for Advanced Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter; Garg, Sanjay

    1995-01-01

    The research vision of the NASA Lewis Research Center in the area of integrated flight and propulsion controls technologies is described. In particular the Integrated Method for Propulsion and Airframe Controls developed at the Lewis Research Center is described including its application to an advanced aircraft configuration. Additionally, future research directions in integrated controls are described.

  18. Attaining and maintaining data integrity with configuration management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Dorothy J.; Jeane, Shirley A.

    1993-08-01

    Managers and scientists are concerned about data integrity because they draw conclusions from data that can have far reaching effects. Projects managers use Configuration Management to insure that hardware, software, and project information are controlled. They have not, as yet, applied its rigorously to data. However, there is ample opportunity in the data collection and production process to jeopardize data integrity. Environmental changes, tampering and production problems can all affect data integrity. There are four functions included in the Configuration Management process: configuration identification, control, auditing and status accounting. These functions provide management the means to attain data integrity and the visibility into engineering processes needed to maintain data integrity. When project managers apply Configuration Management processes to data, the data user can trace back through history to validate data integrity. The user knows that the project allowed only orderly changes to the data. He is assured that project personnel followed procedures to maintain data quality. He also has access to status information about the data. The user receives data products with a known integrity level and a means to assess the impact of past events ont he conclusions derived from the data. To obtain these benefits, project managers should apply the Configuration Management discipline to data.

  19. Integration Process for the Habitat Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy; Merbitz, Jerad; Kennedy, Kriss; Tri, Terry; Howe, A. Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) is an experimental exploration habitat technology and architecture test platform designed for analog demonstration activities The HDU project has required a team to integrate a variety of contributions from NASA centers and outside collaborators and poses a challenge in integrating these disparate efforts into a cohesive architecture To complete the development of the HDU from conception in June 2009 to rollout for operations in July 2010, a cohesive integration strategy has been developed to integrate the various systems of HDU and the payloads, such as the Geology Lab, that those systems will support The utilization of interface design standards and uniquely tailored reviews have allowed for an accelerated design process Scheduled activities include early fit-checks and the utilization of a Habitat avionics test bed prior to equipment installation into HDU A coordinated effort to utilize modeling and simulation systems has aided in design and integration concept development Modeling tools have been effective in hardware systems layout, cable routing and length estimation, and human factors analysis Decision processes on the shell development including the assembly sequence and the transportation have been fleshed out early on HDU to maximize the efficiency of both integration and field operations Incremental test operations leading up to an integrated systems test allows for an orderly systems test program The HDU will begin its journey as an emulation of a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) for 2010 field testing and then may evolve to a Pressurized Core Module (PCM) for 2011 and later field tests, depending on agency architecture decisions The HDU deployment will vary slightly from current lunar architecture plans to include developmental hardware and software items and additional systems called opportunities for technology demonstration One of the HDU challenges has been designing to be prepared for the integration of

  20. Integrated restructurable flight control system demonstration results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jerold L.; Hsu, John Y.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the complementary capabilities of several restructurable flight control system (RFCS) concepts through the integration of these technologies into a complete system. Performance issues were addressed through a re-examination of RFCS functional requirements, and through a qualitative analysis of the design issues that, if properly addressed during integration, will lead to the highest possible degree of fault-tolerant performance. Software developed under previous phases of this contract and under NAS1-18004 was modified and integrated into a complete RFCS subroutine for NASA's B-737 simulation. The integration of these modules involved the development of methods for dealing with the mismatch between the outputs of the failure detection module and the input requirements of the automatic control system redesign module. The performance of this demonstration system was examined through extensive simulation trials.

  1. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that offer promising solutions to the problems associated with the remediation of buried waste. BWID addresses the difficult remediation problems associated with DOE complex-wide buried waste, particularly transuranic (TRU) contaminated buried waste. BWID has implemented a systems approach to the development and demonstration of technologies that will characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of DOE buried wastes. This approach encompasses the entire remediation process from characterization to post-monitoring. The development and demonstration of the technology is predicated on how a technology fits into the total remediation process. To address all of these technological issues, BWID has enlisted scientific expertise of individuals and groups from within the DOE Complex, as well as experts from universities and private industry. The BWID mission is to support development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that, when integrated with commercially-available technologies, forms a comprehensive, remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the DOE Complex. BWID will evaluate and validate demonstrated technologies and transfer this information and equipment to private industry to support the Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), Office of Waste Management (WM), and Office of Facility Transition (FT) remediation planning and implementation activities.

  2. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94.

  3. The Habitat Demonstration Unit System Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Tri, Terry O.; Howe, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Surface System Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) will require a project team to integrate a variety of contributions from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) centers and potential outside collaborators and poses a challenge in integrating these disparate efforts into a cohesive architecture. To accomplish the development of the first version of the HDU, the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM), from conception in June 2009 to rollout for operations in July 2010, the HDU project team is using several strategies to mitigate risks and bring the separate efforts together. First, a set of design standards is being developed to define the interfaces between the various systems of PEM and to the payloads, such as the Geology Laboratory, that those systems will support. Scheduled activities such as early fit-checks and the utilization of a habitat avionics test bed prior to equipment installation into HDU PEM are planned to facilitate the integration process. A coordinated effort to establish simplified Computer Aided Design (CAD) standards and the utilization of a modeling and simulation systems will aid in design and integration concept development. Finally, decision processes on the shell development including the assembly sequence and the transportation have been fleshed out early on HDU design to maximize the efficiency of both integration and field operations.

  4. The Habitat Demonstration Unit System Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Gill, Tracy; Tri, Terry; Howe, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Surface System Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) will require the project team to integrate a variety of contributions from NASA centers and potential outside collaborators and poses a challenge in integrating these disparate efforts into a cohesive architecture. To accomplish the development of the HDU from conception in June 2009 to rollout for operations in July 2010, the HDU team is using several strategies to mitigate risks and bring the separate efforts together. First, a set of design standards is being developed to define the interfaces between the various systems of HDU and to the payloads, such as the Geology Lab, that those systems will support. Scheduled activities such as early fit-checks and the utilization of a Habitat avionics test bed prior to equipment installation into HDU. A coordinated effort to establish simplified Computer Aided Design standards and the utilization of a modeling and simulation systems will aid in design and integration concept development. Finally, decision processes on the shell development including the assembly sequence and the transportation have been fleshed out early on HDU to maximize the efficiency of both integration and field operations.

  5. Environmentally conscious manufacturing integrated demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, D.E.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration was to show that several of the individually developed materials and processes to reduce hazardous materials and waste could be successfully used on a single assembly. A methodology was developed that could be used on any product to plan the approach to eliminating hazardous materials. Sample units of an existing design electronic unit were fabricated applying this methodology and substituting nonhazardous materials and processes. The results of this project show that total waste can be drastically reduced by at least an order of magnitude and hazardous material and waste can be essentially eliminated in the manufacture of this type of electronic devices.

  6. Differential neural network configuration during human path integration.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Aiden E G F; Burles, Ford; Bray, Signe; Levy, Richard M; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a fundamental skill for navigation in both humans and animals. Despite recent advances in unraveling the neural basis of path integration in animal models, relatively little is known about how path integration operates at a neural level in humans. Previous attempts to characterize the neural mechanisms used by humans to visually path integrate have suggested a central role of the hippocampus in allowing accurate performance, broadly resembling results from animal data. However, in recent years both the central role of the hippocampus and the perspective that animals and humans share similar neural mechanisms for path integration has come into question. The present study uses a data driven analysis to investigate the neural systems engaged during visual path integration in humans, allowing for an unbiased estimate of neural activity across the entire brain. Our results suggest that humans employ common task control, attention and spatial working memory systems across a frontoparietal network during path integration. However, individuals differed in how these systems are configured into functional networks. High performing individuals were found to more broadly express spatial working memory systems in prefrontal cortex, while low performing individuals engaged an allocentric memory system based primarily in the medial occipito-temporal region. These findings suggest that visual path integration in humans over short distances can operate through a spatial working memory system engaging primarily the prefrontal cortex and that the differential configuration of memory systems recruited by task control networks may help explain individual biases in spatial learning strategies.

  7. Integrated propulsion technology demonstrator. Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA and Rockwell have embarked on a cooperative agreement to define, develop, fabricate, and operate an integrated propulsion technology demonstrator (IPTD) for the purpose of validating design, process, and technology improvements of launch vehicle propulsion systems. This program, a result of NRA8-11, Task Area 1 A, is jointly funded by both NASA and Rockwell and is sponsored by the Reusable Launch Vehicle office at NASA Marshall Space flight Center. This program plan provides to the joint NASA/Rockwell integrated propulsion technology demonstrator (IPTD) team a description of the activities within tasks / sub tasks and associated schedules required to successfully achieve program objectives. This document also defines the cost elements and manpower allocations for each sub task for purpose of program control. This plan is updated periodically by developing greater depth of direction for outyear tasks as the program matures. Updating is accomplished by adding revisions to existing pages or attaching page revisions to this plan. In either case, revisions will be identified by appropriate highlighting of the change, or specifying a revision page through the use of footnotes on the bottom right of each change page. Authorization for the change is provided by the principal investigators to maintain control of this program plan document and IPTD program activities.

  8. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

  9. Uranium soils integrated demonstration, 1993 status

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhfer, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), operated by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) for the DOE, was selected as the host site for the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration. The Uranium Soils ID was established to develop and demonstrate innovative remediation methods which address the cradle to grave elements involved in the remediation of soils contaminated with radionuclides, principally uranium. The participants in the ID are from FERMCO as well as over 15 other organizations from DOE, private industry and universities. Some of the organizations are technology providers while others are members of the technical support groups which were formed to provide technical reviews, recommendations and labor. The following six Technical Support Groups (TSGs) were formed to focus on the objective of the ID: Characterization, Excavation, Decontamination, Waste Treatment/Disposal, Regulatory, and Performance Assessment. This paper will discuss the technical achievements made to date in the program as well as the future program plans. The focus will be on the realtime analysis devices being developed and demonstrated, the approach used to characterize the physical/chemical properties of the uranium waste form in the soil and lab scale studies on methods to remove the uranium from the soil.

  10. Subsonic static and dynamic stability characteristics of the test technique demonstrator NASP configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the procedure used for and the results obtained of wind-tunnel tests of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) configuration, which were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center High Speed Tunnel using a blended body NASP configuration designed by the research center. Static and dynamic stability characteristics were measured at Mach numbers 0.3, 0.6, and 0.8. In addition to tests of the baseline configuration, component buildup tests with a canard surface and with a body flap were carried out. Results demonstrated a positive static stability of the baseline configuration, except at the higher angles of attack at Mach 0.8. A good agreement was found between the inphase dynamic parameters and the corresponding static data.

  11. Demonstration of a Probabilistic Technique for the Determination of Economic Viability of Very Large Transport Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri N.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, modem aircraft design has experienced a paradigm shift from designing for performance to designing for affordability. This report contains a probabilistic approach that will allow traditional deterministic design methods to be extended to account for disciplinary, economic, and technological uncertainty. The probabilistic approach was facilitated by the Fast Probability Integration (FPI) technique; a technique which allows the designer to gather valuable information about the vehicle's behavior in the design space. This technique is efficient for assessing multi-attribute, multi-constraint problems in a more realistic fashion. For implementation purposes, this technique is applied to illustrate how both economic and technological uncertainty associated with a Very Large Transport aircraft concept may be assessed. The assessment is evaluated with the FPI technique to determine the cumulative probability distributions of the design space, as bound by economic objectives and performance constraints. These distributions were compared to established targets for a comparable large capacity aircraft, similar in size to the Boeing 747-400. The conventional baseline configuration design space was determined to be unfeasible and marginally viable, motivating the infusion of advanced technologies, including reductions in drag, specific fuel consumption, wing weight, and Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation costs. The resulting system design space was qualitatively assessed with technology metric "k" factors. The infusion of technologies shifted the VLT design into regions of feasibility and greater viability. The study also demonstrated a method and relationship by which the impact of new technologies may be assessed in a more system focused approach.

  12. A heat & mass integration approach to reduce capital and operating costs of a distillation configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Madenoor Ramapriya, Gautham; Jiang, Zheyu; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-11

    We propose a general method to consolidate distillation columns of a distillation configuration using heat and mass integration. The proposed method encompasses all heat and mass integrations known till date, and includes many more. Each heat and mass integration eliminates a distillation column, a condenser, a reboiler and the heat duty associated with a reboiler. Thus, heat and mass integration can potentially offer significant capital and operating cost benefits. In this talk, we will study the various possible heat and mass integrations in detail, and demonstrate their benefits using case studies. This work will lay out a framework to synthesize an entire new class of useful configurations based on heat and mass integration of distillation columns.

  13. Energy Systems Integration: Demonstrating Distributed Resource Communications

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    Overview fact sheet about the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Schneider Electric Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) project at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. INTEGRATE is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grid Modernization Initiative.

  14. Program test objectives milestone 3. [Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following conclusions have been developed relative to propulsion system technology adequacy for efficient development and operation of recoverable and expendable launch vehicles (RLV and ELV) and the benefits which the integrated propulsion technology demonstrator will provide for enhancing technology: (1) Technology improvements relative to propulsion system design and operation can reduce program cost. Many features or improvement needs to enhance operability, reduce cost, and improve payload are identified. (2) The Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator (IPTD) Program provides a means of resolving the majority of issues associated with improvement needs. (3) The IPTD will evaluate complex integration of vehicle and facility functions in fluid management and propulsion control systems, and provides an environment for validating improved mechanical and electrical components. (4) The IPTD provides a mechanism for investigating operational issues focusing on reducing manpower and time to perform various functions at the launch site. These efforts include model development, collection of data to validate subject models, and ultimate development of complex time line models. (5) The IPTD provides an engine test bed for tri/bi-propellant engine development firings which is representative of the actual vehicle environment. (6) The IPTD provides for only a limited multiengine configuration integration environment for RLV. Multiengine efforts may be simulated for a number of subsystems and a number of subsystems are relatively independent of the multiengine influences.

  15. EHT Integrator Demonstration at DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodov, Ilia; Miller, Ken; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James

    2015-11-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) has developed a series of analog integrators for magnetic diagnostics for the fusion science and plasma physics communities. Three varieties of EHT integrators: short pulse, high dynamic range, and long pulse, have all been tested at DIII-D. The EHT short pulse integrators were used to measure the poloidal magnetic field coil, saddle coil, and Rogowski coil. The results were compared to existing diagnostics at DIII-D. The EHT high dynamic range integrator was used to measure the toroidal magnetic field. Due to the high dynamic range, this integrator resolved features in the signal that could not otherwise be observed. Additionally, preliminary testing of the EHT long pulse integrator was conducted. The long pulse integrator meets all the specifications for ITER.

  16. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources

  17. Integrated multi-domain radar demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilepsky, Carol C.; Bucknell, Mary; Taylor, Rick

    1991-12-01

    The objective of the IMRD program is to apply artificial intelligence techniques to the adaptive control of a state-of-the-art radar environment. The radar operates in the C-Band and is located within the Rome Laboratory Surveillance Facility (RLSF), Building 106, Griffiss Air Force Base (GAFB). The artificial intelligence is embedded in an adaptive control expert system which is written in Prolog. This system identifies sources of interference in each antenna beam position of the surveillance region and responds with the appropriate adaptive controls to maximize the probability of target detection consistent with operator-specified tactical objectives. In addition, the system has the following features: (1) radar inputs provided by a real, as opposed to a simulated, radar; (2) real-time operation with one scan response time of ten seconds or less; (3) modular design for rulebase and system evolution; (4) extensive parameterization for different radar configurations and operational specifications; and (5) control of a large number of radar parameters. The report includes IMRD organization, parameterization options for configuring it to different environments, the expert system software development, and results.

  18. Integrated geometry and grid generation system for complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akdag, Vedat; Wulf, Armin

    1992-01-01

    A grid generation system was developed that enables grid generation for complex configurations. The system called ICEM/CFD is described and its role in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications is presented. The capabilities of the system include full computer aided design (CAD), grid generation on the actual CAD geometry definition using robust surface projection algorithms, interfacing easily with known CAD packages through common file formats for geometry transfer, grid quality evaluation of the volume grid, coupling boundary condition set-up for block faces with grid topology generation, multi-block grid generation with or without point continuity and block to block interface requirement, and generating grid files directly compatible with known flow solvers. The interactive and integrated approach to the problem of computational grid generation not only substantially reduces manpower time but also increases the flexibility of later grid modifications and enhancements which is required in an environment where CFD is integrated into a product design cycle.

  19. ICAROUS - Integrated Configurable Algorithms for Reliable Operations Of Unmanned Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, María; Muñoz, César; Hagen, George; Narkawicz, Anthony; Balachandran, Swee

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Traffic Management (UTM) project aims at enabling near-term, safe operations of small UAS vehicles in uncontrolled airspace, i.e., Class G airspace. A far-term goal of UTM research and development is to accommodate the expected rise in small UAS traffic density throughout the National Airspace System (NAS) at low altitudes for beyond visual line-of-sight operations. This paper describes a new capability referred to as ICAROUS (Integrated Configurable Algorithms for Reliable Operations of Unmanned Systems), which is being developed under the UTM project. ICAROUS is a software architecture comprised of highly assured algorithms for building safety-centric, autonomous, unmanned aircraft applications. Central to the development of the ICAROUS algorithms is the use of well-established formal methods to guarantee higher levels of safety assurance by monitoring and bounding the behavior of autonomous systems. The core autonomy-enabling capabilities in ICAROUS include constraint conformance monitoring and contingency control functions. ICAROUS also provides a highly configurable user interface that enables the modular integration of mission-specific software components.

  20. The stainless steel beneficial reuse integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.; Lutz, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Process water heat exchangers at SRS contains over 95% 304 stainless steel which could be recycled back to DOE in a ``controlled release`` manner, that is, the radioactive scrap metal (RSM) could be reprocessed into new reusable products for return to DOE for use within the DOE Complex. In 1994, a demonstration was begun to recycle recycle contaminated stainless steel by melting 60 tons of RSM and refabricating it into containers for long-term temporary storage. The demonstration covers the entire recycle chain; the melting and the fabrication are to be done through subcontracts with private industry. Activity level of RSM to be supplied to industry is less than one curie total; the average specific activity level of the cobalt-60 which will be imbedded in the final products was estimated to be 117 pico curies per gram (4.31 becquerels/gram).

  1. Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

    2000-07-01

    As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

  2. PISCES: an integral field spectrograph technology demonstration for the WFIRST coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Mandell, Avi M.; Gong, Qian; Llop-Sayson, Jorge; Brandt, Timothy; Chambers, Victor J.; Grammer, Bryan; Greeley, Bradford; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall D.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Demers, Richard; Tang, Hong; Cady, Eric

    2016-07-01

    We present the design, integration, and test of the Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) integral field spectrograph (IFS). The PISCES design meets the science requirements for the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). PISCES was integrated and tested in the integral field spectroscopy laboratory at NASA Goddard. In June 2016, PISCES was delivered to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) where it was integrated with the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). The SPC/PISCES configuration will demonstrate high contrast integral field spectroscopy as part of the WFIRST CGI technology development program.

  3. Integrated Demonstration of Instrument Placement , Robust Execution and Contingent Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, L.; Bualat, M.; Lees, D.; Smith, D. E.; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor); Washington, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated demonstration of ground-based contingent planning, robust execution and autonomous instrument placement for the efficient exploration of a site by a prototype Mars rover.

  4. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units Testing Plans and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.; Currin, Kelly M.; Orozco-Smith, Evelyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant loading operations with their associated flight and ground systems are some of the most complex, critical activities in launch operations. Consequently, these systems and operations account for a sizeable portion of the life cycle costs of any launch program. NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite advances in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. This project was developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancement in the current state of the art in these areas using two distinct integrated ground operations demonstration units (GODU): GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage (IRAS) and GODU Autonomous Control

  5. Supersonic dynamic stability characteristics of the test technique demonstrator NASP configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, David A.; Boyden, Richmond P.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1992-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) configuration were conducted in both test sections of the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The model used is a Langley designed blended body NASP configuration. Dynamic stability characteristics were measured on this configuration at Mach numbers of 2.0, 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5. In addition to tests of the baseline configuration, component buildup tests were conducted. The test results show that the baseline configuration generally has positive damping about all three axes with only isolated exceptions. In addition, there was generally good agreement between the in-pulse dynamic parameters and the corresponding static data which were measured during another series of tests in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Also included are comparisons of the experimental damping parameters with results from the engineering predictive code APAS (Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System). These comparisons show good agreement at low angles of attack; however, the comparisons are generally not as good at the higher angles of attack.

  6. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration commercialization actions plans. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Glore, D.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is sponsored by US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies form a comprehensive system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the DOE complex. BWID evaluates, validates, and demonstrates technologies and transfers this information throughout DOE and private industry to support DOE. remediation planning and implementation activities. This report documents commercialization action plans for five technologies with near-term commercialization/ implementation potential as well as provides a status of commercial and academic partners for each technology.

  7. Computing Systems Configuration for Highly Integrated Guidance and Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    doit triter des informsations quw provictment aussi bien de caqxeurs autossomes (ceistralca dc navigation, ficisiers de terrain ) qiac de capteurs de...physiquement "proches" des capteurs ou dets terminsaux. Mans [’enasmble dua coctar participe, soovent A I ’exploitation des informations pnuvenant des... capteurse ci I’Alaboratiort de celles envoydes aim tenmsnaux. La configuration informatiquc des systbmes de pilotage et de gtiidagc eat donc

  8. FY-94 buried waste integrated demonstration program report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM) needs and objectives. This document summarizes previous demonstrations and describes the FY-94 BWID technology development and demonstration activities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD), BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process.

  9. A process for ensuring regulatory compliance at the INEL`s buried waste integrated demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, P.G.; Watson, L.R.; Blacker, P.B.

    1993-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program is funded by the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. The mission of this Integrated Demonstration is to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate a suite of innovative technologies for the remediation of radioactive and hazardous waste buried throughout the DOE complex between 1950 and 1970. The program approach to development of a long-range strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities is to combine systems analysis with already identified remediation needs for DOE complex buried waste. The systems analysis effort has produced several configuration options (a top-level block diagram of a cradle-to-grave remediation system) capable of remediating the transuranic-contaminated waste pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Technologies for demonstration are selected using three criteria: (a) the ability to satisfy a specific buried waste need, (b) the ability to satisfy functional and operational requirements defined for functional sub-elements in a configuration option, and (c) performance against Comprehensive Environmental Restoration and Compensation Liability Act selection criteria, such as effectiveness, implementability, and cost. Early demonstrations experienced problems with missed requirements, prompting the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program Office to organize a Corrective Action Team to identify the cause and recommend corrective actions. The result of this team effort is the focus of this paper.

  10. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancements in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. Two Distinct Testing Environments: a) GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage - GODU LH2; b) GODU Autonomous Control - GODU LO2. Scope: I. GODU LH2: a) Investigate alternative storage and distribution architecture for future cryogenic propellant operations. b) Demonstrate advanced cryogenic propellant handling operations (liquefaction, storage and distribution) of normal boiling point and sub-cooled cryogenic propellants. II. GODU L02: a) Develop and demonstrate advanced control and health management technologies and techniques to autonomously control cryogenic propellant servicing operations. b) Investigate modern COTS hardware and control systems in an effort to reduce the "standing army" of engineers associated with maintaining and operating ground systems through the use of health management and autonomous control technologies. Goals: a) Raise Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRL) of several key technology development areas. b) Reduce operations lifecycle costs of future test programs and launch complexes. c) Demonstrate technologies for future exploration beyond low earth orbit. d) Serve as test environments for extraterrestrial surface operations.

  11. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration FY-95 Deployment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, D.E.

    1995-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The FY-95 effort will fund 24 technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. Ten of these technologies will take part in the integrated field demonstration that will take place at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities in the summer of 1995. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects funded in FY-95. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for the INEL integrated field demonstration, INEL research and development (R&D) demonstrations, non-INEL R&D demonstrations, and office research and technical review meetings. Each project will have a test plan detailing the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of the test. Therefore, information that is specific to testing each technology is intentionally limited in this document.

  12. Integrated Advanced Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Configuration Management Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to identify the baseline to be established during the development life cycle of the integrated AMSU-A, and define the methods and procedures which Aerojet will follow in the implementation of configuration control for each established baseline. Also this plan establishes the Configuration Management process to be used for the deliverable hardware, software, and firmware of the Integrated AMSU-A during development, design, fabrication, test, and delivery.

  13. Configurable test bed design for nanosats to qualify commercial and customized integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guareschi, W.; Azambuja, J.; Kastensmidt, F.; Reis, R.; Durao, O.; Schuch, N.; Dessbesel, G.

    The use of small satellites has increased substantially in recent years due to the reduced cost of their development and launch, as well to the flexibility offered by commercial components. The test bed is a platform that allows components to be evaluated and tested in space. It is a flexible platform, which can be adjusted to a wide quantity of components and interfaces. This work proposes the design and implementation of a test bed suitable for test and evaluation of commercial circuits used in nanosatellites. The development of such a platform allows developers to reduce the efforts in the integration of components and therefore speed up the overall system development time. The proposed test bed is a configurable platform implemented using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that controls the communication protocols and connections to the devices under test. The Flash-based ProASIC3E FPGA from Microsemi is used as a control system. This adaptive system enables the control of new payloads and softcores for test and validation in space. Thus, the integration can be easily performed through configuration parameters. It is intended for modularity. Each component connected to the test bed can have a specific interface programmed using a hardware description language (HDL). The data of each component is stored in embedded memories. Each component has its own memory space. The size of the allocated memory can be also configured. The data transfer priority can be set and packaging can be added to the logic, when needed. Communication with peripheral devices and with the Onboard Computer (OBC) is done through the pre-implemented protocols, such as I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit), SPI (Serial Peripheral Interface) and external memory control. In loco primary tests demonstrated the control system's functionality. The commercial ProASIC3E FPGA family is not space-flight qualified, but tests have been made under Total Ionizing Dose (TID) showing its robustness up to 25 kr

  14. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program has a three year project to develop and demonstrate technologies to fundamentally change the way ground servicing activities support future access to space architectures. The AES Integrated Ground Operation Demonstration Units (IGODU) project has created two test beds for investigating and maturing two key elements of spaceport processing activities. The first is the GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage test bed that is demonstrating zero-loss storage of liquid hydrogen propellants and studying the storage and transfer of densified propellants. The second activity is the GODU Autonomous Control test bed that is implementing health management technologies and autonomous control capability of the propellant loading process to reduce the standing army of experts historically needed to ensure safe propellant loading operations. This presentation will give an overview of the activities at the Kennedy Space Center on these two test beds and its potential impact on future access to space programs.

  15. Buried waste integrated demonstration FY 94 deployment plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.; Walker, S.; Garcia, M.M.

    1994-05-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The fiscal year (FY) 1994 effort will fund thirty-eight technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for INEL field demonstrations, INEL laboratory demonstrations, non-INEL demonstrations, and paper studies. Each technology performing tests will prepare a test plan to detail the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of each test. Therefore, information specific to testing each technology is intentionally omitted from this document.

  16. Demonstration of innovative monitoring technologies at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an Integrated Demonstration Program at the Savannah River Site in 1989. The objective of this program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate innovative technologies that can improve present-day environmental restoration methods. The Integrated Demonstration Program at SRS is entitled ``Cleanup of Organics in Soils and Groundwater at Non-Arid Sites.`` New technologies in the areas of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation are being demonstrated and evaluated for their technical performance and cost effectiveness in comparison with baseline technologies. Present site characterization and monitoring methods are costly, time-consuming, overly invasive, and often imprecise. Better technologies are required to accurately describe the subsurface geophysical and geochemical features of a site and the nature and extent of contamination. More efficient, nonintrusive characterization and monitoring techniques are necessary for understanding and predicting subsurface transport. More reliable procedures are also needed for interpreting monitoring and characterization data. Site characterization and monitoring are key elements in preventing, identifying, and restoring contaminated sites. The remediation of a site cannot be determined without characterization data, and monitoring may be required for 30 years after site closure.

  17. Beam Fields in an Integrated Cavity, Coupler and Window Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2010-02-10

    In a multi-bunch high current storage ring, beam generated fields couple strongly into the RF cavity coupler structure when beam arrival times are in resonance with cavity fields. In this study the integrated effect of beam fields over several thousand RF periods is simulated for the complete cavity, coupler, window and waveguide system of the PEP-II B-factory storage ring collider. We show that the beam generated fields at frequencies corresponding to several bunch spacings for this case gives rise to high field strength near the ceramic window which could limit the performance of future high current storage rings such as PEP-X or Super B-factories.

  18. Demonstrating artificial intelligence for space systems - Integration and project management issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Edmund C.; Difilippo, Denise M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of its Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP), NASA has recently demonstrated the Thermal Expert System (TEXSYS). Advanced real-time expert system and human interface technology was successfully developed and integrated with conventional controllers of prototype space hardware to provide intelligent fault detection, isolation, and recovery capability. Many specialized skills were required, and responsibility for the various phases of the project therefore spanned multiple NASA centers, internal departments and contractor organizations. The test environment required communication among many types of hardware and software as well as between many people. The integration, testing, and configuration management tools and methodologies which were applied to the TEXSYS project to assure its safe and successful completion are detailed. The project demonstrated that artificial intelligence technology, including model-based reasoning, is capable of the monitoring and control of a large, complex system in real time.

  19. Use of an Innovation Component Configuration Map to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the use of a custom developed Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to measure technology integration practices of faculty in Schools, Colleges, and Departments of Education (SCDEs). This study investigated the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by SCDE…

  20. Configurable hardware integrate and fire neurons for sparse approximation.

    PubMed

    Shapero, Samuel; Rozell, Christopher; Hasler, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Sparse approximation is an important optimization problem in signal and image processing applications. A Hopfield-Network-like system of integrate and fire (IF) neurons is proposed as a solution, using the Locally Competitive Algorithm (LCA) to solve an overcomplete L1 sparse approximation problem. A scalable system architecture is described, including IF neurons with a nonlinear firing function, and current-based synapses to provide linear computation. A network of 18 neurons with 12 inputs is implemented on the RASP 2.9v chip, a Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) with directly programmable floating gate elements. Said system uses over 1400 floating gates, the largest system programmed on a FPAA to date. The circuit successfully reproduced the outputs of a digital optimization program, converging to within 4.8% RMS, and an objective cost only 1.7% higher on average. The active circuit consumed 559 μA of current at 2.4 V and converges on solutions in 25 μs, with measurement of the converged spike rate taking an additional 1 ms. Extrapolating the scaling trends to a N=1000 node system, the spiking LCA compares favorably with state-of-the-art digital solutions, and analog solutions using a non-spiking approach.

  1. Flight demonstration of integrated airport surface automation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1995-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration showed an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) receiver, a high speed VHF data link, an ASDE-3 radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on AMASS. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with preliminary results.

  2. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C.

    1997-01-15

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

  3. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.

  4. High-Lift Propeller System Configuration Selection for NASA's SCEPTOR Distributed Electric Propulsion Flight Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael D.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Borer, Nicholas K.

    2016-01-01

    Although the primary function of propellers is typically to produce thrust, aircraft equipped with distributed electric propulsion (DEP) may utilize propellers whose main purpose is to act as a form of high-lift device. These \\high-lift propellers" can be placed upstream of wing such that, when the higher-velocity ow in the propellers' slipstreams interacts with the wing, the lift is increased. This technique is a main design feature of a new NASA advanced design project called Scalable Convergent Electric Propulsion Technology Operations Research (SCEPTOR). The goal of the SCEPTOR project is design, build, and y a DEP aircraft to demonstrate that such an aircraft can be much more ecient than conventional designs. This paper provides details into the high-lift propeller system con guration selection for the SCEPTOR ight demonstrator. The methods used in the high-lift propeller system conceptual design and the tradeo s considered in selecting the number of propellers are discussed.

  5. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Phased Array Demonstrated With ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) arrays developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rome Laboratory were demonstrated in aeronautical terminals and in mobile or fixed Earth terminals linked with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four K/Ka-band experimental arrays were demonstrated between May 1994 and May 1995. Each array had GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The 30-GHz transmit array used in uplinks to ACTS was developed by Lewis and Texas Instruments. The three 20-GHz receive arrays used in downlinks from ACTS were developed in cooperation with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force integrated-circuit, active-phased-array development contracts with the Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Four demonstrations, each related to an application of high interest to both commercial and Department of Defense organizations, were conducted. The location, type of link, and the data rate achieved for each of the applications is shown. In one demonstration-- an aeronautical terminal experiment called AERO-X--a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the Lewis Learjet and ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice links (and in one case, interactive video links as well) between ACTS and an Army high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV, or "humvee"). In the fourth demonstration, the array was on a fixed mount and was electronically steered toward ACTS. Lewis served as project manager for all demonstrations and as overall system integrator. Lewis engineers developed the array system including a controller for open-loop tracking of ACTS during flight and HMMWV motion, as well as a laptop data display and recording system used in all demonstrations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory supported the AERO-X program, providing elements of the ACTS Mobile Terminal. The successful

  6. A technique for integrating engine cycle and aircraft configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1994-01-01

    A method for conceptual aircraft design that incorporates the optimization of major engine design variables for a variety of cycle types was developed. The methodology should improve the lengthy screening process currently involved in selecting an appropriate engine cycle for a given application or mission. The new capability will allow environmental concerns such as airport noise and emissions to be addressed early in the design process. The ability to rapidly perform optimization and parametric variations using both engine cycle and aircraft design variables, and to see the impact on the aircraft, should provide insight and guidance for more detailed studies. A brief description of the aircraft performance and mission analysis program and the engine cycle analysis program that were used is given. A new method of predicting propulsion system weight and dimensions using thermodynamic cycle data, preliminary design, and semi-empirical techniques is introduced. Propulsion system performance and weights data generated by the program are compared with industry data and data generated using well established codes. The ability of the optimization techniques to locate an optimum is demonstrated and some of the problems that had to be solved to accomplish this are illustrated. Results from the application of the program to the analysis of three supersonic transport concepts installed with mixed flow turbofans are presented. The results from the application to a Mach 2.4, 5000 n.mi. transport indicate that the optimum bypass ratio is near 0.45 with less than 1 percent variation in minimum gross weight for bypass ratios ranging from 0.3 to 0.6. In the final application of the program, a low sonic boom fix a takeoff gross weight concept that would fly at Mach 2.0 overwater and at Mach 1.6 overland is compared with a baseline concept of the same takeoff gross weight that would fly Mach 2.4 overwater and subsonically overland. The results indicate that for the design mission

  7. NASA's ATM Technology Demonstration-1: Integrated Concept of Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Swenson, Harry N.; Prevot, Thomas; Callantine, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes operations and procedures envisioned for NASA s Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration #1 (ATD-1). The ATD-1 Concept of Operations (ConOps) demonstration will integrate three NASA technologies to achieve high throughput, fuel-efficient arrival operations into busy terminal airspace. They are Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering (TMA-TM) for precise time-based schedules to the runway and points within the terminal area, Controller-Managed Spacing (CMS) decision support tools for terminal controllers to better manage aircraft delay using speed control, and Flight deck Interval Management (FIM) avionics and flight crew procedures to conduct airborne spacing operations. The ATD-1 concept provides de-conflicted and efficient operations of multiple arrival streams of aircraft, passing through multiple merge points, from top-of-descent (TOD) to touchdown. It also enables aircraft to conduct Optimized Profile Descents (OPDs) from en route altitude to the runway, using primarily speed control to maintain separation and schedule. The ATD-1 project is currently addressing the challenges of integrating the three technologies, and implantation into an operational environment. Goals of the ATD-1 demonstration include increasing the throughput of high-density airports, reducing controller workload, increasing efficiency of arrival operations and the frequency of trajectory-based operations, and promoting aircraft ADS-B equipage.

  8. Integrated Modular Avionics for Spacecraft: Earth Observation Use Case Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Rossignol, Alain; Hyounet, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) for Space, as European Space Agency initiative, aimed to make applicable to space domain the time and space partitioning concepts and particularly the ARINC 653 standard [1][2]. Expected benefits of such an approach are development flexibility, capability to provide differential V&V for different criticality level functionalities and to integrate late or In-Orbit delivery. This development flexibility could improve software subcontracting, industrial organization and software reuse. Time and space partitioning technique facilitates integration of software functions as black boxes and integration of decentralized function such as star tracker in On Board Computer to save mass and power by limiting electronics resources. In aeronautical domain, Integrated Modular Avionics architecture is based on a network of LRU (Line Replaceable Unit) interconnected by AFDX (Avionic Full DupleX). Time and Space partitioning concept is applicable to LRU and provides independent partitions which inter communicate using ARINC 653 communication ports. Using End System (LRU component) intercommunication between LRU is managed in the same way than intercommunication between partitions in LRU. In such architecture an application developed using only communication port can be integrated in an LRU or another one without impacting the global architecture. In space domain, a redundant On Board Computer controls (ground monitoring TM) and manages the platform (ground command TC) in terms of power, solar array deployment, attitude, orbit, thermal, maintenance, failure detection and recovery isolation. In addition, Payload units and platform units such as RIU, PCDU, AOCS units (Star tracker, Reaction wheels) are considered in this architecture. Interfaces are mainly realized through MIL-STD-1553B busses and SpaceWire and this could be considered as the main constraint for IMA implementation in space domain. During the first phase of IMA SP project, ARINC653

  9. Energy Systems Integration: Demonstrating Distribution Feeder Voltage Control

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    Overview fact sheet about the Smarter Grid Solutions Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) project at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. INTEGRATE is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grid Modernization Initiative.

  10. Energy Systems Integration: Demonstrating Distributed Grid-Edge Control Hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    Overview fact sheet about the OMNETRIC Group Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) project at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. INTEGRATE is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grid Modernization Initiative.

  11. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

  12. Project Integration Architecture: A Practical Demonstration of Information Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) effort is to provide the ability to propagate information between disparate applications. With this ability, applications may then be formed into an application graph constituting a super-application. Such a super-application would then provide all of the analysis appropriate to a given technical system. This paper reports on a small demonstration of this concept in which a Computer Aided Design (CAD) application was connected to an inlet analysis code and geometry information automatically propagated from one to the other. The majority of the work reported involved not the technology of information propagation, but rather the conversion of propagated information into a form usable by the receiving application.

  13. Transient Simulation of the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidos, Mike; Seymour, Dave

    2003-01-01

    The IPD rocket engine is the product of a joint Air Force/NASA program to demonstrate the concept of a full-flow staged combustion power cycle. In this type of rocket engine cycle, both the entire fuel flow and the entire oxidizer flow are combusted in one of two pre-bumers and used to drive two turbopumps, thus utilizing the flow work of the total propellant flow. The basis of the IPD engine program relies on integrating newly developed and pre-existing hardware to demonstrate the component and material technologies to make this concept feasible, while simultaneously saving development time and costs. To provide insight to the project team and contractors during engine development and test phases, the engine system was modeled at MSFC using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) software to analyze system performance and determine component integration issues. The ROCETS software is used extensively a MSFC to perform steady-state power-balances and transient simulations of thermodynamic power and general fluid systems. The software is favored for its capability to solve large systems of non-linear equations, its librarie of fluid properties and flow devices, its flexibility to modify existing code to improve the physics-derived approximations of real fluid thermodynamic behavior, and the ability to add unique system constraints. The purpose of this paper is to present the methodology used to model the IPD engine system, detail the pitfalls encountered with the software, and explain the approximations made to more accurately represent engine component and fluid behavior. Engine system performance output from the model will be presented and explained in comparison with real fluid and component behavior.

  14. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    A recent Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study identified 59 waste sites at 14 DOE facilities across the nation that exhibit radionuclide contamination in excess of established limits. The rapid and efficient characterization of these sites, and the potentially contaminated regions that surround them represents a technological challenge with no existing solution. In particular, the past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of surface and subsurface soils. Such contamination commonly occurs within waste burial sites, cribs, pond bottom sediments and soils surrounding waste tanks or uranium scrap, ore, tailings, and slag heaps. The objective of the Uranium In Soils Integrated Demonstration is to develop optimal remediation methods for soils contaminated with radionuclides, principally uranium (U), at DOE sites. It is examining all phases involved in an actual cleanup, including all regulatory and permitting requirements, to expedite selection and implementation of the best technologies that show immediate and long-term effectiveness specific to the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and applicable to other radionuclide contaminated DOE sites. The demonstration provides for technical performance evaluations and comparisons of different developmental technologies at FEMP sites, based on cost-effectiveness, risk-reduction effectiveness, technology effectiveness, and regulatory and public acceptability. Technology groups being evaluated include physical and chemical contaminant separations, in situ remediation, real-time characterization and monitoring, precise excavation, site restoration, secondary waste treatment, and soil waste stabilization.

  15. Energy Systems Integration: Demonstrating the Grid Benefits of Connected Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    Overview fact sheet about the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the University of Delaware Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) project at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. INTEGRATE is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grid Modernization Initiative.

  16. National Institute of Statistical Sciences Configuration and Data Integration for Longitudinal Studies Technical Panel. Final Report. NCES 2011-607

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr, Alan F.

    2011-01-01

    This is the final report of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences (NISS) Technical Panel on Configuration and Data Integration for Longitudinal Studies (hereafter, CDI). The principal recommendations regarding configuration are as follows: (1) The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) should configure grades K-12 studies as a…

  17. Dynamic ground-effect measurements on the F-15 STOL and Maneuver Technology Demonstrator (S/MTD) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1990-01-01

    A moving-model ground-effect testing method was used to study the influence of rate-of-descent on the aerodynamic characteristics for the F-15 STOL and Maneuver Technology Demonstrator (S/MTD) configuration for both the approach and roll-out phases of landing. The approach phase was modeled for three rates of descent, and the results were compared to the predictions from the F-15 S/MTD simulation data base (prediction based on data obtained in a wind tunnel with zero rate of descent). This comparison showed significant differences due both to the rate of descent in the moving-model test and to the presence of the ground boundary layer in the wind tunnel test. Relative to the simulation data base predictions, the moving-model test showed substantially less lift increase in ground effect, less nose-down pitching moment, and less increase in drag. These differences became more prominent at the larger thrust vector angles. Over the small range of rates of descent tested using the moving-model technique, the effect of rate of descent on longitudinal aerodynamics was relatively constant. The results of this investigation indicate no safety-of-flight problems with the lower jets vectored up to 80 deg on approach. The results also indicate that this configuration could employ a nozzle concept using lower reverser vector angles up to 110 deg on approach if a no-flare approach procedure were adopted and if inlet reingestion does not pose a problem.

  18. Membranes for the Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Laboratory Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-08-01

    INL has developed polymeric membrane-based chemical separations to enable the thermochemical production of hydrogen. Major activities included studies of sulfuric acid concentration membranes, hydriodic acid concentration membranes, SO2/O2 separation membranes, potential applications of a catalyst reactor system for the decomposition of HI, and evaluation of the chemical separation needs for alternate thermochemical cycles. Membranes for the concentration of sulfuric acid were studied using pervaporation. The goal of this task was to offer the sulfur-iodine (S-I) and the hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycles a method to concentrate the sulfuric acid containing effluent from the decomposer without boiling. In this work, sulfuric acid decomposer effluent needs to be concentrated from ~50 % acid to 80 %. This task continued FY 2006 efforts to characterize water selective membranes for use in sulfuric acid concentration. In FY 2007, experiments were conducted to provide specific information, including transmembrane fluxes, separation factors, and membrane durability, necessary for proper decision making on the potential inclusion of this process into the S-I or HyS Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration.

  19. Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiato, Rocco; Sharma, Ramesh; Allen, Mark; Peyton, Brent; Macur, Richard; Cameron, Jemima

    2013-09-30

    Integrated carbon-to-liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO{sub 2}, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526 targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub-bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal-Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat-camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger-scale process

  20. An integrated approach to demonstrating the ANR pathway of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing-Zhong; Zhu, Yue; Liu, Zhong; Du, Ci; Li, Ke-Gang; Xie, De-Yu

    2012-09-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are oligomers or polymers of plant flavan-3-ols and are important to plant adaptation in extreme environmental conditions. The characterization of anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) has demonstrated the different biogenesis of four stereo-configurations of flavan-3-ols. It is important to understand whether ANR and the ANR pathway widely occur in the plant kingdom. Here, we report an integrated approach to demonstrate the ANR pathway in plants. This includes different methods to extract native ANR from different tissues of eight angiosperm plants (Lotus corniculatus, Desmodium uncinatum, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, Vitis vinifera, Vitis bellula, Parthenocissus heterophylla, and Cerasus serrulata) and one fern plant (Dryopteris pycnopteroides), a general enzymatic analysis approach to demonstrate the ANR activity, high-performance liquid chromatography-based fingerprinting to demonstrate (-)-epicatechin and other flavan-3-ol molecules, and phytochemical analysis of PAs. Results demonstrate that in addition to leaves of M. sativa, tissues of other eight plants contain an active ANR pathway. Particularly, the leaves, flowers and pods of D. uncinatum, which is a model plant to study LAR and the LAR pathways, are demonstrated to express an active ANR pathway. This finding suggests that the ANR pathway involves PA biosynthesis in D. uncinatum. In addition, a sequence BLAST analysis reveals that ANR homologs have been sequenced in plants from both gymnosperms and angiosperms. These data show that the ANR pathway to PA biosynthesis occurs in both seed and seedless vascular plants.

  1. Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The DOE complex currently has 332 underground storage tanks (USTs) that have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production. Very little of the over 100 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste has been treated and disposed of in final form. Two waste storage tank design types are prevalent across the DOE complex: single-shell wall and double-shell wall designs. They are made of stainless steel, concrete, and concrete with carbon steel liners, and their capacities vary from 5000 gallons (19 m{sup 3}) to 10{sup 6} gallons (3785 m{sup 3}). The tanks have an overburden layer of soil ranging from a few feet to tens of feet. Responding to the need for remediation of tank waste, driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements (FFCAs) at all participating sites, the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program was created by the US DOE Office of Technology Development in February 1991. Its mission is to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat to concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to the public and the regulators. The UST-ID has focused on five DOE locations: the Hanford Site, which is the host site, in Richland, Washington; the Fernald Site in Fernald, Ohio; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in Savannah River, South Carolina.

  2. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water

  3. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

  4. A novel configuration for a brushless DC motor with an integrated planetary gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong-Sen; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a novel configuration of a brushless DC (BLDC) motor with an integrated planetary gear train, which provides further functional and structural integrations to overcome inherent drawbacks of traditional designs. The effects of gear teeth on the magnetic field and performance of the BLDC motor are investigated. Two standard gear profile systems integrated on the stator with feasible numbers of gear teeth are introduced to reduce the cogging torque. An equivalent magnetic circuit model and an air-gap permeance model are applied to analytically analyze the magnetic field, while the validity is verified by 2-D finite-element method (FEM). Furthermore, the motor performance is discussed and compared with an existing design. The results show that the present design has the characteristics of lower cogging torque and torque ripple than the conventional design, which is of benefit to the widely applications on accurate motion and position control for BLDC motors.

  5. The electromagnetic integrated demonstration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cold test pit

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, L.; Alumbaugh, D.L.; Pfeifer, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    The electromagnetic integrated demonstration (EMID) is a baseline study in electromagnetic (EM) exploration of the shallow subsurface (< 10 m). Eleven distinct EM systems, covering the geophysical spectrum, acquired data on a grid over the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The systems are investigated and evaluated for the purpose of identifying and reviewing existing geophysical characterization instrumentation (commercial and experimental), integrating those technologies with multi-dimensional interpretational algorithms, and identifying gaps in shallow subsurface EM imaging technology. The EMID data, are valuable for testing and evaluating new interpretational software, and developing techniques for integrating multiple datasets. The experimental field techniques shows how the acquisition of data in a variety of array configurations can considerably enhance interpretation. All data are available on the world wide web. Educators and students are encouraged to use the data for both classroom and graduate studies. The purpose of this paper is to explain why, where, how and what kind of data were collected. It is left to the reader to assess the value of a given system for their particular application. Information about the EMID is organized into two general categories: survey description and system evaluation.

  6. Evaluation of 3 numerical methods for propulsion integration studies on transonic transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaros, S. F.; Carlson, J. R.; Chandrasekaran, B.

    1986-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken at the NASA Langley Research Center to assess the capabilities of available computational methods for use in propulsion integration design studies of transonic transport aircraft, particularly of pylon/nacelle combinations which exhibit essentially no interference drag. The three computer codes selected represent state-of-the-art computational methods for analyzing complex configurations at subsonic and transonic flight conditions. These are: EULER, a finitie volume solution of the Euler equation; VSAERO, a panel solution of the Laplace equation; and PPW, a finite difference solution of the small disturbance transonic equations. In general, all three codes have certain capabilities that allow them to be of some value in predicting the flows about transport configurations, but all have limitations. Until more accurate methods are available, careful application and interpretation of the results of these codes are needed.

  7. Evaluation of three numerical methods for propulsion integration studies on transonic transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaros, Steven F.; Carlson, John R.; Chandrasekaran, Balasubramanyan

    1986-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken at the NASA Langley Research Center to assess the capabilities of available computational methods for use in propulsion integration design studies of transonic transport aircraft, particularly of pylon/nacelle combinations which exhibit essentially no interference drag. The three computer codes selected represent state-of-the-art computational methods for analyzing complex configurations at subsonic and transonic flight conditions. These are: EULER, a finite volume solution of the Euler equation; VSAERO, a panel solution of the Laplace equation; and PPW, a finite difference solution of the small disturbance transonic equations. In general, all three codes have certain capabilities that allow them to be of some value in predicting the flows about transport configurations, but all have limitations. Until more accurate methods are available, careful application and interpretation of the results of these codes are needed.

  8. ATD-1 ATM Technology Demonstration-1 and Integrated Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quon, Leighton

    2014-01-01

    Enabling efficient arrivals for the NextGen Air Traffic Management System and developing a set of integrated decision support tools to reduce the high cognitive workload so that controllers are able to simultaneously achieve safe, efficient, and expedient operations at high traffic demand levels.

  9. EEG and Eye Tracking Demonstrate Vigilance Enhancement with Challenge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Bodala, Indu P.; Li, Junhua; Thakor, Nitish V.; Al-Nashash, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining vigilance is possibly the first requirement for surveillance tasks where personnel are faced with monotonous yet intensive monitoring tasks. Decrement in vigilance in such situations could result in dangerous consequences such as accidents, loss of life and system failure. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to enhance vigilance or sustained attention using “challenge integration,” a strategy that integrates a primary task with challenging stimuli. A primary surveillance task (identifying an intruder in a simulated factory environment) and a challenge stimulus (periods of rain obscuring the surveillance scene) were employed to test the changes in vigilance levels. The effect of integrating challenging events (resulting from artificially simulated rain) into the task were compared to the initial monotonous phase. EEG and eye tracking data is collected and analyzed for n = 12 subjects. Frontal midline theta power and frontal theta to parietal alpha power ratio which are used as measures of engagement and attention allocation show an increase due to challenge integration (p < 0.05 in each case). Relative delta band power of EEG also shows statistically significant suppression on the frontoparietal and occipital cortices due to challenge integration (p < 0.05). Saccade amplitude, saccade velocity and blink rate obtained from eye tracking data exhibit statistically significant changes during the challenge phase of the experiment (p < 0.05 in each case). From the correlation analysis between the statistically significant measures of eye tracking and EEG, we infer that saccade amplitude and saccade velocity decrease with vigilance decrement along with frontal midline theta and frontal theta to parietal alpha ratio. Conversely, blink rate and relative delta power increase with vigilance decrement. However, these measures exhibit a reverse trend when challenge stimulus appears in the task suggesting vigilance enhancement. Moreover, the mean

  10. Analysis of Radiant Cooling System Configurations Integrated with Cooling Tower for Different Indian Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S; Jain, Robin; Srivastava, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Radiant cooling system has proven to be a low energy consumption system for building cooling needs. This study describes the use of cooling tower in radiant cooling system to improve the overall system efficiency. A comprehensive simulation feasibility study of the application of cooling tower in radiant cooling system was performed for the fifteen cities in different climatic zones of India. It was found that in summer, the wet bulb temperature (WBT) of the different climatic zones except warm-humid is suitable for the integration of cooling tower with radiant cooling system. In these climates, cooling tower can provide on average 24 C to 27 C water In order to achieve the energy saving potential, three different configurations of radiant cooling system have been compared in terms of energy consumption. The different configurations of the radiant cooling system integrated with cooling tower are: (1) provide chilled water to the floor, wall and ceiling mounted tubular installation. (2) provide chilled water to the wall and ceiling mounted tabular installation. In this arrangement a separate chiller has also been used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor mounted tubular installation. (3) provide chilled water to the wall mounted tabular installation and a separate chiller is used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor and ceiling mounted tabular installation. A dedicated outdoor air system is also coupled for dehumidification and ventilation in all three configurations. A conventional all-air system was simulated as a baseline to compare these configurations for assessing the energy saving potential.

  11. Demonstration of microcantilever-based sensor array with integrated microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Anderson, Ryan R.; Ness, Stanley J.; Hu, Weisheng; Gustafson, Timothy M.; Noh, Jong W.; Richards, Danny C.; Kim, Seunghyun

    2011-05-01

    We report the integration of a nanomechanical sensor consisting of 16 silicon microcantilevers and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidics. With our recently developed in-plane photonic transduction method we routinely achieve microcantilever transduction responsivities in the range of 0.5-1.1 μm-1, which is comparable to the best reported for the laser reflection readout method used in atomic force microscopy (AFM). Prior work has established that differential surface stress as low as 0.23 mN/m is readily measurable with our arrays. In this paper we show biotin-streptavidin sensing with a differential surface stress of ~2.3 mN/m as a first step toward characterizing integrated microcantilever array/microfluidic sensors.

  12. Outcomes of an integrated telehealth network demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Dimmick, Susan L; Burgiss, Samuel G; Robbins, Sherry; Black, David; Jarnagin, Bertha; Anders, Mary

    2003-01-01

    An integrated telehealth network that linked three hospitals, a federally qualified health care clinic with six sites, a county dental clinic, and patient homes was developed and implemented using both private and federal funding. The goal of the network was to deliver 10 different medical, dental, and behavioral health services to a rural community. The network served patients from nine different counties and two states. Outcomes from the disease management programs for congestive heart failure and diabetes, as well as crisis telehealth and teledental health, were reported. Results for the diabetes disease management program increased the number of diabetics who brought their blood sugar under control. Additionally, based on hospital days per patient per year with and without intervention, and the cost of intervention by telehealth, it was projected that the national cost of care for CHF hospitalizations could be reduced from 8 billion dollars to 4.2 billion dollars. This telehealth network can serve as a model for integrating health services in each county of the state. Once each county had an integrated telehealth network, the county networks could be linked to provide regional services and coordination on a statewide basis.

  13. Systems integration and demonstration of advanced reusable structure for ALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbins, Martin N.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the potential of advanced material to achieve life cycle cost (LCC) benefits for reusable structure on the advanced launch system. Three structural elements were investigated - all components of an Advanced Launch System reusable propulsion/avionics module. Leading aeroshell configurations included sandwich structure using titanium, graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI), or high-temperature aluminum (HTA) face sheets. Thrust structure truss concepts used titanium, graphite/epoxy, or silicon carbide/aluminum struts. Leading aft bulkhead concepts employed graphite epoxy and aluminum. The technical effort focused on the aeroshell because the greatest benefits were expected there. Thermal analyses show the structural temperature profiles during operation. Finite element analyses show stresses during splash-down. Weight statements and manufacturing cost estimates were prepared for calculation of LCC for each design. The Gr/PI aeroshell showed the lowest potential LCC, but the HTA aeroshell was judged to be lower risk. A technology development plan was prepared to validate the applicable structural technology.

  14. Experiment/facility requirements document for the Space Station Furnace Facility. Section 1: Integrated configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The function of the Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is to support materials research into the crystal growth and solidification processes of electronic and photonic materials, metals and alloys, and glasses and ceramics. To support this broad base of research requirements, the SSFF will employ a variety of furnace modules which will be operated, regulated, and supported by a core of common subsystems. Furnace modules may be reconfigured or specifically developed to provide unique solidification conditions for each set of experiments. The SSFF modular approach permits the addition of new or scaled-up furnace modules to support the evolution of the facility as new science requirements are identified. The SSFF Core is of modular design to permit augmentation for enhanced capabilities. The fully integrated configuration of the SSFF will consist of three racks with the capability of supporting up to two furnace modules per rack. The initial configuration of the SSFF will consist of two of the three racks and one furnace module. This Experiment/Facility Requirements Document (E/FRD) describes the integrated facility requirements for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Integrated Configuration-1 (IC1) mission. The IC1 SSFF will consist of two racks: the Core Rack, with the centralized subsystem equipment; and the Experiment Rack-1, with Furnace Module-1 and the distributed subsystem equipment to support the furnace. The SSFF support functions are provided by the following Core subsystems: power conditioning and distribution subsystem (SSFF PCDS); data management subsystem (SSFF DMS); thermal control Subsystem (SSFF TCS); gas distribution subsystem (SSFF GDS); and mechanical structures subsystem (SSFF MSS).

  15. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  16. Space station integrated propulsion and fluid system study: Fluid systems configuration databook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, L.; Bicknell, B.; Bergman, D.; Wilson, S.

    1987-01-01

    This databook contains fluid system requirements and system descriptions for Space Station program elements including the United States and International modules, integrated fluid systems, attached payloads, fluid servicers and vehicle accommodation facilities. Separate sections are devoted to each of the program elements and include a discussion of the overall system requirements, specific fluid systems requirements and systems descriptions. The systems descriptions contain configurations, fluid inventory data and component lists. In addition, a list of information sources is referenced at the end of each section.

  17. Status of ERA Vehicle System Integration Technology Demonstrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Fernandez, Hamilton; Khorrami, Mehdi; James, Kevin D.; Thomas, Russell

    2015-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project within the Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) has the responsibility to explore and document the feasibility, benefits, and technical risk of air vehicle concepts and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. The primary goal of the ERA Project is to select air vehicle concepts and technologies that can simultaneously reduce fuel burn, noise, and emissions. In addition, the ERA Project will identify and mitigate technical risk and transfer knowledge to the aeronautics community at large so that new technologies and vehicle concepts can be incorporated into the future design of aircraft.

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  19. Integration of GCAM-USA into GLIMPSE: Update and demonstration

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to (i) discuss changes made to the GCAM-USA model to more fully support long-term, coordinated environmental-climate-energy planning within the U.S., and (ii) demonstrate the graphical user interface that has been constructed to construct model...

  20. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Technology Demonstration Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; Iverson, David; Pisanich, Greg; Toberman, Mike; Hicks, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is an essential capability that will be required to enable upcoming explorations mission systems such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), as well as NASA aeronautics missions. However, the lack of flight experience and available test platforms have held back the infusion by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of ISHM technologies into future space and aeronautical missions. To address this problem, a pioneer project was conceived to use a high-performance aircraft as a low-cost proxy to develop, mature, and verify the effectiveness of candidate ISHM technologies. Given the similarities between spacecraft and aircraft, an F/A-18 currently stationed at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was chosen as a suitable host platform for the test bed. This report describes how the test bed was conceived, how the technologies were integrated on to the aircraft, and how these technologies were matured during the project. It also describes the lessons learned during the project and a forward path for continued work.

  1. Topology of the configuration space, singularities of the potential, and polynomial integrals of equations of dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. V.; Treschev, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    For integrable systems with two degrees of freedom there are well-known inequalities connecting the Euler characteristic of the configuration space (as a closed two-dimensional surface) with the number of singular points of Newtonian type of the potential energy. On the other hand, there are results on conditions for ergodicity of systems on a two-dimensional torus with short-range potential depending only on the distance from an attracting or repelling centre. In the present paper we consider the problem of conditions for the existence of nontrivial first integrals that are polynomial in the momenta of the problem of motion of a particle on a multi-dimensional Euclidean torus in a force field whose potential has singularity points. These conditions depend only on the order of the singularity, and in the two-dimensional case they are satisfied by potentials with singularities of Newtonian type. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  2. Adaptivity demonstration of inflatable rigidized integrated structures (IRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, M. C.; Higuchi, Ken; Sekine, Koji; Okazaki, Kakuma

    1995-10-01

    An inflatable rigidized integrated structure (IRIS), which is composed of membrane elements and cable networks, and whose structural accuracy is decided by mainly cable networks, has various design adaptivity, since it is a high performance deployable structure for future space applications. In order to keep some stiffness after deployment, materials of membrane are assumed to be rigidized in space, and sometimes the cable network is also rigidized. The concept can cover various structural elements and structure systems. The accuracy analysis of reflector surface constrained by inside hard points and the manufacturing of a simple reflector model is introduced. Test results of rigidized cable columns to show many variations of IRIS to be feasible are also reported.

  3. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Movement Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, GA. The test aircraft was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. Qualitative and quantitative results are discussed.

  4. A knowledge management methodology for the integrated assessment of WWTP configurations during conceptual design.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Baserba, M; Reif, R; Rodriguez-Roda, I; Poch, M

    2012-01-01

    The current complexity involved in wastewater management projects is arising as the XXI century sets new challenges leading towards a more integrated plant design. In this context, the growing number of innovative technologies, stricter legislation and the development of new methodological approaches make it difficult to design appropriate flow schemes for new wastewater projects. Thus, new tools are needed for the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) conceptual design using integrated assessment methods in order to include different types of objectives at the same time i.e. environmental, economical, technical, and legal. Previous experiences used the decision support system (DSS) methodology to handle the specific issues related to wastewater management, for example, the design of treatment facilities for small communities. However, tools developed for addressing the whole treatment process independently of the plant size, capable of integrating knowledge from many different areas, including both conventional and innovative technologies are not available. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present and describe an innovative knowledge-based methodology that handles the conceptual design of WWTP process flow-diagrams (PFDs), satisfying a vast number of different criteria. This global approach is based on a hierarchy of decisions that uses the information contained in knowledge bases (KBs) with the aim of automating the generation of suitable WWTP configurations for a specific scenario. Expert interviews, legislation, specialized literature and engineering experience have been integrated within the different KBs, which indeed constitute one of the main highlights of this work. Therefore, the methodology is presented as a valuable tool which provides customized PFD for each specific case, taking into account process unit interactions and the user specified requirements and objectives.

  5. Habitat Demonstration Unit-Deep Space Habitat (HDU-DSH) Integration and Preparation for Desert RATS 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbeau, Zack

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit, or HDU, is a multi-purpose test bed that allows NASA scientists and engineers to design, develop, and test new living quarters, laboratories, and workspaces for the next generation space mission. Previous testing and integration has occurred during 2010 at the annual Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field testing campaign in the Arizona desert. There the HDU team tests the configuration developed for the fiscal year, or FY configuration. For FY2011, the NASA mission calls for simulating a deep space condition. The HDU-DSH, or Deep Space Habitat, will be configured with new systems and modules that will outfit the test bed with new deep space capabilities. One such addition is the new X-HAB (eXploration Habitat) Inflatable Loft. With any deep space mission there is the need for safe, suitable living quarters. The current HDU configuration does not allow for any living space at all. In fact, Desert RATS 2010 saw the crew sleeping in the Space Exploration Vehicles (SEV) instead of the HDU. The X-HAB Challenge pitted three universities against each other: Oklahoma State University, University of Maryland, and the University of Wisconsin. The winning team will have their design implemented by NASA for field testing at DRATS 2011. This paper will highlight the primary objective of getting the X-HAB field ready which involves the implementation of an elevator/handrail system along with smaller logistical and integration tasks associated with getting the HDU-DSH ready for shipment to DRATS.

  6. A novel proportional--integral-derivative control configuration with application to the control of batch distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Monroy-Loperena, R.; Cervantes, I.; Morales, A.

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a novel proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control configuration based on an observer structure. Batch distillation is used as the base case study where the regulated output is the distillate composition. The proposed PID control law is derived in the framework of robust nonlinear control with modeling error compensation techniques. A reduced-order observer is proposed to estimate both the derivative of the regulated output and the underlying modeling error. These observations are subsequently used in a control loop to feedback variations of distillate composition (derivative feedback) and to counteract the effects of modeling errors. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the resulting control law is equivalent to a classical PID controller with an antireset windup scheme. Moreover, the tuning of the controller is performed very easily in terms of a prescribed closed-loop time constant and an estimation time constant. Numerical results are provided for binary and multicomponent separations. Sampled/delayed measurements and several sources of uncertainties are considered in order to provide a realistic test scenario for the proposed control design procedure.

  7. The Impact of Using Model of Marzano Gain Students the Ability to Configure an Integrated Conceptual Structure in Islamic Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkhateeb, Omar

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed that the impact of using model of Marzano gain students the ability to configure an integrated conceptual structure in Islamic concepts the Sample included studious (120) student students the first year where of college of the educational sciences study in, two branches be organized in their choice was complete random among seven…

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the Wing Planform Study Task and Final Configuration Selection of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology (except for ACT), takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail sizes), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3590 km) (1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block fuel reduction. Good takeoff performance at high-altitude airports on a hot day was also achieved. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation and begin the required control system development and testing.

  9. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Wing Planform Study and Final Configuration Selection Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is documented. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 44% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3589 km 1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block-fuel reduction. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation, and begin the required control system development and test.

  10. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  11. Integrated front-end electronics in a detector compatible process: source-follower and charge-sensitive preamplifier configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, Lodovico; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Speziali, Valeria

    2001-12-01

    This study is concerned with the simulation and design of low-noise front-end electronics monolithically integrated on the same high-resistivity substrate as multielectrode silicon detectors, in a process made available by the Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica (ITC-IRST) of Trento, Italy. The integrated front-end solutions described in this paper use N-channel JFETs as basic elements. The first one is based upon an all-NJFET charge preamplifier designed to match detector capacitances of a few picofarads and available in both a resistive and a non resistive feedback configuration. In the second solution, a single NJFET in the source-follower configuration is connected to the detector, while its source is wired to an external readout channel through an integrated capacitor.

  12. An integrated platform for directly widely-targeted quantitative analysis of feces part I: Platform configuration and method validation.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuelin; Song, Qingqing; Li, Jun; Zheng, Jiao; Li, Chun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lingling; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-07-08

    Direct analysis is of great importance to understand the real chemical profile of a given sample, notably biological materials, because either chemical degradation or diverse errors and uncertainties might be resulted from sophisticated protocols. In comparison with biofluids, it is still challenging for direct analysis of solid biological samples using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Herein, a new analytical platform was configured by online hyphenating pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), turbulent flow chromatography (TFC), and LC-MS/MS. A facile, but robust PLE module was constructed based on the phenomenon that noticeable back-pressure can be generated during rapid fluid passing through a narrow tube. TFC column that is advantageous at extracting low molecular analytes from rushing fluid was employed to link at the outlet of the PLE module to capture constituents-of-interest. An electronic 6-port/2-position valve was introduced between TFC column and LC-MS/MS to fragment each measurement into extraction and elution phases, whereas LC-MS/MS took the charge of analyte separation and monitoring. As a proof of concept, simultaneous determination of 24 endogenous substances including eighteen steroids, five eicosanoids, and one porphyrin in feces was carried out in this paper. Method validation assays demonstrated the analytical platform to be qualified for directly simultaneous measurement of diverse endogenous analytes in fecal matrices. Application of this integrated platform on homolog-focused profiling of feces is discussed in a companion paper.

  13. Overview of ERA Integrated Technology Demonstration (ITD) 51A Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) Integration for Hybrid Wing Body (HWB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; James, Kevin D.; Bonet, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aircraft Project (ERA) was a ve year project broken into two phases. In phase II, high N+2 Technical Readiness Level demonstrations were grouped into Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITD). This paper describes the work done on ITD-51A: the Vehicle Systems Integration, Engine Airframe Integration Demonstration. Refinement of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft from the possible candidates developed in ERA Phase I was continued. Scaled powered, and unpowered wind- tunnel testing, with and without acoustics, in the NASA LARC 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Tunnel, the NASA ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the 40- by 80-foot test section of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) in conjunction with very closely coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics was used to demonstrate the fuel burn and acoustic milestone targets of the ERA Project.

  14. Central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity: a rebreathing demonstration illustrating integrative human physiology.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Christina M; Skow, Rachel J; Tymko, Michael M; Boulet, Lindsey M; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D; Ainslie, Philip N; Lemieux, Chantelle C M; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    One of the most effective ways of engaging students of physiology and medicine is through laboratory demonstrations and case studies that combine 1) the use of equipment, 2) problem solving, 3) visual representations, and 4) manipulation and interpretation of data. Depending on the measurements made and the type of test, laboratory demonstrations have the added benefit of being able to show multiple organ system integration. Many research techniques can also serve as effective demonstrations of integrative human physiology. The "Duffin" hyperoxic rebreathing test is often used in research settings as a test of central respiratory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. We aimed to demonstrate the utility of the hyperoxic rebreathing test for both respiratory and cerebrovascular responses to increases in CO2 and illustrate the integration of the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems. In the present article, methods such as spirometry, respiratory gas analysis, and transcranial Doppler ultrasound are described, and raw data traces can be adopted for discussion in a tutorial setting. If educators have these instruments available, instructions on how to carry out the test are provided so students can collect their own data. In either case, data analysis and quantification are discussed, including principles of linear regression, calculation of slope, the coefficient of determination (R(2)), and differences between plotting absolute versus normalized data. Using the hyperoxic rebreathing test as a demonstration of the complex interaction and integration between the respiratory and cerebrovascular systems provides senior undergraduate, graduate, and medical students with an advanced understanding of the integrative nature of human physiology.

  15. Tool for a configurable integrated circuit that uses determination of dynamic power consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Matthew C. (Inventor); Wang, Li (Inventor); Agarwal, Deepak (Inventor); Davoodi, Azadeh (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A configurable logic tool that allows minimization of dynamic power within an FPGA design without changing user-entered specifications. The minimization of power may use minimized clock nets as a first order operation, and a second order operation that minimizes other factors, such as area of placement, area of clocks and/or slack.

  16. Buried waste integrated demonstration fiscal year 1992 close-out report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, P.G.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Owens, K.J.

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program (BWID) is to support the development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that when integrated with commercially-available baseline technologies form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste disposed of throughout the US Department of Energy complex. To accomplish this mission of identifying technological solutions for remediation deficiencies, the Office of Technology Development initiated the BWID at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-91. This report summarizes the activities of the BWID Program during FY-92.

  17. Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2013-09-01

    This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

  18. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial ACT configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial ACT configuration design task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is summarized. A constrained application of active controls technology (ACT) resulted in significant improvements over a conventional baseline configuration previously established. The configuration uses the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, payload, and design requirements/objectives as the baseline, except for flying qualities, flutter, and ACT. The baseline wing is moved forward 1.68 m. The configuration incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle of attack limiter, wing load alleviation, and flutter mode control. This resulted in a 930 kg reduction in airplane operating empty weight and a 3.6% improvement in cruise efficiency, yielding a 13% range increase. Adjusted to the 3590 km baseline mission range, this amounts to 6% block fuel reduction and a 15.7% higher incremental return on investment, using 1978 dollars and fuel cost.

  19. Demonstration of the feasibility of an integrated x ray laboratory for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, E. D.; Kerner, J. A.; Koppel, L. N.; Boyle, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The identification of minerals and elemental compositions is an important component in the geological and exobiological exploration of the solar system. X ray diffraction and fluorescence are common techniques for obtaining these data. The feasibility of combining these analytical techniques in an integrated x ray laboratory compatible with the volume, mass, and power constraints imposed by many planetary missions was demonstrated. Breadboard level hardware was developed to cover the range of diffraction lines produced by minerals, clays, and amorphous; and to detect the x ray fluorescence emissions of elements from carbon through uranium. These breadboard modules were fabricated and used to demonstrate the ability to detect elements and minerals. Additional effort is required to establish the detection limits of the breadboard modules and to integrate diffraction and fluorescence techniques into a single unit. It was concluded that this integrated x ray laboratory capability will be a valuable tool in the geological and exobiological exploration of the solar system.

  20. Demonstration of An Integrated Approach to Mercury Control at Lee Station

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali Lissianski; Pete Maly

    2007-12-31

    General Electric (GE) has developed an approach whereby native mercury reduction on fly ash can be improved by optimizing the combustion system. This approach eliminates carbon-rich areas in the combustion zone, making the combustion process more uniform, and allows increasing carbon content in fly ash without significant increase in CO emissions. Since boiler excess O{sub 2} can be also reduced as a result of optimized combustion, this process reduces NO{sub x} emissions. Because combustion optimization improves native mercury reduction on fly ash, it can reduce requirements for activated carbon injection (ACI) when integrated with sorbent injection for more efficient mercury control. The approach can be tailored to specific unit configurations and coal types for optimal performance. This report describes results of a U.S. DOE sponsored project designed to evaluate the effect of combustion conditions on 'native' mercury capture on fly ash and integrate combustion optimization for improved mercury and NO{sub x} reduction with ACI. The technology evaluation took place in Lee Station Unit 3 located in Goldsboro, NC and operated by Progress Energy. Unit 3 burns a low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal and is a 250 MW opposed-wall fired unit equipped with an ESP with a specific collection area of 249 ft{sup 2}/kacfm. Unit 3 is equipped with SO{sub 3} injection for ESP conditioning. The technical goal of the project was to evaluate the technology's ability to achieve 70% mercury reduction below the baseline emission value of 2.9 lb/TBtu, which was equivalent to 80% mercury reduction relative to the mercury concentration in the coal. The strategy to achieve the 70% incremental improvement in mercury removal in Unit 3 was (1) to enhance 'naturally' occurring fly ash mercury capture by optimizing the combustion process and using duct humidification to reduce flue gas temperatures at the ESP inlet, and (2) to use ACI in front of the ESP to further reduce mercury emissions. The

  1. Effect of external tank nose shape on the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle 3, integrated configuration (IA37B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Tests of several tank nose shapes were conducted as a part of the investigation of configuration changes to reduce drag for the integrated vehicle. The effect on the integrated vehicle aerodynamic characteristics of several tank nose shapes was investigated. The tank nose shapes investigated were the 600 inch (baseline) and 1204 inch radius ogives, and the 600 inch ogive plus a spike 360 inches long and 12.0 inches in diameter. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.6 through 4.96 and for angles-of-attack and sideslip from -10 through +10 degrees. The model used was the 0.004-scale integrated vehicle model number 34-OTS.

  2. Temporal Integration in Face Perception: Evidence of Configural Processing of Temporally Separated Face Parts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaki, David; Boyd, Jennifer; Moscovitch, Morris

    2007-01-01

    Temporal integration is the process by which temporally separated visual components are combined into a unified representation. Although this process has been studied in object recognition, little is known about temporal integration in face perception and recognition. In the present study, the authors investigated the characteristics and time…

  3. Buried waste integrated demonstration Fiscal Year 1993 close-out report

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, K.J.; Hyde, R.A.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management needs and objectives. BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process. To accomplish this mission of identifying technological solutions for remediation deficiencies, the Office of Technology Development initiated BWID at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report summarizes the activities of the BWID program during FY-93.

  4. Integrated configurable equipment selection and line balancing for mass production with serial-parallel machining systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaïa, Olga; Dolgui, Alexandre; Guschinsky, Nikolai; Levin, Genrikh

    2014-10-01

    Solving equipment selection and line balancing problems together allows better line configurations to be reached and avoids local optimal solutions. This article considers jointly these two decision problems for mass production lines with serial-parallel workplaces. This study was motivated by the design of production lines based on machines with rotary or mobile tables. Nevertheless, the results are more general and can be applied to assembly and production lines with similar structures. The designers' objectives and the constraints are studied in order to suggest a relevant mathematical model and an efficient optimization approach to solve it. A real case study is used to validate the model and the developed approach.

  5. SECAD-- a Schema-based Environment for Configuring, Analyzing and Documenting Integrated Fusion Simulations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shasharina, Svetlana

    2012-05-23

    SECAD is a project that developed a GUI for running integrated fusion simulations as implemented in FACETS and SWIM SciDAC projects. Using the GUI users can submit simulations locally and remotely and visualize the simulation results.

  6. Adaptive Topological Configuration of an Integrated Circuit/Packet-Switched Computer Network.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Gitman et al. [45] state that there are basically two approaches to the integrated network design problem: (1) solve the link/capacity problem for...1972), 1385-1397. 33. Frank, H., and Gitman , I. Economic analysis of integrated voice and data networks: a case study. Proc. of IEEE 66 , 11 (Nov. 1978...1974), 1074-1079. 45. Gitman , I., Hsieh, W., and Occhiogrosso, B. J. Analysis and design of hybrid switching networks. IEEE Trans. on Comm. Com-29

  7. The Integrated Solar Upper Stage engine ground demonstration power management and distribution subsystem design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Kimnach, Greg L.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL), and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) in a joint effort are developing technologies for a solar bimodal system. A solar bimodal system combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A spacecraft Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) bimodal system combines orbital transfer propulsion, electric power generation, and on-board propulsion into one overall system. A key benefit of such integrated system is the augmentation of payload to spacecraft mass ratio thus resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. The NASA/PL/DSWA ISUS program is concentrating efforts on a near-term ground test demonstration of the bimodal concept. A successful ground demonstration of the ISUS various technologies will enable a full system flight demonstration of the bimodal concept. NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland Ohio will be the site for the engine ground demonstrator (EGD). The ISUS bimodal system uses solar concentrators to focus solar energy into an integrated receiver, absorber, and converter (RAC) power plant. The power plant main body is a graphite blackbody that stores thermal energy within a cavity in its main core. During the propulsion phase of the bimodal system a propellant flows into the graphite main core and is distributed uniformly through axial flow channels in the heated cavity. The blackbody core heats the propellant that is then discharged into an output tube thus creating thrust. An array of thermionic generators encircles the graphite core cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions during the power generation phase. The power management and distribution subsystem's main functions are to condition raw electrical power generated by the RAC power plant and deliver it to the spacecraft payloads. This paper

  8. Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) Systems Integration Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy; Merbitz, Jerad; Kennedy, Kriss; Tri, Terry; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project team constructed an analog prototype lunar surface laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a rapid prototyping approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the system integration strategies and lessons learned, that allowed the PEM to be brought from paper design to working field prototype using a multi-center team. The system integration process was based on a rapid prototyping approach. Tailored design review and test and integration processes facilitated that approach. The use of collaboration tools including electronic tools as well as documentation enabled a geographically distributed team take a paper concept to an operational prototype in approximately one year. One of the major tools used in the integration strategy was a coordinated effort to accurately model all the subsystems using computer aided design (CAD), so conflicts were identified before physical components came together. A deliberate effort was made following the deployment of the HDU PEM for field operations to collect lessons learned to facilitate process improvement and inform the design of future flight or analog versions of habitat systems. Significant items within those lessons learned were limitations with the CAD integration approach and the impact of shell design on flexibility of placing systems within the HDU shell.

  9. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Integration Effects for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H; Elkoby, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects of a high bypass ratio engine for a hybrid wing body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. The objective was to provide an understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness as a function of engine gas condition and location as well as nozzle configuration. A 4.7% scale nozzle of a bypass ratio seven engine was run at characteristic cycle points under static and forward flight conditions. The effect of the pylon and its orientation on jet noise was also studied as a function of bypass ratio and cycle condition. The addition of a pylon yielded significant spectral changes lowering jet noise by up to 4 dB at high polar angles and increasing it by 2 to 3 dB at forward angles. In order to assess jet noise shielding, a planform representation of the airframe model, also at 4.7% scale was traversed such that the jet nozzle was positioned from downstream of to several diameters upstream of the airframe model trailing edge. Installations at two fan diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge provided only limited shielding in the forward arc at high frequencies for both the axisymmetric and a conventional round nozzle with pylon. This was consistent with phased array measurements suggesting that the high frequency sources are predominantly located near the nozzle exit and, consequently, are amenable to shielding. The mid to low frequency sources were observed further downstream and shielding was insignificant. Chevrons were designed and used to impact the distribution of sources with the more aggressive design showing a significant upstream migration of the sources in the mid frequency range. Furthermore, the chevrons reduced the low frequency source levels and the typical high frequency increase due to the application of chevron nozzles was successfully shielded. The pylon was further modified with a technology that injects air

  10. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Integration Effects for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Elkoby, Ronen

    2010-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects of a high bypass ratio engine for a hybrid wing body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. The objective was to provide an understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness as a function of engine gas condition and location as well as nozzle configuration. A 4.7% scale nozzle of a bypass ratio seven engine was run at characteristic cycle points under static and forward flight conditions. The effect of the pylon and its orientation on jet noise was also studied as a function of bypass ratio and cycle condition. The addition of a pylon yielded significant spectral changes lowering jet noise by up to 4dB at high polar angles and increasing it by 2 to 3dB at forward angles. In order to assess jet noise shielding, a planform representation of the airframe model, also at 4.7% scale was traversed relative to the jet nozzle from downstream to several diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge. Installations at two fan diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge provided only limited shielding in the forward arc at high frequencies for both the axisymmetric and a conventional round nozzle with pylon. This was consistent with phased array measurements suggesting that the high frequency sources are predominantly located near the nozzle exit and, consequently, are amenable to shielding. The mid to low frequencies sources were observed further downstream and shielding was insignificant. Chevrons were designed and used to impact the distribution of sources with the more aggressive design showing a significant upstream migration of the sources in the mid frequency range. Furthermore, the chevrons reduced the low frequency source levels and the typical high frequency increase due to the application of chevron nozzles was successfully shielded. The pylon was further modified with a technology that injects air through the shelf of the

  11. Density Fitting and Cholesky Decomposition of the Two-Electron Integrals in Local Multireference Configuration Interaction Theory.

    PubMed

    Krisiloff, David B; Krauter, Caroline M; Ricci, Francis J; Carter, Emily A

    2015-11-10

    To treat large molecules with accurate ab initio quantum chemistry, reduced scaling correlated wave function methods are now commonly employed. Optimization of these wave functions in practice requires some approximation of the two-electron integrals. Both Cholesky decomposition (CD) and density fitting (DF) are widely used approaches to approximate these integrals. Here, we compare CD and DF for use in local multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction (LMRSDCI). DF-LMRSDCI provides less accurate total energies than CD-LMRSDCI, but both methods are accurate for energy differences. However, DF-LMRSDCI is significantly less computationally expensive than CD-LMRSDCI on the molecules tested, suggesting that DF-LMRSDCI is an efficient, often sufficiently accurate alternative to our previously reported CD-LMRSDCI method.

  12. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Yin, Hongxi

    2014-11-01

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  13. Use of Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by higher education faculty in Schools Colleges and Department of Education (SCDE), and a) access to technological infrastructure, b) support from human infrastructure, and c) personal attitude toward computer…

  14. Demonstration of a fully integrated superconducting receiver with a 2.7 THz quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Wei; Lou, Zheng; Xu, Gang-Yi; Hu, Jie; Li, Shao-Liang; Zhang, Wen; Zhou, Kang-Min; Yao, Qi-Jun; Zhang, Kun; Duan, Wen-Ying; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Colombelli, Raffaele; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A

    2015-02-23

    We demonstrate for the first time the integration of a superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer and a quantum cascade laser (QCL) on the same 4-K stage of a single cryostat, which is of particular interest for terahertz (THz) HEB/QCL integrated heterodyne receivers for practical applications. Two key issues are addressed. Firstly, a low power consumption QCL is adopted for preventing its heat dissipation from destroying the HEB's superconductivity. Secondly, a simple spherical lens located on the same 4-K stage is introduced to optimize the coupling between the HEB and the QCL, which has relatively limited output power owing to low input direct current (DC) power. Note that simulation techniques are used to design the HEB/QCL integrated heterodyne receiver to avoid the need for mechanical tuning. The integrated HEB/QCL receiver shows an uncorrected noise temperature of 1500 K at 2.7 THz, which is better than the performance of the same receiver with all the components not integrated.

  15. Validation of a highly integrated SiPM readout system with a TOF-PET demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejad, T.; Setayeshi, S.; Tavernier, S.; Bugalho, R.; Ferramacho, L.; Di Francesco, A.; Leong, C.; Rolo, M. D.; Shamshirsaz, M.; Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Silveira, M.; Zorraquino, C.; Varela, J.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a highly integrated, fast and compact readout electronics for Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) based Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF-PET) scanners. The readout is based on the use of TOP-PET Application Specific Integrated Circuit (PETsys TOFPET1 ASIC) with 64 channels, each with its amplifier, discriminator, Time to Digital Converter (TDC) and amplitude determination using Time Over Threshold (TOT). The ASIC has 25 ps r.m.s. intrinsic time resolution and fully digital output. The system is optimised for high rates, good timing, low power consumption and low cost. For validating the readout electronics, we have built a technical PET scanner, hereafter called ``demonstrator'', with 2'048 SiPM channels. The PET demonstrator has 16 compact Detector Modules (DM). Each DM has two ASICs reading 128 SiPM pixels in one-to-one coupling to 128 Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals measuring 3.1 × 3.1 × 15 mm3 each. The data acquisition system for the demonstrator has two Front End Boards type D (FEB/D), each collecting the data of 1'024 channels (8 DMs), and transmitting assembled data frames through a serial link (4.8 Gbps), to a single Data Acquisition (DAQ) board plugged into the Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) bus of the data acquisition PC. Results obtained with this PET demonstrator are presented.

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF AN ADVANCED INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Suzanne Shea; Randhir Sehgal; Ilga Celmins; Andrew Maxson

    2002-02-01

    The primary objective of the project titled ''Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Control System for Simultaneous Emissions Reduction'' was to demonstrate at proof-of-concept scale the use of an online software package, the ''Plant Environmental and Cost Optimization System'' (PECOS), to optimize the operation of coal-fired power plants by economically controlling all emissions simultaneously. It combines physical models, neural networks, and fuzzy logic control to provide both optimal least-cost boiler setpoints to the boiler operators in the control room, as well as optimal coal blending recommendations designed to reduce fuel costs and fuel-related derates. The goal of the project was to demonstrate that use of PECOS would enable coal-fired power plants to make more economic use of U.S. coals while reducing emissions.

  17. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Technologies for Increased Capacity and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, Kathryn A.; Shipman, Floyd S.; Bryant, Wayne H.; Eckhardt, Dave E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity and safety issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration presented an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning system (DGPS) receiver, a high speed very high frequency (VHF) data link, an Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on an AMASS display. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with test results.

  18. Beyond Sexual Orientation: Integrating Gender/Sex and Diverse Sexualities via Sexual Configurations Theory.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M

    2015-07-01

    Sexual orientation typically describes people's sexual attractions or desires based on their sex relative to that of a target. Despite its utility, it has been critiqued in part because it fails to account for non-biological gender-related factors, partnered sexualities unrelated to gender or sex, or potential divergences between love and lust. In this article, I propose Sexual Configurations Theory (SCT) as a testable, empirically grounded framework for understanding diverse partnered sexualities, separate from solitary sexualities. I focus on and provide models of two parameters of partnered sexuality--gender/sex and partner number. SCT also delineates individual gender/sex. I discuss a sexual diversity lens as a way to study the particularities and generalities of diverse sexualities without privileging either. I also discuss how sexual identities, orientations, and statuses that are typically seen as misaligned or aligned are more meaningfully conceptualized as branched or co-incident. I map out some existing identities using SCT and detail its applied implications for health and counseling work. I highlight its importance for sexuality in terms of measurement and social neuroendocrinology, and the ways it may be useful for self-knowledge and feminist and queer empowerment and alliance building. I also make a case that SCT changes existing understandings and conceptualizations of sexuality in constructive and generative ways informed by both biology and culture, and that it is a potential starting point for sexual diversity studies and research.

  19. Involvement of right STS in audio-visual integration for affective speech demonstrated using MEG.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Cindy C; Woods, Will; Johnson, Sam; Green, Gary G R; Young, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Speech and emotion perception are dynamic processes in which it may be optimal to integrate synchronous signals emitted from different sources. Studies of audio-visual (AV) perception of neutrally expressed speech demonstrate supra-additive (i.e., where AV>[unimodal auditory+unimodal visual]) responses in left STS to crossmodal speech stimuli. However, emotions are often conveyed simultaneously with speech; through the voice in the form of speech prosody and through the face in the form of facial expression. Previous studies of AV nonverbal emotion integration showed a role for right (rather than left) STS. The current study therefore examined whether the integration of facial and prosodic signals of emotional speech is associated with supra-additive responses in left (cf. results for speech integration) or right (due to emotional content) STS. As emotional displays are sometimes difficult to interpret, we also examined whether supra-additive responses were affected by emotional incongruence (i.e., ambiguity). Using magnetoencephalography, we continuously recorded eighteen participants as they viewed and heard AV congruent emotional and AV incongruent emotional speech stimuli. Significant supra-additive responses were observed in right STS within the first 250 ms for emotionally incongruent and emotionally congruent AV speech stimuli, which further underscores the role of right STS in processing crossmodal emotive signals.

  20. Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.C.

    1997-11-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  1. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration fiscal Year 1994 close-out report

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, K.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Buried Waste integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management needs and objectives. BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process. To accomplish this mission of identifying technological solutions for remediation deficiencies, the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development initiated BMD at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report summarizes the activities of the BWID program during Fiscal Year 1994. In Fiscal Year 1995, these activities are transitioning into the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area.

  2. Public-private integrated partnerships demonstrate the potential to improve health care access, quality, and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sekhri, Neelam; Feachem, Richard; Ni, Angela

    2011-08-01

    Around the world, publicly owned and run health services face challenges. In poor countries in particular, health services are characterized by such problems as inadequate infrastructure and equipment, frequent shortages of medicines and supplies, and low quality of care. Increasingly, both developed- and developing-country governments are embracing public-private partnerships to harness private financing and expertise to achieve public policy goals. An innovative form of these partnerships is the public-private integrated partnership, which goes a step further than more common hospital building and maintenance arrangements, by combining infrastructure renewal with delivery of clinical services. We describe the benefits and risks inherent in such integrated partnerships and present three case studies that demonstrate innovative design. We conclude that these partnerships have the potential to improve access, quality, and efficiency in health care. More such partnerships should be launched and rigorously evaluated, and their lessons should be widely shared to guide policy makers in the effective use of this model.

  3. Integrating Socioeconomic and Earth Science Data Using Geobrowsers and Web Services: A Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, J. A.; Yetman, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    The societal benefit areas identified as the focus for the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) 10- year implementation plan are an indicator of the importance of integrating socioeconomic data with earth science data to support decision makers. To aid this integration, CIESIN is delivering its global and U.S. demographic data to commercial and open source Geobrowsers and providing open standards based services for data access. Currently, data on population distribution, poverty, and detailed census data for the U.S. are available for visualization and access in Google Earth, NASA World Wind, and a browser-based 2-dimensional mapping client. The mapping client allows for the creation of web map documents that pull together layers from distributed servers and can be saved and shared. Visualization tools with Geobrowsers, user-driven map creation and sharing via browser-based clients, and a prototype for characterizing populations at risk to predicted precipitation deficits will be demonstrated.

  4. Successfully Demonstrating an Integrated Roofing and BIPV Solution for an Historic Building Renovation at the United States Air Force Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Successfully Demonstrating an Integrated Roofing and BIPV Solution for an Historic Building Renovation at the United States Air Force Academy...COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Successfully Demonstrating an Integrated Roofing and BIPV Solution for an Historic...ANSI Std Z39-18 Successfully Demonstrating an Integrated Roofing and BIPV Solution for an Historic Building Renovation at the United States Air Force

  5. Flywheel Single-Axis Integrated Momentum and Power Control System Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2004-01-01

    On July 10, 2003, the NASA Glenn Research Center flywheel team experimentally demonstrated a two-flywheel-module system that simultaneously provided attitude control in a single axis and regulated power. The test was conducted using the D1 flywheel module and the high-speed shaft (HSS) in the High Energy Flywheel Facility (HEFF). Both of these flywheel modules consist of a magnetically levitated rotor with an integral motor/generator, a vacuum housing, and mechanical touchdown bearings. Energy is stored kinetically in the rotor. The motor/generator allows energy to be added to or withdrawn from the rotor, and magnetic bearings and a vacuum enclosure are used to minimize losses.

  6. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report. INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration System Analysis project

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1992-05-01

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  7. Propulsion Airframe Integration Test Techniques for Hypersonic Airbreathing Configurations at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Cabell, Karen F.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The scope and significance of propulsion airframe integration (PAI) for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is presented through a discussion of the PAI test techniques utilized at NASA Langley Research Center. Four primary types of PAI model tests utilized at NASA Langley for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles are discussed. The four types of PAI test models examined are the forebody/inlet test model, the partial-width/truncated propulsion flowpath test model, the powered exhaust simulation test model, and the full-length/width propulsion flowpath test model. The test technique for each of these four types of PAI test models is described, and the relevant PAI issues addressed by each test technique are illustrated through the presentation of recent PAI test data.

  8. Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of transuranic contaminated soils for uranium soil integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1994-10-01

    DOE has initiated the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) project. The objective of the USID project is to develop a remediation strategy that can be adopted for use at other DOE sites requiring remediation. Four major task groups within the USID project were formed, namely the Characterization Task Group (CTG), the Treatability Task Group (TTG), the Secondary Waste Treatment and Disposal Task Group (SWTDTG), and the Risk and Performance Assessment Task Group (RPATG). The CTG is responsible for determining the nature of the uranium contamination in both untreated and treated soil. The TTG is responsible for the selective removal of uranium from these soils in such a manner that the leaching does not seriously degrade the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generate a secondary waste form that is difficult to manage and/or dispose. The SWTDTG is responsible for developing strategies for the removal of uranium from all wastewaters generated by the TTGs. Finally the RPATG is responsible for developing the human health and environmental risk assessment of the untreated and treated soils. Because of the enormity of the work required to successfully remediate uranium-contaminated soils, an integrated approach was designed to avoid needless repetition of activities among the various participants in the USID project. Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were assigned characterization and/or treatability duties in their areas of specialization. All tasks groups are involved in the integrated approach; however, the thrust of this report concentrates on the utility of the integrated approach among the various members of the CTG. This report illustrates the use of the integrated approach for the overall CTG and to provide the results generated specifically by the CTG or ORNL from FY1993 to the present.

  9. Alternative Measurement Configurations for Extracting Bulk Optical Properties Using an Integrating Sphere Setup.

    PubMed

    Thennadil, Suresh N; Chen, Yi-Chieh

    2017-02-01

    The usual approach for estimating bulk optical properties using an integrating sphere measurement setup is by acquiring spectra from three measurement modes namely collimated transmittance (Tc), total transmittance (Td), and total diffuse reflectance (Rd), followed by the inversion of these measurements using the adding-doubling method. At high scattering levels, accurate acquisition of Tc becomes problematic due to the presence of significant amounts of forward-scattered light in this measurement which is supposed to contain only unscattered light. In this paper, we propose and investigate the effectiveness of using alternative sets of integrating sphere measurements that avoid the use of Tc and could potentially increase the upper limit of concentrations of suspensions at which bulk optical property measurements can be obtained in the visible-near-infrared (Vis-NIR) region of the spectrum. We examine the possibility of replacing Tc with one or more reflectance measurements at different sample thicknesses. We also examine the possibility of replacing both the collimated (Tc) and total transmittance (Td) measurements with reflectance measurements taken from different sample thicknesses. The analysis presented here indicates that replacing Tc with a reflectance measurement can reduce the errors in the bulk scattering properties when scattering levels are high. When only multiple reflectance measurements are used, good estimates of the bulk optical properties can be obtained when the absorption levels are low. In addition, we examine whether there is any advantage in using three measurements instead of two to obtain the reduced bulk scattering coefficient and the bulk absorption coefficient. This investigation is made in the context of chemical and biological suspensions which have a much larger range of optical properties compared to those encountered with tissue.

  10. Characterization and on-sky demonstration of an integrated photonic spectrograph for astronomy.

    PubMed

    Cvetojevic, N; Lawrence, J S; Ellis, S C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Haynes, R; Horton, A

    2009-10-12

    We present results from the first on-sky demonstration of a prototype astronomical integrated photonic spectrograph (IPS) using the Anglo-Australian Telescope near-infrared imaging spectrometer (IRIS2) at Siding Spring Observatory to observe atmospheric molecular OH emission lines. We have succeeded in detecting upwards of 27 lines, and demonstrated the practicality of the IPS device for astronomy. Furthermore, we present a laboratory characterization of the device, which is a modified version of a commercial arrayed-waveguide grating multiplexer. We measure the spectral resolution full-width-half-maximum to be 0.75 +/- 0.05 nm (giving R = lambda/deltalambda = 2100 +/- 150 at 1500 nm). We find the free spectral range to be 57.4 +/- 0.6 nm and the peak total efficiency to be approximately 65%. Finally, we briefly discuss the future steps required to realize an astronomical instrument based on this technology concept.

  11. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  12. Space Solar Power Multi-body Dynamics and Controls, Concepts for the Integrated Symmetrical Concentrator Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.; McDonald, Emmett J.

    2000-01-01

    Orbiting space solar power systems are currently being investigated for possible flight in the time frame of 2015-2020 and later. Such space solar power (SSP) satellites are required to be extremely large in order to make practical the process of collection, conversion to microwave radiation, and reconversion to electrical power at earth stations or at remote locations in space. These large structures are expected to be very flexible presenting unique problems associated with their dynamics and control. The purpose of this project is to apply the expanded TREETOPS multi-body dynamics analysis computer simulation program (with expanded capabilities developed in the previous activity) to investigate the control problems associated with the integrated symmetrical concentrator (ISC) conceptual SSP system. SSP satellites are, as noted, large orbital systems having many bodies (perhaps hundreds) with flexible arrays operating in an orbiting environment where the non-uniform gravitational forces may be the major load producers on the structure so that a high fidelity gravity model is required. The current activity arises from our NRA8-23 SERT proposal. Funding, as a supplemental selection, has been provided by NASA with reduced scope from that originally proposed.

  13. 6H-SiC Transistor Integrated Circuits Demonstrating Prolonged Operation at 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Chang, Carl W.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Okojie, Robert S.; Evans, Laura J.; Meredith, Roger; Ferrier, Terry; Krasowski, Michael J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing very high temperature semiconductor integrated circuits (ICs) for use in the hot sections of aircraft engines and for Venus exploration where ambient temperatures are well above the approximately 300 degrees Centigrade effective limit of silicon-on-insulator IC technology. In order for beneficial technology insertion to occur, such transistor ICs must be capable of prolonged operation in such harsh environments. This paper reports on the fabrication and long-term 500 degrees Centigrade operation of 6H-SiC integrated circuits based on epitaxial 6H-SiC junction field effect transistors (JFETs). Simple analog amplifier and digital logic gate ICs have now demonstrated thousands of hours of continuous 500 degrees Centigrade operation in oxidizing air atmosphere with minimal changes in relevant electrical parameters. Electrical characterization and modeling of transistors and circuits at temperatures from 24 degrees Centigrade to 500 degrees Centigrade is also described. Desired analog and digital IC functionality spanning this temperature range was demonstrated without changing the input signals or power supply voltages.

  14. Integration and flight demonstration of a high-capacity monogroove heat-pipe radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The cancellation of the TDRS-B satellite as the payload for the eighth Space Shuttle mission provided a unique opportunity to demonstrate on-orbit operation of the high-capacity monogroove heat pipe used in the space constructible radiator subsystem. In less than 4 months, a flight experiment was conceived, designed, fabricated, tested, integrated with a payload carrier, installed in the Orbiter Challenger payload bay, and successfully operated in flight. Still color photographs and direct crew visual observation of color changes in a pattern of temperature-sensitive liquid-crystal tapes provided the temperature data necessary to verify successful on-orbit startup and orbital transient response of the heat pipe when subjected to a heat load from its attached electrical heaters. This successful on-orbit demonstration verified analytical design tools and provided confidence in the use of high-capacity heat pipes for future space applications. The flight experiment hardware and the integration and test activities that led to the flight are described, and the actual flight results are compared to analytical performance predictions.

  15. Electro-optical backplane demonstrator with integrated multimode gradient-index thin glass waveguide panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Henning; Brusberg, Lars; Pitwon, Richard; Whalley, Simon; Wang, Kai; Miller, Allen; Herbst, Christian; Weber, Daniel; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Optical interconnects for data transmission at board level offer increased energy efficiency, system density, and bandwidth scalability compared to purely copper driven systems. We present recent results on manufacturing of electrooptical printed circuit board (PCB) with integrated planar glass waveguides. The graded index multi-mode waveguides are patterned inside commercially available thin-glass panels by performing a specific ion-exchange process. The glass waveguide panel is embedded within the layer stack-up of a PCB using proven industrial processes. This paper describes the design, manufacture, assembly and characterization of the first electro-optical backplane demonstrator based on integrated planar glass waveguides. The electro-optical backplane in question is created by laminating the glass waveguide panel into a conventional multi-layer electronic printed circuit board stack-up. High precision ferrule mounts are automatically assembled, which will enable MT compliant connectors to be plugged accurately to the embedded waveguide interfaces on the glass panel edges. The demonstration platform comprises a standardized sub-rack chassis and five pluggable test cards each housing optical engines and pluggable optical connectors. The test cards support a variety of different data interfaces and can support data rates of up to 32 Gb/s per channel.

  16. Demonstration of Robustness and Integrated Operation of a Series-Bosch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Mansell, J. Matthew; Barnett, Bill; Stanley, Christine M.; Junaedi, Christian; Vilekar, Saurabh A.; Kent, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Manned missions beyond low Earth orbit will require highly robust, reliable, and maintainable life support systems that maximize recycling of water and oxygen. Bosch technology is one option to maximize oxygen recovery, in the form of water, from metabolically-produced carbon dioxide (CO2). A two stage approach to Bosch, called Series-Bosch, reduces metabolic CO2 with hydrogen (H2) to produce water and solid carbon using two reactors: a Reverse Water-Gas Shift (RWGS) reactor and a carbon formation (CF) reactor. Previous development efforts demonstrated the stand-alone performance of a RWGS reactor containing Incofoam(TradeMark) catalyst and designed for robustness against carbon formation, two membrane separators intended to maximize single pass conversion of reactants, and a batch CF reactor with both transit and surface catalysts. In the past year, Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) developed and delivered a RWGS reactor for testing at NASA. The reactor design was based on their patented Microlith(TradeMark) technology and was first evaluated under a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort in 2010. The Microlith(TradeMark) RWGS reactor was recently evaluated at NASA to compare its performance and operating conditions with the Incofoam(TradeMark) RWGS reactor. Separately, in 2015, a fully integrated demonstration of an S-Bosch system was conducted. In an effort to mitigate risk, a second integrated test was conducted to evaluate the effect of membrane failure on a closed-loop Bosch system. Here, we report and discuss the performance and robustness to carbon formation of both RWGS reactors. We report the results of the integrated operation of a Series-Bosch system and we discuss the technology readiness level. 1

  17. Comparative Monte Carlo study on the performance of integration- and list-mode detector configurations for carbon ion computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sebastian; Gianoli, Chiara; Magallanes, Lorena; Kopp, Benedikt; Tessonnier, Thomas; Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Voss, Bernd; Parodi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of a highly conformal tumor-dose distribution; however, this technique is extremely sensitive to inaccuracies in the treatment procedures. Ambiguities in the conversion of Hounsfield units of the treatment planning x-ray CT to relative stopping power (RSP) can cause uncertainties in the estimated ion range of up to several millimeters. Ion CT (iCT) represents a favorable solution allowing to directly assess the RSP. In this simulation study we investigate the performance of the integration-mode configuration for carbon iCT, in comparison with a single-particle approach under the same set-up. The experimental detector consists of a stack of 61 air-filled parallel-plate ionization chambers, interleaved with 3 mm thick PMMA absorbers. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, this design was applied to acquire iCTs of phantoms of tissue-equivalent materials. An optimization of the acquisition parameters was performed to reduce the dose exposure, and the implications of a reduced absorber thickness were assessed. In order to overcome limitations of integration-mode detection in the presence of lateral tissue heterogeneities a dedicated post-processing method using a linear decomposition of the detector signal was developed and its performance was compared to the list-mode acquisition. For the current set-up, the phantom dose could be reduced to below 30 mGy with only minor image quality degradation. By using the decomposition method a correct identification of the components and a RSP accuracy improvement of around 2.0% was obtained. The comparison of integration- and list-mode indicated a slightly better image quality of the latter, with an average median RSP error below 1.8% and 1.0%, respectively. With a decreased absorber thickness a reduced RSP error was observed. Overall, these findings support the potential of iCT for low dose RSP estimation, showing that integration-mode detectors with dedicated post-processing strategies

  18. Comparative Monte Carlo study on the performance of integration- and list-mode detector configurations for carbon ion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sebastian; Gianoli, Chiara; Magallanes, Lorena; Kopp, Benedikt; Tessonnier, Thomas; Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Voss, Bernd; Parodi, Katia

    2017-02-07

    Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of a highly conformal tumor-dose distribution; however, this technique is extremely sensitive to inaccuracies in the treatment procedures. Ambiguities in the conversion of Hounsfield units of the treatment planning x-ray CT to relative stopping power (RSP) can cause uncertainties in the estimated ion range of up to several millimeters. Ion CT (iCT) represents a favorable solution allowing to directly assess the RSP. In this simulation study we investigate the performance of the integration-mode configuration for carbon iCT, in comparison with a single-particle approach under the same set-up. The experimental detector consists of a stack of 61 air-filled parallel-plate ionization chambers, interleaved with 3 mm thick PMMA absorbers. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, this design was applied to acquire iCTs of phantoms of tissue-equivalent materials. An optimization of the acquisition parameters was performed to reduce the dose exposure, and the implications of a reduced absorber thickness were assessed. In order to overcome limitations of integration-mode detection in the presence of lateral tissue heterogeneities a dedicated post-processing method using a linear decomposition of the detector signal was developed and its performance was compared to the list-mode acquisition. For the current set-up, the phantom dose could be reduced to below 30 mGy with only minor image quality degradation. By using the decomposition method a correct identification of the components and a RSP accuracy improvement of around 2.0% was obtained. The comparison of integration- and list-mode indicated a slightly better image quality of the latter, with an average median RSP error below 1.8% and 1.0%, respectively. With a decreased absorber thickness a reduced RSP error was observed. Overall, these findings support the potential of iCT for low dose RSP estimation, showing that integration-mode detectors with dedicated post-processing strategies

  19. Spent nuclear fuel integrity during dry storage - performance tests and demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doherty, A.L.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of fuel integrity surveillance determined from gas sampling during and after performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1996 by or in cooperation with the US DOE Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The cask performance tests were conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) between 1984 and 1991 and included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of the cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of fuel, and a qualitative determination of the effects of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loading, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the end of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask. A spent fuel behavior project (i.e., enhanced surveillance, monitoring, and gas sampling activities) was initiated by DOE in 1994 for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the gas sampling activities are included in this report. Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at INEL offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. Supporting cask demonstration included licensing and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) at the Virginia Power (VP) Surry reactor site. A CASTOR V/21, an MC-10, and a Nuclear Assurance NAC-I28 have been loaded and placed at the VP ISFSI as part of the demonstration program. 13 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.1 What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  1. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.1 What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  2. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.1 What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  3. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.1 What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  4. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.1 What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  5. Developing waste disposal options in the underground storage tank - integrated demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The principal objective of the Underground Storage Tank - Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID Program is the demonstration and continued development of technologies suitable for the remediation of USTs. The most promising new technologies from industry, universities, national laboratories, and other government agencies are selected for demonstration, testing, and evaluation. The objective is the eventual transfer of new technologies as part of a system to full-scale remediation at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and alternately into the private sector. Technologies under development in the UST-ID Program are targeted toward use in remediation actions at the following five DOE participant sites: Hanford, Fernald, Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River. Combined, these participant sites have more than 300 USTs containing more than 381,800 m{sup 3} (100 Mgal) of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste. This paper focuses on the Low-Level Waste Disposal area of the UST-ID, summarizing the two currently funded technology development projects: the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) Process and Polyethylene Encapsulation. Both technologies are considered options to the-current baseline disposal approaches being developed at the participant sites. For the Hanford Site, this baseline is a grout waste form that is nearing implementation for disposal of low-level liquid tank wastes.

  6. Technology summary of the in situ bioremediation demonstration (methane biostimulation) via horizontal wells at the Savannah River Site Integrated Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Lombard, K.H.; Enzien, M.V.; Dougherty, J.M.; Wear, J.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, has been sponsoring full-scale environmental restoration technology demonstrations for the past 4 years. The Savannah River Site Integrated Demonstration focuses on ``Clean-up of Soils ad Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated VOCs.`` Several laboratories including our own had demonstrated the ability of methanotrophic bacteria to completely degrade or mineralize chlorinated solvents, and these bacteria were naturally found in soil and aquifer material. Thus the test consisted of injection of methane mixed with air into the contaminated aquifer via a horizontal well and extraction from the vadose zone via a parallel horizontal well.

  7. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-08-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the videos in five traditional laboratory experiments by integrating them with the standard pre-laboratory student preparation presentations and instructor demonstrations. We assessed the influence of the videos on student laboratory knowledge and performance, using sections of students who did not view the videos as the control. Our analysis of pre-quizzes revealed the control group had equivalent scores to the treatment group, while the post-quiz results show consistently greater learning gains for the treatment group. Additionally, the students who watched the videos as part of their pre-laboratory instruction completed their experiments in less time.

  8. Demonstration of free space coherent optical communication using integrated silicon photonic orbital angular momentum devices.

    PubMed

    Su, Tiehui; Scott, Ryan P; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Geisler, David J; Cai, Xinran; Yoo, S J B

    2012-04-23

    We propose and demonstrate silicon photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for free-space spatial-division-multiplexing (SDM) optical transmission with multiplexed orbital angular momentum (OAM) states over a topological charge range of -2 to +2. The silicon PIC fabricated using a CMOS-compatible process exploits tunable-phase arrayed waveguides with vertical grating couplers to achieve space division multiplexing and demultiplexing. The experimental results utilizing two silicon PICs achieve SDM mux/demux bit-error-rate performance for 1‑b/s/Hz, 10-Gb/s binary phase shifted keying (BPSK) data and 2-b/s/Hz, 20-Gb/s quadrature phase shifted keying (QPSK) data for individual and two simultaneous OAM states.

  9. Mixed Waste Integrated Program: Demonstrating technologies to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    Mixed waste is defined as ``waste contaminated with chemically hazardous [governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)] and radioactive species [governed by US Department of energy (DOE) orders].`` The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is responding to the need for DOE mixed-waste treatment technologies tat meet these dual regulatory requirements. MWIP is developing emerging and innovative treatment technologies to determine process feasibility. Technology demonstrations of fixed-hearth plasma arc and vitrification systems will be used to determine whether these processes are superior to existing technologies in reducing risk, minimizing life-cycle cost, and improving process performance. MWIP also provides a forum for stakeholder and customer involvement in the technology development process.

  10. A description of the demonstration Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle facility.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J C; Carnes, M D; Dwight, C C; Forrester, R J

    1991-10-01

    A fuel examination facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is being converted into a facility that will electrochemically process spent fuel. This is an important step in the demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor concept being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. Renovations are designed to bring the facility up to current health and safety and environmental standards and to support its new mission. Improvements include the addition of high-reliability earthquake hardened off-gas and electrical power systems, the upgrading of radiological instrumentation, and the incorporation of advances in contamination control. A major task is the construction of a new equipment repair and decontamination facility in the basement of the building to support operations.

  11. Integrated Power and Attitude Control System Demonstrated With Flywheels G2 and D1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph H.

    2005-01-01

    On September 14, 2004, NASA Glenn Research Center's Flywheel Development Team experimentally demonstrated a full-power, high-speed, two-flywheel system, simultaneously regulating a power bus and providing a commanded output torque. Operation- and power-mode transitions were demonstrated up to 2000 W in charge and 1100 W in discharge, while the output torque was simultaneously regulated between plus or minus 0.8 N-m. The G2 and D1 flywheels--magnetically levitated carbon-fiber wheels with permanent magnet motors--were used for the experiment. The units were mounted on an air bearing table in Glenn's High Energy Flywheel Facility. The operational speed range for these tests was between 20,000 and 60,000 rpm. The bus voltage was regulated at 125 V during charge and discharge, and charge-discharge and discharge-charge transitions were demonstrated by changing the amount of power that the power supply provided between 300 and 0 W. In a satellite system, this would be the equivalent of changing the amount of energy that the solar array provides to the spacecraft. In addition to regulating the bus voltage, we simultaneously controlled the net torque produced by the two flywheel modules. Both modules were mounted on an air table that was restrained by a load cell. The load cell measured the force on the table, and the torque produced by the two flywheels on the table could be calculated from that measurement. This method was used to measure the torque produced by the modules, yielding net torques from -0.8 to 0.8 N-m. This was the first Glenn demonstration of the Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS) at high power levels and speeds.

  12. Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A.; Chaiko, D.J.; Matthern, G.

    1994-09-01

    An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

  13. Demonstration of Robustness and Integrated Operation of a Series-Bosch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Mansell, Matthew J.; Stanley, Christine; Barnett, Bill; Junaedi, Christian; Vilekar, Saurabh A.; Ryan, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Manned missions beyond low Earth orbit will require highly robust, reliable, and maintainable life support systems that maximize recycling of water and oxygen. Bosch technology is one option to maximize oxygen recovery, in the form of water, from metabolically-produced carbon dioxide (CO2). A two stage approach to Bosch, called Series-Bosch, reduces metabolic CO2 with hydrogen (H2) to produce water and solid carbon using two reactors: a Reverse Water-Gas Shift (RWGS) reactor and a carbon formation (CF) reactor. Previous development efforts demonstrated the stand-alone performance of a NASA-designed RWGS reactor designed for robustness against carbon formation, two membrane separators intended to maximize single pass conversion of reactants, and a batch CF reactor with both transit and surface catalysts. In the past year, Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) developed and delivered a RWGS reactor for testing at NASA. The reactor design was based on their patented Microlith® technology and was first evaluated under a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort in 2010. The RWGS reactor was recently evaluated at NASA to compare its performance and operating conditions with NASA's RWGS reactor. The test results will be provided in this paper. Separately, in 2015, a semi-continuous CF reactor was designed and fabricated at NASA based on the results from batch CF reactor testing. The batch CF reactor and the semi-continuous CF reactor were individually integrated with an upstream RWGS reactor to demonstrate the system operation and to evaluate performance. Here, we compare the performance and robustness to carbon formation of both RWGS reactors. We report the results of the integrated operation of a Series-Bosch system and we discuss the technology readiness level.

  14. Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Timpson, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    An integrated approach that utilizes various characterization technologies has been developed for the Uranium Soil Integrated Demonstration program. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation site near Cincinnati, Ohio, was selected as the host facility for this demonstration. Characterization of background, untreated contaminated, and treated contaminated soils was performed to assess the contamination and the effect of treatment efforts to remove uranium from these soils. Carbonate minerals were present in the contaminated soils (added for erosion control) but were absent in the nearby background soils. Because of the importance of the carbonate anion to uranium solubility, the occurrence of carbonate minerals in these soils will be an important factor in the development of a successful remediation technology. Uranium partitioning data among several particle-size fractions indicate that conventional soil washing will be ineffective for remediation of these soils and that chemical extraction will be necessary to lower the uranium concentration to the target level (52 mg/kg). Carbonate-based (sodium carbonate/bicarbonate) and acid-based (sulfuric and citric acids) lixiviants were employed for the selective removal of uranium from these soils. Characterization results have identified uranium phosphate minerals as the predominant uranium mineral form in both the untreated and treated soils. The low solubility associated with phosphate minerals is primarily responsible for their occurrence in the posttreated soils. Artificial weathering of the treated soils caused by the treatments, particularly acid-based lixiviants, was documented by their detrimental effects on several physicochemical characteristics of these soils (e.g., soil pH, particle-size distribution, and mineralogy).

  15. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.

    1992-08-10

    Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992.

  16. Uncertainty Evaluation of Computational Model Used to Support the Integrated Powerhead Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, W. G.; Molder, K. J.; Hudson, S. T.; Vadasy, K. V.; Rieder, P. T.; Giel, T.

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Air Force are working on a joint project to develop a new hydrogen-fueled, full-flow, staged combustion rocket engine. The initial testing and modeling work for the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) project is being performed by NASA Marshall and Stennis Space Centers. A key factor in the testing of this engine is the ability to predict and measure the transient fluid flow during engine start and shutdown phases of operation. A model built by NASA Marshall in the ROCket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) program is used to predict transient engine fluid flows. The model is initially calibrated to data from previous tests on the Stennis E1 test stand. The model is then used to predict the next run. Data from this run can then be used to recalibrate the model providing a tool to guide the test program in incremental steps to reduce the risk to the prototype engine. In this paper, they define this type of model as a calibrated model. This paper proposes a method to estimate the uncertainty of a model calibrated to a set of experimental test data. The method is similar to that used in the calibration of experiment instrumentation. For the IPD example used in this paper, the model uncertainty is determined for both LOX and LH flow rates using previous data. The successful use of this model is then demonstrated to predict another similar test run within the uncertainty bounds. The paper summarizes the uncertainty methodology when a model is continually recalibrated with new test data. The methodology is general and can be applied to other calibrated models.

  17. Fixed capital investments for the uranium soils integrated demonstration soil treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.; Stewart, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the United States required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) Program was formed to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium contaminated soils. The USID Program has five major tasks in developing and demonstrating these technologies. Each must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies developed by the USID Program. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

  18. Development, Demonstration, and Analysis of an Integrated Iodine Hall Thruster Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Peeples, Steven R.; Burt, Adam O.; Martin, Adam K.; Martinez, Armando; Seixal, Joao F.; Mauro, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The design of an in-space iodine-vapor-fed Hall effect thruster propellant management system is described. The solid-iodine propellant tank has unique issues associated with the microgravity environment, requiring a solution where the iodine is maintained in intimate thermal contact with the heated tank walls. The flow control valves required alterations from earlier iterations to survive for extended periods of time in the corrosive iodine-vapor environment. Materials have been selected for the entire feed system that can chemically resist the iodine vapor, with the design now featuring Hastelloy or Inconel for almost all the wetted components. An integrated iodine feed system/Hall thruster demonstration unit was fabricated and tested, with all control being handled by an onboard electronics card specifically designed to operate the feed system. Structural analysis shows that the feed system can survive launch loads after the implementation of some minor reinforcement. Flow modeling, while still requiring significant additional validation, is presented to show its potential in capturing the behavior of components in this low-flow, low-pressure system.

  19. Demonstration of an integrated electroactive polymer actuator on a microfluidic electrophoresis device.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander K; Anderson, Kristen M; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2009-07-21

    The construction of microfluidic devices from siloxane-based polymers is widely reported in the current literature. While the use of these materials is primarily due to their rapid and facile fabrication, low cost and robustness, they also have the ability to function as smart materials. This feature, however, has not been commonly exploited in conjunction with their fluid-handling capabilities. Siloxanes are considered smart materials because their shapes can be modified in the presence of an electric field. The energy in the electric field can be transduced into mechanical energy and directly coupled with a microfabricated channel network in order to affect or initiate the movement of fluids. Here, we present a novel microfluidic device into which an electroactive polymer (EAP) actuation unit is integrated. The EAP actuation unit features a microfluidic channel placed above a patterned electrode. The patterned electrode is insulated from the channel by an EAP layer that is composed of PDMS. When a potential is applied across the EAP layer, it changes shape, which also changes the volume of the microfluidic channel above it. With this proof-of-concept device we demonstrated the ability to inject plugs of sample on a standard electrophoresis cross chip solely by changing the magnitude of the electric field between the channel and the electrode. Using an EAP actuation unit, the size of the injection plugs can be varied as a function of the electric field, the active area of the EAP actuation unit and the softness of the EAP.

  20. Development of simulated tank wastes for the US Department of Energy's Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (USTID) is to identify and evaluate technologies that may be used to characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of hazardous and radioactive wastes contained in tanks on US Department of Energy sites. Simulated wastes are an essential component of the evaluation process because they provide controlled samples for technology assessment, and minimize costs and risks involved when working with radioactive wastes. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a recipe to simulate Hanford single-shell tank, (SST) waste. The recipe is derived from existing process recipes, and elemental concentrations are based on characterization data from 18 SSTs. In this procedure, salt cake and metal oxide/hydroxide sludge are prepared individually, and mixed together at varying ratios depending on the specific tank, waste to be simulated or the test being conducted. Elemental and physical properties of the stimulant are comparable with analyzed tank samples, and chemical speciation in the simulant is being improved as speciation data for actual wastes become available. The nonradioactive chemical waste simulant described here is useful for testing technologies on a small scale.

  1. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m{sup 3} of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  2. Advanced Technologies Demonstrated by the Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer (MICAS) Aboard Deep Space 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, David H.; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Brown, Robert H.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lee, Meemong; Sandel, Bill R.; Thomas, David A.; Benoit, Robert T.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2007-04-01

    MICAS is an integrated multi-channel instrument that includes an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (80 185 nm), two high-resolution visible imagers (10 20 μrad/pixel, 400 900 nm), and a short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer (1250 2600 nm). The wavelength ranges were chosen to maximize the science data that could be collected using existing semiconductor technologies and avoiding the need for multi-octave spectrometers. It was flown on DS1 to validate technologies derived from the development of PICS (Planetary Imaging Camera Spectrometer). These technologies provided a novel systems approach enabling the miniaturization and integration of four instruments into one entity, spanning a wavelength range from the UV to IR, and from ambient to cryogenic temperatures with optical performance at a fraction of a wavelength. The specific technologies incorporated were: a built-in fly-by sequence; lightweight and ultra-stable, monolithic silicon-carbide construction, which enabled room-temperature alignment for cryogenic (85 140 K) performance, and provided superb optical performance and immunity to thermal distortion; diffraction-limited, shared optics operating from 80 to 2600 nm; advanced detector technologies for the UV, visible and short-wavelength IR; high-performance thermal radiators coupled directly to the short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector optical bench, providing an instrument with a mass less than 10 kg, instrument power less than 10 W, and total instrument cost of less than ten million dollars. The design allows the wavelength range to be extended by at least an octave at the short wavelength end and to ˜50 microns at the long wavelength end. Testing of the completed instrument demonstrated excellent optical performance down to 77 K, which would enable a greatly reduced background for longer wavelength detectors. During the Deep Space 1 Mission, MICAS successfully collected images and spectra for asteroid 9969 Braille, Mars, and comet 19/P Borrelly

  3. Advanced technologies demonstrated by the miniature integrated camera and spectrometer (MICAS) aboard deep space 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodgers, D.H.; Beauchamp, P.M.; Soderblom, L.A.; Brown, R.H.; Chen, G.-S.; Lee, M.; Sandel, B.R.; Thomas, D.A.; Benoit, R.T.; Yelle, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    MICAS is an integrated multi-channel instrument that includes an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (80-185 nm), two high-resolution visible imagers (10-20 ??rad/pixel, 400-900 nm), and a short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer (1250-2600 nm). The wavelength ranges were chosen to maximize the science data that could be collected using existing semiconductor technologies and avoiding the need for multi-octave spectrometers. It was flown on DS1 to validate technologies derived from the development of PICS (Planetary Imaging Camera Spectrometer). These technologies provided a novel systems approach enabling the miniaturization and integration of four instruments into one entity, spanning a wavelength range from the UV to IR, and from ambient to cryogenic temperatures with optical performance at a fraction of a wavelength. The specific technologies incorporated were: a built-in fly-by sequence; lightweight and ultra-stable, monolithic silicon-carbide construction, which enabled room-temperature alignment for cryogenic (85-140 K) performance, and provided superb optical performance and immunity to thermal distortion; diffraction-limited, shared optics operating from 80 to 2600 nm; advanced detector technologies for the UV, visible and short-wavelength IR; high-performance thermal radiators coupled directly to the short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector optical bench, providing an instrument with a mass less than 10 kg, instrument power less than 10 W, and total instrument cost of less than ten million dollars. The design allows the wavelength range to be extended by at least an octave at the short wavelength end and to 50 microns at the long wavelength end. Testing of the completed instrument demonstrated excellent optical performance down to 77 K, which would enable a greatly reduced background for longer wavelength detectors. During the Deep Space 1 Mission, MICAS successfully collected images and spectra for asteroid 9969 Braille, Mars, and comet 19/P Borrelly. The

  4. Integrative application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial act configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits of a constrained application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) are identified, and the approach to airplane design is established for subsequent steps leading to the development of a less constrained final ACT configuration. The active controls configurations are measured against a conventional baseline configuration, a state-of-the-art transport, to determine whether the performance and economic changes resulting from ACT merit proceeding with the project. The technology established by the conventional baseline configuration was held constant except for the addition of ACT. The wing, with the same planform, was moved forward on the initial ACT configuration to move the loading range aft relative to the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Wing trailing-edge surfaces and surface controls also were reconfigured for load alleviation and structural stabilization.

  5. Effect of silicon configurations on the mechanical integrity of silicon-carbon nanotube heterostructured anode for lithium ion battery: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Sameer S.; Pal, Siladitya; Kumta, Prashant N.; Maiti, Spandan

    2016-02-01

    Heterostructures of silicon and carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been widely studied as Li-ion battery anodes. The focus of the current study is to investigate the role of silicon configurations on the mechanical integrity of the Si-CNT heterostructured anodes during electrochemical cycling. We hypothesize that void nucleation and growth in silicon during electrochemical cycling of Li can induce fracture and eventual failure. To test this hypothesis, we utilized a custom developed multiphysics finite element modeling framework considering the lithium diffusion induced elasto-plastic deformation of silicon. We systematically varied the silicon component configuration and enumerated the stress field within it for one complete electrochemical cycle. Resulting evolution of stress state reveals that reducing the mechanical constraints on Si reduces the plastic flow of the material, and thus possibility of void nucleation and growth. We find that the Si droplet configuration is mechanically stable while the continuous Si coating configuration is prone to void growth induced mechanical failure. Present analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of the effect of Si configurations in heterostructured electrodes on its mechanical integrity, which can help in design of next-generation hetersostructured electrodes with improved capacity retention.

  6. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation. Final Report, October 1980-April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  7. Demonstration of NICT Space Weather Cloud --Integration of Supercomputer into Analysis and Visualization Environment--

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, S.; Morikawa, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Inoue, S.; Tsubouchi, K.; Fukazawa, K.; Kimura, E.; Tatebe, O.; Kato, H.; Shimojo, S.; Murata, K. T.

    2010-12-01

    In the Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP) field, spatio-temporal resolution of computer simulations is getting higher and higher because of tremendous advancement of supercomputers. A more advanced technology is Grid Computing that integrates distributed computational resources to provide scalable computing resources. In the simulation research, it is effective that a researcher oneself designs his physical model, performs calculations with a supercomputer, and analyzes and visualizes for consideration by a familiar method. A supercomputer is far from an analysis and visualization environment. In general, a researcher analyzes and visualizes in the workstation (WS) managed at hand because the installation and the operation of software in the WS are easy. Therefore, it is necessary to copy the data from the supercomputer to WS manually. Time necessary for the data transfer through long delay network disturbs high-accuracy simulations actually. In terms of usefulness, integrating a supercomputer and an analysis and visualization environment seamlessly with a researcher's familiar method is important. NICT has been developing a cloud computing environment (NICT Space Weather Cloud). In the NICT Space Weather Cloud, disk servers are located near its supercomputer and WSs for data analysis and visualization. They are connected to JGN2plus that is high-speed network for research and development. Distributed virtual high-capacity storage is also constructed by Grid Datafarm (Gfarm v2). Huge-size data output from the supercomputer is transferred to the virtual storage through JGN2plus. A researcher can concentrate on the research by a familiar method without regard to distance between a supercomputer and an analysis and visualization environment. Now, total 16 disk servers are setup in NICT headquarters (at Koganei, Tokyo), JGN2plus NOC (at Otemachi, Tokyo), Okinawa Subtropical Environment Remote-Sensing Center, and Cybermedia Center, Osaka University. They are connected on

  8. NREL/SCE High-Penetration PV Integration Project: Report on Field Demonstration of Advanced Inverter Functionality in Fontana, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Southern California Edison High-Penetration PV Integration Project is (1) researching the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) integration, (2) determining mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate those impacts, and (3) seeking to demonstrate these mitigation methods on actual high-penetration PV distribution circuits. This report describes a field demonstration completed during the fall of 2013 on the Fontana, California, study circuit, which includes a total of 4.5 MW of interconnected utility-scale rooftop PV systems. The demonstration included operating a 2-MW PV system at an off-unity power factor that had been determined during previously completed distribution system modeling and PV impact assessment analyses. Data on the distribution circuit and PV system operations were collected during the 2-week demonstration period. This demonstration reinforces the findings of previous laboratory testing that showed that utility-scale PV inverters are capable of operating at off-unity power factor to mitigate PV impacts; however, because of difficulties setting and retaining PV inverter power factor set points during the field demonstration, it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-unity power factor operation to mitigate the voltage impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Lessons learned from this field demonstration are presented to inform future field demonstration efforts.

  9. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  10. High performance dual-mode surface plasmon coupled emission imaging apparatus integrating Kretschmann and reverse Kretschmann configurations for flexible measurements.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei-Peng; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Liu, Qian; Weng, Yu-Hua; Xie, Kai-Xin; Lin, Guo-Chun; Li, Yao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    A Kretschmann (KR) and reverse Kretschmann (RK) dual-mode surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) imaging apparatus based on prism coupling was built up. Highly directional and polarized fluorescence images for both RK and KR configurations were obtained. Besides, surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence and free space imaging can also be measured conveniently from this apparatus. Combining the high sensitivity of KR mode and the simplicity of RK mode, the multifunctional imaging system is flexible to provide different configurations for imaging applications. Compared to the free space imaging, SPCE imaging provides enhanced fluorescence, especially large enhancement up to about 50 fold in KR configuration. Additionally, the degree of evanescent field enhancement effect was easily estimated experimentally using the apparatus to compare the different imaging configurations. We believed that the dual-mode SPCE imaging apparatus will be useful in fundamental study of plasmon-controlled fluorescence and be a powerful tool for optical imaging, especially for microarray and biological applications.

  11. Cooley building opens in Houston. Demonstrates value of fully integrated marketing communications.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke's Episcopal HospiTal in Houston dedicated its new 10-story Denton A. Cooley Building in January. The structure opened with a fanfare, thanks to a well-integrated marketing communications program.

  12. Integrating Vocational & Academic Education. A Handbook Featuring Four Demonstration Sites Including Students from Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; And Others

    This handbook describes the processes and techniques used to develop, implement, and evaluate four integrated vocational and academic learning programs in Wisconsin that included students from special populations. The handbook contains seven chapters. Chapter 1 presents an overview of the project, including the request for proposal process and…

  13. Helping Poor Readers Demonstrate Their Science Competence: Item Characteristics Supporting Text-Picture Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saß, Steffani; Schütte, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Solving test items might require abilities in test-takers other than the construct the test was designed to assess. Item and student characteristics such as item format or reading comprehension can impact the test result. This experiment is based on cognitive theories of text and picture comprehension. It examines whether integration aids, which…

  14. INTEGRATION OF HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT - CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The WHO International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), together with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has developed a framework for integrated assessment of human health and ecological risks. Four case stu...

  15. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  16. Possible stakeholder concerns regarding volatile organic compound in arid soils integrated demonstration technologies not evaluated in the stakeholder involvement program

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) supported the demonstration of a number of innovative technologies, not all of which were evaluated in the integrated demonstration`s stakeholder involvement program. These technologies have been organized into two categories and the first category ranked in order of priority according to interest in the evaluation of the technology. The purpose of this report is to present issues stakeholders would likely raise concerning each of the technologies in light of commentary, insights, data requirements, concerns, and recommendations offered during the VOC-Arid ID`s three-year stakeholder involvement, technology evaluation program. A secondary purpose is to provide a closeout status for each of the technologies associated with the VOC-Arid ID. This report concludes with a summary of concerns and requirements that stakeholders have for all innovative technologies.

  17. Integration of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield on a Lunar Habitat Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Immer, C. D.; Ferreira, J.; Hogue, M. D.; Chen, A.; Csonka, M. W.; VanSuetendael, N.; Snyder, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) to investigate the feasibility of lunar surface technologies and lunar ground operations. The HDU will define and validate lunar scenario architecture through field analog testing. It will contain a four-port vertical habitat module with docking demonstration capabilities. The Electrodynamic Oust Shield (EDS) is being incorporated into the HDU to demonstrate dust removal from a viewport and from a door prior to docking procedures. In this paper, we will describe our efforts to scale up the EDS to protect a viewport 20 cm in diameter. We will also describe the development of several 20 cm x 25 cm EDS patches to demonstrate dust removal from one of the HDU doors.

  18. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 5: System demonstration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, R. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    One of a series of documents describing the ATLAS System for structural analysis and design is presented. A set of problems is described that demonstrate the various analysis and design capabilities of the ATLAS System proper as well as capabilities available by means of interfaces with other computer programs. Input data and results for each demonstration problem are discussed. Results are compared to theoretical solutions or experimental data where possible. Listings of all input data are included.

  19. Integrated Cuing Requirements (ICR) Study: Demonstration Data Base and Users Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    AL. JUL 83 UNCLASSIFIED AFHRL-TP-82-25(2) F331579C814 F /G 5/2 N EELmhhhi 1111 I J W II 11 11.6 8 1jj.25 LAi . MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Date Eraeredo w - F -7 r ----- ------- - . . AFHRL Technical Paper 82-25(11) July 1983 INTEGRATED CUING...material in the Data Base contributes to the design solution. STOT-E ARM COSTI CAA~ f PERFORMANCETRADEOFFS DATA EXPERIENCED 1 DATA~J 1 DESIGNER [j~, HUMAN

  20. LANDSAT demonstration/application and GIS integration in south central Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, A. W.; Derrenbacher, W.

    1981-01-01

    Automated geographic information systems were developed for two sites in Southcentral Alaska to serve as tests for both the process of integrating classified LANDSAT data into a comprehensive environmental data base and the process of using automated information in land capability/suitability analysis and environmental planning. The Big Lake test site, located approximately 20 miles north of the City of Anchorage, comprises an area of approximately 150 square miles. The Anchorage Hillside test site, lying approximately 5 miles southeast of the central part of the city, extends over an area of some 25 square miles. Map construction and content is described.

  1. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EMERGING PIPE WALL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE CAST IRON WATER MAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,500-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Septembe...

  2. Field Demonstration of Emerging Pipe Wall Integrity Assessment Technologies for Large Cast Iron Water Mains - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,000-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast-iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Se...

  3. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: ADSORPTION-INTEGRATED-REACTION (AIR2000) PROCESS, KSE, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Bulletin is a brief description of the AIR2000 technology developed by KSE, Inc., of Amherst, MA. The AIR2000 unit treats air streams containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The demonstration occurred at the Stamina Mills superfund site in North Smithfield, RI from Aug...

  4. [Overall design and proof-test of an integrated environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) for demonstration and verification].

    PubMed

    Rui, Jia-bai; Zheng, Chuan-xian; Zeng, Qing-tang

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To test and demonstrate embryonic form of our future space station ECLSS, which will also form an advanced research and test ground facility. Method. The following functions of the system were tested and demonstrated: integrated solid amine CO2 collection and concentration, Sabatier CO2 reduction, urine processing thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation, solid polymer water electrolysis O2 generation, concentrated ventilation, temperature and humidity control, the measurement and control system, and other non-regenerative techniques. All of these were demonstrated in a sealed adiabatic module, and passed the proof-tests. Result. The principal technical requirements of the system and each regenerative subsystem were met. The integration of system general and each subsystem was successful, and the partial closed loop of the system's integration has been realized basically. Conclusion. The reasonableness of the project design was verified, and the major system technical requirements were satisfied. The suitability and harmonization among system general and each subsystem were good, the system operated normally, and the parameters measured were correct.

  5. The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, R.F.

    1991-12-01

    The West Valley Demonstration project was established by an act of Congress in 1980 to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes produced from operation of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center from 1966 to 1972. The waste will be solidified as borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems.

  6. Bayesian maximum entropy integration of ozone observations and model predictions: an application for attainment demonstration in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Serre, Marc L

    2010-08-01

    States in the USA are required to demonstrate future compliance of criteria air pollutant standards by using both air quality monitors and model outputs. In the case of ozone, the demonstration tests aim at relying heavily on measured values, due to their perceived objectivity and enforceable quality. Weight given to numerical models is diminished by integrating them in the calculations only in a relative sense. For unmonitored locations, the EPA has suggested the use of a spatial interpolation technique to assign current values. We demonstrate that this approach may lead to erroneous assignments of nonattainment and may make it difficult for States to establish future compliance. We propose a method that combines different sources of information to map air pollution, using the Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) Framework. The approach gives precedence to measured values and integrates modeled data as a function of model performance. We demonstrate this approach in North Carolina, using the State's ozone monitoring network in combination with outputs from the Multiscale Air Quality Simulation Platform (MAQSIP) modeling system. We show that the BME data integration approach, compared to a spatial interpolation of measured data, improves the accuracy and the precision of ozone estimations across the state.

  7. Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2001-11-16

    The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared financial support for construction and operation of an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky. Under the Proposed Action, DOE would provide financial assistance, through a Cooperative Agreement with Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, for design, construction, and operation of a 540 megawatt demonstration power station comprised of two synthesis gas-fired combined cycle units in Clark County, Kentucky. The station would also be comprised of a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasifier to produce synthesis gas from a co-feed of coal and refuse-derived fuel pellets and a high temperature molten carbonate fuel cell. The facility would be powered by the synthesis gas feed. The proposed project would consist of the following major components: (1) refuse-derived fuel pellets and coal receipt and storage facilities; (2) a gasification plant; (3) sulfur removal and recovery facilities; (4) an air separation plant; (5) a high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell; and (6) two combined cycle generation units. The IGCC facility would be built to provide needed power capacity to central and eastern Kentucky. At a minimum, 50 percent of the high sulfur coal used would be from the Kentucky region. Two No Action Alternatives are analyzed in the DEIS. Under the No Action Alternative 1, DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of the proposed facility and no new facility would be built. Under the No Action Alternative 2, DOE would not provide any funding and, instead of the proposed demonstration project, Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Global Energy, Inc., would construct and operate, a 540 megawatt natural gas-fired power station. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources

  8. Very high speed integrated circuit /VHSIC/ antijam communications chipset and brassboard demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, G. F.

    1982-10-01

    Three Hughes VHSIC chips for use in digital anti-jam communications systems are described. These chips will be produced in CMOS/SOS using the Hughes 1.25 micron SOS III process. Common features of four digital communications system applications are reviewed. The advantage of spread spectrum signal processing in a jamming environment is identified. The paper then describes the architecture of each signal processing chip type, their performance design goals, and their use in a demonstration with the Army's PLRS/JTIDS Hybrid System as a prototype battlefield information distribution system.

  9. Planarised optical fiber composite using flame hydrolysis deposition demonstrating an integrated FBG anemometer.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R

    2014-12-29

    This paper reports for the first time a planarised optical fiber composite formed using Flame Hydrolysis Deposition (FHD). As a way of format demonstration a Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical (MOEMS) hot wire anemometer is formed using micro-fabrication processing. The planarised device is rigidly secured to a silicon wafer using optical quality doped silica that has been deposited using flame hydrolysis and consolidated at high temperature. The resulting structure can withstand temperatures exceeding 580K and is sensitive enough to resolve free and forced convection interactions at low fluid velocity.

  10. Integration and demonstration of MEMS-scanned LADAR for robotic navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stann, Barry L.; Dammann, John F.; Del Giorno, Mark; DiBerardino, Charles; Giza, Mark M.; Powers, Michael A.; Uzunovic, Nenad

    2014-06-01

    LADAR is among the pre-eminent sensor modalities for autonomous vehicle navigation. Size, weight, power and cost constraints impose significant practical limitations on perception systems intended for small ground robots. In recent years, the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed a LADAR architecture based on a MEMS mirror scanner that fundamentally improves the trade-offs between these limitations and sensor capability. We describe how the characteristics of a highly developed prototype correspond to and satisfy the requirements of autonomous navigation and the experimental scenarios of the ARL Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) program. In particular, the long maximum and short minimum range capability of the ARL MEMS LADAR makes it remarkably suitable for a wide variety of scenarios from building mapping to the manipulation of objects at close range, including dexterous manipulation with robotic arms. A prototype system was applied to a small (approximately 50 kg) unmanned robotic vehicle as the primary mobility perception sensor. We present the results of a field test where the perception information supplied by the LADAR system successfully accomplished the experimental objectives of an Integrated Research Assessment (IRA).

  11. Integrated Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Technology Demonstration for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Knox, James C.; Parrish, Keith J.; Roman, Monserrate C.; Jan, Darrell L.

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the frontiers of deep space continues to be defined by the technological challenges presented by safely transporting a crew to and from destinations of scientific interest. Living and working on that frontier requires highly reliable and efficient life support systems that employ robust, proven process technologies. The International Space Station (ISS), including its environmental control and life support (ECLS) system, is the platform from which humanity's deep space exploration missions begin. The ISS ECLS system Atmosphere Revitalization (AR) subsystem and environmental monitoring (EM) technical architecture aboard the ISS is evaluated as the starting basis for a developmental effort being conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) via the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) Project.. An evolutionary approach is employed by the ARREM project to address the strengths and weaknesses of the ISS AR subsystem and EM equipment, core technologies, and operational approaches to reduce developmental risk, improve functional reliability, and lower lifecycle costs of an ISS-derived subsystem architecture suitable for use for crewed deep space exploration missions. The most promising technical approaches to an ISS-derived subsystem design architecture that incorporates promising core process technology upgrades will be matured through a series of integrated tests and architectural trade studies encompassing expected exploration mission requirements and constraints.

  12. Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Integration Requirements Study. Providing Guidance on Technology Development and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, T.; Meintz, A.; Hardy, K.; Chen, B.; Bohn, T.; Smart, J.; Scoffield, D.; Hovsapian, R.; Saxena, S.; MacDonald, J.; Kiliccote, S.; Kahl, K.; Pratt, R.

    2015-05-28

    The report begins with a discussion of the current state of the energy and transportation systems, followed by a summary of some VGI scenarios and opportunities. The current efforts to create foundational interface standards are detailed, and the requirements for enabling PEVs as a grid resource are presented. Existing technology demonstrations that include vehicle to grid functions are summarized. The report also includes a data-based discussion on the magnitude and variability of PEVs as a grid resource, followed by an overview of existing simulation tools that vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. can be used to explore the expansion of VGI to larger grid functions that might offer system and customer value. The document concludes with a summary of the requirements and potential action items that would support greater adoption of VGI.

  13. Integrating Leonardo da Vinci's principles of demonstration, uncertainty, and cultivation in contemporary nursing education.

    PubMed

    Story, Lachel; Butts, Janie

    2014-03-01

    Nurses today are facing an ever changing health care system. Stimulated by health care reform and limited resources, nursing education is being challenged to prepare nurses for this uncertain environment. Looking to the past can offer possible solutions to the issues nursing education is confronting. Seven principles of da Vincian thinking have been identified (Gelb, 2004). As a follow-up to an exploration of the curiosità principle (Butts & Story, 2013), this article will explore the three principles of dimostrazione, sfumato, and corporalita. Nursing faculty can set the stage for a meaningful educational experience through these principles of demonstration (dimostrazione), uncertainty (sfumato), and cultivation (corporalita). Preparing nurses not only to manage but also to flourish in the current health care environment that will enhance the nurse's and patient's experience.

  14. Overview of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Power System Integration and Operation at Desert RATS 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; George, Pat; Gambrell, Ronnie; Chapman, Chris

    2013-01-01

    A habitat demonstration unit (HDU) was constructed at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and designed by a multicenter NASA team led out of NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The HDU was subsequently utilized at the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) program held at the Black Point Lava Flow in Arizona. This report describes the power system design, installation and operation for the HDU. The requirements for the power system were to provide 120 VAC, 28 VDC, and 120 VDC power to the various loads within the HDU. It also needed to be capable of providing power control and real-time operational data on the load's power consumption. The power system had to be capable of operating off of a 3 phase 480 VAC generator as well as 2 solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems. The system operated well during the 2 week Desert RATS campaign and met all of the main goals of the system. The power system is being further developed to meet the future needs of the HDU and options for this further development are discussed.

  15. Field Demonstration of Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2016-09-01

    Reducing energy consumption in buildings is key to reducing or limiting the negative environmental impacts from the building sector. According to the United States (U.S.) Energy Information Administration (EIA), in 2013, commercial buildings consumed 18.1 quads of primary energy, which was 18.6% of the total U.S. primary energy consumption. The primary energy consumption in the commercial sector is projected to increase by 2.8 quads from 2013 to 2040, the second largest increase after the industrial sector. Further space heating, space cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) services accounted for 31% of the energy consumption in commercial buildings. The technical objective of this project is to demonstrate the capability of the new GS-IHP system to reduce overall energy use for space heating, space cooling, and water heating by at least 45% vs. a conventional electric RTU and electric WH in a light commercial building application. This project supports the DOE-Building Technologies Office (BTO) goals of reducing HVAC energy use by 20% and water heating by 60% by 2030.

  16. Demonstration of Integrated Biorefinery Operations for Producing Biofuels and Chemical / Material Products

    SciTech Connect

    Rushton, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Lignol’s project involved the design, construction and operation of a 10% demonstration scale cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Grand Junction Colorado in partnership with Suncor Energy. The preconstruction phase of the project was well underway when the collapse in energy prices coupled with a significant global economic downturn hit in the end 2008. Citing economic uncertainty, the project was suspended by Suncor. Lignol, with the support of the DOE continued to develop the project by considering relocating the biorefinery to sites that were more favorable in term of feedstock availability, existing infrastructure and potential partners Extended project development activities were conducted at three lead sites which offered certain key benefits to the overall biorefinery project. This work included feedstock availability studies, technical site assessment, engineering, plant design and pilot scale biorefining of feedstocks of interest. The project generated significant operational data on the bioconversion of woody feedstocks into cellulosic ethanol and lignin-based biochemicals. The project also highlighted the challenges faced by technology developers in attracting capital investment in first of kind renewable fuels solutions. The project was concluded on August 29 2011.

  17. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  18. Development of an Automated Micro-Computer Knowledge-Based Integrated Configuration Management System for the Stock Point Logistics Integrated Communications Environment (SPLICE) Project Management Staff.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    using a software product called SUPERCALC2. It has subsequently transitioned to LOTUS 1-2-3. The basic method of developing these orders remained...employed a data entry and validation feature that could be incorporated into the configuration module with little effort. LOTUS 1-2-3 was selected as the...posed some problems which had to be overcome prior to further development. LOTUS 1-2-3 and dBASE III both required special file formats and interfaces

  19. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  20. Recovery Act. Demonstration of a Pilot Integrated Biorefinery for the Efficient, Direct Conversion of Biomass to Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzle, Dennis; Tamblyn, Greg; Caldwell, Matt; Hanbury, Orion; Schuetzle, Robert; Rodriguez, Ramer; Johnson, Alex; Deichert, Fred; Jorgensen, Roger; Struble, Doug

    2015-05-12

    The Renewable Energy Institute International, in collaboration with Greyrock Energy and Red Lion Bio-Energy (RLB) has successfully demonstrated operation of a 25 ton per day (tpd) nameplate capacity, pilot, pre-commercial-scale integrated biorefinery (IBR) plant for the direct production of premium, “drop-in”, synthetic fuels from agriculture and forest waste feedstocks using next-generation thermochemical and catalytic conversion technologies. The IBR plant was built and tested at the Energy Center, which is located in the University of Toledo Medical Campus in Toledo, Ohio.

  1. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  2. Assessment of the integrity of spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage demonstrations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Dobbins, J.C.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes the histories of 17 Zircaloy-clad spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage tests and demonstrations at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) and Climax facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 18th assembly was shipped to the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) and remained there for extensive characterization and as a source of specimens for whole-rod and rod-segment dry storage tests. The report traces the history of the assemblies after discharge from the Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized-water reactor (1975 and 1977) through shipment (first arrival at EMAD in December 1978), dry storage tests and demonstrations, and shipment by truck cask from EMAD to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in May/June 1986. The principal objectives of this report are to assess and document the integrity of the fuel during the extensive dry storage activities at NTS and BCL, and to briefly summarize the dry storage technologies and procedures demonstrated in this program. The dry storage tests and demonstrations involved the following concepts and facilities: (1) surface drywells (EMAD); (2) deep drywells (425 m underground in the Climax granite formation); (3) concrete silo (EMAD); (4) air-cooled vault (EMAD); (5) electrically-heated module for fuel assembly thermal calibration and testing (EMAD/FAITM). 20 refs., 43 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Self-scrubbing coal{sup TM}: An integrated approach to clean air. A proposed Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared by the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), with compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Council on Environmental Quality (CE) regulations for implementating NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE regulations for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021), to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposed demonstration project to be cost-shared by DOE and Custom Coals International (CCI) under the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. CCI is a Pennsylvania general partnership located in Pittsburgh, PA engaged in the commercialization of advanced coal cleaning technologies. The proposed federal action is for DOE to provide, through a cooperative agreement with CCI, cost-shared funding support for the land acquisition, design, construction and demonstration of an advanced coal cleaning technology project, {open_quotes}Self-Scrubbing Coal: An Integrated Approach to Clean Air.{close_quotes} The proposed demonstration project would take place on the site of the presently inactive Laurel Coal Preparation Plant in Shade Township, Somerset County, PA. A newly constructed, advanced design, coal preparation plant would replace the existing facility. The cleaned coal produced from this new facility would be fired in full-scale test burns at coal-fired electric utilities in Indiana, Ohio and PA as part of this project.

  4. Spatial-spectral coherent holographic integrating processor (S2-CHIP): performance analysis and 1.0 GHz experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Kristian D.; Cole, Zachary; Mohan, R. Krishna; Babbitt, William R.

    2003-12-01

    The design, performance analysis and experimental demonstration for an analog, broadband, high performance electro-optical signal processor are presented. The Spatial Spectral (S2) Coherent Holographic Integrating Processor, or S2-CHIP, has been developed recently as a broadband core-component for range and mid-to-high pulse repetition frequency radar-signal processing systems, as well as for lidar and radio astronomy applications. In a range radar system, if the transmit and receive RF waveforms are modulated onto a stable optical carrier, the S2 material will perform the analog correlation of the transmit and receive signals to yield the target"s range, and also coherent integrate multiple return results to increase the signal-to-noise-ratio and provide for target velocity determination. Preliminary experimental results are shown of S2-CHIP range processing using a 1.0 Gb/s data rate with 512-bit BPSK pulses. Good range resolution is observed for delays up to 1.0 microsecond. The ability of the processor"s to handle dynamic coding on the transmit RF waveforms is demonstrated.

  5. Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing team: An examination of LA-ICP-AES in a mobile configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for field-deployable elemental analysis devices that are safer, faster, and less expensive than the fixed laboratory procedures now used to screen hazardous waste sites. As a response to this need, the Technology Integration Program (TIP) created a mobile, field-deployable laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) sampling and analysis prototype. Although the elemental. screening prototype has been successfully field-tested, continued marketing and technical development efforts are required to transfer LA-ICP-AES technology to the commercial sector. TIP established and supported a student research and design group called the Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing (IDMM) team to advance the technology transfer of mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES. The IDMM team developed a conceptual design (which is detailed in this report) for a mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES sampling and analysis system, and reports the following findings: Mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES is commercially viable. Eventual regulatory acceptance of field-deployable LA-ICP-AES, while not a simple process, is likely. Further refinement of certain processes and components of LA-ICP-AES will enhance the device`s sensitivity and accuracy.

  6. Analysis of optical sensing behavior of a novel optical bean-shaped resonator biosensor integrated with MZI configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Yao, Jia; Yuan, Guohui; Yang, Li

    2014-07-01

    A novel optical bean-shaped resonator (BR) biosensor integrated with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer structure based on a silicon-on-isolator platform has been proposed and investigated theoretically and numerically. By characterizing and optimizing the structure, our bean-shaped device exhibits a high extinction ratio over 50 dB and a high Q factor of about 5.46 × 104 in a wide wavelength span. The quasi-free spectral range (FSR) is about 469 nm. The sensitivity of 688.6 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) is achieved for bulk changes of refractive index and the detection range varies from 10-6 to 0.689 RIU. More complex bean-shaped structures can also be cascaded by adding more bending waveguides in BR to obtain wider quasi-FSR range.

  7. Fabrication and test of an integrated optical sensor with high sensitivity and high dynamic range based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, D.; Viegas, J.; Fernandes, L.; Moreira, P. J.; Leite, A. M. P.; Santos, J. L.; Marques, P. V. S.

    2007-05-01

    Integrated optics (IO) technology has been primarily used in optical communication applications but it is expanding fast into the field of optical sensing. In this work we report the fabrication of integrated devices using hybrid sol-gel technology and in particular its application in the fabrication of a refractive index integrated sensor based in a Mach-Zehnder interferometric configuration. In one of the interferometer arms, a analysis chamber is created by exposing the waveguide through the removal of the device cladding. On the same arm, two Bragg gratings with the same period are fabricated: one in the unprotected waveguide area and another in close proximity (cladded area); because of the different effective index in the two grating regions, two peaks are observed in reflection if the device is tested with a broadband source. Any change of the refractive index of the material filling the analysis chamber can be detected in two ways: by measuring the intensity of the interferometric output (at a wavelength different from the Bragg wavelength of the two gratings) or by measuring the spectrum of the reflected signal. The high sensitivity is obtained by measuring the interferometric output, while the high dynamic range can be achieved by measuring the reflected signal from the grating structures.

  8. EarthCube Integration and Test Environment (ECITE) : An environment to verify, validate, integrate and demonstrate EarthCube technology components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.; Law, E.; Keiser, K.; Middleton, D.; Pearlman, J.; Stults, M.; MacDermaid, C.; Yang, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    NSF EarthCube is building a community-driven cyberinfrastructure that supports standards for interoperability, infuses advanced technologies to improve and facilitate interdisciplinary research, and helps educate scientists in the emerging practices of digital scholarship, data and software stewardship, and open science. A Testbed Working Group (TWG) was formed by the EarthCube's Technology and Architecture Committee, and is working with the EarthCube and user communities to define and design a testbed that will facilitate the integration of separately funded EarthCube components and promote collaborative planning, testing and integration of technologies. Specifically, the testbed seeks to: Serve as a common ground for prototyping, testing,integration and preservation of EarthCube components and products; Facilitate verification and validation of technologies, use cases, architecture design, components, scalability, interface specifications and standards; Provide a platform for demonstration and showcasing of EarthCube technologies for science users, technologists and the broader geosciences community. This talk gives a brief overview of the role, activities and accomplished achieved by the TWG, as well as the requirements and design developed to drive the implementation of a sustainable EarthCube testbed.

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers of 1.5, 1.8, and 2.0 of a blended wing-body configuration with and without integral canards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Lamb, M.; Miller, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    An exploratory, experimental, and theoretical investigation was made of a cambered, twisted, and blended wing-body concept with and without integral canard surfaces. Theoretical calculations of the static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-body configurations were compared with the characteristics obtained from tests of a model in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel. Mach numbers of 1.5, 1.8, and 2.0 and a Reynolds number per meter of 6.56 million were used in the calculations and tests. Overall results suggest that planform selection is extremely important and that the supplemental application of new calculation techniques should provide a process for the design of supersonic wings in which spanwise distribution of upwash and leading-edge thrust might be rationally controlled and exploited.

  10. Experimental demonstration of broadband Lorentz non-reciprocity in an integrable photonic architecture based on Mach-Zehnder modulators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisu; Galland, Christophe; Liu, Yang; Tan, Kang; Ding, Ran; Li, Qi; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Lorentz reciprocity is a direct consequence of Maxwell equations governing the propagation of light in passive linear media with symmetric permittivity and permeability tensors. Here, we demonstrate the first active optical isolator and circulator implemented in a linear and reciprocal material platform using commercial Mach-Zehnder modulators. In a proof-of-principle experiment based on single-mode polarization-maintaining fibers, we achieve more than 12.5 dB isolation over an unprecedented 8.7 THz bandwidth at telecommunication wavelengths, with only 9.1 dB total insertion loss. Our architecture provides a practical answer to the challenge of non-reciprocal light routing in photonic integrated circuits.

  11. Final deactivation project report on the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility, Building 7602 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility (Building 7602) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities by the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP). This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This report provides a history and description of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous and radioactive materials inventory, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy integrated catheter for characterization of myocardial tissues: preliminary demonstrations to radiofrequency ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment of atrial fibrillation can be limited by the ability to characterize the tissue in contact. Parameters obtained by conventional catheters, such as impedance and temperature can be insufficient in providing physiological information pertaining to effective treatment. In this report, we present a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-integrated catheter capable of extracting tissue optical properties. Validation experiments were first performed in tissue phantoms with known optical properties. We then apply the technique for characterization of myocardial tissues in swine and human hearts, ex vivo. Additionally, we demonstrate the recovery of critical parameters relevant to RFA therapy including contact verification, and lesion transmurality. These findings support the application of NIRS for improved guidance in RFA therapeutic interventions. PMID:26203376

  13. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

  14. Visual and vestibular perceptual thresholds each demonstrate better precision at specific frequencies and also exhibit optimal integration

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Koeun; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies show that visual motion perception is more precise than vestibular motion perception, but it is unclear whether this is universal or the result of specific experimental conditions. We compared visual and vestibular motion precision over a broad range of temporal frequencies by measuring thresholds for vestibular (subject motion in the dark), visual (visual scene motion) or visual-vestibular (subject motion in the light) stimuli. Specifically, thresholds were measured for motion frequencies spanning a two-decade physiological range (0.05-5 Hz) using single-cycle sinusoidal acceleration roll tilt trajectories (i.e., distinguishing left-side down from right-side down). We found that, while visual and vestibular thresholds were broadly similar between 0.05 and 5.0 Hz, each cue is significantly more precise than the other at certain frequencies. Specifically, we found that 1) visual and vestibular thresholds were indistinguishable at 0.05 Hz and 2 Hz (i.e., similarly precise); 2) visual thresholds were lower (i.e., vision more precise) than vestibular thresholds between 0.1 Hz and 1 Hz; and 3) visual thresholds were higher (i.e., vision less precise) than vestibular thresholds above 2 Hz. This shows that vestibular perception can be more precise than visual perception at physiologically relevant frequencies. We also found that sensory integration of visual and vestibular information is consistent with static Bayesian optimal integration of visual-vestibular cues. In contrast with most prior work that degraded or altered sensory cues, we demonstrated static optimal integration using natural cues. PMID:24371292

  15. Experimental demonstration of multi-dimensional resources integration for service provisioning in cloud radio over fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; He, Yongqi; Lee, Young

    2016-07-01

    Cloud radio access network (C-RAN) becomes a promising scenario to accommodate high-performance services with ubiquitous user coverage and real-time cloud computing in 5G area. However, the radio network, optical network and processing unit cloud have been decoupled from each other, so that their resources are controlled independently. Traditional architecture cannot implement the resource optimization and scheduling for the high-level service guarantee due to the communication obstacle among them with the growing number of mobile internet users. In this paper, we report a study on multi-dimensional resources integration (MDRI) for service provisioning in cloud radio over fiber network (C-RoFN). A resources integrated provisioning (RIP) scheme using an auxiliary graph is introduced based on the proposed architecture. The MDRI can enhance the responsiveness to dynamic end-to-end user demands and globally optimize radio frequency, optical network and processing resources effectively to maximize radio coverage. The feasibility of the proposed architecture is experimentally verified on OpenFlow-based enhanced SDN testbed. The performance of RIP scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposal based on MDRI architecture in terms of resource utilization, path blocking probability, network cost and path provisioning latency, compared with other provisioning schemes.

  16. Experimental demonstration of multi-dimensional resources integration for service provisioning in cloud radio over fiber network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; He, Yongqi; Lee, Young

    2016-01-01

    Cloud radio access network (C-RAN) becomes a promising scenario to accommodate high-performance services with ubiquitous user coverage and real-time cloud computing in 5G area. However, the radio network, optical network and processing unit cloud have been decoupled from each other, so that their resources are controlled independently. Traditional architecture cannot implement the resource optimization and scheduling for the high-level service guarantee due to the communication obstacle among them with the growing number of mobile internet users. In this paper, we report a study on multi-dimensional resources integration (MDRI) for service provisioning in cloud radio over fiber network (C-RoFN). A resources integrated provisioning (RIP) scheme using an auxiliary graph is introduced based on the proposed architecture. The MDRI can enhance the responsiveness to dynamic end-to-end user demands and globally optimize radio frequency, optical network and processing resources effectively to maximize radio coverage. The feasibility of the proposed architecture is experimentally verified on OpenFlow-based enhanced SDN testbed. The performance of RIP scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposal based on MDRI architecture in terms of resource utilization, path blocking probability, network cost and path provisioning latency, compared with other provisioning schemes. PMID:27465296

  17. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  18. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  19. Changes in Soil Chemistry and Agricultural Return Flow in an Integrated Seawater Agriculture System (ISAS) Demonstration in Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Q.; Matiin, W. A.; Ahmad, F.

    2012-12-01

    Growing halophytes using Integrated Seawater Agriculture Systems (ISAS) offers a sustainable solution for the generation of biomass feedstock for carbon neutral biofuels - halophytes do not enter the foodchain and they do not compete with food-crops for natural resources. A field demonstration of ISAS in the coastal regions of Abu Dhabi, UAE, scheduled to start in 2013, will likely face a number of region-specific challenges not encountered in past demonstrations of ISAS at coastal locations in Mexico and Eritrea. The arid climate, unique soil chemistry (evaporite deposits, especially gypsum), and hypersaline coastal hydrogeology of Abu Dhabi will affect long-term halophyte agricultural productivity when Arabian Gulf seawater is applied to coastal soils as part of ISAS. Therefore, the changes in irrigation return flow quality and soil chemistry must be monitored closely over time to establish transient salt and water balances in order to assess the sustainability of ISAS in the region. As an initial phase of the ISAS demonstration project, numerical modeling of different seawater loadings onto coastal soils was conducted to estimate the chemical characteristics of soil and the irrigation return flow over time. These modeling results will be validated with field monitoring data upon completion of one year of ISAS operation. The results from this study could be used to (i) determine the optimal saline water loading that the soils at the ISAS site can tolerate, (ii) potential for sodicity of the soil with saline water application, (iii) impacts of land application of saline water on underlying coastal groundwater, and (iv) develop strategies to control soil water activities in favor of halophyte agricultural productivity.

  20. Mission configurable threat detection sensor suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean; Cantin, Andre; Dubois, Jacques; Trudel, Carol

    2000-12-01

    This article describes work that has been undertaken at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV) to integrate a number of electro-optics sensors into a modular mission configurable threat detection sensor suite (TDSS) demonstrator. The sensor suite is based on a series of plug and play detection heads networked together in the same fashion as a computer network. The architecture allows optimization of the detection capabilities according to a mission requirement. The TDSS demonstrator was developed to study different sensor configuration in order to establish the requirements to improve the protection of the military platforms. It is a good example showing how networking can help in adapting military systems to specific requirements. The paper gives an up to date description of the TDSS demonstrator. To our knowledge, it is the first time that this approach is used in the field of military detection sensors.

  1. Development of simulated tank wastes for the US Department of Energy`s Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (USTID) is to identify and evaluate technologies that may be used to characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of hazardous and radioactive wastes contained in tanks on US Department of Energy sites. Simulated wastes are an essential component of the evaluation process because they provide controlled samples for technology assessment, and minimize costs and risks involved when working with radioactive wastes. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a recipe to simulate Hanford single-shell tank, (SST) waste. The recipe is derived from existing process recipes, and elemental concentrations are based on characterization data from 18 SSTs. In this procedure, salt cake and metal oxide/hydroxide sludge are prepared individually, and mixed together at varying ratios depending on the specific tank, waste to be simulated or the test being conducted. Elemental and physical properties of the stimulant are comparable with analyzed tank samples, and chemical speciation in the simulant is being improved as speciation data for actual wastes become available. The nonradioactive chemical waste simulant described here is useful for testing technologies on a small scale.

  2. Real World Data and Service Integration: Demonstrations and Lessons Learnt from the GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot Phase Four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonis, I.; Alameh, N.; Percivall, G.

    2012-04-01

    The GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilots (AIP) develop and pilot new process and infrastructure components for the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) and the broader GEOSS architecture through an evolutionary development process consisting of a set of phases. Each phase addresses a set of Societal Benefit Areas (SBA) and geoinformatic topics. The first three phases consisted of architecture refinements based on interactions with users; component interoperability testing; and SBA-driven demonstrations. The fourth phase (AIP-4) documented here focused on fostering interoperability arrangements and common practices for GEOSS by facilitating access to priority earth observation data sources and by developing and testing specific clients and mediation components to enable such access. Additionally, AIP-4 supported the development of a thesaurus for earth observation parameters and tutorials to guide data providers to make their data available through GEOSS. The results of AIP-4 are documented in two engineering reports and captured in a series of videos posted online. Led by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), AIP-4 built on contributions from over 60 organizations. This wide portfolio helped testing interoperability arrangements in a highly heterogeneous environment. AIP-4 participants cooperated closely to test available data sets, access services, and client applications in multiple workflows and set ups. Eventually, AIP-4 improved the accessibility of GEOSS datasets identified as supporting Critical Earth Observation Priorities by the GEO User Interface Committee (UIC), and increased the use of the data through promoting availability of new data services, clients, and applications. During AIP-4, A number of key earth observation data sources have been made available online at standard service interfaces, discovered using brokered search approaches, and processed and visualized in generalized client applications. AIP-4 demonstrated the level of interoperability

  3. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 2, Final report: Data in tabular form, Disks 2,3,4

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This document consists solely of data acquired during phase 2 of the integrated demonstration project concerning in situ bioremediation performed at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. The data is presented in tabular form.

  4. A Watershed-based spatially-explicit demonstration of an Integrated Environmental Modeling Framework for Ecosystem Services in the Coal River Basin (WV, USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate a spatially-explicit regional assessment of current condition of aquatic ecoservices in the Coal River Basin (CRB), with limited sensitivity analysis for the atmospheric contaminant mercury. The integrated modeling framework (IMF) forecasts water quality and quant...

  5. Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Saibal Bhattacharya

    2005-08-31

    constraints afflicting mature Mississippian fields. A publicly accessible databank of representative petrophysical properties and relationships was developed to overcome the paucity of such data that is critical to modeling the storage and flow in these reservoirs. Studies in 3 Mississippian fields demonstrated that traditional reservoir models built by integrating log, core, DST, and production data from existing wells on 40-acre spacings are unable to delineate karst-induced compartments, thus making 3D-seismic data critical to characterize these fields. Special attribute analyses on 3D data were shown to delineate reservoir compartments and predict those with pay porosities. Further testing of these techniques is required to validate their applicability in other Mississippian reservoirs. This study shows that detailed reservoir characterization and simulation on geomodels developed by integrating wireline log, core, petrophysical, production and pressure, and 3D-seismic data enables better evaluation of a candidate field for horizontal infill applications. In addition to reservoir compartmentalization, two factors were found to control the economic viability of a horizontal infill well in a mature Mississippian field: (a) adequate reservoir pressure support, and (b) an average well spacing greater than 40-acres.

  6. Development and Demonstration of Grid Integration System for PEVs, ESS, and RE: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-515

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, Tony

    2016-05-01

    NREL and Ideal Power Converters (IPC) will jointly develop and demonstrate a hybrid power converter system integrating bi-directional electric vehicle charging, photovoltaic generation, and stationary battery storage using IPC's 3-Port Hybrid Converter. The organizations will also jointly investigate synergies in tightly integrating these separate power conversion systems.

  7. Restructured Freedom configuration characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    In Jan. 1991, the LaRc SSFO performed an assessment of the configuration characteristics of the proposed pre-integrated Space Station Freedom (SSF) concept. Of particular concern was the relationship of solar array operation and orientation with respect to spacecraft controllability. For the man-tended configuration (MTC), it was determined that torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) seeking Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) control laws could not always maintain attitude. The control problems occurred when the solar arrays were tracking the sun to produce full power while flying in an arrow or gravity gradient flight mode. The large solar array articulations that sometimes result from having the functions of the alpha and beta joints reversed on MTC induced large product of inertia changes that can invalidate the control system gains during an orbit. Several modified sun tracking techniques were evaluated with respect to producing a controllable configuration requiring no modifications to the CMG control algorithms. Another assessment involved the permanently manned configuration (PMC) which has a third asymmetric PV unit on one side of the transverse boom. Recommendations include constraining alpha rotations for MTC in the arrow and gravity gradient flight modes and perhaps developing new non-TEA seeking control laws. Recommendations for PMC include raising the operational altitude and moving to a symmetric configuration as soon as possible.

  8. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; López-Suárez, A.; Can-Uc, B.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Tamayo-Rivera, L.; Oliver, A.

    2015-07-01

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions.

  9. Independent Peer Review of Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project Antenna Pointing Subsystem (APS) Integrated Gimbal Assembly (IGA) Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Larsen, Curtis E.; Pellicciotti, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center Chief Engineer's Office requested an independent review of the structural analysis and modeling of the Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project Antenna Pointing Subsystem (APS) Integrated Gimbal Assembly (IGA) to be conducted by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). At this time, the IGA had completed its critical design review (CDR). The assessment was to be a peer review of the NEi-NASTRAN1 model of the APS Antenna, and not a peer review of the design and the analysis that had been completed by the GRC team for CDR. Thus, only a limited amount of information was provided on the structural analysis. However, the NESC team had difficulty separating analysis concerns from modeling issues. The team studied the NASTRAN model, but did not fully investigate how the model was used by the CoNNeCT Project and how the Project was interpreting the results. The team's findings, observations, and NESC recommendations are contained in this report.

  10. Purge gas recovery of ammonia synthesis plant by integrated configuration of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor and solid oxide fuel cell as a novel technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siavashi, Fakhteh; Saidi, Majid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-01

    The purge gas emission of ammonia synthesis plant which contains hazardous components is one of the major sources of environmental pollution. Using integrated configuration of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system is a new approach which has a great impact to reduce the pollutant emission. By application of this method, not only emission of ammonia and methane in the atmosphere is prevented, hydrogen is produced through the methane steam reforming and ammonia decomposition reactions that take place simultaneously in a catalytic membrane reactor. The pure generated hydrogen by recovery of the purge gas in the Pd-Ag membrane reactor is used as a feed of SOFC. Since water is the only byproduct of the electrochemical reaction in the SOFC, it is recycled to the reactor for providing the required water of the reforming reaction. Performance investigation of the reactor represents that the rate of hydrogen permeation increases with enhancing the reactor temperature and pressure. Also modeling results indicate that the SOFC performance improves with increasing the temperature and fuel utilization ratio. The generated power by recovery of the purging gas stream of ammonia synthesis plant in the Razi petrochemical complex is about 8 MW.

  11. An integrated array of microfluidic oxygenators as a neonatal lung assist device: in vitro characterization and in vivo demonstration.

    PubMed

    Rochow, Niels; Manan, Asmaa; Wu, Wen-I; Fusch, Gerhard; Monkman, Shelley; Leung, Jennifer; Chan, Emily; Nagpal, Dipen; Predescu, Dragos; Brash, John; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam Ravi; Fusch, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    A miniaturized oxygenator device that is perfused like an artificial placenta via the umbilical vessels may have significant potential to save the lives of newborns with respiratory insufficiency. Recently we presented the concept of an integrated modular lung assist device (LAD) that consists of stacked microfluidic single oxygenator units (SOUs) and demonstrated the technical details and operation of SOU prototypes. In this article, we present a LAD prototype that is designed to accommodate the different needs of term and preterm infants by permitting changing of the number of parallel-stacked microfluidic SOUs according to the actual body weight. The SOUs are made of polydimethylsiloxane, arranged in parallel, and connected though 3D-printed polymeric interconnects to form the LAD. The flow characteristics and the gas exchange properties were tested in vitro using human blood. We found that the pressure drop of the LAD increased linearly with flow rate. Gas exchange rates of 2.4-3.8 μL/min/cm(2) (0.3-0.5 mL/kg/min) and 6.4-10.1 μL/min/cm(2) (0.8-1.3 mL/kg/min) for O2 and CO2 , respectively, were achieved. We also investigated protein adsorption to provide preliminary information on the need for application of anticoagulant coating of LAD materials. Albumin adsorption, as measured by gold staining, showed that surface uptake was evenly distributed and occurred at the monolayer level (>0.2 μg/cm(2) ). Finally, we also tested the LAD under in vivo conditions using a newborn piglet model (body weight 1.65-2.0 kg). First, the effect of an arteriovenous bypass via a carotid artery-to-jugular vein shortcut on heart rate and blood pressure was investigated. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure remained stable for extracorporeal flow rates of up to 61 mL/kg/min (101 mL/min). Next, the LAD was connected to umbilical vessels (maximum flow rate of 24 mL/min [10.4 mL/kg/min]), and O2 gas exchange was measured under hypoxic conditions (Fi O2

  12. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2004-03-15

    This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in

  13. Modular small hydro configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  14. Radiant-interchange Configuration Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D C :; Morgan, W R

    1952-01-01

    A study is presented of the geometric configuration factors required for computing radiant heat transfer between opaque surfaces separated by a nonabsorbing medium and various methods of determining the configuration factors are discussed. Configuration-factor solutions available in the literature have been checked and the more complicated equations are presented as families of curves. Cases for point, line, and finite-area sources are worked out over a wide range of geometric proportions. These cases include several new configurations involving rectangles, triangles, and cylinders of finite length which are integrated and tabulated. An analysis is presented, in which configuration factors are employed of the radiant heat transfer to the rotor blades of a typical gas turbine under different conditions of temperature and pressure. (author)

  15. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  16. An automated approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Baelmans, M.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-01-01

    Automated methods based on optimization can greatly assist computational engineering design in many areas. In this paper an optimization approach to the magnetic design of a nuclear fusion reactor divertor is proposed and applied to a tokamak edge magnetic configuration in a first feasibility study. The approach is based on reduced models for magnetic field and plasma edge, which are integrated with a grid generator into one sensitivity code. The design objective chosen here for demonstrative purposes is to spread the divertor target heat load as much as possible over the entire target area. Constraints on the separatrix position are introduced to eliminate physically irrelevant magnetic field configurations during the optimization cycle. A gradient projection method is used to ensure stable cost function evaluations during optimization. The concept is applied to a configuration with typical Joint European Torus (JET) parameters and it automatically provides plausible configurations with reduced heat load.

  17. Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project. Final quarterly technical progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, G.

    1993-05-24

    This Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the period ending March 31, 1993 summarizes the work done to data by Tampella Power Corporation and Enviropower, Inc. on the integrated combined-cycle power plant project. Efforts were concentrated on the Toms Creek PDS (Preliminary Design and Studies). Tampella Power Corporation`s efforts were concentrated on the Toms Creek Preliminary Process Flow Diagram (PFD) and Piping and Instrument Diagrams (P&IDs). Tampella Power Corporation also prepared Heat and Material Balances (H&MBs) for different site-specific cases.

  18. Central Respiratory Chemosensitivity and Cerebrovascular CO[subscript 2] Reactivity: A Rebreathing Demonstration Illustrating Integrative Human Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKay, Christina M.; Skow, Rachel J.; Tymko, Michael M.; Boulet, Lindsey M.; Davenport, Margie H.; Steinback, Craig D.; Ainslie, Philip N.; Lemieux, Chantelle C. M.; Day, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective ways of engaging students of physiology and medicine is through laboratory demonstrations and case studies that combine 1) the use of equipment, 2) problem solving, 3) visual representations, and 4) manipulation and interpretation of data. Depending on the measurements made and the type of test, laboratory demonstrations…

  19. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R. Danly, C.; Fatherley, V. E.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C.; Christensen, K.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G. P.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Skulina, K.

    2015-12-15

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  20. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Christensen, K; Danly, C; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D; Grim, G P; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Merrill, F E; Skulina, K; Volegov, P; Wilde, C

    2015-12-01

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  1. Air Vehicle Integration and Technology Research (AVIATR). Task Order 0003: Condition-Based Maintenance Plus Structural Integrity (CBM+SI) Demonstration (September 2011 to March 2012)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    to speed up the import of RBDMS results through the use of Visual Basic for Applications ( VBA ) macros . These macros are inessential to the...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR- 2013 -0219 AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0003: Condition-Based Maintenance Plus...nationals. Copies may be obtained from the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RQ-WP-TR- 2013 -0219 HAS BEEN

  2. Air Vehicle Integration and Technology Research (AVIATR). Delivery Order 0003: Condition-Based Maintenance Plus Structural Integrity (CBM+SI) Demonstration (September 2008 to March 2009)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    ultrasonic (e.g., pitch-catch arrays , pulse-echo arrays , phase - arrays , etc.). Developing a Structural Health Monitoring (SHm) system for either location...unlimited. Figure C-1. Plot of Damage Indices versus Load Cycles. Data from piezoelectric ultrasonic arrays can be processed to form a variety of damage...Integrity – Basic Phase . The organization of the report follows the agreed to Work Breakdown Structure, and specifically documents the progress to date on

  3. Air Vehicle Integration and Technology Research (AVIATR). Delivery Order 0003: Condition-Based Maintenance Plus Structural Integrity (CBM+SI) Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    based ultrasonic (e.g., pitch-catch arrays , pulse-echo arrays , phase - arrays , ect.). Developing a Structural Health Monitoring (SHm) system for either...distribution unlimited. Figure F-1. Plot of Damage Indices versus Load Cycles Data from piezoelectric ultrasonic arrays can be processed to form a variety...the AVIATR contract Task Order 3, Condition Based Maintenance plus Structural Integrity (CBM+SI) – Basic Phase . The main objective of this task is

  4. Production of high quality ground sections of bone containing metal implants to demonstrate osseo-integration: a simplified method.

    PubMed

    Allison, R T; Sugar, A W

    1990-07-01

    A simple method is described for examining bone-titanium implant relationship using a modified embedding technique. The method involves complete dehydration with acetone prior to infiltrating and embedding in methyl methacrylate supplemented with dibutylphthalate. Slow polymerisation is initiated with benzoyl peroxide, allowed to progress at room temperature and completed at 56 degrees C. Using this method the apparent complete apposition of bone to the titanium fixture surface has been successfully demonstrated.

  5. ITA/CWP and ICB technology demonstrator: a practical integration of disparate ISR/ISTAR assets and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, Flavio; Conway-Jones, Dave

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a US-UK collaboration project sponsored by the Coalition Warfare Program (CWP) of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD). The goal of this project was to integrate a single framework a set of sensor and policy tools and protocols to enable the rapid assembly and deployment of a disparate set of coalition assets combined into a sensor network with policy controlled sharing/dissemination of data and information. This project was based on two key technology components developed as part of the International Technology Alliance in Network and Information Science (ITA) - the Information Fabric and the Policy Management Toolkit, and technology components developed by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB) - the Autonomous UAV Persistent Surveillance using Bio-Inspired Strategies.

  6. First demonstration and field trial on multi-user UDWDM-PON full duplex PSK-PSK with single monolithic integrated dual-output-DFB-SOA based ONUs.

    PubMed

    Chu, GuangYong; Maho, Anaëlle; Cano, Iván; Polo, Victor; Brenot, Romain; Debrégeas, Hélène; Prat, Josep

    2016-10-15

    We demonstrate a monolithically integrated dual-output DFB-SOA, and conduct the field trial on a multi-user bidirectional coherent ultradense wavelength division multiplexing-passive optical network (UDWDM-PON). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first achievement of simplified single integrated laser-based neighboring coherent optical network units (ONUs) with a 12.5 GHz channel spaced ultra-dense access network, including both downstream and upstream, taking the benefits of low footprint and low-temperature dependence.

  7. Space shuttle orbiter avionics software: Post review report for the entry FACI (First Article Configuration Inspection). [including orbital flight tests integrated system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markos, H.

    1978-01-01

    Status of the computer programs dealing with space shuttle orbiter avionics is reported. Specific topics covered include: delivery status; SSW software; SM software; DL software; GNC software; level 3/4 testing; level 5 testing; performance analysis, SDL readiness for entry first article configuration inspection; and verification assessment.

  8. Integrated Laboratory Demonstrations of Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Simulated 10 Meter Telescope at Visible Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. Mark; Johnson, Luke; Laag, Edward A.; Kupke, Renate; Gavel, Donald T.; Bauman, Brian J.; Max, Claire E.

    2010-05-01

    One important frontier for astronomical adaptive optics (AO) involves methods such as multi-object AO and multi-conjugate AO that have the potential to give a significantly larger field of view than conventional AO techniques. A second key emphasis over the next decade will be to push astronomical AO to visible wavelengths. We have conducted the first laboratory simulations of wide-field, laser guide star AO at visible wavelengths on a 10 m class telescope. These experiments, utilizing the UCO/Lick Observatory’s multi-object/laser tomographic adaptive optics (MOAO/LTAO) test bed, demonstrate new techniques in wave front sensing and control that are crucial to future on-sky MOAO systems. We (1) test and confirm the feasibility of highly accurate atmospheric tomography with laser guide stars, (2) demonstrate key innovations allowing open-loop operation of Shack–Hartmann wave front sensors (with errors of ∼30 nm) as will be needed for MOAO, and (3) build a complete error budget model describing system performance. The AO system maintains a performance of 32.4% Strehl ratio on-axis, with 24.5% and 22.6% at 10″ and 15″, respectively, at a science wavelength of 710 nm (R-band) over the equivalent of 0.8 s of simulation. The mean ensquared energy on-axis in a 50 mas spaxel is 46%. The off-axis Strehl ratios are obtained at radial separations 2–3 times the isoplanatic angle of the atmosphere at 710 nm. The MOAO-corrected field of view is ∼25 times larger in area than that limited by anisoplanatism at R-band. The error budget we assemble is composed almost entirely of terms verified through independent, empirical experiments, with minimal parameterization of theoretical models. We find that error terms arising from calibration inaccuracies and optical drift are comparable in magnitude to traditional terms like fitting error and tomographic error. This makes a strong case for implementing additional calibration facilities in future AO systems, including

  9. Mechanical systems with limited configurational space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermeyer, G.-P.

    A mechanical analysis of systems with nonholonomic constraints is developed, combining the parameterized-holonomic-constraint concept of Baumgarte (1982) with numerical integration methods. The notation and problem formulation of Baumgarte are introduced, and the generalized formulas for velocity jumps caused by discontinuous compulsive forces are derived via a variation problem. Classical methods of numerical stabilization of first integrals are examined, a theory of stabilization processes is developed, and an optimal method for the present application is determined. A second approach using quasi-generalized variables is shown to permit the calculation of a large class of constraints without a classical error-minimizing procedure. The coordinate invariance of the jump equations is demonstrated, and necessary and sufficient conditions for velocity jumps are defined. Various test configurations are computed using standard iterative procedures, a time transformation involving ordinary differential equations, and an approximation method based on a finite impulse interval; the results are illustrated with graphs and drawings.

  10. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  11. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-10-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  12. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-10-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  13. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  14. Field Demonstration of Using Advanced PV Inverter Functionality to Mitigate the Impacts of High-Penetration PV Grid Integration on the Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Barry; Gebeyehu, Araya

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes a field demonstration that was completed to show the ability of currently installed PV inverters to implement advanced PV inverter functionality and that such functionality was effective at reducing the voltage-related PV impacts of high-penetration PV integration. A distribution circuit was instrumented and then tested for a two week period using off-unity power factor operation. Specifically, an inductive power factor of -0.95 was demonstrated. The results show that the PV inverters were capable of such operation and that the use of off-unity power factor operation was highly effective at reducing the voltage-related impacts of the PV systems interconnected to the circuits used in the demonstration. The impacts of using off-unity power factor operation - resulting in additional reactive current flow on the distribution circuit - are also presented and analyzed.

  15. Parents as Teachers Health Literacy Demonstration project: integrating an empowerment model of health literacy promotion into home-based parent education.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lauren N; Smith, Sandra A; Thomson, Nicole R

    2015-03-01

    The Parents as Teachers (PAT) Health Literacy Demonstration project assessed the impact of integrating data-driven reflective practices into the PAT home visitation model to promote maternal health literacy. PAT is a federally approved Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting program with the goal of promoting school readiness and healthy child development. This 2-year demonstration project used an open-cohort longitudinal design to promote parents' interactive and reflective skills, enhance health education, and provide direct assistance to personalize and act on information by integrating an empowerment paradigm into PAT's parent education model. Eight parent educators used the Life Skills Progression instrument to tailor the intervention to each of 103 parent-child dyads. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and logistic regression combined with qualitative data demonstrated that mothers achieved overall significant improvements in health literacy, and that home visitors are important catalysts for these improvements. These findings support the use of an empowerment model of health education, skill building, and direct information support to enable parents to better manage personal and child health and health care.

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  19. Summary report of the drilling technologies tested at the Integrated Demonstration Project for cleanup of organic contaminants in soils and groundwater at non-arid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater at SRS. The overall goal of the program is the demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Horizontal environmental well installation technology was one of the remediation technologies that was demonstrated at SRS. Four distinctly different systems of directional drilling and horizontal well installations were successfully demonstrated and evaluated. The four systems were developed in the petroleum industry, the river crossing industry, and the utility industry. The transfer of information concerning the horizontal environmental well installations has been facilitated by publishing a series of reports describing each individual demonstration. This is the final report in the series and provides a comprehensive evaluation of all four systems. The objectives of this report are to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of each drilling technology, describe and compare the problems encountered by each drilling technology, compare the compatibility of each technology with varying logistical and geological conditions, and discuss the expense of using each technology. This report is designed to be a horizontal environmental well reference document for the environmental remediation industry. An environmental problem holder may use this report to evaluate a directional drilling technology for use at his/her site.

  20. Integral Ramjet Booster Demonstration Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    OF AIR FORCE PROGRAM DATA 99 4.2 LABORATORY PROPELLANT STUDIES 102 4.2.1 Propellant Requirements 102 4.2.2 Evolution of LPC -691 Propellant 103...4.2.3 Characterization of LPC -69IB Propellant 106 4.2.4 Propellant Selection-Summary and Conclusions 111 4.2.5 Laboratory Studies of LPC -69ID 117 4.3...00F Versus NCO/OH LPC -691D Propellant 121 4-5 JANNAF Maximum True Stress at 700F Versus NCO/OH LPC -691D Propellant 122 4-6 Torch Test

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  3. Integration of Fish and Wildlife Data with Geobased and Remotely Sensed Land Use/land Cover Data: a Demonstration Using Sites in Pennsylvania. [Berwick and Lancaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushwa, C. T.; Laroche, G.; Dubrock, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service developed a statewide fish and wildlife data base for the Pennsylvania Game Commission that includes 125 categories of information on each of the 844 species. This species data base is integrated with geobased and remotely-sensed land use/land cover data from two sites in Pennsylvania. One site is an energy development project; the other is a high-energy use area. Analyses using the combined animal and land use data bases can be demonstrated for a variety of land use/land cover types at both sites. The ability to make "what if" analysis prior to project implementation is presented.

  4. Design of a canard configured TransCruiser using CEASIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Arthur; Eliasson, Peter; Goetzendorf-Grabowski, Tomasz; Vos, Jan B.; Zhang, Mengmeng; Richardson, Thomas S.

    2011-11-01

    CEASIOM is a multidisciplinary software environment for aircraft design that has been developed as part of the European Framework 6 SimSAC project. It closely integrates discipline-specific tools such as those used for CAD, grid generation, CFD, stability analysis and control system design. The environment allows the user to take an initial design from geometry definition and aerodynamics generation through to full six degrees of freedom simulation and analysis. Key capabilities include variable fidelity aerodynamics tools and aeroelasticity modules. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of CEASIOM by presenting the results of a Design, Simulate and Evaluate (DSE) exercise applied to a novel, project specific, transonic cruiser configuration called the TCR. The baseline TCR configuration is first defined using conventional methods, which is then refined and improved within the CEASIOM software environment. A wind tunnel model of this final configuration was then constructed, tested and used to verify the results generated using CEASIOM.

  5. Experimental demonstration of self-aligned InP/InGaAsP polarization converter for polarization multiplexed photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Masaru; Tanemura, Takuo; Higo, Akio; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2013-03-25

    Highly efficient, low-loss, and compact InP/InGaAsP polarization converter based on a half-ridge waveguide structure is fabricated and demonstrated experimentally. The device is fabricated by a simple self-aligned process and integrated with a ridge InP waveguide. Using a 150-μm-long device, we obtain the mode conversion of more than 96% and the on-chip loss of less than 1.0 dB over the broad wavelength range from 1510 to 1575 nm. The experimental results are explained quantitatively using the full-vector eigenmode calculation, which also reveals large fabrication tolerance of the demonstrated device.

  6. Integration in primary community care networks (PCCNs): examination of governance, clinical, marketing, financial, and information infrastructures in a national demonstration project in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju

    2007-01-01

    Background Taiwan's primary community care network (PCCN) demonstration project, funded by the Bureau of National Health Insurance on March 2003, was established to discourage hospital shopping behavior of people and drive the traditional fragmented health care providers into cooperate care models. Between 2003 and 2005, 268 PCCNs were established. This study profiled the individual members in the PCCNs to study the nature and extent to which their network infrastructures have been integrated among the members (clinics and hospitals) within individual PCCNs. Methods The thorough questionnaire items, covering the network working infrastructures – governance, clinical, marketing, financial, and information integration in PCCNs, were developed with validity and reliability confirmed. One thousand five hundred and fifty-seven clinics that had belonged to PCCNs for more than one year, based on the 2003–2005 Taiwan Primary Community Care Network List, were surveyed by mail. Nine hundred and twenty-eight clinic members responded to the surveys giving a 59.6 % response rate. Results Overall, the PCCNs' members had higher involvement in the governance infrastructure, which was usually viewed as the most important for establishment of core values in PCCNs' organization design and management at the early integration stage. In addition, it found that there existed a higher extent of integration of clinical, marketing, and information infrastructures among the hospital-clinic member relationship than those among clinic members within individual PCCNs. The financial infrastructure was shown the least integrated relative to other functional infrastructures at the early stage of PCCN formation. Conclusion There was still room for better integrated partnerships, as evidenced by the great variety of relationships and differences in extent of integration in this study. In addition to provide how the network members have done for their initial work at the early stage of network

  7. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Vassigh, Kenny; Bendek, Selman; Young, Zion W; Lynch, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide strawman mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible andor UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST.

  8. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  9. Configuration Management Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Policy establishes an Agency-wide Configuration Management Program and to provide responsibilities, compliance requirements, and overall principles for Configuration and Change Management processes to support information technology management.

  10. Active Flow Control (AFC) and Insect Accretion and Mitigation (IAM) System Design and Integration on the Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.; Harris, F. Keith; Spoor, Marc A.; Boyland, Susannah R.; Farrell, Thomas E.; Raines, David M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systems overview of how the Boeing and NASA team designed, analyzed, fabricated, and integrated the Active Flow Control (AFC) technology and Insect Accretion Mitigation (IAM) systems on the Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project partnered with Boeing to demonstrate these two technology systems on a specially outfitted Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator during the spring of 2015. The AFC system demonstrated attenuation of flow separation on a highly deflected rudder and increased the side force generated. This AFC system may enable a smaller vertical tail to provide the control authority needed in the event of an engine failure during takeoff while still operating in a conventional manner over the rest of the flight envelope. The AFC system consisted of ducting to obtain air from the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a control valve to modulate the system mass flow, a heat exchanger to lower the APU air temperature, and additional ducting to deliver the air to the AFC actuators located on the vertical tail. The IAM system demonstrated how to mitigate insect residue adhesion on a wing's leading edge. Something as small as insect residue on a leading edge can cause turbulent wedges that interrupt laminar flow, resulting in an increase in drag and fuel use. The IAM system consisted of NASA developed Engineered Surfaces (ES) which were thin aluminum sheet substrate panels with coatings applied to the exterior. These ES were installed on slats 8 and 9 on the right wing of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. They were designed to support panel removal and installation in one crew shift. Each slat accommodated 4 panels. Both the AFC and IAM flight test were the culmination of several years of development and produced valuable data for the advancement of modern aircraft designs.

  11. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  12. Configuration Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT), is information storage and report generation system for aid of configuration management activities. Configuration management is discipline composed of many techniques selected to track and direct evolution of complex systems. CAT is interactive program that accepts, organizes and stores information pertinent to specific phases of project.

  13. An ontology-based semantic configuration approach to constructing Data as a Service for enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongming; Xie, Cheng; Jiang, Lihong; Fang, Lu; Huang, Chenxi

    2016-03-01

    To align business strategies with IT systems, enterprises should rapidly implement new applications based on existing information with complex associations to adapt to the continually changing external business environment. Thus, Data as a Service (DaaS) has become an enabling technology for enterprise through information integration and the configuration of existing distributed enterprise systems and heterogonous data sources. However, business modelling, system configuration and model alignment face challenges at the design and execution stages. To provide a comprehensive solution to facilitate data-centric application design in a highly complex and large-scale situation, a configurable ontology-based service integrated platform (COSIP) is proposed to support business modelling, system configuration and execution management. First, a meta-resource model is constructed and used to describe and encapsulate information resources by way of multi-view business modelling. Then, based on ontologies, three semantic configuration patterns, namely composite resource configuration, business scene configuration and runtime environment configuration, are designed to systematically connect business goals with executable applications. Finally, a software architecture based on model-view-controller (MVC) is provided and used to assemble components for software implementation. The result of the case study demonstrates that the proposed approach provides a flexible method of implementing data-centric applications.

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  16. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  18. Configurable slit-mask unit of the Multi-Object Spectrometer for Infra-Red Exploration for the Keck telescope: integration and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudakis, Peter; Giriens, Laurent; Henein, Simon; Lisowski, Leszek; O'Hare, Aidan; Onillon, Emmanuel; Schwab, Philippe; Theurillat, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    A Configurable Slit Unit (CSU) has been developed for the Multi-Object Spectrometer for Infra-Red Exploration (MOSFIRE) instrument to be installed on the Keck 1 Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. MOSFIRE will provide NIR multi-object spectroscopy over a field of view of 6.1' x 6.1'. The reconfigurable mask allows the formation of 46 optical slits in a 267 x 267 mm2 field of view. The mechanism is an evolution of a former prototype designed by CSEM and qualified for the European Space Agency (ESA) as a candidate for the slit mask on NIRSpec for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The CSU is designed to simultaneously displace masking bars across the field-of-view (FOV) to mask unwanted light. A set of 46 bar pairs are used to form the MOSFIRE focal plane mask. The sides of the bars are convoluted so that light is prevented from passing between adjacent bars. The slit length is fixed (5.1 mm) but the width is variable down to 200 μm with a slit positioning accuracy of +/- 18 μm. A two-bar prototype mechanism was designed, manufactured and cryogenically tested to validate the modifications from the JWST prototype. The working principle of the mechanism is based on an improved "inch-worm" stepping motion of 92 masking bars forming the optical mask. Original voice coil actuators are used to drive the various clutches. The design makes significant use of flexure structures.

  19. Highly flexible nearest-neighbor-search associative memory with integrated k nearest neighbor classifier, configurable parallelism and dual-storage space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengwei; Mihara, Keisuke; Yamasaki, Shogo; Chen, Lei; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2016-04-01

    VLSI-implementations are often applied to solve the high computational cost of pattern matching but have usually low flexibility for satisfying different target applications. In this paper, a digital word-parallel associative memory architecture for k nearest neighbor (KNN) search, which is one of the most basic algorithms in pattern recognition, is reported applying the squared Euclidean distance measure. The reported architecture features reconfigurable parallelism, dual-storage space to achieve a flexible number of reference vectors, and a dedicated majority vote circuit. Programmable switching circuits, located between vector components, enable scalability of the searching parallelism by configuring the reference feature-vector dimensionality. A pipelined storage with dual static-random-access-memory (SRAM) cells for each unit and an intermediate winner control circuit are designed to extend the applicability by improving the flexibility of the reference storage. A test chip in 180 nm CMOS technology, which has 32 rows, 4 elements in each row and 2-parallel 8-bit dual-components in each element, consumes altogether 61.4 mW and in particular only 11.9 mW during the reconfigurable KNN classification (at 45.58 MHz and 1.8 V).

  20. Deep Trek Re-configurable Processor for Data Acquisition (RPDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme; Michael Johnson

    2009-06-30

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop a high-temperature Re-configurable Processor for Data Acquisition (RPDA). The RPDA development has incorporated multiple high-temperature (225C) electronic components within a compact co-fired ceramic Multi-Chip-Module (MCM) package. This assembly is suitable for use in down-hole oil and gas applications. The RPDA module is programmable to support a wide range of functionality. Specifically this project has demonstrated functional integrity of the RPDA package and internal components, as well as functional integrity of the RPDA configured to operate as a Multi-Channel Data Acquisition Controller. This report reviews the design considerations, electrical hardware design, MCM package design, considerations for manufacturing assembly, test and screening, and results from prototype assembly and characterization testing.

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  2. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  3. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  4. Environmental Assessment for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Finney County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    n /a

    2003-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide partial funding to the Sunflower Electric Power Corporation (Sunflower), to demonstrate the commercial application of Low-NO{sub x} Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve NO{sub x} emission reduction to the level of 0.15 to 0.22 pounds per million British thermal units (lb/MM Btu). The proposed project station is Sunflower's 360 MW coal-fired generation station, Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station). The station, fueled by coal from Wyoming's Powder River Basin, is located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The period of performance is expected to last approximately 2 years. The Holcomb Station, Sunflower LNB/SOFA integrated system would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO{sub x} control technologies. Once modified, the station would demonstrate that a unit equipped with an existing low-NO{sub x} burner system can be retrofitted with a new separated over-fire air (SOFA) system, coal flow measurement and control, and enhanced combustion monitoring to achieve about 45 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The proposed project would demonstrate a technology alternative to Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems. While SCR does generally achieve high reductions in NO{sub x} emissions (from about 0.8 lb/MM to 0.12 lb/MM Btu), it does so at higher capital and operating cost, requires the extensive use of critical construction labor, requires longer periods of unit outage for deployment, and generally requires longer periods of time to complete shakedown and full-scale operation. Cost of the proposed project technology would be on the order of 15-25 percent of that for SCR, with consequential benefits derived from reductions in construction manpower requirements and periods of power outages. This proposed technology demonstration would generally be applicable to boilers using opposed-wall burners

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student…

  6. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  7. SEPAC software configuration control plan and procedures, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    SEPAC Software Configuration Control Plan and Procedures are presented. The objective of the software configuration control is to establish the process for maintaining configuration control of the SEPAC software beginning with the baselining of SEPAC Flight Software Version 1 and encompass the integration and verification tests through Spacelab Level IV Integration. They are designed to provide a simplified but complete configuration control process. The intent is to require a minimum amount of paperwork but provide total traceability of SEPAC software.

  8. Refined conceptual model for the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents a refined geohydrologic and geochemical conceptual model of the host site (Hanford Reservation) for the Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) Expedited Response Action (ERA), based on the results from fiscal year 1992 site characterization activities. The ERA was initiated in December 1990 to minimize or stabilize CCl{sub 4} migration within the unsaturated (vadose) zone in the vicinity of three CCl{sub 4} disposal sites in the 200 West Area (216-Z-1A tile field, 216-Z-9 trench, and 216-Z-18 crib). Implementation of this ERA was based on concerns that CCl{sub 4} residing in the soils was continuing to spread to the groundwater and, if left unchecked, would significantly increase the area of groundwater contamination. A soil-vapor-extraction system began operating at the site in February 1992.

  9. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  17. Wind tunnel test of the 0.019 (2A configuration) jet plume space shuttle integrated vehicle in the ARC 9- by 7-foot unitary wind tunnel (IA12B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The wind tunnel test of the 0.019 jet plume space shuttle integrated vehicle in the Ames 9 ft by 7 ft unitary wind tunnel was conducted at Mach numbers of 1.55 and 2.0 over a Reynolds number range from 3.5 million to 4.1 million/ft. Data were obtained at angles of attack from minus 8 deg to plus 8 deg at 0 deg sideslip and at angles of sideslip from minus 9 deg to plus 8 deg at 0 deg angle of attack. The basic configuration tested was the 2A vehicle with the orbiter at 0 deg angle of incidence with respect to the external tank. The other deviations to the 2A configuration were the solid rocket motor shrouds, which were designed to vehicle '3' lines, and the tank nose, which consisted of the retro-package being removed and replaced by a 16.5 inch full scale radius nose.

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  1. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  2. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  3. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  4. The Habitat Demonstration Unit Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Grill, Tracy R.; Tri, Terry O.; Howe, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will describe an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) led multi-center Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Project. The HDU project is a "technology-pull" project that integrates technologies and innovations from numerous NASA centers. This project will be used to investigate and validate surface architectures, operations concepts, and requirements definition of various habitation concepts. The first habitation configuration this project will build and test is the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). This habitat configuration - the PEM - is based on the Constellation Architecture Scenario 12.1 concept of a vertically oriented habitat module. The HDU project will be tested as part of the 2010 Desert Research and Technologies Simulations (D-RATS) test objectives. The purpose of this project is to develop, integrate, test, and evaluate a habitat configuration in the context of the mission architectures and surface operation concepts. A multi-center approach will be leveraged to build, integrate, and test the PEM through a shared collaborative effort of multiple NASA centers. The HDU project is part of the strategic plan from the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Directorate Integration Office (DIO) and the Lunar Surface Systems Project Office (LSSPO) to test surface elements in a surface analog environment. The 2010 analog field test will include two Lunar Electric Rovers (LER) and the PEM among other surface demonstration elements. This paper will describe the overall objectives, its various habitat configurations, strategic plan, and technology integration as it pertains to the 2010 and 2011 field analog tests. To accomplish the development of the PEM from conception in June 2009 to rollout for operations in July 2010, the HDU project team is using a set of design standards to define the interfaces between the various systems of PEM and to the payloads, such as the Geology Lab, that those systems will support

  5. PIV Logon Configuration Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Glen Alan

    2016-03-04

    This document details the configurations and enhancements implemented to support the usage of federal Personal Identity Verification (PIV) Card for logon on unclassified networks. The guidance is a reference implementation of the configurations and enhancements deployed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Network and Infrastructure Engineering – Core Services (NIE-CS).

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first (useful as an introduction to kinetics) shows how the rate of a reaction is fast at first and then gradually decreases to zero when one reactant has been used up. The second is a gas density demonstration using 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  4. Great Lakes Demonstration 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Representatives from CG Districts 1, 5 , 13, and 17  Enbridge Pipeline, Co.  EPA  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  Observers (CG...distances from the vessel‟s hull. (Figure 5 ) In that configuration, the recovery hose and hydraulic lines dragged across the surface of the nearby...No. CG-D-08-12 2. Government Accession Number 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Great Lakes Demonstration 2 Final Report 5

  5. Apparatus and method for time-integrated, active sampling of contaminants in fluids demonstrated by monitoring of hexavalent chromium in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Roll, Isaac B; Driver, Erin M; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-06-15

    Annual U.S. expenditures of $2B for site characterization invite the development of new technologies to improve data quality while reducing costs and minimizing uncertainty in groundwater monitoring. This work presents a new instrument for time-integrated sampling of environmental fluids using in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE). The In Situ Sampler (IS2) is an automated submersible device capable of extracting dissolved contaminants from water (100s-1000smL) over extended periods (hours to weeks), retaining the analytes, and rejecting the processed fluid. A field demonstration of the IS2 revealed 28-day average concentration of hexavalent chromium in a shallow aquifer affected by tidal stresses via sampling of groundwater as both liquid and sorbed composite samples, each obtained in triplicate. In situ SPE exhibited 75±6% recovery and an 8-fold improvement in reporting limit. Relative to use of conventional methods (100%), beneficial characteristics of the device and method included minimal hazardous material generation (2%), transportation cost (10%), and associated carbon footprint (2%). The IS2 is compatible with commercial SPE resins and standard extraction methods, and has been certified for more general use (i.e., inorganics and organics) by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) of the U.S. Department of Defense.

  6. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

    2008-09-30

    In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW

  7. Protocols for configuring computation loops on a distributed multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Woei Lin; Chuan-lin Wu

    1983-01-01

    Protocols for configuring computation loops in a multiprocessing system are examined. Processing nodes are connected by a reconfigurable communication subnet using a multistage interconnection network. Configuration protocols are presented in terms of distributed algorithms such that processing nodes are configured in loop topologies. The configurability of loop topologies is first investigated. It is verified that the communication subnet can emulate loop distributed systems. It is also proven that multiple loops of various lengths can be configured in the distributed network. The technique demonstrated for configuring loop topologies can be used to configure other computation topologies. 6 references.

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  9. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  18. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  19. Compact Torsatron configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Dominguez, N.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V. E.; Lyon, J. F.; Cary, J. R.; Hanson, J. D.; Navarro, A. P.

    1987-09-01

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high BETA should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite BETA. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  1. Plant-wide control: eco-efficiency and control loop configuration.

    PubMed

    Munir, M T; Yu, W; Young, B R

    2013-01-01

    Since the eco-efficiency of all industrial processes/plants has become increasingly important, engineers need to find a way to integrate the control loop configuration and the measurements of eco-efficiency. A new measure of eco-efficiency, the exergy eco-efficiency factor, for control loop configuration, is proposed in this paper. The exergy eco-efficiency factor is based on the thermodynamic concept of exergy which can be used to analyse a process in terms of its efficiency associated with the control configuration. The combination of control pairing configuration techniques (such as the relative gain array, RGA and Niederlinski index, NI) and the proposed exergy eco-efficiency factor will guide the process designer to reach the optimal control design with low operational cost (i.e., energy consumption). The exergy eco-efficiency factor is implemented in the process simulation case study and the reliability of the proposed method is demonstrated by dynamic simulation results.

  2. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  12. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  13. Software Configuration Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes which are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, SMAP-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the concepts and practices of NASA in software assurance. Lower level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the Software Configuration Management Guidebook which describes software configuration management in a way that is compatible with practices in industry and at NASA Centers. Software configuration management is a key software development process, and is essential for doing software assurance.

  14. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  15. Intranet approach to the GTC configuration management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Alvaro

    1998-08-01

    Due to its size and complexity the GTC Project represents a challenge for configuration management. On the one hand there is a need to record and store the enormous amount of configuration documentation generated during the different phases of the project (technical specifications, engineering drawings, interface control documents, acceptance tests, etc.), so that it can be easily accessed on-line by an Project Office member. Moreover, this documentation has to be properly related to the different configuration elements and interfaces composing the GTC's Product Tree. On the other hand, the need arises to simplify all the configuration control procedures established by System Engineering and their associated work flow (document and baseline approval, configuration change requests and evaluation, approval or rejection of those changes, etc.). Intranet technology has proven to be an excellent and innovative tool for satisfying both needs in an integrated manner. This integrated philosophy of the GTC intranet application helps each member of the Project Office fulfill his or her own responsibilities, reduces paper work and minimizes errors. It also assists in locating and accessing any configuration information with a single tool (any standard Internet navigator) regardless of the original format of such information. This paper presents the main features of this intranet application, as well as the intended future extension to other management disciplines (project management, quality management, etc.).

  16. Electronically configured battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  17. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  18. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  19. Shuttle Liquid Fly Back Booster Configuration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Thomas J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys the basic configuration options available to a Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB), integrated with the Space Shuttle system. The background of the development of the LFBB concept is given. The influence of the main booster engine (BME) installations and the fly back engine (FBE) installation on the aerodynamic configurations are also discussed. Limits on the LFBB configuration design space imposed by the existing Shuttle flight and ground elements are also described. The objective of the paper is to put the constrains and design space for an LFBB in perspective. The object of the work is to define LFBB configurations that significantly improve safety, operability, reliability and performance of the Shuttle system and dramatically lower operations costs.

  20. Saturn IB Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 chart depicts the various mission configurations for the Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  1. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  2. Nuclear Shuttle Logistics Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This 1971 artist's concept shows the Nuclear Shuttle in both its lunar logistics configuraton and geosynchronous station configuration. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development persornel, the Nuclear Shuttle would deliver payloads to lunar orbits or other destinations then return to Earth orbit for refueling and additional missions.

  3. Modular tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report is concerned with the modular tokamak configuration, and presents information on the following topics: modularity; external vacuum boundary; vertical maintenance; combined reactor building/biological shield with totally remote maintenance; independent TF coils; minimum TF coil bore; saddle PF coils; and heat transport system in bore.

  4. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  5. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft[sup 3] of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a cold test pit'' that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 [times] 9 [times] 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub's proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed.

  6. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft{sup 3} of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a ``cold test pit`` that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 {times} 9 {times} 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub`s proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed.

  7. Proceedings of the Special Demonstration Workshop for Integrating Blind Children with Sighted Children into Ongoing Physical Education and Recreation Programs (Cleveland, Ohio, October 9-10, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boninger, Walter B., Ed.

    A special education workshop (Cleveland, Ohio, October 9-10, 1969) for integrating blind children with sighted children into ongoing physical education and recreation programs is described. Physical education and blind children from the viewpoint of opthalmology, social and psychological aspects of blindness as they relate to participation in…

  8. Demonstration of a Sub-Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuit (S-MMIC) using InP HEMT with a 35-nm Gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, W. R.; Din, S.; Padilla, J.; Radisic, V.; Mei, G.; Yoshida, W.; Liu, P. S.; Uyeda, J.; Barsky, M.; Gaier, T.; Fung, A.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Lai, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present two single stage MMIC amplifiers with the first demonstrating a measured S21 gain of 3-dB at 280-GHz and the second demonstrating 2.5-dB gain at 300- GHz, which is the threshold of the sub-millimeter wave regime. The high-frequency operation is enabled by a high-speed InP HEMT with a 35-nm gate. This is the first demonstrated S21 gain at sub-millimeter wave frequencies in a MMIC.

  9. Dynamic Airspace Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In air traffic management systems, airspace is partitioned into regions in part to distribute the tasks associated with managing air traffic among different systems and people. These regions, as well as the systems and people allocated to each, are changed dynamically so that air traffic can be safely and efficiently managed. It is expected that new air traffic control systems will enable greater flexibility in how airspace is partitioned and how resources are allocated to airspace regions. In this talk, I will begin by providing an overview of some previous work and open questions in Dynamic Airspace Configuration research, which is concerned with how to partition airspace and assign resources to regions of airspace. For example, I will introduce airspace partitioning algorithms based on clustering, integer programming optimization, and computational geometry. I will conclude by discussing the development of a tablet-based tool that is intended to help air traffic controller supervisors configure airspace and controllers in current operations.

  10. Versatile composite amplifier configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gift, Stephan J. G.; Maundy, Brent

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a versatile composite amplifier in which a current feedback amplifier (CFA) drives an operational amplifier (OPA). In the conventional OPA-CFA composite amplifier, an OPA drives a CFA resulting in a composite structure that combines the DC input stability of the OPA and the high speed capability of the CFA. The proposed composite configuration combines different features of the CFA and OPA, specifically the constant bandwidth property of the CFA and the high power and high current output capacity of the OPA. The new circuit is easily implemented in the standard inverting and non-inverting configurations using commercially available devices, and the accuracy and constant bandwidth features were experimentally verified. Local feedback around the associated CFA ensures that the proposed composite amplifier possesses a higher level of bandwidth constancy than a single CFA.

  11. Fuel cell system configurations

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Cyphers, Joseph A.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel cell stack configurations having elongated polygonal cross-sectional shapes and gaskets at the peripheral faces to which flow manifolds are sealingly affixed. Process channels convey a fuel and an oxidant through longer channels, and a cooling fluid is conveyed through relatively shorter cooling passages. The polygonal structure preferably includes at least two right angles, and the faces of the stack are arranged in opposite parallel pairs.

  12. Flexible heliac configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Cantrell, J.L.; Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Morris, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    The addition of an l = 1 helical winding to the heliac central conductor adds a significant degree of flexibility to the configuration by making it possible to control the rotational transform and shear. Such control is essential for an experiment because the presence of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile can cause breakup of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. The use of the additional winding also permits reduction of the total central conductor current and can deepen the magnetic well.

  13. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  14. Aquarius Main Structure Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eremenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D Observatory is a joint US-Argentine mission to map the salinity at the ocean surface. This information is critical to improving our understanding of two major components of Earth's climate system - the water cycle and ocean circulation. By measuring ocean salinity from space, the Aquarius/SAC-D Mission will provide new insights into how the massive natural exchange of freshwater between the ocean, atmosphere and sea ice influences ocean circulation, weather and climate. Aquarius is the primary instrument on the SAC-D spacecraft. It consists of a Passive Microwave Radiometer to detect the surface emission that is used to obtain salinity and an Active Scatterometer to measure the ocean waves that affect the precision of the salinity measurement. The Aquarius Primary Structure houses instrument electronics, feed assemblies, and supports a deployable boom with a 2.5 m Reflector, and provides the structural interface to the SAC-D Spacecraft. The key challenge for the Aquarius main structure configuration is to satisfy the needs of component accommodations, ensuring that the instrument can meet all operational, pointing, environmental, and launch vehicle requirements. This paper describes the evolution of the Aquarius main structure configuration, the challenges of balancing the conflicting requirements, and the major configuration driving decisions and compromises.

  15. Experimental demonstration of an OpenFlow/PCE integrated control plane for IP over translucent WSON with the assistance of a per-request-based dynamic topology server.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Casellas, Ramon; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Morita, Itsuro; Martínez, Ricardo; Muñoz, Raül

    2013-02-25

    To mitigate the potential scalability issues of an OpenFlow-based control plane, a seamless OpenFlow and Path Computation Element (PCE) integrated control plane is proposed, by means of an architecture in which the path computation function is formally decoupled from the controller so the controller can off-load the task to one or more dedicated PCEs using an open and standard interface and protocol, and where the PCE obtains its topology database by means of a dedicated dynamic topology server, which is accessed by the PCE on a per-request basis. The overall feasibility and performance metrics of this integrated control plane are experimentally verified and quantitatively evaluated on a real IP over translucent Wavelength Switched Optical Network (WSON) testbed.

  16. A new type of porous graphite foams and their integrated composites with oxide/polymer core/shell nanowires for supercapacitors: structural design, fabrication, and full supercapacitor demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinhui; Chao, Dongliang; Fan, Zhanxi; Guan, Cao; Cao, Xiehong; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-03-12

    We attempt to meet the general design requirements for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes by combining the strategies of lightweight substrate, porous nanostructure design, and conductivity modification. We fabricate a new type of 3D porous and thin graphite foams (GF) and use as the light and conductive substrates for the growth of metal oxide core/shell nanowire arrays to form integrated electrodes. The nanowire core is Co3O4, and the shell is a composite of conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT) and metal oxide (MnO2). To show the advantage of this integrated electrode design (viz., GF + Co3O4/PEDOT-MnO2 core/shell nanowire arrays), three other different less-integrated electrodes are also prepared for comparison. Full supercapacitor devices based on the GF + Co3O4/PEDOT-MnO2 as positive electrodes exhibit the best performance compared to other three counterparts due to an optimal design of structure and a synergistic effect.

  17. X-43C Flight Demonstrator Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    The X-43C Flight Demonstrator Project is a joint NASA-USAF hypersonic propulsion technology flight demonstration project that will expand the hypersonic flight envelope for air-breathing engines. The Project will demonstrate sustained accelerating flight through three flights of expendable X-43C Demonstrator Vehicles (DVs). The approximately 16-foot long X-43C DV will be boosted to the starting test conditions, separate from the booster, and accelerate from Mach 5 to Mach 7 under its own power and autonomous control. The DVs will be powered by a liquid hydrocarbon-fueled, fuel-cooled, dual-mode, airframe integrated scramjet engine system developed under the USAF HyTech Program. The Project is managed by NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program. Flight tests will be conducted by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center off the coast of California over water in the Pacific Test Range. The NASA/USAF/industry project is a natural extension of the Hyper-X Program (X-43A), which will demonstrate short duration (approximately 10 seconds) gaseous hydrogen-fueled scramjet powered flight at Mach 7 and Mach 10 using a heavy-weight, largely heat sink construction, experimental engine. The X-43C Project will demonstrate sustained accelerating flight from Mach 5 to Mach 7 (approximately 4 minutes) using a flight-weight, fuel-cooled, scramjet engine powered by much denser liquid hydrocarbon fuel. The X-43C DV design flows from integrating USAF HyTech developed engine technologies with a NASA Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle accelerator-class configuration and Hyper-X heritage vehicle systems designs. This paper describes the X-43C Project and provides the background for NASA's current hypersonic flight demonstration efforts.

  18. Analysis of conventional and asymmetric aircraft configurations using CEASIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Thomas S.; McFarlane, Cormac; Isikveren, Askin; Badcock, Ken; Da Ronch, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    One of the main drivers behind the SimSAC project and the CEASIOM software is to bring stability analysis and control system design earlier into the aircraft conceptual design process. Within this paper two very different aircraft are considered, a conventional T-tail based on the existing EA500 Very Light Jet and the second, a novel Z-wing configuration known as the GAV or general aviation vehicle. The first aircraft serves as a baseline comparison for the second, and the cruise case is considered as a benchmark for identifying potential drag reductions and aircraft stability characteristics. CEASIOM, the Computerised Environment for Aircraft Synthesis and Integrated Optimisation Methods, is used to generate aerodynamic data sets for both aircraft, create trim conditions and the associated linear models for classical stability analysis. The open-loop Z-wing configuration is shown to display both highly unstable and coupled modes before a multivariable Stability Augmentation System (SAS) is applied both to decouple and stabilise the aircraft. Within this paper, these two aircraft provide a test case with which to demonstrate the capabilities of the CEASIOM environment and the tools which have been developed during the SimSAC project. This new software suite is shown to allow conceptual development of unconventional novel configurations from mass properties through adaptive-fidelity aerodynamics to linear analysis and control system design.

  19. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 1, Final report: Final report text data in tabular form, Disk 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of ground water and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade trichlorethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated aquifer and adjacent vadose zone. The principle carbon/energy source nutrient used in this demonstration was methane (natural gas). In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency, safety, and public and regulatory acceptability. This report describes the preliminary results of the demonstration and provides conclusions only for those measures that the Bioremediation Technical Support Group felt were so overwhelmingly convincing that they do not require further analyses. Though this report is necessarily superficial it does intend to provide a basis for further evaluating the technology and for practitioners to immediately apply some parts of the technology.

  20. Improved Interference configuration for structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houkai; Wei, Shibiao; Wu, Xiaojing; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yuquan; Du, Luping; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved structured illumination configuration for structured illumination microscopy (SIM) based on spatial light modulator. Precise phase shifts and rotation of illumination fringes can be dynamically controlled using a spatial light modulator. The method is different from the conventional illumination configuration that are based on interference of ±1 diffractive order light. The experimental setup requires less optical elements making it compact, reliable, and suitable for integration. The method has been applied in the standing-wave total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy. High lateral resolution of sub-100 nm was achieved in single directional resolution enhancement experiments.

  1. Experimental demonstration of monolithically integrated 16 channel DFB laser array fabricated by nanoimprint lithography with AWG multiplexer and SOA for WDM-PON application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianyi; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Xiaodong; Cao, Mingde; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wen

    2015-03-01

    A 16-channel monolithically integrated distributed feedback (DFB) laser array with arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) multiplexer and semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has been fabricated using nanoimprint technology. Selective lasing wavelength with 200 GHz frequency space has been obtained. The typical threshold current is between 20 mA and 30 mA. The output power is higher than 1 mW with 350 mA current in SOA. The side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of the spectrum is better than 40 dB.

  2. Autonomous, In-Flight Crew Health Risk Management for Exploration-Class Missions: Leveraging the Integrated Medical Model for the Exploration Medical System Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, D. J.; Kerstman, E.; Saile, L.; Myers, J.; Walton, M.; Lopez, V.; McGrath, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) captures organizational knowledge across the space medicine, training, operations, engineering, and research domains. IMM uses this knowledge in the context of a mission and crew profile to forecast risks to crew health and mission success. The IMM establishes a quantified, statistical relationship among medical conditions, risk factors, available medical resources, and crew health and mission outcomes. These relationships may provide an appropriate foundation for developing an in-flight medical decision support tool that helps optimize the use of medical resources and assists in overall crew health management by an autonomous crew with extremely limited interactions with ground support personnel and no chance of resupply.

  3. Lawrence Children's Health Project/EPSDT. A Proposal to Integrate Health and Special Education Services for Children in a School-Based Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrimack Education Center, Chelmsford, MA.

    This final report describes the Lawrence Children's Health Project (LCHP), set up in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1979, in order to demonstrate and evaluate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of an interagency approach to providing health care to children through a school-based local resource network. The LCHP service delivery is said to have…

  4. GSC configuration management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward

    1990-01-01

    The tools and methods used for the configuration management of the artifacts (including software and documentation) associated with the Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project are described. The GCS project is part of a software error studies research program. Three implementations of GCS are being produced in order to study the fundamental characteristics of the software failure process. The Code Management System (CMS) is used to track and retrieve versions of the documentation and software. Application of the CMS for this project is described and the numbering scheme is delineated for the versions of the project artifacts.

  5. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  6. The satellite configuration of satellite-TV navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu-Ping

    2001-02-01

    The positioning accuracy and availability of navigation system are affected directly by the quality of satellite configuration. The possible satellite configurations for satellite-TV navigation system are discussed and estimated in this paper. The results show that a well setted configuration or a resonable integration of satellite-TV navigation system and Chinese Loran-C will improve the positioning accuracy and availability of the system.

  7. Servicers system demonstration plan and capability development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulboaca, M. A.; Cuseo, J. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Maples, R. W.; Reynolds, P. C.; Sterrett, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A plan for the demonstration of the exchange of Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) modules using the servicer mechanism Engineering Test Unit (ETU) was prepared and executed. The plan included: establishment of requirements, conceptual design, selection of MMS spacecraft mockup configuration, selection of MMS module mockup configuration, evaluation of adequacy of ETU load capability, and selection of a stowage rack arrangement. The MMS module exchange demonstration mockup equipment was designed, fabricated, checked out, shipped, installed, and demonstrated.

  8. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    OpenMDAO is an open-source MDAO framework. It is used to develop an integrated analysis and design environment for engineering challenges. This Phase II project integrated additional modules and design tools into OpenMDAO to perform discipline-specific analysis across multiple flight regimes at varying levels of fidelity. It also showcased a refined system architecture that allows the system to be less customized to a specific configuration (i.e., system and configuration separation). By delivering a capable and validated MDAO system along with a set of example applications to be used as a template for future users, this work greatly expands NASA's high-fidelity, physics-based MDAO capabilities and enables the design of revolutionary vehicles in a cost-effective manner. This proposed work complements M4 Engineering's expertise in developing modeling and simulation toolsets that solve relevant subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic demonstration applications.

  9. SIM Configuration Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Kim M.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10 m baseline Michelson interferometer. Planned for launch in 2005 aboard a Delta III launch vehicle, or equivalent, its primary objective is to measure the positions of stars and other celestial objects with an unprecedented accuracy of 4 micro arc seconds. With such an instrument, tremendous advancement can be expected in our understanding of stellar and galactic dynamics. Using triangulation from opposite sides of the orbit around the sun (i.e. by using parallax) one can measure the distance to any observable object in our galaxy. By directly measuring the orbital wobble of nearby stars, the mass and orbit of planets can be determined over a wide range of parameters. The distribution of velocity within nearby galaxies will be measurable. Observations of these and other objects will improve the calibration of distance estimators by more than an order of magnitude. This will permit a much better determination of the Hubble Constant as well as improving our overall understanding of the evolution of the universe. SIM has undergone several transformations, especially over the past year and a half since the start of Phase A. During this phase of a project, it is desirable to perform system-level trade studies, so the substantial evolution of the design that has occurred is quite appropriate. Part of the trade-off process has addressed two major underlying architectures: SIM Classic; and Son of SIM. The difference between these two architectures is related to the overall arrangement of the optical elements and the associated metrology system. Several different configurations have been developed for each architecture. Each configuration is the result of design choices that are influenced by many competing considerations. Some of the more important aspects will be discussed. The Space Interferometry Mission has some extremely challenging goals: millikelvin thermal stability, nanometer stabilization of optics

  10. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  11. Correlation of ground tests and analyses of a dynamically scaled Space Station model configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Edighoffer, Harold H.; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1993-01-01

    Verification of analytical models through correlation with ground test results of a complex space truss structure is demonstrated. A multi-component, dynamically scaled space station model configuration is the focus structure for this work. Previously established test/analysis correlation procedures are used to develop improved component analytical models. Integrated system analytical models, consisting of updated component analytical models, are compared with modal test results to establish the accuracy of system-level dynamic predictions. Design sensitivity model updating methods are shown to be effective for providing improved component analytical models. Also, the effects of component model accuracy and interface modeling fidelity on the accuracy of integrated model predictions is examined.

  12. Correlation of ground tests and analyses of a dynamically scaled space station model configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Edighoffer, Harold H.; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1993-01-01

    Verification of analytical models through correlation with ground test results of a complex space truss structure is demonstrated. A multi-component, dynamically scaled space station model configuration is the focus structure for this work. Previously established test/analysis correlation procedures are used to develop improved component analytical models. Integrated system analytical models, consisting of updated component analytical models, are compared with modal test results to establish the accuracy of system-level dynamic predictions. Design sensitivity model updating methods are shown to be effective for providing improved component analytical models. Also, the effects of component model accuracy and interface modeling fidelity on the accuracy of integrated model predictions is examined.

  13. Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Cornelius, Harold; Hickling, Ron; Brooks, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Emerging test instrumentation and test scenarios increasingly require network communication to manage complexity. Adapting wireless communication infrastructure to accommodate challenging testing needs can benefit from reconfigurable radio technology. A fundamental requirement for a software-definable radio system is independence from carrier frequencies, one of the radio components that to date has seen only limited progress toward programmability. This paper overviews an ongoing project to validate the viability of a promising chipset that performs conversion of radio frequency (RF) signals directly into digital data for the wireless receiver and, for the transmitter, converts digital data into RF signals. The Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver (SCMT) enables four transmitters and four receivers in a single unit the size of a commodity disk drive, programmable for any frequency band between 1 MHz and 6 GHz.

  14. Inductrack magnet configuration

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-10-14

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track of windings is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  15. Inductrack magnet configuration

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2003-12-16

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track of windings is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  16. Power converter connection configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2008-11-11

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  17. Demonstration of the iodine and NO/sub x/ removal systems in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated equipment test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.E.; Jubin, R.T.

    1987-03-01

    This report summarizes the findings from three sets of experiments on iodine and NO/sub x/ removal performance using dual downdraft condensers in the dissolver off-gas line. The initial experiments were conducted in the laboratory using glassware in proof-of-principle tests. Two additional sets of condenser experiments were conducted using equipment prototyical for a 0.5-t/d plant in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report also describes the NO/sub x/ removal performance of a packed scrubber in the IET during the dissolution of depleted uranium oxides. The overall iodine pass-through efficiency of the condensers in the IET was high as desired. Removal efficiencies ranged from only 0.35 to 6.29%, indicating that the bulk of the iodine in the off-gas will be transferred on through the condensers to the iodox process for final disposal rather than recycled to the dissolver. The optimum operating temperature for the first condenser was in the range of 50 to 70/sup 0/C, with the temperature of the second condenser held near 20/sup 0/C. The NO/sub x/ removal performance of the combined dual condensers and packed scrubber resulted in effluent off-gas stream NO/sub x/ compositions of approx.0.4 to 1.0%, which are acceptable levels for the iodox process. The NO/sub x/ removal efficiency of the condensers ranged from approx.5 to 58%, but was generally around 20%. The removal efficiency of the packed tower scrubber was observed to be in the range of 40 to 60%. The NO/sub x/ removal performance of the condensers tended to complement the performance of the scrubber in that the condenser removal afficiency was high when the scrubber efficiency was low and vice versa.

  18. The demonstration of a novel sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process: sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification, and nitrification integrated (SANI®) biological nitrogen removal process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wu, Di; Jiang, Feng; Ekama, George A; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2012-11-01

    Saline water supply has been successfully practiced for toilet flushing in Hong Kong since 1950s, which saves 22% of freshwater in Hong Kong. In order to extend the benefits of saline water supply into saline sewage management, we have recently developed a novel biological organics and nitrogen removal process: the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification, and Nitrification Integrated (SANI®) process. The key features of this novel process include elimination of oxygen demand in organic matter removal and production of minimal sludge. Following the success of a 500-day lab-scale trial, this study reports a pilot scale evaluation of this novel process treating 10 m(3) /day of 6-mm screened saline sewage in Hong Kong. The SANI® pilot plant consisted of a sulfate reduction up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) reactor, an anoxic bioreactor for autotrophic denitrification and an aerobic bioreactor for nitrification. The plant was operated at a steady state for 225 days, during which the average removal efficiencies of both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total suspended solids (TSS) at 87% and no excess sludge was purposefully withdrawn. Furthermore, a tracer test revealed 5% short circuit flow and a 34.6% dead zone in the SRUSB, indicating a good possibility to further optimize the treatment capacity of the process for full-scale application. Compared with conventional biological nitrogen removal processes, the SANI® process reduces 90% of waste sludge, which saves 35% of the energy and reduces 36% of fossil CO(2) emission. The SANI® process not only eliminates the major odor sources originating from primary treatment and subsequent sludge treatment and disposal during secondary saline sewage treatment, but also promotes saline water supply as an economic and sustainable solution for water scarcity and sewage treatment in water-scarce coastal areas.

  19. How Configural Is the Configural Superiority Effect? A Neuroimaging Investigation of Emergent Features in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fox, Olivia M; Harel, Assaf; Bennett, Kevin B

    2017-01-01

    The perception of a visual stimulus is dependent not only upon local features, but also on the arrangement of those features. When stimulus features are perceptually well organized (e.g., symmetric or parallel), a global configuration with a high degree of salience emerges from the interactions between these features, often referred to as emergent features. Emergent features can be demonstrated in the Configural Superiority Effect (CSE): presenting a stimulus within an organized context relative to its presentation in a disarranged one results in better performance. Prior neuroimaging work on the perception of emergent features regards the CSE as an "all or none" phenomenon, focusing on the contrast between configural and non-configural stimuli. However, it is still not clear how emergent features are processed between these two endpoints. The current study examined the extent to which behavioral and neuroimaging markers of emergent features are responsive to the degree of configurality in visual displays. Subjects were tasked with reporting the anomalous quadrant in a visual search task while being scanned. Degree of configurality was manipulated by incrementally varying the rotational angle of low-level features within the stimulus arrays. Behaviorally, we observed faster response times with increasing levels of configurality. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increases in response magnitude across multiple visual areas in occipito-temporal cortex, primarily early visual cortex and object-selective cortex. Our findings suggest that the neural correlates of emergent features can be observed even in response to stimuli that are not fully configural, and demonstrate that configural information is already present at early stages of the visual hierarchy.

  20. How Configural Is the Configural Superiority Effect? A Neuroimaging Investigation of Emergent Features in Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Olivia M.; Harel, Assaf; Bennett, Kevin B.

    2017-01-01

    The perception of a visual stimulus is dependent not only upon local features, but also on the arrangement of those features. When stimulus features are perceptually well organized (e.g., symmetric or parallel), a global configuration with a high degree of salience emerges from the interactions between these features, often referred to as emergent features. Emergent features can be demonstrated in the Configural Superiority Effect (CSE): presenting a stimulus within an organized context relative to its presentation in a disarranged one results in better performance. Prior neuroimaging work on the perception of emergent features regards the CSE as an “all or none” phenomenon, focusing on the contrast between configural and non-configural stimuli. However, it is still not clear how emergent features are processed between these two endpoints. The current study examined the extent to which behavioral and neuroimaging markers of emergent features are responsive to the degree of configurality in visual displays. Subjects were tasked with reporting the anomalous quadrant in a visual search task while being scanned. Degree of configurality was manipulated by incrementally varying the rotational angle of low-level features within the stimulus arrays. Behaviorally, we observed faster response times with increasing levels of configurality. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increases in response magnitude across multiple visual areas in occipito-temporal cortex, primarily early visual cortex and object-selective cortex. Our findings suggest that the neural correlates of emergent features can be observed even in response to stimuli that are not fully configural, and demonstrate that configural information is already present at early stages of the visual hierarchy. PMID:28167924

  1. CFD Computations on Multi-GPU Configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sandeep; Perot, Blair

    2007-11-01

    Programmable graphics processors have shown favorable potential for use in practical CFD simulations -- often delivering a speed-up factor between 3 to 5 times over conventional CPUs. In recent times, most PCs are supplied with the option of installing multiple GPUs on a single motherboard, thereby providing the option of a parallel GPU configuration in a shared-memory paradigm. We demonstrate our implementation of an unstructured CFD solver using a set up which is configured to run two GPUs in parallel, and discuss its performance details.

  2. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a

  3. Expression of the mevalonate pathway enzymes in the Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) sex pheromone gland demonstrated by an integrated proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    González-Caballero, Natalia; Rodríguez-Vega, Andrés; Dias-Lopes, Geovane; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Valente, Richard H.; Brazil, Reginaldo P.; Cuervo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In Latin America, Lutzomyia longipalpis is the main vector of the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, which is the causal agent of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. This insect uses male-produced pheromones for mate recognition. Elucidation of pheromone biogenesis or its regulation may enable molecular strategies for mating disruption and, consequently, the vector's population management. Motivated by our recent results of the transcriptomic characterization of the L. longipalpis pheromone gland, we performed a proteomic analysis of this tissue combining SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry followed by an integrative data analysis. Considering that annotated genome sequences of this sand fly are not available, we designed an alternative workflow searching MS/MS data against two customized databases using three search engines: Mascot, OMSSA and ProLuCID. A total of 542 proteins were confidently characterized, 445 of them using a Uniref100-insect protein database, and 97 using a transcript translated database. In addition, use of PEAKS for de novo peptide sequencing of MS/MS data confirmed ∼90% identifications made with the combination of the three search engines. Our results include the identification of six of the seven enzymes of the mevalonate-pathway, plus the enzymes involved in sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis, all of which are proposed to be involved in pheromone production in L. longipalpis. Biological significance L. longipalpis is the main vector of the protozoan parasite L. infantum, which is the causal agent of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. One of the control measures of such disease is focused on vector population control. As this insect uses male-produced pheromones for mate recognition, the elucidation of pheromone biogenesis or its regulating process may enable molecular strategies for mating disruption and, consequently, this vector's population management. On this regard, in this manuscript we report expression evidence, at the protein level, of

  4. A 28-day rat inhalation study with an integrated molecular toxicology endpoint demonstrates reduced exposure effects for a prototypic modified risk tobacco product compared with conventional cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Kogel, Ulrike; Schlage, Walter K; Martin, Florian; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Leroy, Patrice; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Gebel, Stephan; Buettner, Ansgar; Wyss, Christoph; Esposito, Marco; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-06-01

    Towards a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, we investigated molecular perturbations accompanying histopathological changes in a 28-day rat inhalation study combining transcriptomics with classical histopathology. We demonstrated reduced biological activity of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP) compared with the reference research cigarette 3R4F. Rats were exposed to filtered air or to three concentrations of mainstream smoke (MS) from 3R4F, or to a high concentration of MS from a pMRTP. Histopathology revealed concentration-dependent changes in response to 3R4F that were irritative stress-related in nasal and bronchial epithelium, and inflammation-related in the lung parenchyma. For pMRTP, significant changes were seen in the nasal epithelium only. Transcriptomics data were obtained from nasal and bronchial epithelium and lung parenchyma. Concentration-dependent gene expression changes were observed following 3R4F exposure, with much smaller changes for pMRTP. A computational-modeling approach based on causal models of tissue-specific biological networks identified cell stress, inflammation, proliferation, and senescence as the most perturbed molecular mechanisms. These perturbations correlated with histopathological observations. Only weak perturbations were observed for pMRTP. In conclusion, a correlative evaluation of classical histopathology together with gene expression-based computational network models may facilitate a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, as shown for a pMRTP.

  5. Incremental full configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Paul M.

    2017-03-01

    The incremental expansion provides a polynomial scaling method for computing electronic correlation energies. This article details a new algorithm and implementation for the incremental expansion of full configuration interaction (FCI), called iFCI. By dividing the problem into n-body interaction terms, accurate correlation energies can be recovered at low n in a highly parallel computation. Additionally, relatively low-cost approximations are possible in iFCI by solving for each incremental energy to within a specified threshold. Herein, systematic tests show that FCI-quality energies can be asymptotically reached for cases where dynamic correlation is dominant as well as where static correlation is vital. To further reduce computational costs and allow iFCI to reach larger systems, a select-CI approach (heat-bath CI) requiring two parameters is incorporated. Finally, iFCI provides the first estimate of FCI energies for hexatriene with a polarized double zeta basis set, which has 32 electrons correlated in 118 orbitals, corresponding to a FCI dimension of over 1038.

  6. Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex 3D High-Lift Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    The application of an unstructured grid methodology on a three-dimensional high-lift configuration is presented. The focus of this paper is on the grid generation aspect of an integrated effort for the development of an unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capability at the NASA Langley Research Center. The meshing approach is based on tetrahedral grids generated by the advancing-front and the advancing-layers procedures. The capability of the method for solving high-lift problems is demonstrated on an aircraft model referred to as the energy efficient transport configuration. The grid generation issues, including the pros and cons of the present approach, are discussed in relation to the high-lift problems. Limited viscous flow results are presented to demonstrate the viability of the generated grids. A corresponding Navier-Stokes solution capability, along with further computations on the present grid, is presented in a companion SAE paper.

  7. Launch Vehicle Demonstrator Using Shuttle Assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan D.; Water, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) has the leading role for NASA s preliminary conceptual launch vehicle design and performance analysis. Over the past several years the ACO Earth-to-Orbit Team has evaluated thousands of launch vehicle concept variations for a multitude of studies including agency-wide efforts such as the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), Constellation, Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), Heavy Lift Propulsion Technology (HLPT), Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT), and Space Launch System (SLS). NASA plans to continue human space exploration and space station utilization. Launch vehicles used for heavy lift cargo and crew will be needed. One of the current leading concepts for future heavy lift capability is an inline one and a half stage concept using solid rocket boosters (SRB) and based on current Shuttle technology and elements. Potentially, the quickest and most cost-effective path towards an operational vehicle of this configuration is to make use of a demonstrator vehicle fabricated from existing shuttle assets and relying upon the existing STS launch infrastructure. Such a demonstrator would yield valuable proof-of-concept data and would provide a working test platform allowing for validated systems integration. Using shuttle hardware such as existing RS-25D engines and partial MPS, propellant tanks derived from the External Tank (ET) design and tooling, and four-segment SRB s could reduce the associated upfront development costs and schedule when compared to a concept that would rely on new propulsion technology and engine designs. There are potentially several other additional benefits to this demonstrator concept. Since a concept of this type would be based on man-rated flight proven hardware components, this demonstrator has the potential to evolve into the first iteration of heavy lift crew or cargo and serve as a baseline for block upgrades. This vehicle could also serve as a demonstration

  8. Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shank, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) was to show, in a simulated spacecraft environment, the feasibility of using a microprocessor to automate the onboard orbit determination functions. The software and hardware configuration used to support FEDS during the demonstration and the results of the demonstration are discussed.

  9. Three Studies on Configural Face Processing by Chimpanzees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Lisa A.; Heintz, Matthew; Akamagwuna, Unoma

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of chimpanzees to facial configurations. Three studies further these findings by showing this sensitivity to be specific to second-order relational properties. In humans, this type of configural processing requires prolonged experience and enables subordinate-level discriminations of many…

  10. The guidance of spatial attention during visual search for color combinations and color configurations.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Nick; Eimer, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Representations of target-defining features (attentional templates) guide the selection of target objects in visual search. We used behavioral and electrophysiological measures to investigate how such search templates control the allocation of attention in search tasks where targets are defined by the combination of 2 colors or by a specific spatial configuration of these colors. Target displays were preceded by spatially uninformative cue displays that contained items in 1 or both target-defining colors. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that, during search for color combinations, attention is initially allocated independently and in parallel to all objects with target-matching colors, but is then rapidly withdrawn from objects that only have 1 of the 2 target colors. In Experiment 3, targets were defined by a particular spatial configuration of 2 colors, and could be accompanied by nontarget objects with a different configuration of the same colors. Attentional guidance processes were unable to distinguish between these 2 types of objects. Both attracted attention equally when they appeared in a cue display, and both received parallel focal-attentional processing and were encoded into working memory when they were presented in the same target display. Results demonstrate that attention can be guided simultaneously by multiple features from the same dimension, but that these guidance processes have no access to the spatial-configural properties of target objects. They suggest that attentional templates do not represent target objects in an integrated pictorial fashion, but contain separate representations of target-defining features. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  12. Positronic molecule calculations using Monte Carlo configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Jeremy P.; Paterson, Martin J.

    2016-02-01

    We modify the Monte Carlo configuration interaction procedure to model atoms and molecules combined with a positron. We test this method with standard quantum chemistry basis sets on a number of positronic systems and compare results with the literature and full configuration interaction when appropriate. We consider positronium hydride, positronium hydroxide, lithium positride and a positron interacting with lithium, magnesium or lithium hydride. We demonstrate that we can capture much of the full configuration interaction results, but often require less than 10% of the configurations of these multireference wavefunctions. The effect of the number of frozen orbitals is also discussed.

  13. Integrated Maintenance Information System Diagnostic Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    more critical. Failure of on-board diagnostics to detect and isolate faults requires the technician to use troubleshooting tools external to the...aircraft. The IMIS-DM is one such tool (Cooke, Jernigan, Huntington, Myers, Gumienny, & Maiorana, 1990; Cooke, Jernigan, Myers, Maiorana, Link, & Mason...by mapping these parameters of the system under investigation. 7 Table i. Reachability Matrix Symptoms Fault Codes Symptom Rectification ( Machine

  14. Demonstrating Integrated Pest Management of Hot Peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of organic and synthetic chemical fertilizers on crop growth, yield and associated insect pests for two varieties of hot pepper, Capsicum chinense Jacquin (Solanaceae): “Scotch Bonnet” and “Caribbean Red” in north Florida. Hot peppers were grown under three treatments: poultr...

  15. DEMONSTRATING INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF HOT PEPPERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of organic and synthetic chemical fertilizers on crop growth, yield and associated insect pests for two varieties of hot pepper, Capsicum chinense Jacquin (Solanaceae): “Scotch Bonnet” and “Caribbean Red” in north Florida. Hot peppers were grown under three treatments: poultr...

  16. Renewable Hydrogen: Integration, Validation, and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.

    2008-07-01

    This paper is about producing hydrogen through the electrolysis of water and using the hydrogen in a fuel cell or internal combustion engine generator to produce electricity during times of peak demand, or as a transportation fuel.

  17. Configurational entropy of glueball states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Alex E.; Braga, Nelson R. F.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2017-02-01

    The configurational entropy of glueball states is calculated using a holographic description. Glueball states are represented by a supergravity dual picture, consisting of a 5-dimensional graviton-dilaton action of a dynamical holographic AdS/QCD model. The configurational entropy is studied as a function of the glueball spin and of the mass, providing information about the stability of the glueball states.

  18. Design of a holographic waveguide with L configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Guangxin-Xin; Li, Wen-Qiang

    2016-10-01

    In order to decrease the complexity to design and manufacture the turning grating of the configuration with one reflecting surface, an L-shape two-dimension extended configuration with single plate is given in the paper. This configuration consists of one specular reflecting surface and three holographic gratings two in which periods and the groove orientations are totally same, which makes gratings design and fabrication easier. According to the calculation and analysis to the optical path of configuration, the dimension of the turning grating is no larger than 40mm×30mm. The simulation result demonstrates the display configuration is reasonable and correct and can realize the display effect with 30°×30° field of view and Φ30mm large exit pupil. This configuration can be applied to an Augmented Reality Display (AR) or a Head-Mounted Display (HMD).

  19. A Moving Target Environment for Computer Configurations Using Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, Michael; Fulp, Errin W.

    2011-10-31

    Moving Target (MT) environments for computer systems provide security through diversity by changing various system properties that are explicitly defined in the computer configuration. Temporal diversity can be achieved by making periodic configuration changes; however in an infrastructure of multiple similarly purposed computers diversity must also be spatial, ensuring multiple computers do not simultaneously share the same configuration and potential vulnerabilities. Given the number of possible changes and their potential interdependencies discovering computer configurations that are secure, functional, and diverse is challenging. This paper describes how a Genetic Algorithm (GA) can be employed to find temporally and spatially diverse secure computer configurations. In the proposed approach a computer configuration is modeled as a chromosome, where an individual configuration setting is a trait or allele. The GA operates by combining multiple chromosomes (configurations) which are tested for feasibility and ranked based on performance which will be measured as resistance to attack. The result of successive iterations of the GA are secure configurations that are diverse due to the crossover and mutation processes. Simulations results will demonstrate this approach can provide at MT environment for a large infrastructure of similarly purposed computers by discovering temporally and spatially diverse secure configurations.

  20. Configurable Multi-Purpose Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencia, J. Emilio; Forney, Chirstopher; Morrison, Robert; Birr, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Advancements in technology have allowed the miniaturization of systems used in aerospace vehicles. This technology is driven by the need for next-generation systems that provide reliable, responsive, and cost-effective range operations while providing increased capabilities such as simultaneous mission support, increased launch trajectories, improved launch, and landing opportunities, etc. Leveraging the newest technologies, the command and telemetry processor (CTP) concept provides for a compact, flexible, and integrated solution for flight command and telemetry systems and range systems. The CTP is a relatively small circuit board that serves as a processing platform for high dynamic, high vibration environments. The CTP can be reconfigured and reprogrammed, allowing it to be adapted for many different applications. The design is centered around a configurable field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device that contains numerous logic cells that can be used to implement traditional integrated circuits. The FPGA contains two PowerPC processors running the Vx-Works real-time operating system and are used to execute software programs specific to each application. The CTP was designed and developed specifically to provide telemetry functions; namely, the command processing, telemetry processing, and GPS metric tracking of a flight vehicle. However, it can be used as a general-purpose processor board to perform numerous functions implemented in either hardware or software using the FPGA s processors and/or logic cells. Functionally, the CTP was designed for range safety applications where it would ultimately become part of a vehicle s flight termination system. Consequently, the major functions of the CTP are to perform the forward link command processing, GPS metric tracking, return link telemetry data processing, error detection and correction, data encryption/ decryption, and initiate flight termination action commands. Also, the CTP had to be designed to survive and

  1. NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Deep Space Habitat Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Gill, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) vertical cylinder habitat was established as a exploration habitat testbed platform for integration and testing of a variety of technologies and subsystems that will be required in a human-occupied planetary surface outpost or Deep Space Habitat (DSH). The HDU functioned as a medium-fidelity habitat prototype from 2010-2012 and allowed teams from all over NASA to collaborate on field analog missions, mission operations tests, and system integration tests to help shake out equipment and provide feedback for technology development cycles and crew training. This paper documents the final 2012 configuration of the HDU, and discusses some of the testing that took place. Though much of the higher-fidelity functionality has 'graduated' into other NASA programs, as of this writing the HDU, renamed Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA), will continue to be available as a volumetric and operational mockup for NASA Human Research Program (HRP) research from 2013 onward.

  2. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

  3. Context based configuration management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Yuri O. (Inventor); Gurram, Mohana M. (Inventor); Maluf, David A. (Inventor); Mederos, Luis A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based system for configuring and displaying information on changes in, and present status of, a collection of events associated with a project. Classes of icons for decision events, configurations and feedback mechanisms, and time lines (sequential and/or simultaneous) for related events are displayed. Metadata for each icon in each class is displayed by choosing and activating the corresponding icon. Access control (viewing, reading, writing, editing, deleting, etc.) is optionally imposed for metadata and other displayed information.

  4. Space Station reference configuration description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The data generated by the Space Station Program Skunk Works over a period of 4 months which supports the definition of a Space Station reference configuration is documented. The data were generated to meet these objectives: (1) provide a focal point for the definition and assessment of program requirements; (2) establish a basis for estimating program cost; and (3) define a reference configuration in sufficient detail to allow its inclusion in the definition phase Request for Proposal (RFP).

  5. Hierarchical Poly Tree Configurations for the Solution of Dynamically Refined Finte Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gute, G. D.; Padovan, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how a multilevel substructuring technique, called the Hierarchical Poly Tree (HPT), can be used to integrate a localized mesh refinement into the original finite element model more efficiently. The optimal HPT configurations for solving isoparametrically square h-, p-, and hp-extensions on single and multiprocessor computers is derived. In addition, the reduced number of stiffness matrix elements that must be stored when employing this type of solution strategy is quantified. Moreover, the HPT inherently provides localize 'error-trapping' and a logical, efficient means with which to isolate physically anomalous and analytically singular behavior.

  6. Santa Clara Demonstration Status

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

    1996-08-01

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales

  7. Application of advanced grid generation techniques for flow field computations about complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flowfields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct a boundary-fitted coordinate system. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach; its applications are investigated. The method conservative providing conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-stage Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed. The solutions include: low speed flow over a sphere, high speed flow over a slender body, supersonic flow through a duct, and supersonic internal/external flow interaction for an aircraft configuration at various angles of attack. The results demonstrate that the multiple grids approach along with the conservative interfacing is capable of computing the flows about the complex configurations where the use of a single grid system is not possible.

  8. Sustainable Supply Chain Design: A Configurational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Masoumik, S. Maryam; Raja Ghazilla, Raja Ariffin

    2014-01-01

    Designing the right supply chain that meets the requirements of sustainable development is a significant challenge. Although there are a considerable number of studies on issues relating to sustainable supply chain design (SSCD) in terms of designing the practices, processes, and structures, they have rarely demonstrated how these components can be aligned to form an effective sustainable supply chain (SSC). Considering this gap in the literature, this study adopts the configurational approach to develop a conceptual framework that could configure the components of a SSC. In this respect, a process-oriented approach is utilized to classify and harmonize the design components. A natural-resource-based view (NRBV) is adopted to determine the central theme to align the design components around. The proposed framework presents three types of SSC, namely, efficient SSC, innovative SSC, and reputed SSC. The study culminates with recommendations concerning the direction for future research. PMID:24523652

  9. Shaping light with split lens configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizana, A.; Vargas, A.; Turpin, A.; Ramirez, C.; Estevez, I.; Campos, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present an intuitive and versatile method that can dynamically generate 2D and 3D tailored light patterns. The light structures are generated by dynamically implementing discrete and continuous split lens configurations onto a spatial light modulator. These configurations can be dynamically modified by tuning a reduced number of control parameters with simple physical interpretation. We demonstrate the versatility of the method by experimentally implementing a wide number of structured beams, including optical lattices, a light cone, and vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum. Compared with other optical illuminators, the advantages of our method are its simple interpretation and control for creating the light structures, and that it is based on a robust, dynamic and easy-to-build optical set-up. The proposed method may be useful in a large number of applications, such as optical trapping, super-resolution imaging or illuminating arrays of photonic switching devices.

  10. Sustainable supply chain design: a configurational approach.

    PubMed

    Masoumik, S Maryam; Abdul-Rashid, Salwa Hanim; Olugu, Ezutah Udoncy; Raja Ghazilla, Raja Ariffin

    2014-01-01

    Designing the right supply chain that meets the requirements of sustainable development is a significant challenge. Although there are a considerable number of studies on issues relating to sustainable supply chain design (SSCD) in terms of designing the practices, processes, and structures, they have rarely demonstrated how these components can be aligned to form an effective sustainable supply chain (SSC). Considering this gap in the literature, this study adopts the configurational approach to develop a conceptual framework that could configure the components of a SSC. In this respect, a process-oriented approach is utilized to classify and harmonize the design components. A natural-resource-based view (NRBV) is adopted to determine the central theme to align the design components around. The proposed framework presents three types of SSC, namely, efficient SSC, innovative SSC, and reputed SSC. The study culminates with recommendations concerning the direction for future research.

  11. Perceptual separability of featural and configural information in congenital prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Kimchi, Ruth; Behrmann, Marlene; Avidan, Galia; Amishav, Rama

    2012-01-01

    The deficit in face recognition in individuals with prosopagnosia has often been attributed to an underlying impairment in holistic processing. Exactly what constitutes holistic processing has remained controversial, however. Here, we compare how configural information and featural information interact during face processing in a group of individuals with congenital prosopagnosia (CP) and matched controls. We adopted Amishav and Kimchi's version of Garner's speeded classification task, in which observers classify upright faces based on configural (intereyes and nose-mouth spacing) or featural (shape of eyes, nose, and mouth) information while the other dimension remains constant or varied randomly. We replicated the finding that normal observers evince symmetric Garner interference--failure to selectively attend to features without being influenced by irrelevant variation in configuration, and vice versa--indicating that featural and configural information are integral in normal face processing. In contrast, the CPs showed no Garner interference: They were able to attend to configural information without interference from irrelevant variation in featural information, and they were able to attend to featural information without interference from irrelevant variation in configural information. The absence of Garner interference in CP provides strong evidence that featural information and configural information are perceptually separable in CP's face processing. These findings indicate that CPs do not perceive faces holistically; rather, they process featural and configural information independently.

  12. An automated approach to configuration baseline documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, G.D.; Khan, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents Public Service Electric and Gas Company's (PSE and G's) automated approach to configuration base-line documentation (CBD) for Salem units 1 and 2 and Hope Creek. The CBD project is a proactive project, similar to what is commonly termed a design basis documentation program in the nuclear utility industry. The data information management system (DIMS) element of the CBD project is expected to automate the CBD development, review/approval, control, maintenance, and distribution of CBD and the subsequent integration of the CBD into the day-to-day design processes of PSE and G's nuclear engineering department. The DIMS project scope emphasizes streamlined, swift, and accurate design information retrieval system hardware and software; proper and controlled screening of stored design information; legible storage of design information; and more efficient and user-friendly information handling. This paper discusses the selection and implementation of an integrated optical imaging and textual search technology.

  13. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  14. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 3. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Tabulated data listings are included.

  15. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  16. MHD Equilibrium Configuration Reconstructions for HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhixiong; Dong, Jiaqi; He, Hongda; Jiang, Haibin; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Jinhua

    2011-08-01

    The EFIT (Equilibrium Fitting) code is modified for the equilibrium configuration reconstruction in HL-2A. Signals from Langmuir probe (LP) at the divertor target plates are employed in the reconstruction of divertor configurations. The results show that discharge #2895 starts with a limiter configuration and develops gradually into a divertor configuration after t = 230 ms. This transition process is clearly demonstrated by the LP signals for the reconstruction. The profiles of plasma parameters such as safety factor q, pressure and current density as well as the evolution of major shape parameters of plasma, such as the boundary magnetic fluxes, the positions of both x-point and magnetic axis, are calculated from the reconstructed configurations. The possibility to apply the method to the swing of strike point on the target plate is discussed.

  17. Configural response learning: the acquisition of a nonpredictive motor skill.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, Eliot; Aparicio, Paul; Weinstein, Andrea; Ivry, Richard B

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the representational nature of configural response learning using a task that required simultaneous keypresses with 2 or 3 fingers, similar to the production of chords on the piano. If the benefits of learning are related to the retrieval of individual stimulus-response mappings, performance should depend on the frequencies of the individual responses forming each chord. Alternatively, learning may involve the encoding of configural information concerning the relationship between the chord elements. In Experiment 1, training was restricted to a subset of the 120 possible 3-element chords. Probe blocks included the practiced chords, chords composed of novel configurations of practiced elements (reconfigured), and chords that contained a new element (new). Practiced chords were performed faster than reconfigured chords, indicating learning involves the encoding of configural information. Experiment 2 showed that learning was not restricted to configurations within each hand. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that learning was largely response based.

  18. Optimized configurations of autostable superconducting magnetic bearings for practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schoechlin, A.; Ritter, T.; Bornemann, H.J.

    1995-11-01

    In order to establish an optimized bearing design for a flywheel for energy storage, the authors have studied model bearing configurations involving bulk YBCO pellets and double-dipole magnet configurations. They were interested to see what is the correlation between the maximum attainable levitation force, measured for a typical bearing gap of 3 mm, and the separation between the magnetic poles. Equal polarity (north-north) and alternate polarity (north-south) configurations were investigated. The maximum levitation force was obtained with the alternate polarity arrangement for a separation between the magnetic poles of 6 mm. It represents an increase of 19% compared to a non-optimized configuration. The experiments demonstrate that configurations of superconducting magnetic bearings can be optimized to obtain better levitation properties.

  19. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Waverider-Derived Hypersonic Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Finley, Dennis B.

    1996-01-01

    An evaluation was made on the effects of integrating the required aircraft components with hypersonic high-lift configurations known as waveriders to create hypersonic cruise vehicles. Previous studies suggest that waveriders offer advantages in aerodynamic performance and propulsion/airframe integration (PAI) characteristics over conventional non-waverider hypersonic shapes. A wind-tunnel model was developed that integrates vehicle components, including canopies, engine components, and control surfaces, with two pure waverider shapes, both conical-flow-derived waveriders for a design Mach number of 4.0. Experimental data and limited computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions were obtained over a Mach number range of 1.6 to 4.63. The experimental data show the component build-up effects and the aerodynamic characteristics of the fully integrated configurations, including control surface effectiveness. The aerodynamic performance of the fully integrated configurations is not comparable to that of the pure waverider shapes, but is comparable to previously tested hypersonic models. Both configurations exhibit good lateral-directional stability characteristics.

  20. A satellite for demonstration of Panel Extension Satellite (PETSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yoshiki; Sahara, Hironori; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Greenland, Stephen; Morimoto, Takeshi; Koyama, Kanichi; Kobayashi, Chisato; Kikuchi, Hideaki; Okada, Takanori; Tanaka, Hidenori

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the current status, configuration, architecture, and key technologies of SOHLA-2, the demonstration mission of the PETSAT (Panel ExTension SATellite) concept. The PETSAT proposal is for a modular satellite consisting of any number of unfolding functional panels. These panels are designed around an open architecture and connected through standardized interfaces. The interfaces between panels incorporate a reliable "plug-in" format, such that when combined, the integrated system takes on the intended satellite function in a redundant and distributed manner. By combining the different panel types in any number and configuration, flexibility to mission requirements is achieved. Some panels for performing basic satellite functions will be available as commercial-off-the-shelf components, and others custom developed dependent on the mission. During launch these panels are stowed in a folded low volume configuration, which is then extended on-orbit, realizing a satellite with a large area for the mounting of solar arrays, mission systems, extensible booms, or any other components. SOHLA-2 is both a concept demonstration and a lightning detection mission in the VHF band. It weighs less than 50 kg and consists of six panels: communication, attitude control, propulsion, mission, experiment and bus function. The bus function panel is based on the successful Cubesat XI developed at the University of Tokyo and this acts as the manager of the technology demonstration aspects for the mission. By basing the architecture upon a proven technology, the reliability of the satellite is increased. It is intended that the satellite be launched in early 2008.

  1. A Modular Re-configurable Rover System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouloubasis, A.; McKee, G.; Active Robotics Lab

    design allows the MTR to lift, lower, roll or tilt its body. It also provides the ability to lift any of the legs by nearly 300mm, enhancing internal re-configurability and therefore rough terrain stability off the robotic vehicle. A modular software and control architecture will be used so that integration to, and operation through the MTR, of different Packs can be demonstrated. An on-board high-level controller [4] will communicate with a small network of micro-controllers through an RS485 bus. Additional processing power could be obtained through a Pack with equivalent or higher computational capabilities. 1 The nature of the system offers many opportunities for behavior based control. The control system must accommodate not only rover based behaviors like obstacle avoidance and vehicle stabilization, but also any additional behaviors that different Packs may introduce. The Ego-Behavior Architecture (EBA) [5] comprises a number of behaviors which operate autonomously and independent of each other. This facilitates the design and suits the operation of the MTR since it fulfills the need for uncomplicated assimilation of new behaviors in the existing architecture. Our work at the moment focuses on the design and construction of the mechanical and electronic systems for the MTR and an associated Pack. References [1] NASA, Human Exploration of Mars: The Reference Mission (Version 3.0 with June, 1998 Addendum) of the NASA Mars Exploration Study Team, Exploration Office, Advanced Development Office, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058, June, 1998. [2] A. Trebi-Ollennu, H Das Nayer, H Aghazarian, A ganino, P Pirjanian, B Kennedy, T Huntsberger and P Schenker, Mars Rover Pair Cooperatively Transporting a Long Payload, in Proceedings of the 2002 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2002, pp. 3136-3141. [3] A. K. Bouloubasis, G. T McKee, P. S. Schenker, A Behavior-Based Manipulator for Multi-Robot Transport Tasks, in proceedings of the

  2. A Modular Instrumentation System for NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Kennedy, Kriss; Yim, Hester; Wagner, Raymond S.; Hong, Todd; Studor, George; Delaune, Paul

    2010-01-01

    NASA's human spaceflight program is focused on developing technologies to expand the reaches of human exploration and science activities beyond low earth orbit. A critical aspect of living in space or on planetary surfaces is habitation, which provides a safe and comfortable space in which humans can live and work. NASA is seeking out the best option for habitation by exploring several different concepts through the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project. The purpose of this HDU is to develop a fully autonomous habitation system that enables human exploration of space. One critical feature of the HDU project that helps to accomplish its mission of autonomy is the instrumentation system that monitors key subsystems operating within a Habitat configuration. The following paper will discuss previous instrumentation systems used in analog habitat concepts and how the current instrumentation system being implemented on the HDU1-PEM, or pressurized excursion module, is building upon the lessons learned of those previous systems. Additionally, this paper will discuss the benefits and the limitations of implementing a wireless sensor network (WSN) as the basis for data transport in the instrumentation system. Finally, this paper will address the experiences and lessons learned with integration, testing prior to deployment, and field testing at the JSC rock yard. NASA is developing the HDU1-PEM as a step towards a fully autonomous habitation system that enables human exploration of space. To accomplish this purpose, the HDU project is focusing on development, integration, testing, and evaluation of habitation systems. The HDU will be used as a technology pull, testbed, and integration environment in which to advance NASA's understanding of alternative mission architectures, requirements, and operations concepts definition and validation. This project is a multi-year effort. In 2010, the HDU1-PEM will be in a pressurized excursion module configuration, and in 2011 the

  3. Turbulent optimization of toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Faber, B.; Lucia, M.; Rorvig, M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress in ‘turbulent optimization’ of toroidal configurations is described, using a method recently developed for evolving such configurations to ones having reduced turbulent transport. The method uses the GENE gyrokinetic code to compute the radial heat flux Qgk, and the STELLOPT optimization code with a theory-based ‘proxy’ figure of merit Qpr to stand in for Qgk for computational speed. Improved expressions for Qpr have been developed, involving further geometric quantities beyond those in the original proxy, which can also be used as ‘control knobs’ to reduce Qgk. Use of a global search algorithm has led to the discovery of turbulent-optimized configurations not found by the standard, local algorithm usually employed, as has use of a mapping capability which STELLOPT has been extended to provide, of figures of merit over the search space.

  4. Electronic Configuration of Yb Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Svane, A.; Strange, P.; Winter, H.; Delin, A.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.; Fast, L.; Wills, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    The total energy differences between divalent and trivalent configurations of Yb ions in a number of Yb compounds are studied. Two different band theoretical methods, which differ in the treatment of the localized f electrons, are used. The results show that in all Yb compounds the valence energy differences are equal to the energy needed to localize an f electron. These valence energy differences correlate with the number of f electrons hybridizing with the conduction bands in the trivalent configuration. For divalent YbS, the pressure induced f -electron delocalization implies an intermediate valency, as also indicated by experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  5. NASA HERMeS Hall Thruster Electrical Configuration Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight ready propulsion system. Part of the technology maturation was to test the TDU-1 thruster in several ground based electrical configurations to assess the thruster robustness and suitability to successful in-space operation. The ground based electrical configuration testing has recently been demonstrated as an important step in understanding and assessing how a Hall thruster may operate differently in space compared to ground based testing, and to determine the best configuration to conduct development and qualification testing. This presentation will cover the electrical configuration testing of the TDU-1 HERMeS Hall thruster in NASA Glenn Research Centers Vacuum Facility 5. The three electrical configurations examined are the thruster body tied to facility ground, thruster floating, and finally the thruster body electrically tied to cathode common. The TDU-1 HERMeS was configured with two different exit plane boundary conditions, dielectric and conducting, to examine the influence on the electrical configuration characterization.

  6. NASA HERMeS Hall Thruster Electrical Configuration Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight ready propulsion system. Part of the technology maturation was to test the TDU-1 thruster in several ground based electrical configurations to assess the thruster robustness and suitability to successful in-space operation. The ground based electrical configuration testing has recently been demonstrated as an important step in understanding and assessing how a Hall thruster may operate differently in-space compared to ground based testing, and to determine the best configuration to conduct development and qualification testing. This paper describes the electrical configuration testing of the HERMeS TDU-1 Hall thruster in NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The three electrical configurations examined were 1) thruster body tied to facility ground, 2) thruster floating, and 3) thruster body electrically tied to cathode common. The HERMeS TDU-1 Hall thruster was also configured with two different exit plane boundary conditions, dielectric and conducting, to examine the influence on the electrical configuration characterization.

  7. Space power demonstrator engine, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design, analysis, and preliminary test results for a 25 kWe Free-Piston Stirling engine with integral linear alternators are described. The project is conducted by Mechanical Technology under the direction of LeRC as part of the SP-100 Nuclear Space Power Systems Program. The engine/alternator system is designed to demonstrate the following performance: (1) 25 kWe output at a specific weight less than 8 kg/kW; (2) 25 percent efficiency at a temperature ratio of 2.0; (3) low vibration (amplitude less than .003 in); (4) internal gas bearings (no wear, no external pump); and (5) heater temperature/cooler temperature from 630 to 315 K. The design approach to minimize vibration is a two-module engine (12.5 kWe per module) in a linearly-opposed configuration with a common expansion space. The low specific weight is obtained at high helium pressure (150 bar) and high frequency (105 Hz) and by using high magnetic strength (samarium cobalt) alternator magnets. Engine tests began in June 1985; 16 months following initiation of engine and test cell design. Hydrotest and consequent engine testing to date has been intentionally limited to half pressure, and electrical power output is within 15 to 20 percent of design predictions.

  8. Operational benefits from the terminal configured vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. P.; Schmitz, R. A.; Clark, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle is a flying laboratory used to conduct research and development on improved airborne systems (including avionics) and operational flight procedures, with particular emphasis on utilization in the terminal area environment. The objectives of this technology development activity, focused on conventional transport aircraft, are to develop and demonstrate improvements which can lead to increased airport and runway capacity, increased air traffic controller productivity, energy efficient terminal area operations, reduced weather minima with safety, and reduced community noise by use of appropriate procedures. This paper discusses some early results of this activity in addition to defining present efforts and future research plans.

  9. Block-structured grids for complex aerodynamic configurations: Current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Parlette, Edward B.

    1995-01-01

    The status of CFD methods based on the use of block-structured grids for analyzing viscous flows over complex configurations is examined. The objective of the present study is to make a realistic assessment of the usability of such grids for routine computations typically encountered in the aerospace industry. It is recognized at the very outset that the total turnaround time, from the moment the configuration is identified until the computational results have been obtained and postprocessed, is more important than just the computational time. Pertinent examples will be cited to demonstrate the feasibility of solving flow over practical configurations of current interest on block-structured grids.

  10. Optimization Under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, J.; Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Zahle, F.

    2016-09-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  11. Optimization Under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, J.; Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Zahle, F.

    2016-10-03

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. Lastly, if there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  12. Optimization under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, Julian; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  13. JTAG-based remote configuration of FPGAs over optical fibers

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, B.; Xu, H.; Liu, C.; ...

    2015-01-28

    In this study, a remote FPGA-configuration method based on JTAG extension over optical fibers is presented. The method takes advantage of commercial components and ready-to-use software such as iMPACT and does not require any hardware or software development. The method combines the advantages of the slow remote JTAG configuration and the fast local flash memory configuration. The method has been verified successfully and used in the Demonstrator of Liquid-Argon Trigger Digitization Board (LTDB) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter Phase-I trigger upgrade. All components on the FPGA side are verified to meet the radiation tolerance requirements.

  14. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  15. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  16. Cold-air investigation of a 31/2-stage fan-drive turbine with a stage loading factor of 4 designed for an integral lift engine. 2: Performance of 2-, 3- and 3 1/2-stage configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The stage work distribution among the three stages was very close to the design value. The specific work output-mass flow characteristics of the three stages were closely matched. The efficiency of the 3 1/2 stage turbine at design specific work output and design speed was within 0.008 of the estimated value, and this agreement was felt to demonstrate the adequacy of the prediction method in the high stage loading factor regime.

  17. NCCDS configuration management process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Kathy

    1993-01-01

    By concentrating on defining and improving specific Configuration Management (CM) functions, processes, procedures, personnel selection/development, and tools, internal and external customers received improved CM services. Job performance within the section increased in both satisfaction and output. Participation in achieving major improvements has led to the delivery of consistent quality CM products as well as significant decreases in every measured CM metrics category.

  18. Safe Configuration of TLS Connections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-16

    Lobster [7] is a DSL for security policy configuration that allows modeling of network flows between security domains. While Lobster provides means...scap.nist.gov/ [7] J. Hurd, et al, “ Lobster : A domain specific language for selinux policies”, Galois internal report, 2008. [8] E. Al-Shaeret, et al, “Network

  19. Configuration Effects on Liner Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic performance of a duct liner depends not only on the intrinsic properties of the liner but also on the configuration of the duct in which it is used. A series of experiments is performed in the NASA Langley Research Center Curved Duct Test Rig (at Mach 0.275) to evaluate the effect of duct configuration on the acoustic performance of single degree of freedom perforate-over-honeycomb liners. The liners form the sidewalls of the duct's test section. Variations of duct configuration include: asymmetric (liner on one side and hard wall opposite) and symmetric (liner on both sides) wall treatment; inlet and exhaust orientation, in which the sound propagates either against or with the flow; and straight and curved flow path. The effect that duct configuration has on the overall acoustic performance, particularly the shift in frequency and magnitude of peak attenuation, is quantified. The redistribution of incident mode content is shown. The liners constitute the side walls of the liner test section and the scatter of incident horizontal order 1 mode by the asymmetric treatment and order 2 mode by the symmetric treatment into order 0 mode is shown. Scatter of order 0 incident modes into higher order modes is also shown. This redistribution of mode content is significant because it indicates that the liner design can be manipulated such that energy is scattered into more highly attenuated modes, thus enhancing liner performance.

  20. A Communication Configuration of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.

    A study focused on the way that image, knowledge, behavioral intent, and communicative responsiveness are configured for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The classic model of the adoption process expects that knowledge about a subject will lead to a favorable evaluation of it, which in turn will lead to a decision to act. But the…

  1. Habitat Demonstration Unit Project Leadership and Management Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) led multi-center Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project leadership and management strategies. The HDU project team constructed and tested an analog prototype lunar surface habitat/laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) during 2010. The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a tiger team approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies and innovations from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the leadership and management strategies as well as lessons learned pertaining to leading and managing a multi-center diverse team in a rapid prototype environment. The PEM configuration went from a paper design to an operational surface habitat demonstration unit in less than 12 months. The HDU project is part of the strategic plan from the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Directorate Integration Office (DIO) and the Exploration Mission Systems Office (EMSO) to test destination elements in analog environments. The 2011 HDU-Deep Space Habitat (DSH) configuration will build upon the PEM work, and emphasize validity of crew operations (remote working and living), EVA operations, mission operations, logistics operations, and science operations that might be required in a deep space context for Near Earth Object (NEO) exploration mission architectures. The 2011 HDU-DSH will be field-tested during the 2011 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (DRaTS) field tests. The HDU project is a "technology-pull" project that integrates technologies and innovations from multiple NASA centers. This project will repurpose the HDU 2010 demo unit that was field tested in the 2010 DRaTS, adding habitation functionality to the prototype unit. This paper will describe the strategy of establishing a multi-center project management team that put in place the key multi-center leadership skills and

  2. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work si shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing• ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testingThe driving requirements for this development are:• SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components• Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  3. Self-Directed Lifelong Learning in Hybrid Learning Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremers, Petra H. M.; Wals, Arjen E. J.; Wesselink, Renate; Nieveen, Nienke; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Present-day students are expected to be lifelong learners throughout their working life. Higher education must therefore prepare students to self-direct their learning beyond formal education, in real-life working settings. This can be achieved in so-called hybrid learning configurations in which working and learning are integrated. In such a…

  4. HORIZONTAL CONFIGURATION OF THE LASAGNA (TM) TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY USER GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a user's guide that discusses the technology and operations unique to the installation and operation of the horizontal configuration of the Lasagna? integrated soil remediation technology. This technology, called Lasagna? because of the layers of electrodes and tr...

  5. Flying NASA's terminal configured vehicle against the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, L. H., Jr.; Yenni, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    Technology for advanced airborne systems and flight procedures to improve terminal-area operations in ATC environment is developed. The terminal configured vehicle (TCV) aircraft, its integrated digital electronic displays and flight controls, and how the pilot interfaces with the aircraft to fly precise curved descending approaches using Microwave Landing System (MLS) guidance are discussed.

  6. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Addendum: Design definition document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Gas generator engine characteristics and results of engine configuration refinements are discussed. Updated component mechanical design, performance, and manufacturing information is provided. The results are also provided of ocean recovery studies and various engine integration tasks. The details are provided of the maintenance plan for the Space Transportation Booster Engine.

  7. Influence of stent configuration on cerebral aneurysm fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Babiker, M Haithem; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Ryan, Justin; Albuquerque, Felipe; Collins, Daniel; Elvikis, Arius; Frakes, David H

    2012-02-02

    Embolic coiling is the most popular endovascular treatment available for cerebral aneurysms. Nevertheless, the embolic coiling of wide-neck aneurysms is challenging and, in many cases, ineffective. Use of highly porous stents to support coiling of wide-neck aneurysms has become a common procedure in recent years. Several studies have also demonstrated that high porosity stents alone can significantly alter aneurysmal hemodynamics, but differences among different stent configurations have not been fully characterized. As a result, it is usually unclear which stent configuration is optimal for treatment. In this paper, we present a flow study that elucidates the influence of stent configuration on cerebral aneurysm fluid dynamics in an idealized wide-neck basilar tip aneurysm model. Aneurysmal fluid dynamics for three different stent configurations (half-Y, Y and, cross-bar) were first quantified using particle image velocimetry and then compared. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were also conducted for selected stent configurations to facilitate validation and provide more detailed characterizations of the fluid dynamics promoted by different stent configurations. In vitro results showed that the Y stent configuration reduced cross-neck flow most significantly, while the cross-bar configuration reduced velocity magnitudes within the aneurysmal sac most significantly. The half-Y configuration led to increased velocity magnitudes within the aneurysmal sac at high parent-vessel flow rates. Experimental results were in strong agreement with CFD simulations. Simulated results indicated that differences in fluid dynamic performance among the different stent configurations can be attributed primarily to protruding struts within the bifurcation region.

  8. Integrated microsystems for optical sensing and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindienst, Roman; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Compact optical systems generally form the backbone of integrated optoelectronic microsystems. Miniaturization as well as integration requirements result in system configurations with folded optical axis such as in planar integrated freespace optics. For optimum performance in such systems geometries, the surface profiles of the corresponding optical elements deviate from classical spherical or aspherical shapes. Optimized plane-symmetric or freeform optical elements are required instead. We discuss design, fabrication and characterization of freeform optical elements for the integration of optical microsystems. The systems performance is demonstrated for imaging as well as sensor applications.

  9. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  10. Configuration of frontal sinuses: A forensic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Jhansi Lakshmi; Jaisanghar, Nallusamy; Elangovan, Somasundaram; Mahaboob, Nazargi; Senthilkumar, Balasubramaniyan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Srichinthu, Kenniyan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identification of an individual whether living or deceased is of paramount importance in maintaining the integrity of the society. A simple, reliable, and efficacious method always finds a way for easier acceptance and inclusion in any discipline. Likewise, identification of an individual using the radiographic frontal sinus patterns is a simple technique which emphasized to conduct the study with a proven result. Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the radiographic configurations of frontal sinuses for their uniqueness based on different parameters. Study Group and Methods: Study group consisted of thirty individuals (15 males and 15 females) of age between 20 and 30. Individuals with the history of sinusitis, surgery, or any trauma were not included in the study. Paranasal sinus views were taken using standard exposure parameters, and the radiographs were assessed for their uniqueness. Results: The radiographs were assessed for area size, area asymmetry, superiority of the upper border, outline of the upper border, presence or absence of partial septa and supraorbital cells, and based on these results, a unique code number was assigned to each individual to prove the uniqueness. Conclusion: A frontal sinus comparison is particularly useful when no other means of an individual identification are available. Caution must be taken regarding the physiological and pathological changes (trauma, infection, old age, surgery, etc.) and postmortem changes and about the technical issues while taking a radiograph (distance, angle, orientation of the skull). In spite of all these issues, the configuration of frontal sinus is an excellent individualizing feature. PMID:27829755

  11. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  12. ORION II bus demonstration. Demonstration report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, J.

    1989-02-01

    The Central New York Regional Transportation Authority conducted an 18-month demonstration to determine how the ORION II bus operates in actual service. The ORION II vehicle is a small low floor, accessible heavy duty, diesel-powered transit bus designed to meet the needs of the elderly and handicapped. It has the capacity to seat 26 passengers with 4 wheelchair lockdowns. Side and rear doors are equipped with electrically powered ramps. Eight Thomas vehicles (22-foot, 11,500 lbs, wheelchair equipped, gasoline fueled) were also tested during the demonstration period. Operations (fuel and oil usage) and maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) data were collected and charted-out in the report as well as driver, passenger, and maintenance surveys. This report provides descriptions, photographs, and comparison charts of both the diesel-fueled ORION II transit bus and the gasoline-fueled Thomas vehicles along with the demonstration test plan, evaluations, conclusions, and survey results.

  13. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  14. Hartle formalism for rotating Newtonian configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Quevedo, Hernando; Kalymova, Zhanerke; Zhami, Bakytzhan

    2016-11-01

    We apply the Hartle formalism to study equilibrium configurations in the framework of Newtonian gravity. This approach allows one to study in a simple manner the properties of the interior gravitational field in the case of static as well as stationary rotating stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. It is shown that the gravitational equilibrium conditions reduce to a system of ordinary differential equations which can be integrated numerically. We derive all the relevant equations up to the second order in the angular velocity. Moreover, we find explicitly the total mass, the moment of inertia, the quadrupole moment, the polar and equatorial radii, the eccentricity and the gravitational binding energy of the rotating body. We also present the procedure to calculate the gravitational Love number. We test the formalism in the case of white dwarfs and show its compatibility with the known results in the literature.

  15. Configuration Management Process Assessment Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a strategy for assessing the development and effectiveness of configuration management systems within Programs, Projects, and Design Activities performed by technical organizations and their supporting development contractors. Scope: Various entities CM Systems will be assessed dependent on Project Scope (DDT&E), Support Services and Acquisition Agreements. Approach: Model based structured against assessing organizations CM requirements including best practices maturity criteria. The model is tailored to the entity being assessed dependent on their CM system. The assessment approach provides objective feedback to Engineering and Project Management of the observed CM system maturity state versus the ideal state of the configuration management processes and outcomes(system). center dot Identifies strengths and risks versus audit gotcha's (findings/observations). center dot Used "recursively and iteratively" throughout program lifecycle at select points of need. (Typical assessments timing is Post PDR/Post CDR) center dot Ideal state criteria and maturity targets are reviewed with the assessed entity prior to an assessment (Tailoring) and is dependent on the assessed phase of the CM system. center dot Supports exit success criteria for Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews. center dot Gives a comprehensive CM system assessment which ultimately supports configuration verification activities.*

  16. Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Advanced rotorcraft configurations are being investigated with the objectives of identifying vehicles that are larger, quieter, and faster than current-generation rotorcraft. A large rotorcraft, carrying perhaps 150 passengers, could do much to alleviate airport capacity limitations, and a quiet rotorcraft is essential for community acceptance of the benefits of VTOL operations. A fast, long-range, long-endurance rotorcraft, notably the tilt-rotor configuration, will improve rotorcraft economics through productivity increases. A major part of the investigation of advanced rotorcraft configurations consists of conducting comprehensive analyses of vehicle behavior for the purpose of assessing vehicle potential and feasibility, as well as to establish the analytical models required to support the vehicle development. The analytical work of FY99 included applications to tilt-rotor aircraft. Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) wind tunnel measurements are being compared with calculations performed by using the comprehensive analysis tool (Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD 11)). The objective is to establish the wing and wake aerodynamic models that are required for tilt-rotor analysis and design. The TRAM test in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) produced extensive measurements. This is the first test to encompass air loads, performance, and structural load measurements on tilt rotors, as well as acoustic and flow visualization data. The correlation of measurements and calculations includes helicopter-mode operation (performance, air loads, and blade structural loads), hover (performance and air loads), and airplane-mode operation (performance).

  17. Predictive Modeling of Tokamak Configurations*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, T. A.; Lodestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Bulmer, R. H.; Jong, R. A.; Kaiser, T. B.; Moller, J. M.

    2001-10-01

    The Corsica code provides comprehensive toroidal plasma simulation and design capabilities with current applications [1] to tokamak, reversed field pinch (RFP) and spheromak configurations. It calculates fixed and free boundary equilibria coupled to Ohm's law, sources, transport models and MHD stability modules. We are exploring operations scenarios for both the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks. We will present simulations of the effects of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) relevant to the Quiescent Double Barrier (QDB) regime on DIII-D exploring long pulse operation issues. KSTAR simulations using ECH/ECCD in negative central shear configurations explore evolution to steady state while shape evolution studies during current ramp up using a hyper-resistivity model investigate startup scenarios and limitations. Studies of high bootstrap fraction operation stimulated by recent ECH/ECCD experiments on DIIID will also be presented. [1] Pearlstein, L.D., et al, Predictive Modeling of Axisymmetric Toroidal Configurations, 28th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Madeira, Portugal, June 18-22, 2001. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  18. Configuration control of redundant manipulators - Theory and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1989-01-01

    A simple approach for controlling the manipulator configuration over the entire motion is presented, based on augmentation of the manipulator forward kinematics. User-defined kinematic functions and the end-effector Cartesian coordinates are combined to form a set of task-related configuration variables as generalized coordinates for the manipulator. A task-based adaptive scheme is then utilized to control the configuration variables and achieve tracking of the desired reference trajectories. This achieves the desired end-effector motion while utilizing redundancy to achieve any additional task. Simulation results for a direct-drive two-link arm are given to illustrate the proposed control scheme. The scheme has also been implemented for real-time control of three links of a PUMA 560 industrial robot. The simulation and experimental results validate the configuration control scheme and demonstrate its capabilities for performing various realistic tasks.

  19. Model flight tests of a spin-resistant trainer configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Ross, Holly M.; Robelen, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Powered, radio-controlled flight tests were conducted on a 1/4-scale model of a spin-resistant trainer configuration to determine the stall departure and spin resistance characteristics provided by an outboard wing leading-edge droop modification. The model was instrumented to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information on flight characteristics. Flight test results indicated that the unmodified configuration (wing leading-edge droop off) exhibited an abrupt, uncontrollable roll departure at the stall. With the outboard wing leading-edge droop installed, the modified configuration exhibited flight characteristics that were resistant to stall departure and spin entry. The stall departure and spin resistance characteristics of the modified configuration were demonstrated in flight maneuvers that included idle-power stalls, full-power stalls, sideslip stalls, and accelerated stalls.

  20. The Marine Virtual Laboratory: enabling efficient ocean model configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oke, P. R.; Proctor, R.; Rosebrock, U.; Brinkman, R.; Cahill, M. L.; Coghlan, I.; Divakaran, P.; Freeman, J.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Roughan, M.; Sandery, P. A.; Schaeffer, A.; Wijeratne, S.

    2015-11-01

    The technical steps involved in configuring a regional ocean model are analogous for all community models. All require the generation of a model grid, preparation and interpolation of topography, initial conditions, and forcing fields. Each task in configuring a regional ocean model is straight-forward - but the process of downloading and reformatting data can be time-consuming. For an experienced modeller, the configuration of a new model domain can take as little as a few hours - but for an inexperienced modeller, it can take much longer. In pursuit of technical efficiency, the Australian ocean modelling community has developed the Web-based MARine Virtual Laboratory (WebMARVL). WebMARVL allows a user to quickly and easily configure an ocean general circulation or wave model through a simple interface, reducing the time to configure a regional model to a few minutes. Through WebMARVL, a user is prompted to define the basic options needed for a model configuration, including the: model, run duration, spatial extent, and input data. Once all aspects of the configuration are selected, a series of data extraction, reprocessing, and repackaging services are run, and a "take-away bundle" is prepared for download. Building on the capabilities developed under Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System, WebMARVL also extracts all of the available observations for the chosen time-space domain. The user is able to download the take-away bundle, and use it to run the model of their choice. Models supported by WebMARVL include three community ocean general circulation models, and two community wave models. The model configuration from the take-away bundle is intended to be a starting point for scientific research. The user may subsequently refine the details of the model set-up to improve the model performance for the given application. In this study, WebMARVL is described along with a series of results from test cases comparing WebMARVL-configured models to observations