Science.gov

Sample records for integrated physical mapping

  1. Integrating the USMARC genetic map for the pig with the pig physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map containing 3418 markers and spanning 2,326 cM of the autosomal genome was generated and integrated with the available physical maps for the pig. Marker types consisted of 1531 microsatellites and 1887 markers based on single feature polymorphisms, insertion/delet...

  2. Progress towards integrated physical and genetic maps of chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, C.J.; Barnoski, B.; Budarf, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Our immediate objective is to identify and characterize a set of overlapping YAC clones spanning the long arm of chromosome 22 by STS content mapping of the CEPH YAC libraries. STSs are assigned to bins defined by a 25 interval hybrid mapping panel and the YAC libraries are screened by amplification of hierarchical pools of yeast DNAs. Thus far, 382 probes and STSs have been assigned to bins and 251 probes and STSs have been used to identify a total 659 YACs, which is nearly 5X coverage of the chromosome. We have assembled more than twenty putative contigs using simulated annealing, split and merge, and backtracking optimization algorithms. The largest contig contains 82 STSs linked with 250 YACs, connects bin 12 to 15, and contains approximately one third of the long arm. The proximal region also contains two large contigs in bins 1-2 and bin 9, between them containing 26 STSs and 62 YACs. The DiGeorge (DGCR) region, encompassing bins 3-5, is currently 80% covered in a contig of cosmids. The distal portion (bins 17-22) is the least represented in YACs, due to a paucity of markers and a lower hit-rate of YACs per STS. We are targeting this region with new STSs from inter-Alu PCR plasmid libraries derived from radiation hybrid cell lines that retain relevant portions of the chromosome. A concurrent objective of the center is to construct a robust multi-point linkage map of the chromosome. STRPs (simple tandem repeat polymorphisms) were assembled into a 20-point skeletal map and a 29-point framework map; 15 of the markers in the skeletal map have been unequivocally assigned to single intervals in the hybrid panel with identical linkage and bin orders. This genetic map, combined with markers ordered by pulsed field gel maps covering large portions of the chromosome, provides a robust framework for ordering YACs within contigs and ordering contigs along the chromosome.

  3. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Colin; CHIU, Dr. R.; Shin, Dr. H.; Krywinski, Martin; Fjell, Chris; Wilkin, Jennifer; Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the few such maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2802 contigs, was constructed from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The map represents approximately 9.4-fold coverage of the Populus genome, which has been estimated from the genome sequence assembly to be 485 {+-} 10 Mb in size. BAC ends were sequenced to assist long-range assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence scaffolds and to anchor the physical map to the genome sequence. Simple sequence repeat-based markers were derived from the end sequences and used to initiate integration of the BAC and genetic maps. A total of 2411 physical map contigs, representing 97% of all clones assigned to contigs, were aligned to the sequence assembly (JGI Populus trichocarpa, version 1.0). These alignments represent a total coverage of 384 Mb (79%) of the entire poplar sequence assembly and 295 Mb (96%) of linkage group sequence assemblies. A striking result of the physical map contig alignments to the sequence assembly was the co-localization of multiple contigs across numerous regions of the 19 linkage groups. Targeted sequencing of BAC clones and genetic analysis in a small number of representative regions showed that these co-aligning contigs represent distinct haplotypes in the heterozygous individual sequenced, and revealed the nature of these haplotype sequence differences.

  4. Integrated and sequence-ordered BAC- and YAC-based physical maps for the rat genome.

    PubMed

    Krzywinski, Martin; Wallis, John; Gösele, Claudia; Bosdet, Ian; Chiu, Readman; Graves, Tina; Hummel, Oliver; Layman, Dan; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Zhu, Baoli; Albracht, Derek; Asano, Jennifer; Barber, Sarah; Brown-John, Mabel; Chan, Susanna; Chand, Steve; Cloutier, Alison; Davito, Jonathon; Fjell, Chris; Gaige, Tony; Ganten, Detlev; Girn, Noreen; Guggenheimer, Kurtis; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kreitler, Thomas; Leach, Stephen; Lee, Darlene; Lehrach, Hans; Mayo, Michael; Mead, Kelly; Olson, Teika; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Shin, Heesun; Tänzer, Simone; Thompson, Jason; Tsai, Miranda; Walker, Jason; Yang, George; Sekhon, Mandeep; Hillier, LaDeana; Zimdahl, Heike; Marziali, Andre; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhao, Shaying; Siddiqui, Asim; de Jong, Pieter J; Warren, Wes; Mardis, Elaine; McPherson, John D; Wilson, Richard; Hübner, Norbert; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline

    2004-04-01

    As part of the effort to sequence the genome of Rattus norvegicus, we constructed a physical map comprised of fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the CHORI-230 BAC library. These BAC clones provide approximately 13-fold redundant coverage of the genome and have been assembled into 376 fingerprint contigs. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) map was also constructed and aligned with the BAC map via fingerprinted BAC and P1 artificial chromosome clones (PACs) sharing interspersed repetitive sequence markers with the YAC-based physical map. We have annotated 95% of the fingerprint map clones in contigs with coordinates on the version 3.1 rat genome sequence assembly, using BAC-end sequences and in silico mapping methods. These coordinates have allowed anchoring 358 of the 376 fingerprint map contigs onto the sequence assembly. Of these, 324 contigs are anchored to rat genome sequences localized to chromosomes, and 34 contigs are anchored to unlocalized portions of the rat sequence assembly. The remaining 18 contigs, containing 54 clones, still require placement. The fingerprint map is a high-resolution integrative data resource that provides genome-ordered associations among BAC, YAC, and PAC clones and the assembled sequence of the rat genome.

  5. Twenty-one polymorphic markers from human chromosome 12 for integration of genetic and physical maps

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc-Straceski, J.M.; Kissel, H.; Murtaugh, L.; Kucherlapati, R.; Montogmery, K.T.; Krauter, K.S. ); Tsai, P.; Ward, D.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Twenty-one physically mapped, polymorphic markers have been developed from a chromosome 12-specific cosmid library. The markers consist of CA repeat-containing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) derived from cosmid clones mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Three methods for determining the sequence flanking CA microsatellites were used, including one using degenerate primer sets for direct sequence analysis. Oligonucleotide primer pairs suitable for use in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were selected from the sequences flanking the CA microsatellite and were tested for their ability to generate unique PCR products. The informativeness of these STSs as genetic markers was determined by typing 10 unrelated individuals who are part of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine (EPH) pedigrees. Eleven of the 21 FISH-mapped, polymorphic STSs are heterozygous in 7 or more of the individuals tested. Since these markers are derived from physically mapped cosmids, genetic linkage analysis with them will facilitate the integration of the developing physical and genetic maps of chromosome 12. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Automated integration of genomic physical mapping data via parallel simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, T.

    1994-06-01

    The Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is nearing closure on a high-resolution physical map of human chromosome 19. We have build automated tools to assemble 15,000 fingerprinted cosmid clones into 800 contigs with minimal spanning paths identified. These islands are being ordered, oriented, and spanned by a variety of other techniques including: Fluorescence Insitu Hybridization (FISH) at 3 levels of resolution, ECO restriction fragment mapping across all contigs, and a multitude of different hybridization and PCR techniques to link cosmid, YAC, AC, PAC, and Pl clones. The FISH data provide us with partial order and distance data as well as orientation. We made the observation that map builders need a much rougher presentation of data than do map readers; the former wish to see raw data since these can expose errors or interesting biology. We further noted that by ignoring our length and distance data we could simplify our problem into one that could be readily attacked with optimization techniques. The data integration problem could then be seen as an M x N ordering of our N cosmid clones which ``intersect`` M larger objects by defining ``intersection`` to mean either contig/map membership or hybridization results. Clearly, the goal of making an integrated map is now to rearrange the N cosmid clone ``columns`` such that the number of gaps on the object ``rows`` are minimized. Our FISH partially-ordered cosmid clones provide us with a set of constraints that cannot be violated by the rearrangement process. We solved the optimization problem via simulated annealing performed on a network of 40+ Unix machines in parallel, using a server/client model built on explicit socket calls. For current maps we can create a map in about 4 hours on the parallel net versus 4+ days on a single workstation. Our biologists are now using this software on a daily basis to guide their efforts toward final closure.

  7. A database system for constructing, integrating, and displaying physical maps of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, T.; Wagner, M.; Yeh, Mimi; Ashworth, L.; Nelson, D.; Ow, D.; Branscomb, E.; Carrano, A.

    1994-06-01

    Efforts are underway at numerous sites around the world to construct physical maps of all human chromosomes. These maps will enable researchers to locate, characterize, and eventually understand the genes that control human structure and function. Accomplishing this goal will require a staggering amount of innovation and advancement of biological technology. The volume and complexity of the data already generated requires a sophisticated array of computational support to collect, store, analyze, integrate, and display it in biologically meaningful ways. The Human Genome Center at Livermore has spent the last 6 years constructing a database system to support its physical mapping efforts on human chromosome 19. Our computational support team is composed of experienced computer professionals who share a common pragmatic primary goal of rapidly supplying tools that meet the ever-changing needs of the biologists. Most papers describing computational support of genome research concentrate on mathematical details of key algorithms. However, in this paper we would like to concentrate on the design issues, tradeoffs, and consequences from the point of view of building a complex database system to support leading-edge genomic research. We introduce the topic of physical mapping, discuss the key design issues involved in our databases, and discuss the use of this data by our major tools (DNA fingerprint analysis and overlap computation, contig assembly, map integration, and database browsing.) Given the advantage of hindsight, we discuss what worked, what didn`t, and how we will evolve from here. As early pioneers in this field we hope that our experience may prove useful to others who are now beginning to design and construct similar systems.

  8. Integrated physical, genetic and genome map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Varshney, Rajeev K; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Thudi, Mahendar; Hu, Yuqin; Azam, Sarwar; Zhang, Yong; Jaganathan, Deepa; You, Frank M; Gao, Jinliang; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar; Luo, Ming-Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Physical map of chickpea was developed for the reference chickpea genotype (ICC 4958) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries targeting 71,094 clones (~12× coverage). High information content fingerprinting (HICF) of these clones gave high-quality fingerprinting data for 67,483 clones, and 1,174 contigs comprising 46,112 clones and 3,256 singletons were defined. In brief, 574 Mb genome size was assembled in 1,174 contigs with an average of 0.49 Mb per contig and 3,256 singletons represent 407 Mb genome. The physical map was linked with two genetic maps with the help of 245 BAC-end sequence (BES)-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. This allowed locating some of the BACs in the vicinity of some important quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for drought tolerance and reistance to Fusarium wilt and Ascochyta blight. In addition, fingerprinted contig (FPC) assembly was also integrated with the draft genome sequence of chickpea. As a result, ~965 BACs including 163 minimum tilling path (MTP) clones could be mapped on eight pseudo-molecules of chickpea forming 491 hypothetical contigs representing 54,013,992 bp (~54 Mb) of the draft genome. Comprehensive analysis of markers in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance QTL regions led to identification of 654, 306 and 23 genes in drought tolerance "QTL-hotspot" region, Ascochyta blight resistance QTL region and Fusarium wilt resistance QTL region, respectively. Integrated physical, genetic and genome map should provide a foundation for cloning and isolation of QTLs/genes for molecular dissection of traits as well as markers for molecular breeding for chickpea improvement.

  9. A first generation integrated physical and genetic map of the rainbow trout genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rainbow trout physical map was previously constructed from DNA fingerprinting of 192,096 BAC clones using the 4-color high-information content fingerprinting (HICF) method. The clones were assembled into physical map contigs using the finger-printing contig (FPC) program. The map is composed of ...

  10. The Effects of Integrating Computer-Based Concept Mapping for Physics Learning in Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Shih, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    It generally is accepted that concept mapping has a noticeable impact on learning. But literatures show the use of concept mapping is not benefit all learners. The present study explored the effects of incorporating computer-based concept mapping in physics instruction. A total of 61 9th-grade students participated in this study. By using a…

  11. Integrating the genetic and physical maps of Arabidopsis thaliana: identification of mapped alleles of cloned essential (EMB) genes.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David; Sweeney, Colleen; Muralla, Rosanna

    2009-10-08

    The classical genetic map of Arabidopsis includes more than 130 genes with an embryo-defective (emb) mutant phenotype. Many of these essential genes remain to be cloned. Hundreds of additional EMB genes have been cloned and catalogued (www.seedgenes.org) but not mapped. To facilitate EMB gene identification and assess the current level of saturation, we updated the classical map, compared the physical and genetic locations of mapped loci, and performed allelism tests between mapped (but not cloned) and cloned (but not mapped) emb mutants with similar chromosome locations. Two hundred pairwise combinations of genes located on chromosomes 1 and 5 were tested and more than 1100 total crosses were screened. Sixteen of 51 mapped emb mutants examined were found to be disrupted in a known EMB gene. Alleles of a wide range of published EMB genes (YDA, GLA1, TIL1, AtASP38, AtDEK1, EMB506, DG1, OEP80) were discovered. Two EMS mutants isolated 30 years ago, T-DNA mutants with complex insertion sites, and a mutant with an atypical, embryo-specific phenotype were resolved. The frequency of allelism encountered was consistent with past estimates of 500 to 1000 EMB loci. New EMB genes identified among mapped T-DNA insertion mutants included CHC1, which is required for chromatin remodeling, and SHS1/AtBT1, which encodes a plastidial nucleotide transporter similar to the maize Brittle1 protein required for normal endosperm development. Two classical genetic markers (PY, ALB1) were identified based on similar map locations of known genes required for thiamine (THIC) and chlorophyll (PDE166) biosynthesis. The alignment of genetic and physical maps presented here should facilitate the continued analysis of essential genes in Arabidopsis and further characterization of a broad spectrum of mutant phenotypes in a model plant.

  12. Integrated genome sequence and linkage map of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingzhi; Zhou, Changpin; Cheng, Shifeng; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Yan; Ni, Peixiang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xun; Huang, Ying; Song, Chi; Wang, Zhiwen; Shi, Nan; Zhang, Xudong; Fang, Xiaohua; Yang, Qing; Jiang, Huawu; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-03-01

    The family Euphorbiaceae includes some of the most efficient biomass accumulators. Whole genome sequencing and the development of genetic maps of these species are important components in molecular breeding and genetic improvement. Here we report the draft genome of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant. The assembled genome has a total length of 320.5 Mbp and contains 27,172 putative protein-coding genes. We established a linkage map containing 1208 markers and anchored the genome assembly (81.7%) to this map to produce 11 pseudochromosomes. After gene family clustering, 15,268 families were identified, of which 13,887 existed in the castor bean genome. Analysis of the genome highlighted specific expansion and contraction of a number of gene families during the evolution of this species, including the ribosome-inactivating proteins and oil biosynthesis pathway enzymes. The genomic sequence and linkage map provide a valuable resource not only for fundamental and applied research on physic nut but also for evolutionary and comparative genomics analysis, particularly in the Euphorbiaceae.

  13. Construction of reference chromosome-scale pseudomolecules for potato: integrating the potato genome with genetic and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D'Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A; Hamilton, John P; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J

    2013-11-06

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker-based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal "pseudomolecules".

  14. The Locus Lookup Tool at MaizeGDB: Identification of Genomic Regions in Maize by Integrating Sequence Information with Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to automatically integrate sequence information with physical and genetic maps are scarce. The Locus Lookup Tool enables researchers to define windows of genomic sequence likely to contain loci of interest where only genetic or physical mapping associations are reported. Using the Locus Look...

  15. Map of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    Based on bibliometric data from information-services provider Thomson Reuters, this map reveals "core areas" of physics, shown as coloured circular nodes, and the relationship between these subdisciplines, shown as lines.

  16. Integrating Physical and Topographic Information Into a Fuzzy Scheme to Map Flooded Area by SAR

    PubMed Central

    Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Chini, Marco; Pulvirenti, Luca; Macina, Flavia

    2008-01-01

    A flood mapping procedure based on a fuzzy sets theory has been developed. The method is based on the integration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measurements with additional data on the inundated area, such as a land cover map and a digital elevation model (DEM). The information on land cover has allowed us to account for both specular reflection, typical of open water, and double bounce backscattering, typical of forested and urban areas. DEM has been exploited to include simple hydraulic considerations on the dependence of inundation probability on surface characteristics. Contextual information has been taken into account too. The proposed algorithm has been tested on a flood occurred in Italy on November 1994. A pair of ERS-1 images, collected before and after (three days later) the flood, has been used. The results have been compared with the data provided by a ground survey carried out when the flood reached its maximum extension. Despite the temporal mismatch between the survey and the post-inundation SAR image, the comparison has yielded encouraging results, with the 87% of the pixels correctly classified as inundated. PMID:27879928

  17. Assessment and mapping of debris flow hazard through integrated physically based models and GIS assisted methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronica, Giuseppe T.; Cascone, Ernesto; Randazzo, Giovanni; Biondi, Giovanni; Lanza, Stefania; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Brigandi, Giuseppina

    2010-05-01

    Catastrophic events periodically occur in the area of Messina (Sicily, Italy). Both in October 2007 and in October 2009 debris/mud flows triggered by heavy rainfall affected various towns and villages located along the jonian coast of the town, highlighting the destructive potential of these events. The two events gave rise to severe property damage and in the latter more than 40 people were killed. Objective of this study is to present an integrated modelling approach based on three different models, namely an hydrological model, a slope stability model and an hydraulic model, to identify potential debris flow hazard areas. A continuous semi-distributed form of the well known hydrological model IHACRES has been used to derive soil moisture conditions by simulating the infiltration process in Hortonian form. As matter of fact, the soil is conceptually schematized with a catchment storage parameter which represents catchment wetness/soil moisture. The slope stability model allows identifying potential debris-flow sources and is based on the model SHALSTAB that permits to detect those parts of the catchment whose stability conditions are strongly affected by pore water pressure build-up due to local rainfall and soil conductivity and those parts of the basin that, conversely, are unconditionally stable under static loading conditions. Assuming that the solids and the interstitial fluid move downstream with the same velocity, debris flow propagation is described using a two dimensional depth averaged model. Based on extensive sediment sampling and morphological observations, the rheological characterization of the flowing mixture, along with erosion/deposition mechanisms, will be carefully considered in the model. Differential equations are integrated with an implicit Galerkin finite element scheme or, alternatively, finite volume methods. To illustrate this approach, the proposed methodology is applied to a debris flow occurred in the Mastroguglielmo catchment in

  18. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the Primula vulgaris S locus and localization by chromosome in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Webster, Margaret A; Wright, Jonathan; Cocker, Jonathan M; Smith, Matthew C; Badakshi, Farah; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Heteromorphic flower development in Primula is controlled by the S locus. The S locus genes, which control anther position, pistil length and pollen size in pin and thrum flowers, have not yet been characterized. We have integrated S-linked genes, marker sequences and mutant phenotypes to create a map of the P. vulgaris S locus region that will facilitate the identification of key S locus genes. We have generated, sequenced and annotated BAC sequences spanning the S locus, and identified its chromosomal location. We have employed a combination of classical genetics and three-point crosses with molecular genetic analysis of recombinants to generate the map. We have characterized this region by Illumina sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, together with chromosome in situ hybridization. We present an integrated genetic and physical map across the P. vulgaris S locus flanked by phenotypic and DNA sequence markers. BAC contigs encompass a 1.5-Mb genomic region with 1 Mb of sequence containing 82 S-linked genes anchored to overlapping BACs. The S locus is located close to the centromere of the largest metacentric chromosome pair. These data will facilitate the identification of the genes that orchestrate heterostyly in Primula and enable evolutionary analyses of the S locus.

  19. A High-throughput AFLP-based Method for Constructing Integrated Genetic and Physical Maps: Progress Toward a Sorghum Genome Map

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Patricia E.; Klein, Robert R.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.; Ulanch, Paul E.; Dong, Jianmin; Obert, Jacque A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Schlueter, Shannon D.; Childs, Kevin L.; Ale, Melissa; Mullet, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Sorghum is an important target for plant genomic mapping because of its adaptation to harsh environments, diverse germplasm collection, and value for comparing the genomes of grass species such as corn and rice. The construction of an integrated genetic and physical map of the sorghum genome (750 Mbp) is a primary goal of our sorghum genome project. To help accomplish this task, we have developed a new high-throughput PCR-based method for building BAC contigs and locating BAC clones on the sorghum genetic map. This task involved pooling 24,576 sorghum BAC clones (∼4× genome equivalents) in six different matrices to create 184 pools of BAC DNA. DNA fragments from each pool were amplified using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technology, resolved on a LI-COR dual-dye DNA sequencing system, and analyzed using Bionumerics software. On average, each set of AFLP primers amplified 28 single-copy DNA markers that were useful for identifying overlapping BAC clones. Data from 32 different AFLP primer combinations identified ∼2400 BACs and ordered ∼700 BAC contigs. Analysis of a sorghum RIL mapping population using the same primer pairs located ∼200 of the BAC contigs on the sorghum genetic map. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting of the entire collection of sorghum BAC clones was applied to test and extend the contigs constructed using this PCR-based methodology. Analysis of the fingerprint data allowed for the identification of 3366 contigs each containing an average of 5 BACs. BACs in ∼65% of the contigs aligned by AFLP analysis had sufficient overlap to be confirmed by DNA fingerprint analysis. In addition, 30% of the overlapping BACs aligned by AFLP analysis provided information for merging contigs and singletons that could not be joined using fingerprint data alone. Thus, the combination of fingerprinting and AFLP-based contig assembly and mapping provides a reliable, high-throughput method for building an integrated genetic and physical map

  20. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrielmann, S.

    The tomographic method Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V 2051Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics: Maps, Integrators and Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-10-01

    For many physical systems of interest in various disciplines, the solution to nonlinear differential equations describing the physical systems can be generated using maps, symplectic integrators and solitons. We discuss these methods and apply them for various examples.

  2. Genetic and physical map correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical maps illustrate the arrangement of genes and DNA markers on a chromosome. The relative distances between positions on a genetic map are calculated using recombination frequencies while a physical map is based on the actual number of nucleotide pairs between loci. These maps ar...

  3. A BAC pooling strategy combined with PCR-based screenings in a large, highly repetitive genome enables integration of the maize genetic and physical maps

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Young-Sun; Moak, Patricia; Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Musket, Theresa A; Close, Pamela; Klein, Patricia E; Mullet, John E; McMullen, Michael D; Fang, Zheiwei; Schaeffer, Mary L; Gardiner, Jack M; Coe, Edward H; Davis, Georgia L

    2007-01-01

    Background Molecular markers serve three important functions in physical map assembly. First, they provide anchor points to genetic maps facilitating functional genomic studies. Second, they reduce the overlap required for BAC contig assembly from 80 to 50 percent. Finally, they validate assemblies based solely on BAC fingerprints. We employed a six-dimensional BAC pooling strategy in combination with a high-throughput PCR-based screening method to anchor the maize genetic and physical maps. Results A total of 110,592 maize BAC clones (~ 6x haploid genome equivalents) were pooled into six different matrices, each containing 48 pools of BAC DNA. The quality of the BAC DNA pools and their utility for identifying BACs containing target genomic sequences was tested using 254 PCR-based STS markers. Five types of PCR-based STS markers were screened to assess potential uses for the BAC pools. An average of 4.68 BAC clones were identified per marker analyzed. These results were integrated with BAC fingerprint data generated by the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) and the Arizona Genomics Computational Laboratory (AGCoL) to assemble the BAC contigs using the FingerPrinted Contigs (FPC) software and contribute to the construction and anchoring of the physical map. A total of 234 markers (92.5%) anchored BAC contigs to their genetic map positions. The results can be viewed on the integrated map of maize [1,2]. Conclusion This BAC pooling strategy is a rapid, cost effective method for genome assembly and anchoring. The requirement for six replicate positive amplifications makes this a robust method for use in large genomes with high amounts of repetitive DNA such as maize. This strategy can be used to physically map duplicate loci, provide order information for loci in a small genetic interval or with no genetic recombination, and loci with conflicting hybridization-based information. PMID:17291341

  4. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, David O.

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  5. The integration of recombination and physical maps in a large-genome monocot using haploid genome analysis in a trihybrid allium population.

    PubMed

    Khrustaleva, L I; de Melo, P E; van Heusden, A W; Kik, C

    2005-03-01

    Integrated mapping in large-genome monocots has been carried out on a limited number of species. Furthermore, integrated maps are difficult to construct for these species due to, among other reasons, the specific plant populations needed. To fill these gaps, Alliums were chosen as target species and a new strategy for constructing suitable populations was developed. This strategy involves the use of trihybrid genotypes in which only one homeolog of a chromosome pair is recombinant due to interspecific recombination. We used genotypes from a trihybrid Allium cepa x (A. roylei x A. fistulosum) population. Recombinant chromosomes 5 and 8 from the interspecific parent were analyzed using genomic in situ hybridization visualization of recombination points and the physical positions of recombination were integrated into AFLP linkage maps of both chromosomes. The integrated maps showed that in Alliums recombination predominantly occurs in the proximal half of chromosome arms and that 57.9% of PstI/MseI markers are located in close proximity to the centromeric region, suggesting the presence of genes in this region. These findings are different from data obtained on cereals, where recombination rate and gene density tends to be higher in distal regions.

  6. The Integration of Recombination and Physical Maps in a Large-Genome Monocot Using Haploid Genome Analysis in a Trihybrid Allium Population

    PubMed Central

    Khrustaleva, L. I.; de Melo, P. E.; van Heusden, A. W.; Kik, C.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated mapping in large-genome monocots has been carried out on a limited number of species. Furthermore, integrated maps are difficult to construct for these species due to, among other reasons, the specific plant populations needed. To fill these gaps, Alliums were chosen as target species and a new strategy for constructing suitable populations was developed. This strategy involves the use of trihybrid genotypes in which only one homeolog of a chromosome pair is recombinant due to interspecific recombination. We used genotypes from a trihybrid Allium cepa × (A. roylei × A. fistulosum) population. Recombinant chromosomes 5 and 8 from the interspecific parent were analyzed using genomic in situ hybridization visualization of recombination points and the physical positions of recombination were integrated into AFLP linkage maps of both chromosomes. The integrated maps showed that in Alliums recombination predominantly occurs in the proximal half of chromosome arms and that 57.9% of PstI/MseI markers are located in close proximity to the centromeric region, suggesting the presence of genes in this region. These findings are different from data obtained on cereals, where recombination rate and gene density tends to be higher in distal regions. PMID:15654085

  7. Integration of high-resolution physical and genetic map reveals differential recombination frequency between chromosomes and the genome assembling quality in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qunfeng; He, Yuhua; Cheng, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Ji; Huang, Sanwen; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics in cucumber.

  8. Map of the Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, Kevin W.

    1999-07-02

    Various efforts to map the structure of science have been undertaken over the years. Using a new tool, VxInsight{trademark}, we have mapped and displayed 3000 journals in the physical sciences. This map is navigable and interactively reveals the structure of science at many different levels. Science mapping studies are typically focused at either the macro-or micro-level. At a macro-level such studies seek to determine the basic structural units of science and their interrelationships. The majority of studies are performed at the discipline or specialty level, and seek to inform science policy and technical decision makers. Studies at both levels probe the dynamic nature of science, and the implications of the changes. A variety of databases and methods have been used for these studies. Primary among databases are the citation indices (SCI and SSCI) from the Institute for Scientific Information, which have gained widespread acceptance for bibliometric studies. Maps are most often based on computed similarities between journal articles (co-citation), keywords or topics (co-occurrence or co-classification), or journals (journal-journal citation counts). Once the similarity matrix is defined, algorithms are used to cluster the data.

  9. A 1.7-Mb YAC contig around the human BDNF gene (11p13): integration of the physical, genetic, and cytogenetic maps in relation to WAGR syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rosier, M.F.; Martin, A.; Houlgatte, R.

    1994-11-01

    WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genito-urinary abnormalities, mental retardation) syndrome in humans is associated with deletions of the 11p13 region. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene maps to this region, and its deletion seems to contribute to the severity of the patient`s mental retardation. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) carrying the BDNF gene have been isolated and characterized. Localization of two known exons of this gene leads to a minimal estimation of its size of about 40 kb. Chimerism of the BDNF YACs has been investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromosome assignment on somatic cell hybrids. Using the BDNF gene, YAC end sequence tagged sites (STS), and Genethon microsatellite markers, the authors constructed a 1.7-Mb contig and refined the cytogenetic map at 11p13. The resulting integrated physical, genetic, and cytogenetic map constitutes a resource for the characterization of genes that may be involved in the WAGR syndrome. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred

  11. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Evans, G.A.

    1993-06-15

    A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

  12. Sex-Integrated Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneer, Marian E.

    1978-01-01

    Title IX requires that the practice of segregating physical education classes on the basis of sex must cease. This article offers suggestions on how to ease the transition to sex-integrated physical education programs. (Author/DS)

  13. Recent developments in MAP - MODULAR APPROACH to PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Jennifer; Austen, Dave; Brouwer, Wytze

    2002-05-01

    We present recent developments in MAP - MODULAR APPROACH to PHYSICS - JAVA enhanced modules to be used as aids in teaching the first 3 terms of university physics. The MAP project is very comprehensive and consists of a modular approach to physics that utilizes JAVA applets, FLASH animations and HTML based tutorials. The overall instructional philosophy of MAP is constructivist and the project emphasizes active learner participation. In this talk we will provide a quick overview of the project and the results of recent pilot testing at several Canadian universities. It will also include a discussion of the VIDEO LAB aspect of MAP. This is a component that is integrated into MAP and permits students to capture and evaluate otherwise difficult to study phenomena on video.

  14. Integrating Physically Handicapped Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Intended for regular class teachers working with mainstreamed physically handicapped pupils, the article offers guidelines regarding school organization, conditions directly affecting the pupil, and classroom considerations. A brief review of the major conditions (such as allergies, cerebral palsy, and muscular dystrophy) is presented. (CL)

  15. Physics Integration KErnels (PIKE)

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Roger

    2014-07-31

    Pike is a software library for coupling and solving multiphysics applications. It provides basic interfaces and utilities for performing code-to-code coupling. It provides simple “black-box” Picard iteration methods for solving the coupled system of equations including Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel solvers. Pike was developed originally to couple neutronics and thermal fluids codes to simulate a light water nuclear reactor for the Consortium for Simulation of Light-water Reactors (CASL) DOE Energy Innovation Hub. The Pike library contains no physics and just provides interfaces and utilities for coupling codes. It will be released open source under a BSD license as part of the Trilinos solver framework (trilinos.org) which is also BSD. This code provides capabilities similar to other open source multiphysics coupling libraries such as LIME, AMP, and MOOSE.

  16. Integrable mappings via rational elliptic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Teruhisa

    2004-02-01

    We present a geometric description of the QRT map (which is an integrable mapping introduced by Quispel, Roberts and Thompson) in terms of the addition formula of a rational elliptic surface. By this formulation, we classify all the cases when the QRT map is periodic; and show that its period is 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6. A generalization of the QRT map which acts birationally on a pencil of K3 surfaces, or Calabi-Yau manifolds, is also presented.

  17. Non-integrability vs. integrability in pentagram maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khesin, Boris; Soloviev, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    We revisit recent results on integrable cases for higher-dimensional generalizations of the 2D pentagram map: short-diagonal, dented, deep-dented, and corrugated versions, and define a universal class of pentagram maps, which are proved to possess projective duality. We show that in many cases the pentagram map cannot be included into integrable flows as a time-one map, and discuss how the corresponding notion of discrete integrability can be extended to include jumps between invariant tori. We also present a numerical evidence that certain generalizations of the integrable 2D pentagram map are non-integrable and present a conjecture for a necessary condition of their discrete integrability.

  18. A physical map of the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Simon G; Sekhon, Mandeep; Schein, Jacqueline; Zhao, Shaying; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Scott, Carol E; Evans, Richard S; Burridge, Paul W; Cox, Tony V; Fox, Christopher A; Hutton, Richard D; Mullenger, Ian R; Phillips, Kimbly J; Smith, James; Stalker, Jim; Threadgold, Glen J; Birney, Ewan; Wylie, Kristine; Chinwalla, Asif; Wallis, John; Hillier, LaDeana; Carter, Jason; Gaige, Tony; Jaeger, Sara; Kremitzki, Colin; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; McGrane, Rebecca; Mead, Kelly; Walker, Rebecca; Jones, Steven; Smith, Michael; Asano, Jennifer; Bosdet, Ian; Chan, Susanna; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Chiu, Readman; Fjell, Chris; Fuhrmann, Dan; Girn, Noreen; Gray, Catharine; Guin, Ran; Hsiao, Letticia; Krzywinski, Martin; Kutsche, Reta; Lee, Soo Sen; Mathewson, Carrie; McLeavy, Candice; Messervier, Steve; Ness, Steven; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Saeedi, Parvaneh; Smailus, Duane; Spence, Lorraine; Stott, Jeff; Taylor, Sheryl; Terpstra, Wesley; Tsai, Miranda; Vardy, Jill; Wye, Natasja; Yang, George; Shatsman, Sofiya; Ayodeji, Bola; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Krol, Margaret; Russell, Daniel; Overton, Larry; Malek, Joel A; Holmes, Mike; Heaney, Michael; Shetty, Jyoti; Feldblyum, Tamara; Nierman, William C; Catanese, Joseph J; Hubbard, Tim; Waterston, Robert H; Rogers, Jane; de Jong, Pieter J; Fraser, Claire M; Marra, Marco; McPherson, John D; Bentley, David R

    2002-08-15

    A physical map of a genome is an essential guide for navigation, allowing the location of any gene or other landmark in the chromosomal DNA. We have constructed a physical map of the mouse genome that contains 296 contigs of overlapping bacterial clones and 16,992 unique markers. The mouse contigs were aligned to the human genome sequence on the basis of 51,486 homology matches, thus enabling use of the conserved synteny (correspondence between chromosome blocks) of the two genomes to accelerate construction of the mouse map. The map provides a framework for assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence data, and a tile path of clones for generation of the reference sequence. Definition of the human-mouse alignment at this level of resolution enables identification of a mouse clone that corresponds to almost any position in the human genome. The human sequence may be used to facilitate construction of other mammalian genome maps using the same strategy.

  19. A first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most-widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Coupling great interest in this species as a research model with the need for genetic improvement of aquaculture production efficiency traits justifies the continued development of genomics research resources. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for production and life-history traits in rainbow trout. An integrated physical and genetic map is needed to facilitate fine mapping of QTL and the selection of positional candidate genes for incorporation in marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs for improving rainbow trout aquaculture production. Results The first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome is composed of 238 BAC contigs anchored to chromosomes of the genetic map. It covers more than 10% of the genome across segments from all 29 chromosomes. Anchoring of 203 contigs to chromosomes of the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA) genetic map was achieved through mapping of 288 genetic markers derived from BAC end sequences (BES), screening of the BAC library with previously mapped markers and matching of SNPs with BES reads. In addition, 35 contigs were anchored to linkage groups of the INRA (French National Institute of Agricultural Research) genetic map through markers that were not informative for linkage analysis in the NCCCWA mapping panel. The ratio of physical to genetic linkage distances varied substantially among chromosomes and BAC contigs with an average of 3,033 Kb/cM. Conclusions The integrated map described here provides a framework for a robust composite genome map for rainbow trout. This resource is needed for genomic analyses in this research model and economically important species and will facilitate comparative genome mapping with other salmonids and with model fish species. This resource will also facilitate efforts to

  20. The Pentagram Map: A Discrete Integrable System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsienko, Valentin; Schwartz, Richard; Tabachnikov, Serge

    2010-10-01

    The pentagram map is a projectively natural transformation defined on (twisted) polygons. A twisted polygon is a map from {mathbb Z} into {{mathbb{RP}}^2} that is periodic modulo a projective transformation called the monodromy. We find a Poisson structure on the space of twisted polygons and show that the pentagram map relative to this Poisson structure is completely integrable. For certain families of twisted polygons, such as those we call universally convex, we translate the integrability into a statement about the quasi-periodic motion for the dynamics of the pentagram map. We also explain how the pentagram map, in the continuous limit, corresponds to the classical Boussinesq equation. The Poisson structure we attach to the pentagram map is a discrete version of the first Poisson structure associated with the Boussinesq equation. A research announcement of this work appeared in [16].

  1. Physical and genetic maps for chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, J.B.; Difilippantonio, M.J.; Pakstis, A.J.; Ward, D.C.; Kidd, K.K.; Goodfellow, P.J.

    1993-05-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) physical map of 14 polymorphic loci on chromosome 10 covers over 62% of the fractional length of chromosome 10. The positions of three previously mapped loci are confirmed, nine more are refined, and two new loci are cytogenetically mapped. The order of loci determined by FISH agrees with that obtained by genetic linkage studies. When the distance estimates for the physical map are compared to the distance estimates of the existing linkage map, the sex average ratio of the fractional length (FL) per centimorgan (cM) for this portion of chromosome 10 is 0.004 (or 0.4% FL/cM). However, the average ratios for male- and female-specific genetic distances are quite different, in agreement with an overall higher rate of recombination in females (0.008 FL/cM and 0.003 FL/cM, respectively). Moreover, the ratio across the centromere is larger for both the male (0.031 FL/cM) and the female (0.009 FL/cM) than the ratio encompassing the q arm (0.006 FL/cM for males and 0.002 FL/cM for females), suggesting that there is reduced recombination at the centromere in both the male and the female maps when compared to the physical distance generated from FISH on metaphase chromosomes. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Statistical and computational challenges in physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.O.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-06-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like Huntington`s disease, cystic fibrosis, and myotonic dystrophy. Instrumental in these efforts has been the construction of so-called {open_quotes}physical maps{close_quotes} of large regions of human chromosomes. Constructing a physical map of a chromosome presents a number of interesting challenges to the computational statistician. In addition to the general ill-posedness of the problem, complications include the size of the data sets, computational complexity, and the pervasiveness of experimental error. The nature of the problem and the presence of many levels of experimental uncertainty make statistical approaches to map construction appealing. Simultaneously, however, the size and combinatorial complexity of the problem make such approaches computationally demanding. In this paper we discuss what physical maps are and describe three different kinds of physical maps, outlining issues which arise in constructing them. In addition, we describe our experience with powerful, interactive statistical computing environments. We found that the ability to create high-level specifications of proposed algorithms which could then be directly executed provided a flexible rapid prototyping facility for developing new statistical models and methods. The ability to check the implementation of an algorithm by comparing its results to that of an executable specification enabled us to rapidly debug both specification and implementation in an environment of changing needs.

  3. Outcome mapping for health system integration.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care.

  4. Outcome mapping for health system integration

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. PMID:23526058

  5. Boolean differentiation and integration using Karnaugh maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, J. H.; Tapia, M. A.; Bennett, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for differentiation and integration of Boolean functions by means of Karnaugh maps. The algorithms are considered simple when the number of variables is six or less; in this case Boolean differentiation and integration is said to be as easy as the Karnaugh map method of simplifying switching functions. It is suggested that the algorithms would be useful in the analysis of faults in combinational systems and in the synthesis of asynchronous sequential systems which utilize edge-sensitive flip-flops.

  6. Technologies for large-scale physical mapping of human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1994-12-01

    Since its inception 6 years ago, the Human Genome Project has made rapid progress towards its ultimate goal of developing the complete sequence of all human chromosomes. This progress has been made possible through the development of automated devices by laboratories throughout the world that aid the molecular biologist in various phases of the project. The initial phase involves the generation of physical and genetic maps of each chromosome. This task is nearing completion at a low resolution level with several instances of very high detailed maps being developed for isolated chromosomes. In support of the initial mapping thrust of this program, the robotics and automation effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed DNA gridding technologies along with associated database and user interface systems. This paper will discuss these systems in detail and focus on the formalism developed for subsystems which allow for facile system integration.

  7. Discrete mappings with an explicit discrete Lyapunov function related to integrable mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hironori; Takahashi, Daisuke; Matsukidaira, Junta

    2006-05-01

    We propose discrete mappings of second order that have a discrete analogue of Lyapunov function. The mappings are extensions of the integrable Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) mapping, and a discrete Lyapunov function of the mappings is identical to an explicit conserved quantity of the QRT mapping. Moreover we can obtain a differential and an ultradiscrete limit of the mappings preserving the existence of Lyapunov function. We also give applications of a mapping with an adjusted parameter, a probabilistic mapping and coupled mappings.

  8. Integration of the draft sequence and physical map as a framework for genomic research in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. and Zucc.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is a model for the legume research community due to its importance as a crop, a well populated genetic map, and the availability of a genome sequence. Even though a whole genome shotgun sequence and Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) libraries are available, a high-resolution chromosome-b...

  9. Refined physical map of the human PAX2/HOX11/NFKB2 cancer gene region at 10q24 and relocalization of the HPV6AI1 viral integration site to 14q13.3-q21.1

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Sheryl M; McDonald, Margaret; Chen, Xiao-Ning; Korenberg, Julie R; Neri, Antonino; Kahn, Tomas; Eccles, Michael R; Morris, Christine M

    2003-01-01

    Background Chromosome band 10q24 is a gene-rich domain and host to a number of cancer, developmental, and neurological genes. Recurring translocations, deletions and mutations involving this chromosome band have been observed in different human cancers and other disease conditions, but the precise identification of breakpoint sites, and detailed characterization of the genetic basis and mechanisms which underlie many of these rearrangements has yet to be resolved. Towards this end it is vital to establish a definitive genetic map of this region, which to date has shown considerable volatility through time in published works of scientific journals, within different builds of the same international genomic database, and across the differently constructed databases. Results Using a combination of chromosome and interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), BAC end-sequencing and genomic database analysis we present a physical map showing that the order and chromosomal orientation of selected genes within 10q24 is CEN-CYP2C9-PAX2-HOX11-NFKB2-TEL. Our analysis has resolved the orientation of an otherwise dynamically evolving assembly of larger contigs upstream of this region, and in so doing verifies the order and orientation of a further 9 cancer-related genes and GOT1. This study further shows that the previously reported human papillomavirus type 6a DNA integration site HPV6AI1 does not map to 10q24, but that it maps at the interface of chromosome bands 14q13.3-q21.1. Conclusions This revised map will allow more precise localization of chromosome rearrangements involving chromosome band 10q24, and will serve as a useful baseline to better understand the molecular aetiology of chromosomal instability in this region. In particular, the relocation of HPV6AI1 is important to report because this HPV6a integration site, originally isolated from a tonsillar carcinoma, was shown to be rearranged in other HPV6a-related malignancies, including 2 of 25 genital condylomas

  10. Integrating Databases with Maps: The Delivery of Cultural Data through TimeMap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian

    TimeMap is a unique integration of database management, metadata and interactive maps, designed to contextualise and deliver cultural data through maps. TimeMap extends conventional maps with the time dimension, creating and animating maps "on-the-fly"; delivers them as a kiosk application or embedded in Web pages; links flexibly to…

  11. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  12. Nomenclature for physical mapping of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Among these issues, that of establishing nomenclature conventions, was seen to be fundamental to the development of useful data management systems and essential for the orderly and efficient development of such systems. Therefore, the present workshop was convened, as the first in the recommended series, to identify the issues involved in establishing nomenclature standards and to develop a set of recommendations for such standards. This report summarizes the proceedings of the workshop and lays out specific proposals for naming DNA entities for physical mapping. The scientific community should discuss and develop these proposals so that naming conventions can be established. The proposals apply specifically to human DNA entities; however, the relevance to nomenclature in other systems should be part of the broader discussion. 13 refs.

  13. The Many Faces of Integrated Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Placek, Judith H.; O'Sullivan, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Describes two forms of integrating physical education curriculum that are appropriate for elementary and secondary education (internal and external). Presents implications of integrated curriculum for teachers and schools, discusses implications for teacher education and physical education units, and examines the importance of subject matter…

  14. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  15. Generating a physical map of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, N.; Oin, S.; Sait, S.

    1994-09-01

    A four-hit chromosome-specific YAC library is being used to construct an overlapping YAC clone physical map of human chromosome 11. Each of the 1824 YAC clones have been sized by pulsed-field gel analysis with a resulting average insert size of 350 kb. Three hundred of the clones have been localized to a chromosome band by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We are using two complementary approaches to assemble YAC contigs: hybridization-based screening with Alu-PCR products and STS-based screening. Both screening approaches use pooling strategies to uniquely address each of the well locations with a minimum number of DNA pools. Since our main source of YAC clones is a chromosome specific library, the pool complexity is an order of magnitude smaller in comparison to total genomic libraries. Alu products with three different Alu primers were generated from both the monochromosomal J1 hybrid and individual YAC clones. YAC clones were chosen to generate probes using a sample without replacement strategy. Greater than 1700 YAC clones have been assembled into contigs. These initial contigs are estimated to be on average 1 Mb in size. Each of the contigs have been binned into a chromosomal band by virture of it containing YACs localized by FISH or YACs positive for one or more mapped STSs. Confirmation of the contigs is being achieved with Line I fingerprinting. The initial contigs are currently being joined using probes derived from the YAC clone ends defining the outermost points in the contigs for hybridization of colony filters. Remaining gaps in the contigs will be joined using alternative large insert libraries.

  16. Physically Important Integrals Without Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reif, F.; Larkin, Jill H.

    1976-01-01

    Develops a geometric solution to be used with spatial integrals needed for finding electric and magnetic fields. The method is used in the calculation of the electric fields due to a uniformly charged plane, line and sphere. (CP)

  17. Building a cognitive map by assembling multiple path integration systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ranxiao Frances

    2016-06-01

    Path integration and cognitive mapping are two of the most important mechanisms for navigation. Path integration is a primitive navigation system which computes a homing vector based on an animal's self-motion estimation, while cognitive map is an advanced spatial representation containing richer spatial information about the environment that is persistent and can be used to guide flexible navigation to multiple locations. Most theories of navigation conceptualize them as two distinctive, independent mechanisms, although the path integration system may provide useful information for the integration of cognitive maps. This paper demonstrates a fundamentally different scenario, where a cognitive map is constructed in three simple steps by assembling multiple path integrators and extending their basic features. The fact that a collection of path integration systems can be turned into a cognitive map suggests the possibility that cognitive maps may have evolved directly from the path integration system.

  18. Conflation and integration of archived geologic maps and associated uncertainties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoberg, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Old, archived geologic maps are often available with little or no associated metadata. This creates special problems in terms of extracting their data to use with a modern database. This research focuses on some problems and uncertainties associated with conflating older geologic maps in regions where modern geologic maps are, as yet, non-existent as well as vertically integrating the conflated maps with layers of modern GIS data (in this case, The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey). Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri was chosen as the test area. It is covered by six archived geologic maps constructed in the years between 1928 and 1994. Conflating these maps results in a map that is internally consistent with these six maps, is digitally integrated with hydrography, elevation and orthoimagery data, and has a 95% confidence interval useful for further data set integration.

  19. Integration of the feline radiation hybrid and linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Murphy, W J; Menotti-Raymond, M; O'Brien, S J

    2001-06-01

    The recent development of genome mapping resources for the domestic cat provides a unique opportunity to study comparative medicine in this companion animal which can inform and benefit both veterinary and human biomedical concerns. We describe here the integration and order comparison of the feline radiation hybrid (RH) map with the feline interspecies backcross (ISB) genetic linkage map, constructed by a backcross of F1 hybrids between domestic cat (Felis catus) and the Asian leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). Of 253 microsatellite loci mapped in the ISB, 176 equivalently spaced markers were ordered among a framework of 424 Type I coding markers in the RH map. The integration of the RH and ISB maps resolves the orientation of multiple linkage groups and singleton loci from the ISB genetic map. This integrated map provides the foundation for gene mapping assessments in the domestic cat and in related species of the Felidae family.

  20. Integrated Genomic Map from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli J96

    PubMed Central

    Melkerson-Watson, Lyla J.; Rode, Christopher K.; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy; Bloch, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli J96 is a uropathogen having both broad similarities to and striking differences from nonpathogenic, laboratory E. coli K-12. Strain J96 contains three large (>100-kb) unique genomic segments integrated on the chromosome; two are recognized as pathogenicity islands containing urovirulence genes. Additionally, the strain possesses a fourth smaller accessory segment of 28 kb and two deletions relative to strain K-12. We report an integrated physical and genetic map of the 5,120-kb J96 genome. The chromosome contains 26 NotI, 13 BlnI, and 7 I-CeuI macrorestriction sites. Macrorestriction mapping was rapidly accomplished by a novel transposon-based procedure: analysis of modified minitransposon insertions served to align the overlapping macrorestriction fragments generated by three different enzymes (each sharing a common cleavage site within the insert), thus integrating the three different digestion patterns and ordering the fragments. The resulting map, generated from a total of 54 mini-Tn10 insertions, was supplemented with auxanography and Southern analysis to indicate the positions of insertionally disrupted aminosynthetic genes and cloned virulence genes, respectively. Thus, it contains not only physical, macrorestriction landmarks but also the loci for eight housekeeping genes shared with strain K-12 and eight acknowledged urovirulence genes; the latter confirmed clustering of virulence genes at the large unique accessory chromosomal segments. The 115-kb J96 plasmid was resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in NotI digests. However, because the plasmid lacks restriction sites for the enzymes BlnI and I-CeuI, it was visualized in BlnI and I-CeuI digests only of derivatives carrying plasmid inserts artificially introducing these sites. Owing to an I-SceI site on the transposon, the plasmid could also be visualized and sized from plasmid insertion mutants after digestion with this enzyme. The insertional strains generated in construction of

  1. Physical mapping of genetic markers on the short arm of chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Goodart, S.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-12-01

    The deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 is associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. In addition, loss of this portion of a chromosome is a common cytogenetic marker in a number of malignancies. However, to date, no genes associated with these disorders have been identified. Physical maps are the first step in isolating causative genes, and genes involved in autosomal recessive disorders are now routinely mapped through the identification of linked markers. Extensive genetic maps based upon polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) have provided researchers with a large number of markers to which such disorders can be genetically mapped. However, the physical locations of many of these STRs have not been determined. Toward the goal of integrating the human genetic maps with the physical maps, a 5p somatic cell hybrid deletion mapping panel that was derived from patients with 5p deletions or translocations was used to physically map 47 STRs that have been used to construct genetic maps of 5p. These data will be useful in the localization of disease genes that map to 5p and may be involved in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. 26 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Integrated Learning with Physical Education and Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Bidner, Sara; Edwards, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Integrated learning is well established in education, primarily in the classroom subjects. This article describes settings and ways for extending integrated instruction to physical education and music. Benefits of these connections include reinforcing content and better meeting the needs of students whose intelligences include the bodily…

  3. Meeting the Demands of Professional Education: A Study of Mind Mapping in a Professional Doctoral Physical Therapy Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Elicia L.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to investigate whether the quiz scores of physical therapy students who integrated mind mapping in their learning strategies are significantly different than the quiz scores of students who did not use mind mapping to learn in a lecture-based research course and examine the students' perceptions of mind mapping as a…

  4. A physical map of the bovine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Cattle are important agriculturally and relevant as a model organism. Previously described genetic and radiation hybrid (RH) maps of the bovine genome have been used to identify genomic regions and genes affecting specific traits. Application of these maps to identify influential geneti...

  5. Physics Research Integrated Development Environment (PRIDE)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.; Cormell, L.

    1993-12-01

    Past efforts to implement a Software Engineering approach to High Energy Physics computing have been met with significant resistance and have been, in many cases, only marginally successful. At least a portion of the problem has been the Lick of an integrated development environment, tailored to High Energy Physics and incorporating a suite of Computer Aided Software Engineering tools. The Superconducting Super Collider Physics Research Division Computing Department is implementing pilot projects to develop just such an environment.

  6. Cyber/Physical Security Vulnerability Assessment Integration

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Douglas G.; Clements, Samuel L.; Patrick, Scott W.; Perkins, Casey J.; Muller, George; Lancaster, Mary J.; Hutton, William J.

    2013-02-28

    Securing high value and critical assets is one of the biggest challenges facing this nation and others around the world. In modern integrated systems, there are four potential modes of attack available to an adversary: • physical only attack, • cyber only attack, • physical-enabled cyber attack, • cyber-enabled physical attack. Blended attacks involve an adversary working in one domain to reduce system effectiveness in another domain. This enables the attacker to penetrate further into the overall layered defenses. Existing vulnerability assessment (VA) processes and software tools which predict facility vulnerabilities typically evaluate the physical and cyber domains separately. Vulnerabilities which result from the integration of cyber-physical control systems are not well characterized and are often overlooked by existing assessment approaches. In this paper, we modified modification of the timely detection methodology, used for decades in physical security VAs, to include cyber components. The Physical and Cyber Risk Analysis Tool (PACRAT) prototype illustrates an integrated vulnerability assessment that includes cyber-physical interdependencies. Information about facility layout, network topology, and emplaced safeguards is used to evaluate how well suited a facility is to detect, delay, and respond to attacks, to identify the pathways most vulnerable to attack, and to evaluate how often safeguards are compromised for a given threat or adversary type. We have tested the PACRAT prototype on critical infrastructure facilities and the results are promising. Future work includes extending the model to prescribe the recommended security improvements via an automated cost-benefit analysis.

  7. Construction of genome-wide physical BAC contigs using mapped cDNA as probes: Toward an integrated BAC library resource for genome sequencing and analysis. Annual report, July 1995--January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.C.; Bocskai, D.; Cao, Y.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of human genome project is to characterize and sequence entire genomes of human and several model organisms, thus providing complete sets of information on the entire structure of transcribed, regulatory and other functional regions for these organisms. In the past years, a number of useful genetic and physical markers on human and mouse genomes have been made available along with the advent of BAC library resources for these organisms. The advances in technology and resource development made it feasible to efficiently construct genome-wide physical BAC contigs for human and other genomes. Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes are available for human genome mapping. ESTs and cDNAs are excellent resources for building contig maps for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms--as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDoreen genomic libraries efficiently for large number of DNA probes by combining over 100 cDNA probes in each hybridization. Second, the linkage and order of genes are rather conserved among human, mouse and other model organisms. Therefore, gene markers have advantages over random anonymous STSs in building maps for comparative genomic studies.

  8. An integration of integrated information theory with fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Adam B.

    2014-01-01

    To truly eliminate Cartesian ghosts from the science of consciousness, we must describe consciousness as an aspect of the physical. Integrated Information Theory states that consciousness arises from intrinsic information generated by dynamical systems; however existing formulations of this theory are not applicable to standard models of fundamental physical entities. Modern physics has shown that fields are fundamental entities, and in particular that the electromagnetic field is fundamental. Here I hypothesize that consciousness arises from information intrinsic to fundamental fields. This hypothesis unites fundamental physics with what we know empirically about the neuroscience underlying consciousness, and it bypasses the need to consider quantum effects. PMID:24550877

  9. An integration of integrated information theory with fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Adam B

    2014-01-01

    To truly eliminate Cartesian ghosts from the science of consciousness, we must describe consciousness as an aspect of the physical. Integrated Information Theory states that consciousness arises from intrinsic information generated by dynamical systems; however existing formulations of this theory are not applicable to standard models of fundamental physical entities. Modern physics has shown that fields are fundamental entities, and in particular that the electromagnetic field is fundamental. Here I hypothesize that consciousness arises from information intrinsic to fundamental fields. This hypothesis unites fundamental physics with what we know empirically about the neuroscience underlying consciousness, and it bypasses the need to consider quantum effects.

  10. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  11. Semantic integration for mapping the underworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Gaihua; Cohn, Anthony G.

    2008-10-01

    Utility infrastructure is vital to the daily life of modern society. As the vast majority of urban utility assets are buried underneath public roads, the need to install/repair utility assets often requires opening ground with busy traffic. Unfortunately, at present most excavation works are carried out without knowing exactly what is where, which causes far more street breakings than necessary. This research studies how maximum benefit can be gained from the existing knowledge of buried assets. The key challenge here is that utility data is heterogeneous, which arises due to different domain perceptions and varying data modelling practices. This research investigates factors which prevent utility knowledge from being fully exploited and suggests that integration techniques can be applied for reconciling semantic heterogeneity within the utility domain. In this paper we discuss the feasibility of a common utility ontology to describe underground assets, and present techniques for constructing a basic utility ontology in the form of a thesaurus. The paper also demonstrates how the utility thesaurus developed is employed as a shared ontology for mapping utility data. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the techniques proposed, and feedback from industrial partners is encouraging and shows that techniques work effectively with real world utility data.

  12. Integrable mappings of the plane preserving biquadratic invariant curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrou, Apostolos; Roberts, John A. G.

    2001-08-01

    We provide a general framework to construct integrable mappings of the plane that preserve a one-parameter family B(x,y,K) of biquadratic invariant curves where parametrization by K is very general. These mappings are reversible by construction (i.e. they are the composition of two involutions) and can be shown to be measure preserving. They generalize integrable maps previously given by McMillan and Quispel, Roberts and Thompson. By considering a transformation of the case of the symmetric biquadratic to a canonical form, we provide a normal form for the symmetric integrable map acting on each invariant curve. We give a Lax pair for a large subclass of our symmetric integrable maps, including at least a 10-parameter subfamily of the 12-parameter symmetric Quispel-Roberts-Thompson maps.

  13. Singular Function Integration in Computational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbun, Javier

    2009-03-01

    In teaching computational methods in the undergraduate physics curriculum, standard integration approaches taught include the rectangular, trapezoidal, Simpson, Romberg, and others. Over time, these techniques have proven to be invaluable and students are encouraged to employ the most efficient method that is expected to perform best when applied to a given problem. However, some physics research applications require techniques that can handle singularities. While decreasing the step size in traditional approaches is an alternative, this may not always work and repetitive processes make this route even more inefficient. Here, I present two existing integration rules designed to handle singular integrals. I compare them to traditional rules as well as to the exact analytic results. I suggest that it is perhaps time to include such approaches in the undergraduate computational physics course.

  14. A second generation integrated map of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome: analysis of synteny with model fish genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we generated DNA fingerprints and end sequences from bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from two new libraries to improve the first generation integrated physical and genetic map of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome. The current version of the physical map is compose...

  15. Multiscale mapping: Physical concepts and mathematical techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an introductory summary for papers either invited or a part of a symposium at the 18th World Congress of Soil Science, July 2006 in Philadelphia. The symposium, titled "Multiscale Mapping of Soil Properties for Environmental Studies, Agriculture, and Decision Making," focused on techniques u...

  16. Methods of geometrical integration in accelerator physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    In the paper we consider a method of geometric integration for a long evolution of the particle beam in cyclic accelerators, based on the matrix representation of the operator of particles evolution. This method allows us to calculate the corresponding beam evolution in terms of two-dimensional matrices including for nonlinear effects. The ideology of the geometric integration introduces in appropriate computational algorithms amendments which are necessary for preserving the qualitative properties of maps presented in the form of the truncated series generated by the operator of evolution. This formalism extends both on polarized and intense beams. Examples of practical applications are described.

  17. A physical genome map of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO.

    PubMed Central

    Römling, U; Grothues, D; Bautsch, W; Tümmler, B

    1989-01-01

    A complete macrorestriction map of the 5.9 Mb genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO (DSM 1707) was constructed by the combination of various one- and two-dimensional pulsed field gel electrophoresis techniques. A total of 51 restriction sites (36 SpeI sites, 15 DpnI sites) were placed on the physical map yielding an average resolution of 110 kb. Several genes encoding virulence factors and enzymes of metabolic pathways were located on the anonymous map by Southern hybridization. Distances between the gene loci were similar on the genetic and physical maps, suggesting an even distribution of genome mobility throughout the bacterial chromosome. The four rRNA operons were organized in pairs of inverted repeats. The two-dimensional macro-restriction techniques described herein are generally applicable for the genome mapping of any prokaryote and lower eukaryote which yields resolvable fragment patterns on two-dimensional pulsed field gels. Images PMID:2512121

  18. Cortical cartography reveals political and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Loring, David W; Gaillard, William Davis; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Meador, Kimford J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in functional imaging have provided noninvasive techniques to probe brain organization of multiple constructs including language and memory. Because of high overall rates of agreements with older techniques, including Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), some have proposed that those approaches should be largely abandoned because of their invasiveness, and replaced with noninvasive functional imaging methods. High overall agreement, however, is based largely on concordant language lateralization in series dominated by cases of typical cerebral dominance. Advocating a universal switch from Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) ignores the differences in specific expertise across epilepsy centers, many of which often have greater skill with one approach rather than the other, and that Wada, CSM, fMRI, and MEG protocols vary across institutions resulting in different outcomes and reliability. Specific patient characteristics also affect whether Wada or CSM might influence surgical management, making it difficult to accept broad recommendations against currently useful clinical tools. Although the development of noninvasive techniques has diminished the frequency of more invasive approaches, advocating their use to replace Wada testing and CSM across all epilepsy surgery programs without consideration of the different skills, protocols, and expertise at any given center site is ill-advised.

  19. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  20. What Do Pre-Service Physics Teachers Know and Think about Concept Mapping?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didis, Nilüfer; Özcan, Özgür; Azar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In order to use concept maps in physics classes effectively, teachers' knowledge and ideas about concept mapping are as important as the physics knowledge used in mapping. For this reason, we aimed to examine pre-service physics teachers' knowledge on concept mapping, their ideas about the implementation of concept mapping in physics…

  1. A physical map of 30,000 human genes.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Schuler, G D; Gyapay, G; Beasley, E M; Soderlund, C; Rodriguez-Tomé, P; Hui, L; Matise, T C; McKusick, K B; Beckmann, J S; Bentolila, S; Bihoreau, M; Birren, B B; Browne, J; Butler, A; Castle, A B; Chiannilkulchai, N; Clee, C; Day, P J; Dehejia, A; Dibling, T; Drouot, N; Duprat, S; Fizames, C; Fox, S; Gelling, S; Green, L; Harrison, P; Hocking, R; Holloway, E; Hunt, S; Keil, S; Lijnzaad, P; Louis-Dit-Sully, C; Ma, J; Mendis, A; Miller, J; Morissette, J; Muselet, D; Nusbaum, H C; Peck, A; Rozen, S; Simon, D; Slonim, D K; Staples, R; Stein, L D; Stewart, E A; Suchard, M A; Thangarajah, T; Vega-Czarny, N; Webber, C; Wu, X; Hudson, J; Auffray, C; Nomura, N; Sikela, J M; Polymeropoulos, M H; James, M R; Lander, E S; Hudson, T J; Myers, R M; Cox, D R; Weissenbach, J; Boguski, M S; Bentley, D R

    1998-10-23

    A map of 30,181 human gene-based markers was assembled and integrated with the current genetic map by radiation hybrid mapping. The new gene map contains nearly twice as many genes as the previous release, includes most genes that encode proteins of known function, and is twofold to threefold more accurate than the previous version. A redesigned, more informative and functional World Wide Web site (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genemap) provides the mapping information and associated data and annotations. This resource constitutes an important infrastructure and tool for the study of complex genetic traits, the positional cloning of disease genes, the cross-referencing of mammalian genomes, and validated human transcribed sequences for large-scale studies of gene expression.

  2. Examining the Conceptual Organization of Students in an Integrated Algebra and Physical Science Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Susan L.

    1998-01-01

    Compares the conceptual organization of students in an integrated algebra and physical science class (SAM 9) with that of students in a discipline-specific physical science class (PSO). Analysis of students' concept maps indicates that the SAM9 students used a greater number of procedural linkages to connect mathematics and science concepts than…

  3. Creation of a global land cover and a probability map through a new map integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Iwao, Koki; Yamagata, Yoshiki

    2014-05-01

    Global land cover maps are widely used for assessment and in research of various kinds, and in recent years have also come to be used for socio-economic forecasting. However, existing maps are not very accurate, and differences between maps also contribute to their unreliability. Improving the accuracy of global land cover maps would benefit a number of research fields. In this paper, we propose a methodology for using ground truth data to integrate existing global land cover maps. We checked the accuracy of a map created using this methodology and found that the accuracy of the new map is 74.6%, which is 3% higher than for existing maps. We then created a 0.5-min latitude by 0.5-min longitude probability map. This map indicates the probability of agreement between the category class of the new map and truth data. Using the map, we found that the probabilities of cropland and grassland are relatively low compared with other land cover types. This appears to be because the definitions of cropland differ between maps, so the accuracy may be improved by including pasture and idle plot categories.

  4. DNA fiber mapping techniques for the assembly of high-resolution physical maps.

    PubMed

    Weier, H U

    2001-08-01

    High-resolution physical maps are indispensable for directed sequencing projects or the finishing stages of shotgun sequencing projects. These maps are also critical for the positional cloning of disease genes and genetic elements that regulate gene expression. Typically, physical maps are based on ordered sets of large insert DNA clones from cosmid, P1/PAC/BAC, or yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries. Recent technical developments provide detailed information about overlaps or gaps between clones and precisely locate the position of sequence tagged sites or expressed sequences, and thus support efforts to determine the complete sequence of the human genome and model organisms. Assembly of physical maps is greatly facilitated by hybridization of non-isotopically labeled DNA probes onto DNA molecules that were released from interphase cell nuclei or recombinant DNA clones, stretched to some extent and then immobilized on a solid support. The bound DNA, collectively called "DNA fibers," may consist of single DNA molecules in some experiments or bundles of chromatin fibers in others. Once released from the interphase nuclei, the DNA fibers become more accessible to probes and detection reagents. Hybridization efficiency is therefore increased, allowing the detection of DNA targets as small as a few hundred base pairs. This review summarizes different approaches to DNA fiber mapping and discusses the detection sensitivity and mapping accuracy as well as recent achievements in mapping expressed sequence tags and DNA replication sites.

  5. CYBER/PHYSICAL SECURITY VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Douglas G.; Key, Brad; Clements, Samuel L.; Hutton, William J.; Craig, Philip A.; Patrick, Scott W.; Crawford, Cary E.

    2011-07-17

    This internally funded Laboratory-Directed R&D project by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in conjunction with QinetiQ North America, is intended to identify and properly assess areas of overlap (and interaction) in the vulnerability assessment process between cyber security and physical protection. Existing vulnerability analysis (VA) processes and software tools exist, and these are heavily utilized in the determination of predicted vulnerability within the physical and cyber security domains. These determinations are normally performed independently of one another, and only interact on a superficial level. Both physical and cyber security subject matter experts have come to realize that though the various interactive elements exist, they are not currently quantified in most periodic security assessments. This endeavor aims to evaluate both physical and cyber VA techniques and provide a strategic approach to integrate the interdependent relationships of each into a single VA capability. This effort will also transform the existing suite of software currently utilized in the physical protection world to more accurately quantify the risk associated with a blended attack scenario. Performance databases will be created to support the characterization of the cyber security elements, and roll them into prototype software tools. This new methodology and software capability will enable analysts to better identify and assess the overall risk during a vulnerability analysis.

  6. Physical and Comparative Mapping of Distal Mouse Chromosome 16

    PubMed Central

    Cabin, Deborah E.; McKee-Johnson, Jennifer W.; Matesic, Lydia E.; Wiltshire, Tim; Rue, Elizabeth E.; Mjaatvedt, Anne E.; Huo, Yong Kang; Korenberg, Julie R.; Reeves, Roger H.

    1998-01-01

    Distal mouse Chromosome 16 (Chr. 16) includes a region of conserved linkage with human Chromosome 21 (Chr. 21). Mouse models of Down syndrome based on trisomy of distal Chr. 16 have several phenotypes similar to those seen in human patients and have proven useful for correlating dosage imbalance of specific genes with specific developmental anomalies. The degree to which such findings can be related to Down syndrome depends on how well the conserved synteny is maintained. Twenty-four genes have been mapped in both species and there are no discordancies, but the region could carry hundreds of genes. Comparative sequence represents the ultimate comparative map and will aid in identification of genes and their regulatory sequences. A physical map of the distal 4.5 Mb of Chr. 16 has been assembled as an essential step toward a map of sequence-ready templates. The map consists of 51 YACs and 15 BACs and includes 18 transcripts, 9 of which are mapped for the first time in mouse, and 3 of which are, for the first time, described in either species. YAC fragmentation was used to precisely localize the 49 markers on the map. Comparison of this physical map with that of the corresponding region on Chr. 21 shows conservation not only of gene order but of size in the 3 Mb from Cbr1 to Ets2; distal to Ets2, the human map is expanded. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to GenBank. See Tables 1 and 2 for accession nos.] PMID:9750193

  7. Integrating Radar Image Data with Google Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Bruce D.; Gibas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A public Web site has been developed as a method for displaying the multitude of radar imagery collected by NASA s Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) instrument during its 16-year mission. Utilizing NASA s internal AIRSAR site, the new Web site features more sophisticated visualization tools that enable the general public to have access to these images. The site was originally maintained at NASA on six computers: one that held the Oracle database, two that took care of the software for the interactive map, and three that were for the Web site itself. Several tasks were involved in moving this complicated setup to just one computer. First, the AIRSAR database was migrated from Oracle to MySQL. Then the back-end of the AIRSAR Web site was updated in order to access the MySQL database. To do this, a few of the scripts needed to be modified; specifically three Perl scripts that query that database. The database connections were then updated from Oracle to MySQL, numerous syntax errors were corrected, and a query was implemented that replaced one of the stored Oracle procedures. Lastly, the interactive map was designed, implemented, and tested so that users could easily browse and access the radar imagery through the Google Maps interface.

  8. A cytological-physical map of 22q11

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Rizzu, P.; Gaddini, L.

    1994-09-01

    Our laboratory is involved in the construction of a cytological-physical map of 22q11 and isolation of expressed sequences from the region involved in DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome (VCFS). One of the goals of the mapping is an understanding of the molecular mechanisms which generate the 22q11 microdeletions observed with high frequency in DGS and VCFS. Our of over 60 deleted patients studied in our laboratory, all but one were deleted for two loci approximately 1-2 Mb apart. There is evidence from patients with balanced and unbalanced translocations that deletion of the whole region is not necessary for determination of the clinical phenotype. Therefore, it is possible that deletion breakpoints occur as a consequence of structural characteristics of the DNA that predispose to rearrangements. A striking characteristic of the 22q11 region is the abundance of low copy repeat sequences. It is reasonable to think that recombination between these repeats may lead to microdeletions. However, a direct demonstration of such mechanism is not available yet. The presence of repeats makes standard physical mapping techniques based on hybridization or STS mapping often difficult to interpret. For example, we have found clones positive for the same STS that are located in different positions within 22q11. For this reason we have used high resolution cytological mapping as a supporting technique for map validation. We present the current status map which includes known polymorphic and non-polymorphic loci, newly isolated clones and chromosomal deletion breakpoints. The map extends from the loci D22S9/D22S24 to TOP1P2. Extended chromatin hybridization experiments visually demonstrate the presence of at least two repeat islands flanking (or at) the region where chromosomal breakpoints of the commonly deleted region occur.

  9. Integrating physical stress, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Uyttewaal, Magalie; Traas, Jan; Hamant, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Linking the gene regulatory network to morphogenesis is a central question in developmental biology. Shape relies on the combined actions of biochemistry and biophysics, two parameters that are under local genetic control. The blooming of molecular biology since the 1970s has promoted a biochemical view of development, leaving behind the contribution of physical forces. Recently, the development of new techniques, such as live imaging, micromechanical approaches, and computer modeling, has revitalized the biomechanics field. In this review, we use shoot apical meristem development to illustrate how biochemistry and biomechanics cooperate to integrate the local cellular gene input into global growth patterns.

  10. Successful Curriculum Mapping: Fostering Smooth Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehead, Pamela; LaBeau, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Four years ago, the staff at our school (Marie C. Graham Elementary School in Harrison Township, Michigan) agreed to take an evaluative look at the use of technology in the classroom. Through a self-study process and a district technology initiative called Project 2000, teachers had the opportunity for change relative to technology integration.…

  11. Numerical and physical magnitudes are mapped into time.

    PubMed

    Ben-Meir, Shachar; Ganor-Stern, Dana; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments we investigated mapping of numerical and physical magnitudes with temporal order. Pairs of digits were presented sequentially for a size comparison task. An advantage for numbers presented in ascending order was found when participants were comparing the numbers' physical and numerical magnitudes. The effect was more robust for comparisons of physical size, as it was found using both select larger and select smaller instructions, while for numerical comparisons it was found only for select larger instructions. Varying both the digits' numerical and physical sizes resulted in a size congruity effect, indicating automatic processing of the irrelevant magnitude dimension. Temporal order and the congruency between numerical and physical magnitudes affected comparisons in an additive manner, thus suggesting that they affect different stages of the comparison process.

  12. A draft physical map of a D-genome cotton species (Gossypium raimondii)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetically anchored physical maps of large eukaryotic genomes have proven useful both for their intrinsic merit and as an adjunct to genome sequencing. Cultivated tetraploid cottons, Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense, share a common ancestor formed by a merger of the A and D genomes about 1-2 million years ago. Toward the long-term goal of characterizing the spectrum of diversity among cotton genomes, the worldwide cotton community has prioritized the D genome progenitor Gossypium raimondii for complete sequencing. Results A whole genome physical map of G. raimondii, the putative D genome ancestral species of tetraploid cottons was assembled, integrating genetically-anchored overgo hybridization probes, agarose based fingerprints and 'high information content fingerprinting' (HICF). A total of 13,662 BAC-end sequences and 2,828 DNA probes were used in genetically anchoring 1585 contigs to a cotton consensus genetic map, and 370 and 438 contigs, respectively to Arabidopsis thaliana (AT) and Vitis vinifera (VV) whole genome sequences. Conclusion Several lines of evidence suggest that the G. raimondii genome is comprised of two qualitatively different components. Much of the gene rich component is aligned to the Arabidopsis and Vitis vinifera genomes and shows promise for utilizing translational genomic approaches in understanding this important genome and its resident genes. The integrated genetic-physical map is of value both in assembling and validating a planned reference sequence. PMID:20569427

  13. An integrated radiation physics computer code system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyn, J. J.; Harris, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    An integrated computer code system for the semi-automatic and rapid analysis of experimental and analytic problems in gamma photon and fast neutron radiation physics is presented. Such problems as the design of optimum radiation shields and radioisotope power source configurations may be studied. The system codes allow for the unfolding of complex neutron and gamma photon experimental spectra. Monte Carlo and analytic techniques are used for the theoretical prediction of radiation transport. The system includes a multichannel pulse-height analyzer scintillation and semiconductor spectrometer coupled to an on-line digital computer with appropriate peripheral equipment. The system is geometry generalized as well as self-contained with respect to material nuclear cross sections and the determination of the spectrometer response functions. Input data may be either analytic or experimental.

  14. Improving Integration Effectiveness of ID Mapping Based Biological Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Hasan M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biological objects such as genes, proteins, and pathways are represented by a convenient identifier, or ID, which is then used to cross reference, link and describe objects in biological databases. Relationships among the objects are often established using non-trivial and computationally complex ID mapping systems or converters, and are stored in authoritative databases such as UniGene, GeneCards, PIR and BioMart. Despite best efforts, such mappings are largely incomplete and riddled with false negatives. Consequently, data integration using record linkage that relies on these mappings produces poor quality of data, inadvertently leading to erroneous conclusions. In this paper, we discuss this largely ignored dimension of data integration, examine how the ubiquitous use of identifiers in biological databases is a significant barrier to knowledge fusion using distributed computational pipelines, and propose two algorithms for ad hoc and restriction free ID mapping of arbitrary types using online resources. We also propose two declarative statements for ID conversion and data integration based on ID mapping on-the-fly.

  15. A high utility integrated map of the pig genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The domestic pig is being increasingly exploited as a system for modeling human disease. It also has substantial economic importance for meat-based protein production. Physical clone maps have underpinned large-scale genomic sequencing and enabled focused cloning efforts for many genome...

  16. A comprehensive whole-genome integrated cytogenetic map for the alpaca (Lama pacos).

    PubMed

    Avila, Felipe; Baily, Malorie P; Perelman, Polina; Das, Pranab J; Pontius, Joan; Chowdhary, Renuka; Owens, Elaine; Johnson, Warren E; Merriwether, David A; Raudsepp, Terje

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis of the alpaca (Lama pacos, LPA) has progressed slowly compared to other domestic species. Here, we report the development of the first comprehensive whole-genome integrated cytogenetic map for the alpaca using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and CHORI-246 BAC library clones. The map is comprised of 230 linearly ordered markers distributed among all 36 alpaca autosomes and the sex chromosomes. For the first time, markers were assigned to LPA14, 21, 22, 28, and 36. Additionally, 86 genes from 15 alpaca chromosomes were mapped in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius, CDR), demonstrating exceptional synteny and linkage conservation between the 2 camelid genomes. Cytogenetic mapping of 191 protein-coding genes improved and refined the known Zoo-FISH homologies between camelids and humans: we discovered new homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) corresponding to HSA1-LPA/CDR11, HSA4-LPA/CDR31 and HSA7-LPA/CDR36, and revised the location of breakpoints for others. Overall, gene mapping was in good agreement with the Zoo-FISH and revealed remarkable evolutionary conservation of gene order within many human-camelid HSBs. Most importantly, 91 FISH-mapped markers effectively integrated the alpaca whole-genome sequence and the radiation hybrid maps with physical chromosomes, thus facilitating the improvement of the sequence assembly and the discovery of genes of biological importance.

  17. Integrating Terrain Maps Into a Reactive Navigation Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ayanna; Werger, Barry; Seraji, Homayoun

    2006-01-01

    An improved method of processing information for autonomous navigation of a robotic vehicle across rough terrain involves the integration of terrain maps into a reactive navigation strategy. Somewhat more precisely, the method involves the incorporation, into navigation logic, of data equivalent to regional traversability maps. The terrain characteristic is mapped using a fuzzy-logic representation of the difficulty of traversing the terrain. The method is robust in that it integrates a global path-planning strategy with sensor-based regional and local navigation strategies to ensure a high probability of success in reaching a destination and avoiding obstacles along the way. The sensor-based strategies use cameras aboard the vehicle to observe the regional terrain, defined as the area of the terrain that covers the immediate vicinity near the vehicle to a specified distance a few meters away.

  18. Discrete Integrable Systems and Poisson Algebras From Cluster Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordy, Allan P.; Hone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We consider nonlinear recurrences generated from cluster mutations applied to quivers that have the property of being cluster mutation-periodic with period 1. Such quivers were completely classified by Fordy and Marsh, who characterised them in terms of the skew-symmetric matrix that defines the quiver. The associated nonlinear recurrences are equivalent to birational maps, and we explain how these maps can be endowed with an invariant Poisson bracket and/or presymplectic structure. Upon applying the algebraic entropy test, we are led to a series of conjectures which imply that the entropy of the cluster maps can be determined from their tropical analogues, which leads to a sharp classification result. Only four special families of these maps should have zero entropy. These families are examined in detail, with many explicit examples given, and we show how they lead to discrete dynamics that is integrable in the Liouville-Arnold sense.

  19. Research on Integrated Mapping——A Case Study of Integrated Land Use with Swamp Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Yan, F.; Chang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Unified real estate registration system shows the attention, determination and effort to of CPC Central Committee and State Council on real estate registration in China. However, under current situation, China's real estate registration work made less progress. One of the reasons is that it's hard to express the property right of real estate on one map under the multi-sector management system. Under current multi-sector management system in China, different departments usually just survey and mapping the land type under its jurisdiction. For example, wetland investigation only mapping all kinds of wetland resources but not mapping other resource types. As a result, it cause he problem of coincidence or leak in integration of different results from different departments. As resources of the earth's surface, the total area of forest, grassland, wetland and so on should be equal to the total area of the earth's surface area. However, under the current system, the area of all kinds of resources is not equal to the sum of the earth's surface. Therefore, it is of great importance to express all the resources on one map. On one hand, this is conducive to find out the real area and distribution of resources and avoid the problem of coincidence or leak in integration; On the other hand, it is helpful to study the dynamic change of different resources. Therefore, we first proposed the "integrated mapping" as a solution, and take integrated land use with swamp mapping in Northeast China as an example to investigate the feasibility and difficulty. Study showed that: integrated land use with swamp mapping can be achieved through combining land use survey standards with swamps survey standards and "second mapping" program. Based on the experience of integrated land use with swamp mapping, we point out its reference function on integrated mapping and unified real estate registration system. We concluded that: (1) Comprehending and integrating different survey standard of

  20. Comparing the performance of various digital soil mapping approaches to map physical soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Pásztor, László

    2015-04-01

    Spatial information on physical soil properties is intensely expected, in order to support environmental related and land use management decisions. One of the most widely used properties to characterize soils physically is particle size distribution (PSD), which determines soil water management and cultivability. According to their size, different particles can be categorized as clay, silt, or sand. The size intervals are defined by national or international textural classification systems. The relative percentage of sand, silt, and clay in the soil constitutes textural classes, which are also specified miscellaneously in various national and/or specialty systems. The most commonly used is the classification system of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Soil texture information is essential input data in meteorological, hydrological and agricultural prediction modelling. Although Hungary has a great deal of legacy soil maps and other relevant soil information, it often occurs, that maps do not exist on a certain characteristic with the required thematic and/or spatial representation. The recent developments in digital soil mapping (DSM), however, provide wide opportunities for the elaboration of object specific soil maps (OSSM) with predefined parameters (resolution, accuracy, reliability etc.). Due to the simultaneous richness of available Hungarian legacy soil data, spatial inference methods and auxiliary environmental information, there is a high versatility of possible approaches for the compilation of a given soil map. This suggests the opportunity of optimization. For the creation of an OSSM one might intend to identify the optimum set of soil data, method and auxiliary co-variables optimized for the resources (data costs, computation requirements etc.). We started comprehensive analysis of the effects of the various DSM components on the accuracy of the output maps on pilot areas. The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate different

  1. An integrated map with cosmid/PAC contigs of a 4-Mb down syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Susukida, Rie; Okano, Saishi

    1996-03-05

    The major phenotypic features of Down syndrome have been correlated with partial trisomies of chromosome 21, allowing us to define the candidate gene region to a 4-Mb segment on the 21q22.2 band. We present here a high resolution physical map with megabase-sized cosmid/PAC contigs. This ordered clone library has provided unique material for the integration of a variety of mappable objects, including exons, cDNAs, restriction sites etc. Furthermore, our results have emplified a strategy for the completion of the chromosome 21 map to sequencing. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Integrability and vesture for harmonic maps into symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Shabnam; Tahvildar-Zadeh, Shadi

    2016-05-01

    After formulating the notion of integrability for axially symmetric harmonic maps from ℝ3 into symmetric spaces, we give a complete and rigorous proof that, subject to some mild restrictions on the target, all such maps are integrable. Furthermore, we prove that a variant of the inverse scattering method, called vesture (dressing) can always be used to generate new solutions for the harmonic map equations starting from any given solution. In particular, we show that the problem of finding N-solitonic harmonic maps into a non-compact Grassmann manifold SU(p,q)/S(U(p) × U(q)) is completely reducible via the vesture (dressing) method to a problem in linear algebra which we prove is solvable in general. We illustrate this method, and establish its agreement with previously known special cases, by explicitly computing a 1-solitonic harmonic map for the two cases (p = 1,q = 1) and (p = 2,q = 1) and showing that the family of solutions obtained in each case contains respectively the Kerr family of solutions to the Einstein vacuum equations, and the Kerr-Newman family of solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations in the hyperextreme sector of the corresponding parameters.

  3. A microsatellite-based, physically anchored linkage map for the gray, short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed

    Samollow, Paul B; Gouin, Nicolas; Miethke, Pat; Mahaney, Susan M; Kenney, Margaret; VandeBerg, John L; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Kammerer, Candace M

    2007-01-01

    The genome of the gray, short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, will be the first of any marsupial to be fully sequenced. The utility of this sequence will be greatly enhanced by construction and integration of detailed genetic and physical maps. Therefore, it is important to verify the unusual recombinational characteristics that were suggested by the 'first-generation' M. domestica linkage map; specifically, very low levels of recombination and severely reduced female recombination, both of which are contrary to patterns in other vertebrates. We constructed a new linkage map based on a different genetic cross, using a new and much larger set of map markers, and physically anchored and oriented the linkage groups onto chromosomes via fluorescence in-situ hybridization mapping. This map includes 150 loci in eight autosomal linkage groups corresponding to the eight autosome pairs, and spans 86-89% of the autosomal genome. The sex-averaged autosomal map covers 715 cM, with a full-length estimate of 866 cM; the shortest full-length linkage map reported for any vertebrate. The sex-specific maps confirmed severely reduced female recombination in all linkage groups, and an overall F/M map ratio = 0.54. These results greatly extend earlier findings, and provide an improved microsatellite-based linkage map for this species.

  4. Mapping of topological quantum circuits to physical hardware.

    PubMed

    Paler, Alexandru; Devitt, Simon J; Nemoto, Kae; Polian, Ilia

    2014-04-11

    Topological quantum computation is a promising technique to achieve large-scale, error-corrected computation. Quantum hardware is used to create a large, 3-dimensional lattice of entangled qubits while performing computation requires strategic measurement in accordance with a topological circuit specification. The specification is a geometric structure that defines encoded information and fault-tolerant operations. The compilation of a topological circuit is one important aspect of programming a quantum computer, another is the mapping of the topological circuit into the operations performed by the hardware. Each qubit has to be controlled, and measurement results are needed to propagate encoded quantum information from input to output. In this work, we introduce an algorithm for mapping an topological circuit to the operations needed by the physical hardware. We determine the control commands for each qubit in the computer and the relevant measurements that are needed to track information as it moves through the circuit.

  5. An integrated restriction fragment length polymorphism--amplified fragment length polymorphism linkage map for cultivated sunflower.

    PubMed

    Gedil, M A; Wye, C; Berry, S; Segers, B; Peleman, J; Jones, R; Leon, A; Slabaugh, M B; Knapp, S J

    2001-04-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) maps have been constructed for cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) using three independent sets of RFLP probes. The aim of this research was to integrate RFLP markers from two sets with RFLP markers for resistance gene candidate (RGC) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Genomic DNA samples of HA370 and HA372, the parents of the F2 population used to build the map, were screened for AFLPs using 42 primer combinations and RFLPs using 136 cDNA probes (RFLP analyses were performed on DNA digested with EcoRI, HindIII, EcoRV, or DraI). The AFLP primers produced 446 polymorphic and 1101 monomorphic bands between HA370 and HA372. The integrated map was built by genotyping 296 AFLP and 104 RFLP markers on 180 HA370 x HA372 F2 progeny (the AFLP marker assays were performed using 18 primer combinations). The HA370 x HA372 map comprised 17 linkage groups, presumably corresponding to the 17 haploid chromosomes of sunflower, had a mean density of 3.3 cM, and was 1326 cM long. Six RGC RFLP loci were polymorphic and mapped to three linkage groups (LG8, LG13, and LG15). AFLP markers were densely clustered on several linkage groups, and presumably reside in centromeric regions where recombination is reduced and the ratio of genetic to physical distance is low. Strategies for targeting markers to euchromatic DNA need to be tested in sunflower. The HA370 x HA372 map integrated 14 of 17 linkage groups from two independent RFLP maps. Three linkage groups were devoid of RFLP markers from one of the two maps.

  6. TOWARD EFFICIENT RIPARIAN RESTORATION: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC, PHYSICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to determine the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts for water quality protection and salmonid habitat enhancement in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. The integrated modeling system co...

  7. Movement and Learning: Integrating Physical Activity into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Emily; Miller, Stacia; Chavez, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    We know the benefits of physical activity, and yet recess and physical education classes are being cut or scaled back to make room for meeting academic standards. Is cutting recess and physical education really benefiting academics? A look at some recent studies suggests that it is not. Integrating physical activity into the classroom may increase…

  8. Dogs, Cats, and Kids: Integrating Yoga into Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toscano, Lisa; Clemente, Fran

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the benefits of integrating yoga into elementary physical education classes. Taught as warm-up exercises or as an entire class, yoga offers children of any age and physical ability the opportunity to experience success in physical activity. Children need to experience joy while participating in physical activity in order to…

  9. Integrating Evolutionary Game Theory into Mechanistic Genotype-Phenotype Mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuli; Jiang, Libo; Ye, Meixia; Sun, Lidan; Gragnoli, Claudia; Wu, Rongling

    2016-05-01

    Natural selection has shaped the evolution of organisms toward optimizing their structural and functional design. However, how this universal principle can enhance genotype-phenotype mapping of quantitative traits has remained unexplored. Here we show that the integration of this principle and functional mapping through evolutionary game theory gains new insight into the genetic architecture of complex traits. By viewing phenotype formation as an evolutionary system, we formulate mathematical equations to model the ecological mechanisms that drive the interaction and coordination of its constituent components toward population dynamics and stability. Functional mapping provides a procedure for estimating the genetic parameters that specify the dynamic relationship of competition and cooperation and predicting how genes mediate the evolution of this relationship during trait formation.

  10. Microsatellite Discovery from BAC End Sequences and Genetic Mapping to Anchor the Soybean Physical and Genetic Maps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical maps can be an invaluable resource for improving and assessing the quality of a whole-genome sequence assembly. Here we report the identification and screening of 3,290 microsatellites (SSRs) identified from BAC end sequences of clones comprising the physical map of the cultivar Williams 8...

  11. Integrated Modeling, Mapping, and Simulation (IMMS) framework for planning exercises.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman-Hill, Ernest J.; Plantenga, Todd D.

    2010-06-01

    The Integrated Modeling, Mapping, and Simulation (IMMS) program is designing and prototyping a simulation and collaboration environment for linking together existing and future modeling and simulation tools to enable analysts, emergency planners, and incident managers to more effectively, economically, and rapidly prepare, analyze, train, and respond to real or potential incidents. When complete, the IMMS program will demonstrate an integrated modeling and simulation capability that supports emergency managers and responders with (1) conducting 'what-if' analyses and exercises to address preparedness, analysis, training, operations, and lessons learned, and (2) effectively, economically, and rapidly verifying response tactics, plans and procedures.

  12. Physical and transcriptional map in the CMT 1A region

    SciTech Connect

    Chevillard, C.; Passage, E.; Cudrey, C.

    1994-09-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) has been mapped to the proximal short arm of chromosome 17. CMT1A is the most frequent of the motor and sensory peripheral neuropathies and is associated with a duplication of a 1.5 Mb fragment in proximal 17p12. Several groups have proposed that the gene coding for peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) as the candidate gene for CMT1A. We have recently published a {open_quote}MegaYAC{close_quote} contig of 6 Mb which covers the CMT1A critical region. In order to isolate new genes localized in this region, we used a {open_quote}physical trapping {close_quote} strategy derived from the direct cDNA selection technique developed by Parimoo et al. This approach has allowed us to construct cDNA {open_quotes}minilibraries{close_quotes} using YAC DNA from the CMT1A region. One of the clones in these minilibraries has been mapped back to the CMT1A duplication. Other potentially interesting clones are in the process of further characterization. Furthermore, we have mapped several Genethon microsatellites in the 6 Mb YAC contig and some are located in the CMT1A duplicated region. These highly polymorphic markers should prove useful for diagnostic testing in CMT1A.

  13. The new integrable symplectic map and the symmetry of integrable nonlinear lattice equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huanhe; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoen

    2016-07-01

    A discrete matrix spectral problem is presented and the hierarchy of discrete integrable systems is derived. Their Hamiltonian structures are established. As to the discrete integrable system, nonlinearization of the spatial parts of the Lax pairs and the adjoint Lax pairs generate a new integrable symplectic map. Based on the theory, a new integrable symplectic map and a family of finite-dimension completely integrable systems are given. Especially, two explicit equations are obtained under the Bargmann constraint. Finally, the symmetry of the discrete equation is provided according to the recursion operator and the seed symmetry. Although the solutions of the discrete equations have been gained by many methods, there are few articles that solving the discrete equation via the symmetry. So the solution of the discrete lattice equation is obtained through the symmetry theory.

  14. MapGene2Chrom, a tool to draw gene physical map based on Perl and SVG languages.

    PubMed

    Jiangtao, Chao; Yingzhen, Kong; Qian, Wang; Yuhe, Sun; Daping, Gong; Jing, Lv; Guanshan, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage map is helpful for analysis on heredity of some gene families and map-based gene cloning because of its simple and elegant manifestation. One software is in need to draw a gene physical map, which shows a manner similar to the genetic linkage map, based on the relative physical distance between genes. Although some tools like GBrowse and MapViewer etc. are available to draw gene physical map, there are obvious limitations for them: (1) the data need to be decorated in advance; (2) users can't modify results. Therefore, we developed a bio-assisted mapping software--MapGene2Chrom with PC and web versions, which is based on Perl and SVG languages. The software can be used to draw the corresponding physical map quickly in SVG format based on the input data. It will become a useful tool for drawing gene physical map with the advantages of simple input data format, easily modified output and very good portability.

  15. Fast Mapping Rapidly Integrates Information into Existing Memory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Coutanche, Marc N.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Successful learning involves integrating new material into existing memory networks. A learning procedure known as fast mapping (FM), thought to simulate the word-learning environment of children, has recently been linked to distinct neuroanatomical substrates in adults. This idea has suggested the (never-before tested) hypothesis that FM may promote rapid incorporation into cortical memory networks. We test this hypothesis here in two experiments. In our first experiment, we introduced fifty participants to sixteen unfamiliar animals and names through FM or explicit encoding (EE), and tested subjects on the training day, and again after sleep. Learning through EE produced strong declarative memories, without immediate lexical competition, as expected from slow-consolidation models. Learning through FM, however, led to almost immediate lexical competition, which continued to the next day. Additionally, the learned words began to prime related concepts on the day following FM (but not EE) training. In a second experiment, we replicated the lexical integration results, and determined that presenting an already-known item during learning was crucial for rapid integration through FM. The findings presented here indicate that learned items can be integrated into cortical memory networks at an accelerated rate through fast mapping. The retrieval of a known related concept, in order to infer the target of the FM question, is critical for this effect. PMID:25222265

  16. Integration of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) linkage and chromosomal maps.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, A; Vallejos, C E; Bachmair, A; Schweizer, D

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridisation of pooled, closely linked RFLP markers was used to integrate the genetic linkage map and the mitotic chromosome map of the common bean. Pooled RFLP probes showed clear and reproducible signals and allowed the assignment of all linkage groups to the chromosomes of two Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars, Saxa and Calima. Low extension values for signals originating from clustered RFLPs suggest that these clones are physically close to each other and that clusters in the genetic map are not a result of suppression of recombination due to the occurrence of chromosome rearrangements. For linkage group K, clustering of markers could be associated with proximity to centromeres. High variation in the number of 45S rDNA loci was observed among cultivars, suggesting that these terminal sites are highly recombinogenic in common bean.

  17. IEMIS (Integrated Emergency Management Information System) Floodplain Mapping Based on a Lidar Derived Data Set.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-05

    0-A193 971 IEMIS (INTEGRATED EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM ) FLOODPLRIN MAP.. (U) ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG HS J...illustrate the application of the automated mapping capabilities of the Integrated Emergency Management Information System (IEMIS) to FISs. Unclassified...mapping capabilities of the Integrated Emergency Management Information System (IEMIS) to FISs. II. BACKGROUND The concept of mounting laser ranging

  18. Comparison of peanut gentics and physical maps provided insights on collinearity, reversions and translocations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical maps are the valuable resources for peanut research community in understanding genome organization and serving as the basis for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection. Physical maps of two diploid wild peanut progenitor species, Arachis duranensis (A genome) and A. ipae...

  19. Learning about A level physics students’ understandings of particle physics using concept mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale piece of research using concept mapping to elicit A level students’ understandings of particle physics. Fifty-nine year 12 (16- and 17 year-old) students from two London schools participated. The exercise took place during school physics lessons. Students were instructed how to make a concept map and were provided with 24 topic-specific key words. Students’ concept maps were analysed by identifying the knowledge propositions they represented, enumerating how many students had made each one, and by identifying errors and potential misconceptions, with reference to the specification they were studying. The only correct statement made by a majority of students in both schools was that annihilation takes place when matter and antimatter collide, although there was evidence that some students were unable to distinguish between annihilation and pair production. A high proportion of students knew of up, down and strange quarks, and that the electron is a lepton. However, some students appeared to have a misconception that everything is made of quarks. Students found it harder to classify tau particles than they did electrons and muons. Where students made incorrect links about muons and tau particles their concept maps suggested that they thought they were mesons or quarks.

  20. Integrating Recent Land Cover Mapping Efforts to Update the National Gap Analysis Program's Species Habitat Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKerrow, A. J.; Davidson, A.; Earnhardt, T. S.; Benson, A. L.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decade, great progress has been made to develop national extent land cover mapping products to address natural resource issues. One of the core products of the GAP Program is range-wide species distribution models for nearly 2000 terrestrial vertebrate species in the U.S. We rely on deductive modeling of habitat affinities using these products to create models of habitat availability. That approach requires that we have a thematically rich and ecologically meaningful map legend to support the modeling effort. In this work, we tested the integration of the Multi-Resolution Landscape Characterization Consortium's National Land Cover Database 2011 and LANDFIRE's Disturbance Products to update the 2001 National GAP Vegetation Dataset to reflect 2011 conditions. The revised product can then be used to update the species models. We tested the update approach in three geographic areas (Northeast, Southeast, and Interior Northwest). We used the NLCD product to identify areas where the cover type mapped in 2011 was different from what was in the 2001 land cover map. We used Google Earth and ArcGIS base maps as reference imagery in order to label areas identified as "changed" to the appropriate class from our map legend. Areas mapped as urban or water in the 2011 NLCD map that were mapped differently in the 2001 GAP map were accepted without further validation and recoded to the corresponding GAP class. We used LANDFIRE's Disturbance products to identify changes that are the result of recent disturbance and to inform the reassignment of areas to their updated thematic label. We ran species habitat models for three species including Lewis's Woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis) and the White-tailed Jack Rabbit (Lepus townsendii) and Brown Headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla). For each of three vertebrate species we found important differences in the amount and location of suitable habitat between the 2001 and 2011 habitat maps. Specifically, Brown headed nuthatch habitat in

  1. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Physical Modelling Systems Design. A Personal View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) Physical Modeling Systems Design project was undertaken in a time of rapid change in the industrial, business, technological, training, and educational areas in Australia. A specification of a manufacturing physical modeling system was drawn up. Physical modeling provides a flexibility and configurability…

  2. Rethinking Middle School Physical Education Curriculum: An Integrated, Thematic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Placek, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews current thinking about middle school physical education and raises questions about its place in middle schools. It is suggested that physical education be integrated into the core curriculum of middle schools, and five conceptions of middle school physical education are offered. (GLR)

  3. Integrating Physical Activity into Academic Pursuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaus, Mark D.; Simpson, Cynthia G.

    2009-01-01

    Children of today may be the first generation in the United States in more than 200 years to have a life expectancy shorter than their parents. Low levels of fitness caused by physical inactivity and poor nutritional habits of many of today's youth may be a contributing factor. Combating low fitness levels with physical activity is of utmost…

  4. Integrated Health and Physical Education Program to Reduce Media Use and Increase Physical Activity in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clocksin, Brian D.; Wattson, Doris L.; Williams, Daniel P.; Randsell, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare an integrated health and physical education curriculum, focused on reducing media use and on increasing physical activity in middle school adolescents, to traditional and nonintegrated health and physical education curricula. Two middle schools' health and physical education classes were assigned to an…

  5. Reconstructing the integrated Sachs-Wolfe map with galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Jessica; Huterer, Dragan

    2016-08-01

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is a large-angle modulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), generated when CMB photons traverse evolving potential wells associated with large scale structure (LSS). Recent efforts have been made to reconstruct maps of the ISW signal using information from surveys of galaxies and other LSS tracers, but investigation into how survey systematics affect their reliability has so far been limited. Using simulated ISW and LSS maps, we study the impact of galaxy survey properties and systematic errors on the accuracy of a reconstructed ISW signal. We find that systematics that affect the observed distribution of galaxies along the line of sight, such as photo-z and bias-evolution related errors, have a relatively minor impact on reconstruction quality. In contrast, however, we find that direction-dependent calibration errors can be very harmful. Specifically, we find that, in order to avoid significant degradation of our reconstruction quality statistics, direction-dependent number density fluctuations due to systematics must be controlled so that their variance is smaller than 10-6 (which corresponds to a 0.1% calibration). Additionally, we explore the implications of our results for attempts to use reconstructed ISW maps to shed light on the origin of large-angle CMB alignments. We find that there is only a weak correlation between the true and reconstructed angular momentum dispersion, which quantifies alignment, even for reconstructed ISW maps which are fairly accurate overall.

  6. A Fast and Scalable Radiation Hybrid Map Construction and Integration Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Richa; Applegate, David L.; Maglott, Donna; Schuler, Gregory D.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a fast and scalable strategy for constructing a radiation hybrid (RH) map from data on different RH panels. The maps on each panel are then integrated to produce a single RH map for the genome. Recurring problems in using maps from several sources are that the maps use different markers, the maps do not place the overlapping markers in same order, and the objective functions for map quality are incomparable. We use methods from combinatorial optimization to develop a strategy that addresses these issues. We show that by the standard objective functions of obligate chromosome breaks and maximum likelihood, software for the traveling salesman problem produces RH maps with better quality much more quickly than using software specifically tailored for RH mapping. We use known algorithms for the longest common subsequence problem as part of our map integration strategy. We demonstrate our methods by reconstructing and integrating maps for markers typed on the Genebridge 4 (GB4) and the Stanford G3 panels publicly available from the RH database. We compare map quality of our integrated map with published maps for GB4 panel and G3 panel by considering whether markers occur in the same order on a map and in DNA sequence contigs submitted to GenBank. We find that all of the maps are inconsistent with the sequence data for at least 50% of the contigs, but our integrated maps are more consistent. The map integration strategy not only scales to multiple RH maps but also to any maps that have comparable criteria for measuring map quality. Our software improves on current technology for doing RH mapping in areas of computation time and algorithms for considering a large number of markers for mapping. The essential impediments to producing dense high-quality RH maps are data quality and panel size, not computation. PMID:10720576

  7. Map Matching and Real World Integrated Sensor Data Warehousing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.

    2014-02-01

    The inclusion of interlinked temporal and spatial elements within integrated sensor data enables a tremendous degree of flexibility when analyzing multi-component datasets. The presentation illustrates how to warehouse, process, and analyze high-resolution integrated sensor datasets to support complex system analysis at the entity and system levels. The example cases presented utilizes in-vehicle sensor system data to assess vehicle performance, while integrating a map matching algorithm to link vehicle data to roads to demonstrate the enhanced analysis possible via interlinking data elements. Furthermore, in addition to the flexibility provided, the examples presented illustrate concepts of maintaining proprietary operational information (Fleet DNA) and privacy of study participants (Transportation Secure Data Center) while producing widely distributed data products. Should real-time operational data be logged at high resolution across multiple infrastructure types, map matched to their associated infrastructure, and distributed employing a similar approach; dependencies between urban environment infrastructures components could be better understood. This understanding is especially crucial for the cities of the future where transportation will rely more on grid infrastructure to support its energy demands.

  8. Automated computer vision interpretation for physical and genetic mapping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    Much of the high-throughput data currently generated in the molecular genetics laboratory is in the form of two dimensional images. In physical mapping, a high-density gridded filter containing thousands YACs or cosmids can be hybridized against a single labeled probe, such as the IRS-PCR products of a radiation hybrid (RH). In genetic mapping, hundreds of polymorphic dinucleotide repeat PCR experiments can be multiplexed into distinct lanes, size ranges, and fluorescent colors on a single run of an Applied Biosystems (ABl) 373A automated DNA sequencer. For all its advantages such high-throughput data introduces a new fundamental bottleneck: the greatly increased time, expense, and error of scoring these assays when relying solely on the human visual system. Toward this end, we have developed a novel computer vision automation architecture that addresses the needs of high-throughput data interpretation in the molecular genetics laboratory. A flexible knowledge-based approach is used to systematically detect and analyze signal features, motivated by how human experts perform the interpretation. This architecture enables customization to similar hybridization-and gel-based tasks. Our prototype system has thus far been tested on both hybridization data and ABl gel images.

  9. Physical maps and recombination frequency of six rice chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianzhong; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi-Tsugane, Mika; Ito, Yukiyo; Chiden, Yoshino; Fujisawa, Masaki; Katagiri, Satoshi; Saji, Shoko; Yoshiki, Shoji; Karasawa, Wataru; Yoshihara, Rie; Hayashi, Akiko; Kobayashi, Harumi; Ito, Kazue; Hamada, Masao; Okamoto, Masako; Ikeno, Maiko; Ichikawa, Yoko; Katayose, Yuichi; Yano, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji

    2003-12-01

    We constructed physical maps of rice chromosomes 1, 2, and 6-9 with P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. These maps, with only 20 gaps, cover more than 97% of the predicted length of the six chromosomes. We submitted a total of 193 Mbp of non-overlapping sequences to public databases. We analyzed the DNA sequences of 1316 genetic markers and six centromere-specific repeats to facilitate characterization of chromosomal recombination frequency and of the genomic composition and structure of the centromeric regions. We found marked changes in the relative recombination rate along the length of each chromosome. Chromosomal recombination at the centromere core and surrounding regions on the six chromosomes was completely suppressed. These regions have a total physical length of about 23 Mbp, corresponding to 11.4% of the entire size of the six chromosomes. Chromosome 6 has the longest quiescent region, with about 5.6 Mbp, followed by chromosome 8, with quiescent region about half this size. Repetitive sequences accounted for at least 40% of the total genomic sequence on the partly sequenced centromeric region of chromosome 1. Rice CentO satellite DNA is arrayed in clusters and is closely associated with the presence of Centromeric Retrotransposon of Rice (CRR)- and RIce RetroElement 7 (RIRE7)-like retroelement sequences. We also detected relatively small coldspot regions outside the centromeric region; their repetitive content and gene density were similar to those of regions with normal recombination rates. Sequence analysis of these regions suggests that either the amount or the organization patterns of repetitive sequences may play a role in the inactivation of recombination.

  10. The National Map 2.0 Tactical Plan: "Toward the (Integrated) National Map"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zulick, Carl A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Map's 2-year goal, as described in this plan, is to provide a range of geospatial products and services that meet the basic goals of the original vision for The National Map while furthering the National Spatial Data Infrastructure that underpins U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science. To accomplish this goal, the National Geospatial Program (NGP) will acquire, store, maintain, and distribute base map data. The management team for the NGP sets priorities for The National Map in three areas: Data and Products, Services, and Management. Priorities for fiscal years 2008 and 2009 (October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2009), involving the current data inventory, data acquisition, and the integration of data, are (1) incorporating current data from Federal, State, and local organizations into The National Map to the degree possible, given data availability and program resources; (2) collaborating with other USGS programs to incorporate data that support the USGS Science Strategy; (3) supporting the Department of the Interior (DOI) high-priority geospatial information needs; (4) emergency response; (5) homeland security, natural hazards; and (6) graphics products delivery. The management team identified known constraints, enablers, and drivers for the acquisition and integration of data. The NGP management team also identified customer-focused products and services of The National Map. Ongoing planning and management activities direct the development and delivery of these products and services. Management of work flow processes to support The National Map priorities are identified and established through a business-driven prioritization process. This tactical plan is primarily for use as a document to guide The National Map program for the next two fiscal years. The document is available to the public because of widespread interest in The National Map. The USGS collaborates with a broad range of customers and partners who are essential to the success of The

  11. Cyber / Physical Security Vulnerability Assessment Integration

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Douglas G.; Simpkins, Bret E.

    2012-07-28

    Abstract Both physical protection and cyber security domains offer solutions for the discovery of vulnerabilities through the use of various assessment processes and software tools. Each vulnerability assessment (VA) methodology provides the ability to identify and categorize vulnerabilities, and quantifies the risks within their own areas of expertise. Neither approach fully represents the true potential security risk to a site and/or a facility, nor comprehensively assesses the overall security posture. The technical approach to solving this problem was to identify methodologies and processes that blend the physical and cyber security assessments, and develop tools to accurately quantify the unaccounted for risk. SMEs from both the physical and the cyber security domains developed the blending methodologies, and cross trained each other on the various aspects of the physical and cyber security assessment processes. A local critical infrastructure entity volunteered to host a proof of concept physical/cyber security assessment, and the lessons learned have been leveraged by this effort. The four potential modes of attack an adversary can use in approaching a target are; Physical Only Attack, Cyber Only Attack, Physical Enabled Cyber Attack, and the Cyber Enabled Physical Attack. The Physical Only and the Cyber Only pathway analysis are two of the most widely analyzed attack modes. The pathway from an off-site location to the desired target location is dissected to ensure adversarial activity can be detected and neutralized by the protection strategy, prior to completion of a predefined task. This methodology typically explores a one way attack from the public space (or common area) inward towards the target. The Physical Enabled Cyber Attack and the Cyber Enabled Physical Attack are much more intricate. Both scenarios involve beginning in one domain to affect change in the other, then backing outward to take advantage of the reduced system effectiveness, before

  12. The roots of physics students' motivations: Fear and integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dusen, Ben

    Too often, physics students are beset by feelings of failure and isolation rather than experiencing the creative joys of discovery that physics has to offer. This dissertation research was founded on the desire of a teacher to make physics class exciting and motivating to his students. This work explores how various aspects of learning environments interact with student motivation. This work uses qualitative and quantitative methods to explore how students are motivated to engage in physics and how they feel about themselves while engaging in physics. The collection of four studies in this dissertation culminates in a sociocultural perspective on motivation and identity. This perspective uses two extremes of how students experience physics as a lens for understanding motivation: fear and self-preservation versus integrity and self-expression. Rather than viewing motivation as a property of the student, or viewing students as inherently interested or disinterested in physics, the theoretical perspective on motivation and identity helps examine features of the learning environments that determine how students' experience themselves through physics class. This perspective highlights the importance of feeling a sense of belonging in the context of physics and the power that teachers have in shaping students' motivation through the construction of their classroom learning environments. Findings demonstrate how different ways that students experience themselves in physics class impact their performance and interest in physics. This dissertation concludes with a set of design principles that can foster integration and integrity among students in physics learning environments.

  13. Physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents: a self-organizing maps approach.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Chenoll, Maite; Garcia-Massó, Xavier; Morales, Jose; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; González, Luis-Millán; Toca-Herrera, José-Luis

    2015-06-01

    The relationship among physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents has been widely studied; however, controversy concerning this topic persists. The methods used thus far to analyse the relationship between these variables have included mostly traditional lineal analysis according to the available literature. The aim of this study was to perform a visual analysis of this relationship with self-organizing maps and to monitor the subject's evolution during the 4 years of secondary school. Four hundred and forty-four students participated in the study. The physical activity and physical fitness of the participants were measured, and the participants' grade point averages were obtained from the five participant institutions. Four main clusters representing two primary student profiles with few differences between boys and girls were observed. The clustering demonstrated that students with higher energy expenditure and better physical fitness exhibited lower body mass index (BMI) and higher academic performance, whereas those adolescents with lower energy expenditure exhibited worse physical fitness, higher BMI and lower academic performance. With respect to the evolution of the students during the 4 years, ∼25% of the students originally clustered in a negative profile moved to a positive profile, and there was no movement in the opposite direction.

  14. Path-integral approach to 't Hooft's derivation of quantum physics from classical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blasone, Massimo; Jizba, Petr; Kleinert, Hagen

    2005-05-15

    We present a path-integral formulation of 't Hooft's derivation of quantum physics from classical physics. The crucial ingredient of this formulation is Gozzi et al.'s supersymmetric path integral of classical mechanics. We quantize explicitly two simple classical systems: the planar mathematical pendulum and the Roessler dynamical system.

  15. Level Spacings for Integrable Quantum Maps in Genus Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelditch, Steve

    We study the pair correlation function for a variety of completely integrable quantum maps in one degree of freedom. For simplicity we assume that the classical phase space M is the Riemann sphere P1 and that the classical map is a fixed-time map of a Hamilton flow. The quantization is then a unitary N × N matrix Ut,N and its pair correlation measure gives the distribution of spacings between eigenvalues in an interval of length comparable to the mean level spacing ( 1/N). The physicists' conjecture (Berry-Tabor conjecture) is that as , should converge to the pair correlation function of a Poisson process. For any 2-parameter family of Hamiltonians of the form with we prove that this conjecture is correct for almost all (α, β) along the subsequence of Planck constants . In the addendum to this paper [Z. Addendum], we further show that for polynomial phases φ the a.e. convergence to Poisson holds along the full sequence of Planck constants for the Cesaro means of .

  16. Polytene Chromosomal Maps of 11 Drosophila Species: The Order of Genomic Scaffolds Inferred From Genetic and Physical Maps

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Bhutkar, Arjun; McAllister, Bryant F.; Matsuda, Muneo; Matzkin, Luciano M.; O'Grady, Patrick M.; Rohde, Claudia; Valente, Vera L. S.; Aguadé, Montserrat; Anderson, Wyatt W.; Edwards, Kevin; Garcia, Ana C. L.; Goodman, Josh; Hartigan, James; Kataoka, Eiko; Lapoint, Richard T.; Lozovsky, Elena R.; Machado, Carlos A.; Noor, Mohamed A. F.; Papaceit, Montserrat; Reed, Laura K.; Richards, Stephen; Rieger, Tania T.; Russo, Susan M.; Sato, Hajime; Segarra, Carmen; Smith, Douglas R.; Smith, Temple F.; Strelets, Victor; Tobari, Yoshiko N.; Tomimura, Yoshihiko; Wasserman, Marvin; Watts, Thomas; Wilson, Robert; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Markow, Therese A.; Gelbart, William M.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    The sequencing of the 12 genomes of members of the genus Drosophila was taken as an opportunity to reevaluate the genetic and physical maps for 11 of the species, in part to aid in the mapping of assembled scaffolds. Here, we present an overview of the importance of cytogenetic maps to Drosophila biology and to the concepts of chromosomal evolution. Physical and genetic markers were used to anchor the genome assembly scaffolds to the polytene chromosomal maps for each species. In addition, a computational approach was used to anchor smaller scaffolds on the basis of the analysis of syntenic blocks. We present the chromosomal map data from each of the 11 sequenced non-Drosophila melanogaster species as a series of sections. Each section reviews the history of the polytene chromosome maps for each species, presents the new polytene chromosome maps, and anchors the genomic scaffolds to the cytological maps using genetic and physical markers. The mapping data agree with Muller's idea that the majority of Drosophila genes are syntenic. Despite the conservation of genes within homologous chromosome arms across species, the karyotypes of these species have changed through the fusion of chromosomal arms followed by subsequent rearrangement events. PMID:18622037

  17. Mapping biological ideas: Concept maps as knowledge integration tools for evolution education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    Many students leave school with a fragmented understanding of biology that does not allow them to connect their ideas to their everyday lives (Wandersee, 1989; Mintzes, Wandersee, & Novak, 1998; Mintzes, Wandersee, & Novak, 2000a). Understanding evolution ideas is seen as central to building an integrated knowledge of biology (Blackwell, Powell, & Dukes, 2003; Thagard & Findlay, 2010). However, the theory of evolution has been found difficult to understand as it incorporates a wide range of ideas from different areas (Bahar et al., 1999; Tsui & Treagust, 2003) and multiple interacting levels (Wilensky & Resnick, 1999; Duncan & Reiser, 2007; Hmelo-Silver et al., 2007). Research suggests that learners can hold a rich repertoire of co-existing alternative ideas of evolution (for example, Bishop & Anderson, 1990; Demastes, Good, & Peebles, 1996; Evans, 2008), especially of human evolution (for example, Nelson, 1986; Sinatra et al., 2003; Poling & Evans, 2004). Evolution ideas are difficult to understand because they often contradict existing alternative ideas (Mayr, 1982; Wolpert, 1994; Evans, 2008). Research suggests that understanding human evolution is a key to evolution education (for example, Blackwell et al., 2003; Besterman & Baggott la Velle, 2007). This dissertation research investigates how different concept mapping forms embedded in a collaborative technology-enhanced learning environment can support students' integration of evolution ideas using case studies of human evolution. Knowledge Integration (KI) (Linn et al., 2000; Linn et al., 2004) is used as the operational framework to explore concept maps as knowledge integration tools to elicit, add, critically distinguish, group, connect, and sort out alternative evolution ideas. Concept maps are a form of node-link diagram for organizing and representing connections between ideas as a semantic network (Novak & Gowin, 1984). This dissertation research describes the iterative development of a novel biology

  18. Comparing Two Forms of Concept Map Critique Activities to Facilitate Knowledge Integration Processes in Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendimann, Beat A.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Concept map activities often lack a subsequent revision step that facilitates knowledge integration. This study compares two collaborative critique activities using a Knowledge Integration Map (KIM), a form of concept map. Four classes of high school biology students (n?=?81) using an online inquiry-based learning unit on evolution were assigned…

  19. Physical mapping of 49 microsatellite markers on chromosome 19 and correlation with the genetic linkage map

    SciTech Connect

    Reguigne-Arnould, I.; Mollicone, R.; Candelier, J.J.

    1996-03-05

    We have regionally localized 49 microsatellite markers developed by Genethon using a panel of previously characterized somatic cell hybrids that retain fragments from chromosome 19. The tight correlation observed between the physical and the genetic orders of the microsatellites provide cytogenetic anchorages to the genetic map data. We propose a position for the centromere just above D19S415, from the study of two hybrids, each of which retains one of the two derivatives of a balanced translocation t(1;19)(q11;q11). Microsatellites, which can be identified by a standard PCR protocol, are useful tools for the localization of disease genes and for the establishment of YAC or cosmid contigs. These markers can also judiciously be used for the characterization of new hybrid cell line panels. We report such a characterization of 11 clones, 8 of which were obtained by irradiation-fusion. Using the whole hybrid panel, we were able to define the order of 12 pairs of genetically colocalized microsatellites. As examples of gene mapping by the combined use of microsatellites and hybrid cell lines, we regionally assigned the PVS locus between the 19q13.2 markers D19S417 and D19S423 and confirmed the locations of fucosyltransferase loci FUT1, FUT2, and FUT5. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Integration and Physical Education: A Review of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttinen, Risto Harri Juhani; McLoughlin, Gabriella; Fredrick, Ray, III; Novak, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards Initiative has placed an increased focus on mathematics and English language arts. A relationship between physical activity and academic achievement is evident, but research on integration of academic subjects with physical education is still unclear. This literature review examined databases for the years…

  1. Integrating Computational Chemistry into the Physical Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Engel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Relatively few undergraduate physical chemistry programs integrate molecular modeling into their quantum mechanics curriculum owing to concerns about limited access to computational facilities, the cost of software, and concerns about increasing the course material. However, modeling exercises can be integrated into an undergraduate course at a…

  2. Integrative Curriculum Program for Physical Education: Classroom on the Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Carol C.; Irwin, Richard L.; Hays, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Integrative curriculum has been noted as a best practice toward effective learning. Quality physical educators struggle and search for different ways to integrate other content areas (e.g.., language arts, math, and social studies) into their daily lessons; however, due to budgetary limitations, they must find ways to do so with educationally…

  3. From Planetary Mapping to Map Production: Planetary Cartography as integral discipline in Planetary Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, Andrea; van Gasselt, Stephan; Hargitai, Hendrik; Hare, Trent; Manaud, Nicolas; Karachevtseva, Irina; Kersten, Elke; Roatsch, Thomas; Wählisch, Marita; Kereszturi, Akos

    2016-04-01

    Cartography is one of the most important communication channels between users of spatial information and laymen as well as the open public alike. This applies to all known real-world objects located either here on Earth or on any other object in our Solar System. In planetary sciences, however, the main use of cartography resides in a concept called planetary mapping with all its various attached meanings: it can be (1) systematic spacecraft observation from orbit, i.e. the retrieval of physical information, (2) the interpretation of discrete planetary surface units and their abstraction, or it can be (3) planetary cartography sensu strictu, i.e., the technical and artistic creation of map products. As the concept of planetary mapping covers a wide range of different information and knowledge levels, aims associated with the concept of mapping consequently range from a technical and engineering focus to a scientific distillation process. Among others, scientific centers focusing on planetary cartography are the United State Geological Survey (USGS, Flagstaff), the Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK, Moscow), Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE, Hungary), and the German Aerospace Center (DLR, Berlin). The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the Commission Planetary Cartography within International Cartographic Association (ICA), the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), the WG IV/8 Planetary Mapping and Spatial Databases within International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) and a range of other institutions contribute on definition frameworks in planetary cartography. Classical cartography is nowadays often (mis-)understood as a tool mainly rather than a scientific discipline and an art of communication. Consequently, concepts of information systems, mapping tools and cartographic frameworks are used interchangeably, and cartographic workflows and visualization of spatial information in thematic maps have often been

  4. Digital Geologic Mapping and Integration with the Geoweb: The Death Knell for Exclusively Paper Geologic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of traditional methods of geologic mapping with rapidly developing web-based geospatial applications ('the geoweb') and the various collaborative opportunities of web 2.0 have the potential to change the nature, value, and relevance of geologic maps and related field studies. Parallel advances in basic GPS technology, digital photography, and related integrative applications provide practicing geologic mappers with greatly enhanced methods for collecting, visualizing, interpreting, and disseminating geologic information. Even a cursory application of available tools can make field and office work more enriching and efficient; whereas more advanced and systematic applications provide new avenues for collaboration, outreach, and public education. Moreover, they ensure a much broader audience among an immense number of internet savvy end-users with very specific expectations for geospatial data availability. Perplexingly, the geologic community as a whole is not fully exploring this opportunity despite the inevitable revolution in portends. The slow acceptance follows a broad generational trend wherein seasoned professionals are lagging behind geology students and recent graduates in their grasp of and interest in the capabilities of the geoweb and web 2.0 types of applications. Possible explanations for this include: fear of the unknown, fear of learning curve, lack of interest, lack of academic/professional incentive, and (hopefully not) reluctance toward open collaboration. Although some aspects of the expanding geoweb are cloaked in arcane computer code, others are extremely simple to understand and use. A particularly obvious and simple application to enhance any field study is photo geotagging, the digital documentation of the locations of key outcrops, illustrative vistas, and particularly complicated geologic field relations. Viewing geotagged photos in their appropriate context on a virtual globe with high-resolution imagery can be an

  5. Physical mapping of 43 STSs to human chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Orphanos, V.; Santibanez-Koref, M.; McGown, G.; Hey, Y.; Rackstraw, C.; Boyle, J.M. )

    1994-03-15

    The authors have localized 43 sequence-tagged sites by deletion mapping using a chromosome 6 panel of 18 translocation hybrids. Thirty-four loci were mapped to the long arm of chromosome 6, and 9 were mapped to 6p. Many of the loci contain (CA)[sub n], dinucleotide repeated sequences and therefore will be useful markers for mapping genes on chromosome 6. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Discovery of myosin genes by physical mapping in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Titus, M A; Kuspa, A; Loomis, W F

    1994-01-01

    The diversity of the myosin family in a single organism, Dictyostelium discoideum, has been investigated by a strategy devised to rapidly identify and clone additional members of a gene family. An ordered array of yeast artificial chromosome clones that encompasses the Dictyostelium genome was probed at low stringency with conserved regions of the myosin motor domain to identify all possible myosin loci. The previously identified myosin loci (mchA, myoA-E) were detected by hybridization to the probes, as well as an additional seven previously unidentified loci (referred to as myoF-L). Clones corresponding to four of these additional loci (myoF, myoH-J) were obtained by using the isolated yeast artificial chromosomes as templates in a PCR employing degenerate primers specific for conserved regions of the myosin head. Sequence analysis and physical mapping of these clones confirm that these PCR products are derived from four previously unidentified myosin genes. Preliminary analysis of these sequences suggests that at least one of the genes (myoJ) encodes a member of a potentially different class of myosins. With the development of whole genome libraries for a variety of organisms, this approach can be used to rapidly explore the diversity of this and other gene families in a number of systems. PMID:7937787

  7. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. |

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The MARINER Integrated Seismic and Geophysical Mapping Experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. A.; Canales, J.; Sohn, R. A.; Paulatto, M.; Arai, R.; Szitkar, F.

    2013-12-01

    The MARINER (Mid-Atlantic Ridge INtegrated Experiments at Rainbow) seismic and geophysical mapping experiment was designed to examine the relationship between tectonic rifting, heat/melt supply, and oceanic core complex formation at a non-transform offset (NTO) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 36°N, the site of the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow hydrothermal system. We present an overview of the components of the experiment and the various projects stemming from it. The 5-week experiment was carried out aboard the R/V M. G. Langseth in April-May 2013, and consisted of a 3D active-source seismic tomography experiment, 2D multi-channel seismic profiles, an on-going nine month passive micro-seismicity study, dense acoustic mapping of the seafloor (including depth and amplitude information), gravity field mapping, and magnetic field mapping. During the tomography experiment, we deployed 46 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) over a 35 x 80 sq. km area centered on Rainbow. Twenty-six wide-angle seismic lines were carried out using the Langseth's 36-element source, generating ~175,000 seismic records. The MCS experiment, which was also recorded on 20 OBS, consisted of twenty-one densely spaced seismic lines using an 8-km-long hydrophone streamer. Bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic surveys were carried out over a broader, 80x105 sq. km, area centered on Rainbow. Overall, the experiment extends across two segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge separated by the Rainbow NTO massif. MARINER multi-beam bathymetry and acoustic imagery provide a broad view of the geologic and geophysical character of the ridge system, emphasizing the strong variability of ridge morphology, tectonics, and lava emplacement. The magnetization map shows a clear central anomaly with normal polarity, flanked by regions of negative polarity, consistent with the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal (~780,000 Ma). Rainbow itself lies in a region of weaker magnetization strength, which could be linked to a decrease in the depth of the

  9. Analysis of adiabatic trapping for quasi-integrable area-preserving maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzani, Armando; Frye, Christopher; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hernalsteens, Cédric

    2014-04-01

    Trapping phenomena involving nonlinear resonances have been considered in the past in the framework of adiabatic theory. Several results are known for continuous-time dynamical systems generated by Hamiltonian flows in which the combined effect of nonlinear resonances and slow time variation of some system parameters is considered. The focus of this paper is on discrete-time dynamical systems generated by two-dimensional symplectic maps. The possibility of extending the results of neo-adiabatic theory to quasi-integrable area-preserving maps is discussed. Scaling laws are derived, which describe the adiabatic transport as a function of the system parameters using a probabilistic point of view. These laws can be particularly relevant for physical applications. The outcome of extensive numerical simulations showing the excellent agreement with the analytical estimates and scaling laws is presented and discussed in detail.

  10. Validity and Responsiveness of Concept Map Assessment Scores in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yun Soo; Jang, Yongkyu; Kang, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Concept map assessment has been applied to many education areas to measure students' knowledge structure. However, the proper and valid use of concept map assessment has not been examined in physical education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the evidence of validity and responsiveness of the concept map assessment scores in physical…

  11. Integrating Enhanced Satellite Data Maps Into Coastal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Petra M.; Foley, David G.; King, Chad; Schwing, Franklin B.; Price, Holly; Bograd, Steven J.; Palacios, Daniel M.

    2006-04-01

    Coastal areas continue to be popular destinations for tourists as well as for a large population who now reside year-round near coasts and whose size is predicted to grow steadily. Along with rapid growth in recreational and commercial marine activities, this increase in coastal development also brings issues related to urban runoff, water quality, beach access, and marine ecosystem health. All of these factors contribute to an increase in pressure on the living marine biota found in coastal waters. Coastal managers are therefore faced with the dual task of conserving and protecting marine resources as well as allowing for multiple uses within nearshore waters. A beneficial tool that has yet to be routinely integrated in discussions between regional planners and various stakeholders is a data map depicting representative oceanic conditions of coastal and adjacent waters. Classifying the state of the pelagic realm provides much needed information when deliberating such issues as the creation of marine reserves.

  12. Enhanced canopy fuel mapping by integrating lidar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Birgit E.; Nelson, Kurtis J.

    2016-10-03

    BackgroundThe Wildfire Sciences Team at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earth Resources Observation and Science Center produces vegetation type, vegetation structure, and fuel products for the United States, primarily through the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) program. LANDFIRE products are used across disciplines for a variety of applications. The LANDFIRE data retain their currency and relevancy through periodic updating or remapping. These updating and remapping efforts provide opportunities to improve the LANDFIRE product suite by incorporating data from other sources. Light detection and ranging (lidar) is uniquely suitable for gathering information on vegetation structure and spatial arrangement because it can collect data in three dimensions. The Wildfire Sciences Team has several completed and ongoing studies focused on integrating lidar into vegetation and fuels mapping.

  13. D Topological Indoor Building Modeling Integrated with Open Street Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Rahman, A. Abdul; Boguslawski, P.

    2016-09-01

    Considering various fields of applications for building surveying and various demands, geometry representation of a building is the most crucial aspect of a building survey. The interiors of the buildings need to be described along with the relative locations of the rooms, corridors, doors and exits in many kinds of emergency response, such as fire, bombs, smoke, and pollution. Topological representation is a challenging task within the Geography Information Science (GIS) environment, as the data structures required to express these relationships are particularly difficult to develop. Even within the Computer Aided Design (CAD) community, the structures for expressing the relationships between adjacent building parts are complex and often incomplete. In this paper, an integration of 3D topological indoor building modeling in Dual Half Edge (DHE) data structure and outdoor navigation network from Open Street Map (OSM) is presented.

  14. Physical Webbing: Collaborative Kinesthetic Three-Dimensional Mind Maps[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Marian H.

    2012-01-01

    Mind Mapping has predominantly been used by individuals or collaboratively in groups as a paper-based or computer-generated learning strategy. In an effort to make Mind Mapping kinesthetic, collaborative, and three-dimensional, an innovative pedagogical strategy, termed Physical Webbing, was devised. In the Physical Web activity, groups…

  15. Constructing module maps for integrated analysis of heterogeneous biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Amar, David; Shamir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Improved methods for integrated analysis of heterogeneous large-scale omic data are direly needed. Here, we take a network-based approach to this challenge. Given two networks, representing different types of gene interactions, we construct a map of linked modules, where modules are genes strongly connected in the first network and links represent strong inter-module connections in the second. We develop novel algorithms that considerably outperform prior art on simulated and real data from three distinct domains. First, by analyzing protein–protein interactions and negative genetic interactions in yeast, we discover epistatic relations among protein complexes. Second, we analyze protein–protein interactions and DNA damage-specific positive genetic interactions in yeast and reveal functional rewiring among protein complexes, suggesting novel mechanisms of DNA damage response. Finally, using transcriptomes of non–small-cell lung cancer patients, we analyze networks of global co-expression and disease-dependent differential co-expression and identify a sharp drop in correlation between two modules of immune activation processes, with possible microRNA control. Our study demonstrates that module maps are a powerful tool for deeper analysis of heterogeneous high-throughput omic data. PMID:24497192

  16. A High Density Consensus Genetic Map of Tetraploid Cotton That Integrates Multiple Component Maps through Molecular Marker Redundancy Check

    PubMed Central

    Blenda, Anna; Fang, David D.; Rami, Jean-François; Garsmeur, Olivier; Luo, Feng; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    A consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cutoff. As a result, 20% of the markers (3,410) could be considered as redundant with some other markers. The marker redundancy information had been a crucial part of the map integration process, in which the six most informative interspecific Gossypium hirsutum×G. barbadense genetic maps were used for assembling a high density consensus (HDC) map for tetraploid cotton. With redundant markers being removed, the HDC map could be constructed thanks to the sufficient number of collinear non-redundant markers in common between the component maps. The HDC map consists of 8,254 loci, originating from 6,669 markers, and spans 4,070 cM, with an average of 2 loci per cM. The HDC map presents a high rate of locus duplications, as 1,292 markers among the 6,669 were mapped in more than one locus. Two thirds of the duplications are bridging homoeologous AT and DT chromosomes constitutive of allopolyploid cotton genome, with an average of 64 duplications per AT/DT chromosome pair. Sequences of 4,744 mapped markers were used for a mutual blast alignment (BBMH) with the 13 major scaffolds of the recently released Gossypium raimondii genome indicating high level of homology between the diploid D genome and the tetraploid cotton genetic map, with only a few minor possible structural rearrangements. Overall, the HDC map will serve as a valuable resource for trait QTL comparative mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and better understanding of the genome structure and evolution of tetraploid cotton. PMID:23029214

  17. A high density consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton that integrates multiple component maps through molecular marker redundancy check

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultra-dense consensus (UDC) genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density component maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cut...

  18. EST-derived single nucleotide polymorphism markers for assembling genetic and physical maps of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Kota, R; Varshney, R K; Prasad, M; Zhang, H; Stein, N; Graner, A

    2008-08-01

    In a panel of seven genotypes, 437 expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived DNA fragments were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were polymorphic between the parents of three mapping populations were mapped by heteroduplex analysis and a genome-wide consensus map comprising 216 EST-derived SNPs and 4 InDel (insertion/deletion) markers was constructed. The average frequency of SNPs amounted to 1/130 bp and 1/107.8 bp for a set of randomly selected and a set of mapped ESTs, respectively. The calculated nucleotide diversities (pi) ranged from 0 to 40.0 x 10(-3) (average 3.1 x 10(-3)) and 0.52 x 10(-3) to 39.51 x 10(-3) (average 4.37 x 10(-3)) for random and mapped ESTs, respectively. The polymorphism information content value for mapped SNPs ranged from 0.24 to 0.50 with an average of 0.34. As expected, combination of SNPs present in an amplicon (haplotype) exhibited a higher information content ranging from 0.24 to 0.85 with an average of 0.50. Cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence assays (including InDels) were designed for a total of 87 (39.5%) SNP markers. The high abundance of SNPs in the barley genome provides avenues for the systematic development of saturated genetic maps and their integration with physical maps.

  19. Physically-Based Shallow Landslide Susceptibility Mapping, NW of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Manuel; Bateira, Carlos; Soares, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Two physically-based models - Shallow Landslide Stability Analysis (SHALSTAB) and Safety Factor (SF) - are applied in Serra da Peneda (northwest of Portugal) to evaluate shallow landslide susceptibility in Tibo drainage basin. This small basin is located in an area of granitic and metasedimentary substrate, covered by different types of surficial formations (weathering mantles and slope deposits). The application of the selected models requires the determination of a set of mechanical and hydrological parameters, and the use of high resolution topographic information to create an accurate DTM. To fulfill this goal we have applied the Shallow Landslide Stability Analysis (SHALSTAB) and the SF (Safety Factor) models. The shallow landslide area was inventoried on the field. The cohesion was assessed by back analysis and the other mechanical and hydrological soil parameters were assessed on the field survey. Several susceptibility scenarios were tested with SHALSTAB model. The best SHALSTAB scenario used to assess the susceptibility is achieved using the following parameters: cohesion (c) = 2000 N/m2, soil thickness (z) = 1,2 m, internal friction (?)=32o and soil weight (?s)=14,7 KN/m3. Shallow landslide susceptibility mapping using the SF model, was based on the cartography of the factors registered on the field survey and used the following parameters: cohesion (c) = 2000 - 6000 N/m2, soil thickness (z) =1,2 m, internal friction (?)=30 - 40o; soil volumic weight (?m) = 13,7 - 15,7 KN/m3 and Hydraulic conductivity = 0 - 3,9-03 kfs. SHALSTAB scenarios were validated by overlaying the shallow landslide area (scar concentration) and selected the better susceptibility modeling. The parameters used on the SF model applied spatially variable values registered in the field survey (using the superficial formation cartography). To validate the SF model we used the AUC (Area Under the Curve) method. The two models were compared by the scar concentration and landslide potential

  20. Integrated information theory: from consciousness to its physical substrate.

    PubMed

    Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie; Massimini, Marcello; Koch, Christof

    2016-07-01

    In this Opinion article, we discuss how integrated information theory accounts for several aspects of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. Integrated information theory starts from the essential properties of phenomenal experience, from which it derives the requirements for the physical substrate of consciousness. It argues that the physical substrate of consciousness must be a maximum of intrinsic cause-effect power and provides a means to determine, in principle, the quality and quantity of experience. The theory leads to some counterintuitive predictions and can be used to develop new tools for assessing consciousness in non-communicative patients.

  1. Integrated optical Dirac physics via inversion symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Matthew J.; Zhang, Fan; Bojko, Richard; Chrostowski, Lukas; Rechtsman, Mikael C.

    2016-12-01

    Graphene and boron nitride are two-dimensional materials whose atoms are arranged in a honeycomb lattice. Their unique properties arise because their electrons behave like relativistic particles (without and with mass, respectively)—namely, they obey the Dirac equation. Here, we use a photonic analog of boron nitride to observe Dirac physics in a silicon integrated optical platform. This will allow for photonic applications of Dirac dispersions (gapped and ungapped) to be realized in an on-chip, integrated nanophotonic platform.

  2. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    PubMed

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles

  3. NEW APPROACHES: Using concept maps with trainee physics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Peter; Willson, Mike

    1996-11-01

    The technique of Concept Mapping described here is useful for identifying gaps in trainee teachers' knowledge, which may then be addressed to help those who must nowadays teach Science outside their own specialism.

  4. Condensed-matter physics: Vibrations mapped by an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliex, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The vibrational excitations of nanostructures have been mapped using state-of-the-art electron microscopy. The results improve our understanding of these excitations, which will aid the design of nanostructures. See Letter p.529

  5. Fine structure of matrix Darboux-Toda integrable mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leznov, A. N.; Yuzbashyan, E. A.

    1998-05-01

    The matrix Darboux-Toda mapping is represented as a product of a number of commutative mappings. The matrix Davey-Stewartson hierarchy is invariant with respect to each of these mappings. We thus introduce an entirely new type of discrete transformation for this hierarchy. The discrete transformation for the vector nonlinear Schrödinger system coincides with one of the mappings under necessary reduction conditions.

  6. Milkweed Seed Dispersal: A Means for Integrating Biology and Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisbee, Gregory D.; Kaiser, Cheryl A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that integrates biology and physics concepts by experimenting with the seed dispersal of common milkweed or similar wind-dispersed seeds. Student teams collect seeds and measure several parameters, review principles of trajectory motion, perform experiments, and graph data. Students examine the ideas of…

  7. Conceptual Integration of Chemical Equilibrium by Prospective Physical Sciences Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganaras, Kostas; Dumon, Alain; Larcher, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an empirical study concerning the mastering of the chemical equilibrium concept by prospective physical sciences teachers. The main objective was to check whether the concept of chemical equilibrium had become an integrating and unifying concept for them, that is to say an operational and functional knowledge to explain and…

  8. Integrating Key Competences in School Physical Education Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleixà, Teresa; González-Arévalo, Carles; Braz-Vieira, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the European Union published its recommendations on competences for lifelong learning. Since then, key competences have been integrated into the official curriculum in Spain. The objectives of the present study are: a) to describe the strategies used most frequently by physical education teachers to incorporate key competences in their…

  9. Understanding Student Use of Differentials in Physics Integration Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Dehui; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on students' use of the mathematical concept of differentials in physics problem solving. For instance, in electrostatics, students need to set up an integral to find the electric field due to a charged bar, an activity that involves the application of mathematical differentials (e.g., "dr," "dq"). In this…

  10. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data

    PubMed Central

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403 173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  11. Physical Activity Affects Brain Integrity in HIV + Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Mario; Baker, Laurie M.; Vaida, Florin; Paul, Robert; Basco, Brian; Ances, Beau M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has suggested benefits of aerobic physical activity (PA) on cognition and brain volumes in HIV uninfected (HIV−) individuals, however, few studies have explored the relationships between PA and brain integrity (cognition and structural brain volumes) in HIV-infected (HIV +) individuals. Seventy HIV + individuals underwent neuropsychological testing, structural neuroimaging, laboratory tests, and completed a PA questionnaire, recalling participation in walking, running, and jogging activities over the last year. A PA engagement score of weekly metabolic equivalent (MET) hr of activity was calculated using a compendium of PAs. HIV + individuals were classified as physically active (any energy expended above resting expenditure, n = 22) or sedentary (n = 48). Comparisons of neuropsychological performance, grouped by executive and motor domains, and brain volumes were completed between groups. Physically active and sedentary HIV + individuals had similar demographic and laboratory values, but the active group had higher education (14.0 vs. 12.6 years, p = .034). Physically active HIV + individuals performed better on executive (p = .040, unadjusted; p = .043, adjusted) but not motor function (p = .17). In addition, among the physically active group the amount of physical activity (METs) positively correlated with executive (Pearson’s r = 0.45, p = 0.035) but not motor (r = 0.21; p = .35) performance. In adjusted analyses the physically active HIV + individuals had larger putamen volumes (p = .019). A positive relationship exists between PA and brain integrity in HIV + individuals. Results from the present study emphasize the importance to conduct longitudinal interventional investigation to determine if PA improves brain integrity in HIV + individuals. PMID:26581799

  12. Becoming physics people: Development of integrated physics identity through the Learning Assistant experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Eleanor W.; Conn, Jessica; Close, Hunter G.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] In this study, we analyze the experience of students in the Physics Learning Assistant (LA) program at Texas State University in terms of the existing theoretical frameworks of community of practice and physics identity, and explore the implications suggested by these theories for LA program adoption and adaptation. Regression models from physics identity studies show that the physics identity construct strongly predicts intended choice of a career in physics. The goal of our current project is to understand the details of the impacts of participation in the LA experience on participants' practice and self-concept, in order to identify critical elements of LA program structure that positively influence physics identity and physics career intentions for students. Our analysis suggests that participation in the LA program impacts LAs in ways that support both stronger "physics student" identity and stronger "physics instructor" identity, and that these identities are reconciled into a coherent integrated physics identity. Increased comfort in interactions with peers, near peers, and faculty seems to be an important component of this identity development and reconciliation, suggesting that a focus on supporting community membership is useful for effective program design.

  13. Tyramide-FISH mapping of single genes for development of an integrated recombination and cytogenetic map of chromosome 5 of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Dmitry; Divashuk, Mikhail; Havey, Michael J; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2015-03-01

    Chromosome 5 of onion carries major quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control dry-matter content, pungency and storability of bulbs, amounts and types of epicuticular waxes, and resistances to abiotic factors, all of which are of interest to breeders. SNPs, SSRs, and RFLPs in expressed regions of the onion genome have been genetically mapped, and we used these clones and sequences from the NCBI database to develop DNA probes for in situ hybridization to integrate the genetic and physical maps of onion chromosome 5. We produced genomic amplicons from expressed regions of the onion genome that carried both exons and introns in order to increase the hybridization specificity of the probes and to enlarge the target DNA sizes. Tyramide-FISH technique was used to increase the detection sensitivity of relatively short target DNA regions, which range from 950 to 2100 bp. Through the integration of genetic and chromosomal maps, we were able to estimate the distribution of recombination events along onion chromosome 5. We demonstrated the efficiency of chromosomal in situ mapping of exon-intron genomic clones for the extremely large genome of onion.

  14. Trends in integrated circuit design for particle physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    Integrated circuits are one of the key complex units available to designers of multichannel detector setups. A whole number of factors makes Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) valuable for Particle Physics and Astrophysics experiments. Among them the most important ones are: integration scale, low power dissipation, radiation tolerance. In order to make possible future experiments in the intensity, cosmic, and energy frontiers today ASICs should provide new level of functionality at a new set of constraints and trade-offs, like low-noise high-dynamic range amplification and pulse shaping, high-speed waveform sampling, low power digitization, fast digital data processing, serialization and data transmission. All integrated circuits, necessary for physical instrumentation, should be radiation tolerant at an earlier not reached level (hundreds of Mrad) of total ionizing dose and allow minute almost 3D assemblies. The paper is based on literary source analysis and presents an overview of the state of the art and trends in nowadays chip design, using partially own ASIC lab experience. That shows a next stage of ising micro- and nanoelectronics in physical instrumentation.

  15. Integrating In Silico Resources to Map a Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanqing; Beck, Tim N.; Golemis, Erica A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of publicly available life science databases offer a wealth of information that can support interpretation of experimentally derived data and greatly enhance hypothesis generation. Protein interaction and functional networks are not simply new renditions of existing data: they provide the opportunity to gain insights into the specific physical and functional role a protein plays as part of the biological system. In this chapter, we describe different in silico tools that can quickly and conveniently retrieve data from existing data repositories and discuss how the available tools are best utilized for different purposes. While emphasizing protein-protein interaction databases (e.g., BioGrid and IntAct), we also introduce metasearch platforms such as STRING and GeneMANIA, pathway databases (e.g., BioCarta and Pathway Commons), text mining approaches (e.g., PubMed and Chilibot), and resources for drug-protein interactions, genetic information for model organisms and gene expression information based on microarray data mining. Furthermore, we provide a simple step-by-step protocol to building customized protein-protein interaction networks in Cytoscape, a powerful network assembly and visualization program, integrating data retrieved from these various databases. As we illustrate, generation of composite interaction networks enables investigators to extract significantly more information about a given biological system than utilization of a single database or sole reliance on primary literature. PMID:24233784

  16. The new AP Physics exams: Integrating qualitative and quantitative reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elby, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    When physics instructors and education researchers emphasize the importance of integrating qualitative and quantitative reasoning in problem solving, they usually mean using those types of reasoning serially and separately: first students should analyze the physical situation qualitatively/conceptually to figure out the relevant equations, then they should process those equations quantitatively to generate a solution, and finally they should use qualitative reasoning to check that answer for plausibility (Heller, Keith, & Anderson, 1992). The new AP Physics 1 and 2 exams will, of course, reward this approach to problem solving. But one kind of free response question will demand and reward a further integration of qualitative and quantitative reasoning, namely mathematical modeling and sense-making--inventing new equations to capture a physical situation and focusing on proportionalities, inverse proportionalities, and other functional relations to infer what the equation ``says'' about the physical world. In this talk, I discuss examples of these qualitative-quantitative translation questions, highlighting how they differ from both standard quantitative and standard qualitative questions. I then discuss the kinds of modeling activities that can help AP and college students develop these skills and habits of mind.

  17. Map_plot and bgg_plot: software for integration of geoscience datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillot, Philippe; Punongbayan, Jane T.; Rea, Brice

    2004-02-01

    Since 1985, the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) has been supporting multidisciplinary research in exploring the structure and history of Earth beneath the oceans. After more than 200 Legs, complementary datasets covering different geological environments, periods and space scales have been obtained and distributed world-wide using the ODP-Janus and Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory-Borehole Research Group (LDEO-BRG) database servers. In Earth Sciences, more than in any other science, the ensemble of these data is characterized by heterogeneous formats and graphical representation modes. In order to fully and quickly assess this information, a set of Unix/Linux and Generic Mapping Tool-based C programs has been designed to convert and integrate datasets acquired during the present ODP and the future Integrated ODP (IODP) Legs. Using ODP Leg 199 datasets, we show examples of the capabilities of the proposed programs. The program map_plot is used to easily display datasets onto 2-D maps. The program bgg_plot (borehole geology and geophysics plot) displays data with respect to depth and/or time. The latter program includes depth shifting, filtering and plotting of core summary information, continuous and discrete-sample core measurements (e.g. physical properties, geochemistry, etc.), in situ continuous logs, magneto- and bio-stratigraphies, specific sedimentological analyses (lithology, grain size, texture, porosity, etc.), as well as core and borehole wall images. Outputs from both programs are initially produced in PostScript format that can be easily converted to Portable Document Format (PDF) or standard image formats (GIF, JPEG, etc.) using widely distributed conversion programs. Based on command line operations and customization of parameter files, these programs can be included in other shell- or database-scripts, automating plotting procedures of data requests. As an open source software, these programs can be customized and interfaced to fulfill any specific

  18. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This project is now progressing strongly. Thirteen somatic cell hybrids containing rearranged {number sign}16 chromosomes have been constructed, bringing the total number of hybrids constructed by the group to 27 which divides chromosome 16 into 29 regions. 170 probes have been mapped into these regions. Although this is the second progress report for this contract it essentially contains all the work carried out since the first progress report covered a period of less than three months during which little had been done other than setting up. The project has been progressing very well and has led to numerous collaborations with other groups involved in mapping this chromosome or studying genes on it. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. (Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22)

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  20. [Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-12-31

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  1. Physics of vertically integrated waveguide photodetectors and amplifiers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.M.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the efforts supported by LLNL under the Subcontract No. B239593 at the University of Arizona during the Fiscal Year 1992. A solid physical foundation has been developed for understanding the operation of vertically integrated photodetectors and amplifiers. This has been achieved through a combination of numerical simulation and development of simple coupled-mode theories. Coupled-mode theory has been used to elucidate the physics underlying the operation of vertically integrated photodetectors. In particular, the relation between the spatial transients observed in experiments and numerical simulations, and the non-power orthogonality of the underlying modes has been clarified. The coupled-mode theory has been extended to the case of coupled waveguide-amplifiers.

  2. Using MapMyFitness to Place Physical Activity into Neighborhood Context

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jana A.; James, Peter; Robinson, Jamaica R. M.; Eastman, Kyler M.; Conley, Kevin D.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Laden, Francine

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain detailed information on the context of physical activity at large geographic scales, such as the entire United States, as well as over long periods of time, such as over years. MapMyFitness is a suite of interactive tools for individuals to track their workouts online or using global positioning system in their phones or other wireless trackers. This method article discusses the use of physical activity data tracked using MapMyFitness to examine patterns over space and time. An overview of MapMyFitness, including data tracked, user information, and geographic scope, is explored. We illustrate the utility of MapMyFitness data using tracked physical activity by users in Winston-Salem, NC, USA between 2006 and 2013. Types of physical activities tracked are described, as well as the percent of activities occurring in parks. Strengths of MapMyFitness data include objective data collection, low participant burden, extensive geographic scale, and longitudinal series. Limitations include generalizability, behavioral change as the result of technology use, and potential ethical considerations. MapMyFitness is a powerful tool to investigate patterns of physical activity across large geographic and temporal scales. PMID:24653982

  3. A Differential Algebraic Integration Algorithm for Symplectic Mappings in Systems with Three-Dimensional Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P

    2004-09-15

    A differential algebraic integration algorithm is developed for symplectic mapping through a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic field. The self-consistent reference orbit in phase space is obtained by making a canonical transformation to eliminate the linear part of the Hamiltonian. Transfer maps from the entrance to the exit of any 3-D magnetic field are then obtained through slice-by-slice symplectic integration. The particle phase-space coordinates are advanced by using the integrable polynomial procedure. This algorithm is a powerful tool to attain nonlinear maps for insertion devices in synchrotron light source or complicated magnetic field in the interaction region in high energy colliders.

  4. Maximizing Information Diffusion in the Cyber-physical Integrated Network.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongliang; Lv, Shaohe; Jiao, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Juan

    2015-11-11

    Nowadays, our living environment has been embedded with smart objects, such as smart sensors, smart watches and smart phones. They make cyberspace and physical space integrated by their abundant abilities of sensing, communication and computation, forming a cyber-physical integrated network. In order to maximize information diffusion in such a network, a group of objects are selected as the forwarding points. To optimize the selection, a minimum connected dominating set (CDS) strategy is adopted. However, existing approaches focus on minimizing the size of the CDS, neglecting an important factor: the weight of links. In this paper, we propose a distributed maximizing the probability of information diffusion (DMPID) algorithm in the cyber-physical integrated network. Unlike previous approaches that only consider the size of CDS selection, DMPID also considers the information spread probability that depends on the weight of links. To weaken the effects of excessively-weighted links, we also present an optimization strategy that can properly balance the two factors. The results of extensive simulation show that DMPID can nearly double the information diffusion probability, while keeping a reasonable size of selection with low overhead in different distributed networks.

  5. A comprehensive protein-centric ID mapping service for molecular data integration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongzhan; Suzek, Baris E.; Mazumder, Raja; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yongxing; Wu, Cathy H.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifier (ID) mapping establishes links between various biological databases and is an essential first step for molecular data integration and functional annotation. ID mapping allows diverse molecular data on genes and proteins to be combined and mapped to functional pathways and ontologies. We have developed comprehensive protein-centric ID mapping services providing mappings for 90 IDs derived from databases on genes, proteins, pathways, diseases, structures, protein families, protein interaction, literature, ontologies, etc. The services are widely used and have been regularly updated since 2006. Availability: www.uniprot.org/mappingandproteininformation-resource.org/pirwww/search/idmapping.shtml Contact: huang@dbi.udel.edu PMID:21478197

  6. Physical Education Teachers' Subjective Theories about Integrating Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    As well as other school subjects, physical education (PE) is emerging in terms of integrating information and communication technology (ICT) into regular classes. Such innovative teaching practices that implement ICT in PE involve diverse parties that are affected by these teaching processes. Students, principals, districts, parents,…

  7. Pre-Service Physics and Chemistry Teachers' Conceptual Integration of Physics and Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuysuz, Mustafa; Bektas, Oktay; Geban, Omer; Ozturk, Gokhan; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the pre-service teachers' opinions about conceptual integration (CI) and their understanding of it. A qualitative phenomenology design was used in the study. Data was collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews comprising ten guiding questions. Three pre-service physics and three pre-service chemistry teachers…

  8. Physical mapping of a pollen modifier locus controlling self-incompatibility in apricot and synteny analysis within the Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga, Elena; Molina, Laura; Badenes, María Luisa; Romero, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    S-locus products (S-RNase and F-box proteins) are essential for the gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) specific recognition in Prunus. However, accumulated genetic evidence suggests that other S-locus unlinked factors are also required for GSI. For instance, GSI breakdown was associated with a pollen-part mutation unlinked to the S-locus in the apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cv. 'Canino'. Fine-mapping of this mutated modifier gene (M-locus) and the synteny analysis of the M-locus within the Rosaceae are here reported. A segregation distortion loci mapping strategy, based on a selectively genotyped population, was used to map the M-locus. In addition, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig was constructed for this region using overlapping oligonucleotides probes, and BAC-end sequences (BES) were blasted against Rosaceae genomes to perform micro-synteny analysis. The M-locus was mapped to the distal part of chr.3 flanked by two SSR markers within an interval of 1.8 cM corresponding to ~364 Kb in the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) genome. In the integrated genetic-physical map of this region, BES were mapped against the peach scaffold_3 and BACs were anchored to the apricot map. Micro-syntenic blocks were detected in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) LG17/9 and strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) FG6 chromosomes. The M-locus fine-scale mapping provides a solid basis for self-compatibility marker-assisted selection and for positional cloning of the underlying gene, a necessary goal to elucidate the pollen rejection mechanism in Prunus. In a wider context, the syntenic regions identified in peach, apple and strawberry might be useful to interpret GSI evolution in Rosaceae.

  9. Mining plant genome browsers as a means for efficient connection of physical, genetic and cytogenetic mapping: An example using soybean

    PubMed Central

    Belarmino, Luis C.; da S. Oliveira, Ana R.; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana C.; de A. Bortoleti, Kyria C.; Bezerra-Neto, João Pacífico; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V.; Benko-Iseppon, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    Physical maps are important tools to uncover general chromosome structure as well as to compare different plant lineages and species, helping to elucidate genome structure, evolution and possibilities regarding synteny and colinearity. The increasing production of sequence data has opened an opportunity to link information from mapping studies to the underlying sequences. Genome browsers are invaluable platforms that provide access to these sequences, including tools for genome analysis, allowing the integration of multivariate information, and thus aiding to explain the emergence of complex genomes. The present work presents a tutorial regarding the use of genome browsers to develop targeted physical mapping, providing also a general overview and examples about the possibilities regarding the use of Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC), simple sequence repeats (SSR) and rDNA probes, highlighting the potential of such studies for map integration and comparative genetics. As a case study, the available genome of soybean was accessed to show how the physical and in silico distribution of such sequences may be compared at different levels. Such evaluations may also be complemented by the identification of sequences beyond the detection level of cytological methods, here using members of the aquaporin gene family as an example. The proposed approach highlights the complementation power of the combination of molecular cytogenetics and computational approaches for the anchoring of coding or repetitive sequences in plant genomes using available genome browsers, helping in the determination of sequence location, arrangement and number of repeats, and also filling gaps found in computational pseudochromosome assemblies. PMID:22802719

  10. Persistent Mappings in Cross-Domain Analogical Learning of Physics Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    retrieval? 6.1 Materials The problems were selected from a variety of physics resources, (Shearer et al. 1971; Giancoli 1991; Ogata 1997; Fogiel...of electricity. In Mental Models, by D. Gentner and A.L. Stevens. Eltham, London: Greenwich University Press. Giancoli , D. (1991). Physics ...PERSISTENT MAPPINGS IN CROSS-DOMAIN ANALOGICAL LEARNING OF PHYSICS DOMAINS Matthew Klenk (matthew.klenk.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) Navy Center for

  11. Spectroscopic mapping of the physical properties of supernova remnant N 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletti, D.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Physical conditions inside a supernova remnant can vary significantly between different positions. However, typical observational data of supernova remnants are integrated data or contemplate specific portions of the remnant. Aims: We study the spatial variation in the physical properties of the N 49 supernova remnant based on a spectroscopic mapping of the whole nebula. Methods: Long-slit spectra were obtained with the slit (~4' × 1.03″) aligned along the east-west direction from 29 different positions spaced by 2″ in declination. A total of 3248 1D spectra were extracted from sections of 2″ of the 2D spectra. More than 60 emission lines in the range 3550 Å to 8920 Å were measured in these spectra. Maps of the fluxes and of intensity ratios of these emission lines were built with a spatial resolution of 2″ × 2″. Results: An electron density map has been obtained using the [S II] λ6716 /λ6731 line ratio. Values vary from ~500 cm-3 at the northeast region to more than 3500 cm-3 at the southeast border. We calculated the electron temperature using line ratio sensors for the ions S+, O++, O+, and N+. Values are about 3.6 × 104 K for the O++ sensor and about 1.1 × 104 K for other sensors. The Hα/Hβ ratio map presents a ring structure with higher values that may result from collisional excitation of hydrogen. We detected an area with high values of [N II] λ6583/Hα extending from the remnant center to its northeastern border, which may be indicating an overabundance of nitrogen in the area due to contamination by the progenitor star. We found a radial dependence in many line intensity ratio maps. We observed an increase toward the remnant borders of the intensity ratio of any two lines in which the numerator comes before in the sequence [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ4363, [Ar III] λ7136, [Ne III] λ3869, [O II] λ7325, [O II] λ3727, He II λ4686, Hβ λ4861, [N II] λ6583, He I λ6678, [S II] λ6731, [S II] λ6716, [O i] λ6300, [Ca II]

  12. Using Concept Maps to Assess Interdisciplinary Integration of Green Engineering Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrego, Maura; Newswander, Chad B.; McNair, Lisa D.; McGinnis, Sean; Paretti, Marie C.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering education, like many fields, has started to explore the benefits of concept maps as an assessment technique for knowledge integration. Because they allow students to graphically link topics and represent complex interconnections among diverse concepts, we argue that concept maps are particularly appropriate for assessing…

  13. Transition Funding for the Shallow Water Integrated Mapping System (SWIMS) and Modular Microstructure Profiler (MMP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Mapping System ( SWIMS ) and Modular Microstructure Profiler (MMP) Matthew H. Alford Scripps Institution of Oceanography 9500 Gilman Drive, mail code...performance of operational and climate models, as well as for understanding local problems such as pollutant dispersal and biological productivity. SWIMS ...moored profiling instruments. OBJECTIVES • Transition the Shallow Water Integrated Mapping System ( SWIMS ) and Modular Microstructure Profiler

  14. Construction of an integrated genetic map for Capsicum baccatum L.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ramos, H C C; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Gonçalves, L S A; Viana, A P

    2015-06-18

    Capsicum baccatum L. is one of the five Capsicum domesticated species and has multiple uses in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. This species is also a valuable source of genes for chili pepper breeding, especially genes for disease resistance and fruit quality. However, knowledge of the genetic structure of C. baccatum is limited. A reference map for C. baccatum (2n = 2x = 24) based on 42 microsatellite, 85 inter-simple sequence repeat, and 56 random amplified polymorphic DNA markers was constructed using an F2 population consisting of 203 individuals. The map was generated using the JoinMap software (version 4.0) and the linkage groups were formed and ordered using a LOD score of 3.0 and maximum of 40% recombination. The genetic map consisted of 12 major and four minor linkage groups covering a total genome distance of 2547.5 cM with an average distance of 14.25 cM between markers. Of the 152 pairs of microsatellite markers available for Capsicum annuum, 62 were successfully transferred to C. baccatum, generating polymorphism. Forty-two of these markers were mapped, allowing the introduction of C. baccatum in synteny studies with other species of the genus Capsicum.

  15. An Integrated Simulation Module for Cyber-Physical Automation Systems.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, Francesco; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea; Prist, Mariorosario

    2016-05-05

    The integration of Wireless Sensors Networks (WSNs) into Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs) is an important research problem to solve in order to increase the performances, safety, reliability and usability of wireless automation systems. Due to the complexity of real CPSs, emulators and simulators are often used to replace the real control devices and physical connections during the development stage. The most widespread simulators are free, open source, expandable, flexible and fully integrated into mathematical modeling tools; however, the connection at a physical level and the direct interaction with the real process via the WSN are only marginally tackled; moreover, the simulated wireless sensor motes are not able to generate the analogue output typically required for control purposes. A new simulation module for the control of a wireless cyber-physical system is proposed in this paper. The module integrates the COntiki OS JAva Simulator (COOJA), a cross-level wireless sensor network simulator, and the LabVIEW system design software from National Instruments. The proposed software module has been called "GILOO" (Graphical Integration of Labview and cOOja). It allows one to develop and to debug control strategies over the WSN both using virtual or real hardware modules, such as the National Instruments Real-Time Module platform, the CompactRio, the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), etc. To test the proposed solution, we decided to integrate it with one of the most popular simulators, i.e., the Contiki OS, and wireless motes, i.e., the Sky mote. As a further contribution, the Contiki Sky DAC driver and a new "Advanced Sky GUI" have been proposed and tested in the COOJA Simulator in order to provide the possibility to develop control over the WSN. To test the performances of the proposed GILOO software module, several experimental tests have been made, and interesting preliminary results are reported. The GILOO module has been applied to a smart home

  16. GoMapMan: integration, consolidation and visualization of plant gene annotations within the MapMan ontology.

    PubMed

    Ramsak, Živa; Baebler, Špela; Rotter, Ana; Korbar, Matej; Mozetic, Igor; Usadel, Björn; Gruden, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    GoMapMan (http://www.gomapman.org) is an open web-accessible resource for gene functional annotations in the plant sciences. It was developed to facilitate improvement, consolidation and visualization of gene annotations across several plant species. GoMapMan is based on the MapMan ontology, organized in the form of a hierarchical tree of biological concepts, which describe gene functions. Currently, genes of the model species Arabidopsis and three crop species (potato, tomato and rice) are included. The main features of GoMapMan are (i) dynamic and interactive gene product annotation through various curation options; (ii) consolidation of gene annotations for different plant species through the integration of orthologue group information; (iii) traceability of gene ontology changes and annotations; (iv) integration of external knowledge about genes from different public resources; and (v) providing gathered information to high-throughput analysis tools via dynamically generated export files. All of the GoMapMan functionalities are openly available, with the restriction on the curation functions, which require prior registration to ensure traceability of the implemented changes.

  17. A physically based criterion for hydraulic hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesi, Luca; Pilotti, Marco; Petrucci, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic hazard maps are widely used for land use and emergency planning. Due to their practical consequences, it is important that their meaning is effectively transferred and shared by the stakeholders; to this purpose maps should communicate hazard levels moving from the potential consequences on specified targets. For these reasons flood maps showing only the extension of the inundated areas or flow features as depth and/or velocity may reveal themselves as ineffective instruments. The selection of the specific target to analyse must, in our opinion, be site-specific and reflect land use and/or the hydraulics features of the phenomenon. In case of sudden processes, such as torrential floods or debris flows, hazard levels should be referred to human life, because emergency plans may not mitigate risk; on the contrary, when the time scale of the flood wave propagation is sufficiently larger than the warning system one, the focus might move to the economic value of properties, since human-focused criteria may result in too severe land planning restrictions. This contribution starts exploring, from a theoretical point of view, human hazard levels as drowning, toppling and friction stability limits, which are the main failure mechanisms of human stability in flows. The proposed approach considers the human body, set on a slope and hit by a current of known density, as a combination of cylinders with different dimensions. The drowning threshold is identified through a limiting water depth, while toppling and translation are studied respectively through a moment and momentum balance. The involved forces are the friction at the bottom, the destabilizing drag force exerted by the current, the human weight and buoyancy. Several threshold curves on the velocity-depth plane can be identified as a function of different masses and heights for children and adults. Because of its dependence from the fluid density, this methodology may be applied also to define hazard

  18. Mapping the Big Picture. Integrating Curriculum & Assessment K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Heidi Hayes

    Although teachers may work in the same building for years, they usually have slight knowledge about what goes on in each other's classrooms. In a similar way, there is little knowledge at one school level about what happens at other levels. This book presents a way for teachers to make maps as a way to communicate about curriculum development.…

  19. Parallel computation of a maximum-likelihood estimator of a physical map.

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, S M; Machaka, S A; Shete, S S; Kota, R N

    2001-01-01

    Reconstructing a physical map of a chromosome from a genomic library presents a central computational problem in genetics. Physical map reconstruction in the presence of errors is a problem of high computational complexity that provides the motivation for parallel computing. Parallelization strategies for a maximum-likelihood estimation-based approach to physical map reconstruction are presented. The estimation procedure entails a gradient descent search for determining the optimal spacings between probes for a given probe ordering. The optimal probe ordering is determined using a stochastic optimization algorithm such as simulated annealing or microcanonical annealing. A two-level parallelization strategy is proposed wherein the gradient descent search is parallelized at the lower level and the stochastic optimization algorithm is simultaneously parallelized at the higher level. Implementation and experimental results on a distributed-memory multiprocessor cluster running the parallel virtual machine (PVM) environment are presented using simulated and real hybridization data. PMID:11238392

  20. 77 FR 9226 - Physical Systems Integration, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Physical Systems Integration, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Physical Systems Integration, LLC's application for...

  1. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  2. An integrated physical and biological model for anaerobic lagoons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin; Chen, Zhenbin

    2011-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that integrates physical and biological processes for anaerobic lagoons is presented. In the model development, turbulence is represented using a transition k-ω model, heat conduction and solar radiation are included in the thermal model, biological oxygen demand (BOD) reduction is characterized by first-order kinetics, and methane yield rate is expressed as a linear function of temperature. A test of the model applicability is conducted in a covered lagoon digester operated under tropical climate conditions. The commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent, is employed to solve the integrated model. The simulation procedures include solving fluid flow and heat transfer, predicting local resident time based on the converged flow fields, and calculating the BOD reduction and methane production. The simulated results show that monthly methane production varies insignificantly, but the time to achieve a 99% BOD reduction in January is much longer than that in July.

  3. Integrating particle physical geometry into composting degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjiang; Ai, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to integrate physical geometry of compost particle with degradation kinetics to model biological reactions, which revealing additional dynamic approaches. A sphere and its circumscribing cube were used to represent compost particles. An inner sphere, representing anaerobic zone, was introduced to describe variations of substrate volume without sufficient oxygen supply. Degradation of soluble substrates and hydrolysis of insoluble substrates were associated with the particle geometry. Transportation of soluble substrates produced from hydrolysis was expressed using Fick's law. Through the integration of degradation kinetics with geometry models, degradation models could describe varying volume of composting materials involving aerobic or anaerobic digestion and transportation of soluble substrates in a unit compost particle.

  4. Mapping the Prevalence of Physical Inactivity in U.S. States, 1984-2015

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xiaoling; Yang, Yan; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is a leading cause of morbidity, disability and premature mortality in the U.S. and worldwide. This study aimed to map the prevalence of physical inactivity across U.S. states over the past three decades, and estimate the over-time adjusted changes in the prevalence of physical inactivity in each state. Methods Individual-level data (N = 6,701,954) were taken from the 1984–2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an annually repeated cross-sectional survey of state-representative adult population. Prevalence of self-reported leisure-time physical inactivity was estimated by state and survey year, accounting for the BRFSS sampling design. Logistic regressions were performed to estimate the changes in the prevalence of physical inactivity over the study period for each state, adjusting for individual characteristics including sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and employment status. Results The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity varied substantially across states and survey years. In general, the adjusted prevalence of physical inactivity gradually declined over the past three decades in a majority of states. However, a substantial proportion of American adults remain physically inactive. Among the 50 states and District of Columbia, 45 had over a fifth of their adult population without any leisure-time physical activity, and 8 had over 30% without physical activity in 2015. Moreover, the adjusted prevalence of physical inactivity in several states (Arizona, North Carolina, North Dakota, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming) remained largely unchanged or even increased (Minnesota and Ohio) over the study period. Conclusions Although the prevalence of physical inactivity declined over the past three decades in a majority of states, the rates remain substantially high and vary considerably across states. Closely monitoring and tracking physical activity level using the state physical activity

  5. Integrative Analysis of the Physical Transport Network into Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Robert C.; Ross, Joshua V.; Wittmann, Talia A.; Prowse, Thomas A. A.; Cassey, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Effective biosecurity is necessary to protect nations and their citizens from a variety of threats, including emerging infectious diseases, agricultural or environmental pests and pathogens, and illegal wildlife trade. The physical pathways by which these threats are transported internationally, predominantly shipping and air traffic, have undergone significant growth and changes in spatial distributions in recent decades. An understanding of the specific pathways and donor-traffic hotspots created by this integrated physical transport network is vital for the development of effective biosecurity strategies into the future. In this study, we analysed the physical transport network into Australia over the period 1999–2012. Seaborne and air traffic were weighted to calculate a “weighted cumulative impact” score for each source region worldwide, each year. High risk source regions, and those source regions that underwent substantial changes in risk over the study period, were determined. An overall risk ranking was calculated by integrating across all possible weighting combinations. The source regions having greatest overall physical connectedness with Australia were Singapore, which is a global transport hub, and the North Island of New Zealand, a close regional trading partner with Australia. Both those regions with large amounts of traffic across multiple vectors (e.g., Hong Kong), and those with high levels of traffic of only one type (e.g., Bali, Indonesia with respect to passenger flights), were represented among high risk source regions. These data provide a baseline model for the transport of individuals and commodities against which the effectiveness of biosecurity controls may be assessed, and are a valuable tool in the development of future biosecurity policy. PMID:26881782

  6. Integrative Analysis of the Physical Transport Network into Australia.

    PubMed

    Cope, Robert C; Ross, Joshua V; Wittmann, Talia A; Prowse, Thomas A A; Cassey, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Effective biosecurity is necessary to protect nations and their citizens from a variety of threats, including emerging infectious diseases, agricultural or environmental pests and pathogens, and illegal wildlife trade. The physical pathways by which these threats are transported internationally, predominantly shipping and air traffic, have undergone significant growth and changes in spatial distributions in recent decades. An understanding of the specific pathways and donor-traffic hotspots created by this integrated physical transport network is vital for the development of effective biosecurity strategies into the future. In this study, we analysed the physical transport network into Australia over the period 1999-2012. Seaborne and air traffic were weighted to calculate a "weighted cumulative impact" score for each source region worldwide, each year. High risk source regions, and those source regions that underwent substantial changes in risk over the study period, were determined. An overall risk ranking was calculated by integrating across all possible weighting combinations. The source regions having greatest overall physical connectedness with Australia were Singapore, which is a global transport hub, and the North Island of New Zealand, a close regional trading partner with Australia. Both those regions with large amounts of traffic across multiple vectors (e.g., Hong Kong), and those with high levels of traffic of only one type (e.g., Bali, Indonesia with respect to passenger flights), were represented among high risk source regions. These data provide a baseline model for the transport of individuals and commodities against which the effectiveness of biosecurity controls may be assessed, and are a valuable tool in the development of future biosecurity policy.

  7. An integrated genetic map based on four mapping populations and quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) cultivars share a narrow genetic base due to many years of selection for desirable horticultural qualities. Wild subspecies within C. lanatus are important potential sources of novel alleles for watermelon breeding, but successful trait introgression into elite cultivars has had limited success. The application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in watermelon is yet to be realized, mainly due to the past lack of high quality genetic maps. Recently, a number of useful maps have become available, however these maps have few common markers, and were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making integration and comparative analysis among maps difficult. The objective of this research was to use single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) anchor markers to construct an integrated genetic map for C. lanatus. Results Under the framework of the high density genetic map, an integrated genetic map was constructed by merging data from four independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines, which included three subspecies of watermelon. The 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel), 36 structure variation (SV) and 386 SNP markers from the four maps were used to construct an integrated map. This integrated map contained 1339 markers, spanning 798 cM with an average marker interval of 0.6 cM. Fifty-eight previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 12 traits in these populations were also integrated into the map. In addition, new QTL identified for brix, fructose, glucose and sucrose were added. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in different genetic backgrounds mapped to similar genomic regions of the integrated map, suggesting that such QTL are responsible for the phenotypic variability observed in a broad array of watermelon germplasm. Conclusions The integrated map described herein enhances the utility of genomic tools over

  8. Physical mapping of complex genomes by sampled sequencing: A theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Smith, M.; Quackenbush, J.

    1995-05-01

    A method for high-throughput, high-resolution physical mapping of complex genomes and human chromosomes called Genomic Sequence Sampling (GSS) has recently been proposed. This mapping strategy employs high-density cosmid contig assembly over 200-kb to 1-Mb regions of the target genome coupled with DNA sequencing of the cosmid ends. The relative order and spacing of the sequence fragments is determined from the template contig, resulting in a physical map of 1-to 5-kb resolution that contains a substantial portion of the entire sequence at one-pass accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to determine the theoretical parameters for GSS mapping, to evaluate the effectiveness of the contig-building strategy, and to calculate the expected fraction of the target genome that can be recovered as mapped sequence. A novel aspect of the cosmid fingerprinting and contig-building strategy involves determining the orientation of the genomic inserts relative to the cloning vectors, so that the sampled sequence fragments can be mapped with high resolution. The algorithm is based upon complete restriction enzyme digestion, contig assembly by matching fragments, and end-orientation of individual cosmids by determining the best consistent fit of the labeled cosmid end fragments in the consensus restriction map. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  9. A new family of four-dimensional symplectic and integrable mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capel, H. W.; Sahadevan, R.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the generalisations of the Quispel, Roberts and Thompson (QRT) family of mappings in the plane leaving a rational quadratic expression invariant to the case of four variables. We assume invariance of the rational expression under a cyclic permutation of variables and we impose a symplectic structure with Poisson brackets of the Weyl type. All mappings satisfying these conditions are shown to be integrable either as four-dimensional mappings with two explicit integrals which are in involution with respect to the symplectic structure and which can also be inferred from the periodic reductions of the double-discrete versions of the modified Korteweg-deVries ( ΔΔMKdV) and sine-Gordon ( ΔΔsG) equations or by reduction to two-dimensional mappings with one integral of the symmetric QRT family.

  10. Efficacy of Physical Integration, Disability Awareness, and Adventure Programming on Adolescents' Acceptance of Individuals with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet R.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of three physically integrated camping programs (physical integration alone or with disability awareness or inclusionary adventure programs) on adolescents' acceptance of peers with disabilities. Pretests and posttests indicated that physical integration did not make significant attitudinal changes, but both other…

  11. An Integrated Linkage Map for Cultivated Peanut Derived from Two RILs Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparable integrated map for cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) was constructed from the integration of two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations in which two runner type cultivars, one Spanish type cultivar and one breeding line derived from a cross of Virginia type and hirsuta type wer...

  12. Mapping the goal space: personality integration and higher-order goals.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Jacob B

    2014-04-01

    By situating goals at the heart of human cognitive function, Huang & Bargh (H&B) provide a useful platform for understanding the process of personality integration as the gradual mapping of implicit motives into a coherently organized self-system. This integrative process is a critical feature of human development that must be accounted for by any complete goal theory.

  13. Use of an Innovation Component Configuration Map to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the use of a custom developed Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to measure technology integration practices of faculty in Schools, Colleges, and Departments of Education (SCDEs). This study investigated the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by SCDE…

  14. Sensor Integration in a Low Cost Land Mobile Mapping System

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Sergio; Gonçalves, José A.; Bastos, Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Mobile mapping is a multidisciplinary technique which requires several dedicated equipment, calibration procedures that must be as rigorous as possible, time synchronization of all acquired data and software for data processing and extraction of additional information. To decrease the cost and complexity of Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS), the use of less expensive sensors and the simplification of procedures for calibration and data acquisition are mandatory features. This article refers to the use of MMS technology, focusing on the main aspects that need to be addressed to guarantee proper data acquisition and describing the way those aspects were handled in a terrestrial MMS developed at the University of Porto. In this case the main aim was to implement a low cost system while maintaining good quality standards of the acquired georeferenced information. The results discussed here show that this goal has been achieved. PMID:22736985

  15. Sensor integration in a low cost land mobile mapping system.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Sergio; Gonçalves, José A; Bastos, Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Mobile mapping is a multidisciplinary technique which requires several dedicated equipment, calibration procedures that must be as rigorous as possible, time synchronization of all acquired data and software for data processing and extraction of additional information. To decrease the cost and complexity of Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS), the use of less expensive sensors and the simplification of procedures for calibration and data acquisition are mandatory features. This article refers to the use of MMS technology, focusing on the main aspects that need to be addressed to guarantee proper data acquisition and describing the way those aspects were handled in a terrestrial MMS developed at the University of Porto. In this case the main aim was to implement a low cost system while maintaining good quality standards of the acquired georeferenced information. The results discussed here show that this goal has been achieved.

  16. Assess, Map and Predict the Integrity, Resilience, and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This project will provide knowledge and adaptive management techniques to both maintain healthy waters and to improve degraded systems. It will provide scientific support for the National Aquatic Resource Surveys. Results will provide a basis for informed decision making and tools applicable to EPA program office and regional needs at national regional, and local scales. The research products, tools, models, and maps produced will be an excellent means to communicate management options with stakeholders. To share information about SSWR research projects

  17. The Irish Seabed Mapping Programme: INFOMAR - Integrated Mapping Survey for the Sustainable Developments of Ireland's Marine Resources. Progress to Date.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, F.; Benetti, S.; Fitzpatrick, F.

    2006-12-01

    During the last six years, the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute of Ireland worked together on the multimillion Irish National Seabed Survey project with the purpose of mapping the Irish marine territory using a suite of remote sensing equipment, from multibeam to seismic, achieving 87% coverage of the marine zone. Ireland was the first country in the world to carry out an extensive mapping project of their extended Exclusive Economic Zone. The Irish National Seabed Survey is now succeeded by the multiyear INFOMAR Programme. INFOMAR will concentrate initially on mapping twenty-six selected priority bays, three sea areas and the fisheries-protection "Biologically Sensitive Area", and then will complete 100% mapping of the remainder of the EEZ. Designed to incorporate all elements of an integrated mapping programme, the key data acquisition will include hydrography, oceanographic, geological and heritage data. These data sets discharge Ireland's obligations under international treaties to which she is signatory and the uses of these data are vast and multipurpose: from management plans for inshore fishing, aquaculture, coastal protection and engineering works, to environmental impact assessments related to licensing activity and support to the evolving needs of integrated coastal zone management. INFOMAR also includes a data management, exchange and integration programme for the establishment of a National Marine Data Discovery and Exchange Service; providing improved dissemination of information to researchers, policy makers, the public and private sector and the adoption of standard operating procedures in data management to facilitate inter-agency data integration. During the first year of activity, INFOMAR carried out an integrated survey from the national research vessel, the RV Celtic Explorer, acquiring hydrographic, geophysical and groundtruthing data from Bantry and Dunmanus Bays, located off the South West coast of Ireland. Airborne Li

  18. An integrated genetic linkage map of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) constructed from two RIL populations.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongde; Feng, Suping; Chen, Charles; Guo, Yufang; Knapp, Steven; Culbreath, Albert; He, Guohao; Wang, Ming Li; Zhang, Xinyou; Holbrook, C Corley; Ozias-Akins, Peggy; Guo, Baozhu

    2012-03-01

    Construction and improvement of a genetic map for peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) continues to be an important task in order to facilitate quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and the development of tools for marker-assisted breeding. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative integrated map from two cultivated × cultivated recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping populations and to apply in mapping Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) resistance trait in peanut. A total of 4,576 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from three sources: published SSR markers, newly developed SSR markers from expressed sequence tags (EST) and from bacterial artificial chromosome end-sequences were used for screening polymorphisms. Two cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers were also included to differentiate ahFAD2A alleles and ahFAD2B alleles. A total of 324 markers were anchored on this integrated map covering 1,352.1 cM with 21 linkage groups (LGs). Combining information from duplicated loci between LGs and comparing with published diploid maps, seven homoeologous groups were defined and 17 LGs (A1-A10, B1-B4, B7, B8, and B9) were aligned to corresponding A-subgenome or B-subgenome of diploid progenitors. One reciprocal translocation was confirmed in the tetraploid-cultivated peanut genome. Several chromosomal rearrangements were observed by comparing with published cultivated peanut maps. High consistency with cultivated peanut maps derived from different populations may support this integrated map as a reliable reference map for peanut whole genome sequencing assembling. Further two major QTLs for TSWV resistance were identified for each RILs, which illustrated the application of this map.

  19. Students' network integration vs. persistence in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Justyna; Brewe, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Society is constantly in flux, which demands the continuous development of our educational system to meet new challenges and impart the appropriate knowledge/skills to students. In order to improve student learning, among other things, the way we are teaching has significantly changed over the past few decades. We are moving away from traditional, lecture-based teaching towards more interactive, engagement-based strategies. A current, major challenge for universities is to increase student retention. While students' academic and social integration into an institution seems to be vital for student retention, research on the effect of interpersonal interactions is rare. I use of network analysis to investigate academic and social experiences of students in and beyond the classroom. In particular, there is a compelling case that transformed physics classes, such as Modeling Instruction (MI), promote persistence by the creation of learning communities that support the integration of students into the university. I will discuss recent results on pattern development in networks of MI students' interactions throughout the semester, as well as the effect of students' position within the network on their persistence in physics.

  20. Modeling photonic crystals by boundary integral equations and Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Jianhua; Lu Yayan Antoine, Xavier

    2008-04-20

    Efficient numerical methods for analyzing photonic crystals (PhCs) can be developed using the Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DtN) maps of the unit cells. The DtN map is an operator that takes the wave field on the boundary of a unit cell to its normal derivative. In frequency domain calculations for band structures and transmission spectra of finite PhCs, the DtN maps allow us to reduce the computation to the boundaries of the unit cells. For two-dimensional (2D) PhCs with unit cells containing circular cylinders, the DtN maps can be constructed from analytic solutions (the cylindrical waves). In this paper, we develop a boundary integral equation method for computing DtN maps of general unit cells containing cylinders with arbitrary cross sections. The DtN map method is used to analyze band structures for 2D PhCs with elliptic and other cylinders.

  1. Prioritization maps: The integration of environmental risks to manage water quality in harbor areas.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Paloma F; Gómez, Aina G; Ondiviela, Bárbara; Puente, Araceli; Juanes, José A

    2016-10-15

    A method to integrate the environmental risk of the multiple effects from uses and activities developed in harbor areas is presented. Consequences are considered as the effects derived from all identified hazards. Vulnerability is expressed in terms of functional relations between environmental susceptibility against a disturbance and the state of protection of the receptors at risk. Consequences and vulnerability are integrated obtaining a spatial variation of risk: prioritization maps. The maps are developed by 4 main stages: (1) environmental hazard identification; (2) estimation of the consequences; (3) estimation of vulnerability and, (4) integration of environmental risks. To adapt prioritization maps to the peculiarities of the study area, three different methods for the integration of the effects are proposed: average-value, worst-case and weighted methods. The implementation to a real case (Tarragona harbor, NE Spain) confirms its usefulness as a risk analysis tool to communicate and support water quality management in harbors.

  2. Using Playground Maps for Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, A. Vonnie

    2016-01-01

    Many schools now decorate their outside hard surface areas with maps. These maps provide color and excitement to a playground and are a terrific teaching tool for geography. But these maps can easily be integrated into physical education as well to promote both physical activity as well as knowledge of geography. The purpose of this article is to…

  3. 3-D or median map? Earthquake scenario ground-motion maps from physics-based models versus maps from ground-motion prediction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are two common ways to create a ground-motion map for a hypothetical earthquake: using ground motion prediction equations (by far the more common of the two) and using 3-D physics-based modeling. The former is very familiar to engineers, the latter much less so, and the difference can present a problem because engineers tend to trust the familiar and distrust novelty. Maps for essentially the same hypothetical earthquake using the two different methods can look very different, while appearing to present the same information. Using one or the other can lead an engineer or disaster planner to very different estimates of damage and risk. The reasons have to do with depiction of variability, spatial correlation of shaking, the skewed distribution of real-world shaking, and the upward-curving relationship between shaking and damage. The scientists who develop the two kinds of map tend to specialize in one or the other and seem to defend their turf, which can aggravate the problem of clearly communicating with engineers.The USGS Science Application for Risk Reduction's (SAFRR) HayWired scenario has addressed the challenge of explaining to engineers the differences between the two maps, and why, in a disaster planning scenario, one might want to use the less-familiar 3-D map.

  4. Mitotic-chromosome-based physical mapping of the Culex quinquefasciatus genome.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Anastasia N; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Kinney, Nicholas A; Kokhanenko, Alina A; deBruyn, Becky S; Lovin, Diane D; Stegniy, Vladimir N; Severson, David W; Sharakhov, Igor V; Sharakhova, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    The genome assembly of southern house mosquito Cx. quinquefasciatus is represented by a high number of supercontigs with no order or orientation on the chromosomes. Although cytogenetic maps for the polytene chromosomes of this mosquito have been developed, their utilization for the genome mapping remains difficult because of the low number of high-quality spreads in chromosome preparations. Therefore, a simple and robust mitotic-chromosome-based approach for the genome mapping of Cx. quinquefasciatus still needs to be developed. In this study, we performed physical mapping of 37 genomic supercontigs using fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic chromosomes from imaginal discs of 4th instar larvae. The genetic linkage map nomenclature was adopted for the chromosome numbering based on the direct positioning of 58 markers that were previously genetically mapped. The smallest, largest, and intermediate chromosomes were numbered as 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For idiogram development, we analyzed and described in detail the morphology and proportions of the mitotic chromosomes. Chromosomes were subdivided into 19 divisions and 72 bands of four different intensities. These idiograms were used for mapping the genomic supercontigs/genetic markers. We also determined the presence of length polymorphism in the q arm of sex-determining chromosome 1 in Cx. quinquefasciatus related to the size of ribosomal locus. Our physical mapping and previous genetic linkage mapping resulted in the chromosomal assignment of 13% of the total genome assembly to the chromosome bands. We provided the first detailed description, nomenclature, and idiograms for the mitotic chromosomes of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Further application of the approach developed in this study will help to improve the quality of the southern house mosquito genome.

  5. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness and Academic Achievement in Adolescents: A Self-Organizing Maps Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicer-Chenoll, Maite; Garcia-Massó, Xavier; Morales, Jose; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; González, Luis-Millán; Toca-Herrera, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The relationship among physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents has been widely studied; however, controversy concerning this topic persists. The methods used thus far to analyse the relationship between these variables have included mostly traditional lineal analysis according to the available literature. The…

  6. A second generation SNP and SSR integrated linkage map and QTL mapping for the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Gao-Feng; Xiong, Liang-Wei; Han, Zhi-Ke; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Jian-Bin; Wu, Xu-Gan; Yan, Yin-Long; Shen, Hong; Huang, Long; Chen, Li

    2017-01-01

    The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis is the most economically important cultivated crab species in China, and its genome has a high number of chromosomes (2n = 146). To obtain sufficient markers for construction of a dense genetic map for this species, we employed the recently developed specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) method for large-scale SNPs screening and genotyping in a F1 full-sib family of 149 individuals. SLAF-seq generated 127,677 polymorphic SNP markers, of which 20,803 valid markers were assigned into five segregation types and were used together with previous SSR markers for linkage map construction. The final integrated genetic map included 17,680 SNP and 629 SSR markers on the 73 linkage groups (LG), and spanned 14,894.9 cM with an average marker interval of 0.81 cM. QTL mapping localized three significant growth-related QTL to a 1.2 cM region in LG53 as well as 146 sex-linked markers in LG48. Genome-wide QTL-association analysis further identified four growth-related QTL genes named LNX2, PAK2, FMRFamide and octopamine receptors. These genes are involved in a variety of different signaling pathways including cell proliferation and growth. The map and SNP markers described here will be a valuable resource for the E. sinensis genome project and selective breeding programs. PMID:28045132

  7. A physical map of important QTLs, functional markers and genes available for sesame breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Komivi

    2016-10-01

    Sesame is one of the oldest oilseed crops grown mainly in Africa and Asia. Although genetic and genomic studies on sesame have started late, the past 5 years have witnessed extensive progresses in these areas on this crop. Important genomic sequence resources such as functional markers, genes and QTLs linked to agronomically important traits, have been generated through linkage mapping and association analysis to assist sesame improvement programs. However, most of these data are scattered in different maps making them hard to be exploited efficiently in breeding programs. In this study, we report a comprehensive physical map gathering 151 published genomic sequence resources which highlighted some hotspot functional regions in the sesame genome. Moreover, 83,135 non-redundant SSRs have been supplied along with their physical position and motif composition. This will assist future research in fine mapping or pinpointing more functional genes based on the already published QTLs and functional markers. This physical map represents a good landmark for further non-overlapping genetic and genomic studies working towards sesame improvement.

  8. Dense gene physical maps of the non-model species Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    Orengo, Dorcas J; Puerma, Eva; Papaceit, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen; Aguadé, Montserrat

    2017-01-11

    The comparative analysis of genetic and physical maps as well as of whole genome sequences had revealed that in the Drosophila genus, most structural rearrangements occurred within chromosomal elements as a result of paracentric inversions. Genome sequence comparison would seem the best method to estimate rates of chromosomal evolution, but the high-quality reference genomes required for this endeavor are still scanty. Here, we have obtained dense physical maps for Muller elements A, C, and E of Drosophila subobscura, a species with an extensively studied rich and adaptive chromosomal polymorphism. These maps are based on 462 markers: 115, 236, and 111 markers for elements A, C, and E, respectively. The availability of these dense maps will facilitate genome assembly and will thus greatly contribute to obtaining a good reference genome, which is a required step for D. subobscura to attain the model species status. The comparative analysis of these physical maps and those obtained from the D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster genomes allowed us to infer the number of fixed inversions and chromosomal evolutionary rates for each pairwise comparison. For all three elements, rates inferred from the more closely related species were higher than those inferred from the more distantly related species, which together with results of relative-rate tests point to an acceleration in the D. subobscura lineage at least for elements A and E.

  9. Learning Movement Culture: Mapping the Landscape between Physical Education and School Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    This article examines Movement Culture as an approach to support teachers in exploring the integration of Sport as a medium for learning within Physical Education. By avoiding the need to draw clearly defined lines between Physical Education and Sport, Movement Culture embraces both. It acknowledges the need for subject matter in Physical…

  10. Measuring community integration using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and participatory mapping for people who were once homeless.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dara V; Helfrich, Christine A; Hursh, Norman C; Sally Rogers, E; Gopal, Sucharita

    2014-05-01

    Measures of community integration rely on self-report assessments that often quantify physical or social participation, but fail to capture the individual׳s spatial presence in the community. The current study documents the activity space, or area of daily experiences, of 37 individuals who were once homeless through participatory mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Contrary to expectations, there was no significant relationship between activity space size and community integration measures, except a negative association with physical integration. Further analysis revealed, however, that continued use of homeless services, geographically spread throughout the city, was associated with larger activity space size, but may be counterproductive to social and psychological integration efforts. Analysis of the types of locations identified revealed high importance given to leisure locations and ongoing involvement with medical and mental health locations. Finally, community integration outcomes did not differ significantly by demographics or housing type, but rather degree of family involvement and feeling like home, factors that may have more potential for change.

  11. Integration of data-driven and physically-based methods to assess shallow landslides susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajas, Sara; Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Zêzere, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    Approaches used to assess shallow landslides susceptibility at the basin scale are conceptually different depending on the use of statistic or deterministic methods. The data-driven methods are sustained in the assumption that the same causes are likely to produce the same effects and for that reason a present/past landslide inventory and a dataset of factors assumed as predisposing factors are crucial for the landslide susceptibility assessment. The physically-based methods are based on a system controlled by physical laws and soil mechanics, where the forces which tend to promote movement are compared with forces that tend to promote resistance to movement. In this case, the evaluation of susceptibility is supported by the calculation of the Factor of safety (FoS), and dependent of the availability of detailed data related with the slope geometry and hydrological and geotechnical properties of the soils and rocks. Within this framework, this work aims to test two hypothesis: (i) although conceptually distinct and based on contrasting procedures, statistic and deterministic methods generate similar shallow landslides susceptibility results regarding the predictive capacity and spatial agreement; and (ii) the integration of the shallow landslides susceptibility maps obtained with data-driven and physically-based methods, for the same study area, generate a more reliable susceptibility model for shallow landslides occurrence. To evaluate these two hypotheses, we select the Information Value data-driven method and the physically-based Infinite Slope model to evaluate shallow landslides in the study area of Monfalim and Louriceira basins (13.9 km2), which is located in the north of Lisbon region (Portugal). The landslide inventory is composed by 111 shallow landslides and was divide in two independent groups based on temporal criteria (age ≤ 1983 and age > 1983): (i) the modelling group (51 cases) was used to define the weights for each predisposing factor

  12. MAPPING WATERSHED INTEGRITY FOR THE CONTERMINOUS UNITED STATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watersheds provide a variety of ecosystem services valued by society. Production of these services is sensitive to watershed alteration by human activities. Flotemersch and others (2015), defined watershed integrity (WI) as the “capacity of a watershed to support and maint...

  13. Mapping Watershed Integrity for the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watersheds provide a variety of ecosystem services valued by society. Production of these services is partially a function of the degree to which watersheds are altered by human activities. In a recent manuscript, Flotemersch and others (in preparation), defined watershed integr...

  14. Physical and genetic map of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 chromosome: comparison with that of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL 1403 reveals a large genome inversion.

    PubMed Central

    Le Bourgeois, P; Lautier, M; van den Berghe, L; Gasson, M J; Ritzenthaler, P

    1995-01-01

    A physical and genetic map of the chromosome of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris reference strain MG1363 was established. The physical map was constructed for NotI, ApaI, and SmaI enzymes by using a strategy that combines creation of new rare restriction sites by the random-integration vector pRL1 and ordering of restriction fragments by indirect end-labeling experiments. The MG1363 chromosome appeared to be circular and 2,560 kb long. Seventy-seven chromosomal markers were located on the physical map by hybridization experiments. Integration via homologous recombination of pRC1-derived plasmids allowed a more precise location of some lactococcal genes and determination of their orientation on the chromosome. The MG1363 chromosome contains six rRNA operons; five are clustered within 15% of the chromosome and transcribed in the same direction. Comparison of the L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 physical map with those of the two L. lactis subsp. lactis strains IL1403 and DL11 revealed a high degree of restriction polymorphism. At the genetic organization level, despite an overall conservation of gene organization, strain MG1363 presents a large inversion of half of the genome in the region containing the rRNA operons. PMID:7751295

  15. Second-generation integrated genetic linkage/radiation hybrid maps of the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Roelke, M E; Chen, Z Q; Menotti, K A; Sun, S; Schäffer, A A; Tomlin, J F; Agarwala, R; O'Brien, S J; Murphy, W J

    2003-01-01

    We report construction of second-generation integrated genetic linkage and radiation hybrid (RH) maps in the domestic cat (Felis catus) that exhibit a high level of marker concordance and provide near-full genome coverage. A total of 864 markers, including 585 coding loci (type I markers) and 279 polymorphic microsatellite loci (type II markers), are now mapped in the cat genome. We generated the genetic linkage map utilizing a multigeneration interspecies backcross pedigree between the domestic cat and the Asian leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). Eighty-one type I markers were integrated with 247 type II markers from a first-generation map to generate a map of 328 loci (320 autosomal and 8 X-linked) distributed in 47 linkage groups, with an average intermarker spacing of 8 cM. Genome coverage spans approximately 2,650 cM, allowing an estimate for the genetic length of the sex-averaged map as 3,300 cM. The 834-locus second-generation domestic cat RH map was generated from the incorporation of 579 type I and 255 type II loci. Type I markers were added using targeted selection to cover either genomic regions underrepresented in the first-generation map or to refine breakpoints in human/feline synteny. The integrated linkage and RH maps reveal approximately 110 conserved segments ordered between the human and feline genomes, and provide extensive anchored reference marker homologues that connect to the more gene dense human and mouse sequence maps, suitable for positional cloning applications.

  16. Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), Spring 2000: High School Health/Physical Education, Released Items, Grade 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This document presents 10 released items from the Health/Physical Education Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) test given in the spring of 2000 to ninth graders. Items from the test sessions include: selected-response (multiple choice), constructed-response, and a performance event. The selected-response items consist of individual questions…

  17. Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), Spring 2000: Elementary Health/Physical Education, Released Items, Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This document presents 10 released items from the Health/Physical Education Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) test given in the spring of 2000 to fifth graders. Items from the test sessions include: selected-response (multiple choice), constructed-response, and a performance event. The selected-response items consist of individual questions…

  18. GRAD-MAP: A Joint Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter; Anderson, Neil; Jameson, Katie; Price, Lora; Roberg-Clark, Gareth; Rogoszinksi, Zeeve; Sheppard, Kyle; Taylor, Corbin; Uher, Tim; Wilkins, Ashlee; Hammer, Donna

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland's Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP), builds connections between UMD and mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions, and community colleges, and uses seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community of undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, and is now in its third year. GRAD-MAP launched with a three-pronged approach: 1) Collaborative Seminars, 2) A Winter Workshop, and 3) A Spring Symposium. This program allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the numbers of minority students participating in astronomy and physics research (or, worse, simply shuffle around students who already are or would be); it is committed to identifying students who are otherwise underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline, not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make the climate of academic physics and astronomy more inclusive to them and all other underrepresented minority students. We will describe the key elements of our program, and highlight successes and lessons learned; GRAD-MAP can serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion. Supported by NSF PIRE and CAREER programs, Maryland Space Grant Consortium, and UMD Departments of Physics and Astronomy.

  19. Accuracy assessment of topographic mapping using UAV image integrated with satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, S. M.; Ahmad, Baharin; Ahmad, Anuar

    2014-02-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle or UAV is extensively applied in various fields such as military applications, archaeology, agriculture and scientific research. This study focuses on topographic mapping and map updating. UAV is one of the alternative ways to ease the process of acquiring data with lower operating costs, low manufacturing and operational costs, plus it is easy to operate. Furthermore, UAV images will be integrated with QuickBird images that are used as base maps. The objective of this study is to make accuracy assessment and comparison between topographic mapping using UAV images integrated with aerial photograph and satellite image. The main purpose of using UAV image is as a replacement for cloud covered area which normally exists in aerial photograph and satellite image, and for updating topographic map. Meanwhile, spatial resolution, pixel size, scale, geometric accuracy and correction, image quality and information contents are important requirements needed for the generation of topographic map using these kinds of data. In this study, ground control points (GCPs) and check points (CPs) were established using real time kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK-GPS) technique. There are two types of analysis that are carried out in this study which are quantitative and qualitative assessments. Quantitative assessment is carried out by calculating root mean square error (RMSE). The outputs of this study include topographic map and orthophoto. From this study, the accuracy of UAV image is ± 0.460 m. As conclusion, UAV image has the potential to be used for updating of topographic maps.

  20. Mapping the physical location of Telecenter using the geospatial information systems: A requirement of spatial digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohari, Abdul Manaf; Hin, Cheng Wei; Fuad, Nurwahida

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a study of Telecenter lifetime value is vital to academician, government and non-profit organization where Telecenter has great contribute to the nation development of rural community. Telecenter as important location of enhance the relationship of socio-economic, where placed all non-profit activity into single location platform. Consistently, previous studies mentioned Telecenter have significance contribution toward the nation, however, research and knowledge still lacking regarding the location factors that affecting the Telecenter specifically on spatial aspects of physical location environment. This research aimed to understand the requirement of spatial digital mapping the physical location of Telecenter, according to location of user and it environment, by using the geospatial information systems references, as called grid coordinate systems. The suggestion and implications of this study are briefly explored where spatial location factor plays important role in determine the lifetime value of Telecenter.

  1. Mental and Physical (MAP) Training: a neurogenesis-inspired intervention that enhances health in humans.

    PubMed

    Shors, Tracey J; Olson, Ryan L; Bates, Marsha E; Selby, Edward A; Alderman, Brandon L

    2014-11-01

    New neurons are generated in the hippocampus each day and their survival is greatly enhanced through effortful learning (Shors, 2014). The numbers of cells produced can be increased by physical exercise (van Praag, Kempermann, & Gage, 1999). These findings inspired us to develop a clinical intervention for humans known as Mental and Physical Training, or MAP Training. Each session consists of 30min of mental training with focused attention meditation (20min sitting and 10min walking). Meditation is an effortful training practice that involves learning about the transient nature of thoughts and thought patterns, and acquiring skills to recognize them without necessarily attaching meaning and/or emotions to them. The mental training component is followed by physical training with 30min of aerobic exercise performed at moderate intensity. During this component, participants learn choreographed dance routines while engaging in aerobic exercise. In a pilot "proof-of-concept" study, we provided supervised MAP Training (2 sessions per week for 8weeks) to a group of young mothers in the local community who were recently homeless, most of them having previously suffered from physical and sexual abuse, addiction, and depression. Preliminary data suggest that MAP Training improves dependent measures of aerobic fitness (as assessed by maximal rate of oxygen consumed) while decreasing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Similar changes were not observed in a group of recently homeless women who did not participate in MAP Training. It is not currently possible to determine whether new neurons in the human brain increase in number as a result of MAP Training. Rather these preliminary results of MAP Training illustrate how neuroscientific research can be translated into novel clinical interventions that benefit human health and wellness.

  2. An integrated genetic linkage map for white clover (Trifolium repens L.) with alignment to Medicago

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a temperate forage legume with an allotetraploid genome (2n=4×=32) estimated at 1093 Mb. Several linkage maps of various sizes, marker sources and completeness are available, however, no integrated map and marker set has explored consistency of linkage analysis among unrelated mapping populations. Such integrative analysis requires tools for homoeologue matching among populations. Development of these tools provides for a consistent framework map of the white clover genome, and facilitates in silico alignment with the model forage legume, Medicago truncatula. Results This is the first report of integration of independent linkage maps in white clover, and adds to the literature on methyl filtered GeneThresher®-derived microsatellite (simple sequence repeat; SSR) markers for linkage mapping. Gene-targeted SSR markers were discovered in a GeneThresher® (TrGT) methyl-filtered database of 364,539 sequences, which yielded 15,647 SSR arrays. Primers were designed for 4,038 arrays and of these, 465 TrGT-SSR markers were used for parental consensus genetic linkage analysis in an F1 mapping population (MP2). This was merged with an EST-SSR consensus genetic map of an independent population (MP1), using markers to match homoeologues and develop a multi-population integrated map of the white clover genome. This integrated map (IM) includes 1109 loci based on 804 SSRs over 1274 cM, covering 97% of the genome at a moderate density of one locus per 1.2 cM. Eighteen candidate genes and one morphological marker were also placed on the IM. Despite being derived from disparate populations and marker sources, the component maps and the derived IM had consistent representations of the white clover genome for marker order and genetic length. In silico analysis at an E-value threshold of 1e-20 revealed substantial co-linearity with the Medicago truncatula genome, and indicates a translocation between T. repens groups 2 and 6 relative to

  3. Construction of an integrated pepper map using RFLP, SSR, CAPS, AFLP, WRKY, rRAMP, and BAC end sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Ryul; Bae, Ik-Hyun; Park, Soung-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Min, Woong-Ki; Han, Jung-Heon; Kim, Ki-Taek; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2009-01-31

    Map-based cloning to find genes of interest, markerassisted selection (MAS), and marker-assisted breeding (MAB) all require good genetic maps with high reproducible markers. For map construction as well as chromosome assignment, development of single copy PCR-based markers and map integration process are necessary. In this study, the 132 markers (57 STS from BAC-end sequences, 13 STS from RFLP, and 62 SSR) were newly developed as single copy type PCR-based markers. They were used together with 1830 markers previously developed in our lab to construct an integrated map with the Joinmap 3.0 program. This integrated map contained 169 SSR, 354 RFLP, 23 STS from BAC-end sequences, 6 STS from RFLP, 152 AFLP, 51 WRKY, and 99 rRAMP markers on 12 chromosomes. The integrated map contained four genetic maps of two interspecific (Capsicum annuum 'TF68' and C. chinense 'Habanero') and two intraspecific (C. annuum 'CM334' and C. annuum 'Chilsungcho') populations of peppers. This constructed integrated map consisted of 805 markers (map distance of 1858 cM) in interspecific populations and 745 markers (map distance of 1892 cM) in intraspecific populations. The used pepper STS were first developed from end sequences of BAC clones from Capsicum annuum 'CM334'. This integrated map will provide useful information for construction of future pepper genetic maps and for assignment of linkage groups to pepper chromosomes.

  4. A Marker-Dense Physical Map of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum Genome

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Wood, Todd C.; Stacey, Minviluz G.; Loh, John T.; Judd, Adam; Goicoechea, Jose L.; Stacey, Gary; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wing, Rod A.

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones are effective mapping and sequencing reagents for use with a wide variety of small and large genomes. This report describes the development of a physical framework for the genome of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of soybean. A BAC library for B. japonicum was constructed that provides a 77-fold genome coverage based on an estimated genome size of 8.7 Mb. The library contains 4608 clones with an average insert size of 146 kb. To generate a physical map, the entire library was fingerprinted with HindIII, and the fingerprinted clones were assembled into contigs using the Fingerprint Contig software (FPC; Sanger Centre, UK). The FPC analysis placed 3410 clones in six large contigs. The ends of 1152 BAC inserts were sequenced to generate a sequence-tagged connector (STC) framework. To join and orient the contigs, high-density BAC colony filters were probed with 41 known gene probes and 17 end sequences from contig boundaries. STC sequences were searched against the public databases using FASTA and BLASTX algorithms. Query results allowed the identification of 113 high probability matches with putative functional identities that were placed on the physical map. Combined with the hybridization data, a high-resolution physical map with 194 positioned markers represented in two large contigs was developed, providing a marker every 45 kb. Of these markers, 177 are known or putative B. japonicum genes. Additionally, 1338 significant BLASTX results (E < 10−4) were manually sorted by function to produce a functionally categorized database of relevant B. japonicum STC sequences that can also be traced to specific locations in the physical map. PMID:11483585

  5. ODP-PLOT and MAP-PLOT: Software for integration of geosciences data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillot, P.

    2002-12-01

    Since 17 years, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) supports multidisciplinary researches to explore the structure and history of Earth beneath the oceans. After more than 200 Legs, complementary data sets covering different time and space scales have been obtained and distributed world-wide using ODP-Janus and LDEO-BRG data base servers. In Earth Sciences, more than any other science, the ensemble of these data is characterized by heterogeneous format and graphical representation mode. In order to fully and quickly put value into this information, we present a set of Unix/Linux-based C programs for conversion and integration of data sets acquired during ODP legs. Using Leg 199 datasets, we show examples of the capabilities of these programs. ODP-PLOT displays data with respect to depth and/or time. The program includes depth-time shifting, filtering and plotting of core summary, analysis (structure) and measurements (physical properties, geochemistry ...) of samples, in-situ continuous logs, magneto- and bio-stratigraphy, specific sediment analysis (lithology, grain size, texture, porosity...), core and borehole wall images. MAP-PLOT is used to easily display datasets onto 2-D maps. Outputs of both programs can be in post-script (ps), portable document format (pdf) or standard image format (GIF, JPEG, ...). Based on command line operations and customization of parameter files, these programs can be included in other Shell- or database- scripts, automating plotting procedures of data request. As an open source software, these programs can be customized to answer any specific plotting need.

  6. BAC library resources for map-based cloning and physical map construction in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although second generation sequencing (2GS) technologies allow re-sequencing of previously gold-standard-sequenced genomes, whole genome shotgun sequencing and de novo assembly of large and complex eukaryotic genomes is still difficult. Availability of a genome-wide physical map is therefore still a prerequisite for whole genome sequencing for genomes like barley. To start such an endeavor, large insert genomic libraries, i.e. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) libraries, which are unbiased and representing deep haploid genome coverage, need to be ready in place. Result Five new BAC libraries were constructed for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar Morex. These libraries were constructed in different cloning sites (HindIII, EcoRI, MboI and BstXI) of the respective vectors. In order to enhance unbiased genome representation and to minimize the number of gaps between BAC contigs, which are often due to uneven distribution of restriction sites, a mechanically sheared library was also generated. The new BAC libraries were fully characterized in depth by scrutinizing the major quality parameters such as average insert size, degree of contamination (plate wide, neighboring, and chloroplast), empty wells and off-scale clones (clones with <30 or >250 fragments). Additionally a set of gene-based probes were hybridized to high density BAC filters and showed that genome coverage of each library is between 2.4 and 6.6 X. Conclusion BAC libraries representing >20 haploid genomes are available as a new resource to the barley research community. Systematic utilization of these libraries in high-throughput BAC fingerprinting should allow developing a genome-wide physical map for the barley genome, which will be instrumental for map-based gene isolation and genome sequencing. PMID:21595870

  7. Integrating visual information across camera movements with a visual-motor calibration map

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopowicz, P.N.; Cooper, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    Facing the competing demands for wider field of view and higher spatial resolution, computer vision will evolve toward greater use of foveal sensors and frequent camera movements. Integration of visual information across movements becomes a fundamental problem. We show that integration is possible using a biologically-inspired representation we call the visual-motor calibration map. The map is a memory-based model of the relationship between camera movements and corresponding pixel locations before and after any movement. The map constitutes a self-calibration that can compensate for non-uniform sampling, lens distortion, mechanical misalignments, and arbitrary pixel reordering. Integration takes place entirely in a retinotopic frame, using a short-term, predictive visual memory.

  8. Palaeohexaploid ancestry for Caryophyllales inferred from extensive gene-based physical and genetic mapping of the sugar beet genome (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dohm, Juliane C; Lange, Cornelia; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schulz, Britta; Lehrach, Hans; Weisshaar, Bernd; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2012-05-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is an important crop plant that accounts for 30% of the world's sugar production annually. The genus Beta is a distant relative of currently sequenced taxa within the core eudicotyledons; the genomic characterization of sugar beet is essential to make its genome accessible to molecular dissection. Here, we present comprehensive genomic information in genetic and physical maps that cover all nine chromosomes. Based on this information we identified the proposed ancestral linkage groups of rosids and asterids within the sugar beet genome. We generated an extended genetic map that comprises 1127 single nucleotide polymorphism markers prepared from expressed sequence tags and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences. To construct a genome-wide physical map, we hybridized gene-derived oligomer probes against two BAC libraries with 9.5-fold cumulative coverage of the 758 Mbp genome. More than 2500 probes and clones were integrated both in genetic maps and the physical data. The final physical map encompasses 535 chromosomally anchored contigs that contains 8361 probes and 22 815 BAC clones. By using the gene order established with the physical map, we detected regions of synteny between sugar beet (order Caryophyllales) and rosid species that involves 1400-2700 genes in the sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis, poplar, grapevine, and cacao. The data suggest that Caryophyllales share the palaeohexaploid ancestor proposed for rosids and asterids. Taken together, we here provide extensive molecular resources for sugar beet and enable future high-resolution trait mapping, gene identification, and cross-referencing to regions sequenced in other plant species.

  9. An integrated approach for automated cover-type mapping of large inaccessible areas in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Michael D.

    1988-01-01

    The lack of any detailed cover type maps in the state necessitated that a rapid and accurate approach to be employed to develop maps for 329 million acres of Alaska within a seven-year period. This goal has been addressed by using an integrated approach to computer-aided analysis which combines efficient use of field data with the only consistent statewide spatial data sets available: Landsat multispectral scanner data, digital elevation data derived from 1:250 000-scale maps, and 1:60 000-scale color-infrared aerial photographs.

  10. Spatial data software integration - Merging CAD/CAM/mapping with GIS and image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Thomas L.; Bryant, Nevin A.

    1987-01-01

    The integration of CAD/CAM/mapping with image processing using geographic information systems (GISs) as the interface is examined. Particular emphasis is given to the development of software interfaces between JPL's Video Image Communication and Retrieval (VICAR)/Imaged Based Information System (IBIS) raster-based GIS and the CAD/CAM/mapping system. The design and functions of the VICAR and IBIS are described. Vector data capture and editing are studied. Various software programs for interfacing between the VICAR/IBIS and CAD/CAM/mapping are presented and analyzed.

  11. GRAD-MAP: A Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robyn; Rogoszinski, Zeeve; Sheppard, Kyle; Taylor, Corbin; Wilkins, Ashlee; Vogel, Stuart; Rolston, Steve; Hammer, Donna; Gezari, Suvi; Williams, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland's Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP) builds connections with mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), and community colleges using seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community: undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, inclusion-minded graduate student mentors, and faculty versed in the experiences of students at MSIs. In its fourth year, GRAD-MAP remains a graduate-student-powered initiative with a four-pronged approach: 1) Fall Collaborative Seminars, 2) Winter Workshop, 3) Spring Symposium, and 4) Summer Scholars Program. This coherent programming allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the number of minority students or simply shuffle around students who already are, or would be, active in research. GRAD-MAP is committed to identifying students who are underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline. Our goal is not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make substantial, sustainable efforts toward a more inclusive climate in physics and astronomy. We will describe the key elements of our program, highlight successes and lessons learned, and describe formal evaluation currently underway with the intent that GRAD-MAP could serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion.

  12. Integrated cytogenetic BAC map of the genome of the gray, short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Duke, S E; Samollow, P B; Mauceli, E; Lindblad-Toh, K; Breen, M

    2007-01-01

    The generation of high-quality genome assemblies for numerous species is advancing at a rapid pace. As the number of genome assemblies increases, so does our ability to investigate genome relationships and their contributions to unraveling complex biological, evolutionary, and biomedical processes. A key process in the generation of a genome assembly is to determine and verify the precise physical location and order of the large sequence blocks (scaffolds) that result from the assembly. For organisms of relatively recent common ancestry this process may be achieved largely through comparative sequence alignment. However, as the evolutionary distance between species lengthens, the use of comparative sequence alignment becomes increasingly less reliable. Simultaneous cytogenetic mapping, using multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, offers an alternative means to define the cytogenetic location and relative order of DNA sequences, thereby anchoring the genome sequence to the karyotype. In this article we report the molecular cytogenetic locations of 415 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that served to anchor sequence scaffolds of the gray, short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) to its karyotype, which enabled accurate integration of these regions into the genome assembly.

  13. A physical map of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster: Cosmid contigs and sequence tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Madueno, E.; Modolell, J.; Papagiannakis, G.

    1995-04-01

    A physical map of the euchromatic X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster has been constructed by assembling contiguous arrays of cosmids that were selected by screening a library with DNA isolated from microamplified chromosomal divisions. This map, consisting of 893 cosmids, covers {approximately}64% of the euchromatic part of the chromosome. In addition, 568 sequence tagged sites (STS), in aggregate representing 120 kb of sequenced DNA, were derived from selected cosmids. Most of these STSs, spaced at an average distance of {approximately} 35 kb along the euchromatic region of the chromosome, represent DNA tags that can be used as entry points to the fruitfly genome. Furthermore, 42 genes have been placed on the physical map, either through the hybridization of specific probes to the cosmids or through the fact that they were represented among the STSs. These provide a link between the physical and the genetic maps of D. melanogaster. Nine novel genes have been tentatively identified in Drosophila on the basis of matches between STS sequences and sequences from other species. 32 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Physical mapping and molecular cloning of mung bean yellow mosaic virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, T; Ikegami, M; Miura, K

    1990-01-01

    Viral single-stranded DNA of mung bean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was converted to the double-stranded state in vitro, and physical mapping was carried out. The genome of MYMV was found to consist of two major components (designated as DNA 1 and DNA 2). In addition, some minor components were detected. Molecular cloning of the major components was carried out, using in vitro double-stranded DNA and replicative intermediate DNAs. DNA 1 is about 2.72 and DNA 2 about 2.67 kilobase pairs. No similarities were observed when the two restriction maps of DNA 1 and 2 were compared.

  15. The Effectiveness of Concept Maps in Teaching Physics Concepts Applied to Engineering Education: Experimental Comparison of the Amount of Learning Achieved with and without Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Guadalupe; Perez, Angel Luis; Suero, Maria Isabel; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to quantify the effectiveness of concept maps in learning physics in engineering degrees. The following research question was posed: What was the difference in learning results from the use of concept maps to study a particular topic in an engineering course? The study design was quasi-experimental and used a post-test as a…

  16. Application of integrated methods in mapping waste disposal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soupios, Pantelis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Papadopoulos, Ilias; Kouli, Maria; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sarris, Apostolos; Manios, Thrassyvoulos

    2007-11-01

    An integrated suite of environmental methods was used to characterize the hydrogeological, geological and tectonic regime of the largest waste disposal landfill of Crete Island, the Fodele municipal solid waste site (MSW), to determine the geometry of the landfill (depth and spatial extent of electrically conductive anomalies), to define the anisotropy caused by bedrock fabric fractures and to locate potential zones of electrically conductive contamination. A combination of geophysical methods and chemical analysis was implemented for the characterization and management of the landfill. Five different types of geophysical surveys were performed: (1) 2D electrical resistance tomography (ERT), (2) electromagnetic measurements using very low frequencies (VLF), (3) electromagnetic conductivity (EM31), (4) seismic refraction measurements (SR), and (5) ambient noise measurements (HVSR). The above geophysical methods were used with the aim of studying the subsurface properties of the landfill and to define the exact geometrical characteristics of the site under investigation.

  17. Fostering Scientific Thinking by Prospective Teachers in a Course That Integrates Physics and Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.; Jansen, Henri; Winograd, Kenneth; Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We designed a physics course for prospective elementary and middle school teachers to foster aspects of scientific thinking recommended in reform documents. Because the elementary school curriculum focuses heavily on literacy, we also explicitly integrated physics and literacy learning in this course. By integrating physics and literacy learning,…

  18. Hudson Canyon benthic habitats characterization and mapping by integrated analysis of multidisciplinary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Guida, Vincent G.; Rona, Peter A.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Scranton, Mary I.; Asper, Vernon; Diercks, Arne

    2013-04-01

    Hudson Canyon, about 180 km SE of New York City, is the largest eastern U.S. submarine canyon and is under consideration for HAPC (Habitat Area of Particular Concern) status, representing a fisheries and biodiversity hot spot. Interest in the area, within the perspective of ecosystem based management, marine spatial planning, habitat and species conservation, led to a joint project between NOAA Northeast Fisheries, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Mississippi Mineral Research Institute (MMRI), National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), Stony Brook and Rutgers Universities for the study of benthic habitats, that includes the assembly of existing data with newly collected ones: acoustic mapping, visual ground-truthing, hydrographic, sedimentological, and trawl data collections. Acoustic mapping, performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar, provided ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery (3m and 1m respectively) at all water depths for identification of geomorphological features and for the characterization of surficial sediments along the two thirds of the shelf portion of the canyon. Identification of benthic and demersal communities was accomplished by visual ground thruthing with underwater vehicle video and still cameras, and from trawl catch data. A CTD-rosette sampler provided water column salinity-temperature profiles and water samples for dissolved methane analysis in the vicinity of suspected bottom sources. Analysis of data revealed a complex of topographic structures and hydrological patterns that provide a wide range of physical habitats in a relatively small area. A mosaic of sandy and muddy substrates, gravel beds, rock outcrops, and semilithified clay outcrops host rich and varied faunal assemblages, including deepwater corals and sponge communities. Pockmark fields, occurring below 300 m depth, suggest that methane-based chemosynthetic carbonate deposition contributes to creation of specific hard bottom habitats

  19. The Field-Testing of a Novel Integrated Mapping Protocol for Neglected Tropical Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pelletreau, Sonia; Nyaku, Mawuli; Dembele, Massitan; Sarr, Boubacar; Budge, Philip; Ross, Rachael; Mathieu, Els

    2011-01-01

    Background Vertical control and elimination programs focused on specific neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) can achieve notable success by reducing the prevalence and intensity of infection. However, many NTD-endemic countries have not been able to launch or scale-up programs because they lack the necessary baseline data for planning and advocacy. Each NTD program has its own mapping guidelines to collect missing data. Where geographic overlap among NTDs exists, an integrated mapping approach could result in significant resource savings. We developed and field-tested an innovative integrated NTD mapping protocol (Integrated Threshold Mapping (ITM) Methodology) for lymphatic filariasis (LF), trachoma, schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths (STH). Methodology/Principal Findings The protocol is designed to be resource-efficient, and its specific purpose is to determine whether a threshold to trigger public health interventions in an implementation unit has been attained. The protocol relies on World Health Organization (WHO) recommended indicators in the disease-specific age groups. For each disease, the sampling frame was the district, but for schistosomiasis, the sub-district rather than the ecological zone was used. We tested the protocol by comparing it to current WHO mapping methodologies for each of the targeted diseases in one district each in Mali and Senegal. Results were compared in terms of public health intervention, and feasibility, including cost. In this study, the ITM methodology reached the same conclusions as the WHO methodologies regarding the initiation of public health interventions for trachoma, LF and STH, but resulted in more targeted intervention recommendations for schistosomiasis. ITM was practical, feasible and demonstrated an overall cost saving compared with the standard, non-integrated, WHO methodologies. Conclusions/Significance This integrated mapping tool could facilitate the implementation of much-needed programs in endemic

  20. An integrated pan-tropical biomass map using multiple reference datasets.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Valerio; Herold, Martin; Heuvelink, Gerard B M; Lewis, Simon L; Phillips, Oliver L; Asner, Gregory P; Armston, John; Ashton, Peter S; Banin, Lindsay; Bayol, Nicolas; Berry, Nicholas J; Boeckx, Pascal; de Jong, Bernardus H J; DeVries, Ben; Girardin, Cecile A J; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Lindsell, Jeremy A; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; Lucas, Richard; Malhi, Yadvinder; Morel, Alexandra; Mitchard, Edward T A; Nagy, Laszlo; Qie, Lan; Quinones, Marcela J; Ryan, Casey M; Ferry, Slik J W; Sunderland, Terry; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Gatti, Roberto Cazzolla; Valentini, Riccardo; Verbeeck, Hans; Wijaya, Arief; Willcock, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We combined two existing datasets of vegetation aboveground biomass (AGB) (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108, 2011, 9899; Nature Climate Change, 2, 2012, 182) into a pan-tropical AGB map at 1-km resolution using an independent reference dataset of field observations and locally calibrated high-resolution biomass maps, harmonized and upscaled to 14 477 1-km AGB estimates. Our data fusion approach uses bias removal and weighted linear averaging that incorporates and spatializes the biomass patterns indicated by the reference data. The method was applied independently in areas (strata) with homogeneous error patterns of the input (Saatchi and Baccini) maps, which were estimated from the reference data and additional covariates. Based on the fused map, we estimated AGB stock for the tropics (23.4 N-23.4 S) of 375 Pg dry mass, 9-18% lower than the Saatchi and Baccini estimates. The fused map also showed differing spatial patterns of AGB over large areas, with higher AGB density in the dense forest areas in the Congo basin, Eastern Amazon and South-East Asia, and lower values in Central America and in most dry vegetation areas of Africa than either of the input maps. The validation exercise, based on 2118 estimates from the reference dataset not used in the fusion process, showed that the fused map had a RMSE 15-21% lower than that of the input maps and, most importantly, nearly unbiased estimates (mean bias 5 Mg dry mass ha(-1) vs. 21 and 28 Mg ha(-1) for the input maps). The fusion method can be applied at any scale including the policy-relevant national level, where it can provide improved biomass estimates by integrating existing regional biomass maps as input maps and additional, country-specific reference datasets.

  1. The need for sustained and integrated high-resolution mapping of dynamic coastal environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Lillycrop, Jeff W.; Howd, Peter A.; Wozencraft, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of the United States' coastal zone response to both human activities and natural processes is dynamic. Coastal resource and population protection requires understanding, in detail, the processes needed for change as well as the physical setting. Sustained coastal area mapping allows change to be documented and baseline conditions to be established, as well as future behavior to be predicted in conjunction with physical process models. Hyperspectral imagers and airborne lidars, as well as other recent mapping technology advances, allow rapid national scale land use information and high-resolution elevation data collection. Coastal hazard risk evaluation has critical dependence on these rich data sets. A fundamental storm surge model parameter in predicting flooding location, for example, is coastal elevation data, and a foundation in identifying the most vulnerable populations and resources is land use maps. A wealth of information for physical change process study, coastal resource and community management and protection, and coastal area hazard vulnerability determination, is available in a comprehensive national coastal mapping plan designed to take advantage of recent mapping technology progress and data distribution, management, and collection.

  2. Integrating Community Volcanic Hazard Mapping, Geographic Information Systems, and Modeling to Reduce Volcanic Hazard Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajo Sanchez, Jorge V.

    This dissertation is composed of an introductory chapter and three papers about vulnerability and volcanic hazard maps with emphasis on lahars. The introductory chapter reviews definitions of the term vulnerability by the social and natural hazard community and it provides a new definition of hazard vulnerability that includes social and natural hazard factors. The first paper explains how the Community Volcanic Hazard Map (CVHM) is used for vulnerability analysis and explains in detail a new methodology to obtain valuable information about ethnophysiographic differences, hazards, and landscape knowledge of communities in the area of interest: the Canton Buenos Aires situated on the northern flank of the Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano, El Salvador. The second paper is about creating a lahar hazard map in data poor environments by generating a landslide inventory and obtaining potential volumes of dry material that can potentially be carried by lahars. The third paper introduces an innovative lahar hazard map integrating information generated by the previous two papers. It shows the differences in hazard maps created by the communities and experts both visually as well as quantitatively. This new, integrated hazard map was presented to the community with positive feedback and acceptance. The dissertation concludes with a summary chapter on the results and recommendations.

  3. Whole genome profiling physical map and ancestral annotation of tobacco Hicks Broadleaf.

    PubMed

    Sierro, Nicolas; van Oeveren, Jan; van Eijk, Michiel J T; Martin, Florian; Stormo, Keith E; Peitsch, Manuel C; Ivanov, Nikolai V

    2013-09-01

    Genomics-based breeding of economically important crops such as banana, coffee, cotton, potato, tobacco and wheat is often hampered by genome size, polyploidy and high repeat content. We adapted sequence-based whole-genome profiling (WGP™) technology to obtain insight into the polyploidy of the model plant Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). N. tabacum is assumed to originate from a hybridization event between ancestors of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis approximately 200,000 years ago. This resulted in tobacco having a haploid genome size of 4500 million base pairs, approximately four times larger than the related tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) genomes. In this study, a physical map containing 9750 contigs of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed. The mean contig size was 462 kbp, and the calculated genome coverage equaled the estimated tobacco genome size. We used a method for determination of the ancestral origin of the genome by annotation of WGP sequence tags. This assignment agreed with the ancestral annotation available from the tobacco genetic map, and may be used to investigate the evolution of homoeologous genome segments after polyploidization. The map generated is an essential scaffold for the tobacco genome. We propose the combination of WGP physical mapping technology and tag profiling of ancestral lines as a generally applicable method to elucidate the ancestral origin of genome segments of polyploid species. The physical mapping of genes and their origins will enable application of biotechnology to polyploid plants aimed at accelerating and increasing the precision of breeding for abiotic and biotic stress resistance.

  4. Genetic and physical mapping of the genomic region spanning CMT4A

    SciTech Connect

    Othmane, K.B.; Loeb, D.; Roses, A.D.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4) is a severe childhood neuropathy classified into three types: A, B, and C. We previously mapped CMT4A to chromosome 8q13-q21 in four large Tunisian families. Analysis of recombination events suggested the order: cent.-D8S279-(D8S286,D8S164, CMT4A)-D8S84-tel. Families with types B and C were subsequently typed and linkage for these types was excluded for the CMT4A region and other known CMT loci. Recently, the gene for a major peripheral myelin protein (PMP2) was mapped by FISH to chromosome 8q21-q22 and therefore appeared to be a strong candidate gene for CMT4A. We used SSCP analysis, DNA sequencing, FISH and YAC mapping analysis, and demonstrated that PMP2 is not the defect in CMT4A. Using physical mapping data, we sublocalized a new genethon marker (D8S548) to the CMT4A region between D8S286 and D8S164. All affected CMT4A patients were homozygotes for this polymorphic microsatellite as expected from its physical localization. We screened the CEPH megabase YAC library using the closest markers; over 30 YACs were isolated and characterized by PFGE. FISH analysis revealed about 16% chimeras. The YACs span the 8 cM region between D8S279 and PMP2 (mapped distal to D8S84), with a current 1 cM gap between D8S164 and D8S84. We are currently using Alu-PCR and vectorette to develop end clones in order to identify new YACs in the region and further close this gap. Alu-PCR fragments have identified several new microsatellites in the region which can be used for additional mapping of the CMT4A gene.

  5. Creating and Mapping Flash Flood Social and Physical Vulnerability Index of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauhidur Rahman, Muhammad; Aldosary, Adel S.; Nahiduzzaman, Khondokar Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Over the past couple of years, the frequency and magnitude of flash floods are increasing in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For effective planning and mitigation purposes, it is necessary to identify and visualize areas that are vulnerable to the flooding. In this paper, we will first create a flash flood social and physical vulnerability index for the city of Riyadh based on physical and social-economic data. Building upon the index, the areas of Riyadh that are highly vulnerable to flash floods will be identified and mapped using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Finally, possible mitigation measures that can be used to reduce the impacts of flooding will be discussed in details.

  6. Effects of Various Types of Situps on Integrated MAP's of the Abdominal Musculature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Larry

    The electrical activity of the abdominal muscles was tested during situps to determine the effect upon integrated muscle action potential (MAP). The following types of situps were used in testing 18 college males: (1) trunk curls; (2) AAHPER situp; (3) YMCA situp; (4) modified AAHPER situp; and (5) modified YMCA situp. All situps were performed…

  7. Breaking Concept Boundaries to Enhance Creative Potential: Using Integrated Concept Maps for Conceptual Self-Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Gloria Yi-Ming; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Sun, Chuen-Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The authors address the role of computer support for building conceptual self-awareness--that is, enabling students to think outside of concept boundaries in hope of enhancing creative potential. Based on meta-cognition theory, we developed an integrated concept mapping system (ICMSys) to improve users' conceptual self-awareness in addition to…

  8. Integrated environmental mapping and monitoring, a methodological approach to optimise knowledge gathering and sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, Ingunn; Ødegård, Øyvind; Sørensen, Asgeir J; Johnsen, Geir; Moline, Mark A; Berge, Jørgen

    2015-07-15

    New technology has led to new opportunities for a holistic environmental monitoring approach adjusted to purpose and object of interest. The proposed integrated environmental mapping and monitoring (IEMM) concept, presented in this paper, describes the different steps in such a system from mission of survey to selection of parameters, sensors, sensor platforms, data collection, data storage, analysis and to data interpretation for reliable decision making. The system is generic; it can be used by authorities, industry and academia and is useful for planning- and operational phases. In the planning process the systematic approach is also ideal to identify areas with gap of knowledge. The critical stages of the concept is discussed and exemplified by two case studies, one environmental mapping and one monitoring case. As an operational system, the IEMM concept can contribute to an optimised integrated environmental mapping and monitoring for knowledge generation as basis for decision making.

  9. A Systematic Review of Mapping Strategies for the Sonification of Physical Quantities

    PubMed Central

    Dubus, Gaël; Bresin, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The field of sonification has progressed greatly over the past twenty years and currently constitutes an established area of research. This article aims at exploiting and organizing the knowledge accumulated in previous experimental studies to build a foundation for future sonification works. A systematic review of these studies may reveal trends in sonification design, and therefore support the development of design guidelines. To this end, we have reviewed and analyzed 179 scientific publications related to sonification of physical quantities. Using a bottom-up approach, we set up a list of conceptual dimensions belonging to both physical and auditory domains. Mappings used in the reviewed works were identified, forming a database of 495 entries. Frequency of use was analyzed among these conceptual dimensions as well as higher-level categories. Results confirm two hypotheses formulated in a preliminary study: pitch is by far the most used auditory dimension in sonification applications, and spatial auditory dimensions are almost exclusively used to sonify kinematic quantities. To detect successful as well as unsuccessful sonification strategies, assessment of mapping efficiency conducted in the reviewed works was considered. Results show that a proper evaluation of sonification mappings is performed only in a marginal proportion of publications. Additional aspects of the publication database were investigated: historical distribution of sonification works is presented, projects are classified according to their primary function, and the sonic material used in the auditory display is discussed. Finally, a mapping-based approach for characterizing sonification is proposed. PMID:24358192

  10. Comparative Physical Mapping Between Oryza sativa (AA Genome Type) and O. punctata (BB Genome Type)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, HyeRan; Miguel, Phillip San; Nelson, William; Collura, Kristi; Wissotski, Marina; Walling, Jason G.; Kim, Jun Pyo; Jackson, Scott A.; Soderlund, Carol; Wing, Rod A.

    2007-01-01

    A comparative physical map of the AA genome (Oryza sativa) and the BB genome (O. punctata) was constructed by aligning a physical map of O. punctata, deduced from 63,942 BAC end sequences (BESs) and 34,224 fingerprints, onto the O. sativa genome sequence. The level of conservation of each chromosome between the two species was determined by calculating a ratio of BES alignments. The alignment result suggests more divergence of intergenic and repeat regions in comparison to gene-rich regions. Further, this characteristic enabled localization of heterochromatic and euchromatic regions for each chromosome of both species. The alignment identified 16 locations containing expansions, contractions, inversions, and transpositions. By aligning 40% of the punctata BES on the map, 87% of the punctata FPC map covered 98% of the O. sativa genome sequence. The genome size of O. punctata was estimated to be 8% larger than that of O. sativa with individual chromosome differences of 1.5–16.5%. The sum of expansions and contractions observed in regions >500 kb were similar, suggesting that most of the contractions/expansions contributing to the genome size difference between the two species are small, thus preserving the macro-collinearity between these species, which diverged ∼2 million years ago. PMID:17339227

  11. Mapping Physical Characteristics of the Columbia River Mouth Using Transmittered Diving Waterbirds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    18 2 OBJECTIVES The objectives of this project are to: • Investigate the use of cormorants (Phalacrocorax spp.) as platforms to measure...conductivity, temperature, and depth across the MCR • Investigate the use of cormorants to collect river/sea bed imagery across the MCR • Collaborate with...bed form, or other physical features for the MCR. APPROACH The spatial distribution of individual foraging cormorants can be precisely mapped

  12. A BAC based physical map and genome survey of the rice false smut fungus Villosiclava virens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice false smut caused by Villosiclava virens is a devastating fungal disease that spreads in major rice-growing regions throughout the world. However, the genomic information for this fungal pathogen is limited and the pathogenic mechanism of this disease is still not clear. To facilitate genetic, molecular and genomic studies of this fungal pathogen, we constructed the first BAC-based physical map and performed the first genome survey for this species. Results High molecular weight genomic DNA was isolated from young mycelia of the Villosiclava virens strain UV-8b and a high-quality, large-insert and deep-coverage Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library was constructed with the restriction enzyme HindIII. The BAC library consisted of 5,760 clones, which covers 22.7-fold of the UV-8b genome, with an average insert size of 140 kb and an empty clone rate of lower than 1%. BAC fingerprinting generated successful fingerprints for 2,290 BAC clones. Using the fingerprints, a whole genome-wide BAC physical map was constructed that contained 194 contigs (2,035 clones) spanning 51.2 Mb in physical length. Bidirectional-end sequencing of 4,512 BAC clones generated 6,560 high quality BAC end sequences (BESs), with a total length of 3,030,658 bp, representing 8.54% of the genome sequence. Analysis of the BESs revealed general genome information, including 51.52% GC content, 22.51% repetitive sequences, 376.12/Mb simple sequence repeat (SSR) density and approximately 36.01% coding regions. Sequence comparisons to other available fungal genome sequences through BESs showed high similarities to Metarhizium anisopliae, Trichoderma reesei, Nectria haematococca and Cordyceps militaris, which were generally in agreement with the 18S rRNA gene analysis results. Conclusion This study provides the first BAC-based physical map and genome information for the important rice fungal pathogen Villosiclava virens. The BAC clones, physical map and genome information will

  13. Refinement of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Locus by Genetic and Physical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. H.; Kleyn, P. W.; Vitale, E.; Ross, B. M.; Lien, L.; Xu, J.; Carter, T. A.; Brzustowicz, L. M.; Obici, S.; Selig, S.; Pavone, L.; Parano, E.; Penchaszadeh, G. K.; Munsat, T.; Kunkel, L. M.; Gilliam, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We report the mapping and characterization of 12 microsatellite markers including 11 novel markers. All markers were generated from overlapping YAC clones that span the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. PCR amplification of 32 overlapping YAC clones shows that 9 of the new markers (those set in italics) map to the interval between the two previous closest flanking markers (D5S629 and D5S557): cen - D5S6 - D5S125 - D5S435 - D5S1407-D5S629-D5S1410-D5S1411/D5S1412-D5S1413-D5S1414-D5Z8-D5Z9-CATT1-D5Z10/D5Z6-D5S557-D5S1408-D5S1409-D5S637-D5S351-MAP1B-tel. Four of these new markers detect multiple loci in and out of the SMA gene region. Genetic analysis of recombinant SMA families indicates that D5S1413 is a new proximal flanking locus for the SMA gene. Interestingly, among the 40 physically mapped loci, the 14 multilocus markers map contiguously to a genomic region that overlaps, and perhaps helps define, the minimum genetic region encompassing the SMA gene(s). ImagesFigure 2Figure 5 PMID:7825579

  14. An integrated linkage map reveals candidate genes underlying adaptive variation in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    McKinney, G J; Seeb, L W; Larson, W A; Gomez-Uchida, D; Limborg, M T; Brieuc, M S O; Everett, M V; Naish, K A; Waples, R K; Seeb, J E

    2016-05-01

    Salmonids are an important cultural and ecological resource exhibiting near worldwide distribution between their native and introduced range. Previous research has generated linkage maps and genomic resources for several species as well as genome assemblies for two species. We first leveraged improvements in mapping and genotyping methods to create a dense linkage map for Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha by assembling family data from different sources. We successfully mapped 14 620 SNP loci including 2336 paralogs in subtelomeric regions. This improved map was then used as a foundation to integrate genomic resources for gene annotation and population genomic analyses. We anchored a total of 286 scaffolds from the Atlantic salmon genome to the linkage map to provide a framework for the placement 11 728 Chinook salmon ESTs. Previously identified thermotolerance QTL were found to colocalize with several candidate genes including HSP70, a gene known to be involved in thermal response, as well as its inhibitor. Multiple regions of the genome with elevated divergence between populations were also identified, and annotation of ESTs in these regions identified candidate genes for fitness related traits such as stress response, growth and behaviour. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of combining genomic resources with linkage maps to enhance evolutionary inferences.

  15. Aerotriangulation Supported by Camera Station Position Determined via Physical Integration of LIDAR and SLR Digital Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitishita, E.; Martins, M.; Centeno, J.; Hainosz, F.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays lidar and photogrammetric surveys have been used together in many mapping procedures due to their complementary characteristics. Lidar survey is capable to promptly acquire reliable elevation information that is sometimes difficult via photogrammetric procedure. On the other hand, photogrammetric survey is easily able to get semantic information of the objects. Accessibility, availability, the increasing sensor size and quick image acquisition and processing are properties that have raised the use of SLR digital cameras in photogrammetry. Orthoimage generation is a powerful photogrammetric mapping procedure, where the advantages of the integration of lidar and image datasets are very well characterized. However, to perform this application both datasets must be within a common reference frame. In this paper, a procedure to have digital images positioned and oriented in the same lidar frame via a combination of direct and indirect georeferencing is studied. The SLR digital camera was physically connected with the lidar system to calculate the camera station's position in lidar frame. After that, the aerotriangulation supported by camera station's position is performed to get image's exterior orientation parameters (EOP).

  16. Analyzing diffraction gratings by a boundary integral equation Neumann-to-Dirichlet map method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yumao; Lu, Ya Yan

    2009-11-01

    For analyzing diffraction gratings, a new method is developed based on dividing one period of the grating into homogeneous subdomains and computing the Neumann-to-Dirichlet (NtD) maps for these subdomains by boundary integral equations. For a subdomain, the NtD operator maps the normal derivative of the wave field to the wave field on its boundary. The integral operators used in this method are simple to approximate, since they involve only the standard Green's function of the Helmholtz equation in homogeneous media. The method retains the advantages of existing boundary integral equation methods for diffraction gratings but avoids the quasi-periodic Green's functions that are expensive to evaluate.

  17. Overview of National Thematic Data Integration (An Experience on One Map Mangrove Sulawesi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiastuti, A. W.; Yuwono, D. M.; Niendyawati; Pramono, G. H.; Rahmanto, B. D.

    2016-11-01

    Playing role as coastal shield with enormous economic value and ecological functions, mangrove forest management is always challenging to be studied. As either the largest archipelagic countryor the largest mangrove forest habitat around the globe, Indonesia needs a national mangrove forest baseline data and its updating for coastal management. Many stakeholders and institutions, including Geospatial Information Agency (BIG), had conducted mangrove mapping and updating. However, in order to achieve one mangrove national data, coordination and synergy among stakeholders and institutions such as: the Ministry of Environment and Forestry as mangrove custodian, Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space, Ministry of Marine and Fisheries, and BIG aligned with the National Mangrove Working Group is needed. A fundamental step for national mangrove forest management is the establishment of National One Map Mangrove Program by means of coordination, synchronization, and integration of mangrove geospatial data from various stakeholders. This paper will discuss the technical process of data integration and field survey in order to produce One Map Mangrove Sulawesi with the same geo-reference, database, and also standard and specification. The result of One Map Mangrove Sulawesi Program comprises of information about mangrove current status, existing area, and its distribution in Sulawesi.Beside the geospatial data from Ministry of Environment and Forestry and other institutions, the primary data used to map mangrove forest in Sulawesi is SPOT 6 and SPOT 7(year 2014 - 2015) imageries yielded map scale of 1: 25,000. On screen digitation using NIR, Red and Green bands and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)image transformation are applied for the initial canopy density classification. Field survey was doneto obtain field data forvegetation analysis, image classification andre-interpretation. In 2015, the process of producing One Map Mangrove Sulawesi has

  18. High-throughput Physical Mapping of Chromosomes using Automated in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    George, Phillip; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Sharakhov, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    Projects to obtain whole-genome sequences for 10,000 vertebrate species1 and for 5,000 insect and related arthropod species2 are expected to take place over the next 5 years. For example, the sequencing of the genomes for 15 malaria mosquitospecies is currently being done using an Illumina platform3,4. This Anopheles species cluster includes both vectors and non-vectors of malaria. When the genome assemblies become available, researchers will have the unique opportunity to perform comparative analysis for inferring evolutionary changes relevant to vector ability. However, it has proven difficult to use next-generation sequencing reads to generate high-quality de novo genome assemblies5. Moreover, the existing genome assemblies for Anopheles gambiae, although obtained using the Sanger method, are gapped or fragmented4,6. Success of comparative genomic analyses will be limited if researchers deal with numerous sequencing contigs, rather than with chromosome-based genome assemblies. Fragmented, unmapped sequences create problems for genomic analyses because: (i) unidentified gaps cause incorrect or incomplete annotation of genomic sequences; (ii) unmapped sequences lead to confusion between paralogous genes and genes from different haplotypes; and (iii) the lack of chromosome assignment and orientation of the sequencing contigs does not allow for reconstructing rearrangement phylogeny and studying chromosome evolution. Developing high-resolution physical maps for species with newly sequenced genomes is a timely and cost-effective investment that will facilitate genome annotation, evolutionary analysis, and re-sequencing of individual genomes from natural populations7,8. Here, we present innovative approaches to chromosome preparation, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and imaging that facilitate rapid development of physical maps. Using An. gambiae as an example, we demonstrate that the development of physical chromosome maps can potentially improve genome

  19. The Effect of Collaborative Concept Mapping on Elementary Preservice Teachers' Anxiety, Efficacy, and Achievement in Physical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene M.; Haney, Jodi J.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the effects of using concept-mapping activities in a physical science class for elementary science teachers on physical science achievement, self-efficacy, and anxiety toward learning and teaching physical science. Discusses implications for teacher education. Contains 54 references. (WRM)

  20. Expansion of polynomial Lie group integrals in terms of certain maps on surfaces, and factorizations of permutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, Marcel

    2017-02-01

    Using the diagrammatic approach to integrals over Gaussian random matrices, we find a representation for polynomial Lie group integrals as infinite sums over certain maps on surfaces. The maps involved satisfy a specific condition: they have some marked vertices, and no closed walks that avoid these vertices. We also formulate our results in terms of permutations, arriving at new kinds of factorization problems.

  1. Implementation and Outcomes of a Responsibility-Based Physical Activity Program Integrated Into an Intact High School Physical Education Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Paul M.; Burton, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Underserved youth are at risk for numerous threats to their physical and psychological well-being. To navigate the challenges they face, they need a variety of positive life skills. This study systematically explored the implementation and short-term outcomes of a responsibility-based physical activity program that was integrated into an intact…

  2. Integral field spectroscopy of planetary nebulae: mapping the line diagnostics and hydrogen-poor zones with VLT FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, Y. G.; Walsh, J. R.; Péquignot, D.; Barlow, M. J.; Danziger, I. J.; Liu, X.-W.

    2008-05-01

    Results from the first dedicated study of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) by means of optical integral field spectroscopy with the Very Large Telescope Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph Argus integral field unit are presented. Three typical Galactic disc PNe have been mapped with the 11.5 × 7.2-arcsec2 Argus array: 2D spectral maps of the main shell of NGC5882 and of large areas of NGC 6153 and NGC 7009 with 297 spatial pixels per target were obtained at subarcsec resolutions. A corresponding number of 297 spectra per target were obtained in the 396.4-507.8nm range. Spatially resolved maps of emission lines and of nebular physical properties such as electron temperatures, densities and ionic abundances were produced. The abundances of helium and of doubly ionized carbon and oxygen, relative to hydrogen, were derived from optical recombination lines (ORLs), while those of O2+ were also derived from the classic collisionally excited lines (CELs). The occurrence of the abundance discrepancy problem, pertaining to oxygen, was investigated by mapping the ratio of ORL/CEL abundances for O2+ [the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF)] across the face of the PNe. The ADF varies between targets and also with position within the targets, attaining values of ~40 in the case of NGC 6153 and ~30 in the case of NGC 7009. Correlations of the ADF with geometric distance from the central star and plasma surface brightness (for NGC 6153), as well as with [OIII] electron temperature, plasma ionization state and other physical properties of the targets are established. Very small values of the temperature fluctuation parameter in the plane of the sky, t2A(O2+), are found in all cases. It is argued that these results provide further evidence for the existence in run-of-the-mill PNe of a distinct nebular component consisting of hydrogen-deficient, super-metal-rich plasma. The zones containing this posited component appear as undulations in the CII and OII ORL abundance

  3. Mapping virtual addresses to different physical addresses for value disambiguation for thread memory access requests

    DOEpatents

    Gala, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-02

    A multiprocessor system includes nodes. Each node includes a data path that includes a core, a TLB, and a first level cache implementing disambiguation. The system also includes at least one second level cache and a main memory. For thread memory access requests, the core uses an address associated with an instruction format of the core. The first level cache uses an address format related to the size of the main memory plus an offset corresponding to hardware thread meta data. The second level cache uses a physical main memory address plus software thread meta data to store the memory access request. The second level cache accesses the main memory using the physical address with neither the offset nor the thread meta data after resolving speculation. In short, this system includes mapping of a virtual address to a different physical addresses for value disambiguation for different threads.

  4. Integration of diverse remote sensing data sets for geologic mapping and resource exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Dietz, John B.

    1991-01-01

    The use of high-quality multispectral images in the visible, near-infrared, shortwave infrared, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of the spectrum for producing thematic maps showing details of the surface geology is reported. The airborne data sets used in the study include the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner, and the airborne SAR. Ancillary data include a digital elevation model, National High Altitude Photography, Landsat Multispectral Scanner data, Landsat Thematic Mapper data, laboratory and field spectral measurements, and traditional geologic mapping. The integrated, multispectral images are shown to provide new geologic information that can be used in mineral deposit models to provide exploration targets.

  5. Integration Over Curves and Surfaces Defined by the Closest Point Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    paper provides simple formulations for integrating over manifolds of codimensions one, or two in R3 , when the manifolds are described by functions...level set. Now suppose that ∂Ω is a smooth hypersurface in R3 and assume that x is suffi- ciently close to Ω so that the closest point mapping x∗ = P∂Ω(x...closest point mapping ∂P∂Ω ∂x ; namely, ˆ ∂Ω v(x(s))ds = ˆ R3 v(P∂Ω(x))δ(d∂Ω(x)) 2∏ j=1 σj(x)dx. To motivate the new approach using singular values, we

  6. Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding reveals developmental process integration and a fresh look at evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yant, Levi

    2012-02-01

    How does evolution forge adaptive responses? Are many changes required or few? Just how complex are the transcriptional networks that control development? Diverse questions like these are being newly addressed by next-generation sequencing-based techniques. Facilitating a mechanistic understanding, these approaches reveal the direct in vivo interactions between transcription factors and their physical targets, combined with genome-scale readouts to comprehensively map adaptive gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Here I focus on pioneering work from the last 3 years that has leveraged these data to investigate diverse aspects of GRN circuitry controlling the reproductive transition in plants. These approaches have revealed surprising new functions for long-investigated key players in developmental programs and laid bare the basis for pleiotropy in many others, suggesting widespread process integration at the transcriptional level. Evolutionary questions begged by the recent deluge of GRN mapping data are being assessed anew, both by emerging work outside Arabidopsis thaliana and novel analyses within. These studies have swiftly exposed the distinctive power and adaptability of genome-wide GRN mapping and illustrate that this unique data type holds tremendous promise for plant biology.

  7. Physical localization and genetic mapping of the fertility restoration gene Rfo in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiuhuan; Primomo, Valerio; Li, Zenglu; Zhang, Yongping; Jan, Chao-Chien; Tulsieram, Lomas; Xu, Steven S

    2009-04-01

    The Ogu cytoplasm for male sterility and its fertility restorer gene Rfo in canola (Brassica napus L.) were originally introgressed from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and have been widely used for canola hybrid production and breeding. The objective of this study was to determine the physical location of the Rfo locus in the canola genome using fluorescence in situ hybridization and genetic mapping. For physical localization of the Rfo gene, two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, G62 and B420, which were closely linked to the Rfo gene, were used as probes to hybridize with the somatic metaphase chromosomes of a canola hybrid variety, PHI-46 (46H02), containing the Rfo fragment. The results showed that both clones were physically located at the end of one large metacentric chromosome. By simultaneous use of two BAC clones and 45S rDNA repeated sequences as the probes, we demonstrated that the large metacentric chromosome probed with the two BAC clones did not carry 45S rDNA repeated sequences. The chromosome was 3.65 +/- 0.74 microm in average length (20 cells) and ranked second in size among the chromosomes without 45S rDNAs. The centromere index of the chromosome (20 cells) was calculated as 43.74 +/- 4.19. A comparison with previously reported putative karyotypes of B. napus (AACC) and its diploid ancestors Brassica rapa L. (AA) and Brassica oleracea L. (CC) suggests that the chromosome carrying the Rfo fragment might belong to one of three large metacentric chromosomes of the C genome. Genetic mapping has confirmed the localization of the Rfo fragment to the distal region of linkage group N19, which corresponds to the C genome in B. napus. This study has provided the evidence of the location of the Rfo gene on canola chromosomes and established a basic framework for further physical mapping and manipulation of the gene.

  8. Physical and genetic mapping of the muscle phosphofructokinase gene (PFKM): Reassignment to human chromosome 12q

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T.D.; Akots, G.; Bowden, D.W.

    1996-05-15

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a key rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis and represents a major control point in the metabolism of glucose. There are at least three known isoforms of PFK in humans, referred to as the muscle, platelet, and liver forms, each of which is differentially expressed in various tissues. The gene for muscle phosphofructokinase, PFKM, is mutated in Tarui disease and conceivably contributes to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Based on physical and genetic mapping, we have found that the gene for PFKM does not map to chromosome 1 as previously described, but instead maps to chromosome 12. PCR analysis with a somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using primers derived from intron 6 and exon 18 of the PFKM gene showed consistent amplification of cell lines containing chromosome 12 (concordance, 100%). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with CEPH YAC 762G4, isolated with exon 18 primers, indicated that this clone maps to 12q13, centromeric to the diacylglycerol kinase gene (DAGK) at 12q13.3. A highly informative genetic marker isolated from YAC 762G4 was used to map PFKM genetically between the CHLC framework markers D12S1090 and D12S390. This placement for 762G4 was significantly proximal to the recently reported locus for a third gene for maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The PFKM-associated microsatellite will be a valuable tool in the evaluation of PFKM in diabetic populations as well as in linkage analysis in families with Tarui disease. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Data layer integration for the national map of the united states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E.L.; Finn, M.P.; Starbuck, M.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of geographic data layers in multiple raster and vector formats, from many different organizations and at a variety of resolutions and scales, is a significant problem for The National Map of the United States being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Our research has examined data integration from a layer-based approach for five of The National Map data layers: digital orthoimages, elevation, land cover, hydrography, and transportation. An empirical approach has included visual assessment by a set of respondents with statistical analysis to establish the meaning of various types of integration. A separate theoretical approach with established hypotheses tested against actual data sets has resulted in an automated procedure for integration of specific layers and is being tested. The empirical analysis has established resolution bounds on meanings of integration with raster datasets and distance bounds for vector data. The theoretical approach has used a combination of theories on cartographic transformation and generalization, such as T??pfer's radical law, and additional research concerning optimum viewing scales for digital images to establish a set of guiding principles for integrating data of different resolutions.

  10. Concepts of integrated satellite surveys. [thematic mapping of land use in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Morocco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The United Nations initially contracted with NASA to carry out investigations in three countries; but now as the result of rapidly increasing interest, ERTS imagery has been/is being used in 7 additional projects related to agriculture, forestry, land-use, soils, landforms and hydrology. Initially the ERTS frames were simply used to provide a synoptic view of a large area of a developing country as a basis to regional surveys. From this, interest has extended to using reconstituted false color imagery and latterly, in co-operation with Purdue University, the use of computer generated false color mosaics and computer generated large scale maps. As many developing countries are inadequately mapped and frequently rely on outdated maps, the ERTS imagery is considered to provide a very wide spectrum of valuable data. Thematic maps can be readily prepared at a scale of 1:250,000 using standard NASA imagery. These provide coverage of areas not previously mapped and provide supplementary information and enable existing maps to be up-dated. There is also increasing evidence that ERTS imagery is useful for temporal studies and for providing a new dimension in integrated surveys.

  11. Putting people on the map through an approach that integrates social data in conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Stephanson, Sheri L; Mascia, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    Conservation planning is integral to strategic and effective operations of conservation organizations. Drawing upon biological sciences, conservation planning has historically made limited use of social data. We offer an approach for integrating data on social well-being into conservation planning that captures and places into context the spatial patterns and trends in human needs and capacities. This hierarchical approach provides a nested framework for characterizing and mapping data on social well-being in 5 domains: economic well-being, health, political empowerment, education, and culture. These 5 domains each have multiple attributes; each attribute may be characterized by one or more indicators. Through existing or novel data that display spatial and temporal heterogeneity in social well-being, conservation scientists, planners, and decision makers may measure, benchmark, map, and integrate these data within conservation planning processes. Selecting indicators and integrating these data into conservation planning is an iterative, participatory process tailored to the local context and planning goals. Social well-being data complement biophysical and threat-oriented social data within conservation planning processes to inform decisions regarding where and how to conserve biodiversity, provide a structure for exploring socioecological relationships, and to foster adaptive management. Building upon existing conservation planning methods and insights from multiple disciplines, this approach to putting people on the map can readily merge with current planning practices to facilitate more rigorous decision making.

  12. The case of the QRS-T angles versus QRST integral maps.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, Adriaan

    2014-01-01

    This contribution discusses the QRS-T angle as well as the QRST integral map. Both of these topics have been tested in their application in extracting the major features of depolarization and repolarization: their spatio-temporal behaviour, and how much of their global or local nature might be deduced from signals that can be observed clinically. Recently, it is in particular the QRS-T angle that has received considerable attention, a method that stems directly from vectorcardiography, a subdomain of electrocardiography. The QRST integral map is a display of a map on the body surface of the integrals over time of the ECG signals observed at sets of electrodes. The common biophysical background of both techniques is highlighted. In particular it is explained why, in healthy myocardium, both provide a similar view on the global timing of the depolarization and repolarization of all cardiac myocytes, more specifically, on the dispersion of their action potential durations. In the presence of ischemia, the view obtained is of the integral over time of the transmembrane potentials, which comprises a 'mixture' of their timing and magnitude. The analysis of results of a simulation study emphasizes the large discrepancies that may be observed between the QRS-T angle in the frontal plane and its 3D variant. It is shown that the required vector representation of the signals may be derived from the 12-lead ECG by using the transfer matrix proposed in 1990 by Kors and colleagues.

  13. Somatic cell hybrid and long-range physical mapping of 11p13 microdissected genomic clones.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, L M; Senger, G; Lüdecke, H J; Claussen, U; Horsthemke, B; Zhang, S S; Metzroth, B; Hohenfellner, K; Zabel, B; Shows, T B

    1990-01-01

    Microdissection and microcloning of banded human metaphase chromosomes have been used to construct a genomic library of 20,000 clones that is highly enriched for chromosome 11p13 DNA sequences. Clones from this library have been mapped on a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids that divides the region from distal p12 to proximal p14 into seven physical intervals, A total of 1500 clones has been isolated, 250 clones have been characterized, and 58 clones have been mapped. Six of the clones were used to complete a long-range physical map of 7.5 megabases through the region. Two of the clones are localized to the Wilms tumor (WT) region, three are localized to the aniridia (AN2) region, and two are localized to the region between WT and AN2. The library represents DNA sequences spanning a distance of approximately 13 x 10(6) base pairs, with an average density of one clone per 37,000 base pairs. Images PMID:2169618

  14. A natural user interface to integrate citizen science and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Eduardo; Laut, Jeffrey; Nov, Oded; Cappa, Paolo; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Citizen science enables volunteers to contribute to scientific projects, where massive data collection and analysis are often required. Volunteers participate in citizen science activities online from their homes or in the field and are motivated by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Here, we investigated the possibility of integrating citizen science tasks within physical exercises envisaged as part of a potential rehabilitation therapy session. The citizen science activity entailed environmental mapping of a polluted body of water using a miniature instrumented boat, which was remotely controlled by the participants through their physical gesture tracked by a low-cost markerless motion capture system. Our findings demonstrate that the natural user interface offers an engaging and effective means for performing environmental monitoring tasks. At the same time, the citizen science activity increases the commitment of the participants, leading to a better motion performance, quantified through an array of objective indices. The study constitutes a first and necessary step toward rehabilitative treatments of the upper limb through citizen science and low-cost markerless optical systems.

  15. A natural user interface to integrate citizen science and physical exercise

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Eduardo; Laut, Jeffrey; Nov, Oded; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Citizen science enables volunteers to contribute to scientific projects, where massive data collection and analysis are often required. Volunteers participate in citizen science activities online from their homes or in the field and are motivated by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Here, we investigated the possibility of integrating citizen science tasks within physical exercises envisaged as part of a potential rehabilitation therapy session. The citizen science activity entailed environmental mapping of a polluted body of water using a miniature instrumented boat, which was remotely controlled by the participants through their physical gesture tracked by a low-cost markerless motion capture system. Our findings demonstrate that the natural user interface offers an engaging and effective means for performing environmental monitoring tasks. At the same time, the citizen science activity increases the commitment of the participants, leading to a better motion performance, quantified through an array of objective indices. The study constitutes a first and necessary step toward rehabilitative treatments of the upper limb through citizen science and low-cost markerless optical systems. PMID:28231261

  16. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report, October 1, 1990--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-12-31

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  17. Multipoint-likelihood maximization mapping on 4 segregating populations to achieve an integrated framework map for QTL analysis in pot azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids) is the most important flowering pot plant produced in Belgium, being exported world-wide. In the breeding program, flower color is the main feature for selection, only in later stages cultivation related plant quality traits are evaluated. As a result, plants with attractive flowering are kept too long in the breeding cycle. The inheritance of flower color has been well studied; information on the heritability of cultivation related quality traits is lacking. For this purpose, QTL mapping in diverse genetic backgrounds appeared to be a must and therefore 4 mapping populations were made and analyzed. Results An integrated framework map on four individual linkage maps in Rhododendron simsii hybrids was constructed. For genotyping, mainly dominant scored AFLP (on average 364 per population) and MYB-based markers (15) were combined with co-dominant SSR (23) and EST markers (12). Linkage groups were estimated in JoinMap. A consensus grouping for the 4 mapping populations was made and applied in each individual mapping population. Finally, 16 stable linkage groups were set for the 4 populations; the azalea chromosome number being 13. A combination of regression mapping (JoinMap) and multipoint-likelihood maximization (Carthagène) enabled the construction of 4 maps and their alignment. A large portion of loci (43%) was common to at least two populations and could therefore serve as bridging markers. The different steps taken for map optimization and integration into a reference framework map for QTL mapping are discussed. Conclusions This is the first map of azalea up to our knowledge. AFLP and SSR markers are used as a reference backbone and functional markers (EST and MYB) were added as candidate genes for QTL analysis. The alignment of the 4 maps on the basis of framework markers will facilitate in turn the alignment of QTL regions detected in each of the populations. The approach we took is thoroughly different than the

  18. [Application of biotope mapping model integrated with vegetation cover continuity attributes in urban biodiversity conservation].

    PubMed

    Gao, Tian; Qiu, Ling; Chen, Cun-gen

    2010-09-01

    Based on the biotope classification system with vegetation structure as the framework, a modified biotope mapping model integrated with vegetation cover continuity attributes was developed, and applied to the study of the greenbelts in Helsingborg in southern Sweden. An evaluation of the vegetation cover continuity in the greenbelts was carried out by the comparisons of the vascular plant species richness in long- and short-continuity forests, based on the identification of woodland continuity by using ancient woodland indicator species (AWIS). In the test greenbelts, long-continuity woodlands had more AWIS. Among the forests where the dominant trees were more than 30-year-old, the long-continuity ones had a higher biodiversity of vascular plants, compared with the short-continuity ones with the similar vegetation structure. The modified biotope mapping model integrated with the continuity features of vegetation cover could be an important tool in investigating urban biodiversity, and provide corresponding strategies for future urban biodiversity conservation.

  19. Multi-Sensor Integration to Map Odor Distribution for the Detection of Chemical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Acar, Levent

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping odor distribution derived from a chemical source using multi-sensor integration and reasoning system design. Odor localization is the problem of finding the source of an odor or other volatile chemical. Most localization methods require a mobile vehicle to follow an odor plume along its entire path, which is time consuming and may be especially difficult in a cluttered environment. To solve both of the above challenges, this paper proposes a novel algorithm that combines data from odor and anemometer sensors, and combine sensors’ data at different positions. Initially, a multi-sensor integration method, together with the path of airflow was used to map the pattern of odor particle movement. Then, more sensors are introduced at specific regions to determine the probable location of the odor source. Finally, the results of odor source location simulation and a real experiment are presented. PMID:27384568

  20. Ensemble Integration of Forest Disturbance Maps for the Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, W. B.; Healey, S. P.; Yang, Z.; Zhu, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Kennedy, R. E.; Huang, C.; Steinwand, D.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Stehman, S. V.; Loveland, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent convergence of free, high quality Landsat data and acceleration in the development of dense Landsat time series algorithms has spawned a nascent interagency effort known as the Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS). LCMS is being designed to map historic land cover changes associated with all major disturbance agents and land cover types in the US. Currently, five existing algorithms are being evaluated for inclusion in LCMS. The priorities of these five algorithms overlap to some degree, but each has its own strengths. This has led to the adoption of a novel approach, within LCMS, to integrate the map outputs (i.e., base learners) from these change detection algorithms using empirical ensemble models. Training data are derived from independent datasets representing disturbances such as: harvest, fire, insects, wind, and land use change. Ensemble modeling is expected to produce significant increases in predictive accuracy relative to the results of the individual base learners. The non-parametric models used in LCMS also provide a framework for matching output ensemble maps to independent sample-based statistical estimates of disturbance area. Multiple decision trees "vote" on class assignment, and it is possible to manipulate vote thresholds to ensure that ensemble maps reflect areas of disturbance derived from sources such as national-scale ground or image-based inventories. This talk will focus on results of the first ensemble integration of the base learners for six Landsat scenes distributed across the US. We will present an assessment of base learner performance across different types of disturbance against an independently derived, sample-based disturbance dataset (derived from the TimeSync Landsat time series visualization tool). The goal is to understand the contributions of each base learner to the quality of the ensemble map products. We will also demonstrate how the ensemble map products can be manipulated to match sample-based annual

  1. Integrated Range-Doppler Map and Extended Target Classification with Adaptive Waveform for Cognitive Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    wideband waveform. 14. SUBJECT TERMS waveform design, eigen waveform, ambiguity function, target identification , target detection , range Doppler map...are also interested in identification of extended targets . And finally, the third objective (which utilizes the results of the first two) is to...design an integrated scheme for the combined problem of range-Doppler location/ detection with extended target type identification with the use of a

  2. Integrated Gravity Mapping System (IGMS) Study Program for Aircraft and Land Vehicles. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Office (SP24) for the US Navy, under the management of Sperry Systems Management. 1.3 Scope 1.3.1 General The Integrated Gravity Mapping System (IGMS...program plan outlined on Figure 2-1 incorporates the experiences gained on the GSS ADM system for Sperry /SSPC/USN, which was delivered and installed...5 5 * . .SS * use of a smaller militarized computer. Improvement observed as a result of efforts conducted under the Sperry /SSPO program will be

  3. Intraoperative Monitoring and Mapping of the Functional Integrity of the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Conejero, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic damage is very high in surgical interventions in or around the brainstem. However, surgical techniques and intraoperative neuromonitoring (ION) have evolved sufficiently to increase the likelihood of successful functional outcomes in many patients. We present a critical review of the methodologies available for intraoperative monitoring and mapping of the brainstem. There are three main groups of techniques that can be used to assess the functional integrity of the brainstem: 1) mapping, which provides rapid anatomical identification of neural structures using electrical stimulation with a hand-held probe, 2) monitoring, which provides real-time information about the functional integrity of the nervous tissue, and 3) techniques involving the examination of brainstem reflexes in the operating room, which allows for the evaluation of the reflex responses that are known to be crucial for most brainstem functions. These include the blink reflex, which is already in use, and other brainstem reflexes that are being explored, such as the masseter H-reflex. This is still under development but is likely to have important functional consequences. Today an abundant armory of ION methods is available for the monitoring and mapping of the functional integrity of the brainstem during surgery. ION methods are essential in surgery either in or around the brainstem; they facilitate the removal of lesions and contribute to notable improvements in the functional outcomes of patients. PMID:27449909

  4. The Relative Effectiveness of Integrated Reading Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taslidere, Erdal; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the combined and partial effects of the Integrated Reading/Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach on ninth grade private high school students' achievement in and attitudes toward optics. The Integrated Reading/Study Strategy is a new strategy which was developed by integrating previously…

  5. Integrating conventional classifiers with a GIS expert system to increase the accuracy of invasive species mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masocha, Mhosisi; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2011-06-01

    Mapping the cover of invasive species using remotely sensed data alone is challenging, because many invaders occur as mid-level canopy species or as subtle understorey species and therefore contribute little to the spectral signatures captured by passive remote sensing devices. In this study, two common non-parametric classifiers namely, the neural network and support vector machine were used to map four cover classes of the invasive shrub Lantana camara in a protected game reserve and the adjacent area under communal land management in Zimbabwe. These classifiers were each combined with a geographic information system (GIS) expert system, in order to test whether the new hybrid classifiers yielded significantly more accurate invasive species cover maps than the single classifiers. The neural network, when used on its own, mapped the cover of L. camara with an overall accuracy of 71% and a Kappa index of agreement of 0.61. When the neural network was combined with an expert system, the overall accuracy and Kappa index of agreement significantly increased to 83% and 0.77, respectively. Similarly, the support vector machine achieved an overall accuracy of 64% with a Kappa index of agreement of 0.52, whereas the hybrid support vector machine and expert system classifier achieved a significantly higher overall accuracy of 76% and a Kappa index of agreement of 0.67. These results suggest that integrating conventional image classifiers with an expert system increases the accuracy of invasive species mapping.

  6. GIS integration of the 1:2880 Stabile cadastre map sheets from Bukovina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crǎciunescu, Vasile; Niè›U, Constantin; Timár, Gábor; Boicu, Alin; Rus, Ioan

    2010-05-01

    Starting with 1975, the North-West part of the Moldavia Principality was occupied by the Habsburg Monarchy and become known as Duchy of Bukovina. During the 143 years of Austrian rule (1775 - 1918), this territory was the subject of several topographic and cadastral surveys. The paper will focus on the cadastral maps produced under the Stabile cadaster (also known as Franciscan cadastre). In the Habsburg Empire, this cadastral survey was started in 1817, at an order of the Emperor Francis I of Austria, as a base for his land taxation reform. In Bukovina, the land registration system was introduced in 1832. The base maps, known as Katastralmappe or Parzellenplan, were drawn under the 1:2880 scale, using Viennese Klafter (fathom) as length unit (1 Viennese Klafter = 1.89648 meters). Each taxation parish (usually centered on the most important cities/villages) was surveyed and mapped individually. The map sheets were accompanied by several registers (e.g. register of building plots, register of land plots) with informations regarding the cadastral parcels. Today, such documents represent a valuable resource in reconstructing the natural and built environment. The study presents the way this maps can be georeferenced and integrated into modern GIS applications, for precise digitization, spatial analysis and 3D reconstruction. The base of the georeference is the knowledge of the projection and datum parameters of the survey in Bukovina as well as the sheet labeling system.

  7. Interfacing 1990 US Census TIGER map files with New S graphics software. [Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER)

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzardi, M.; Mohr, M.S.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . School of Public Health)

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, the United States Bureau of the Census released detailed geographic base files known as TIGER/Line (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing) which contain detail on the physical features and census tract boundaries of every county in the United States. The TIGER database is attractive for two reasons. First, it is publicly available through the Bureau of the Census on tape or cd-rom for a minimal fee. Second, it contains 24 billion characters of data which describe geographic features of interest to the Census Bureau such as coastlines, hydrography, transportation networks, political boundaries, etc. Unfortunately, the large TIGER database only provides raw alphanumeric data; no utility software, graphical or otherwise, is included. On the other hand New S, a popular statistical software package by AT T, has easily operated functions that permit advanced graphics in conjunction with data analysis. New S has the ability to plot contours, lines, segments, and points. However, of special interest is the New S function map and its options. Using the map function, which requires polygons as input, census tracts can be quickly selected, plotted, shaded, etc. New S graphics combined with the TIGER database has obvious potential. This paper reports on our efforts to use the TIGER map files with New S, especially to construct census tract maps of counties. While census tract boundaries are inherently polygonal, they are not organized as such in the TIGER database. This conversion of the TIGER line'' format into New S polygon/polyline'' format is one facet of the work reported here. Also we discuss the selection and extraction of auxiliary geographic information from TIGER files for graphical display using New S.

  8. A 1. 8-Mb YAC contig in Xp11. 23: Identification of Cpg islands and physical mapping of CA repeats in a region of high gene density

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, M.P.; Nemeth, A.H.; Campbell, L.; Raut, C.P.; Davies, K.E. ); Weissenbach, J. )

    1994-05-15

    The genes ARAF1, SYN1, TIMP, and PFC are clustered within 70 kb of one another, and, as reported in the accompanying paper, at least four more genes map within 400 kb: a cluster of Krueppel-type zinc finger genes (including ZNF21, ZNF41, and ZNF81) and ELK-1, a member of the ets oncogene superfamily. This gene-rich region is of particular interest because of the large number of disease genes mapping to Xp11.23: At least three eye diseases (retinitis pigmentosa type 2, congenital stationary night blindness CSNB1, and Aland Island eye disease), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked nephrolithiasis, and a translocation breakpoint associated with synovial sarcoma. The authors have constructed a 1.8-Mb YAC contig in this region, confirming the link between TIMP and OATL1 reported by Knight et al. (1994) and extending the map in the distal direction. To investigate the likelihood that more genes are located within this region, they have carried out detailed mapping of rare-cutter restriction sites in these YACs and identified seven CpG islands. At least six of these islands are located over 50 kb from any known gene locations, suggesting that the region contains at least this many as yet unidentified genes. They have also mapped the physical locations of six highly polymorphic CA repeats within the contig, thus integrating the physical, genetic, and transcriptional maps of the region and facilitating the mapping and identification of disease genes. Together with the report by Knight et al., these data indicate the following order of loci: Xpter-DXS1264-DXS1055-DXS1003-DXS1146-DXS1266-(ZNF41, ARAF1)-SYN1 CA repeat-SYN1 (3[prime] end)-TIMP-SYN1 (5[prime] end)-PFC CA repeat-PFC-(DXS426, ELK1)-(DXS1265, ZNF81)-ZNF21-DXS1267-OATL1-Xcen. 40 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Canonical path-integral measures for Holst and Plebanski gravity: II. Gauge invariance and physical inner product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin

    2010-12-01

    This paper serves as a continuation for the discussion in Engle et al (2010, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 245014). We analyze the invariance properties of the gravity path-integral measure derived from canonical framework and discuss which path-integral formula may be employed in the concrete computation e.g. constructing a spin-foam model, so that the final model can be interpreted as a physical inner product in the canonical theory. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part is concerning the gauge invariance of the canonical path-integral measure for gravity from the reduced phase space quantization. We show that the path-integral measure is invariant under all the gauge transformations generated by all the constraints. These gauge transformations are the local symmetries of the gravity action, which is implemented without anomaly at the quantum level by the invariant path-integral measure. However, these gauge transformations coincide with the spacetime diffeomorphisms only when the equations of motion are imposed. But the path-integral measure is not invariant under spacetime diffeomorphisms, i.e. the local symmetry of spacetime diffeomorphisms become anomalous in the reduced phase space path-integral quantization. In the second part, we present a path-integral formula, which formally solves all the quantum constraint equations of gravity, and further results in a rigging map in the sense of refined algebraic quantization (RAQ). Then we give a formal path-integral expression of the physical inner product in loop quantum gravity (LQG). This path-integral expression is simpler than the one from reduced phase space quantization, since all the gauge-fixing conditions are removed except the time gauge. The resulting path-integral measure is different from the product Lebesgue measure up to a local measure factor containing both the spacetime volume element and the spatial volume element. This formal path-integral expression of the physical inner product can be

  10. Mapping the telomere integrated genome of human herpesvirus 6A and 6B.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Jesse H; Pantry, Shara N; Medveczky, Maria M; Prichett, Joshua; Loomis, Kristin S; Ablashi, Dharam; Medveczky, Peter G

    2013-07-20

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) is the causative agent of roseola infantum. HHV-6A and 6B can reactivate in immunosuppressed individuals and are linked with severe inflammatory response, organ rejection and central nervous system diseases. About 0.85% of the US and UK population carries an integrated HHV-6 genome in all nucleated cells through germline transmission. We have previously reported that the HHV-6A genome integrated in telomeres of patients suffering from neurological dysfunction and also in telomeres of tissue culture cells. We now report that HHV-6B also integrates in telomeres during latency. Detailed mapping of the integrated viral genomes demonstrates that a single HHV-6 genome integrates and telomere repeats join the left end of the integrated viral genome. When HEK-293 cells carrying integrated HHV-6A were exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A, circularization and/or formation of concatamers were detected and this assay could be used to distinguish between lytic replication and latency.

  11. Positional Accuracy of Airborne Integrated Global Positioning and Inertial Navigation Systems for Mapping in Glen Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.; Hothem, Larry D.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution airborne and satellite image sensor systems integrated with onboard data collection based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation systems (INS) may offer a quick and cost-effective way to gather accurate topographic map information without ground control or aerial triangulation. The Applanix Corporation?s Position and Orientation Solutions for Direct Georeferencing of aerial photography was used in this project to examine the positional accuracy of integrated GPS/INS for terrain mapping in Glen Canyon, Arizona. The research application in this study yielded important information on the usefulness and limits of airborne integrated GPS/INS data-capture systems for mapping.

  12. TRANSVERSE MERCATOR MAP PROJECTION OF THE SPHEROID USING TRANSFORMATION OF THE ELLIPTIC INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    This program produces the Gauss-Kruger (constant meridional scale) Transverse Mercator Projection which is used to construct the U.S. Army's Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) Grid System. The method is capable of mapping the entire northern hemisphere of the earth (and, by symmetry of the projection, the entire earth) accurately with respect to a single principal meridian, and is therefore mathematically insensitive to proximity either to the pole or the equator, or to the departure of the meridian from the central meridian. This program could be useful to any map-making agency. The program overcomes the limitations of the "series" method (Thomas, 1952) presently used to compute the UTM Grid, specifically its complicated derivation, non-convergence near the pole, lack of rigorous error analysis, and difficulty of obtaining increased accuracy. The method is based on the principle that the parametric colatitude of a point is the amplitude of the Elliptic Integral of the 2nd Kind, and this (irreducible) integral is the desired projection. Thus, a specification of the colatitude leads, most directly (and with strongest motivation) to a formulation in terms of amplitude. The most difficult problem to be solved was setting up the method so that the Elliptic Integral of the 2nd Kind could be used elsewhere than on the principal meridian. The point to be mapped is specified in conventional geographic coordinates (geodetic latitude and longitudinal departure from the principal meridian). Using the colatitude (complement of latitude) and the longitude (departure), the initial step is to map the point to the North Polar Stereographic Projection. The closed-form, analytic function that coincides with the North Polar Stereographic Projection of the spheroid along the principal meridian is put into a Newton-Raphson iteration that solves for the tangent of one half the parametric colatitude, generalized to the complex plane. Because the parametric colatitude is the amplitude of

  13. New generation of integrated geological-geomorphological reconstruction maps in the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierik, Harm Jan; Cohen, Kim; Stouthamer, Esther

    2016-04-01

    Geological-geomorphological reconstructions are important for integrating diverse types of data and improving understanding of landscape formation processes. This works especially well in densely populated Holocene landscapes, where large quantities of raw data are produced by geotechnical, archaeological, soil science and hydrological communities as well as in academic research. The Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands, has a long tradition of integrated digital reconstruction maps and databases. This contributed to improve understanding of delta evolution, especially regarding the channel belt network evolution. In this contribution, we present a new generation of digital map products for the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta. Our reconstructions expand existing channel belt network maps, with new map layers containing natural levee extent and relative elevation. The maps we present have been based on hundreds of thousands of lithological borehole descriptions, >1000 radiocarbon dates, and further integrate LIDAR data, soil maps and archaeological information. For selected time slices through the Late Holocene, the map products describe the patterns of levee distribution. Additionally, we mapped the palaeo-topography of the levees through the delta, aiming to resolve what parts of the overbank river landscape were the relatively low and high positioned areas in the past landscape. The resulting palaeogeographical maps are integrative products created for a very data-rich research area. They will allow for delta-wide analysis in studying changes in the Late Holocene landscape and the interaction with past habitation.

  14. Localization of Jacobsen syndrome breakpoints on a 40-Mb physical map of distal chromosome 11q.

    PubMed

    Tunnacliffe, A; Jones, C; Le Paslier, D; Todd, R; Cherif, D; Birdsall, M; Devenish, L; Yousry, C; Cotter, F E; James, M R

    1999-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a haploinsufficiency disorder caused, most frequently by terminal deletion of part of the long arm of chromosome 11, with breakpoints in 11q23.3-11q24.2. Inheritance of an expanded p(CCG)n trinucleotide repeat at the folate-sensitive fragile site FRA11B has been implicated in the generation of the chromosome breakpoint in several Jacobsen syndrome patients. The majority of such breakpoints, however, map distal to this fragile site and are not linked with its expression. To characterize these distal breakpoints and ultimately to further investigate the mechanisms of chromosome breakage, a 40-Mb YAC contig covering the distal long arm of chromosome 11 was assembled. The utility of the YAC contig was demonstrated in three ways: (1) by rapidly mapping the breakpoints from two new Jacobsen syndrome patients using FISH; (2) by demonstrating conversion to high resolution PAC contigs after direct screening of PAC library filters with a YAC clone containing a Jacobsen syndrome breakpoint; and (3) by placing 23 Jacobsen syndrome breakpoints on the physical map. This analysis has suggested the existence of at least two new Jacobsen syndrome breakpoint cluster regions in distal chromosome 11.

  15. Comparative physical mapping reveals features of microsynteny between Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yan, H H; Mudge, J; Kim, D-J; Shoemaker, R C; Cook, D R; Young, N D

    2004-02-01

    To gain insight into genomic relationships between soybean (Glycine max) and Medicago truncatula, eight groups of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs, together spanning 2.60 million base pairs (Mb) in G. max and 1.56 Mb in M. truncatula, were compared through high-resolution physical mapping combined with sequence and hybridization analysis of low-copy BAC ends. Cross-hybridization among G. max and M. truncatula contigs uncovered microsynteny in six of the contig groups and extensive microsynteny in three. Between G. max homoeologous (within genome duplicate) contigs, 85% of coding and 75% of noncoding sequences were conserved at the level of cross-hybridization. By contrast, only 29% of sequences were conserved between G. max and M. truncatula, and some kilobase-scale rearrangements were also observed. Detailed restriction maps were constructed for 11 contigs from the three highly microsyntenic groups, and these maps suggested that sequence order was highly conserved between G. max duplicates and generally conserved between G. max and M. truncatula. One instance of homoeologous BAC contigs in M. truncatula was also observed and examined in detail. A sequence similarity search against the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence identified up to three microsyntenic regions in A. thaliana for each of two of the legume BAC contig groups. Together, these results confirm previous predictions of one recent genome-wide duplication in G. max and suggest that M. truncatula also experienced ancient large-scale genome duplications.

  16. Genetic analysis of 12 unrelated CADASIL families: Demonstration of genetic homogeneity: Physical mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Nibbio, A.; Vahedi, K.

    1994-09-01

    CADASIL is the acronym (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Ischemic Strokes and Leukoencephalopathy) designating a recently identified mendelian cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of ischemic sensory and motor deficits leading to a progressive subcortical dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows extensive areas of increased signal in the hemispheric white matter. We recently mapped the CADASIL locus in 2 large families on chromosome 19 in a 14 cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215{sup *}. Forty additional families have been collected. Twelve of them including more than 200 members have already been genotyped with a set of 10 highly polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families are significantly linked to chromosome 19 demonstrating genetic homogeneity. Combined lod scores for several of these markers are above 30. The size of the mapping interval has been reduced to 2 cM. Genetic testing for presymptomatic individuals is now possible with respect to all ethical rules in this severe condition. Lastly, physical mapping of the affected gene has been started and data will be presented at the meeting.

  17. A BAC-based physical map of the Drosophila buzzatii genome

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Josefa; Nefedov, Michael; Bosdet, Ian; Casals, Ferran; Calvete, Oriol; Delprat, Alejandra; Shin, Heesun; Chiu, Readman; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Hoskins, Roger A.; Schein, JacquelineE.; de Jong, Pieter; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2005-03-18

    Large-insert genomic libraries facilitate cloning of large genomic regions, allow the construction of clone-based physical maps and provide useful resources for sequencing entire genomes. Drosophilabuzzatii is a representative species of the repleta group in the Drosophila subgenus, which is being widely used as a model in studies of genome evolution, ecological adaptation and speciation. We constructed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic library of D. buzzatii using the shuttle vector pTARBAC2.1. The library comprises 18,353 clones with an average insert size of 152 kb and a {approx}18X expected representation of the D. buzzatii euchromatic genome. We screened the entire library with six euchromatic gene probes and estimated the actual genome representation to be {approx}23X. In addition, we fingerprinted by restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis a sample of 9,555 clones, and assembled them using Finger Printed Contigs (FPC) software and manual editing into 345 contigs (mean of 26 clones per contig) and 670singletons. Finally, we anchored 181 large contigs (containing 7,788clones) to the D. buzzatii salivary gland polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization of 427 representative clones. The BAC library and a database with all the information regarding the high coverage BAC-based physical map described in this paper are available to the research community.

  18. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods... Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2495 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: tduda@whoi.edu James F. Lynch Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering...Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2230 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: jlynch@whoi.edu Ying

  19. Preliminary integrated geologic map databases for the United States: Digital data for the reconnaissance bedrock geologic map for the northern Alaska peninsula area, southwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    he growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for digital geologic maps that have been attributed with information about age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. This report is part of a series of integrated geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. Three national-scale geologic maps that portray most or all of the United States already exist; for the conterminous U.S., King and Beikman (1974a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:2,500,000, Beikman (1980) compiled a map for Alaska at 1:2,500,000 scale, and for the entire U.S., Reed and others (2005a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:5,000,000. A digital version of the King and Beikman map was published by Schruben and others (1994). Reed and Bush (2004) produced a digital version of the Reed and others (2005a) map for the conterminous U.S. The present series of maps is intended to provide the next step in increased detail. State geologic maps that range in scale from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000 are available for most of the country, and digital versions of these state maps are the basis of this product. The digital geologic maps presented here are in a standardized format as ARC/INFO export files and as ArcView shape files. Data tables that relate the map units to detailed lithologic and age information accompany these GIS files. The map is delivered as a set 1:250,000-scale quadrangle files. To the best of our ability, these quadrangle files are edge-matched with respect to geology. When the maps are merged, the combined attribute tables can be used directly with the merged maps to make derivative maps.

  20. Preliminary integrated geologic map databases for the United States: Digital data for the reconnaissance geologic map of the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for digital geologic maps that have been attributed with information about age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. This report is part of a series of integrated geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. Three national-scale geologic maps that portray most or all of the United States already exist; for the conterminous U.S., King and Beikman (1974a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:2,500,000, Beikman (1980) compiled a map for Alaska at 1:2,500,000 scale, and for the entire U.S., Reed and others (2005a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:5,000,000. A digital version of the King and Beikman map was published by Schruben and others (1994). Reed and Bush (2004) produced a digital version of the Reed and others (2005a) map for the conterminous U.S. The present series of maps is intended to provide the next step in increased detail. State geologic maps that range in scale from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000 are available for most of the country, and digital versions of these state maps are the basis of this product. The digital geologic maps presented here are in a standardized format as ARC/INFO Exportfiles/ and as ArcView shape files. Data tables that relate the map units to detailed lithologic and age information accompany these GIS files. The map is delivered as a set 1:250,000-scale quadrangle files. To the best of our ability, these quadrangle files are edge-matched with respect to geology. When the maps are merged, the combined attribute tables can be used directly with the merged maps to make derivative maps.

  1. Preliminary integrated geologic map databases for the United States: Digital data for the reconnaissance geologic map of the lower Yukon River region, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for digital geologic maps that have been attributed with information about age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. This report is part of a series of integrated geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. Three national-scale geologic maps that portray most or all of the United States already exist; for the conterminous U.S., King and Beikman (1974a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:2,500,000, Beikman (1980) compiled a map for Alaska at 1:2,500,000 scale, and for the entire U.S., Reed and others (2005a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:5,000,000. A digital version of the King and Beikman map was published by Schruben and others (1994). Reed and Bush (2004) produced a digital version of the Reed and others (2005a) map for the conterminous U.S. The present series of maps is intended to provide the next step in increased detail. State geologic maps that range in scale from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000 are available for most of the country, and digital versions of these state maps are the basis of this product. The digital geologic maps presented here are in a standardized format as ARC/INFO export files and as ArcView shape files. Data tables that relate the map units to detailed lithologic and age information accompany these GIS files. The map is delivered as a set 1:250,000-scale quadrangle files. To the best of our ability, these quadrangle files are edge-matched with respect to geology. When the maps are merged, the combined attribute tables can be used directly with the merged maps to make derivative maps.

  2. Preliminary integrated geologic map databases for the United States: Digital data for the generalized bedrock geologic map, Yukon Flats region, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, Alison B.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Stanley, Richard G.; Crews, Jessie

    2006-01-01

    The growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for digital geologic maps that have been attributed with information about age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. This report is part of a series of integrated geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. Three national-scale geologic maps that portray most or all of the United States already exist; for the conterminous U.S., King and Beikman (1974a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:2,500,000, Beikman (1980) compiled a map for Alaska at 1:2,500,000 scale, and for the entire U.S., Reed and others (2005a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:5,000,000. A digital version of the King and Beikman map was published by Schruben and others (1994). Reed and Bush (2004) produced a digital version of the Reed and others (2005a) map for the conterminous U.S. The present series of maps is intended to provide the next step in increased detail. State geologic maps that range in scale from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000 are available for most of the country, and digital versions of these state maps are the basis of this product. The digital geologic maps presented here are in a standardized format as ARC/INFO export files and as ArcView shape files. Data tables that relate the map units to detailed lithologic and age information accompany these GIS files. The map is delivered as a set 1:250,000-scale quadrangle files. To the best of our ability, these quadrangle files are edge-matched with respect to geology. When the maps are merged, the combined attribute tables can be used directly with the merged maps to make derivative maps.

  3. Characterization and Physical Mapping of Ribosomal RNA Gene Families in Plantago

    PubMed Central

    DHAR, MANOJ K.; FRIEBE, BERND; KAUL, SANJANA; GILL, BIKRAM S.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The organization of rRNA genes in cultivated Plantago ovata Forsk. and several of its wild allies was analysed to gain insight into the phylogenetic relationships of these species in the genus which includes some 200 species. • Methods Specific primers were designed to amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions from seven Plantago species and the resulting fragments were cloned and sequenced. Similarly, using specific primers, the 5S rRNA genes from these species were amplified and subsequently cloned. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal RNA genes. • Results The ITS1 region is 19–29 bp longer than the ITS2 in different Plantago species. The 5S rRNA gene-repeating unit varies in length from 289 to 581 bp. Coding regions are highly conserved across species, but the non-transcribed spacers (NTS) do not match any database sequences. The clone from the cultivated species P. ovata was used for physical mapping of these genes by FISH. Four species have one FISH site while three have two FISH sites. In P. lanceolata and P. rhodosperma, the 5S and 45S (18S-5·8S-25S) sites are coupled. • Conclusions Characterization of 5S and 45S rRNA genes has indicated a possible origin of P. ovata, the only cultivated species of the genus and also the only species with x = 4, from a species belonging to subgenus Psyllium. Based on the studies reported here, P. ovata is closest to P. arenaria, although on the basis of other data the two species have been placed in different subgenera. FISH mapping can be used as an efficient tool to help determine phylogenetic relationships in the genus Plantago and show the interrelationship between P. lanceolata and P. lagopus. PMID:16481363

  4. Rockfall hazard assessment integrating probabilistic physically based rockfall source detection (Norddal municipality, Norway).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugsi Molina, F. X.; Oppikofer, T.; Fischer, L.; Hermanns, R. L.; Taurisano, A.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional techniques to assess rockfall hazard are partially based on probabilistic analysis. Stochastic methods has been used for run-out analysis of rock blocks to estimate the trajectories that a detached block will follow during its fall until it stops due to kinetic energy loss. However, the selection of rockfall source areas is usually defined either by multivariate analysis or by field observations. For either case, a physically based approach is not used for the source area detection. We present an example of rockfall hazard assessment that integrates a probabilistic rockfall run-out analysis with a stochastic assessment of the rockfall source areas using kinematic stability analysis in a GIS environment. The method has been tested for a steep more than 200 m high rock wall, located in the municipality of Norddal (Møre og Romsdal county, Norway), where a large number of people are either exposed to snow avalanches, rockfalls, or debris flows. The area was selected following the recently published hazard mapping plan of Norway. The cliff is formed by medium to coarse-grained quartz-dioritic to granitic gneisses of Proterozoic age. Scree deposits product of recent rockfall activity are found at the bottom of the rock wall. Large blocks can be found several tens of meters away from the cliff in Sylte, the main locality in the Norddal municipality. Structural characterization of the rock wall was done using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds in the software Coltop3D (www.terranum.ch), and results were validated with field data. Orientation data sets from the structural characterization were analyzed separately to assess best-fit probability density functions (PDF) for both dip angle and dip direction angle of each discontinuity set. A GIS-based stochastic kinematic analysis was then carried out using the discontinuity set orientations and the friction angle as random variables. An airborne laser scanning digital elevation model (ALS-DEM) with 1 m

  5. Fuzzy cognitive mapping in support of integrated ecosystem assessments: Developing a shared conceptual model among stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Vasslides, James M; Jensen, Olaf P

    2016-01-15

    Ecosystem-based approaches, including integrated ecosystem assessments, are a popular methodology being used to holistically address management issues in social-ecological systems worldwide. In this study we utilized fuzzy logic cognitive mapping to develop conceptual models of a complex estuarine system among four stakeholder groups. The average number of categories in an individual map was not significantly different among groups, and there were no significant differences between the groups in the average complexity or density indices of the individual maps. When ordered by their complexity scores, eight categories contributed to the top four rankings of the stakeholder groups, with six of the categories shared by at least half of the groups. While non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) analysis displayed a high degree of overlap between the individual models across groups, there was also diversity within each stakeholder group. These findings suggest that while all of the stakeholders interviewed perceive the subject ecosystem as a complex series of social and ecological interconnections, there are a core set of components that are present in most of the groups' models that are crucial in managing the system towards some desired outcome. However, the variability in the connections between these core components and the rest of the categories influences the exact nature of these outcomes. Understanding the reasons behind these differences will be critical to developing a shared conceptual model that will be acceptable to all stakeholder groups and can serve as the basis for an integrated ecosystem assessment.

  6. An integrated two-stage support vector machine approach to forecast inundation maps during typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhong, Bing-Chen; Wang, Jhih-Huang; Lin, Gwo-Fong

    2017-04-01

    During typhoons, accurate forecasts of hourly inundation depths are essential for inundation warning and mitigation. Due to the lack of observed data of inundation maps, sufficient observed data are not available for developing inundation forecasting models. In this paper, the inundation depths, which are simulated and validated by a physically based two-dimensional model (FLO-2D), are used as a database for inundation forecasting. A two-stage inundation forecasting approach based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to yield 1- to 6-h lead-time inundation maps during typhoons. In the first stage (point forecasting), the proposed approach not only considers the rainfall intensity and inundation depth as model input but also simultaneously considers cumulative rainfall and forecasted inundation depths. In the second stage (spatial expansion), the geographic information of inundation grids and the inundation forecasts of reference points are used to yield inundation maps. The results clearly indicate that the proposed approach effectively improves the forecasting performance and decreases the negative impact of increasing forecast lead time. Moreover, the proposed approach is capable of providing accurate inundation maps for 1- to 6-h lead times. In conclusion, the proposed two-stage forecasting approach is suitable and useful for improving the inundation forecasting during typhoons, especially for long lead times.

  7. A construction of a large family of commuting pairs of integrable symplectic birational four-dimensional maps.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Matteo; Suris, Yuri B

    2017-02-01

    We give a construction of completely integrable four-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with cubic Hamilton functions. Applying to the corresponding pairs of commuting quadratic Hamiltonian vector fields the so called Kahan-Hirota-Kimura discretization scheme, we arrive at pairs of birational four-dimensional maps. We show that these maps are symplectic with respect to a symplectic structure that is a perturbation of the standard symplectic structure on [Formula: see text], and possess two independent integrals of motion, which are perturbations of the original Hamilton functions and which are in involution with respect to the perturbed symplectic structure. Thus, these maps are completely integrable in the Liouville-Arnold sense. Moreover, under a suitable normalization of the original pairs of vector fields, the pairs of maps commute and share the invariant symplectic structure and the two integrals of motion.

  8. Integrated microfluidic array plate (iMAP) for cellular and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Dimov, Ivan K; Kijanka, Gregor; Park, Younggeun; Ducrée, Jens; Kang, Taewook; Lee, Luke P

    2011-08-21

    Just as the Petri dish has been invaluable to the evolution of biomedical science in the last 100 years, microfluidic cell assay platforms have the potential to change significantly the way modern biology and clinical science are performed. However, an evolutionary process of creating an efficient microfluidic array for many different bioassays is necessary. Specifically for a complete view of a cell response it is essential to incorporate cytotoxic, protein and gene analysis on a single system. Here we present a novel cellular and molecular analysis platform, which allows access to gene expression, protein immunoassay, and cytotoxicity information in parallel. It is realized by an integrated microfluidic array plate (iMAP). The iMAP enables sample processing of cells, perfusion based cell culture, effective perturbation of biologic molecules or drugs, and simultaneous, real-time optical analysis for different bioassays. The key features of the iMAP design are the interface of on-board gravity driven flow, the open access input fluid exchange and the highly efficient sedimentation based cell capture mechanism (∼100% capture rates). The operation of the device is straightforward (tube and pump free) and capable of handling dilute samples (5-cells per experiment), low reagent volumes (50 nL per reaction), and performing single cell protein and gene expression measurements. We believe that the unique low cell number and triple analysis capabilities of the iMAP platform can enable novel dynamic studies of scarce cells.

  9. Integrated microfluidic array plate (iMAP) for cellular and molecular analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Dimov, Ivan K.; Kijanka, Gregor; Park, Younggeun; Ducrée, Jens; Kang, Taewook

    2014-01-01

    Just as the Petri dish has been invaluable to the evolution of biomedical science in the last 100 years, microfluidic cell assay platforms have the potential to change significantly the way modern biology and clinical science are performed. However, an evolutionary process of creating an efficient microfluidic array for many different bioassays is necessary. Specifically for a complete view of a cell response it is essential to incorporate cytotoxic, protein and gene analysis on a single system. Here we present a novel cellular and molecular analysis platform, which allows access to gene expression, protein immunoassay, and cytotoxicity information in parallel. It is realized by an integrated microfluidic array plate (iMAP). The iMAP enables sample processing of cells, perfusion based cell culture, effective perturbation of biologic molecules or drugs, and simultaneous, real-time optical analysis for different bioassays. The key features of the iMAP design are the interface of on-board gravity driven flow, the open access input fluid exchange and the highly efficient sedimentation based cell capture mechanism (~100% capture rates). The operation of the device is straightforward (tube and pump free) and capable of handling dilute samples (5-cells per experiment), low reagent volumes (50 nL per reaction), and performing single cell protein and gene expression measurements. We believe that the unique low cell number and triple analysis capabilities of the iMAP platform can enable novel dynamic studies of scarce cells. PMID:21709914

  10. The articulation of integration of clinical and basic sciences in concept maps: differences between experienced and resident groups.

    PubMed

    Vink, Sylvia; van Tartwijk, Jan; Verloop, Nico; Gosselink, Manon; Driessen, Erik; Bolk, Jan

    2016-08-01

    To determine the content of integrated curricula, clinical concepts and the underlying basic science concepts need to be made explicit. Preconstructed concept maps are recommended for this purpose. They are mainly constructed by experts. However, concept maps constructed by residents are hypothesized to be less complex, to reveal more tacit basic science concepts and these basic science concepts are expected to be used for the organization of the maps. These hypotheses are derived from studies about knowledge development of individuals. However, integrated curricula require a high degree of cooperation between clinicians and basic scientists. This study examined whether there are consistent variations regarding the articulation of integration when groups of experienced clinicians and basic scientists and groups of residents and basic scientists-in-training construct concept maps. Seven groups of three clinicians and basic scientists on experienced level and seven such groups on resident level constructed concept maps illuminating clinical problems. They were guided by instructions that focused them on articulation of integration. The concept maps were analysed by features that described integration. Descriptive statistics showed consistent variations between the two expertise levels. The concept maps of the resident groups exceeded those of the experienced groups in articulated integration. First, they used significantly more links between clinical and basic science concepts. Second, these links connected basic science concepts with a greater variety of clinical concepts than the experienced groups. Third, although residents did not use significantly more basic science concepts, they used them significantly more frequent to organize the clinical concepts. The conclusion was drawn that not all hypotheses could be confirmed and that the resident concept maps were more elaborate than expected. This article discusses the implications for the role that residents and

  11. Coupling ocean colour remote sensing data into physical-ecosystem models: mapping uncertainty distributions from space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Twardowski, Mike; Trees, Chuck; Sanjuan-Calzado, Violeta

    2013-04-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing (OCRS) has transformed our understanding of complex feedback processes linking physical forcing events to biogeochemical responses. With continuous daily global coverage extending beyond the last decade, OCRS has become established as an essential global climate variable with potential use as a sensitive indicator of regional and global response to changing climate. There is increasing focus on use of OCRS data for validation and assimilation into coupled physical-ecosystem models for both environmental and operational applications. It is therefore essential that OCRS data products are not only optimised for maximum accuracy, but are also provided to end users with appropriate uncertainties. A simple spectral deconvolution model will be presented along with a new bootstrap approach for estimating product uncertainties. This approach can be adapted for both remote sensing and in situ data, opening up the possibility of mapping uncertainty distributions in 3-D for the first time, and can be applied to other established OCRS data products, including the existent historic data set. Ecosystem models seek to reproduce and predict ocean biogeochemical processes, where the models are constrained by physical parameters such as: wind, currents, density and light. The hydrographic aspects of marine ecosystems can generally be defined through ocean circulation models, which are largely independent of the ecosystem itself. The physical optics determining the light environment, on the other hand, are two-way coupled with ecosystem models since light interacts with seawater and suspended constituents. The Optical Physical and Ecosystem Regional Assessment (OPERA) model proposes a more comprehensive and challenging approach, where all optical interactions occurring within the volume of water are taken into account, thus providing a more accurate definition of light dependent processes.

  12. Coupling ocean colour remote sensing data into physical-ecosystem models: mapping uncertainty distributions from space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Twardowski, Mike; Trees, Chuck; Sanjuan Calzado, Violeta

    2014-05-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing (OCRS) has transformed our understanding of complex feedback processes linking physical forcing events to biogeochemical responses. With continuous daily global coverage extending beyond the last decade, OCRS has become established as an essential global climate variable with potential use as a sensitive indicator of regional and global response to changing climate. There is increasing focus on use of OCRS data for validation and assimilation into coupled physical-ecosystem models for both environmental and operational applications. It is therefore essential that OCRS data products are not only optimised for maximum accuracy, but are also provided to end users with appropriate uncertainties. A simple spectral deconvolution model will be presented along with a new bootstrap approach for estimating product uncertainties. This approach can be adapted for both remote sensing and in situ data, opening up the possibility of mapping uncertainty distributions in 3-D for the first time, and can be applied to other established OCRS data products, including the existent historic data set. Ecosystem models seek to reproduce and predict ocean biogeochemical processes, where the models are constrained by physical parameters such as: wind, currents, density and light. The hydrographic aspects of marine ecosystems can generally be defined through ocean circulation models, which are largely independent of the ecosystem itself. The physical optics determining the light environment, on the other hand, are two-way coupled with ecosystem models since light interacts with seawater and suspended constituents. The Optical Physical and Ecosystem Regional Assessment (OPERA) model proposes a more comprehensive and challenging approach, where all optical interactions occurring within the volume of water are taken into account, thus providing a more accurate definition of light dependent processes.

  13. A Concept-Map Integrated Dynamic Assessment System for Improving Ecology Observation Competences in Mobile Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Pi-Hsia; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Su, I-Hsiang; Lin, I-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Observation competence plays a fundamental role in outdoor scientific investigation. The computerized concept mapping technique as a Mindtool has shown the potential for enhancing meaningful learning in science education. The purposes of the present study are to develop a concept map integrated mobile learning design for ecology observation and to…

  14. The Articulation of Integration of Clinical and Basic Sciences in Concept Maps: Differences between Experienced and Resident Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Sylvia; van Tartwijk, Jan; Verloop, Nico; Gosselink, Manon; Driessen, Erik; Bolk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    To determine the content of integrated curricula, clinical concepts and the underlying basic science concepts need to be made explicit. Preconstructed concept maps are recommended for this purpose. They are mainly constructed by experts. However, concept maps constructed by residents are hypothesized to be less complex, to reveal more tacit basic…

  15. Integrating Animations, Narratives and Textual Information for Improving Physics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adegoke, Benson Adesina

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This article examined the effect of multimedia instruction on students' learning outcomes (achievement and interest) in secondary school physics. Method: The sample comprised of 517 (294 boys and 223 girls) students who came from 12 senior secondary schools in Ibadan Educational Zone 1, Oyo State, Nigeria. Their ages ranged between…

  16. Integrated Hydrologic Validation to Improve Physical Precipitation Retrievals for GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.; Tian, Y.; Kumar, S.

    2011-12-01

    One of the five scientific objectives for GPM is to "Improve hydrological modeling and prediction", including advancing prediction skill for high-impact hazards such as floods, droughts, landslides and landfalling hurricanes. Given the focus on land hydrology, and the range of hydrologic regimes targeted by GPM, it follows that a hydrologically-oriented ground validation program that covers these regimes from both the physical retrieval and the hydrological prediction perspectives is required for the successful application of GPM to land hydrology. In order to investigate the robustness of both hydrologic model predictions and physical precipitation retrievals, this talk will present recent evaluations of skill in land surface hydrologic models forced with TRMM-era multisensor products, with and without land data assimilation. In addition to LSM skill, we will also demonstrate how physical precipitation retrievals can be supported by land surface emissivity and temperature estimates obtained by coupling microwave emission models (e.g., the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation Community Radiative Transfer Model CRTM and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting's Community Microwave Emission Model CMEM) to the land surface models in the Land Information System (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov). Evaluation at multiple frequencies, with and without land data assimilation, demonstrates the critical impact of certain real-time ancillary data (e.g., snow cover) on the microwave background states required for physical retrievals.

  17. Physical play and cognitive development: integrating activity, cognition, and education.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, D F; Brown, R D

    1998-06-01

    We propose that humans may have evolved a special sensitivity to certain types of social information during rough-and-tumble play that facilitates social cognition. The cognitive benefits of physical play are described as providing a break from demanding intellectual tasks, and are hypothesized to be related to gender differences in spatial cognition.

  18. Use of Picture Cards in Integrated Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Leslie; Bowers, Tiffany; French, Ron

    2007-01-01

    With the implementation of the inclusion concept in public school classes, the ability of the general physical educator to effectively teach all of his or her students has been tested. This is particularly true with some students who have a receptive language disability (e.g., deaf, traumatic brain injury), an expressive language disability (e.g.,…

  19. Rainsticks: Integrating Culture, Folklore, and the Physics of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine; Fies, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is for students to build a rainstick out of materials in their own environment and imitate the sound of rain while investigating the physical principles of sound. Students will be able to relate the sound produced by an instrument to the type and quantity of materials used in its construction.

  20. How to Integrate Tai Ji Quan into Physical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chunlei

    2008-01-01

    Tai ji quan, also known as "tai chi," is an ancient Chinese exercise characterized by soft, slow, and meditative movements. It consists of a set of continuous, evenly paced, carefully choreographed, but natural, body shifts. "Tai ji" is an ancient Chinese philosophy, while "tai ji quan" refers to a type of physical activity based on tai ji…

  1. An Integrated, Statistical Molecular Approach to the Physical Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartier, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative to the "thermodynamics first" or "quantum first" approaches to the physical chemistry curriculum, the statistical definition of entropy and the Boltzmann distribution are introduced in the first days of the course and the entire two-semester curriculum is then developed from these concepts. Once the tools of statistical mechanics…

  2. Integrating Microcomputers and Microelectronics into the Physics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Douglas S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary microcomputer and microelectronics program offered jointly by the Physics and Computer Science Departments of East Texas State University. The program operates on both the graduate and undergraduate level. Content as well as structure of the program are discussed. (Author/DS)

  3. An integrated map of HIV-human protein complexes that facilitate viral infection.

    PubMed

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Olivieri, Kevin; Pache, Lars; Shih, Hsin Ling; Pustovalova, Olga; Bessarabova, Marina; Young, John A T; Chanda, Sumit K; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Recent proteomic and genetic studies have aimed to identify a complete network of interactions between HIV and human proteins and genes. This HIV-human interaction network provides invaluable information as to how HIV exploits the host machinery and can be used as a starting point for further functional analyses. We integrated this network with complementary datasets of protein function and interaction to nominate human protein complexes with likely roles in viral infection. Based on our approach we identified a global map of 40 HIV-human protein complexes with putative roles in HIV infection, some of which are involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription, translation, and cytoskeletal regulation. Targeted RNAi screens were used to validate several proteins and complexes for functional impact on viral infection. Thus, our HIV-human protein complex map provides a significant resource of potential HIV-host interactions for further study.

  4. The GDB Human Genome Data Base: a source of integrated genetic mapping and disease data.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, K A

    1993-01-01

    The GDB Human Genome Data Base refers collectively to GDB and OMIM, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. GDB and OMIM are linked databases that provide an international repository for information generated by the Human Genome Initiative. GDB contains human gene mapping data, while OMIM offers the text of Dr. Victor A. McKusick's catalog of genetic disease and phenotype descriptions. These databases, updated and edited continuously, integrate bibliographic and full-text information with several types of mapping data. They are accessible through a flexible interface and are available through SprintNet and the Internet to the scientific community without cost. This paper provides an overview of the context, development, structure, content, and use of these databases. PMID:8374584

  5. A MAP OF THE INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE SIGNAL FROM LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Granett, Benjamin R.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2009-08-10

    We construct a map of the time derivative of the gravitational potential traced by Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The potential decays on large scales due to cosmic acceleration, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. With a template fit, we directly measure this signature on the CMB at a 2{sigma} confidence level. The measurement is consistent with the cross-correlation statistic, strengthening the claim that dark energy is indeed the cause of the correlation. This new approach potentially simplifies the cosmological interpretation. Our constructed linear ISW map shows no evidence for degree-scale cold and hot spots associated with supervoid and supercluster structures. This suggests that the linear ISW effect in a concordance {lambda}CDM cosmology is insufficient to explain the strong CMB imprints from these structures that we previously reported.

  6. A terracing operator for physical property mapping with potential field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordell, L.; McCafferty, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The terracing operator works iteratively on gravity or magnetic data, using the sense of the measured field's local curvature, to produce a field comprised of uniform domains separated by abrupt domain boundaries. The result is crudely proportional to a physical-property function defined in one (profile case) or two (map case) horizontal dimensions. This result can be extended to a physical-property model if its behavior in the third (vertical) dimension is defined, either arbitrarily or on the basis of the local geologic situation. The terracing algorithm is computationally fast and appropriate to use with very large digital data sets. The terracing operator was applied separately to aeromagnetic and gravity data from a 136km x 123km area in eastern Kansas. Results provide a reasonable good physical representation of both the gravity and the aeromagnetic data. Superposition of the results from the two data sets shows many areas of agreement that can be referenced to geologic features within the buried Precambrian crystalline basement. -from Authors

  7. Integration of Brassica A genome genetic linkage map between Brassica napus and B. rapa.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, Keita; Morgan, Colin; Bancroft, Ian

    2008-03-01

    An integrated linkage map between B. napus and B. rapa was constructed based on a total of 44 common markers comprising 41 SSR (33 BRMS, 6 Saskatoon, and 2 BBSRC) and 3 SNP/indel markers. Between 3 and 7 common markers were mapped onto each of the linkage groups A1 to A10. The position and order of most common markers revealed a high level of colinearity between species, although two small regions on A4, A5, and A10 revealed apparent local inversions between them. These results indicate that the A genome of Brassica has retained a high degree of colinearity between species, despite each species having evolved independently after the integration of the A and C genomes in the amphidiploid state. Our results provide a genetic integration of the Brassica A genome between B. napus and B. rapa. As the analysis employed sequence-based molecular markers, the information will accelerate the exploitation of the B. rapa genome sequence for the improvement of oilseed rape.

  8. Intensity Maps Production Using Real-Time Joint Streaming Data Processing From Social and Physical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropivnitskaya, Y. Y.; Tiampo, K. F.; Qin, J.; Bauer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Intensity is one of the most useful measures of earthquake hazard, as it quantifies the strength of shaking produced at a given distance from the epicenter. Today, there are several data sources that could be used to determine intensity level which can be divided into two main categories. The first category is represented by social data sources, in which the intensity values are collected by interviewing people who experienced the earthquake-induced shaking. In this case, specially developed questionnaires can be used in addition to personal observations published on social networks such as Twitter. These observations are assigned to the appropriate intensity level by correlating specific details and descriptions to the Modified Mercalli Scale. The second category of data sources is represented by observations from different physical sensors installed with the specific purpose of obtaining an instrumentally-derived intensity level. These are usually based on a regression of recorded peak acceleration and/or velocity amplitudes. This approach relates the recorded ground motions to the expected felt and damage distribution through empirical relationships. The goal of this work is to implement and evaluate streaming data processing separately and jointly from both social and physical sensors in order to produce near real-time intensity maps and compare and analyze their quality and evolution through 10-minute time intervals immediately following an earthquake. Results are shown for the case study of the M6.0 2014 South Napa, CA earthquake that occurred on August 24, 2014. The using of innovative streaming and pipelining computing paradigms through IBM InfoSphere Streams platform made it possible to read input data in real-time for low-latency computing of combined intensity level and production of combined intensity maps in near-real time. The results compare three types of intensity maps created based on physical, social and combined data sources. Here we correlate

  9. Integration of Google Maps/Earth with microscale meteorology models and data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yansen; Huynh, Giap; Williamson, Chatt

    2013-12-01

    The Google Maps/Earth GIS has been integrated with a microscale meteorological model to improve the system's functionality and ease of use. Almost all the components of the model system, including the terrain data processing, morphological data generation, meteorological data gathering and initialization, and displaying/visualizing the model results, have been improved by using this approach. Different from the traditional stand-along model system, this novel system takes advantages of enormous resources in map and image data retrieving/handling, four-dimensional (space and time) data visualization, overlaying, and many other advanced GIS features that the Google Maps/Earth platform has to offer. We have developed modular components for all of the model system controls and data processing programs which are glued together with the JavaScript language and KML/XML data. We have also developed small modular software using the Google application program interface to convert the model results and intermediate data for visualizations and animations. Capabilities such as high-resolution image, street view, and 3D buildings in the Google Earth/Map are also used to quickly generate small-scale vegetation and building morphology data that are required for the microscale meteorological models. This system has also been applied to visualize the data from other instruments such as Doppler wind lidars. Because of the tight integration of the internet based GIS and a microscale meteorology model, the model system is more versatile, intuitive, and user-friendly than a stand-along system we had developed before. This kind of system will enhance the user experience and also help researchers to explore new phenomena in fine-scale meteorology.

  10. Integrating Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response, Mosaic and Bathymetry Data for Benthic Habitat Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives

  11. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Cetacean and Sound Mapping Effort: Continuing Forward with an Integrated Ocean Noise Strategy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jolie; Ferguson, Megan; Gedamke, Jason; Hatch, Leila; Southall, Brandon; Van Parijs, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    To help manage chronic and cumulative impacts of human activities on marine mammals, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) convened two working groups, the Underwater Sound Field Mapping Working Group (SoundMap) and the Cetacean Density and Distribution Mapping Working Group (CetMap), with overarching effort of both groups referred to as CetSound, which (1) mapped the predicted contribution of human sound sources to ocean noise and (2) provided region/time/species-specific cetacean density and distribution maps. Mapping products were presented at a symposium where future priorities were identified, including institutionalization/integration of the CetSound effort within NOAA-wide goals and programs, creation of forums and mechanisms for external input and funding, and expanded outreach/education. NOAA is subsequently developing an ocean noise strategy to articulate noise conservation goals and further identify science and management actions needed to support them.

  12. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    in the abyssal oceans , where typically SIW/Stopo > 1 for tall seamounts and ridges , the entire bottom topography contributes to the generation of...internal waves. In contrast, for (a) (b) 18 moderate ocean depths (say less than 4 km), where typically SIW/Stopo < 1 for seamounts and ridges , the...Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods

  13. Contract-Based Integration of Cyber-Physical Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-14

    Physical Analyses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ivan Ruchkin, Dionisio De Niz, Sagar Chaki, David Garlan...Architectural views tackle model consistency, not analytic tool consistency [3][4] ● Meta-level AADL languages do not allow domain-specific semantics [5...O- automata by over-approximation of continuous interaction, 2004 [2] Sangiovanni-Vincentelli et al. Taming Dr. Frankenstein: contract-based design

  14. Contract-Based Integration of Cyber-Physical Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-14

    Physical Analyses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dionisio de Niz Ivan Ruchkin; Sagar Chaki; David Garlan...Architectural views tackle model consistency, not analytic tool consistency [3][4] ● Meta-level AADL languages do not allow domain-specific semantics [5...O- automata by over-approximation of continuous interaction, 2004 [2] Sangiovanni-Vincentelli et al. Taming Dr. Frankenstein: contract-based design

  15. Organic–Inorganic Eu3+/Tb3+ codoped hybrid films for temperature mapping in integrated circuits

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Carlos D. S.; Lima, Patrícia P.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Millán, Angel; Amaral, Vitor S.; Palacio, Fernando; Carlos, Luís D.

    2013-01-01

    The continuous decrease on the geometric size of electronic devices and integrated circuits generates higher local power densities and localized heating problems that cannot be characterized by conventional thermographic techniques. Here, a self-referencing intensity-based molecular thermometer involving a di-ureasil organic-inorganic hybrid thin film co-doped with Eu3+ and Tb3+ tris (β-diketonate) chelates is used to obtain the temperature map of a FR4 printed wiring board with spatio-temporal resolutions of 0.42 μm/4.8 ms. PMID:24790938

  16. Fingerprinting: Modelling and mapping physical top soil properties with the Mole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loonstra, Eddie; van Egmond, Fenny

    2010-05-01

    The Mole is a passive gamma ray soil sensor system. It is designed for the mobile collection of radioactive energy stemming from soil. As the system is passive, it only measures energy that reaches the surface of soil. In general, this energy comes from upto 30 to 40 cm deep, which can be considered topsoil. The gathered energy spectra are logged every second, are processed with the method of Full Spectrum Analysis. This method uses all available spectral data and processes it with a Chi square optimalisation using a set of standard spectra into individual nuclide point data. A standard spectrum is the measured full spectrum of a specific detector derived when exposed to 1 Bq/kg of a nuclide. With this method the outcome of the surveys become quantitative.The outcome of a field survey with the Mole results in a data file containing point information of position, Total Counts and the decay products of 232Th, 238U, 40K and 137Cs. Five elements are therefor available for the modelling of soil properties. There are several ways for the modelling of soil properties with sensor derived gamma ray data. The Mole generates ratio scale output. For modelling a quantitative deterministic approach is used based on sample locations. This process is called fingerprinting. Fingerprinting is a comparison of the concentration of the radioactive trace elements and the lab results (pH, clay content, etc.) by regression analysis. This results in a mathematical formula describing the relationship between a dependent and independent property. The results of the sensor readings are interpolated into a nuclide map with GIS software. With the derived formula a soil property map is composed. The principle of fingerprinting can be applied on large geographical areas for physical soil properties such as clay, loam or sand (50 micron), grain size and organic matter. Collected sample data of previous field surveys within the same region can be used for the prediction of soil properties elsewhere

  17. Analysis of Radiation Impact on White Mice through Radiation Dose Mapping in Medical Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutikno, Madnasri; Susilo; Arya Wijayanti, Riza

    2016-08-01

    A study about X-ray radiation impact on the white mice through radiation dose mapping in Medical Physic Laboratory is already done. The purpose of this research is to determine the minimum distance of radiologist to X-ray instrument through treatment on the white mice. The radiation exposure doses are measured on the some points in the distance from radiation source between 30 cm up to 80 with interval of 30 cm. The impact of radiation exposure on the white mice and the effects of radiation measurement in different directions are investigated. It is founded that minimum distance of radiation worker to radiation source is 180 cm and X-ray has decreased leukocyte number and haemoglobin and has increased thrombocyte number in the blood of white mice.

  18. Standardized reference ideogram for physical mapping in the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Dalzell, P; Miles, L G; Isberg, S R; Glenn, T C; King, C; Murtagh, V; Moran, C

    2009-01-01

    Basic cytogenetic data, such as diploid number and general chromosome morphology, are available for many reptilian species. Here we present a detailed cytogenetic examination of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) karyotype, including the creation of the first fully annotated G-band standard ideogram for any crocodilian species. The C. porosus karyotype contains macrochromosomes and has a diploid number of 34. This study presents a detailed description of each chromosome, permitting unambiguous chromosome identification. The fully annotated standardized C. porosus ideogram provides the backbone to a standard nomenclature system which can be used to accurately identify specific band locations. Seven microsatellite containing fosmid clones were fluorescently labeled and used as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for physical localization. Chromosome locations for each of these FISH probes were successfully assigned, demonstrating the utility of the fully annotated ideogram for genome mapping.

  19. Phylogenetic conservation and physical mapping of members of the H6 homeobox gene family.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H S; Murray, J C; Leysens, N J; Goodfellow, P J; Solursh, M

    1995-06-01

    Homeobox genes represent a class of transcription factors that play key roles in the regulation of embryogenesis and development. Here we report the identification of a homeobox-containing gene family that is highly conserved at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels in a diverse number of species. These species encompass both vertebrate and invertebrate phylogenies, ranging from Homo sapiens to Drosophila melanogaster. In humans, at least two homeobox sequences from this family were identified representing a previously reported member of this family as well as a novel homeobox sequence that we physically mapped to the 10q25.2-q26.3 region of human Chromosome (Chr) 10. Multiple members of this family were also detected in three additional vertebrate species including Equus caballus (horse), Gallus gallus (Chicken), and Mus musculus (mouse), whereas only single members were detected in Tripneustes gratilla (sea urchin), Petromyzon marinus (lamprey), Salmo salar (salmon), Ovis aries (sheep), and D. melanogaster (fruit fly).

  20. Becoming Physics People: Development of Integrated Physics Identity through the Learning Assistant Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Eleanor W.; Conn, Jessica; Close, Hunter G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the experience of students in the Physics Learning Assistant (LA) program at Texas State University in terms of the existing theoretical frameworks of "community of practice" and "physics identity," and explore the implications suggested by these theories for LA program adoption and adaptation.…

  1. Linkage mapping and physical localization of the major histocompatibility complex region of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gouin, N; Deakin, J E; Miska, K B; Miller, R D; Kammerer, C M; Graves, J A M; VandeBerg, J L; Samollow, P B

    2006-01-01

    We used genetic linkage mapping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to conduct the first analysis of genic organization and chromosome localization of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of a marsupial, the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica. Family based linkage analyses of two M. domestica MHC Class I genes (UA1, UG) and three MHC Class II genes (DAB, DMA, and DMB) revealed that these genes were tightly linked and positioned in the central region of linkage group 3 (LG3). This cluster of MHC genes was physically mapped to the centromeric region of chromosome 2q by FISH using a BAC clone containing the UA1 gene. An interesting finding from the linkage analyses is that sex-specific recombination rates were virtually identical within the MHC region. This stands in stark contrast to the genome-wide situation, wherein males exhibit approximately twice as much recombination as females, and could have evolutionary implications for maintaining equality between males and females in the ability to generate haplotype diversity in this region. These analyses also showed that three non-MHC genes that flank the MHC region on human chromosome 6, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), and prolactin (PRL), are split among two separate linkage groups (chromosomes) in M. domestica. Comparative analysis with eight other vertebrate species suggests strong conservation of the BMP6-PRL synteny among birds and mammals, although the BMP6-PRL-MHC-ME1 synteny is not conserved.

  2. Driven by Beliefs: Understanding Challenges Physical Science Teachers Face When Integrating Engineering and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dare, Emily A.; Ellis, Joshua A.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to ignore the increased use of technological innovations in today's world, which has led to various calls for the integration of engineering into K-12 science standards. The need to understand how engineering is currently being brought to science classrooms is apparent and necessary in order to address these calls for integration.…

  3. A high-resolution reference genetic map positioning 8.8 K genes for the conifer white spruce: structural genomics implications and correspondence with physical distance.

    PubMed

    Pavy, Nathalie; Lamothe, Manuel; Pelgas, Betty; Gagnon, France; Birol, Inanç; Bohlmann, Joerg; Mackay, John; Isabel, Nathalie; Bousquet, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Over the last decade, extensive genetic and genomic resources have been developed for the conifer white spruce (Picea glauca, Pinaceae), which has one of the largest plant genomes (20 Gbp). Draft genome sequences of white spruce and other conifers have recently been produced, but dense genetic maps are needed to comprehend genome macrostructure, delineate regions involved in quantitative traits, complement functional genomic investigations, and assist the assembly of fragmented genomic sequences. A greatly expanded P. glauca composite linkage map was generated from a set of 1976 full-sib progeny, with the positioning of 8793 expressed genes. Regions with significant low or high gene density were identified. Gene family members tended to be mapped on the same chromosomes, with tandemly arrayed genes significantly biased towards specific functional classes. The map was integrated with transcriptome data surveyed across eight tissues. In total, 69 clusters of co-expressed and co-localising genes were identified. A high level of synteny was found with pine genetic maps, which should facilitate the transfer of structural information in the Pinaceae. Although the current white spruce genome sequence remains highly fragmented, dozens of scaffolds encompassing more than one mapped gene were identified. From these, the relationship between genetic and physical distances was examined and the genome-wide recombination rate was found to be much smaller than most estimates reported for angiosperm genomes. This gene linkage map shall assist the large-scale assembly of the next-generation white spruce genome sequence and provide a reference resource for the conifer genomics community.

  4. Ego Integrity of Older People with Physical Disability and Therapeutic Recreation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Shim, Hye-Eun; Sia, Charmin Kathleen M.; Siazon, Wilbart Harvey S.; Sibal, Mary Joyce Ann P.; Siglos, Joanna Brigitte Lorraine C.; Simeon, Francis Marlo C.

    2011-01-01

    Ego integrity, the last developmental task in Erikson's psychological theory, develops naturally among older people. However, the presence of loss-like physical disability-can considerably affect the quality of life, interactions, and well being of older adults. Hence, older people with physical disabilities need more assistance in accomplishing…

  5. Utility of Acculturation in Physical Activity Research in Latina Adults: An Integrative Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Tanya J.; Dodgson, Joan E.; Coe, Kathryn; Keller, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Latina adults in the United States have a disproportionately higher prevalence of chronic diseases related to low physical activity levels than non-Hispanic women. Literature indicates that acculturation may be a contributing factor to being physically active, but the extent of this association remains unclear. An integrative review of literature…

  6. Models for Integrating Technology in Higher Education: The Physics of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Gregory; Williams, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Institutions that place laptops in the hands of every student offer unique opportunities to integrate technology into instruction. The following is a description of how various technologies have been introduced into a new undergraduate physics course called Physics of Sound at a so-called laptop institution. This article presents classroom…

  7. The Effects of Role Modeling on Technology Integration within Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baert, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The national standards for physical education teacher education (PETE) in the US state that teacher candidates should be able to plan and implement technology infused lessons that meet lesson objectives and enhance learning in physical education (standard 3.7). Research shows that role modeling of technology integration can have a positive impact…

  8. Intuitive Physics of Free Fall: An Information Integration Approach to the Mass-Speed Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicovaro, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the intuitive physics of free fall was explored using Information Integration Theory and Functional Measurement. The participants had to rate the speed of objects differing in mass and height of release at the end of an imagined free fall. According to physics, falling speed increases with height of release but it is substantially…

  9. The Impact of the Physical Environment on the Social Integration of Individuals with Disabilities in Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Social integration in community is especially important for individuals with disabilities well-being. Although individuals with disabilities reside within the community's physical environment, they are often marginalized in the social environment. This may be the result of individuals with disabilities residing in physical environments that…

  10. Understanding Introductory Students' Application of Integrals in Physics from Multiple Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Dehui

    2013-01-01

    Calculus is used across many physics topics from introductory to upper-division level college courses. The concepts of differentiation and integration are important tools for solving real world problems. Using calculus or any mathematical tool in physics is much more complex than the straightforward application of the equations and algorithms that…

  11. Integrating Video-Capture Virtual Reality Technology into a Physically Interactive Learning Environment for English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jie Chi; Chen, Chih Hung; Jeng, Ming Chang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design and develop a Physically Interactive Learning Environment, the PILE system, by integrating video-capture virtual reality technology into a classroom. The system is designed for elementary school level English classes where students can interact with the system through physical movements. The system is designed to…

  12. Integrated Modeling, Mapping, and Simulation (IMMS) Framework for Exercise and Response Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mapar, Jalal; Hoette, Trisha; Mahrous, Karim; Pancerella, Carmen M.; Plantenga, Todd; Yang, Christine; Yang, Lynn; Hopmeier, Michael

    2011-01-01

    EmergenCy management personnel at federal, stale, and local levels can benefit from the increased situational awareness and operational efficiency afforded by simulation and modeling for emergency preparedness, including planning, training and exercises. To support this goal, the Department of Homeland Security's Science & Technology Directorate is funding the Integrated Modeling, Mapping, and Simulation (IMMS) program to create an integrating framework that brings together diverse models for use by the emergency response community. SUMMIT, one piece of the IMMS program, is the initial software framework that connects users such as emergency planners and exercise developers with modeling resources, bridging the gap in expertise and technical skills between these two communities. SUMMIT was recently deployed to support exercise planning for National Level Exercise 2010. Threat, casualty. infrastructure, and medical surge models were combined within SUMMIT to estimate health care resource requirements for the exercise ground truth.

  13. "Riding the Rip": An Experiential and Integrated Human-Physical Geography Curriculum in Costa Rica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannstrom, Christian; Houser, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Integrating research into short-term study abroad programs is challenging because of language, fieldwork logistics, and traditional learning models based on passive classroom experiences. Experiential learning often makes use of research as experience, but relatively few examples integrate human and physical geography. Here, we describe an…

  14. Physical Maps of the Six Smallest Chromosomes of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae at a Resolution of 2.6 Kilobase Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Riles, L.; Dutchik, J. E.; Baktha, A.; McCauley, B. K.; Thayer, E. C.; Leckie, M. P.; Braden, V. V.; Depke, J. E.; Olson, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Physical maps of the six smallest chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented. In order of increasing size, they are chromosomes I, VI, III, IX, V and VIII, comprising 2.49 megabase pairs of DNA. The maps are based on the analysis of an overlapping set of lambda and cosmid clones. Overlaps between adjacent clones were recognized by shared restriction fragments produced by the combined action of EcoRI and HindIII. The average spacing between mapped cleavage sites is 2.6 kb. Five of the six chromosomes were mapped from end to end without discontinuities; a single internal gap remains in the map of chromosome IX. The reported maps span an estimated 97% of the DNA on the six chromosomes; nearly all the missing segments are telomeric. The maps are fully cross-correlated with the previously published SfiI/NotI map of the yeast genome by A. J. Link and M. V. Olson. They have also been cross-correlated with the yeast genetic map at 51 loci. PMID:8514151

  15. Combinatory action of VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways maintains endothelial-cell integrity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hanbing; Wang, Danyang; Wang, Nan; Rios, Yesenia; Huang, Haigen; Li, Song; Wu, Xinrong; Lin, Shuo

    2011-07-01

    Blood vessels normally maintain stereotyped lumen diameters and their stable structures are crucial for vascular function. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of vessel diameters and the integrity of endothelial cells. We investigated this issue in zebrafish embryos by a chemical genetics approach. Small molecule libraries were screened using live Tg(kdrl:GRCFP)(zn1) transgenic embryos in which endothelial cells are specifically labeled with GFP. By analyzing the effects of compounds on the morphology and function of embryonic blood vessels after lumen formation, PP1, a putative Src kinase inhibitor, was identified as capable of specifically reducing vascular lumen size by interrupting endothelial-cell integrity. The inhibitory effect is not due to Src or general VEGF signaling inhibition because another Src inhibitor and Src morpholino as well as several VEGFR inhibitors failed to produce a similar phenotype. After profiling a panel of 22 representative mammalian kinases and surveying published data, we selected a few possible new candidates. Combinational analysis of these candidate kinase inhibitors established that PP1 induced endothelial collapse by inhibiting both the VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways. More importantly, combinatory use of two clinically approved drugs Dasatinib and Sunitinib produced the same phenotype. This is the first study to elucidate the pathways controlling maintenance of endothelial integrity using a chemical genetics approach, indicating that endothelial integrity is controlled by the combined action of the VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways. Our results also suggest the possible side effect of the combination of two anticancer drugs on the circulatory system.

  16. Vertically integrated pixel readout chip for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Khalid, Farah; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of the vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics for the International Linear Collider. Some testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second iteration of the silicon implementation of the prototype, data-pushed concept of the readout developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the 3D MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  17. The iFit: an integrated physical fitness testing system to evaluate the degree of physical fitness of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kevin C; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Hsu, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Han, Chang-Mu; Lee, Ming-Ren

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated physical fitness testing system (iFit) that evaluates the physical fitness of older adults. The intent of the test is to help them manage and promote their health and mitigate the effects of aging. National protocols of physical fitness were implemented to support the assessment. The proposed system encompasses four modules of physical fitness assessment for both users and medical professionals. The test information will be recorded and managed through a wireless sensor network that will enable a better understanding of users' fitness states. Furthermore, the iFit has been validated by a test session attended by elderly participants. The results show that there is a significant correlation between iFit use in the test of flexibility, grip strength, and balance, compared to conventional methods.

  18. Integrating computers in physics teaching: An Indian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Pratibha

    1997-03-01

    The University of Delhi has around twenty affiliated undergraduate colleges that offer a three-year physics major program to nearly five hundred students. All follow a common curriculum and submit to a centralized examination. This structure of tertiary education makes it relatively difficult to implement radical or rapid changes in the formal curriculum. The technology onslaught has, at last, irrevocably altered this; computers are carving new windows in old citadels and defining the agenda in teaching-learning environments the world over. In 1992, we formally introduced Computational Physics as a core paper in the second year of the Bachelor's program. As yet, the emphasis is on imparting familiarity with computers, a programming language and rudiments of numerical algorithms. In a parallel development, we also introduced a strong component of instrumentation with modern day electronic devices, including microprocessors. Many of us, however, would like to see not just computer presence in our curriculum but a totally new curriculum and teaching strategy that exploits, befittingly, the new technology. The current challenge is to realize in practice the full potential of the computer as the proverbial versatile tool: interfacing laboratory experiments for real-time acquisition and control of data; enabling rigorous analysis and data modeling; simulating micro-worlds and real life phenomena; establishing new cognitive linkages between theory and empirical observation; and between abstract constructs and visual representations.

  19. Encrypting three-dimensional information system based on integral imaging and multiple chaotic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yan; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Xiong, Zhao-Long; Deng, Huan

    2016-02-01

    An encrypting three-dimensional (3-D) information system based on integral imaging (II) and multiple chaotic maps is proposed. In the encrypting process, the elemental image array (EIA) which represents spatial and angular information of the real 3-D scene is picked up by a microlens array. Subsequently, R, G, and B color components decomposed by the EIA are encrypted using multiple chaotic maps. Finally, these three encrypted components are interwoven to obtain the cipher information. The decryption process implements the reverse operation of the encryption process for retrieving the high-quality 3-D images. Since the encrypted EIA has the data redundancy property due to II, and all parameters of the pickup part are the secret keys of the encrypting system, the system sensitivity on the changes of the plaintext and secret keys can be significantly improved. Moreover, the algorithm based on multiple chaotic maps can effectively enhance the security. A preliminary experiment is carried out, and the experimental results verify the effectiveness, robustness, and security of the proposed system.

  20. Delivering integrated HAZUS-MH flood loss analyses and flood inundation maps over the Web

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn,, Paul P.; Longenecker, Herbert E.; Aguinaldo, John J.; Rahav, Ami N.

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding is responsible for more loss of life and damages to property than any other natural hazard. Recently developed flood inundation mapping technologies make it possible to view the extent and depth of flooding on the land surface over the Internet; however, by themselves these technologies are unable to provide estimates of losses to property and infrastructure. The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA's) HAZUS-MH software is extensively used to conduct flood loss analyses in the United States, providing a nationwide database of population and infrastructure at risk. Unfortunately, HAZUS-MH requires a dedicated Geographic Information System (GIS) workstation and a trained operator, and analyses are not adapted for convenient delivery over the Web. This article describes a cooperative effort by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and FEMA to make HAZUS-MH output GIS and Web compatible and to integrate these data with digital flood inundation maps in USGS’s newly developed Inundation Mapping Web Portal. By running the computationally intensive HAZUS-MH flood analyses offline and converting the output to a Web-GIS compatible format, detailed estimates of flood losses can now be delivered to anyone with Internet access, thus dramatically increasing the availability of these forecasts to local emergency planners and first responders.

  1. Integrating and mining the chromatin landscape of cell-type specificity using self-organizing maps

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Ali; Pepke, Shirley; Jansen, Camden; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis; Hardison, Ross C.; Myers, Richard M.; Wold, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether self-organizing maps (SOMs) could be used to effectively integrate, visualize, and mine diverse genomics data types, including complex chromatin signatures. A fine-grained SOM was trained on 72 ChIP-seq histone modifications and DNase-seq data sets from six biologically diverse cell lines studied by The ENCODE Project Consortium. We mined the resulting SOM to identify chromatin signatures related to sequence-specific transcription factor occupancy, sequence motif enrichment, and biological functions. To highlight clusters enriched for specific functions such as transcriptional promoters or enhancers, we overlaid onto the map additional data sets not used during training, such as ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, CAGE, and information on cis-acting regulatory modules from the literature. We used the SOM to parse known transcriptional enhancers according to the cell-type-specific chromatin signature, and we further corroborated this pattern on the map by EP300 (also known as p300) occupancy. New candidate cell-type-specific enhancers were identified for multiple ENCODE cell types in this way, along with new candidates for ubiquitous enhancer activity. An interactive web interface was developed to allow users to visualize and custom-mine the ENCODE SOM. We conclude that large SOMs trained on chromatin data from multiple cell types provide a powerful way to identify complex relationships in genomic data at user-selected levels of granularity. PMID:24170599

  2. Formal Integrals and Nekhoroshev Stability in a Mapping Model for the Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2005-04-01

    A symplectic mapping model for the co-orbital motion (Sándor et al., 2002, Cel. Mech. Dyn. Astr. 84, 355) in the circular restricted three body problem is used to derive Nekhoroshev stability estimates for the Sun Jupiter Trojans. Following a brief review of the analytical part of Nekhoroshev theory, a direct method is developed to construct formal integrals of motion in symplectic mappings without use of a normal form. Precise estimates are given for the region of effective stability based on the optimization of the size of the remainder of the formal series. The stability region found for t=1010 yrs corresponds to a libration amplitude Dp=10.6°. About 30% of asteroids with accurately known proper elements (Milani, 1993, Cel. Mech. Dyn. Astron. 57, 59), at low eccentricities and inclinations, are included within this region. This represents an improvement with respect to previous estimates given in the literature. The improvement is due partly to the choice of better variables, but also to the use of a mapping model, which is a simplification of the circular restricted three body problem.

  3. Delivering integrated HAZUS-MH flood loss analyses and flood inundation maps over the Web.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Paul P; Longenecker, Herbert E; Aguinaldo, John J; Rahav, Ami N

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding is responsible for more loss of life and damages to property than any other natural hazard. Recently developed flood inundation mapping technologies make it possible to view the extent and depth of flooding on the land surface over the Internet; however, by themselves these technologies are unable to provide estimates of losses to property and infrastructure. The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) HAZUS-MH software is extensively used to conduct flood loss analyses in the United States, providing a nationwide database of population and infrastructure at risk. Unfortunately, HAZUS-MH requires a dedicated Geographic Information System (GIS) workstation and a trained operator, and analyses are not adapted for convenient delivery over the Web. This article describes a cooperative effort by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and FEMA to make HAZUS-MH output GIS and Web compatible and to integrate these data with digital flood inundation maps in USGS's newly developed Inundation Mapping Web Portal. By running the computationally intensive HAZUS-MH flood analyses offline and converting the output to a Web-GIS compatible format, detailed estimates of flood losses can now be delivered to anyone with Internet access, thus dramatically increasing the availability of these forecasts to local emergency planners and first responders.

  4. An integrated system at the Bleien Observatory for mapping the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chihway; Monstein, Christian; Akeret, Joel; Seehars, Sebastian; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Glauser, Adrian; Stuber, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the hardware system at the Bleien Observatory. The system is designed to deliver a map of the Galaxy at 990-1260 MHz for studying the foreground contamination of low-redshift (z = 0.13-0.43) H I intensity mapping experiments as well as other astronomical Galactic studies. This hardware system is composed of a 7 m parabolic dish, a dual-polarization corrugated horn feed, a pseudo-correlation receiver, a Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer and an integrated control system that controls and monitors the progress of the data collection. The main innovative designs in the hardware are (1) the pseudo-correlation receiver and the cold reference source within (2) the high dynamic range, high frequency resolution spectrometer and (3) the phase-switch implementation of the system. This is the first time these technologies are used together for an L-band radio telescope to achieve an electronically stable system, which is an essential first step for wide-field cosmological measurements. This work demonstrates the prospects and challenges for future H I intensity mapping experiments.

  5. Integration between ground based and satellite SAR data in landslide mapping: The San Fratello case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardi, Federica; Frodella, William; Ciampalini, Andrea; Bianchini, Silvia; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Gigli, Giovanni; Fanti, Riccardo; Moretti, Sandro; Basile, Giuseppe; Casagli, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of the integration of PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry) and GB-InSAR (Ground-based Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) for landslide hazard mitigation was evaluated for mapping and monitoring activities of the San Fratello landslide (Sicily, Italy). Intense and exceptional rainfall events are the main factors that triggered several slope movements in the study area, which is susceptible to landslides, because of its steep slopes and silty-clayey sedimentary cover. In the last three centuries, the town of San Fratello was affected by three large landslides, developed in different periods: the oldest one occurred in 1754, damaging the northeastern sector of the town; in 1922 a large landslide completely destroyed a wide area in the western hillside of the town. In this paper, the attention is focussed on the most recent landslide that occurred on 14 February 2010: in this case, the phenomenon produced the failure of a large sector of the eastern hillside, causing severe damages to buildings and infrastructures. In particular, several slow-moving rotational and translational slides occurred in the area, making it suitable to monitor ground instability through different InSAR techniques. PS-InSAR™ (permanent scatterers SAR interferometry) techniques, using ERS-1/ERS-2, ENVISAT, RADARSAT-1, and COSMO-SkyMed SAR images, were applied to analyze ground displacements during pre- and post-event phases. Moreover, during the post-event phase in March 2010, a GB-InSAR system, able to acquire data continuously every 14 min, was installed collecting ground displacement maps for a period of about three years, until March 2013. Through the integration of space-borne and ground-based data sets, ground deformation velocity maps were obtained, providing a more accurate delimitation of the February 2010 landslide boundary, with respect to the carried out traditional geomorphological field survey. The integration of GB-InSAR and PSI techniques proved to

  6. Construction of a large scale integrated map of macrophage pathogen recognition and effector systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In an effort to better understand the molecular networks that underpin macrophage activation we have been assembling a map of relevant pathways. Manual curation of the published literature was carried out in order to define the components of these pathways and the interactions between them. This information has been assembled into a large integrated directional network and represented graphically using the modified Edinburgh Pathway Notation (mEPN) scheme. Results The diagram includes detailed views of the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, other pathogen recognition systems, NF-kappa-B, apoptosis, interferon signalling, MAP-kinase cascades, MHC antigen presentation and proteasome assembly, as well as selected views of the transcriptional networks they regulate. The integrated pathway includes a total of 496 unique proteins, the complexes formed between them and the processes in which they are involved. This produces a network of 2,170 nodes connected by 2,553 edges. Conclusions The pathway diagram is a navigable visual aid for displaying a consensus view of the pathway information available for these systems. It is also a valuable resource for computational modelling and aid in the interpretation of functional genomics data. We envisage that this work will be of value to those interested in macrophage biology and also contribute to the ongoing Systems Biology community effort to develop a standard notation scheme for the graphical representation of biological pathways. PMID:20470404

  7. Maintaining a cognitive map in darkness: the need to fuse boundary knowledge with path integration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Allen; Ball, David; Milford, Michael; Wyeth, Gordon; Wiles, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Spatial navigation requires the processing of complex, disparate and often ambiguous sensory data. The neurocomputations underpinning this vital ability remain poorly understood. Controversy remains as to whether multimodal sensory information must be combined into a unified representation, consistent with Tolman's "cognitive map", or whether differential activation of independent navigation modules suffice to explain observed navigation behaviour. Here we demonstrate that key neural correlates of spatial navigation in darkness cannot be explained if the path integration system acted independently of boundary (landmark) information. In vivo recordings demonstrate that the rodent head direction (HD) system becomes unstable within three minutes without vision. In contrast, rodents maintain stable place fields and grid fields for over half an hour without vision. Using a simple HD error model, we show analytically that idiothetic path integration (iPI) alone cannot be used to maintain any stable place representation beyond two to three minutes. We then use a measure of place stability based on information theoretic principles to prove that featureless boundaries alone cannot be used to improve localization above chance level. Having shown that neither iPI nor boundaries alone are sufficient, we then address the question of whether their combination is sufficient and--we conjecture--necessary to maintain place stability for prolonged periods without vision. We addressed this question in simulations and robot experiments using a navigation model comprising of a particle filter and boundary map. The model replicates published experimental results on place field and grid field stability without vision, and makes testable predictions including place field splitting and grid field rescaling if the true arena geometry differs from the acquired boundary map. We discuss our findings in light of current theories of animal navigation and neuronal computation, and elaborate on

  8. Integrating fuel cell power systems into building physical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the integration of fuel cell power plants and absorption chillers to cogenerate chilled water or hot water/steam for all weather air conditioning as one possible approach to building system applications. Absorption chillers utilize thermal energy in an absorption based cycle to chill water. It is feasible to use waste heat from fuel cells to provide hydronic heating and cooling. Performance regimes will vary as a function of the supply and quality of waste heat. Respective performance characteristics of fuel cells, absorption chillers and air conditioning systems will define relationships between thermal and electrical load capacities for the combined systems. Specifically, this paper develops thermodynamic relationships between bulk electrical power and cooling/heating capacities for combined fuel cell and absorption chiller system in building applications.

  9. RIMS: An Integrated Mapping and Analysis System with Applications to Earth Sciences and Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, A. A.; Glidden, S.; Shiklomanov, A. I.; Lammers, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    A web-based information and computational system for analysis of spatially distributed Earth system, climate, and hydrologic data have been developed. The System allows visualization, data exploration, querying, manipulation and arbitrary calculations with any loaded gridded or vector polygon dataset. The system's acronym, RIMS, stands for its core functionality as a Rapid Integrated Mapping System. The system can be deployed for a Global scale projects as well as for regional hydrology and climatology studies. In particular, the Water Systems Analysis Group of the University of New Hampshire developed the global and regional (Northern Eurasia, pan-Arctic) versions of the system with different map projections and specific data. The system has demonstrated its potential for applications in other fields of Earth sciences and education. The key Web server/client components of the framework include (a) a visualization engine built on Open Source libraries (GDAL, PROJ.4, etc.) that are utilized in a MapServer; (b) multi-level data querying tools built on XML server-client communication protocols that allow downloading map data on-the-fly to a client web browser; and (c) data manipulation and grid cell level calculation tools that mimic desktop GIS software functionality via a web interface. Server side data management of the system is designed around a simple database of dataset metadata facilitating mounting of new data to the system and maintaining existing data in an easy manner. RIMS contains "built-in" river network data that allows for query of upstream areas on-demand which can be used for spatial data aggregation and analysis of sub-basin areas. RIMS is an ongoing effort and currently being used to serve a number of websites hosting a suite of hydrologic, environmental and other GIS data.

  10. A Phenomenological Study: A Phenomenological Exploration of the Lived Experience of Practicing Physical Education Teachers on the Integration of Technology in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armijo, Erica Anne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the lived experiences of practicing physical education teachers on the integration of technology in a physical education. This study arose from my current experiences as a physical educator and the current inculcation of technology in education and more specifically physical education. As a current physical…

  11. Integrating Physics and Literacy Learning in a Physics Course for Prospective Elementary and Middle School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Emily H.; Jansen, Henri; Winograd, Kenneth; Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam

    2013-06-01

    The ability to listen closely, speak clearly, write coherently, read with comprehension, and to create and critique media offerings in science contexts is essential for effective science teaching. How might instructors develop such abilities in a physics course for prospective elementary and middle school teachers? We describe here such a course, involving collaboration among physics, science education, and literacy faculty members and two graduate assistants. Meeting twice a week for 10 weeks, the course emphasized questioning, predicting, exploring, observing, discussing, writing, and reading in physical science contexts. We report common themes about aspects that fostered or hindered science and literacy learning, changes in views about science teaching and learning, and positive shifts in interest in science and intended teaching practices.

  12. The Physical Genome Mapping of Anopheles albimanus Corrected Scaffold Misassemblies and Identified Interarm Rearrangements in Genus Anopheles

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Gleb N.; Peery, Ashley N.; Jiang, Xiaofang; Tu, Zhijian; Stegniy, Vladimir N.; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Sharakhov, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles albimanus was sequenced as part of the 16 Anopheles Genomes Project published in 2015. The draft assembly of this species consisted of 204 scaffolds with an N50 scaffold size of 18.1 Mb and a total assembly size of 170.5 Mb. It was among the smallest genomes with the longest scaffolds in the 16 Anopheles species cluster, making An. albimanus the logical choice for anchoring the genome assembly to chromosomes. In this study, we developed a high-resolution cytogenetic photomap with completely straightened polytene chromosomes from the salivary glands of the mosquito larvae. Based on this photomap, we constructed a chromosome-based genome assembly using fluorescent in situ hybridization of PCR-amplified DNA probes. Our physical mapping, assisted by an ortholog-based bioinformatics approach, identified and corrected nine misassemblies in five large genomic scaffolds. Misassemblies mostly occurred in junctions between contigs. Our comparative analysis of scaffolds with the An. gambiae genome detected multiple genetic exchanges between pericentromeric regions of chromosomal arms caused by partial-arm translocations. The final map consists of 40 ordered genomic scaffolds and corrected fragments of misassembled scaffolds. The An. albimanus physical map comprises 98.2% of the total genome assembly and represents the most complete genome map among mosquito species. This study demonstrates that physical mapping is a powerful tool for correcting errors in draft genome assemblies and for creating chromosome-anchored reference genomes. PMID:27821634

  13. Integration of the Rat Recombination and EST Maps in the Rat Genomic Sequence and Comparative Mapping Analysis With the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Steven P.; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Argoud, Karène; Watanabe, Takeshi K.; Lathrop, Mark; Gauguier, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Inbred strains of the laboratory rat are widely used for identifying genetic regions involved in the control of complex quantitative phenotypes of biomedical importance. The draft genomic sequence of the rat now provides essential information for annotating rat quantitative trait locus (QTL) maps. Following the survey of unique rat microsatellite (11,585 including 1648 new markers) and EST (10,067) markers currently available, we have incorporated a selection of 7952 rat EST sequences in an improved version of the integrated linkage-radiation hybrid map of the rat containing 2058 microsatellite markers which provided over 10,000 potential anchor points between rat QTL and the genomic sequence of the rat. A total of 996 genetic positions were resolved (avg. spacing 1.77 cM) in a single large intercross and anchored in the rat genomic sequence (avg. spacing 1.62 Mb). Comparative genome maps between rat and mouse were constructed by successful computational alignment of 6108 mapped rat ESTs in the mouse genome. The integration of rat linkage maps in the draft genomic sequence of the rat and that of other species represents an essential step for translating rat QTL intervals into human chromosomal targets. PMID:15060020

  14. An iso-integral mapping technique using magnetocardiogram, and its possible use for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, K; Miyashita, T; Kandori, A; Mitsui, T; Terada, Y; Sato, M; Shiono, J; Horigome, H; Yamada, S; Yamaguchi, I

    2000-02-01

    We have developed an iso-integral mapping technique that uses magneto-cardiogram (MCG) data to obtain a map as projected total current image on the torso from the heart. We have also investigated the applicability of iso-integral mapping to the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. We simulated and measured the characteristics of two types of iso-integral maps: one using tangential (Bxy) components, and one using the normal component (Bz). Each vector component was measured by two types of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system to determine the tangential and normal components. The tangential component of the magnetic field appeared to be equivalent to the current image in the myocardium projected on the observing plane, and we were able to obtain a projected total current image by integration of the tangential components during the depolarization and repolarization processes. And we found that the iso-integral maps of normal hearts showed similar pattern in both processes; however, those of ischemic hearts showed different patterns.

  15. Integration of remote sensing and morphological data for an optimal mapping of badland areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, T.; Liberti, M.; Carone, M. T.; Coppola, R.; D'Emilio, M.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-04-01

    Badlands are complex and peculiar types of erosional formations deriving from the action of geological, geomorphological and denudation processes. For soil erosion assessment such as temporal monitoring of badland areas, digital soil mapping from remote sensing images can be a valuable tool. It can allow for exploring both the role of climate effects on landform development and changes of erosion rate due to human influence. However, in order to effectively use multispectral satellite data, which are still a main source of information for multitemporal analyses, many attempts are required to solve the problems linked to low spectral separability of land features. In particular, data from the Landsat TM/ETM series, recognized particularly appropriate for supporting both research and land conservation planning, showed their limit in accurately detecting eroded materials influenced by run-off processes. These surface processes, indeed, are responsible for the increase in spectral confusion by spreading materials from badlands to the surrounding areas. To overcome this problem, we proposed the integration of spectral data with morphological information deriving from a Digital Elevation Model. We used slope and hillslope aspect as key parameters in identifying eroded formations. Therefore, our protocol was developed by testing all possible combinations of classification algorithm (Maximum likelihood Classifier and Parallelepiped) and input layers (spectral and morphological). Results obtained in a badlands sites located in Basilicata region (Southern Italy) showed a progressive reduction of misclassified badlands-pixels in the surrounding deposition areas by adding the terrain predictors. Our methodology allowed the improvement of badlands mapping: the best performance was obtained by applying MLC on all TM seven bands together with slope and aspect maps. Here, we show results from validation tests carried out on an other badland areas with similar heterogeneity which

  16. 3. 6-Mb genomic and YAC physical map of the Down syndrome chromosome region on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne-Zacharia, M.C.; Dahmane, N.; Theophile, D.; Orti, R.; Chettouh, Z.; Sinet, P.M.; Delabar, J.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The Down syndrome chromosome region (DCR) on chromosome 21 has been shown to contain a gene(s) important in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. The authors constructed a long-range restriction map of the D21S55-D21S65 region covering the proximal part of the DCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of lymphocyte DNA digested with three rare cutting enzymes, NotI, NruI, and Mlu1, was used to establish two physical linkage groups of 5 and 7 markers, respectively, spanning 4.6 Mb on the NotI map. Mapping analysis of 40 YACs allowed the selection of 13 YACs covering 95% of the D21S55-D21S65 region and spanning 3.6 Mb. The restriction maps of these YACs and their positioning on the genomic map allowed 19 markers to be ordered, including 4 NotI linking clones, 9 polymorphic markers, the CBR gene, and the AML1 gene. The distances between markers could also be estimated. This physical map and the location of eight NotI sites between D21S55 and D21S17 should facilitate the isolation of previously unidentified genes in this region. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Integrating Physics and Literacy Learning in a Physics Course for Prospective Elementary and Middle School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.; Jansen, Henri; Winograd, Kenneth; Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The ability to listen closely, speak clearly, write coherently, read with comprehension, and to create and critique media offerings in science contexts is essential for effective science teaching. How might instructors develop such abilities in a physics course for prospective elementary and middle school teachers? We describe here such a course,…

  18. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  19. Physics-based real time ground motion parameter maps: the Central Mexico example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Guzman, L.; Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G.; Quiroz Ramirez, A.; Carrillo Lucia, M. A.; Perez Yanez, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the use of near real time ground motion simulations in the generation of ground motion parameter maps for Central Mexico. Simple algorithm approaches to predict ground motion parameters of civil protection and risk engineering interest are based on the use of observed instrumental values, reported macroseismic intensities and their correlations, and ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). A remarkable example of the use of this approach is the worldwide Shakemap generation program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Nevertheless, simple approaches rely strongly on the availability of instrumental and macroseismic intensity reports, as well as the accuracy of the GMPEs and the site effect amplification calculation. In regions where information is scarce, the GMPEs, a reference value in a mean sense, provide most of the ground motion information together with site effects amplification using a simple parametric approaches (e.g. the use of Vs30), and have proven to be elusive. Here we propose an approach that includes physics-based ground motion predictions (PBGMP) corrected by instrumental information using a Bayesian Kriging approach (Kitanidis, 1983) and apply it to the central region of Mexico. The method assumes: 1) the availability of a large database of low and high frequency Green's functions developed for the region of interest, using fully three-dimensional and representative one-dimension models, 2) enough real time data to obtain the centroid moment tensor and a slip rate function, and 3) a computational infrastructure that can be used to compute the source parameters and generate broadband synthetics in near real time, which will be combined with recorded instrumental data. By using a recently developed velocity model of Central Mexico and an efficient finite element octree-based implementation we generate a database of source-receiver Green's functions, valid to 0.5 Hz, that covers 160 km x 300 km x 700 km of Mexico, including a

  20. An Integrated Spin-Labeling/Computational-Modeling Approach for Mapping Global Structures of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Tangprasertchai, Narin S; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ding, Yuan; Tham, Kenneth; Rohs, Remo; Haworth, Ian S; Qin, Peter Z

    2015-01-01

    The technique of site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) provides unique information on biomolecules by monitoring the behavior of a stable radical tag (i.e., spin label) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this chapter, we describe an approach in which SDSL is integrated with computational modeling to map conformations of nucleic acids. This approach builds upon a SDSL tool kit previously developed and validated, which includes three components: (i) a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe, designated as R5, which can be efficiently attached at defined sites within arbitrary nucleic acid sequences; (ii) inter-R5 distances in the nanometer range, measured via pulsed EPR; and (iii) an efficient program, called NASNOX, that computes inter-R5 distances on given nucleic acid structures. Following a general framework of data mining, our approach uses multiple sets of measured inter-R5 distances to retrieve "correct" all-atom models from a large ensemble of models. The pool of models can be generated independently without relying on the inter-R5 distances, thus allowing a large degree of flexibility in integrating the SDSL-measured distances with a modeling approach best suited for the specific system under investigation. As such, the integrative experimental/computational approach described here represents a hybrid method for determining all-atom models based on experimentally-derived distance measurements.

  1. An Integrated Spin-Labeling/Computational-Modeling Approach for Mapping Global Structures of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Tangprasertchai, Narin S.; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ding, Yuan; Tham, Kenneth; Rohs, Remo; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    The technique of site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) provides unique information on biomolecules by monitoring the behavior of a stable radical tag (i.e., spin label) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this chapter, we describe an approach in which SDSL is integrated with computational modeling to map conformations of nucleic acids. This approach builds upon a SDSL tool kit previously developed and validated, which includes three components: (i) a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe, designated as R5, which can be efficiently attached at defined sites within arbitrary nucleic acid sequences; (ii) inter-R5 distances in the nanometer range, measured via pulsed EPR; and (iii) an efficient program, called NASNOX, that computes inter-R5 distances on given nucleic acid structures. Following a general framework of data mining, our approach uses multiple sets of measured inter-R5 distances to retrieve “correct” all-atom models from a large ensemble of models. The pool of models can be generated independently without relying on the inter-R5 distances, thus allowing a large degree of flexibility in integrating the SDSL-measured distances with a modeling approach best suited for the specific system under investigation. As such, the integrative experimental/computational approach described here represents a hybrid method for determining all-atom models based on experimentally-derived distance measurements. PMID:26477260

  2. Unisensory processing and multisensory integration in schizophrenia: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Stone, David B; Urrea, Laura J; Aine, Cheryl J; Bustillo, Juan R; Clark, Vincent P; Stephen, Julia M

    2011-10-01

    In real-world settings, information from multiple sensory modalities is combined to form a complete, behaviorally salient percept - a process known as multisensory integration. While deficits in auditory and visual processing are often observed in schizophrenia, little is known about how multisensory integration is affected by the disorder. The present study examined auditory, visual, and combined audio-visual processing in schizophrenia patients using high-density electrical mapping. An ecologically relevant task was used to compare unisensory and multisensory evoked potentials from schizophrenia patients to potentials from healthy normal volunteers. Analysis of unisensory responses revealed a large decrease in the N100 component of the auditory-evoked potential, as well as early differences in the visual-evoked components in the schizophrenia group. Differences in early evoked responses to multisensory stimuli were also detected. Multisensory facilitation was assessed by comparing the sum of auditory and visual evoked responses to the audio-visual evoked response. Schizophrenia patients showed a significantly greater absolute magnitude response to audio-visual stimuli than to summed unisensory stimuli when compared to healthy volunteers, indicating significantly greater multisensory facilitation in the patient group. Behavioral responses also indicated increased facilitation from multisensory stimuli. The results represent the first report of increased multisensory facilitation in schizophrenia and suggest that, although unisensory deficits are present, compensatory mechanisms may exist under certain conditions that permit improved multisensory integration in individuals afflicted with the disorder.

  3. Preliminary integrated geologic map databases for the United States: Digital data for the geology of southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gehrels, George E.; Berg, Henry C.

    2006-01-01

    The growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for digital geologic maps that have been attributed with information about age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. This report is part of a series of integrated geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. Three national-scale geologic maps that portray most or all of the United States already exist; for the conterminous U.S., King and Beikman (1974a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:2,500,000, Beikman (1980) compiled a map for Alaska at 1:2,500,000 scale, and for the entire U.S., Reed and others (2005a,b) compiled a map at a scale of 1:5,000,000. A digital version of the King and Beikman map was published by Schruben and others (1994). Reed and Bush (2004) produced a digital version of the Reed and others (2005a) map for the conterminous U.S. The present series of maps is intended to provide the next step in increased detail. State geologic maps that range in scale from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000 are available for most of the country, and digital versions of these state maps are the basis of this product. The digital geologic maps presented here are in a standardized format as ARC/INFO export files and as ArcView shape files. Data tables that relate the map units to detailed lithologic and age information accompany these GIS files. The map is delivered as a set of 1:250,000-scale quadrangle files. To the best of our ability, these quadrangle files are edge-matched with respect to geology. When the maps are merged, the combined attribute tables can be used directly with the merged maps to make derivative maps.

  4. Progress towards the construction of a sequence-ready physical map of the 3AS chromosome arm of hexaploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large genome size (~17 Gb), polyploid nature, and repetitive sequence content (>90%) of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) present a challenge for constructing physical maps, which are fundamental resources to aid genomic sequencing and annotation, and gene cloning. One approach to reduce the c...

  5. Physical and transcriptional map of the mouse Chromosome 10 proximal region syntenic to human 6q16-q21.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, N; Benachenhou, N; Vacher, J

    2001-12-01

    Toward the isolation of the grey-lethal (gl) gene, we have genetically localized this locus on mouse Chromosome (Chr) 10 between the Fyn gene and the D10Mit148 microsatellite marker. Here, we have screened five yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries and isolated more than 100 YAC clones mapping to this region. Forty-two clones were characterized and assembled in an approximately 8.5 megabases (Mb) contig showing high linkage conservation with the human 6q16-q21 interval. During this study, 24 specific novel sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were derived from YAC insert ends, and 15 mouse genes were precisely mapped to the contig. The physical and transcriptional map presented here will provide novel resources to isolate the gl locus associated with osteopetrosis, and will also provide candidate loci for other defects mapped on human Chr 6q.

  6. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map.

  7. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map. PMID:26742857

  8. BESIII Physics Data Storing and Processing on HBase and MapReduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEI, Xiaofeng; Li, Qiang; Kan, Bowen; Sun, Gongxing; Sun, Zhenyu

    2015-12-01

    In the past years, we have successfully applied Hadoop to high-energy physics analysis. Although, it has not only improved the efficiency of data analysis, but also reduced the cost of cluster building so far, there are still some spaces to be optimized, like inflexible pre-selection, low-efficient random data reading and I/O bottleneck caused by Fuse that is used to access HDFS. In order to change this situation, this paper presents a new analysis platform for high-energy physics data storing and analysing. The data structure is changed from DST tree-like files to HBase according to the features of the data itself and analysis processes, since HBase is more suitable for processing random data reading than DST files and enable HDFS to be accessed directly. A few of optimization measures are taken for the purpose of getting a good performance. A customized protocol is defined for data serializing and desterilizing for the sake of decreasing the storage space in HBase. In order to make full use of locality of data storing in HBase, utilizing a new MapReduce model and a new split policy for HBase regions are proposed in the paper. In addition, a dynamic pluggable easy-to-use TAG (event metadata) based pre-selection subsystem is established. It can assist physicists even to filter out 999%o uninterested data, if the conditions are set properly. This means that a lot of I/O resources can be saved, the CPU usage can be improved and consuming time for data analysis can be reduced. Finally, several use cases are designed, the test results show that the new platform has an excellent performance with 3.4 times faster with pre-selection and 20% faster without preselection, and the new platform is stable and scalable as well.

  9. Concept Maps as a Research and Evaluation Tool To Assess Conceptual Change in Quantum Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2002-01-01

    Informs teachers about using concept maps as a learning tool and alternative assessment tools in education. Presents research results of how students might use concept maps to communicate their cognitive structure. (Author/KHR)

  10. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Yash Paul; Saxena, Maneesha S; Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  11. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  12. SNP Discovery and Chromosome Anchoring Provide the First Physically-Anchored Hexaploid Oat Map and Reveal Synteny with Model Species

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shiaoman; Jellen, Eric N.; Carson, Martin L.; Rines, Howard W.; Obert, Donald E.; Lutz, Joseph D.; Shackelford, Irene; Korol, Abraham B.; Wight, Charlene P.; Gardner, Kyle M.; Hattori, Jiro; Beattie, Aaron D.; Bjørnstad, Åsmund; Bonman, J. Michael; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Sorrells, Mark E.; Brown-Guedira, Gina L.; Mitchell Fetch, Jennifer W.; Harrison, Stephen A.; Howarth, Catherine J.; Ibrahim, Amir; Kolb, Frederic L.; McMullen, Michael S.; Murphy, J. Paul; Ohm, Herbert W.; Rossnagel, Brian G.; Yan, Weikai; Miclaus, Kelci J.; Hiller, Jordan; Maughan, Peter J.; Redman Hulse, Rachel R.; Anderson, Joseph M.; Islamovic, Emir

    2013-01-01

    A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42) has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources. PMID:23533580

  13. Assessment of the nutrient removal performance in integrated constructed wetlands with the self-organizing map.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Scholz, Miklas; Mustafa, Atif; Harrington, Rory

    2008-07-01

    The self-organizing map (SOM) model was applied to predict outflow nutrient concentrations for integrated constructed wetlands (ICWs) treating farmyard runoff. The SOM showed that the outflow ammonia-nitrogen concentrations were strongly correlated with water temperature and salt concentrations, indicating that ammonia-nitrogen removal is effective at low salt concentrations and comparatively high temperatures in ICWs. Soluble reactive phosphorus removal was predominantly affected by salt and dissolved oxygen concentrations. In addition, pH and temperature were weakly correlated with soluble reactive phosphorus removal, suggesting that soluble reactive phosphorus was easily removed within ICWs, if salt concentrations were low, and dissolved oxygen, temperature and pH values were high. The SOM model performed very well in predicting the nutrient concentrations with water quality variables such as temperature, conductivity and dissolved oxygen, which can be measured cost-effectively. The results indicate that the SOM model was an appropriate approach to monitor wastewater treatment processes in ICWs.

  14. Mapping variable ring polymer molecular dynamics: A path-integral based method for nonadiabatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, Nandini

    2013-09-01

    We introduce mapping-variable ring polymer molecular dynamics (MV-RPMD), a model dynamics for the direct simulation of multi-electron processes. An extension of the RPMD idea, this method is based on an exact, imaginary time path-integral representation of the quantum Boltzmann operator using continuous Cartesian variables for both electronic states and nuclear degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the accuracy of the MV-RPMD approach in calculations of real-time, thermal correlation functions for a range of two-state single-mode model systems with different coupling strengths and asymmetries. Further, we show that the ensemble of classical trajectories employed in these simulations preserves the Boltzmann distribution and provides a direct probe into real-time coupling between electronic state transitions and nuclear dynamics.

  15. Mapping Identifiers for the Integration of Genomic Datasets with the R/Bioconductor package biomaRt

    PubMed Central

    Durinck, Steffen; Spellman, Paul T.; Birney, Ewan; Huber, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Genomic experiments produce multiple views of biological systems, among them DNA sequence and copy number variation, mRNA and protein abundance. Understanding these systems requires integrated bioinformatic analysis. Public databases such as Ensembl provide relationships and mappings between the relevant sets of probe and target molecules. However, the relationships can be biologically complex and the content of the databases is dynamic. We demonstrate how to use the computational environment R to integrate and jointly analyse experimental datasets, employing BioMart web services to provide the molecule mappings. We also discuss typical problems that are encountered in making gene to transcript to protein mappings. The approach provides a flexible, programmable and reproducible basis for state-of-the-art bioinformatic data integration. PMID:19617889

  16. Mapping a near surface variable geologic regime using an integrated geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, N.T.; Sandberg, S.K.; Miller, P.; Powell, G.

    1997-10-01

    An integrated geophysical approach involving seismic, electromagnetic, and electrical methods was employed to map fluvial, colluvial and bedrock geology, to delineate bedrock channels, and to determine fracture and joint orientations that may influence migration of petroleum hydrocarbons at the Glenrock Oil Seep. Both P (primary)-wave and S (shear)-wave seismic refraction techniques were used to map the bedrock surface topography, bedrock minima, stratigraphic boundaries, and possible structure. S-wave data were preferred because of better vertical resolution due to the combination of slower velocities and lower frequency wave train. Azimuthal resistivity/EP (induced polarization) and azimuthal electromagnetics were used to determine fracture orientations and groundwater flow directions. Terrain conductivity was used to map the fluvial sedimentary sequences (e.g., paleochannel and overbank deposits) in the North Platte River floodplain. Conductivity measurements were also used to estimate bedrock depth and to assist in the placement and recording parameters of the azimuthal soundings. The geophysical investigation indicated that groundwater flow pathways were controlled by the fluvial paleochannels and bedrock erosional features. Primary groundwater flow direction in the bedrock and colluvial sediments was determined from the azimuthal measurements and confirmed by drilling to be N20-40W along the measured strike of the bedrock and joint orientations. Joint/fracture orientations were measured at N20-40W and N10-30E from the azimuthal data and confirmed from measurements at a bedrock outcrop south of the site. The bedrock has an apparent N10E anisotropy in the seismic velocity profiles on the old refinery property that closely match that of measured joint/fracture orientations and may have a minor effect on groundwater flow.

  17. Integrated Transcriptome Map Highlights Structural and Functional Aspects of the Normal Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Piovesan, Allison; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2017-04-01

    A systematic meta-analysis of the available gene expression profiling datasets for the whole normal human heart generated a quantitative transcriptome reference map of this organ. Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM) software integrated 32 gene expression profile datasets from different sources returning a reference value of expression for each of the 43,360 known, mapped transcripts assayed by any of the experimental platforms used in this regard. Main findings include the visualization at the gene and chromosomal levels of the classical description of the basic histology and physiology of the heart, the identification of suitable housekeeping reference genes, the analysis of stoichiometry of gene products, and the focusing on chromosome 21 genes, which are present in one excess copy in Down syndrome subjects, presenting cardiovascular defects in 30-40% of cases. Independent in vitro validation showed an excellent correlation coefficient (r = 0.98) with the in silico data. Remarkably, heart/non-cardiac tissue expression ratio may also be used to anticipate that effects of mutations will most probably affect or not the heart. The quantitative reference global portrait of gene expression in the whole normal human heart illustrates the structural and functional aspects of the whole organ and is a general model to understand the mechanisms underlying heart pathophysiology. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 759-770, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Vertical integration of cosmid and YAC resources for interval mapping on the X-chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.; Coffey, A.J.; Giannelli, F.; Bentley, D.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The vertical integration of cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) resources is of particular importance in the development of high-resolution maps of selected regions of the human genome. A resource of approximately 95,000 cosmids constructed using DNA from primary fibroblasts of karyotype 49,XXXXX was validated by detailed characterization of a 200-kb cosmid contig spanning exons 8-20 of the dystrophin gene. This resource was used to construct contigs in 0.65 Mb of Xq26 by hybridization of gel-purified YAC DNA to high-density gridded arrays of the cosmid library; positive cosmids were overlapped by fingerprinting. Contigs were oriented and ordered relative to existing YACs in the region using cross-hybridization. The overlaps between a representative set of cosmids define 54 intervals of 5-20 kb and were used to construct a high-resolution cosmid interval map of the region, locating markers, dinucleotide repeats, and candidate CpG islands. This approach can be applied rapidly to large regions of the genome and without recourse to subcloning of individual YACs. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Integration of Self-Organizing Map (SOM) and Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) for network intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; He, Haibo; Man, Hong; Shen, Xiaoping

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes an approach to integrate the self-organizing map (SOM) and kernel density estimation (KDE) techniques for the anomaly-based network intrusion detection (ABNID) system to monitor the network traffic and capture potential abnormal behaviors. With the continuous development of network technology, information security has become a major concern for the cyber system research. In the modern net-centric and tactical warfare networks, the situation is more critical to provide real-time protection for the availability, confidentiality, and integrity of the networked information. To this end, in this work we propose to explore the learning capabilities of SOM, and integrate it with KDE for the network intrusion detection. KDE is used to estimate the distributions of the observed random variables that describe the network system and determine whether the network traffic is normal or abnormal. Meanwhile, the learning and clustering capabilities of SOM are employed to obtain well-defined data clusters to reduce the computational cost of the KDE. The principle of learning in SOM is to self-organize the network of neurons to seek similar properties for certain input patterns. Therefore, SOM can form an approximation of the distribution of input space in a compact fashion, reduce the number of terms in a kernel density estimator, and thus improve the efficiency for the intrusion detection. We test the proposed algorithm over the real-world data sets obtained from the Integrated Network Based Ohio University's Network Detective Service (INBOUNDS) system to show the effectiveness and efficiency of this method.

  20. Physical mapping of 5S and 45S rDNA loci in pufferfishes (Tetraodontiformes).

    PubMed

    Noleto, Rafael Bueno; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Cipriano, Roger Raupp; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2007-06-01

    Chromosomal features, location and variation of the major and minor rDNA genes cluster were studied in three pufferfish species: Sphoeroides greeleyi and Sphoeroides testudineus (Tetraodontidae) and Cyclichthys spinosus (Diodontidae). The location of the major rDNA was revealed with an 18S probe in two loci for all species. The minor rDNA loci (5S rDNA) was found in one chromosome pair in tetraodontid fishes and four sites located on two distinct chromosomal pairs in C. spinosus. A syntenical organization was not observed among the ribosomal genes. Signal homogeneity for GC/AT-DNA specific fluorochromes was observed in diodontid fish except in the NORs regions, which were CMA3-positive. Giemsa karyotypes of tetraodontid species presents 2n=46, having the same diploid value of other Sphoeroides species that have been investigated. On the other hand, the karyotype of C. spinosus, described for the first time, shows 2n=50 chromosomes (4m+18sm+12st+16a). The foreknowledge of the karyotypic structure of this group and also the physical mapping of certain genes could be very helpful for further DNA sequence analysis.

  1. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  2. Flexible and Stretchable Physical Sensor Integrated Platforms for Wearable Human-Activity Monitoringand Personal Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Trung, Tran Quang; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable physical sensors that can measure and quantify electrical signals generated by human activities are attracting a great deal of attention as they have unique characteristics, such as ultrathinness, low modulus, light weight, high flexibility, and stretchability. These flexible and stretchable physical sensors conformally attached on the surface of organs or skin can provide a new opportunity for human-activity monitoring and personal healthcare. Consequently, in recent years there has been considerable research effort devoted to the development of flexible and stretchable physical sensors to fulfill the requirements of future technology, and much progress has been achieved. Here, the most recent developments of flexible and stretchable physical sensors are described, including temperature, pressure, and strain sensors, and flexible and stretchable sensor-integrated platforms. The latest successful examples of flexible and stretchable physical sensors for the detection of temperature, pressure, and strain, as well as their novel structures, technological innovations, and challenges, are reviewed first. In the next section, recent progress regarding sensor-integrated wearable platforms is overviewed in detail. Some of the latest achievements regarding self-powered sensor-integrated wearable platform technologies are also reviewed. Further research direction and challenges are also proposed to develop a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform for monitoring human activity and personal healthcare in the near future.

  3. Research of physical properties of TiO2 nanolayers for integrated photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struk, Przemysław; Pustelny, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents investigation of physical properties of wide bandgap oxide semiconductor - titanium dioxide for applications in integrated photonics as well as for future applications in gas sensors structures. The investigation presented in the paper was focused on: surface topography of TiO2 layer measured by AFM method, as well as investigation of Raman shift obtained by Raman spectroscopy. Finally the integrated photonics in the form of planar waveguide is also presented.

  4. The Effectiveness of Concept Maps in Teaching Physics Concepts Applied to Engineering Education: Experimental Comparison of the Amount of Learning Achieved With and Without Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Guadalupe; Pérez, Ángel Luis; Suero, María Isabel; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2013-04-01

    A study was conducted to quantify the effectiveness of concept maps in learning physics in engineering degrees. The following research question was posed: What was the difference in learning results from the use of concept maps to study a particular topic in an engineering course? The study design was quasi-experimental and used a post-test as a measuring instrument. The sample included 114 university students from the School of Industrial Engineering who were divided into two equivalent homogeneous groups of 57 students each. The amount of learning attained by the students in each group was compared, with the independent variable being the teaching method; the experimental group (E.G.) used concept maps, while the control group (C.G.) did not. We performed a crossover study with the two groups of students, with one group acting as the E.G. for the topic of optical fibers and as the C.G. for the topic of the fundamental particles of matter and vice versa for the other group. For each of the two topics studied, the evaluation instrument was a test of 100 dichotomous items. The resulting data were subjected to a comparative statistical analysis, which revealed a significant difference in the amount of learning attained by the E.G. students as compared with the C.G. students. The results allow us to state that for the use of concept maps, the average increment in the E.G. students' learning was greater than 19 percentage points.

  5. Toward a physical map of Drosophila buzzatii. Use of randomly amplified polymorphic dna polymorphisms and sequence-tagged site landmarks.

    PubMed Central

    Laayouni, H; Santos, M; Fontdevila, A

    2000-01-01

    We present a physical map based on RAPD polymorphic fragments and sequence-tagged sites (STSs) for the repleta group species Drosophila buzzatii. One hundred forty-four RAPD markers have been used as probes for in situ hybridization to the polytene chromosomes, and positive results allowing the precise localization of 108 RAPDs were obtained. Of these, 73 behave as effectively unique markers for physical map construction, and in 9 additional cases the probes gave two hybridization signals, each on a different chromosome. Most markers (68%) are located on chromosomes 2 and 4, which partially agree with previous estimates on the distribution of genetic variation over chromosomes. One RAPD maps close to the proximal breakpoint of inversion 2z(3) but is not included within the inverted fragment. However, it was possible to conclude from this RAPD that the distal breakpoint of 2z(3) had previously been wrongly assigned. A total of 39 cytologically mapped RAPDs were converted to STSs and yielded an aggregate sequence of 28,431 bp. Thirty-six RAPDs (25%) did not produce any detectable hybridization signal, and we obtained the DNA sequence from three of them. Further prospects toward obtaining a more developed genetic map than the one currently available for D. buzzatii are discussed. PMID:11102375

  6. A 4-gigabase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current limitations in genome sequencing technology require the construction of physical maps for high-quality draft sequences of large plant genomes, such as that of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor. To construct a physical map of the Ae. tauschii genome, we fingerprinted 461,70...

  7. Comparing morphologies of drainage basins on Mars and Earth using integral-geometry and neural maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Coradetti, S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare morphologies of drainage basins on Mars and Earth in order to confine the formation process of Martian valley networks. Basins on both planets are computationally extracted from digital topography. Integral-geometry methods are used to represent each basin by a circularity function that encapsulates its internal structure. The shape of such a function is an indicator of the style of fluvial erosion. We use the self-organizing map technique to construct a similarity graph for all basins. The graph reveals systematic differences between morphologies of basins on the two planets. This dichotomy indicates that terrestrial and Martian surfaces were eroded differently. We argue that morphologies of Martian basins are incompatible with runoff from sustained, homogeneous rainfall. Fluvial environments compatible with observed morphologies are discussed. We also construct a similarity graph based on the comparison of basins hypsometric curves to demonstrate that hypsometry is incapable of discriminating between terrestrial and Martian basins. INDEX TERMS: 1824 Hydrology: Geomorphology (1625); 1886 Hydrology: Weathering (1625); 5415 Planetology: Solid Surface Planets: Erosion and weathering; 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects Mars. Citation: Stepinski, T. F., and S. Coradetti (2004), Comparing morphologies of drainage basins on Mars and Earth using integral-ge

  8. Kinect v2 and RGB Stereo Cameras Integration for Depth Map Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanelli, R.; Nascetti, A.; Crespi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Today range cameras are widespread low-cost sensors based on two different principles of operation: we can distinguish between Structured Light (SL) range cameras (Kinect v1, Structure Sensor, ...) and Time Of Flight (ToF) range cameras (Kinect v2, ...). Both the types are easy to use 3D scanners, able to reconstruct dense point clouds at high frame rate. However the depth maps obtained are often noisy and not enough accurate, therefore it is generally essential to improve their quality. Standard RGB cameras can be a valuable solution to solve such issue. The aim of this paper is therefore to evaluate the integration feasibility of these two different 3D modelling techniques, characterized by complementary features and based on standard low-cost sensors. For this purpose, a 3D model of a DUPLOTM bricks construction was reconstructed both with the Kinect v2 range camera and by processing one stereo pair acquired with a Canon Eos 1200D DSLR camera. The scale of the photgrammetric model was retrieved from the coordinates measured by Kinect v2. The preliminary results are encouraging and show that the foreseen integration could lead to an higher metric accuracy and a major level of completeness with respect to that obtained by using only separated techniques.

  9. GeoEye vs. QuickBird: operational potentialities, limits, and integration for fast map production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgogno Mondino, E.; Chiabrando, F.

    2010-10-01

    Very High Resolution Satellite (VHRS) images have already demonstrated their great potentialities both for the generation of satellite orthoimages and for map production and updating at the middle scale (1:10000 - 1:5000). Nevertheless a big research effort has still to be done in order to investigate how different data with similar features can be integrated to improve the final result and especially to overcome the objective difficulty, for a common customer, of getting stereopairs from a single sensor. In this work a Geo GeoEye image and an Orthoready QuickBird one covering about 120 Km2 in the region of Tera (Niger), are considered to determine how successfully they can be integrated to exploit the maximum of resident information required to describe as better as possible the test area. A comparative process was employed to determine the planimetric positional difference affecting the original acquired images, the orthoimages obtained through a Rational Function Model (RFM) approach based on the released RPC (Rational Polynomial Coefficients) and a "rigorous" multi-sensor bundle adjustment performing the simultaneous orientation of both the images in a single block.

  10. Environmental science applications with Rapid Integrated Mapping and analysis System (RIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, A.; Prusevich, A.; Gordov, E.; Okladnikov, I.; Titov, A.

    2016-11-01

    The Rapid Integrated Mapping and analysis System (RIMS) has been developed at the University of New Hampshire as an online instrument for multidisciplinary data visualization, analysis and manipulation with a focus on hydrological applications. Recently it was enriched with data and tools to allow more sophisticated analysis of interdisciplinary data. Three different examples of specific scientific applications with RIMS are demonstrated and discussed. Analysis of historical changes in major components of the Eurasian pan-Arctic water budget is based on historical discharge data, gridded observational meteorological fields, and remote sensing data for sea ice area. Express analysis of the extremely hot and dry summer of 2010 across European Russia is performed using a combination of near-real time and historical data to evaluate the intensity and spatial distribution of this event and its socioeconomic impacts. Integrative analysis of hydrological, water management, and population data for Central Asia over the last 30 years provides an assessment of regional water security due to changes in climate, water use and demography. The presented case studies demonstrate the capabilities of RIMS as a powerful instrument for hydrological and coupled human-natural systems research.

  11. An integrative architecture for general intelligence and executive function revealed by lesion mapping

    PubMed Central

    Colom, Roberto; Solomon, Jeffrey; Krueger, Frank; Forbes, Chad; Grafman, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Although cognitive neuroscience has made remarkable progress in understanding the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in executive control, the broader functional networks that support high-level cognition and give rise to general intelligence remain to be well characterized. Here, we investigated the neural substrates of the general factor of intelligence (g) and executive function in 182 patients with focal brain damage using voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System were used to derive measures of g and executive function, respectively. Impaired performance on these measures was associated with damage to a distributed network of left lateralized brain areas, including regions of frontal and parietal cortex and white matter association tracts, which bind these areas into a coordinated system. The observed findings support an integrative framework for understanding the architecture of general intelligence and executive function, supporting their reliance upon a shared fronto-parietal network for the integration and control of cognitive representations and making specific recommendations for the application of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System to the study of high-level cognition in health and disease. PMID:22396393

  12. An Integrative Hierarchical Stepwise Sampling Strategy For Spatial Sampling And Its Application In Digital Soil Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Zhu, A.; Qi, F.; Qin, C.; Li, B.; Pei, T.

    2011-12-01

    Sampling design plays an important role in spatial modeling. Existing methods often require large amount of samples to achieve desired mapping accuracy but imply considerable cost. When there are not enough resources for collecting a large set of samples at once, stepwise sampling approach is often the only option for collecting the needed large sample set, especially in the case of field surveying over large areas. This paper proposes an integrative hierarchical stepwise sampling strategy which makes the samples collected at different stages an integrative one. The strategy is based on samples' representativeness of the geographic feature at different scales. The basic idea is to sample at locations that are representative of large-scale spatial patterns first and then add samples that represent more local patterns in a stepwise fashion. Based on the relationships between geographic feature and its environmental covariates, the proposed sampling method approximates a hierarchy of spatial variations of the geographic feature under concern by delineating natural aggregates (clusters) of its relevant environmental covariates at different scales. The natural occurrence of such aggregates is modeled using a fuzzy c-means clustering method. We iterate through different numbers of clusters from only a few to many more to be able to reveal clusters at different spatial scales. At a particular iteration, locations that bear high similarity to the cluster prototypes are identified. If a location is consistently identified at multiple iterations it is then considered to be more representative of the general or large-scale spatial patterns. Locations that are identified less during the iterations are representative of local patterns. The integrative stepwise sampling design then gives higher sampling priority to the locations that are more representative of the large scale patterns than local ones. We applied this sampling design in a digital soil mapping case study

  13. Development of a high density integrated reference genetic linkage map for the multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaonan; Ramchiary, Nirala; Choi, Su Ryun; Van Nguyen, Dan; Hossain, Md Jamil; Yang, Hyeon Kook; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2010-11-01

    We constructed a high-density Brassica rapa integrated linkage map by combining a reference genetic map of 78 doubled haploid lines derived from Chiifu-401-42 × Kenshin (CKDH) and a new map of 190 F2 lines derived from Chiifu-401-42 × rapid cycling B. rapa (CRF2). The integrated map contains 1017 markers and covers 1262.0 cM of the B. rapa genome, with an average interlocus distance of 1.24 cM. High similarity of marker order and position was observed among the linkage groups of the maps with few short-distance inversions. In total, 155 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, anchored to 102 new bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and 146 intron polymorphic (IP) markers were mapped in the integrated map, which would be helpful to align the sequenced BACs in the ongoing multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP). Further, comparison of the B. rapa consensus map with the 10 B. juncea A-genome linkage groups by using 98 common IP markers showed high-degree colinearity between the A-genome linkage groups, except for few markers showing inversion or translocation. Suggesting that chromosomes are highly conserved between these Brassica species, although they evolved independently after divergence. The sequence information coming out of BrGSP would be useful for B. juncea breeding. and the identified Arabidopsis chromosomal blocks and known quantitative trait loci (QTL) information of B. juncea could be applied to improve other Brassica crops including B. rapa.

  14. Approaches and Applications of Physically-based, Spatially-distributed Integrated surface / subsurface flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, S.; Huyakorn, P. S.

    2004-12-01

    Physically-based, spatially-distributed (PBSD) modeling of integrated surface water and groundwater flow is necessary for evaluating the complex processes of runoff, recharge, evapotranspiration, subsurface flow, and baseflow, to comprehensively manage water resources for diverse and competing needs such as conjunctive use, aquifer storage and recovery, flood protection, wetland restoration and minimum flow evaluation. Some current approaches to PBSD modeling of integrated surface and subsurface flow will be discussed. Challenges to PBSD integrated modeling will be presented, and application case studies will be presented.

  15. Health risk in the context of climate change and adaptation - Concept and mapping as an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienberger, S.; Notenbaert, A.; Zeil, P.; Bett, B.; Hagenlocher, M.; Omolo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change has been stated as being one of the greatest challenges to global health in the current century. Climate change impacts on human health and the socio-economic and related poverty consequences are however still poorly understood. While epidemiological issues are strongly coupled with environmental and climatic parameters, the social and economic circumstances of populations might be of equal or even greater importance when trying to identify vulnerable populations and design appropriate and well-targeted adaptation measures. The inter-linkage between climate change, human health risk and socio-economic impacts remains an important - but largely outstanding - research field. We present an overview on how risk is traditionally being conceptualised in the human health domain and reflect critically on integrated approaches as being currently used in the climate change context. The presentation will also review existing approaches, and how they can be integrated towards adaptation tools. Following this review, an integrated risk concept is being presented, which has been currently adapted under the EC FP7 research project (HEALTHY FUTURES; http://www.healthyfutures.eu/). In this approach, health risk is not only defined through the disease itself (as hazard) but also by the inherent vulnerability of the system, population or region under study. It is in fact the interaction of environment and society that leads to the development of diseases and the subsequent risk of being negatively affected by it. In this conceptual framework vulnerability is being attributed to domains of lack of resilience as well as underlying preconditions determining susceptibilities. To fulfil a holistic picture vulnerability can be associated to social, economic, environmental, institutional, cultural and physical dimensions. The proposed framework also establishes the important nexus to adaptation and how different measures can be related to avoid disease outbreaks, reduce

  16. Trust-region based return mapping algorithm for implicit integration of elastic-plastic constitutive models

    DOE PAGES

    Lester, Brian; Scherzinger, William

    2017-01-19

    Here, a new method for the solution of the non-linear equations forming the core of constitutive model integration is proposed. Specifically, the trust-region method that has been developed in the numerical optimization community is successfully modified for use in implicit integration of elastic-plastic models. Although attention here is restricted to these rate-independent formulations, the proposed approach holds substantial promise for adoption with models incorporating complex physics, multiple inelastic mechanisms, and/or multiphysics. As a first step, the non-quadratic Hosford yield surface is used as a representative case to investigate computationally challenging constitutive models. The theory and implementation are presented, discussed, andmore » compared to other common integration schemes. Multiple boundary value problems are studied and used to verify the proposed algorithm and demonstrate the capabilities of this approach over more common methodologies. Robustness and speed are then investigated and compared to existing algorithms. Through these efforts, it is shown that the utilization of a trust-region approach leads to superior performance versus a traditional closest-point projection Newton-Raphson method and comparable speed and robustness to a line search augmented scheme.« less

  17. Visual-Somatosensory Integration is Linked to Physical Activity Level in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jeannette R; Dumas, Kristina; Holtzer, Roee

    2015-01-01

    Studies examining multisensory integration (MSI) in aging consistently demonstrate greater reaction time (RT) facilitation in old compared to young adults, but often fail to determine the utility of MSI. The aim of the current experiment was to further elucidate the utility of MSI in aging by determining its relationship to physical activity level. 147 non-demented older adults (mean age 77 years; 57% female) participated. Participants were instructed to make speeded responses to visual, somatosensory, and visual-somatosensory (VS) stimuli. Depending on the magnitude of the individuals' RT facilitation, participants were classified into a MSI or NO MSI group. Physical activity was assessed using a validated physical activity scale. As predicted, RTs to VS stimuli were significantly shorter than those elicited to constituent unisensory conditions. Multisensory RT facilitation was a significant predictor of total number of physical activity days per month, with individuals in the NO MSI group reporting greater engagement in physical activities compared to those requiring greater RT facilitation.

  18. Physical map of the centromeric region of human chromosome 7: relationship between two distinct alpha satellite arrays.

    PubMed Central

    Wevrick, R; Willard, H F

    1991-01-01

    A long-range physical map of the centromeric region of human chromosome 7 has been constructed in order to define the region containing sequences with potential involvement in centromere function. The map is centered around alpha satellite DNA, a family of tandemly repeated DNA forming arrays of hundreds to thousands of kilobasepairs at the primary constriction of every human chromosome. Two distinct alpha satellite arrays (the loci D7Z1 and D7Z2) have previously been localized to chromosome 7. Detailed one- and two- locus maps of the chromosome 7 centromere have been constructed. Our data indicate that D7Z1 and D7Z2 arrays are not interspersed with each other but are both present on a common Mlu I restriction fragment estimated to be 3500 kb and 5500 kb on two different chromosome 7's investigated. These long-range maps, combined with previous measurements of the D7Z1 and D7Z2 array lengths, are used to construct a consensus map of the centromere of chromosome 7. The analysis used to construct the map provides, by extension, a framework for analysis of the structure of DNA in the centromeric regions of other human and mammalian chromosomes. Images PMID:2041770

  19. Using Computer-Assisted Argumentation Mapping to develop effective argumentation skills in high school advanced placement physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heglund, Brian

    Educators recognize the importance of reasoning ability for development of critical thinking skills, conceptual change, metacognition, and participation in 21st century society. There is a recognized need for students to improve their skills of argumentation, however, argumentation is not explicitly taught outside logic and philosophy---subjects that are not part of the K-12 curriculum. One potential way of supporting the development of argumentation skills in the K-12 context is through incorporating Computer-Assisted Argument Mapping to evaluate arguments. This quasi-experimental study tested the effects of such argument mapping software and was informed by the following two research questions: 1. To what extent does the collaborative use of Computer-Assisted Argumentation Mapping to evaluate competing theories influence the critical thinking skill of argument evaluation, metacognitive awareness, and conceptual knowledge acquisition in high school Advanced Placement physics, compared to the more traditional method of text tables that does not employ Computer-Assisted Argumentation Mapping? 2. What are the student perceptions of the pros and cons of argument evaluation in the high school Advanced Placement physics environment? This study examined changes in critical thinking skills, including argumentation evaluation skills, as well as metacognitive awareness and conceptual knowledge, in two groups: a treatment group using Computer-Assisted Argumentation Mapping to evaluate physics arguments, and a comparison group using text tables to evaluate physics arguments. Quantitative and qualitative methods for collecting and analyzing data were used to answer the research questions. Quantitative data indicated no significant difference between the experimental groups, and qualitative data suggested students perceived pros and cons of argument evaluation in the high school Advanced Placement physics environment, such as self-reported sense of improvement in argument

  20. Constructing a new integrated genetic linkage map and mapping quantitative trait loci for vegetative mycelium growth rate in Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wen-Bing; Liu, Wei; Lu, Ying-Ying; Bian, Yin-Bing; Zhou, Yan; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Cheung, Man Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2014-03-01

    The most saturated linkage map for Lentinula edodes to date was constructed based on a monokaryotic population of 146 single spore isolates (SSIs) using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), insertion-deletion (InDel) markers, and the mating-type loci. Five hundred and twenty-four markers were located on 13 linkage groups (LGs). The map spanned a total length of 1006.1 cM, with an average marker spacing of 2.0 cM. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping was utilized to uncover the loci regulating and controlling the vegetative mycelium growth rate on various synthetic media, and complex medium for commercial cultivation of L. edodes. Two and 13 putative QTLs, identified respectively in the monokaryotic population and two testcross dikaryotic populations, were mapped on seven different LGs. Several vegetative mycelium growth rate-related QTLs uncovered here were clustered on LG4 (Qmgr1, Qdgr1, Qdgr2 and Qdgr9) and LG6 (Qdgr3, Qdgr4 and Qdgr5), implying the presence of main genomic areas responsible for growth rate regulation and control. The QTL hotspot region on LG4 was found to be in close proximity to the region containing the mating-type A (MAT-A) locus. Moreover, Qdgr2 on LG4 was detected on different media, contributing 8.07 %-23.71 % of the phenotypic variation. The present study provides essential information for QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in L. edodes.

  1. Retention of Differential and Integral Calculus: A Case Study of a University Student in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukic Matic, Ljerka; Dahl, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a study on retention of differential and integral calculus concepts of a second-year student of physical chemistry at a Danish university. The focus was on what knowledge the student retained 14 months after the course and on what effect beliefs about mathematics had on the retention. We argue that if a student can quickly…

  2. Effects of Integrated Physical Exercises and Gestures on Preschool Children's Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavilidi, Myrto-Foteini; Okely, Anthony D.; Chandler, Paul; Cliff, Dylan P.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that integrating human movement into a cognitive learning task can be effective for learning due to its cognitive and physiological effects. In this study, the learning effects of enacting words through whole-body movements (i.e., physical exercise) and part-body movements (i.e., gestures) were investigated in a foreign language…

  3. Integration of Information and Communication Technology and Pupils' Motivation in a Physical Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legrain, Pascal; Gillet, Nicolas; Gernigon, Christophe; Lafreniere, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an integrative model regarding the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on achievement in physical education. Pupils' perceptions of autonomy-support from teacher, satisfaction of basic psychological needs, and self-determined motivation were considered to mediate the impact of ICT on…

  4. The integral fast reactor (IFR) concept: Physics of operation and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D.C.; Chang, Y.I.

    1987-01-01

    The IFR concept employs a pool layout, a U/Pu/Zr metal alloy fuel and a closed fuel cycle based on pyrometallurgical reprocessing and injection casting refabrication. The reactor physics issues of designing for inherent safety and for a closed fissile self-sufficient integral fuel cycle with uranium startup and potential actinide transmutation are discussed.

  5. Solid-state NMR analysis of soil organic matter fractions from integrated physical-chemical extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) are usually extracted from soil by either physical (size, density) or chemical (e.g., base, acid) procedures. In this study we used 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to chemically characterize the fractions that were obtained by an integrated pr...

  6. Living Arrangements, Social Integration, and Loneliness in Later Life: The Case of Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite the theoretical linkages between household composition and social integration, relatively limited research has considered how living arrangements affect risk for loneliness in later life. Prior work has also failed to consider whether physical disability moderates this potentially important relationship. Using data from a sample of older…

  7. Conceptual Integration of Hybridization by Algerian Students Intending to Teach Physical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salah, Hazzi; Dumon, Alain

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to assess the difficulties encountered by students of the Ecole Normale Superieure of Kouba (Algeria) intending to teach physical science in the integration of the hybridization of atomic orbitals. It is a concept that they should use in describing the formation of molecular orbitals ([sigma] and [pi]) in organic chemistry and gaps…

  8. Lysozyme Thermal Denaturation and Self-Interaction: Four Integrated Thermodynamic Experiments for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Schaefle, Nathaniel J.; Muth, Gregory W.; Miessler, Gary L.; Clark, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an effort to infuse our physical chemistry laboratory with biologically relevant, investigative experiments, we detail four integrated thermodynamic experiments that characterize the denaturation (or unfolding) and self-interaction of hen egg white lysozyme as a function of pH and ionic strength. Students first use Protein Explorer to…

  9. Physical Integration and Social Segregation of Northern Negro College Students (1953, 1963 and 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    Extensive observations of the pattern of seating by Negro and white college students in the cafeterias of Brooklyn College (1953) and City College of New York (1963 and 1965) revealed consistent isolation of the Negro students. This pattern of social (self) segregation existed within environments which have always been physically integrated and…

  10. Abstract Applets: A Method for Integrating Numerical Problem Solving into the Undergraduate Physics Curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E

    2003-02-13

    In upper-division undergraduate physics courses, it is desirable to give numerical problem-solving exercises integrated naturally into weekly problem sets. I explain a method for doing this that makes use of the built-in class structure of the Java programming language. I also supply a Java class library that can assist instructors in writing programs of this type.

  11. Integrated Science as a Preparation for 'A' Level Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Peter J.

    1985-01-01

    Compared performance in A-level science examinations of students who took an integrated science course (SCISP) with students who studied the separate subjects of physics, chemistry, and biology to 0-level standard. Results show no significant differences between the performance of the two groups. (JN)

  12. Purposeful Movement: The Integration of Physical Activity into a Mathematics Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Kailey; Dinkel, Danae; Schaffer, Connie; Hiveley, Seth; Colpitts, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Classroom physical activity (PA) has been linked to a multitude of health and academic benefits. However, due to barriers such as lack of time and resources many teachers are not implementing classroom PA to the degree they would like to. One innovative solution is to integrate classroom PA into academic concepts. Based on self-determination…

  13. The impact of two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques for the consistent and complete mapping of bacterial genomes: refined physical map of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO.

    PubMed Central

    Römling, U; Tümmler, B

    1991-01-01

    The SpeI/DpnI map of the 5.9 Mb Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO (DSM 1707) genome was refined by two-dimensional (2D) pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques (PFGE) which allow the complete and consistent physical mapping of any bacterial genome of interest. Single restriction digests were repetitively separated by PFGE employing different pulse times and ramps in order to detect all bands with optimum resolution. Fragment order was evaluated from the pattern of 2D PFGE gels: 1. Partial-complete digestion. A partial restriction digest was separated in the first dimension, redigested to completion, and subsequently perpendicularly resolved in the second dimension. 2D-gel comparisons of the ethidium bromide stain of all fragments and of the autoradiogram of end-labeled partial digestion fragments was nearly sufficient for the construction of the macrorestriction map. 2. Reciprocal gels. A complete restriction digest with enzyme A was run in the first dimension, redigested with enzyme B, and separated in the second orthogonal direction. The order of restriction digests was reverse on the second gel. In case of two rare-cutters, fragments were visualized by ethidium bromide staining or hybridization with genomic DNA. If a frequent and a rare cutter were employed, linking fragments were identified by end-labeling of the first digest. 3. A few small fragments were isolated by preparative PFGE and used as a probe for Southern analysis.--38 SpeI and 15 DpnI fragments were positioned on the map. The zero point was relocated to the 'origin of replication'. The anonymous mapping techniques described herein are unbiased by repetitive DNA, unclonable genomic regions, unfavourable location of restriction sites, or cloning artifacts as frequently encountered in other top-down or bottom-up approaches. Images PMID:1905802

  14. Genome-wide linkage analysis and physical mapping of the rippling muscle disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, D.A.; Buist, N.R.M.; Bhaskar, A.C.

    1994-09-01

    Rippling muscle disease (RMD) is an inherited disorder of skeletal muscle in which mechanical stimuli provoke electrically silent contractions. The patient`s symptoms are muscle cramps, pain, and stiffness, particularly during or following exercise. Clinical signs are balling of muscle following percussion, and a characteristic lateral rolling movement of muscle occurring after contraction followed by stretching. We report a new 44-member pedigree segregating RMD as an autosomal dominant trait. A genome-wide genetic linkage study in this family, using a novel approach of testing closely spaced highly polymorphic markers in affected individuals, localized the responsible gene to the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 1 with a maximum multi-point lod score of 3.56 ({theta}=0). In this family, RMD is localized to a 6 cM region near D1S235. Physical mapping of the linked region yielded several positive YAC clones, one of which spans the entire 6 cM distance. Several candidate genes not present in the YAC contig, but in the region of 1q4, have been excluded as causative by either linkage analysis of intragenic microsatellite repeats (alpha-actinin, angiotensinogen) or by SSCP of exons (skeletal muscle alpha-actinin). We studied two previously reported German families for linkage to the same locus and this same area did not co-segregate with the disease, a finding that shows that different genetic defects can cause a similar clinical phenotype (genetic heterogeneity). An understanding of the defect in contraction control within the muscle fibers in this disease may lead to a better understanding of muscle force transduction, intracellular calcium homeostasis, or both.

  15. Preliminary Integrated Geologic Map Databases for the United States: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Dicken, Connie L.; Horton, John D.; Foose, Michael P.; Mueller, Julia A.L.; Hon, Rudi

    2006-01-01

    The rapid growth in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has highlighted the need for regional and national scale digital geologic maps that have standardized information about geologic age and lithology. Such maps can be conveniently used to generate derivative maps for manifold special purposes such as mineral-resource assessment, metallogenic studies, tectonic studies, and environmental research. Although two digital geologic maps (Schruben and others, 1994; Reed and Bush, 2004) of the United States currently exist, their scales (1:2,500,000 and 1:5,000,000) are too general for many regional applications. Most states have digital geologic maps at scales of about 1:500,000, but the databases are not comparably structured and, thus, it is difficult to use the digital database for more than one state at a time. This report describes the result for a seven state region of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to produce a series of integrated and standardized state geologic map databases that cover the entire United States. In 1997, the United States Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program initiated the National Surveys and Analysis (NSA) Project to develop national digital databases. One primary activity of this project was to compile a national digital geologic map database, utilizing state geologic maps, to support studies in the range of 1:250,000- to 1:1,000,000-scale. To accomplish this, state databases were prepared using a common standard for the database structure, fields, attribution, and data dictionaries. For Alaska and Hawaii new state maps are being prepared and the preliminary work for Alaska is being released as a series of 1:250,000 scale quadrangle reports. This document provides background information and documentation for the integrated geologic map databases of this report. This report is one of a series of such reports releasing preliminary standardized geologic map databases for the United States. The data products of the

  16. Construction of an integrated high density simple sequence repeat linkage map in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its applicability.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Sachiko N; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Mori, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Masanobu; Hashizume, Fujio; Tsuji, Tomoko; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Takahashi, Chika; Wada, Tsuyuko; Ono, Akiko; Kawashima, Kumiko; Nakazaki, Naomi; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Watanabe, Akiko; Tabata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is an octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) of the Rosaceae family whose genomic architecture is still controversial. Several recent studies support the AAA'A'BBB'B' model, but its complexity has hindered genetic and genomic analysis of this important crop. To overcome this difficulty and to assist genome-wide analysis of F. × ananassa, we constructed an integrated linkage map by organizing a total of 4474 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers collected from published Fragaria sequences, including 3746 SSR markers [Fragaria vesca expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived SSR markers] derived from F. vesca ESTs, 603 markers (F. × ananassa EST-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa ESTs, and 125 markers (F. × ananassa transcriptome-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa transcripts. Along with the previously published SSR markers, these markers were mapped onto five parent-specific linkage maps derived from three mapping populations, which were then assembled into an integrated linkage map. The constructed map consists of 1856 loci in 28 linkage groups (LGs) that total 2364.1 cM in length. Macrosynteny at the chromosome level was observed between the LGs of F. × ananassa and the genome of F. vesca. Variety distinction on 129 F. × ananassa lines was demonstrated using 45 selected SSR markers.

  17. Rapid mapping of schistosomiasis and other neglected tropical diseases in the context of integrated control programmes in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brooker, S; Kabatereine, N B; Gyapong, J O; Stothard, J R; Utzinger, J

    2009-11-01

    There is growing interest and commitment to the control of schistosomiasis and other so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Resources for control are inevitably limited, necessitating assessment methods that can rapidly and accurately identify and map high-risk communities so that interventions can be targeted in a spatially-explicit and cost-effective manner. Here, we review progress made with (1) mapping schistosomiasis across Africa using available epidemiological data and, more recently, climate-based risk prediction; (2) the development and use of morbidity questionnaires for rapid identification of high-risk communities of urinary schistosomiasis; and (3) innovative sampling-based approaches for intestinal schistosomiasis, using the lot quality assurance sampling technique. Experiences are also presented for the rapid mapping of other NTDs, including onchocerciasis, loiasis and lymphatic filariasis. Future directions for an integrated rapid mapping approach targeting multiple NTDs simultaneously are outlined, including potential challenges in developing an integrated survey tool. The lessons from the mapping of human helminth infections may also be relevant for the rapid mapping of malaria as its control efforts are intensified.

  18. High-definition mapping of retroviral integration sites defines the fate of allogeneic T cells after donor lymphocyte infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Maruggi, Giulietta; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Malani, Nirav; Pellin, Danilo; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Magnani, Zulma; Ciceri, Fabio; Ambrosi, Alessandro; von Kalle, Christof; Bushman, Frederic D; Bonini, Chiara; Schmidt, Manfred; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2010-12-22

    The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing to build a genome-wide, high-definition map of retroviral integration sites in the genome of peripheral blood T cells from two different donors and used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to associate integration clusters to transcriptional activity and to genetic and epigenetic features of the T cell genome. Comparison with matched random controls and with integrations obtained from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells showed that integration clusters occur within chromatin regions bearing epigenetic marks associated with active promoters and regulatory elements in a cell-specific fashion. Analysis of integration sites in T cells obtained ex vivo two months after infusion showed no evidence of integration-related clonal expansion or dominance, but rather loss of cells harboring integration events interfering with RNA post-transcriptional processing. The study shows that high-definition maps of retroviral integration sites are a powerful tool to analyze the fate of genetically modified T cells in patients and the biological consequences of retroviral transduction.

  19. Integrating aeromagnetic and Landsat™ 8 data into subsurface structural mapping of Precambrian basement complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayode, John Stephen; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Abdullah, Khiruddin B.; Khalil, Amin E.

    2017-01-01

    The integration of Aeromagnetic data and remotely sensed imagery with the intents of mapping the subsurface geological structures in part of the South-western basement complex of Nigeria was developed using the PCI Geomatica Software. 2013. The data obtained from the Nigerian Geological Survey Agency; was corrected using Regional Residual Separation of the Total Magnetic field anomalies enhanced, and International Geomagnetic Reference Field removed. The principal objective of this study is, therefore, to introduce a rapid and efficient method of subsurface structural depth estimate and structural index evaluation through the incorporation of the Euler Deconvolution technique into PCI Geomatica 2013 to prospect for subsurface geological structures. The shape and depth of burial helped to define these structures from the regional aeromagnetic map. The method enabled various structural indices to be automatically delineated for an index of between 0.5 SI and 3.0 SI at a maximum depth of 1.1 km that clearly showed the best depths estimate for all the structural indices. The results delineate two major magnetic belts in the area; the first belt shows an elongated ridge-like structure trending mostly along the NorthNortheast-SouthSouthwest and the other anomalies trends primarily in the Northeast, Northwest, Northeast-Southwest parts of the study area that could be attributed to basement complex granitic intrusions from the tectonic history of the area. The majority of the second structures showed various linear structures different from the first structure. Basically, a significant offset was delineated at the core segment of the study area, suggesting a major subsurface geological feature that controls mineralisation in this area.

  20. The Effect of Concept Mapping-Guided Discovery Integrated Teaching Approach on Chemistry Students' Achievement and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatokun, K. V. F.; Eniayeju, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Concept Mapping-Guided Discovery Integrated Teaching Approach on the achievement and retention of chemistry students. The sample comprised 162 Senior Secondary two (SS 2) students drawn from two Science Schools in Nasarawa State, Central Nigeria with equivalent mean scores of 9.68 and 9.49 in their pre-test.…

  1. Physical and Linkage Maps for Drosophila serrata, a Model Species for Studies of Clinal Adaptation and Sexual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Ann J.; Rusuwa, Bosco B.; Blacket, Mark J.; Frentiu, Francesca D.; Sullivan, Mitchell; Foley, Bradley R.; Beatson, Scott; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Chenoweth, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila serrata is a member of the montium group, which contains more than 98 species and until recently was considered a subgroup within the melanogaster group. This Drosophila species is an emerging model system for evolutionary quantitative genetics and has been used in studies of species borders, clinal variation and sexual selection. Despite the importance of D. serrata as a model for evolutionary research, our poor understanding of its genome remains a significant limitation. Here, we provide a first-generation gene-based linkage map and a physical map for this species. Consistent with previous studies of other drosophilids we observed strong conservation of genes within chromosome arms homologous with D. melanogaster but major differences in within-arm synteny. These resources will be a useful complement to ongoing genome sequencing efforts and QTL mapping studies in this species. PMID:22384407

  2. The Potential for Signal Integration and Processing in Interacting Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, John H.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular response to environmental stimuli requires biochemical information processing through which sensory inputs and cellular status are integrated and translated into appropriate responses by way of interacting networks of enzymes. One such network, the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade is a highly conserved signal transduction module that propagates signals from cell surface receptors to various cytosolic and nuclear targets by way of a phosphorylation cascade. We have investigated the potential for signal processing within a network of interacting feed-forward kinase cascades typified by the MAP kinase cascade. A genetic algorithm was used to search for sets of kinetic parameters demonstrating representative key input-output patterns of interest. We discuss two of the networks identified in our study, one implementing the exclusive-or function (XOR) and another implementing what we refer to as an in-band detector (IBD) or two-sided threshold. These examples confirm the potential for logic and amplitude-dependent signal processing in interacting MAP kinase cascades demonstrating limited cross-talk. Specifically, the XOR function allows the network to respond to either one, but not both signals simultaneously, while the IBD permits the network to respond exclusively to signals within a given range of strength, and to suppress signals below as well as above this range. The solution to the XOR problem is interesting in that it requires only two interacting pathways, crosstalk at only one layer, and no feedback or explicit inhibition. These types of responses are not only biologically relevant but constitute signal processing modules that can be combined to create other logical functions and that, in contrast to amplification, cannot be achieved with a single cascade or with two non-interacting cascades. Our computational results revealed surprising similarities between experimental data describing the JNK/MKK4/MKK7 pathway and the solution for

  3. Mapping Depositional Facies on Great Bahama Bank: An Integration of Groundtruthing and Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariss, M.; Purkis, S.; Ellis, J. M.; Swart, P. K.; Reijmer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Great Bahama Bank (GBB) has been used in many models to illustrate depositional facies variation across flat-topped, isolated carbonate platforms. Such models have served as subsurface analogs at a variety of scales. In this presentation we have integrated Landsat TM imagery, a refined bathymetric digital elevation model, and seafloor sample data compiled into ArcGIS and analyzed with eCognition to develop a depositional facies map that is more robust than previous versions. For the portion of the GBB lying to the west of Andros Island, the facies map was generated by pairing an extensive set of GPS-constrained field observations and samples (n=275) (Reijmer et al., 2009, IAS Spec Pub 41) with computer and manual interpretation of the Landsat imagery. For the remainder of the platform, which lacked such rigorous ground-control, the Landsat imagery was segmented into lithotopes - interpreted to be distinct bodies of uniform sediment - using a combination of edge detection, spectral and textural analysis, and manual editing. A map was then developed by assigning lithotopes to facies classes on the basis of lessons derived from the portion of the platform for which we had rigorous conditioning. The new analysis reveals that GBB is essentially a very grainy platform with muddier accumulations only in the lee of substantial island barriers; in this regard Andros Island, which is the largest island on GBB, exerts a direct control over the muddiest portion of GBB. Mudstones, wackestones, and mud-rich packstones cover 7%, 6%, and 15%, respectively, of the GBB platform top. By contrast, mud-poor packstones, grainstones, and rudstones account for 19%, 44%, and 3%, respectively. Of the 44% of the platform-top classified as grainstone, only 4% is composed of 'high-energy' deposits characterized by the development of sandbar complexes. The diversity and size of facies bodies is broadly the same on the eastern and western limb of the GBB platform, though the narrower eastern

  4. Integration of Landsat-based disturbance maps in the Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, S. P.; Cohen, W. B.; Eidenshink, J. C.; Hernandez, A. J.; Huang, C.; Kennedy, R. E.; Moisen, G. G.; Schroeder, T. A.; Stehman, S.; Steinwand, D.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Woodcock, C.; Yang, L.; Yang, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Land cover change can have a profound effect upon an area's natural resources and its role in biogeochemical and hydrological cycles. Many land cover changes processes are sensitive to climate, including: fire; storm damage, and insect activity. Monitoring of both past and ongoing land cover change is critical, particularly as we try to understand the impact of a changing climate on the natural systems we manage. The Landsat series of satellites, which initially launched in 1972, has allowed land observation at spatial and spectral resolutions appropriate for identification of many types of land cover change. Over the years, and particularly since the opening of the Landsat archive in 2008, many approaches have been developed to meet individual monitoring needs. Algorithms vary by the cover type targeted, the rate of change sought, and the period between observations. The Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS) is envisioned as a sustained, inter-agency monitoring program that brings together and operationally provides the best available land cover change maps over the United States. Expanding upon the successful USGS/Forest Service Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project, LCMS is designed to serve a variety of research and management communities. The LCMS Science Team is currently assessing the relative strengths of a variety of leading change detection approaches, primarily emphasizing Landsat observations. Using standardized image pre-processing methods, maps produced by these algorithms have been compared at intensive validation sites across the country. Additionally, LCMS has taken steps toward a data-mining framework, in which ensembles of algorithm outputs are used with non-parametric models to create integrated predictions of change across a variety of scenarios and change dynamics. We present initial findings from the LCMS Science Team, including validation results from individual algorithms and assessment of initial 'integrated' products from the

  5. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of a high quality reference sequence is a daunting task in crops like wheat with large (~17Gb), highly repetitive (>80%) and polyploid genome. To achieve complete sequence assembly of such genomes, development of a high quality physical map is a necessary first step. However, due to the lack of recombination in certain regions of the chromosomes, genetic mapping, which uses recombination frequency to map marker loci, alone is not sufficient to develop high quality marker scaffolds for a sequence ready physical map. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping, which uses radiation induced chromosomal breaks, has proven to be a successful approach for developing marker scaffolds for sequence assembly in animal systems. Here, the development and characterization of a RH panel for the mapping of D-genome of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii is reported. Results Radiation dosages of 350 and 450 Gy were optimized for seed irradiation of a synthetic hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat with the D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. The surviving plants after irradiation were crossed to durum wheat (AABB), to produce pentaploid RH1s (AABBD), which allows the simultaneous mapping of the whole D-genome. A panel of 1,510 RH1 plants was obtained, of which 592 plants were generated from the mature RH1 seeds, and 918 plants were rescued through embryo culture due to poor germination (<3%) of mature RH1 seeds. This panel showed a homogenous marker loss (2.1%) after screening with SSR markers uniformly covering all the D-genome chromosomes. Different marker systems mostly detected different lines with deletions. Using markers covering known distances, the mapping resolution of this RH panel was estimated to be <140kb. Analysis of only 16 RH lines carrying deletions on chromosome 2D resulted in a physical map with cM/cR ratio of 1:5.2 and 15 distinct bins. Additionally, with this small set of lines, almost all the tested ESTs could be mapped. A set of 399 most informative RH

  6. ConMap: Investigating New Computer-Based Approaches to Assessing Conceptual Knowledge Structure in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Ian D.

    There is a growing consensus among educational researchers that traditional problem-based assessments are not effective tools for diagnosing a student's knowledge state and for guiding pedagogical intervention, and that new tools grounded in the results of cognitive science research are needed. The ConMap ("Conceptual Mapping") project, described…

  7. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of ``physical linking clones`` that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the ``rare-cutter`` endonucleases.

  8. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of physical linking clones'' that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the rare-cutter'' endonucleases.

  9. Construction, alignment and analysis of twelve framework physical maps that represent the ten genome types of the genus Oryza

    PubMed Central

    Kim, HyeRan; Hurwitz, Bonnie; Yu, Yeisoo; Collura, Kristi; Gill, Navdeep; SanMiguel, Phillip; Mullikin, James C; Maher, Christopher; Nelson, William; Wissotski, Marina; Braidotti, Michele; Kudrna, David; Goicoechea, José Luis; Stein, Lincoln; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, Scott A; Soderlund, Carol; Wing, Rod A

    2008-01-01

    We describe the establishment and analysis of a genus-wide comparative framework composed of 12 bacterial artificial chromosome fingerprint and end-sequenced physical maps representing the 10 genome types of Oryza aligned to the O. sativa ssp. japonica reference genome sequence. Over 932 Mb of end sequence was analyzed for repeats, simple sequence repeats, miRNA and single nucleotide variations, providing the most extensive analysis of Oryza sequence to date. PMID:18304353

  10. Construction, alignment and analysis of twelve framework physical maps that represent the ten genome types of the genus Oryza.

    PubMed

    Kim, HyeRan; Hurwitz, Bonnie; Yu, Yeisoo; Collura, Kristi; Gill, Navdeep; SanMiguel, Phillip; Mullikin, James C; Maher, Christopher; Nelson, William; Wissotski, Marina; Braidotti, Michele; Kudrna, David; Goicoechea, José Luis; Stein, Lincoln; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, Scott A; Soderlund, Carol; Wing, Rod A

    2008-01-01

    We describe the establishment and analysis of a genus-wide comparative framework composed of 12 bacterial artificial chromosome fingerprint and end-sequenced physical maps representing the 10 genome types of Oryza aligned to the O. sativa ssp. japonica reference genome sequence. Over 932 Mb of end sequence was analyzed for repeats, simple sequence repeats, miRNA and single nucleotide variations, providing the most extensive analysis of Oryza sequence to date.

  11. Tn5. 7 construction and physical mapping of pRPS404 containing photosynthetic genes from Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Zsebo, K.M.; Wu, F.; Hearst J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A transposon, Tn5.7, has been constructed incorporating the transposition functions of Tn5 and the antibiotic-resistance factors from Tn7. It was used to mutagenize the plasmid pRPS404 which contains the photosynthetic genes of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and is Kanamycin. In conjunction with the mutagenesis, physical mapping of the restriction endonuclease recognition sites for XhoI. Bg/II, KnpI, and SstI has been accomplished. 13 references, 2 figures.

  12. The physical map of wheat chromosome 1BS provides insights into its gene space organization and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The wheat genome sequence is an essential tool for advanced genomic research and improvements. The generation of a high-quality wheat genome sequence is challenging due to its complex 17 Gb polyploid genome. To overcome these difficulties, sequencing through the construction of BAC-based physical maps of individual chromosomes is employed by the wheat genomics community. Here, we present the construction of the first comprehensive physical map of chromosome 1BS, and illustrate its unique gene space organization and evolution. Results Fingerprinted BAC clones were assembled into 57 long scaffolds, anchored and ordered with 2,438 markers, covering 83% of chromosome 1BS. The BAC-based chromosome 1BS physical map and gene order of the orthologous regions of model grass species were consistent, providing strong support for the reliability of the chromosome 1BS assembly. The gene space for chromosome 1BS spans the entire length of the chromosome arm, with 76% of the genes organized in small gene islands, accompanied by a two-fold increase in gene density from the centromere to the telomere. Conclusions This study provides new evidence on common and chromosome-specific features in the organization and evolution of the wheat genome, including a non-uniform distribution of gene density along the centromere-telomere axis, abundance of non-syntenic genes, the degree of colinearity with other grass genomes and a non-uniform size expansion along the centromere-telomere axis compared with other model cereal genomes. The high-quality physical map constructed in this study provides a solid basis for the assembly of a reference sequence of chromosome 1BS and for breeding applications. PMID:24359668

  13. Physical and functional mapping of Tn2603, a transposon encoding ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and mercury resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Tanaka, M; Baba, R; Yamagishi, S

    1981-01-01

    A map of cleavage sites for restriction endonuclease EcoRI, BamHI, HindIII, and SalI on Tn2603, a transposon encoding resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and mercury, was constructed by an analysis of restriction cleavage patterns of plasmid pMK1.::Tn2603 and its deletion derivative. By cloning the fragments generated from pMK1.::Tn2603 with these restriction endonucleases to a pACYC184 plasmid vehicle, the regions necessary for expression of resistance were located on the restriction cleavage map of Tn2603. Ampicillin, streptomycin, and sulfonamide-resistance genes were mapped in a cluster on the region between the center and the right and the mercury-resistance gene was located to the left of the map. The final functional map of Tn2603 was compared with those of Tn4 and Tn21 and the evolutional relationships between them were discussed.

  14. Mapping wildland fuels for fire management across multiple scales: integrating remote sensing, GIS, and biophysical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keane, Robert E.; Burgan, Robert E.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel maps are essential for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. However, fuel mapping is an extremely difficult and complex process requiring expertise in remotely sensed image classification, fire behavior, fuels modeling, ecology, and geographical information systems (GIS). This paper first presents the challenges of mapping fuels: canopy concealment, fuelbed complexity, fuel type diversity, fuel variability, and fuel model generalization. Then, four approaches to mapping fuels are discussed with examples provided from the literature: (1) field reconnaissance; (2) direct mapping methods; (3) indirect mapping methods; and (4) gradient modeling. A fuel mapping method is proposed that uses current remote sensing and image processing technology. Future fuel mapping needs are also discussed which include better field data and fuel models, accurate GIS reference layers, improved satellite imagery, and comprehensive ecosystem models.

  15. Path integration and cognitive mapping in a continuous attractor neural network model.

    PubMed

    Samsonovich, A; McNaughton, B L

    1997-08-01

    A minimal synaptic architecture is proposed for how the brain might perform path integration by computing the next internal representation of self-location from the current representation and from the perceived velocity of motion. In the model, a place-cell assembly called a "chart" contains a two-dimensional attractor set called an "attractor map" that can be used to represent coordinates in any arbitrary environment, once associative binding has occurred between chart locations and sensory inputs. In hippocampus, there are different spatial relations among place fields in different environments and behavioral contexts. Thus, the same units may participate in many charts, and it is shown that the number of uncorrelated charts that can be encoded in the same recurrent network is potentially quite large. According to this theory, the firing of a given place cell is primarily a cooperative effect of the activity of its neighbors on the currently active chart. Therefore, it is not particularly useful to think of place cells as encoding any particular external object or event. Because of its recurrent connections, hippocampal field CA3 is proposed as a possible location for this "multichart" architecture; however, other implementations in anatomy would not invalidate the main concepts. The model is implemented numerically both as a network of integrate-and-fire units and as a "macroscopic" (with respect to the space of states) description of the system, based on a continuous approximation defined by a system of stochastic differential equations. It provides an explanation for a number of hitherto perplexing observations on hippocampal place fields, including doubling, vanishing, reshaping in distorted environments, acquiring directionality in a two-goal shuttling task, rapid formation in a novel environment, and slow rotation after disorientation. The model makes several new predictions about the expected properties of hippocampal place cells and other cells of the

  16. ArrayXPath: mapping and visualizing microarray gene-expression data with integrated biological pathway resources using Scalable Vector Graphics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee-Joon; Kim, Mingoo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Ju Han

    2004-07-01

    Biological pathways can provide key information on the organization of biological systems. ArrayXPath (http://www.snubi.org/software/ArrayXPath/) is a web-based service for mapping and visualizing microarray gene-expression data for integrated biological pathway resources using Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). By integrating major bio-databases and searching pathway resources, ArrayXPath automatically maps different types of identifiers from microarray probes and pathway elements. When one inputs gene-expression clusters, ArrayXPath produces a list of the best matching pathways for each cluster. We applied Fisher's exact test and the false discovery rate (FDR) to evaluate the statistical significance of the association between a cluster and a pathway while correcting the multiple-comparison problem. ArrayXPath produces Javascript-enabled SVGs for web-enabled interactive visualization of pathways integrated with gene-expression profiles.

  17. Mapping the Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies by Means of Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairós, L. M.; Caon, N.; Weilbacher, P.; Papaderos, P.; García-Lorenzo, B.

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal-poor and gas-rich systems undergoing intense, spatially extended star-forming activity. These galaxies offer a unique opportunity to investigate dwarf galaxy formation and evolution, and probe violent star formation and its implications on the chemical, dynamical and structural properties of low-mass extragalactic systems near and far. Several fundamental questions in BCD research, such as their star formation histories and the mechanisms that control their cyclic starburst activity, are still far from well understood. In order to improve our understanding on BCD evolution, we are carrying out a comprehensive Integral Field Spectroscopic (IFS) survey of a large sample of BCDs. Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy provides simultaneously spectral and spatial information, allowing, in just one shot, to study the morphology and evolutionary status of the stellar component, and the physical properties of the warm interstellar medium (e.g., extinction, chemical abundances, kinematics). This ongoing IFS survey will supply much needed local templates that will ease the interpretation of IFS data for intermediate and high-redshift star-forming galaxies.

  18. Living arrangements, social integration, and loneliness in later life: the case of physical disability.

    PubMed

    Russell, David

    2009-12-01

    Despite the theoretical linkages between household composition and social integration, relatively limited research has considered how living arrangements affect risk for loneliness in later life. Prior work has also failed to consider whether physical disability moderates this potentially important relationship. Using data from a sample of older adults with and without a physical disability (N = 868), this study aims to (1) document variations in loneliness across living arrangements, (2) assess whether any observed association varies by physical disability status, and (3) evaluate the mediating role of social integration and social support. Results reveal that those living alone or with people other than a spouse (children, extended family members) report greater loneliness than those living with a spouse. However the magnitude of these differences is greater for older adults with a physical disability. Measures of social integration and social support attenuated, but did not fully explain, inter-household variations in loneliness. These findings point to the independent significance of living arrangements for experiences of loneliness in later life among both disabled and nondisabled adults.

  19. Physical map, marker order, and YAC contig of an 11 cM region of 5q31 involved in myeloid leukemia and limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Horrigan, S.K.; Ramesar, R.S.; Yamaoka, L.H.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome band 5q31 contains a large number of disease genes including those for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1 (LGM1), an autosomal dominant form of hereditary deafness, corneal dystrophies, as well as a putative tumor suppressor gene involved in myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia. To facilitate the identification of these genes, we prepared a YAC contig spanning the region from IL9 to D5S434. This was done with reference to a composite map consisting of markers which had been ordered physically by FISH, which was integrated with CEPH and CHLC markers that had been ordered genetically. These markers were used to screen the CEPH megaYAC library, and also to extract YACs from the CEPH-genethon physical map data base. YAC overlaps were used to confirm marker order and localize additional markers to the region. This YAC contig spans approximately 11 cM and contains 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers, 12 non-polymorphic STS markers and 6 known genes (including IL9, CDC25, EGR1, CD14, FGF1, GRL). A total of 51 YACs were isolated using these markers. YAC overlaps were identified by STS content and Alu-PCR hybridization. Thirty nine YACs fall within the minimum deleted region involved in acute myeloid leukemia (IL9 to D5S166 interval); these YACs were further used to order 10 microsatellite and 8 STS markers that had been regionally localized. This map and the new markers will be used to facilitate the search for candidate genes for the myeloid leukemia tumor suppressor and for LGM1.

  20. Clinical data integration of distributed data sources using Health Level Seven (HL7) v3-RIM mapping

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health information exchange and health information integration has become one of the top priorities for healthcare systems across institutions and hospitals. Most organizations and establishments implement health information exchange and integration in order to support meaningful information retrieval among their disparate healthcare systems. The challenges that prevent efficient health information integration for heterogeneous data sources are the lack of a common standard to support mapping across distributed data sources and the numerous and diverse healthcare domains. Health Level Seven (HL7) is a standards development organization which creates standards, but is itself not the standard. They create the Reference Information Model. RIM is developed by HL7's technical committees. It is a standardized abstract representation of HL7 data across all the domains of health care. In this article, we aim to present a design and a prototype implementation of HL7 v3-RIM mapping for information integration of distributed clinical data sources. The implementation enables the user to retrieve and search information that has been integrated using HL7 v3-RIM technology from disparate health care systems. Method and results We designed and developed a prototype implementation of HL7 v3-RIM mapping function to integrate distributed clinical data sources using R-MIM classes from HL7 v3-RIM as a global view along with a collaborative centralized web-based mapping tool to tackle the evolution of both global and local schemas. Our prototype was implemented and integrated with a Clinical Database management Systems CDMS as a plug-in module. We tested the prototype system with some use case scenarios for distributed clinical data sources across several legacy CDMS. The results have been effective in improving information delivery, completing tasks that would have been otherwise difficult to accomplish, and reducing the time required to finish tasks which are used in

  1. The quench map in an integrable classical field theory: nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudrelier, Vincent; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics obtained by an abrupt change (a quench) in the parameters of an integrable classical field theory, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We first consider explicit one-soliton examples, which we fully describe by solving the direct part of the inverse scattering problem. We then develop some aspects of the general theory using elements of the inverse scattering method. For this purpose, we introduce the quench map which acts on the space of scattering data and represents the change of parameter with fixed field configuration (initial condition). We describe some of its analytic properties by implementing a higher level version of the inverse scattering method, and we discuss the applications of Darboux-Bäcklund transformations, Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equations and the Rosales series solution to a related, dual quench problem. Finally, we comment on the interplay between quantum and classical tools around the theme of quenches and on the usefulness of the quantization of our classical approach to the quantum quench problem.

  2. An integrated map of genetic variation from 1,092 human genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Through characterising the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help understand the genetic contribution to disease. We describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome and exome sequencing. By developing methodologies to integrate information across multiple algorithms and diverse data sources we provide a validated haplotype map of 38 million SNPs, 1.4 million indels and over 14 thousand larger deletions. We show that individuals from different populations carry different profiles of rare and common variants and that low-frequency variants show substantial geographic differentiation, which is further increased by the action of purifying selection. We show that evolutionary conservation and coding consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways and that each individual harbours hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as transcription-factor-motif disrupting changes. This resource, which captures up to 98% of accessible SNPs at a frequency of 1% in populations of medical genetics focus, enables analysis of common and low-frequency variants in individuals from diverse, including admixed, populations. PMID:23128226

  3. An integrated map of genetic variation from 1,092 human genomes.

    PubMed

    Abecasis, Goncalo R; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D; DePristo, Mark A; Durbin, Richard M; Handsaker, Robert E; Kang, Hyun Min; Marth, Gabor T; McVean, Gil A

    2012-11-01

    By characterizing the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help to understand the genetic contribution to disease. Here we describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome and exome sequencing. By developing methods to integrate information across several algorithms and diverse data sources, we provide a validated haplotype map of 38 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1.4 million short insertions and deletions, and more than 14,000 larger deletions. We show that individuals from different populations carry different profiles of rare and common variants, and that low-frequency variants show substantial geographic differentiation, which is further increased by the action of purifying selection. We show that evolutionary conservation and coding consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways, and that each individual contains hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as motif-disrupting changes in transcription-factor-binding sites. This resource, which captures up to 98% of accessible single nucleotide polymorphisms at a frequency of 1% in related populations, enables analysis of common and low-frequency variants in individuals from diverse, including admixed, populations.

  4. Model Integration for Real-Time Flood Forecasting Inundation Mapping for Nashville Tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, W.; Moran, B.; LaRosa, J.

    2012-12-01

    In May of 2010, between 14 and 19 inches of rain fell on the Nashville metro area in two days, quickly overwhelming tributaries to the Cumberland River and causing wide-spread, serious flooding. Tractor-trailers and houses were seen floating down Mill Creek, a primary tributary in the south eastern area of Nashville. Twenty-six people died and over 2 billion dollars in damage occurred as a result of the flood. Since that time, several other significant rainfall events have occurred in the area. Emergency responders were unable to deliver aid or preventive measures to areas under threat of flooding (or under water) in time to reduce damages because they could not identify those areas far enough in advance of the floods. Nashville Metro Water, the National Weather Service, the US Geological Survey and the US Army Corps of Engineers established a joint venture to seek ways to better forecast short-term flood events in the region. One component of this effort was a pilot project to compute and display real time inundation maps for Mill Creek, a 108 square-mile basin to the south east of Nashville. HEC-RTS (Real-Time Simulation) was used to assimilate and integrate the hydrologic model HEC-HMS with the hydraulics model HEC-RAS and the inundation mapping program HEC-RAS Mapper. The USGS, along with the other agencies, installed additional precipitation and flow/stage gages in the area. Measurements are recorded every 5-30 minutes and are posted on the USGS NWIS database, which are downloaded by HEC-RTS. Using this data in combination with QPFs (Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts) from the NWS, HEC-RTS applies HEC-HMS and HEC-RAS to estimate current and forecast stage hydrographs. The peak stages are read by HEC-RAS Mapper to compute inundation depths for 6 by 6 foot grid cells. HEC-RTS displays the inundation on a high resolution MrSid aerial photo, along with subbasin boundary, street and various other layers. When a user zooms in and "mouses" over a cell, the

  5. Physical and perceptual factors shape the neural mechanisms that integrate audiovisual signals in speech comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lee, HweeLing; Noppeney, Uta

    2011-08-03

    Face-to-face communication challenges the human brain to integrate information from auditory and visual senses with linguistic representations. Yet the role of bottom-up physical (spectrotemporal structure) input and top-down linguistic constraints in shaping the neural mechanisms specialized for integrating audiovisual speech signals are currently unknown. Participants were presented with speech and sinewave speech analogs in visual, auditory, and audiovisual modalities. Before the fMRI study, they were trained to perceive physically identical sinewave speech analogs as speech (SWS-S) or nonspeech (SWS-N). Comparing audiovisual integration (interactions) of speech, SWS-S, and SWS-N revealed a posterior-anterior processing gradient within the left superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG): Bilateral posterior STS/STG integrated audiovisual inputs regardless of spectrotemporal structure or speech percept; in left mid-STS, the integration profile was primarily determined by the spectrotemporal structure of the signals; more anterior STS regions discarded spectrotemporal structure and integrated audiovisual signals constrained by stimulus intelligibility and the availability of linguistic representations. In addition to this "ventral" processing stream, a "dorsal" circuitry encompassing posterior STS/STG and left inferior frontal gyrus differentially integrated audiovisual speech and SWS signals. Indeed, dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian model comparison provided strong evidence for a parallel processing structure encompassing a ventral and a dorsal stream with speech intelligibility training enhancing the connectivity between posterior and anterior STS/STG. In conclusion, audiovisual speech comprehension emerges in an interactive process with the integration of auditory and visual signals being progressively constrained by stimulus intelligibility along the STS and spectrotemporal structure in a dorsal fronto-temporal circuitry.

  6. Integration of sewer system maps in topographically based sub-basin delineation in suburban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowfsky, Sonja; Branger, Flora; Braud, Isabelle; Rodriguez, Fabrice

    2010-05-01

    " can be made. It encompasses the whole connected sewer system and the topographic catchment boundary. The area of interest is therefore defined. The next step is the determination of the extended drainage network, consisting of the natural river, ditches, combined and separated sewer systems and retention basins. This requires a detailed analysis of sewer system data, field work (mapping of ditches and inlets into the natural river). Contacts with local authorities are also required to keep up-to-date about recent changes. Pure wastewater and drinking water pipes are not integrated in the drainage network. In order to have a unique drainage network for the model, choices might have to be made in case of several coexisting drainage pipes. The urban sub-basins are then delineated with the help of a cadastral map (Rodriguez et al., 2003) or an aerial photography. Each cadastral unit is connected to the closest drainage pipe, following the principle of proximity and gravity. The assembly of all cadastral units connected to one network reach represents one urban sub-basin. The sub-basins in the rural part are calculated using the d8 flow direction and watershed delineation algorithm with "stream burning" (Hutchinson, 1989). One sub-basin is delineated for each reach of the extended drainage network. Some manual corrections of the calculated sub-basins are necessary. Finally, the urban and rural sub-basins are merged by subtraction of the urban area from the rural area and subsequent union of both maps. This method was applied to the Chaudanne catchment, a sub-basin of the Yzeron catchment (ca. 4 km2) in the suburban region of Lyon city, France. The method leads to a 30 % extended catchment area, as compared to the topographic catchment area. For each river inlet the sub-basin area could be determined, as well as for each retention basin. This information can be directly used for the dimensioning of retention basins, pipe diameters, etc.

  7. Integrating Spherical Panoramas and Maps for Visualization of Cultural Heritage Objects Using Virtual Reality Technology.

    PubMed

    Koeva, Mila; Luleva, Mila; Maldjanski, Plamen

    2017-04-11

    Development and virtual representation of 3D models of Cultural Heritage (CH) objects has triggered great interest over the past decade. The main reason for this is the rapid development in the fields of photogrammetry and remote sensing, laser scanning, and computer vision. The advantages of using 3D models for restoration, preservation, and documentation of valuable historical and architectural objects have been numerously demonstrated by scientists in the field. Moreover, 3D model visualization in virtual reality has been recognized as an efficient, fast, and easy way of representing a variety of objects worldwide for present-day users, who have stringent requirements and high expectations. However, the main focus of recent research is the visual, geometric, and textural characteristics of a single concrete object, while integration of large numbers of models with additional information-such as historical overview, detailed description, and location-are missing. Such integrated information can be beneficial, not only for tourism but also for accurate documentation. For that reason, we demonstrate in this paper an integration of high-resolution spherical panoramas, a variety of maps, GNSS, sound, video, and text information for representation of numerous cultural heritage objects. These are then displayed in a web-based portal with an intuitive interface. The users have the opportunity to choose freely from the provided information, and decide for themselves what is interesting to visit. Based on the created web application, we provide suggestions and guidelines for similar studies. We selected objects, which are located in Bulgaria-a country with thousands of years of history and cultural heritage dating back to ancient civilizations. The methods used in this research are applicable for any type of spherical or cylindrical images and can be easily followed and applied in various domains. After a visual and metric assessment of the panoramas and the evaluation of

  8. Do Humans Integrate Routes Into a Cognitive Map? Map- Versus Landmark-Based Navigation of Novel Shortcuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foo, Patrick; Warren, William H.; Duchon, Andrew; Tarr, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Do humans integrate experience on specific routes into metric survey knowledge of the environment, or do they depend on a simpler strategy of landmark navigation? The authors tested this question using a novel shortcut paradigm during walking in a virtual environment. The authors find that participants could not take successful shortcuts in a…

  9. Efficacy of an Integrated School Curriculum Pedometer Intervention to Enhance Physical Activity and to Reduce Weight Status in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Michael; Birch, Samantha; Woodfield, Lorayne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an integrated school curriculum pedometer intervention on children's physical activity and weight status. Following ethics approval and informed consent, 59 children (22 boys, 27 girls, aged 10-11) from a primary school in central England completed a four-week integrated physical activity…

  10. Mapping University Students' Epistemic Framing of Computational Physics Using Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodin, Madelen

    2012-01-01

    Solving physics problem in university physics education using a computational approach requires knowledge and skills in several domains, for example, physics, mathematics, programming, and modeling. These competences are in turn related to students' beliefs about the domains as well as about learning. These knowledge and beliefs components are…

  11. Design and implementation of space physics multi-model application integration based on web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenping; Zou, Ziming

    With the development of research on space environment and space science, how to develop network online computing environment of space weather, space environment and space physics models for Chinese scientific community is becoming more and more important in recent years. Currently, There are two software modes on space physics multi-model application integrated system (SPMAIS) such as C/S and B/S. the C/S mode which is traditional and stand-alone, demands a team or workshop from many disciplines and specialties to build their own multi-model application integrated system, that requires the client must be deployed in different physical regions when user visits the integrated system. Thus, this requirement brings two shortcomings: reducing the efficiency of researchers who use the models to compute; inconvenience of accessing the data. Therefore, it is necessary to create a shared network resource access environment which could help users to visit the computing resources of space physics models through the terminal quickly for conducting space science research and forecasting spatial environment. The SPMAIS develops high-performance, first-principles in B/S mode based on computational models of the space environment and uses these models to predict "Space Weather", to understand space mission data and to further our understanding of the solar system. the main goal of space physics multi-model application integration system (SPMAIS) is to provide an easily and convenient user-driven online models operating environment. up to now, the SPMAIS have contained dozens of space environment models , including international AP8/AE8、IGRF、T96 models,and solar proton prediction model、geomagnetic transmission model,etc. which are developed by Chinese scientists. another function of SPMAIS is to integrate space observation data sets which offers input data for models online high-speed computing. In this paper, service-oriented architecture (SOA) concept that divides

  12. The Effects of Basic Gymnastics Training Integrated with Physical Education Courses on Selected Motor Performance Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpkaya, Ufuk

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of gymnastics training integrated with physical education courses on selected motor performance variables in seven year old girls. Subjects were divided into two groups: (1) control group (N=15, X=7.56 plus or minus 0.46 year old); (2) gymnastics group (N=16, X=7.60 plus or minus 0.50 year…

  13. High resolution physical mapping of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) region utilizing YAC, PAC, and cosmid clones

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, N.; Yaraghi, Z.; Besner, A.

    1994-09-01

    The childhood SMAs are a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by anterior horn cells degeneration resulting in muscular wasting and weakness. All three types have been mapped to a 1.4 Mb region of 5q13.1 flanked centromerically by D5S435 and telomerically by D5S557. Several groups including our own have generated YAC contigs of the region documenting deletion, duplications and repetitive sequences. We have generated a higher resolution contiguous array of cosmid clones encompassing the region containing the microsatellites (MSRs) CATT-1 and CMS-1. These MSRs exist in multiple copies, termed subloci, which are present in a variable number among chromosomes. We have mapped four of the CATT-1 subloci, two of that we have shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with SMA, to a 100 kb interval within our cosmid array. The lack of a representation of all the CMS-1 subloci in our YAC and cosmid clones, in addition to the instability of these MSRs within the YAC clones, has rendered mapping problematic. Due to the reported stability of P1 artificial chromosomes (PAC), we have also constructed a contiguous array of 11 PAC clones spanning this critical interval. The unequivocal orientation of the contig along 5q13 has been confirmed by analysis with 4 genetic markers, 4 single copy probes and 3 STSs. Preliminary analysis has shown greater retention of MSR alleles in the PACs, suggesting their greater stability when compared to YACs. Mapping of cosmid and PAC clones derived from different individuals has allowed us to map the multiple CMS-1 and CATT-1 subloci along 5q13. We have identified a recombination event indicating that the SMA gene lies telomeric to one CMS sublocus. Placement of this sublocus in our physical map has enabled further refinement of the critical SMA region from previous estimates of 700 kb to an approximate 300 kb interval flanked by the markers CMS and D5S557.

  14. A physical map for the Amborella trichopoda genome sheds light on the evolution of angiosperm genome structure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent phylogenetic analyses have identified Amborella trichopoda, an understory tree species endemic to the forests of New Caledonia, as sister to a clade including all other known flowering plant species. The Amborella genome is a unique reference for understanding the evolution of angiosperm genomes because it can serve as an outgroup to root comparative analyses. A physical map, BAC end sequences and sample shotgun sequences provide a first view of the 870 Mbp Amborella genome. Results Analysis of Amborella BAC ends sequenced from each contig suggests that the density of long terminal repeat retrotransposons is negatively correlated with that of protein coding genes. Syntenic, presumably ancestral, gene blocks were identified in comparisons of the Amborella BAC contigs and the sequenced Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Oryza sativa genomes. Parsimony mapping of the loss of synteny corroborates previous analyses suggesting that the rate of structural change has been more rapid on lineages leading to Arabidopsis and Oryza compared with lineages leading to Populus and Vitis. The gamma paleohexiploidy event identified in the Arabidopsis, Populus and Vitis genomes is shown to have occurred after the divergence of all other known angiosperms from the lineage leading to Amborella. Conclusions When placed in the context of a physical map, BAC end sequences representing just 5.4% of the Amborella genome have facilitated reconstruction of gene blocks that existed in the last common ancestor of all flowering plants. The Amborella genome is an invaluable reference for inferences concerning the ancestral angiosperm and subsequent genome evolution. PMID:21619600

  15. Construction of physical maps of the Hor1 locus of two barley cultivars by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Siedler, H; Graner, A

    1991-04-01

    In order to construct a physical map of the Hor1 locus of barley (Hordeum vulgare) high molecular weight DNA was prepared from leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Seventeen different restriction endonucleases containing CpG or CpXpG motifs in their recognition sequences were tested and ten proved useful for the generation of high molecular weight DNA fragments. Physical maps of the Hor1 region of the barley cultivars IGRI and FRANKA spanning a distance of 370 and 430 kb respectively were constructed. The maps include sites of nine restriction endonucleases in IGRI and of eight in FRANKA. The maximal extent of the Hor1 locus could be limited to a 135 kb DNA fragment occurring in both cultivars. The differences in arrangement of restriction sites and in fragment lengths reveal major differences in the Hor1 flanking region in the two cultivars. The location of a CpG island, however, is highly conserved in both cultivars and reflects similarities to the organization of mammalian genomes.

  16. [Vocational integration of physically handicapped persons--a regional study in the Regensburg district].

    PubMed

    Dalferth, M; Schnappauf, K; Sommerer, I

    1995-05-01

    The present study had been aimed at tracing possible reasons for insufficient placement of people with physical disablement in the open labour market in the Regensburg region, at gaining insights on the prerequisites of and potential for improving vocational integration as well as at clarifying the relevance of alternative work and employment opportunities in terms of halfway and sheltered settings. Based on a structured questioning schedule, interviews were carried out with 10 experts, 32 physically disabled individuals and 30 employers concerning their placement notions and experience. Generally speaking, it was in particular found that insufficient placement cannot simply be attributed to economic trends; the groups interviewed, rather, differ in some of their underlying assumptions and expectations, a fact which impacts negatively on the integration process. Interaction of disabled and nondisabled persons hence requires greater attention. For the disabled, along with their educational-occupational qualifications, acquisition of communication and social skills is crucial in vocational integration, whereas the companies, in particular small and medium-sized ones, are in need of better information and counselling as well as appropriate supports to be provided by job or placement assistants when hiring physically disabled persons.

  17. Fitness, but not physical activity, is related to functional integrity of brain networks associated with aging.

    PubMed

    Voss, Michelle W; Weng, Timothy B; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Wong, Chelsea N; Cooke, Gillian E; Clark, Rachel; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Gothe, Neha P; Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-05-01

    Greater physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with reduced age-related cognitive decline and lower risk for dementia. However, significant gaps remain in the understanding of how physical activity and fitness protect the brain from adverse effects of brain aging. The primary goal of the current study was to empirically evaluate the independent relationships between physical activity and fitness with functional brain health among healthy older adults, as measured by the functional connectivity of cognitively and clinically relevant resting state networks. To build context for fitness and physical activity associations in older adults, we first demonstrate that young adults have greater within-network functional connectivity across a broad range of cortical association networks. Based on these results and previous research, we predicted that individual differences in fitness and physical activity would be most strongly associated with functional integrity of the networks most sensitive to aging. Consistent with this prediction, and extending on previous research, we showed that cardiorespiratory fitness has a positive relationship with functional connectivity of several cortical networks associated with age-related decline, and effects were strongest in the default mode network (DMN). Furthermore, our results suggest that the positive association of fitness with brain function can occur independent of habitual physical activity. Overall, our findings provide further support that cardiorespiratory fitness is an important factor in moderating the adverse effects of aging on cognitively and clinically relevant functional brain networks.

  18. On the integrability of the shift map on twisted pentagram spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marí Beffa, Gloria

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we prove that the shift map defined on the moduli space of twisted pentagram spirals of type (N,1) possesses a non-standard Lax representation with an associated monodromy whose conjugation class is preserved by the map. We prove this by finding a coordinate system in the moduli space of twisted spirals, writing the map in terms of the coordinates and associating a natural parameter-free non-standard Lax representation. We then show that the map is invariant under the action of a one-parameter group on the moduli space of twisted (N,1) spirals, which allows us to construct the Lax pair. We also show that the monodromy defines an associated Riemann surface that is preserved by the map. We use this fact to generate invariants of the shift map. This paper is supported by the author NSF grant DMS #0804541 and #1405722

  19. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 [sup 32]P- or [sup 33]P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  20. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-12-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 {sup 32}P- or {sup 33}P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.