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Sample records for integrated sequence motif

  1. iMotifs: an integrated sequence motif visualization and analysis environment

    PubMed Central

    Piipari, Matias; Down, Thomas A.; Saini, Harpreet; Enright, Anton; Hubbard, Tim J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Short sequence motifs are an important class of models in molecular biology, used most commonly for describing transcription factor binding site specificity patterns. High-throughput methods have been recently developed for detecting regulatory factor binding sites in vivo and in vitro and consequently high-quality binding site motif data are becoming available for increasing number of organisms and regulatory factors. Development of intuitive tools for the study of sequence motifs is therefore important. iMotifs is a graphical motif analysis environment that allows visualization of annotated sequence motifs and scored motif hits in sequences. It also offers motif inference with the sensitive NestedMICA algorithm, as well as overrepresentation and pairwise motif matching capabilities. All of the analysis functionality is provided without the need to convert between file formats or learn different command line interfaces. The application includes a bundled and graphically integrated version of the NestedMICA motif inference suite that has no outside dependencies. Problems associated with local deployment of software are therefore avoided. Availability: iMotifs is licensed with the GNU Lesser General Public License v2.0 (LGPL 2.0). The software and its source is available at http://wiki.github.com/mz2/imotifs and can be run on Mac OS X Leopard (Intel/PowerPC). We also provide a cross-platform (Linux, OS X, Windows) LGPL 2.0 licensed library libxms for the Perl, Ruby, R and Objective-C programming languages for input and output of XMS formatted annotated sequence motif set files. Contact: matias.piipari@gmail.com; imotifs@googlegroups.com PMID:20106815

  2. FastMotif: spectral sequence motif discovery.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoló; Vlassis, Nikos

    2015-08-15

    Sequence discovery tools play a central role in several fields of computational biology. In the framework of Transcription Factor binding studies, most of the existing motif finding algorithms are computationally demanding, and they may not be able to support the increasingly large datasets produced by modern high-throughput sequencing technologies. We present FastMotif, a new motif discovery algorithm that is built on a recent machine learning technique referred to as Method of Moments. Based on spectral decompositions, our method is robust to model misspecifications and is not prone to locally optimal solutions. We obtain an algorithm that is extremely fast and designed for the analysis of big sequencing data. On HT-Selex data, FastMotif extracts motif profiles that match those computed by various state-of-the-art algorithms, but one order of magnitude faster. We provide a theoretical and numerical analysis of the algorithm's robustness and discuss its sensitivity with respect to the free parameters. The Matlab code of FastMotif is available from http://lcsb-portal.uni.lu/bioinformatics. vlassis@adobe.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. AliBiMotif: integrating alignment and biclustering to unravel transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Moreau, Yves; Madeira, Sara C

    2012-01-01

    Transcription Factors (TFs) control transcription by binding to specific sites in the promoter regions of the target genes, which can be modelled by structured motifs. In this paper we propose AliBiMotif, a method combining sequence alignment and a biclustering approach based on efficient string matching techniques using suffix trees to unravel approximately conserved sets of blocks (structured motifs) while straightforwardly disregarding non-conserved stretches in-between. The ability to ignore the width of non-conserved regions is a major advantage of the proposed method over other motif finders, as the lengths of the binding sites are usually easier to estimate than the separating distances.

  4. Discovering novel sequence motifs with MEME.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Timothy L

    2002-11-01

    This unit illustrates how to use MEME to discover motifs in a group of related nucleotide or peptide sequences. A MEME motif is a sequence pattern that occurs repeatedly in one or more sequences in the input group. MEME can be used to discover novel patterns because it bases its discoveries only on the input sequences, not on any prior knowledge (such as databases of known motifs). The input to MEME is a set of unaligned sequences of the same type (peptide or nucleotide). For each motif it discovers, MEME reports the occurrences (sites), consensus sequence, and the level of conservation (information content) at each position in the pattern. MEME also produces block diagrams showing where all of the discovered motifs occur in the training set sequences. MEME's hypertext (HTML) output also contains buttons that allow for the convenient use of the motifs in other searches.

  5. Parametric bootstrapping for biological sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patrick K; Erill, Ivan

    2016-10-06

    Biological sequence motifs drive the specific interactions of proteins and nucleic acids. Accordingly, the effective computational discovery and analysis of such motifs is a central theme in bioinformatics. Many practical questions about the properties of motifs can be recast as random sampling problems. In this light, the task is to determine for a given motif whether a certain feature of interest is statistically unusual among relevantly similar alternatives. Despite the generality of this framework, its use has been frustrated by the difficulties of defining an appropriate reference class of motifs for comparison and of sampling from it effectively. We define two distributions over the space of all motifs of given dimension. The first is the maximum entropy distribution subject to mean information content, and the second is the truncated uniform distribution over all motifs having information content within a given interval. We derive exact sampling algorithms for each. As a proof of concept, we employ these sampling methods to analyze a broad collection of prokaryotic and eukaryotic transcription factor binding site motifs. In addition to positional information content, we consider the informational Gini coefficient of the motif, a measure of the degree to which information is evenly distributed throughout a motif's positions. We find that both prokaryotic and eukaryotic motifs tend to exhibit higher informational Gini coefficients (IGC) than would be expected by chance under either reference distribution. As a second application, we apply maximum entropy sampling to the motif p-value problem and use it to give elementary derivations of two new estimators. Despite the historical centrality of biological sequence motif analysis, this study constitutes to our knowledge the first use of principled null hypotheses for sequence motifs given information content. Through their use, we are able to characterize for the first time differerences in global motif statistics

  6. Motif Yggdrasil: sampling sequence motifs from a tree mixture model.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Samuel A; Lagergren, Jens

    2007-06-01

    In phylogenetic foot-printing, putative regulatory elements are found in upstream regions of orthologous genes by searching for common motifs. Motifs in different upstream sequences are subject to mutations along the edges of the corresponding phylogenetic tree, consequently taking advantage of the tree in the motif search is an appealing idea. We describe the Motif Yggdrasil sampler; the first Gibbs sampler based on a general tree that uses unaligned sequences. Previous tree-based Gibbs samplers have assumed a star-shaped tree or partially aligned upstream regions. We give a probabilistic model (MY model) describing upstream sequences with regulatory elements and build a Gibbs sampler with respect to this model. The model allows toggling, i.e., the restriction of a position to a subset of nucleotides, but does not require aligned sequences nor edge lengths, which may be difficult to come by. We apply the collapsing technique to eliminate the need to sample nuisance parameters, and give a derivation of the predictive update formula. We show that the MY model improves the modeling of difficult motif instances and that the use of the tree achieves a substantial increase in nucleotide level correlation coefficient both for synthetic data and 37 bacterial lexA genes. We investigate the sensitivity to errors in the tree and show that using random trees MY sampler still has a performance similar to the original version.

  7. A Discriminative Approach for Unsupervised Clustering of DNA Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Wingender, Edgar; Borlak, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Algorithmic comparison of DNA sequence motifs is a problem in bioinformatics that has received increased attention during the last years. Its main applications concern characterization of potentially novel motifs and clustering of a motif collection in order to remove redundancy. Despite growing interest in motif clustering, the question which motif clusters to aim at has so far not been systematically addressed. Here we analyzed motif similarities in a comprehensive set of vertebrate transcription factor classes. For this we developed enhanced similarity scores by inclusion of the information coverage (IC) criterion, which evaluates the fraction of information an alignment covers in aligned motifs. A network-based method enabled us to identify motif clusters with high correspondence to DNA-binding domain phylogenies and prior experimental findings. Based on this analysis we derived a set of motif families representing distinct binding specificities. These motif families were used to train a classifier which was further integrated into a novel algorithm for unsupervised motif clustering. Application of the new algorithm demonstrated its superiority to previously published methods and its ability to reproduce entrained motif families. As a result, our work proposes a probabilistic approach to decide whether two motifs represent common or distinct binding specificities. PMID:23555204

  8. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features.

  9. MIDDAS-M: Motif-Independent De Novo Detection of Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters through the Integration of Genome Sequencing and Transcriptome Data

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Nagano, Nozomi; Ishii, Tomoko; Kawano, Jin; Yamane, Noriko; Kozone, Ikuko; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Asai, Kiyoshi; Yu, Jiujiang; Bennett, Joan W.; Machida, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Many bioactive natural products are produced as “secondary metabolites” by plants, bacteria, and fungi. During the middle of the 20th century, several secondary metabolites from fungi revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry, for example, penicillin, lovastatin, and cyclosporine. They are generally biosynthesized by enzymes encoded by clusters of coordinately regulated genes, and several motif-based methods have been developed to detect secondary metabolite biosynthetic (SMB) gene clusters using the sequence information of typical SMB core genes such as polyketide synthases (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). However, no detection method exists for SMB gene clusters that are functional and do not include core SMB genes at present. To advance the exploration of SMB gene clusters, especially those without known core genes, we developed MIDDAS-M, a motif-independent de novo detection algorithm for SMB gene clusters. We integrated virtual gene cluster generation in an annotated genome sequence with highly sensitive scoring of the cooperative transcriptional regulation of cluster member genes. MIDDAS-M accurately predicted 38 SMB gene clusters that have been experimentally confirmed and/or predicted by other motif-based methods in 3 fungal strains. MIDDAS-M further identified a new SMB gene cluster for ustiloxin B, which was experimentally validated. Sequence analysis of the cluster genes indicated a novel mechanism for peptide biosynthesis independent of NRPS. Because it is fully computational and independent of empirical knowledge about SMB core genes, MIDDAS-M allows a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of SMB gene clusters, including those with novel biosynthetic mechanisms that do not contain any functionally characterized genes. PMID:24391870

  10. rMotifGen: random motif generator for DNA and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Rouchka, Eric C; Hardin, C Timothy

    2007-08-07

    Detection of short, subtle conserved motif regions within a set of related DNA or amino acid sequences can lead to discoveries about important regulatory domains such as transcription factor and DNA binding sites as well as conserved protein domains. In order to help assess motif detection algorithms on motifs with varying properties and levels of conservation, we have developed a computational tool, rMotifGen, with the sole purpose of generating a number of random DNA or protein sequences containing short sequence motifs. Each motif consensus can be user-defined, randomly generated, or created from a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM). Insertions and mutations within these motifs are created according to user-defined parameters and substitution matrices. The resulting sequences can be helpful in mutational simulations and in testing the limits of motif detection algorithms. Two implementations of rMotifGen have been created, one providing a graphical user interface (GUI) for random motif construction, and the other serving as a command line interface. The second implementation has the added advantages of platform independence and being able to be called in a batch mode. rMotifGen was used to construct sample sets of sequences containing DNA motifs and amino acid motifs that were then tested against the Gibbs sampler and MEME packages. rMotifGen provides an efficient and convenient method for creating random DNA or amino acid sequences with a variable number of motifs, where the instance of each motif can be incorporated using a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or by creating an instance mutated from its corresponding consensus using an evolutionary model based on substitution matrices. rMotifGen is freely available at: http://bioinformatics.louisville.edu/brg/rMotifGen/.

  11. rMotifGen: random motif generator for DNA and protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Rouchka, Eric C; Hardin, C Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Background Detection of short, subtle conserved motif regions within a set of related DNA or amino acid sequences can lead to discoveries about important regulatory domains such as transcription factor and DNA binding sites as well as conserved protein domains. In order to help assess motif detection algorithms on motifs with varying properties and levels of conservation, we have developed a computational tool, rMotifGen, with the sole purpose of generating a number of random DNA or protein sequences containing short sequence motifs. Each motif consensus can be user-defined, randomly generated, or created from a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM). Insertions and mutations within these motifs are created according to user-defined parameters and substitution matrices. The resulting sequences can be helpful in mutational simulations and in testing the limits of motif detection algorithms. Results Two implementations of rMotifGen have been created, one providing a graphical user interface (GUI) for random motif construction, and the other serving as a command line interface. The second implementation has the added advantages of platform independence and being able to be called in a batch mode. rMotifGen was used to construct sample sets of sequences containing DNA motifs and amino acid motifs that were then tested against the Gibbs sampler and MEME packages. Conclusion rMotifGen provides an efficient and convenient method for creating random DNA or amino acid sequences with a variable number of motifs, where the instance of each motif can be incorporated using a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or by creating an instance mutated from its corresponding consensus using an evolutionary model based on substitution matrices. rMotifGen is freely available at: . PMID:17683637

  12. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by patterns in

  13. Learning Cellular Sorting Pathways Using Protein Interactions and Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Ho; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Proper subcellular localization is critical for proteins to perform their roles in cellular functions. Proteins are transported by different cellular sorting pathways, some of which take a protein through several intermediate locations until reaching its final destination. The pathway a protein is transported through is determined by carrier proteins that bind to specific sequence motifs. In this article, we present a new method that integrates protein interaction and sequence motif data to model how proteins are sorted through these sorting pathways. We use a hidden Markov model (HMM) to represent protein sorting pathways. The model is able to determine intermediate sorting states and to assign carrier proteins and motifs to the sorting pathways. In simulation studies, we show that the method can accurately recover an underlying sorting model. Using data for yeast, we show that our model leads to accurate prediction of subcellular localization. We also show that the pathways learned by our model recover many known sorting pathways and correctly assign proteins to the path they utilize. The learned model identified new pathways and their putative carriers and motifs and these may represent novel protein sorting mechanisms. Supplementary results and software implementation are available from http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/software/2010_RECOMB_pathways/. PMID:21999284

  14. Occurrence probability of structured motifs in random sequences.

    PubMed

    Robin, S; Daudin, J-J; Richard, H; Sagot, M-F; Schbath, S

    2002-01-01

    The problem of extracting from a set of nucleic acid sequences motifs which may have biological function is more and more important. In this paper, we are interested in particular motifs that may be implicated in the transcription process. These motifs, called structured motifs, are composed of two ordered parts separated by a variable distance and allowing for substitutions. In order to assess their statistical significance, we propose approximations of the probability of occurrences of such a structured motif in a given sequence. An application of our method to evaluate candidate promoters in E. coli and B. subtilis is presented. Simulations show the goodness of the approximations.

  15. Probabilistic models for semisupervised discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Choi, Seungjin

    2011-01-01

    Methods for discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), searching only for patterns that differentiate two sets (positive and negative sets) of sequences. On one hand, discriminative methods increase the sensitivity and specificity of motif discovery, compared to generative models. On the other hand, generative models can easily exploit unlabeled sequences to better detect functional motifs when labeled training samples are limited. In this paper, we develop a hybrid generative/discriminative model which enables us to make use of unlabeled sequences in the framework of discriminative motif discovery, leading to semisupervised discriminative motif discovery. Numerical experiments on yeast ChIP-chip data for discovering DNA motifs demonstrate that the best performance is obtained between the purely-generative and the purely-discriminative and the semisupervised learning improves the performance when labeled sequences are limited.

  16. Retroviruses integrate into a shared, non-palindromic DNA motif.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Paul D W; Huvet, Maxime; Melamed, Anat; Maertens, Goedele N; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-14

    Many DNA-binding factors, such as transcription factors, form oligomeric complexes with structural symmetry that bind to palindromic DNA sequences(1). Palindromic consensus nucleotide sequences are also found at the genomic integration sites of retroviruses(2-6) and other transposable elements(7-9), and it has been suggested that this palindromic consensus arises as a consequence of the structural symmetry in the integrase complex(2,3). However, we show here that the palindromic consensus sequence is not present in individual integration sites of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but arises in the population average as a consequence of the existence of a non-palindromic nucleotide motif that occurs in approximately equal proportions on the plus strand and the minus strand of the host genome. We develop a generally applicable algorithm to sort the individual integration site sequences into plus-strand and minus-strand subpopulations, and use this to identify the integration site nucleotide motifs of five retroviruses of different genera: HTLV-1, HIV-1, murine leukaemia virus (MLV), avian sarcoma leucosis virus (ASLV) and prototype foamy virus (PFV). The results reveal a non-palindromic motif that is shared between these retroviruses.

  17. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  18. MEME: discovering and analyzing DNA and protein sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Timothy L; Williams, Nadya; Misleh, Chris; Li, Wilfred W

    2006-07-01

    MEME (Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation) is one of the most widely used tools for searching for novel 'signals' in sets of biological sequences. Applications include the discovery of new transcription factor binding sites and protein domains. MEME works by searching for repeated, ungapped sequence patterns that occur in the DNA or protein sequences provided by the user. Users can perform MEME searches via the web server hosted by the National Biomedical Computation Resource (http://meme.nbcr.net) and several mirror sites. Through the same web server, users can also access the Motif Alignment and Search Tool to search sequence databases for matches to motifs encoded in several popular formats. By clicking on buttons in the MEME output, users can compare the motifs discovered in their input sequences with databases of known motifs, search sequence databases for matches to the motifs and display the motifs in various formats. This article describes the freely accessible web server and its architecture, and discusses ways to use MEME effectively to find new sequence patterns in biological sequences and analyze their significance.

  19. MEME: discovering and analyzing DNA and protein sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Timothy L.; Williams, Nadya; Misleh, Chris; Li, Wilfred W.

    2006-01-01

    MEME (Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation) is one of the most widely used tools for searching for novel ‘signals’ in sets of biological sequences. Applications include the discovery of new transcription factor binding sites and protein domains. MEME works by searching for repeated, ungapped sequence patterns that occur in the DNA or protein sequences provided by the user. Users can perform MEME searches via the web server hosted by the National Biomedical Computation Resource () and several mirror sites. Through the same web server, users can also access the Motif Alignment and Search Tool to search sequence databases for matches to motifs encoded in several popular formats. By clicking on buttons in the MEME output, users can compare the motifs discovered in their input sequences with databases of known motifs, search sequence databases for matches to the motifs and display the motifs in various formats. This article describes the freely accessible web server and its architecture, and discusses ways to use MEME effectively to find new sequence patterns in biological sequences and analyze their significance. PMID:16845028

  20. MotifHyades: Expectation Maximization for de novo DNA Motif Pair Discovery on Paired Sequences.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2017-06-13

    In higher eukaryotes, protein-DNA binding interactions are the central activities in gene regulation. In particular, DNA motifs such as transcription factor binding sites are the key components in gene transcription. Harnessing the recently available chromatin interaction data, computational methods are desired for identifying the coupling DNA motif pairs enriched on long-range chromatin-interacting sequence pairs (e.g. promoter-enhancer pairs) systematically. To fill the void, a novel probabilistic model (namely, MotifHyades) is proposed and developed for de novo DNA motif pair discovery on paired sequences. In particular, two expectation maximization algorithms are derived for efficient model training with linear computational complexity. Under diverse scenarios, MotifHyades is demonstrated faster and more accurate than the existing ad hoc computational pipeline. In addition, MotifHyades is applied to discover thousands of DNA motif pairs with higher gold standard motif matching ratio, higher DNase accessibility, and higher evolutionary conservation than the previous ones in the human K562 cell line. Lastly, it has been run on five other human cell lines (i.e. GM12878, HeLa-S3, HUVEC, IMR90, and NHEK), revealing another thousands of novel DNA motif pairs which are characterized across a broad spectrum of genomic features on long-range promoter-enhancer pairs. The matrix-algebra-optimized versions of MotifHyades and the discovered DNA motif pairs can be found in http://bioinfo.cs.cityu.edu.hk/MotifHyades . kc.w@cityu.edu.hk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Functional characterization of motif sequences under purifying selection.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Hua; Chang, Andrew Ying-Fei; Liao, Ben-Yang; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    Diverse life forms are driven by the evolution of gene regulatory programs including changes in regulator proteins and cis-regulatory elements. Alterations of cis-regulatory elements are likely to dominate the evolution of the gene regulatory networks, as they are subjected to smaller selective constraints compared with proteins and hence may evolve quickly to adapt the environment. Prior studies on cis-regulatory element evolution focus primarily on sequence substitutions of known transcription factor-binding motifs. However, evolutionary models for the dynamics of motif occurrence are relatively rare, and comprehensive characterization of the evolution of all possible motif sequences has not been pursued. In the present study, we propose an algorithm to estimate the strength of purifying selection of a motif sequence based on an evolutionary model capturing the birth and death of motif occurrences on promoters. We term this measure as the 'evolutionary retention coefficient', as it is related yet distinct from the canonical definition of selection coefficient in population genetics. Using this algorithm, we estimate and report the evolutionary retention coefficients of all possible 10-nucleotide sequences from the aligned promoter sequences of 27 748. orthologous gene families in 34 mammalian species. Intriguingly, the evolutionary retention coefficients of motifs are intimately associated with their functional relevance. Top-ranking motifs (sorted by evolutionary retention coefficients) are significantly enriched with transcription factor-binding sequences according to the curated knowledge from the TRANSFAC database and the ChIP-seq data generated from the ENCODE Consortium. Moreover, genes harbouring high-scoring motifs on their promoters retain significantly coherent expression profiles, and those genes are over-represented in the functional classes involved in gene regulation. The validation results reveal the dependencies between natural selection and

  2. MISCORE: a new scoring function for characterizing DNA regulatory motifs in promoter sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational approaches for finding DNA regulatory motifs in promoter sequences are useful to biologists in terms of reducing the experimental costs and speeding up the discovery process of de novo binding sites. It is important for rule-based or clustering-based motif searching schemes to effectively and efficiently evaluate the similarity between a k-mer (a k-length subsequence) and a motif model, without assuming the independence of nucleotides in motif models or without employing computationally expensive Markov chain models to estimate the background probabilities of k-mers. Also, it is interesting and beneficial to use a priori knowledge in developing advanced searching tools. Results This paper presents a new scoring function, termed as MISCORE, for functional motif characterization and evaluation. Our MISCORE is free from: (i) any assumption on model dependency; and (ii) the use of Markov chain model for background modeling. It integrates the compositional complexity of motif instances into the function. Performance evaluations with comparison to the well-known Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) score and Information Content (IC) have shown that MISCORE has promising capabilities to separate and recognize functional DNA motifs and its instances from non-functional ones. Conclusions MISCORE is a fast computational tool for candidate motif characterization, evaluation and selection. It enables to embed priori known motif models for computing motif-to-motif similarity, which is more advantageous than IC and MAP score. In addition to these merits mentioned above, MISCORE can automatically filter out some repetitive k-mers from a motif model due to the introduction of the compositional complexity in the function. Consequently, the merits of our proposed MISCORE in terms of both motif signal modeling power and computational efficiency will make it more applicable in the development of computational motif discovery tools. PMID:23282090

  3. PISMA: A Visual Representation of Motif Distribution in DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara-Silva, Rogelio; Alvarado-Hermida, Moisés; Díaz-Contreras, Gibrán; Sánchez-Barrios, Martha; Carrera, Samantha; Galván, Silvia Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Because the graphical presentation and analysis of motif distribution can provide insights for experimental hypothesis, PISMA aims at identifying motifs on DNA sequences, counting and showing them graphically. The motif length ranges from 2 to 10 bases, and the DNA sequences range up to 10 kb. The motif distribution is shown as a bar-code–like, as a gene-map–like, and as a transcript scheme. Results: We obtained graphical schemes of the CpG site distribution from 91 human papillomavirus genomes. Also, we present 2 analyses: one of DNA motifs associated with either methylation-resistant or methylation-sensitive CpG islands and another analysis of motifs associated with exosome RNA secretion. Availability and Implementation: PISMA is developed in Java; it is executable in any type of hardware and in diverse operating systems. PISMA is freely available to noncommercial users. The English version and the User Manual are provided in Supplementary Files 1 and 2, and a Spanish version is available at www.biomedicas.unam.mx/wp-content/software/pisma.zip and www.biomedicas.unam.mx/wp-content/pdf/manual/pisma.pdf. PMID:28469418

  4. The distribution of RNA motifs in natural sequences.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, V; Ferbeyre, G; Pageau, M; Paquin, B; Cedergren, R

    1999-11-15

    Functional analysis of genome sequences has largely ignored RNA genes and their structures. We introduce here the notion of 'ribonomics' to describe the search for the distribution of and eventually the determination of the physiological roles of these RNA structures found in the sequence databases. The utility of this approach is illustrated here by the identification in the GenBank database of RNA motifs having known binding or chemical activity. The frequency of these motifs indicates that most have originated from evolutionary drift and are selectively neutral. On the other hand, their distribution among species and their location within genes suggest that the destiny of these motifs may be more elaborate. For example, the hammerhead motif has a skewed organismal presence, is phylogenetically stable and recent work on a schistosome version confirms its in vivo biological activity. The under-representation of the valine-binding motif and the Rev-binding element in GenBank hints at a detrimental effect on cell growth or viability. Data on the presence and the location of these motifs may provide critical guidance in the design of experiments directed towards the understanding and the manipulation of RNA complexes and activities in vivo.

  5. PISMA: A Visual Representation of Motif Distribution in DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Silva, Rogelio; Alvarado-Hermida, Moisés; Díaz-Contreras, Gibrán; Sánchez-Barrios, Martha; Carrera, Samantha; Galván, Silvia Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Because the graphical presentation and analysis of motif distribution can provide insights for experimental hypothesis, PISMA aims at identifying motifs on DNA sequences, counting and showing them graphically. The motif length ranges from 2 to 10 bases, and the DNA sequences range up to 10 kb. The motif distribution is shown as a bar-code-like, as a gene-map-like, and as a transcript scheme. We obtained graphical schemes of the CpG site distribution from 91 human papillomavirus genomes. Also, we present 2 analyses: one of DNA motifs associated with either methylation-resistant or methylation-sensitive CpG islands and another analysis of motifs associated with exosome RNA secretion. PISMA is developed in Java; it is executable in any type of hardware and in diverse operating systems. PISMA is freely available to noncommercial users. The English version and the User Manual are provided in Supplementary Files 1 and 2, and a Spanish version is available at www.biomedicas.unam.mx/wp-content/software/pisma.zip and www.biomedicas.unam.mx/wp-content/pdf/manual/pisma.pdf.

  6. An integrative and applicable phylogenetic footprinting framework for cis-regulatory motifs identification in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Fennell, Anne; Wang, Guanghui; Kang, Yu; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-08-09

    Phylogenetic footprinting is an important computational technique for identifying cis-regulatory motifs in orthologous regulatory regions from multiple genomes, as motifs tend to evolve slower than their surrounding non-functional sequences. Its application, however, has several difficulties for optimizing the selection of orthologous data and reducing the false positives in motif prediction. Here we present an integrative phylogenetic footprinting framework for accurate motif predictions in prokaryotic genomes (MP(3)). The framework includes a new orthologous data preparation procedure, an additional promoter scoring and pruning method and an integration of six existing motif finding algorithms as basic motif search engines. Specifically, we collected orthologous genes from available prokaryotic genomes and built the orthologous regulatory regions based on sequence similarity of promoter regions. This procedure made full use of the large-scale genomic data and taxonomy information and filtered out the promoters with limited contribution to produce a high quality orthologous promoter set. The promoter scoring and pruning is implemented through motif voting by a set of complementary predicting tools that mine as many motif candidates as possible and simultaneously eliminate the effect of random noise. We have applied the framework to Escherichia coli k12 genome and evaluated the prediction performance through comparison with seven existing programs. This evaluation was systematically carried out at the nucleotide and binding site level, and the results showed that MP(3) consistently outperformed other popular motif finding tools. We have integrated MP(3) into our motif identification and analysis server DMINDA, allowing users to efficiently identify and analyze motifs in 2,072 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. The performance evaluation indicated that MP(3) is effective for predicting regulatory motifs in prokaryotic genomes. Its application may enhance

  7. Chaotic motif sampler: detecting motifs from biological sequences by using chaotic neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Takafumi; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    Identification of a region in biological sequences, motif extraction problem (MEP) is solved in bioinformatics. However, the MEP is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, it is almost impossible to obtain an optimal solution within a reasonable time frame. To find near optimal solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems such as traveling salesman problems, quadratic assignment problems, and vehicle routing problems, chaotic search, which is one of the deterministic approaches, has been proposed and exhibits better performance than stochastic approaches. In this paper, we propose a new alignment method that employs chaotic dynamics to solve the MEPs. It is called the Chaotic Motif Sampler. We show that the performance of the Chaotic Motif Sampler is considerably better than that of the conventional methods such as the Gibbs Site Sampler and the Neighborhood Optimization for Multiple Alignment Discovery.

  8. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pantazes, Robert J.; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N.; Murray, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  9. WildSpan: mining structured motifs from protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Automatic extraction of motifs from biological sequences is an important research problem in study of molecular biology. For proteins, it is desired to discover sequence motifs containing a large number of wildcard symbols, as the residues associated with functional sites are usually largely separated in sequences. Discovering such patterns is time-consuming because abundant combinations exist when long gaps (a gap consists of one or more successive wildcards) are considered. Mining algorithms often employ constraints to narrow down the search space in order to increase efficiency. However, improper constraint models might degrade the sensitivity and specificity of the motifs discovered by computational methods. We previously proposed a new constraint model to handle large wildcard regions for discovering functional motifs of proteins. The patterns that satisfy the proposed constraint model are called W-patterns. A W-pattern is a structured motif that groups motif symbols into pattern blocks interleaved with large irregular gaps. Considering large gaps reflects the fact that functional residues are not always from a single region of protein sequences, and restricting motif symbols into clusters corresponds to the observation that short motifs are frequently present within protein families. To efficiently discover W-patterns for large-scale sequence annotation and function prediction, this paper first formally introduces the problem to solve and proposes an algorithm named WildSpan (sequential pattern mining across large wildcard regions) that incorporates several pruning strategies to largely reduce the mining cost. Results WildSpan is shown to efficiently find W-patterns containing conserved residues that are far separated in sequences. We conducted experiments with two mining strategies, protein-based and family-based mining, to evaluate the usefulness of W-patterns and performance of WildSpan. The protein-based mining mode of WildSpan is developed for

  10. WildSpan: mining structured motifs from protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chen-Ming; Chen, Chien-Yu; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    2011-03-31

    Automatic extraction of motifs from biological sequences is an important research problem in study of molecular biology. For proteins, it is desired to discover sequence motifs containing a large number of wildcard symbols, as the residues associated with functional sites are usually largely separated in sequences. Discovering such patterns is time-consuming because abundant combinations exist when long gaps (a gap consists of one or more successive wildcards) are considered. Mining algorithms often employ constraints to narrow down the search space in order to increase efficiency. However, improper constraint models might degrade the sensitivity and specificity of the motifs discovered by computational methods. We previously proposed a new constraint model to handle large wildcard regions for discovering functional motifs of proteins. The patterns that satisfy the proposed constraint model are called W-patterns. A W-pattern is a structured motif that groups motif symbols into pattern blocks interleaved with large irregular gaps. Considering large gaps reflects the fact that functional residues are not always from a single region of protein sequences, and restricting motif symbols into clusters corresponds to the observation that short motifs are frequently present within protein families. To efficiently discover W-patterns for large-scale sequence annotation and function prediction, this paper first formally introduces the problem to solve and proposes an algorithm named WildSpan (sequential pattern mining across large wildcard regions) that incorporates several pruning strategies to largely reduce the mining cost. WildSpan is shown to efficiently find W-patterns containing conserved residues that are far separated in sequences. We conducted experiments with two mining strategies, protein-based and family-based mining, to evaluate the usefulness of W-patterns and performance of WildSpan. The protein-based mining mode of WildSpan is developed for discovering

  11. Finding sequence motifs in prokaryotic genomes--a brief practical guide for a microbiologist.

    PubMed

    Mrázek, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Finding significant nucleotide sequence motifs in prokaryotic genomes can be divided into three types of tasks: (1) supervised motif finding, where a sample of motif sequences is used to find other similar sequences in genomes; (2) unsupervised motif finding, which typically relates to the task of finding regulatory motifs and protein binding sites and (3) exploratory motif finding, which aims to identify potential functionally significant sequence motifs as those that are unusual in some statistical sense. This article provides a conceptual overview for each type of task, a brief description of basic algorithms used in their solution, and a review of selected relevant software available online.

  12. A generalized profile syntax for biomolecular sequence motifs and its function in automatic sequence interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, P.; Bairoch, A.

    1994-12-31

    A general syntax for expressing bimolecular sequence motifs is described, which will be used in future releases of the PROSITE data bank and in a similar collection of nucleic acid sequence motifs currently under development. The central part of the syntax is a regular structure which can be viewed as a generalization of the profiles introduced by Gribskov and coworkers. Accessory features implement specific motif search strategies and provide information helpful for the interpretation of predicted matches. Two contrasting examples, representing E. coli promoters and SH3 domains respectively, are shown to demonstrate the versatility of the syntax, and its compatibility with diverse motif search methods. It is argued, that a comprehensive machine-readable motif collection based on the new syntax, in conjunction with a standard search program, can serve as a general-purpose sequence interpretation and function prediction tool.

  13. Finding sequence motifs in groups of functionally related proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, H O; Annau, T M; Chandrasegaran, S

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a method for rapidly finding patterns of conserved amino acid residues (motifs) in groups of functionally related proteins. All 3-amino acid patterns in a group of proteins of the type aa1 d1 aa2 d2 aa3, where d1 and d2 are distances that can be varied in a range up to 24 residues, are accumulated into an array. Segments of the proteins containing those patterns that occur most frequently are aligned on each other by a scoring method that obtains an average relatedness value for all the amino acids in each column of the aligned sequence block based on the Dayhoff relatedness odds matrix. The automated method successfully finds and displays nearly all of the sequence motifs that have been previously reported to occur in 33 reverse transcriptases, 18 DNA integrases, and 30 DNA methyltransferases.

  14. Computational definition of sequence motifs governing constitutive exon splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2004-06-01

    We have searched for sequence motifs that contribute to the recognition of human pre-mRNA splice sites by comparing the frequency of 8-mers in internal noncoding exons versus unspliced pseudo exons and 5' untranslated regions (5' untranslated regions [UTRs]) of transcripts of intronless genes. This type of comparison avoids the isolation of sequences that are distinguished by their protein-coding information. We classified sequence families comprising 2069 putative exonic enhancers and 974 putative exonic silencers. Representatives of each class functioned as enhancers or silencers when inserted into a test exon and assayed in transfected mammalian cells. As a class, the enhancer sequencers were more prevalent and the silencer elements less prevalent in all exons compared with introns. A survey of 58 reported exonic splicing mutations showed good agreement between the splicing phenotype and the effect of the mutation on the motifs defined here. The large number of effective sequences implied by these results suggests that sequences that influence splicing may be very abundant in pre-mRNA.

  15. Discriminative motif discovery in DNA and protein sequences using the DEME algorithm.

    PubMed

    Redhead, Emma; Bailey, Timothy L

    2007-10-15

    Motif discovery aims to detect short, highly conserved patterns in a collection of unaligned DNA or protein sequences. Discriminative motif finding algorithms aim to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of motif discovery by utilizing a second set of sequences, and searching only for patterns that can differentiate the two sets of sequences. Potential applications of discriminative motif discovery include discovering transcription factor binding site motifs in ChIP-chip data and finding protein motifs involved in thermal stability using sets of orthologous proteins from thermophilic and mesophilic organisms. We describe DEME, a discriminative motif discovery algorithm for use with protein and DNA sequences. Input to DEME is two sets of sequences; a "positive" set and a "negative" set. DEME represents motifs using a probabilistic model, and uses a novel combination of global and local search to find the motif that optimally discriminates between the two sets of sequences. DEME is unique among discriminative motif finders in that it uses an informative Bayesian prior on protein motif columns, allowing it to incorporate prior knowledge of residue characteristics. We also introduce four, synthetic, discriminative motif discovery problems that are designed for evaluating discriminative motif finders in various biologically motivated contexts. We test DEME using these synthetic problems and on two biological problems: finding yeast transcription factor binding motifs in ChIP-chip data, and finding motifs that discriminate between groups of thermophilic and mesophilic orthologous proteins. Using artificial data, we show that DEME is more effective than a non-discriminative approach when there are "decoy" motifs or when a variant of the motif is present in the "negative" sequences. With real data, we show that DEME is as good, but not better than non-discriminative algorithms at discovering yeast transcription factor binding motifs. We also show that DEME can find

  16. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx(5 )[ATS]x(4) Gx(4) [VIL]WNR[TS]x(2) [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x(3){K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes.

  17. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bryan M.; Keasey, Sarah L.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Lountos, George T.; Dyas, Beverly K.; Cherry, Scott; Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Waugh, David S.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P) residue, but also the Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7), atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27), viral (variola VH1), and Cdc25 (A-C). Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P) peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets. PMID:26302245

  18. cisExpress: motif detection in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Triska, Martin; Grocutt, David; Southern, James; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2013-09-01

    One of the major challenges for contemporary bioinformatics is the analysis and accurate annotation of genomic datasets to enable extraction of useful information about the functional role of DNA sequences. This article describes a novel genome-wide statistical approach to the detection of specific DNA sequence motifs based on similarities between the promoters of similarly expressed genes. This new tool, cisExpress, is especially designed for use with large datasets, such as those generated by publicly accessible whole genome and transcriptome projects. cisExpress uses a task farming algorithm to exploit all available computational cores within a shared memory node. We demonstrate the robust nature and validity of the proposed method. It is applicable for use with a wide range of genomic databases for any species of interest. cisExpress is available at www.cisexpress.org.

  19. cisExpress: motif detection in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Triska, Martin; Grocutt, David; Southern, James; Murphy, Denis J.; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: One of the major challenges for contemporary bioinformatics is the analysis and accurate annotation of genomic datasets to enable extraction of useful information about the functional role of DNA sequences. This article describes a novel genome-wide statistical approach to the detection of specific DNA sequence motifs based on similarities between the promoters of similarly expressed genes. This new tool, cisExpress, is especially designed for use with large datasets, such as those generated by publicly accessible whole genome and transcriptome projects. cisExpress uses a task farming algorithm to exploit all available computational cores within a shared memory node. We demonstrate the robust nature and validity of the proposed method. It is applicable for use with a wide range of genomic databases for any species of interest. Availability: cisExpress is available at www.cisexpress.org. Contact: tatiana.tatarinova@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23793750

  20. Software tools for motif and pattern scanning: program descriptions including a universal sequence reading algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cockwell, K Y; Giles, I G

    1989-07-01

    Two programs, MOTIF and PATTERN, that scan sequences for matches to user-defined motifs and patterns of motifs based on identity and set membership are described. The programs use a simple and logical notation to define motifs, and may be used either interactively or by using command line parameters (suitable for batch processing). The two programs described also incorporate a simple, yet reliable, algorithm that automatically detects in which of six possible formats the sequence entry is written.

  1. Characterizing regulatory path motifs in integrated networks using perturbational data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We introduce Pathicular http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/software/details/Pathicular, a Cytoscape plugin for studying the cellular response to perturbations of transcription factors by integrating perturbational expression data with transcriptional, protein-protein and phosphorylation networks. Pathicular searches for 'regulatory path motifs', short paths in the integrated physical networks which occur significantly more often than expected between transcription factors and their targets in the perturbational data. A case study in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies eight regulatory path motifs and demonstrates their biological significance. PMID:20230615

  2. Improved K-means clustering algorithm for exploring local protein sequence motifs representing common structural property.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Altun, Gulsah; Harrison, Robert; Tai, Phang C; Pan, Yi

    2005-09-01

    Information about local protein sequence motifs is very important to the analysis of biologically significant conserved regions of protein sequences. These conserved regions can potentially determine the diverse conformation and activities of proteins. In this work, recurring sequence motifs of proteins are explored with an improved K-means clustering algorithm on a new dataset. The structural similarity of these recurring sequence clusters to produce sequence motifs is studied in order to evaluate the relationship between sequence motifs and their structures. To the best of our knowledge, the dataset used by our research is the most updated dataset among similar studies for sequence motifs. A new greedy initialization method for the K-means algorithm is proposed to improve traditional K-means clustering techniques. The new initialization method tries to choose suitable initial points, which are well separated and have the potential to form high-quality clusters. Our experiments indicate that the improved K-means algorithm satisfactorily increases the percentage of sequence segments belonging to clusters with high structural similarity. Careful comparison of sequence motifs obtained by the improved and traditional algorithms also suggests that the improved K-means clustering algorithm may discover some relatively weak and subtle sequence motifs, which are undetectable by the traditional K-means algorithms. Many biochemical tests reported in the literature show that these sequence motifs are biologically meaningful. Experimental results also indicate that the improved K-means algorithm generates more detailed sequence motifs representing common structures than previous research. Furthermore, these motifs are universally conserved sequence patterns across protein families, overcoming some weak points of other popular sequence motifs. The satisfactory result of the experiment suggests that this new K-means algorithm may be applied to other areas of bioinformatics

  3. Sequence Bundles: a novel method for visualising, discovering and exploring sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We introduce Sequence Bundles--a novel data visualisation method for representing multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). We identify and address key limitations of the existing bioinformatics data visualisation methods (i.e. the Sequence Logo) by enabling Sequence Bundles to give salient visual expression to sequence motifs and other data features, which would otherwise remain hidden. Methods For the development of Sequence Bundles we employed research-led information design methodologies. Sequences are encoded as uninterrupted, semi-opaque lines plotted on a 2-dimensional reconfigurable grid. Each line represents a single sequence. The thickness and opacity of the stack at each residue in each position indicates the level of conservation and the lines' curved paths expose patterns in correlation and functionality. Several MSAs can be visualised in a composite image. The Sequence Bundles method is designed to favour a tangible, continuous and intuitive display of information. Results We have developed a software demonstration application for generating a Sequence Bundles visualisation of MSAs provided for the BioVis 2013 redesign contest. A subsequent exploration of the visualised line patterns allowed for the discovery of a number of interesting features in the dataset. Reported features include the extreme conservation of sequences displaying a specific residue and bifurcations of the consensus sequence. Conclusions Sequence Bundles is a novel method for visualisation of MSAs and the discovery of sequence motifs. It can aid in generating new insight and hypothesis making. Sequence Bundles is well disposed for future implementation as an interactive visual analytics software, which can complement existing visualisation tools. PMID:25237395

  4. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; Morabito, Giuseppa; Fiers, Martijn; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and network evolution. PMID

  5. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the ‘CCCGCC’ motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  6. Identification of sequence motifs in oligonucleotides whose presence is correlated with antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Matveeva, O V; Tsodikov, A D; Giddings, M; Freier, S M; Wyatt, J R; Spiridonov, A N; Shabalina, S A; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    2000-08-01

    Design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting any mRNA can be much more efficient when several activity-enhancing motifs are included and activity-decreasing motifs are avoided. This conclusion was made after statistical analysis of data collected from >1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides. Highly significant positive correlation between the presence of motifs CCAC, TCCC, ACTC, GCCA and CTCT in the oligonucleotide and its antisense efficiency was demonstrated. In addition, negative correlation was revealed for the motifs GGGG, ACTG, AAA and TAA. It was found that the likelihood of activity of an oligonucleotide against a desired mRNA target is sequence motif content dependent.

  7. Identification of sequence motifs in oligonucleotides whose presence is correlated with antisense activity

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, O. V.; Tsodikov, A. D.; Giddings, M.; Freier, S. M.; Wyatt, J. R.; Spiridonov, A. N.; Shabalina, S. A.; Gesteland, R. F.; Atkins, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    Design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting any mRNA can be much more efficient when several activity-enhancing motifs are included and activity-decreasing motifs are avoided. This conclusion was made after statistical analysis of data collected from >1000 experiments with phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides. Highly significant positive correlation between the presence of motifs CCAC, TCCC, ACTC, GCCA and CTCT in the oligonucleotide and its antisense efficiency was demonstrated. In addition, negative correlation was revealed for the motifs GGGG, ACTG, AAA and TAA. It was found that the likelihood of activity of an oligonucleotide against a desired mRNA target is sequence motif content dependent. PMID:10908347

  8. Active motif finder - a bio-tool based on mutational structures in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Mani; Shanmuga-priya, Palaniyandi; Hemavathi, Kamalakannan; Seenivasagam, Rengasamy

    2011-01-01

    Active Motif Finder (AMF) is a novel algorithmic tool, designed based on mutations in DNA sequences. Tools available at present for finding motifs are based on matching a given motif in the query sequence. AMF describes a new algorithm that identifies the occurrences of patterns which possess all kinds of mutations like insertion, deletion and mismatch. The algorithm is mainly based on the Alignment Score Matrix (ASM) computation by comparing input motif with full length sequence. Much of the effort in bioinformatics is directed to identify these motifs in the sequences of newly discovered genes. The proposed bio-tool serves as an open resource for analysis and useful for studying polymorphisms in DNA sequences. AMF can be searched via a user-friendly interface. This tool is intended to serve the scientific community working in the areas of chemical and structural biology, and is freely available to all users, at http://www.sastra.edu/scbt/amf/. PMID:23554723

  9. Exhaustive Search for Over-represented DNA Sequence Motifs with CisFinder

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We present CisFinder software, which generates a comprehensive list of motifs enriched in a set of DNA sequences and describes them with position frequency matrices (PFMs). A new algorithm was designed to estimate PFMs directly from counts of n-mer words with and without gaps; then PFMs are extended over gaps and flanking regions and clustered to generate non-redundant sets of motifs. The algorithm successfully identified binding motifs for 12 transcription factors (TFs) in embryonic stem cells based on published chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data. Furthermore, CisFinder successfully identified alternative binding motifs of TFs (e.g. POU5F1, ESRRB, and CTCF) and motifs for known and unknown co-factors of genes associated with the pluripotent state of ES cells. CisFinder also showed robust performance in the identification of motifs that were only slightly enriched in a set of DNA sequences. PMID:19740934

  10. HIGEDA: a hierarchical gene-set genetics based algorithm for finding subtle motifs in biological sequences.

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh; Altman, Tom; Gardiner, Katheleen

    2010-02-01

    Identification of motifs in biological sequences is a challenging problem because such motifs are often short, degenerate, and may contain gaps. Most algorithms that have been developed for motif-finding use the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm iteratively. Although EM algorithms can converge quickly, they depend strongly on initialization parameters and can converge to local sub-optimal solutions. In addition, they cannot generate gapped motifs. The effectiveness of EM algorithms in motif finding can be improved by incorporating methods that choose different sets of initial parameters to enable escape from local optima, and that allow gapped alignments within motif models. We have developed HIGEDA, an algorithm that uses the hierarchical gene-set genetic algorithm (HGA) with EM to initiate and search for the best parameters for the motif model. In addition, HIGEDA can identify gapped motifs using a position weight matrix and dynamic programming to generate an optimal gapped alignment of the motif model with sequences from the dataset. We show that HIGEDA outperforms MEME and other motif-finding algorithms on both DNA and protein sequences. Source code and test datasets are available for download at http://ouray.cudenver.edu/~tnle/, implemented in C++ and supported on Linux and MS Windows.

  11. Computational generation and screening of RNA motifs in large nucleotide sequence pools

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; Izzo, Joseph A.; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Gan, Hin Hark; Schlick, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Although identification of active motifs in large random sequence pools is central to RNA in vitro selection, no systematic computational equivalent of this process has yet been developed. We develop a computational approach that combines target pool generation, motif scanning and motif screening using secondary structure analysis for applications to 1012–1014-sequence pools; large pool sizes are made possible using program redesign and supercomputing resources. We use the new protocol to search for aptamer and ribozyme motifs in pools up to experimental pool size (1014 sequences). We show that motif scanning, structure matching and flanking sequence analysis, respectively, reduce the initial sequence pool by 6–8, 1–2 and 1 orders of magnitude, consistent with the rare occurrence of active motifs in random pools. The final yields match the theoretical yields from probability theory for simple motifs and overestimate experimental yields, which constitute lower bounds, for aptamers because screening analyses beyond secondary structure information are not considered systematically. We also show that designed pools using our nucleotide transition probability matrices can produce higher yields for RNA ligase motifs than random pools. Our methods for generating, analyzing and designing large pools can help improve RNA design via simulation of aspects of in vitro selection. PMID:20448026

  12. Mitoxantrone and Analogues Bind and Stabilize i-Motif Forming DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Elisé P.; Day, Henry A.; Ibrahim, Ali M.; Kumar, Jeethendra; Boswell, Leo J. E.; Huguin, Camille; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Pors, Klaus; Waller, Zoë A. E.

    2016-12-01

    There are hundreds of ligands which can interact with G-quadruplex DNA, yet very few which target i-motif. To appreciate an understanding between the dynamics between these structures and how they can be affected by intervention with small molecule ligands, more i-motif binding compounds are required. Herein we describe how the drug mitoxantrone can bind, induce folding of and stabilise i-motif forming DNA sequences, even at physiological pH. Additionally, mitoxantrone was found to bind i-motif forming sequences preferentially over double helical DNA. We also describe the stabilisation properties of analogues of mitoxantrone. This offers a new family of ligands with potential for use in experiments into the structure and function of i-motif forming DNA sequences.

  13. Mitoxantrone and Analogues Bind and Stabilize i-Motif Forming DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Elisé P.; Day, Henry A.; Ibrahim, Ali M.; Kumar, Jeethendra; Boswell, Leo J. E.; Huguin, Camille; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Pors, Klaus; Waller, Zoë A. E.

    2016-01-01

    There are hundreds of ligands which can interact with G-quadruplex DNA, yet very few which target i-motif. To appreciate an understanding between the dynamics between these structures and how they can be affected by intervention with small molecule ligands, more i-motif binding compounds are required. Herein we describe how the drug mitoxantrone can bind, induce folding of and stabilise i-motif forming DNA sequences, even at physiological pH. Additionally, mitoxantrone was found to bind i-motif forming sequences preferentially over double helical DNA. We also describe the stabilisation properties of analogues of mitoxantrone. This offers a new family of ligands with potential for use in experiments into the structure and function of i-motif forming DNA sequences. PMID:28004744

  14. Physical-chemical property based sequence motifs and methods regarding same

    DOEpatents

    Braun, Werner; Mathura, Venkatarajan S.; Schein, Catherine H.

    2008-09-09

    A data analysis system, program, and/or method, e.g., a data mining/data exploration method, using physical-chemical property motifs. For example, a sequence database may be searched for identifying segments thereof having physical-chemical properties similar to the physical-chemical property motifs.

  15. Fast and Accurate Discovery of Degenerate Linear Motifs in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Linear motifs mediate a wide variety of cellular functions, which makes their characterization in protein sequences crucial to understanding cellular systems. However, the short length and degenerate nature of linear motifs make their discovery a difficult problem. Here, we introduce MotifHound, an algorithm particularly suited for the discovery of small and degenerate linear motifs. MotifHound performs an exact and exhaustive enumeration of all motifs present in proteins of interest, including all of their degenerate forms, and scores the overrepresentation of each motif based on its occurrence in proteins of interest relative to a background (e.g., proteome) using the hypergeometric distribution. To assess MotifHound, we benchmarked it together with state-of-the-art algorithms. The benchmark consists of 11,880 sets of proteins from S. cerevisiae; in each set, we artificially spiked-in one motif varying in terms of three key parameters, (i) number of occurrences, (ii) length and (iii) the number of degenerate or “wildcard” positions. The benchmark enabled the evaluation of the impact of these three properties on the performance of the different algorithms. The results showed that MotifHound and SLiMFinder were the most accurate in detecting degenerate linear motifs. Interestingly, MotifHound was 15 to 20 times faster at comparable accuracy and performed best in the discovery of highly degenerate motifs. We complemented the benchmark by an analysis of proteins experimentally shown to bind the FUS1 SH3 domain from S. cerevisiae. Using the full-length protein partners as sole information, MotifHound recapitulated most experimentally determined motifs binding to the FUS1 SH3 domain. Moreover, these motifs exhibited properties typical of SH3 binding peptides, e.g., high intrinsic disorder and evolutionary conservation, despite the fact that none of these properties were used as prior information. MotifHound is available (http://michnick.bcm.umontreal.ca or http

  16. Fission yeast hotspot sequence motifs are also active in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Walter W; Steiner, Estelle M

    2012-01-01

    In most organisms, including humans, meiotic recombination occurs preferentially at a limited number of sites in the genome known as hotspots. There has been substantial progress recently in elucidating the factors determining the location of meiotic recombination hotspots, and it is becoming clear that simple sequence motifs play a significant role. In S. pombe, there are at least five unique sequence motifs that have been shown to produce hotspots of recombination, and it is likely that there are more. In S. cerevisiae, simple sequence motifs have also been shown to produce hotspots or show significant correlations with hotspots. Some of the hotspot motifs in both yeasts are known or suspected to bind transcription factors (TFs), which are required for the activity of those hotspots. Here we show that four of the five hotspot motifs identified in S. pombe also create hotspots in the distantly related budding yeast S. cerevisiae. For one of these hotspots, M26 (also called CRE), we identify TFs, Cst6 and Sko1, that activate and inhibit the hotspot, respectively. In addition, two of the hotspot motifs show significant correlations with naturally occurring hotspots. The conservation of these hotspots between the distantly related fission and budding yeasts suggests that these sequence motifs, and others yet to be discovered, may function widely as hotspots in many diverse organisms.

  17. Factoring local sequence composition in motif significance analysis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Patrick; Keich, Uri

    2008-01-01

    We recently introduced a biologically realistic and reliable significance analysis of the output of a popular class of motif finders. In this paper we further improve our significance analysis by incorporating local base composition information. Relying on realistic biological data simulation, as well as on FDR analysis applied to real data, we show that our method is significantly better than the increasingly popular practice of using the normal approximation to estimate the significance of a finder's output. Finally we turn to leveraging our reliable significance analysis to improve the actual motif finding task. Specifically, endowing a variant of the Gibbs Sampler with our improved significance analysis we demonstrate that de novo finders can perform better than has been perceived. Significantly, our new variant outperforms all the finders reviewed in a recently published comprehensive analysis of the Harbison genome-wide binding location data. Interestingly, many of these finders incorporate additional information such as nucleosome positioning and the significance of binding data.

  18. Characterization of the tandem CWCH2 sequence motif: a hallmark of inter-zinc finger interactions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) domain is widely conserved among eukaryotic proteins. In Zic/Gli/Zap1 C2H2 ZF proteins, the two N-terminal ZFs form a single structural unit by sharing a hydrophobic core. This structural unit defines a new motif comprised of two tryptophan side chains at the center of the hydrophobic core. Because each tryptophan residue is located between the two cysteine residues of the C2H2 motif, we have named this structure the tandem CWCH2 (tCWCH2) motif. Results Here, we characterized 587 tCWCH2-containing genes using data derived from public databases. We categorized genes into 11 classes including Zic/Gli/Glis, Arid2/Rsc9, PacC, Mizf, Aebp2, Zap1/ZafA, Fungl, Zfp106, Twincl, Clr1, and Fungl-4ZF, based on sequence similarity, domain organization, and functional similarities. tCWCH2 motifs are mostly found in organisms belonging to the Opisthokonta (metazoa, fungi, and choanoflagellates) and Amoebozoa (amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum). By comparison, the C2H2 ZF motif is distributed widely among the eukaryotes. The structure and organization of the tCWCH2 motif, its phylogenetic distribution, and molecular phylogenetic analysis suggest that prototypical tCWCH2 genes existed in the Opisthokonta ancestor. Within-group or between-group comparisons of the tCWCH2 amino acid sequence identified three additional sequence features (site-specific amino acid frequencies, longer linker sequence between two C2H2 ZFs, and frequent extra-sequences within C2H2 ZF motifs). Conclusion These features suggest that the tCWCH2 motif is a specialized motif involved in inter-zinc finger interactions. PMID:20167128

  19. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  20. An artificial intelligence approach to motif discovery in protein sequences: application to steriod dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T L; Baker, M E; Elkan, C P

    1997-05-01

    MEME (Multiple Expectation-maximization for Motif Elicitation) is a unique new software tool that uses artificial intelligence techniques to discover motifs shared by a set of protein sequences in a fully automated manner. This paper is the first detailed study of the use of MEME to analyse a large, biologically relevant set of sequences, and to evaluate the sensitivity and accuracy of MEME in identifying structurally important motifs. For this purpose, we chose the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily because it is large and phylogenetically diverse, providing a test of how well MEME can work on sequences with low amino acid similarity. Moreover, this dataset contains enzymes of biological importance, and because several enzymes have known X-ray crystallographic structures, we can test the usefulness of MEME for structural analysis. The first six motifs from MEME map onto structurally important alpha-helices and beta-strands on Streptomyces hydrogenans 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We also describe MAST (Motif Alignment Search Tool), which conveniently uses output from MEME for searching databases such as SWISS-PROT and Genpept. MAST provides statistical measures that permit a rigorous evaluation of the significance of database searches with individual motifs or groups of motifs. A database search of Genpept90 by MAST with the log-odds matrix of the first six motifs obtained from MEME yields a bimodal output, demonstrating the selectivity of MAST. We show for the first time, using primary sequence analysis, that bacterial sugar epimerases are homologs of short-chain dehydrogenases. MEME and MAST will be increasingly useful as genome sequencing provides large datasets of phylogenetically divergent sequences of biomedical interest.

  1. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs.

    PubMed

    Neely, Robert K; Roberts, Richard J

    2008-05-14

    Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360), cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases.

  2. Predicting candidate genomic sequences that correspond to synthetic functional RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Laserson, Uri; Gan, Hin Hark; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Riboswitches and RNA interference are important emerging mechanisms found in many organisms to control gene expression. To enhance our understanding of such RNA roles, finding small regulatory motifs in genomes presents a challenge on a wide scale. Many simple functional RNA motifs have been found by in vitro selection experiments, which produce synthetic target-binding aptamers as well as catalytic RNAs, including the hammerhead ribozyme. Motivated by the prediction of Piganeau and Schroeder [(2003) Chem. Biol., 10, 103–104] that synthetic RNAs may have natural counterparts, we develop and apply an efficient computational protocol for identifying aptamer-like motifs in genomes. We define motifs from the sequence and structural information of synthetic aptamers, search for sequences in genomes that will produce motif matches, and then evaluate the structural stability and statistical significance of the potential hits. Our application to aptamers for streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin B and ATP identifies 37 candidate sequences (in coding and non-coding regions) that fold to the target aptamer structures in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Further energetic screening reveals that several candidates exhibit energetic properties and sequence conservation patterns that are characteristic of functional motifs. Besides providing candidates for experimental testing, our computational protocol offers an avenue for expanding natural RNA's functional repertoire. PMID:16254081

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of a conserved sequence motif in the ribosomal genes of the ciliate Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Catania, Francesco; Lynch, Michael

    2010-05-04

    In protozoa, the identification of preserved motifs by comparative genomics is often impeded by difficulties to generate reliable alignments for non-coding sequences. Moreover, the evolutionary dynamics of regulatory elements in 3' untranslated regions (both in protozoa and metazoa) remains a virtually unexplored issue. By screening Paramecium tetraurelia's 3' untranslated regions for 8-mers that were previously found to be preserved in mammalian 3' UTRs, we detect and characterize a motif that is distinctly conserved in the ribosomal genes of this ciliate. The motif appears to be conserved across Paramecium aurelia species but is absent from the ribosomal genes of four additional non-Paramecium species surveyed, including another ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Motif-free ribosomal genes retain fewer paralogs in the genome and appear to be lost more rapidly relative to motif-containing genes. Features associated with the discovered preserved motif are consistent with this 8-mer playing a role in post-transcriptional regulation. Our observations 1) shed light on the evolution of a putative regulatory motif across large phylogenetic distances; 2) are expected to facilitate the understanding of the modulation of ribosomal genes expression in Paramecium; and 3) reveal a largely unexplored--and presumably not restricted to Paramecium--association between the presence/absence of a DNA motif and the evolutionary fate of its host genes.

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of a conserved sequence motif in the ribosomal genes of the ciliate Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In protozoa, the identification of preserved motifs by comparative genomics is often impeded by difficulties to generate reliable alignments for non-coding sequences. Moreover, the evolutionary dynamics of regulatory elements in 3' untranslated regions (both in protozoa and metazoa) remains a virtually unexplored issue. Results By screening Paramecium tetraurelia's 3' untranslated regions for 8-mers that were previously found to be preserved in mammalian 3' UTRs, we detect and characterize a motif that is distinctly conserved in the ribosomal genes of this ciliate. The motif appears to be conserved across Paramecium aurelia species but is absent from the ribosomal genes of four additional non-Paramecium species surveyed, including another ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Motif-free ribosomal genes retain fewer paralogs in the genome and appear to be lost more rapidly relative to motif-containing genes. Features associated with the discovered preserved motif are consistent with this 8-mer playing a role in post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions Our observations 1) shed light on the evolution of a putative regulatory motif across large phylogenetic distances; 2) are expected to facilitate the understanding of the modulation of ribosomal genes expression in Paramecium; and 3) reveal a largely unexplored--and presumably not restricted to Paramecium--association between the presence/absence of a DNA motif and the evolutionary fate of its host genes. PMID:20441586

  5. Transferring functional annotations of membrane transporters on the basis of sequence similarity and sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane transporters catalyze the transport of small solute molecules across biological barriers such as lipid bilayer membranes. Experimental identification of the transported substrates is very tedious. Once a particular transport mechanism has been identified in one organism, it is thus highly desirable to transfer this information to related transporter sequences in different organisms based on bioinformatics evidence. Results We present a thorough benchmark at which level of sequence identity membrane transporters from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Arabidopsis thaliana belong to the same families of the Transporter Classification (TC) system, and at what level these membrane transporters mediate the transport of the same substrate. We found that two membrane transporter sequences from different organisms that are aligned with normalized BLAST expectation value better than E-value 1e-8 are highly likely to belong to the same TC family (F-measure around 90%). Enriched sequence motifs identified by MEME at thresholds below 1e-12 support accurate classification into TC families for about two thirds of the sequences (F-measure 80% and higher). For the comparison of transported substrates, we focused on the four largest substrate classes of amino acids, sugars, metal ions, and phosphate. At similar identity thresholds, the nature of the transported substrates was more divergent (F-measure 40 - 75% at the same thresholds) than the TC family membership. Conclusions We suggest an acceptable threshold of 1e-8 for BLAST and HMMER where at least three quarters of the sequences are classified according to the TC system with a reasonably high accuracy. Researchers who wish to apply these thresholds in their studies should multiply these thresholds by the size of the database they search against. Our findings should be useful to those who wish to transfer transporter functional annotations across species. PMID:24283849

  6. A gating motif in the translocation channel sets the hydrophobicity threshold for signal sequence function

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, Steven F.; Mandon, Elisabet C.

    2012-01-01

    A critical event in protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum is the structural transition between the closed and open conformations of Sec61, the eukaryotic translocation channel. Channel opening allows signal sequence insertion into a gap between the N- and C-terminal halves of Sec61. We have identified a gating motif that regulates the transition between the closed and open channel conformations. Polar amino acid substitutions in the gating motif cause a gain-of-function phenotype that permits translocation of precursors with marginally hydrophobic signal sequences. In contrast, hydrophobic substitutions at certain residues in the gating motif cause a protein translocation defect. We conclude that the gating motif establishes the hydrophobicity threshold for functional insertion of a signal sequence into the Sec61 complex, thereby allowing the wild-type translocation channel to discriminate between authentic signal sequences and the less hydrophobic amino acid segments in cytosolic proteins. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that the gating motif is conserved between eubacterial and archaebacterial SecY and eukaryotic Sec61. PMID:23229898

  7. Recurring sequence-structure motifs in (βα)8-barrel proteins and experimental optimization of a chimeric protein designed based on such motifs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Tongchuan; Liu, Ruicun; Song, Meilin; Wang, Juncheng; Hong, Jiong; Chen, Quan; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    An interesting way of generating novel artificial proteins is to combine sequence motifs from natural proteins, mimicking the evolutionary path suggested by natural proteins comprising recurring motifs. We analyzed the βα and αβ modules of TIM barrel proteins by structure alignment-based sequence clustering. A number of preferred motifs were identified. A chimeric TIM was designed by using recurring elements as mutually compatible interfaces. The foldability of the designed TIM protein was then significantly improved by six rounds of directed evolution. The melting temperature has been improved by more than 20°C. A variety of characteristics suggested that the resulting protein is well-folded. Our analysis provided a library of peptide motifs that is potentially useful for different protein engineering studies. The protein engineering strategy of using recurring motifs as interfaces to connect partial natural proteins may be applied to other protein folds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An intuitionistic approach to scoring DNA sequences against transcription factor binding site motifs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Blanco, Armando; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2010-11-08

    Transcription factors (TFs) control transcription by binding to specific regions of DNA called transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). The identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology and includes the subtask of predicting the location of known TFBS motifs in a given DNA sequence. It has previously been shown that, when scoring matches to known TFBS motifs, interdependencies between positions within a motif should be taken into account. However, this remains a challenging task owing to the fact that sequences similar to those of known TFBSs can occur by chance with a relatively high frequency. Here we present a new method for matching sequences to TFBS motifs based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets (IFS) theory, an approach that has been shown to be particularly appropriate for tackling problems that embody a high degree of uncertainty. We propose SCintuit, a new scoring method for measuring sequence-motif affinity based on IFS theory. Unlike existing methods that consider dependencies between positions, SCintuit is designed to prevent overestimation of less conserved positions of TFBSs. For a given pair of bases, SCintuit is computed not only as a function of their combined probability of occurrence, but also taking into account the individual importance of each single base at its corresponding position. We used SCintuit to identify known TFBSs in DNA sequences. Our method provides excellent results when dealing with both synthetic and real data, outperforming the sensitivity and the specificity of two existing methods in all the experiments we performed. The results show that SCintuit improves the prediction quality for TFs of the existing approaches without compromising sensitivity. In addition, we show how SCintuit can be successfully applied to real research problems. In this study the reliability of the IFS theory for motif discovery tasks is proven.

  9. Physical Motif Clustering within Intrinsically Disordered Nucleoporin Sequences Reveals Universal Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) FG motif containing proteins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive. Our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These functionally conserved features provide insight into the particular biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC, strongly constraining current models. Additionally this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. PMID:24066078

  10. ssHMM: extracting intuitive sequence-structure motifs from high-throughput RNA-binding protein data.

    PubMed

    Heller, David; Krestel, Ralf; Ohler, Uwe; Vingron, Martin; Marsico, Annalisa

    2017-08-30

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in RNA post-transcriptional regulation and recognize target RNAs via sequence-structure motifs. The extent to which RNA structure influences protein binding in the presence or absence of a sequence motif is still poorly understood. Existing RNA motif finders either take the structure of the RNA only partially into account, or employ models which are not directly interpretable as sequence-structure motifs. We developed ssHMM, an RNA motif finder based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) and Gibbs sampling which fully captures the relationship between RNA sequence and secondary structure preference of a given RBP. Compared to previous methods which output separate logos for sequence and structure, it directly produces a combined sequence-structure motif when trained on a large set of sequences. ssHMM's model is visualized intuitively as a graph and facilitates biological interpretation. ssHMM can be used to find novel bona fide sequence-structure motifs of uncharacterized RBPs, such as the one presented here for the YY1 protein. ssHMM reaches a high motif recovery rate on synthetic data, it recovers known RBP motifs from CLIP-Seq data, and scales linearly on the input size, being considerably faster than MEMERIS and RNAcontext on large datasets while being on par with GraphProt. It is freely available on Github and as a Docker image. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Enhancing Gibbs sampling method for motif finding in DNA with initial graph representation of sequences.

    PubMed

    Stepančič, Ziva

    2014-10-01

    Finding short patterns with residue variation in a set of sequences is still an open problem in genetics, since motif-finding techniques on DNA and protein sequences are inconclusive on real data sets and their performance varies on different species. Hence, finding new algorithms and evolving established methods are vital to further understanding of genome properties and the mechanisms of protein development. In this work, we present an approach to finding functional motifs in DNA sequences in connection to Gibbs sampling method. Starting points in the search space are partly determined via graphical representation of input sequences opposed to completely random initial points with the standard Gibbs sampling. Our algorithm is evaluated on synthetic as well as on real data sets by using several statistics, such as sensitivity, positive predictive value, specificity, performance, and correlation coefficient. Additionally, a comparison between our algorithm and the basic standard Gibbs sampling algorithm is made to show improvement in accuracy, repeatability, and performance.

  12. Creation of Hybrid Nanorods From Sequences of Natural Trimeric Fibrous Proteins Using the Fibritin Trimerization Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Mitraki, Anna

    Stable, artificial fibrous proteins that can be functionalized open new avenues in fields such as bionanomaterials design and fiber engineering. An important source of inspiration for the creation of such proteins are natural fibrous proteins such as collagen, elastin, insect silks, and fibers from phages and viruses. The fibrous parts of this last class of proteins usually adopt trimeric, β-stranded structural folds and are appended to globular, receptor-binding domains. It has been recently shown that the globular domains are essential for correct folding and trimerization and can be successfully substituted by a very small (27-amino acid) trimerization motif from phage T4 fibritin. The hybrid proteins are correctly folded nanorods that can withstand extreme conditions. When the fibrous part derives from the adenovirus fiber shaft, different tissue-targeting specificities can be engineered into the hybrid proteins, which therefore can be used as gene therapy vectors. The integration of such stable nanorods in devices is also a big challenge in the field of biomechanical design. The fibritin foldon domain is a versatile trimerization motif and can be combined with a variety of fibrous motifs, such as coiled-coil, collagenous, and triple β-stranded motifs, provided the appropriate linkers are used. The combination of different motifs within the same fibrous molecule to create stable rods with multiple functions can even be envisioned. We provide a comprehensive overview of the experimental procedures used for designing, creating, and characterizing hybrid fibrous nanorods using the fibritin trimerization motif.

  13. Identification of an oligodeoxynucleotide sequence motif that specifically inhibits phosphorylation by protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, A M; Matson, S; Cheng, K; Fisher, E; Koretzky, G A; Koland, J G

    1997-04-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have central roles in cellular signal transduction. We have identified a sequence motif (CGT[C]GA) in phosphorothioate-modified oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of recombinant or immunoprecipitated PTK in vitro. Hexamer ODNs containing this motif block both substrate and autophosphorylation of at least four different PTKs but have no apparent effect on the enzymatic activity of a serine/threonine protein kinase. These data suggest possible new applications for ODNs and have implications for the design and interpretation of experiments using antisense or triplex ODNs.

  14. Classification of protein motifs based on subcellular localization uncovers evolutionary relationships at both sequence and functional levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most proteins have evolved in specific cellular compartments that limit their functions and potential interactions. On the other hand, motifs define amino acid arrangements conserved between protein family members and represent powerful tools for assigning function to protein sequences. The ideal motif would identify all members of a protein family but in practice many motifs identify both family members and unrelated proteins, referred to as True Positive (TP) and False Positive (FP) sequences, respectively. Results To address the relationship between protein motifs, protein function and cellular localization, we systematically assigned subcellular localization data to motif sequences from the comprehensive PROSITE sequence motif database. Using this data we analyzed relationships between localization and function. We find that TPs and FPs have a strong tendency to localize in different compartments. When multiple localizations are considered, TPs are usually distributed between related cellular compartments. We also identified cases where FPs are concentrated in particular subcellular regions, indicating possible functional or evolutionary relationships with TP sequences of the same motif. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the systematic examination of subcellular localization has the potential to uncover evolutionary and functional relationships between motif-containing sequences. We believe that this type of analysis complements existing motif annotations and could aid in their interpretation. Our results shed light on the evolution of cellular organelles and potentially establish the basis for new subcellular localization and function prediction algorithms. PMID:23865897

  15. Using hybrid hierarchical K-means (HHK) clustering algorithm for protein sequence motif super-rule-tree (SRT) structure construction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bernard; He, Jieyue; Pellicer, Stephen; Pan, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Many algorithms or techniques to discover motifs require a predefined fixed window size in advance. Because of the fixed size, these approaches often deliver a number of similar motifs simply shifted by some bases or including mismatches. To confront the mismatched motifs problem, we use the super-rule concept to construct a Super-Rule-Tree (SRT) by a modified Hybrid Hierarchical K-means (HHK) clustering algorithm, which requires no parameter set-up to identify the similarities and dissimilarities between the motifs. By analysing the motif results generated by our approach, they are significant not only in sequence area but also in secondary structure similarity.

  16. DNA sequence motif: a jack of all trades for ChIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing, often referred to as ChIP-Seq, has become an industry standard to study a landscape of DNA-protein interactions in vivo. ChIP-Seq captures highly specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factors (TFs) bound to appropriate binding sites, and sparse patterns formed by different histone marks. In this review, we focus on DNA sequence analysis methods adequate for TF ChIP-Seq data. We discuss numerous tasks starting from basic DNA motif finding and motif discovery as is, further applied to explore various features of experimental data. We show how sequence analysis of ChIP-Seq data derives novel biological knowledge on multiple levels, from individual transcription factor binding sites to genome segments operating as regulatory modules. Finally, we provide an overview of existing software in the field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DEEP MOTIF DASHBOARD: VISUALIZING AND UNDERSTANDING GENOMIC SEQUENCES USING DEEP NEURAL NETWORKS.

    PubMed

    Lanchantin, Jack; Singh, Ritambhara; Wang, Beilun; Qi, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    Deep neural network (DNN) models have recently obtained state-of-the-art prediction accuracy for the transcription factor binding (TFBS) site classification task. However, it remains unclear how these approaches identify meaningful DNA sequence signals and give insights as to why TFs bind to certain locations. In this paper, we propose a toolkit called the Deep Motif Dashboard (DeMo Dashboard) which provides a suite of visualization strategies to extract motifs, or sequence patterns from deep neural network models for TFBS classification. We demonstrate how to visualize and understand three important DNN models: convolutional, recurrent, and convolutional-recurrent networks. Our first visualization method is finding a test sequence's saliency map which uses first-order derivatives to describe the importance of each nucleotide in making the final prediction. Second, considering recurrent models make predictions in a temporal manner (from one end of a TFBS sequence to the other), we introduce temporal output scores, indicating the prediction score of a model over time for a sequential input. Lastly, a class-specific visualization strategy finds the optimal input sequence for a given TFBS positive class via stochastic gradient optimization. Our experimental results indicate that a convolutional-recurrent architecture performs the best among the three architectures. The visualization techniques indicate that CNN-RNN makes predictions by modeling both motifs as well as dependencies among them.

  18. Species-Specific Minimal Sequence Motif for Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Activating Mouse TLR9.

    PubMed

    Pohar, Jelka; Lainšček, Duško; Fukui, Ryutaro; Yamamoto, Chikako; Miyake, Kensuke; Jerala, Roman; Benčina, Mojca

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG recapitulate the activation of TLR9 by microbial DNA. ODNs are potent stimulators of the immune response in cells expressing TLR9. Despite extensive use of mice as experimental animals in basic and applied immunological research, the key sequence determinants that govern the activation of mouse TLR9 by ODNs have not been well defined. We performed a systematic investigation of the sequence motif of B class phosphodiester ODNs to identify the sequence properties that govern mouse TLR9 activation. In contrast to ODNs activating human TLR9, where the minimal sequence motif for the receptor activation comprises a pair of closely positioned CpGs we found that the mouse TLR9 requires a single CpG positioned 4-6 nt from the 5'-end. Activation is augmented by a 5'TCC sequence one to three nucleotides from the CG. The distance of the CG dinucleotide of four to six nucleotides from the 5'-end and the ODN's length fine-tunes activation of mouse macrophages. Length of the ODN <23 and >29 nt decreases activation of dendritic cells. The ODNs with minimal sequence induce Th1-type cytokine synthesis in dendritic cells and confirm the expression of cell surface markers in B cells. Identification of the minimal sequence provides an insight into the sequence selectivity of mouse TLR9 and points to the differences in the receptor selectivity between species probably as a result of differences in the receptor binding sites.

  19. Conserved sequence motifs among bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphatases that define a new phosphohydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Thaller, M. C.; Schippa, S.; Rossolini, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Members of a new molecular family of bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs), indicated as class C, were found to share significant sequence similarities to bacterial class B NSAPs and to some plant acid phosphatases, representing the first example of a family of bacterial NSAPs that has a relatively close eukaryotic counterpart. Despite the lack of an overall similarity, conserved sequence motifs were also identified among the above enzyme families (class B and class C bacterial NSAPs, and related plant phosphatases) and several other families of phosphohydrolases, including bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatases, histidinol-phosphatase domains of the bacterial bifunctional enzymes imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratases, and bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphoserine phosphatases and threalose-6-phosphatases. These conserved motifs are clustered within two domains, separated by a variable spacer region, according to the pattern [FILMAVT]-D-[ILFRMVY]-D-[GSNDE]-[TV]-[ILVAM]-[AT S VILMC]-X-¿YFWHKR)-X-¿YFWHNQ¿-X( 102,191)-¿KRHNQ¿-G-D-¿FYWHILVMC¿-¿QNH¿-¿FWYGP¿-D -¿PSNQYW¿. The dephosphorylating activity common to all these proteins supports the definition of this phosphatase motif and the inclusion of these enzymes into a superfamily of phosphohydrolases that we propose to indicate as "DDDD" after the presence of the four invariant aspartate residues. Database searches retrieved various hypothetical proteins of unknown function containing this or similar motifs, for which a phosphohydrolase activity could be hypothesized. PMID:9684901

  20. Using machine learning to predict gene expression and discover sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejing

    Recently, large amounts of experimental data for complex biological systems have become available. We use tools and algorithms from machine learning to build data-driven predictive models. We first present a novel algorithm to discover gene sequence motifs associated with temporal expression patterns of genes. Our algorithm, which is based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, is able to directly model the flow of information, from gene sequence to gene expression, to learn cis regulatory motifs and characterize associated gene expression patterns. Our algorithm outperforms traditional computational methods e.g. clustering in motif discovery. We then present a study of extending a machine learning model for transcriptional regulation predictive of genetic regulatory response to Caenorhabditis elegans. We show meaningful results both in terms of prediction accuracy on the test experiments and biological information extracted from the regulatory program. The model discovers DNA binding sites ab initio. We also present a case study where we detect a signal of lineage-specific regulation. Finally we present a comparative study on learning predictive models for motif discovery, based on different boosting algorithms: Adaptive Boosting (AdaBoost), Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Totally Corrective Boosting (TotalBoost). We evaluate and compare the performance of the three boosting algorithms via both statistical and biological validation, for hypoxia response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  1. Nucleotide binding database NBDB – a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand–protein interactions found in crystallized ligand–protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  2. A Convex Atomic-Norm Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ian E. H.; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Jiong; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery, known as NP-hard problems, are two fundamental tasks in Bioinformatics. Existing approaches to these two problems are based on either local search methods such as Expectation Maximization (EM), Gibbs Sampling or greedy heuristic methods. In this work, we develop a convex relaxation approach to both problems based on the recent concept of atomic norm and develop a new algorithm, termed Greedy Direction Method of Multiplier, for solving the convex relaxation with two convex atomic constraints. Experiments show that our convex relaxation approach produces solutions of higher quality than those standard tools widely-used in Bioinformatics community on the Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery problems. PMID:27559428

  3. 'Size leap' algorithm: an efficient extraction of the longest common motifs from a molecular sequence set. Application to the DNA sequence reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Danckaert, A; Chappey, C; Hazout, S

    1991-10-01

    We propose a new method, called 'size leap' algorithm, of search for motifs of maximum size and common to two fragments at least. It allows the creation of a reduced database of motifs from a set of sequences whose size obeys the series of Fibonacci numbers. The convenience lies in the efficiency of the motif extraction. It can be applied in the establishment of overlap regions for DNA sequence reconstruction and multiple alignment of biological sequences. The method of complete DNA sequence reconstruction by extraction of the longest motifs ('anchor motifs') is presented as an application of the size leap algorithm. The details of a reconstruction from three sequenced fragments are given as an example.

  4. The tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains sequence motifs characteristic for enzymes containing molybdopterin dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Schmitz, R A; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1995-12-15

    Formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases are molybdenum or tungsten iron-sulfur proteins containing a pterin dinucleotide cofactor. We report here on the primary structures of the four subunits FwdABCD of the tungsten enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum which were determined by cloning and sequencing the encoding genes fwdABCD. FwdB was found to contain sequence motifs characteristic for molybdopterin-dinucleotide-containing enzymes indicating that this subunit harbors the active site. FwdA, FwdC and FwdD showed no significant sequence similarity to proteins in the data bases. Northern blot analysis revealed that the four fwd genes form a transcription unit together with three additional genes designated fwdE, fwdF and fwdG. A 17.8-kDa protein and an 8.6-kDa protein, both containing two [4Fe-4S] cluster binding motifs, were deduced from fwdE and fwdG. The open reading frame fwdF encodes a 38.6-kDa protein containing eight binding motifs for [4Fe-4S] clusters suggesting the gene product to be a novel polyferredoxin. All seven fwd genes were expressed in Escherichia coli yielding proteins of the expected size. The fwd operon was found to be located in a region of the M. thermoautotrophicum genome encoding molybdenum enzymes and proteins involved in molybdopterin biosynthesis.

  5. RNA-protein binding motifs mining with a new hybrid deep learning based cross-domain knowledge integration approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2017-02-28

    RNAs play key roles in cells through the interactions with proteins known as the RNA-binding proteins (RBP) and their binding motifs enable crucial understanding of the post-transcriptional regulation of RNAs. How the RBPs correctly recognize the target RNAs and why they bind specific positions is still far from clear. Machine learning-based algorithms are widely acknowledged to be capable of speeding up this process. Although many automatic tools have been developed to predict the RNA-protein binding sites from the rapidly growing multi-resource data, e.g. sequence, structure, their domain specific features and formats have posed significant computational challenges. One of current difficulties is that the cross-source shared common knowledge is at a higher abstraction level beyond the observed data, resulting in a low efficiency of direct integration of observed data across domains. The other difficulty is how to interpret the prediction results. Existing approaches tend to terminate after outputting the potential discrete binding sites on the sequences, but how to assemble them into the meaningful binding motifs is a topic worth of further investigation. In viewing of these challenges, we propose a deep learning-based framework (iDeep) by using a novel hybrid convolutional neural network and deep belief network to predict the RBP interaction sites and motifs on RNAs. This new protocol is featured by transforming the original observed data into a high-level abstraction feature space using multiple layers of learning blocks, where the shared representations across different domains are integrated. To validate our iDeep method, we performed experiments on 31 large-scale CLIP-seq datasets, and our results show that by integrating multiple sources of data, the average AUC can be improved by 8% compared to the best single-source-based predictor; and through cross-domain knowledge integration at an abstraction level, it outperforms the state-of-the-art predictors by 6

  6. CyanoLyase: a database of phycobilin lyase sequences, motifs and functions

    PubMed Central

    Bretaudeau, Anthony; Coste, François; Humily, Florian; Garczarek, Laurence; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Six, Christophe; Ratin, Morgane; Collin, Olivier; Schluchter, Wendy M.; Partensky, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    CyanoLyase (http://cyanolyase.genouest.org/) is a manually curated sequence and motif database of phycobilin lyases and related proteins. These enzymes catalyze the covalent ligation of chromophores (phycobilins) to specific binding sites of phycobiliproteins (PBPs). The latter constitute the building bricks of phycobilisomes, the major light-harvesting systems of cyanobacteria and red algae. Phycobilin lyases sequences are poorly annotated in public databases. Sequences included in CyanoLyase were retrieved from all available genomes of these organisms and a few others by similarity searches using biochemically characterized enzyme sequences and then classified into 3 clans and 32 families. Amino acid motifs were computed for each family using Protomata learner. CyanoLyase also includes BLAST and a novel pattern matching tool (Protomatch) that allow users to rapidly retrieve and annotate lyases from any new genome. In addition, it provides phylogenetic analyses of all phycobilin lyases families, describes their function, their presence/absence in all genomes of the database (phyletic profiles) and predicts the chromophorylation of PBPs in each strain. The site also includes a thorough bibliography about phycobilin lyases and genomes included in the database. This resource should be useful to scientists and companies interested in natural or artificial PBPs, which have a number of biotechnological applications, notably as fluorescent markers. PMID:23175607

  7. Peptide sequence motif analysis of tandem MS data with the SALSA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Hansen, Beau T; Davey, Sean W; Tiscareno, Laura; Mason, Daniel E

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a pattern recognition algorithm called SALSA (scoring algorithm for spectral analysis) for the detection of specific features in tandem MS (MS-MS) spectra. Application of the SALSA algorithm to the detection of peptide MS-MS ion series enables identification of MS-MS spectra displaying characteristics of specific peptide sequences. SALSA analysis scores MS-MS spectra based on correspondence between theoretical ion series for peptide sequence motifs and actual MS-MS product ion series, regardless of their absolute positions on the m/z axis. Analyses of tryptic digests of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by LC-MS-MS followed by SALSA analysis detected MS-MS spectra for both unmodified and multiple modified forms of several BSA tryptic peptides. SALSA analysis of MS-MS data from mixtures of BSA and human serum albumin (HSA) tryptic digests indicated that ion series searches with BSA peptide sequence motifs identified MS-MS spectra for both BSA and closely related HSA peptides. Optimal discrimination between MS-MS spectra of variant peptide forms is achieved when the SALSA search criteria are optimized to the target peptide. Application of SALSA to LC-MS-MS proteome analysis will facilitate the characterization of modified and sequence variant proteins.

  8. A Sequence Motif within Trypanosome Precursor tRNAs Influences Abundance and Mitochondrial Localization

    PubMed Central

    Sherrer, R. Lynn; Yermovsky-Kammerer, Audra E.; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2003-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei lacks mitochondrial genes encoding tRNAs and must import nuclearly encoded tRNAs from the cytosol. The mechanism and specificity of this process remain unclear. We have identified a unique sequence motif, YGG(C/A)RRC, upstream of the genes encoding mitochondrially localized tRNAs in T. brucei. Both in vitro import studies and in vivo transfection studies indicate that deletion of the YGG(C/A)RRC sequence alters mitochondrial localization of tRNALeu, and in vivo studies also show a decrease in the cellular abundance of tRNALeu. These studies provide direct evidence for cis-acting RNA motifs within precursor tRNAs that facilitate the selection of tRNAs for mitochondrial import in trypanosomes. Furthermore, we found that mutations to the YGG(C/A)RRC sequence also altered the intracellular distribution of other endogenous tRNAs, suggesting a general role for this sequence in tRNA trafficking in trypanosomes. PMID:14645518

  9. A sequence motif within trypanosome precursor tRNAs influences abundance and mitochondrial localization.

    PubMed

    Sherrer, R Lynn; Yermovsky-Kammerer, Audra E; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2003-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei lacks mitochondrial genes encoding tRNAs and must import nuclearly encoded tRNAs from the cytosol. The mechanism and specificity of this process remain unclear. We have identified a unique sequence motif, YGG(C/A)RRC, upstream of the genes encoding mitochondrially localized tRNAs in T. brucei. Both in vitro import studies and in vivo transfection studies indicate that deletion of the YGG(C/A)RRC sequence alters mitochondrial localization of tRNA(Leu), and in vivo studies also show a decrease in the cellular abundance of tRNA(Leu). These studies provide direct evidence for cis-acting RNA motifs within precursor tRNAs that facilitate the selection of tRNAs for mitochondrial import in trypanosomes. Furthermore, we found that mutations to the YGG(C/A)RRC sequence also altered the intracellular distribution of other endogenous tRNAs, suggesting a general role for this sequence in tRNA trafficking in trypanosomes.

  10. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  11. QGRS-H Predictor: a web server for predicting homologous quadruplex forming G-rich sequence motifs in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Camille; Frees, Scott; Bagga, Paramjeet S.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring G-quadruplex structural motifs, formed by guanine-rich nucleic acids, have been reported in telomeric, promoter and transcribed regions of mammalian genomes. G-quadruplex structures have received significant attention because of growing evidence for their role in important biological processes, human disease and as therapeutic targets. Lately, there has been much interest in the potential roles of RNA G-quadruplexes as cis-regulatory elements of post-transcriptional gene expression. Large-scale computational genomics studies on G-quadruplexes have difficulty validating their predictions without laborious testing in ‘wet’ labs. We have developed a bioinformatics tool, QGRS-H Predictor that can map and analyze conserved putative Quadruplex forming 'G'-Rich Sequences (QGRS) in mRNAs, ncRNAs and other nucleotide sequences, e.g. promoter, telomeric and gene flanking regions. Identifying conserved regulatory motifs helps validate computations and enhances accuracy of predictions. The QGRS-H Predictor is particularly useful for mapping homologous G-quadruplex forming sequences as cis-regulatory elements in the context of 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions, and CDS sections of aligned mRNA sequences. QGRS-H Predictor features highly interactive graphic representation of the data. It is a unique and user-friendly application that provides many options for defining and studying G-quadruplexes. The QGRS-H Predictor can be freely accessed at: http://quadruplex.ramapo.edu/qgrs/app/start. PMID:22576365

  12. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds.

  13. DNA sequence analysis of cagA 3' motifs of Helicobacter pylori strains from patients with peptic ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Salih, Barik A; Bolek, Bora Kazim; Arikan, Soykan

    2010-02-01

    The Helicobacter pylori cagA gene is a major virulence factor that plays an important role in gastric pathologies. DNA sequence data for the cagA 3' region of Western isolates differ markedly in their EPIYA motifs from those of East Asian isolates. An increase in the number of these motifs is known to be associated with gastric cancer. Whether such an association is also the case for peptic ulceration was investigated in this study. Gastric biopsies were collected from 96 patients with duodenal ulcer (DU), gastric ulcer (GU) and gastritis. The types of EPIYA motif detected by PCR among 28 DU strains were 13 ABC, eight ABCC, six ABCCC, and in one patient both ABC and ABCCCCC; among nine GU strains were two ABC, five ABCC and two ABCCC; and among 40 gastritis strains were 35 ABC and five ABCC. DNA sequencing was carried out to confirm the detection of the EPIYA motif types and to analyse their peptide sequences. A significant association was found between the number of the EPIYA-C motifs (>or=2) and peptic ulceration (P=0.00001) compared with gastritis. In conclusion, this study shows that our patients harboured cagA-positive H. pylori strains with EPIYA motifs of the Western type and that the increase in the number of EPIYA-C motifs was significantly associated with DU and GU but not with gastritis, indicating predictive association with the severity of the disease.

  14. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  15. Quadfinder: server for identification and analysis of quadruplex-forming motifs in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Vinod; Hariharan, Manoj; Arora, Amit; Maiti, Souvik

    2006-01-01

    G-quadruplex secondary structures, which play a structural role in repetitive DNA such as telomeres, may also play a functional role at other genomic locations as targetable regulatory elements which control gene expression. The recent interest in application of quadruplexes in biological systems prompted us to develop a tool for the identification and analysis of quadruplex-forming nucleotide sequences especially in the RNA. Here we present Quadfinder, an online server for prediction and bioinformatics of uni-molecular quadruplex-forming nucleotide sequences. The server is designed to be user-friendly and needs minimal intervention by the user, while providing flexibility of defining the variants of the motif. The server is freely available at URL . PMID:16845097

  16. A Bayesian hidden Markov model for motif discovery through joint modeling of genomic sequence and ChIP-chip data.

    PubMed

    Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Gupta, Mayetri; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2009-12-01

    We propose a unified framework for the analysis of chromatin (Ch) immunoprecipitation (IP) microarray (ChIP-chip) data for detecting transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or motifs. ChIP-chip assays are used to focus the genome-wide search for TFBSs by isolating a sample of DNA fragments with TFBSs and applying this sample to a microarray with probes corresponding to tiled segments across the genome. Present analytical methods use a two-step approach: (i) analyze array data to estimate IP-enrichment peaks then (ii) analyze the corresponding sequences independently of intensity information. The proposed model integrates peak finding and motif discovery through a unified Bayesian hidden Markov model (HMM) framework that accommodates the inherent uncertainty in both measurements. A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is formulated for parameter estimation, adapting recursive techniques used for HMMs. In simulations and applications to a yeast RAP1 dataset, the proposed method has favorable TFBS discovery performance compared to currently available two-stage procedures in terms of both sensitivity and specificity.

  17. A Bayesian hidden Markov model for motif discovery through joint modeling of genomic sequence and ChIP-chip data

    PubMed Central

    Gelfond, Jonathan A. L.; Gupta, Mayetri; Ibrahim, Joseph G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY We propose a unified framework for the analysis of Chromatin (Ch) Immunoprecipitation (IP) microarray (ChIP-chip) data for detecting transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or motifs. ChIP-chip assays are used to focus the genome-wide search for TFBSs by isolating a sample of DNA fragments with TFBSs and applying this sample to a microarray with probes corresponding to tiled segments across the genome. Present analytical methods use a two-step approach: (i) analyze array data to estimate IP enrichment peaks then (ii) analyze the corresponding sequences independently of intensity information. The proposed model integrates peak finding and motif discovery through a unified Bayesian hidden Markov model (HMM) framework that accommodates the inherent uncertainty in both measurements. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm is formulated for parameter estimation, adapting recursive techniques used for HMMs. In simulations and applications to a yeast RAP1 dataset, the proposed method has favorable TFBS discovery performance compared to currently available two-stage procedures in terms of both sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19210737

  18. Complementary intron sequence motifs associated with human exon repetition: a role for intragenic, inter-transcript interactions in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Richard J; Eperon, Ian C; Samani, Nilesh J

    2007-01-15

    Exon repetition describes the presence of tandemly repeated exons in mRNA in the absence of duplications in the genome. The regulation of this process is not fully understood. We therefore investigated the entire flanking intronic sequences of exons involved in exon repetition for common sequence elements. A computational analysis of 48 human single exon repetition events identified two common sequence motifs. One of these motifs is pyrimidine-rich and is more common in the upstream intron, whilst the other motif is highly enriched in purines and is more common in the downstream intron. As the two motifs are complementary to each other, they support a model by which exon repetition occurs as a result of trans-splicing between separate pre-mRNA transcripts from the same gene that are brought together during transcription by complementary intronic sequences. The majority of the motif instances overlap with the locations of mobile elements such as Alu elements. We explore the potential importance of complementary intron sequences in a rat gene that undertakes natural exon repetition in a strain specific manner. The possibility that distant complementary sequences can stimulate inter-transcript splicing during transcription suggests an unsuspected new role for potential secondary structures in endogenous genes.

  19. Functional characterization of sequence motifs in the transit peptide of Arabidopsis small subunit of rubisco.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Sookjin; Lee, Gil-Je; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Cheong, Gang-Won; Hwang, Inhwan

    2006-02-01

    The transit peptides of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins are necessary and sufficient for targeting and import of proteins into chloroplasts. However, the sequence information encoded by transit peptides is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated sequence motifs in the transit peptide of the small subunit of the Rubisco complex by examining the ability of various mutant transit peptides to target green fluorescent protein reporter proteins to chloroplasts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf protoplasts. We divided the transit peptide into eight blocks (T1 through T8), each consisting of eight or 10 amino acids, and generated mutants that had alanine (Ala) substitutions or deletions, of one or two T blocks in the transit peptide. In addition, we generated mutants that had the original sequence partially restored in single- or double-T-block Ala (A) substitution mutants. Analysis of chloroplast import of these mutants revealed several interesting observations. Single-T-block mutations did not noticeably affect targeting efficiency, except in T1 and T4 mutations. However, double-T mutants, T2A/T4A, T3A/T6A, T3A/T7A, T4A/T6A, and T4A/T7A, caused a 50% to 100% loss in targeting ability. T3A/T6A and T4A/T6A mutants produced only precursor proteins, whereas T2A/T4A and T4A/T7A mutants produced only a 37-kD protein. Detailed analyses revealed that sequence motifs ML in T1, LKSSA in T3, FP and RK in T4, CMQVW in T6, and KKFET in T7 play important roles in chloroplast targeting. In T1, the hydrophobicity of ML is important for targeting. LKSSA in T3 is functionally equivalent to CMQVW in T6 and KKFET in T7. Furthermore, subcellular fractionation revealed that Ala substitution in T1, T3, and T6 produced soluble precursors, whereas Ala substitution in T4 and T7 produced intermediates that were tightly associated with membranes. These results demonstrate that the transit peptide contains multiple motifs and that some of them act in concert or

  20. MoD Tools: regulatory motif discovery in nucleotide sequences from co-regulated or homologous genes

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Giulio; Mereghetti, Paolo; Zambelli, Federico; Stefani, Marco; Mauri, Giancarlo; Pesole, Graziano

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the complex mechanisms regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is one of the greatest challenges of the post-genomic era. The MoD (MOtif Discovery) Tools web server comprises a set of tools for the discovery of novel conserved sequence and structure motifs in nucleotide sequences, motifs that in turn are good candidates for regulatory activity. The server includes the following programs: Weeder, for the discovery of conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in nucleotide sequences from co-regulated genes; WeederH, for the discovery of conserved TFBSs and distal regulatory modules in sequences from homologous genes; RNAProfile, for the discovery of conserved secondary structure motifs in unaligned RNA sequences whose secondary structure is not known. In this way, a given gene can be compared with other co-regulated genes or with its homologs, or its mRNA can be analyzed for conserved motifs regulating its post-transcriptional fate. The web server thus provides researchers with different strategies and methods to investigate the regulation of gene expression, at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Available at and . PMID:16845071

  1. Sequence motifs and prokaryotic expression of the reptilian paramyxovirus fusion protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, J.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Fourteen reptilian paramyxovirus isolates were chosen to represent the known extent of genetic diversity among this novel group of viruses. Selected regions of the fusion (F) gene were sequenced, analyzed and compared. The F gene of all isolates contained conserved motifs homologous to those described for other members of the family Paramyxoviridae including: signal peptide, transmembrane domain, furin cleavage site, fusion peptide, N-linked glycosylation sites, and two heptad repeats, the second of which (HRB-LZ) had the characteristics of a leucine zipper. Selected regions of the fusion gene of isolate Gono-GER85 were inserted into a prokaryotic expression system to generate three recombinant protein fragments of various sizes. The longest recombinant protein was cleaved by furin into two fragments of predicted length. Western blot analysis with virus-neutralizing rabbit-antiserum against this isolate demonstrated that only the longest construct reacted with the antiserum. This construct was unique in containing 30 additional C-terminal amino acids that included most of the HRB-LZ. These results indicate that the F genes of reptilian paramyxoviruses contain highly conserved motifs typical of other members of the family and suggest that the HRB-LZ domain of the reptilian paramyxovirus F protein contains a linear antigenic epitope. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  2. Sequence motifs and prokaryotic expression of the reptilian paramyxovirus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Franke, J; Batts, W N; Ahne, W; Kurath, G; Winton, J R

    2006-03-01

    Fourteen reptilian paramyxovirus isolates were chosen to represent the known extent of genetic diversity among this novel group of viruses. Selected regions of the fusion (F) gene were sequenced, analyzed and compared. The F gene of all isolates contained conserved motifs homologous to those described for other members of the family Paramyxoviridae including: signal peptide, transmembrane domain, furin cleavage site, fusion peptide, N-linked glycosylation sites, and two heptad repeats, the second of which (HRB-LZ) had the characteristics of a leucine zipper. Selected regions of the fusion gene of isolate Gono-GER85 were inserted into a prokaryotic expression system to generate three recombinant protein fragments of various sizes. The longest recombinant protein was cleaved by furin into two fragments of predicted length. Western blot analysis with virus-neutralizing rabbit-antiserum against this isolate demonstrated that only the longest construct reacted with the antiserum. This construct was unique in containing 30 additional C-terminal amino acids that included most of the HRB-LZ. These results indicate that the F genes of reptilian paramyxoviruses contain highly conserved motifs typical of other members of the family and suggest that the HRB-LZ domain of the reptilian paramyxovirus F protein contains a linear antigenic epitope.

  3. Integration of retinal image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  4. The Motif Tool Assessment Platform (MTAP) for sequence-based transcription factor binding site prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Quest, Daniel; Ali, Hesham

    2010-01-01

    Predicting transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) from sequence is one of the most challenging problems in computational biology. The development of (semi-)automated computer-assisted prediction methods is needed to find TFBS over an entire genome, which is a first step in reconstructing mechanisms that control gene activity. Bioinformatics journals continue to publish diverse methods for predicting TFBS on a monthly basis. To help practitioners in deciding which method to use to predict for a particular TFBS, we provide a platform to assess the quality and applicability of the available methods. Assessment tools allow researchers to determine how methods can be expected to perform on specific organisms or on specific transcription factor families. This chapter introduces the TFBS detection problem and reviews current strategies for evaluating algorithm effectiveness. In this chapter, a novel and robust assessment tool, the Motif Tool Assessment Platform (MTAP), is introduced and discussed.

  5. The structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere reveals the prevalence of tandemly repeated sequences able to form i-motifs

    PubMed Central

    Garavís, Miguel; Méndez-Lago, María; Gabelica, Valérie; Whitehead, Siobhan L.; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres are the chromosomal loci at which spindle microtubules attach to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most eukaryotes, centromeres are made up of highly repetitive DNA sequences (satellite DNA) interspersed with middle repetitive DNA sequences (transposable elements). Despite the efforts to establish complete genomic sequences of eukaryotic organisms, the so-called ‘finished’ genomes are not actually complete because the centromeres have not been assembled due to the intrinsic difficulties in constructing both physical maps and complete sequence assemblies of long stretches of tandemly repetitive DNA. Here we show the first molecular structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere and the ability of the C-rich dodeca satellite strand to form dimeric i-motifs. The finding of i-motif structures in simple and complex centromeric satellite DNAs leads us to suggest that these centromeric sequences may have been selected not by their primary sequence but by their ability to form noncanonical secondary structures. PMID:26289671

  6. The structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere reveals the prevalence of tandemly repeated sequences able to form i-motifs.

    PubMed

    Garavís, Miguel; Méndez-Lago, María; Gabelica, Valérie; Whitehead, Siobhan L; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2015-08-20

    Centromeres are the chromosomal loci at which spindle microtubules attach to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most eukaryotes, centromeres are made up of highly repetitive DNA sequences (satellite DNA) interspersed with middle repetitive DNA sequences (transposable elements). Despite the efforts to establish complete genomic sequences of eukaryotic organisms, the so-called 'finished' genomes are not actually complete because the centromeres have not been assembled due to the intrinsic difficulties in constructing both physical maps and complete sequence assemblies of long stretches of tandemly repetitive DNA. Here we show the first molecular structure of an endogenous Drosophila centromere and the ability of the C-rich dodeca satellite strand to form dimeric i-motifs. The finding of i-motif structures in simple and complex centromeric satellite DNAs leads us to suggest that these centromeric sequences may have been selected not by their primary sequence but by their ability to form noncanonical secondary structures.

  7. Sequence search and analysis of gene products containing RNA recognition motifs in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-12-22

    Gene expression is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. RNA-binding proteins are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation events. They are involved in a variety of functions such as splicing, alternative splicing, nuclear import and export of mRNA, RNA stability and translation. There are several well-characterized RNA-binding motifs present in a whole genome, such as RNA recognition motif (RRM), KH domain, zinc-fingers etc. In the present study, we have investigated human genome for the presence of RRM-containing gene products starting from RRM domains in the Pfam (Protein family database) repository. In Pfam, seven families are recorded to contain RRM-containing proteins. We studied these families for their taxonomic representation, sequence features (identity, length, phylogeny) and structural properties (mapping conservation on the structures). We then examined the presence of RRM-containing gene products in Homo sapiens genome and identified 928 RRM-containing gene products. These were studied for their predicted domain architectures, biological processes, involvement in pathways, disease relevance and disorder content. RRM domains were observed to occur multiple times in a single polypeptide. However, there are 56 other co-existing domains involved in different regulatory functions. Further, functional enrichment analysis revealed that RRM-containing gene products are mainly involved in biological functions such as mRNA splicing and its regulation. Our sequence analysis identified RRM-containing gene products in the human genome and provides insights into their domain architectures and biological functions. Since mRNA splicing and gene regulation are important in the cellular machinery, this analysis provides an early overview of genes that carry out these functions.

  8. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling and vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-28

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, that is, the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, platelets express 3 glycoproteins that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors: Fc receptor γ chain, which is noncovalently associated with the glycoprotein VI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2, the receptor for podoplanin, and Fc receptor γII A, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. Although both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet G protein-coupled receptors in hemostasis, the contribution of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed during the past decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury.

  9. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs.

    PubMed

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M; Kjaerulff, S; Bonvin, A; Nielsen, O; Clevers, H

    2000-09-01

    Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment of promoter elements controlled by the yeast genes ste11 and Rox1 has indicated strict conservation of a larger DNA motif. By site selection, we identify a highly specific 12-base pair motif for Ste11, AGAACAAAGAAA. Similarly, we show that Tcf1, MatMc, and Sox4 bind unique, highly specific DNA motifs of 12, 12, and 10 base pairs, respectively. Footprinting with a deletion mutant of Ste11 reveals a novel interaction between the 3' base pairs of the extended DNA motif and amino acids C-terminal to the HMG domain. The sequence-specific interaction of Ste11 with these 3' base pairs contributes significantly to binding and bending of the DNA motif.

  10. Direct RNA motif definition and identification from multiple sequence alignments using secondary structure profiles.

    PubMed

    Gautheret, D; Lambert, A

    2001-11-09

    We present here a new approach to the problem of defining RNA signatures and finding their occurrences in sequence databases. The proposed method is based on "secondary structure profiles". An RNA sequence alignment with secondary structure information is used as an input. Two types of weight matrices/profiles are constructed from this alignment: single strands are represented by a classical lod-scores profile while helical regions are represented by an extended "helical profile" comprising 16 lod-scores per position, one for each of the 16 possible base-pairs. Database searches are then conducted using a simultaneous search for helical profiles and dynamic programming alignment of single strand profiles. The algorithm has been implemented into a new software, ERPIN, that performs both profile construction and database search. Applications are presented for several RNA motifs. The automated use of sequence information in both single-stranded and helical regions yields better sensitivity/specificity ratios than descriptor-based programs. Furthermore, since the translation of alignments into profiles is straightforward with ERPIN, iterative searches can easily be conducted to enrich collections of homologous RNAs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Exceptional motifs in different Markov chain models for a statistical analysis of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Schbath, S; Prum, B; de Turckheim, E

    1995-01-01

    Identifying exceptional motifs is often used for extracting information from long DNA sequences. The two difficulties of the method are the choice of the model that defines the expected frequencies of words and the approximation of the variance of the difference T(W) between the number of occurrences of a word W and its estimation. We consider here different Markov chain models, either with stationary or periodic transition probabilities. We estimate the variance of the difference T(W) by the conditional variance of the number of occurrences of W given the oligonucleotides counts that define the model. Two applications show how to use asymptotically standard normal statistics associated with the counts to describe a given sequence in terms of its outlying words. Sequences of Escherichia coli and of Bacillus subtilis are compared with respect to their exceptional tri- and tetranucleotides. For both bacteria, exceptional 3-words are mainly found in the coding frame. E. coli palindrome counts are analyzed in different models, showing that many overabundant words are one-letter mutations of avoided palindromes.

  12. SIRW: a web server for the Simple Indexing and Retrieval System that combines sequence motif searches with keyword searches

    PubMed Central

    Ramu, Chenna

    2003-01-01

    SIRW (http://sirw.embl.de/) is a World Wide Web interface to the Simple Indexing and Retrieval System (SIR) that is capable of parsing and indexing various flat file databases. In addition it provides a framework for doing sequence analysis (e.g. motif pattern searches) for selected biological sequences through keyword search. SIRW is an ideal tool for the bioinformatics community for searching as well as analyzing biological sequences of interest. PMID:12824415

  13. SIRW: A web server for the Simple Indexing and Retrieval System that combines sequence motif searches with keyword searches.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Chenna

    2003-07-01

    SIRW (http://sirw.embl.de/) is a World Wide Web interface to the Simple Indexing and Retrieval System (SIR) that is capable of parsing and indexing various flat file databases. In addition it provides a framework for doing sequence analysis (e.g. motif pattern searches) for selected biological sequences through keyword search. SIRW is an ideal tool for the bioinformatics community for searching as well as analyzing biological sequences of interest.

  14. Synthesis, anti-mycobacterial activity and DNA sequence-selectivity of a library of biaryl-motifs containing polyamides.

    PubMed

    Brucoli, Federico; Guzman, Juan D; Maitra, Arundhati; James, Colin H; Fox, Keith R; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-07-01

    The alarming rise of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains, compel the development of new molecules with novel modes of action to control this world health emergency. Distamycin analogues containing N-terminal biaryl-motifs 2(1-5)(1-7) were synthesised using a solution-phase approach and evaluated for their anti-mycobacterial activity and DNA-sequence selectivity. Thiophene dimer motif-containing polyamide 2(2,6) exhibited 10-fold higher inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis compared to distamycin and library member 2(5,7) showed high binding affinity for the 5'-ACATAT-3' sequence.

  15. The nature of actinomycin D binding to d(AACCAXYG) sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Ming; Sha, Feng; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2004-01-01

    Earlier studies by others had indicated that actinomycin D (ACTD) binds well to d(AACCATAG) and the end sequence TAG-3' is essential for its strong binding. In an effort to verify these assertions and to uncover other possible strong ACTD binding sequences as well as to elucidate the nature of their binding, systematic studies have been carried out with oligomers of d(AACCAXYG) sequence motifs, where X and Y can be any DNA base. The results indicate that in addition to TAG-3', oligomers ending with XAG-3' and XCG-3' all provide binding constants > or =1 x 10(7) M(-1) and even sequences ending with XTG-3' and XGG-3' exhibit binding affinities in the range 1-8 x 10(6) M(-1). The nature of the strong ACTD affinity of the sequences d(A1A2C3C4A5X6Y7G8) was delineated via comparative binding studies of d(AACCAAAG), d(AGCCAAAG) and their base substituted derivatives. Two binding modes are proposed to coexist, with the major component consisting of the 3'-terminus G base folding back to base pair with C4 and the ACTD inserting at A2C3C4 by looping out the C3 while both faces of the chromophore are stacked by A and G bases, respectively. The minor mode is for the G to base pair with C3 and to have the same A/chromophore/G stacking but without a looped out base. These assertions are supported by induced circular dichroic and fluorescence spectral measurements.

  16. DMINDA 2.0: integrated and systematic views of regulatory DNA motif identification and analyses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinyu; Chen, Xin; McDermaid, Adam; Ma, Qin

    2017-08-15

    Motif identification and analyses are important and have been long-standing computational problems in bioinformatics. Substantial efforts have been made in this field during the past several decades. However, the lack of intuitive and integrative web servers impedes the progress of making effective use of emerging algorithms and tools. Here we present an integrated web server, DMINDA 2.0, which contains: (i) five motif prediction and analyses algorithms, including a phylogenetic footprinting framework; (ii) 2125 species with complete genomes to support the above five functions, covering animals, plants and bacteria and (iii) bacterial regulon prediction and visualization. DMINDA 2.0 is freely available at http://bmbl.sdstate.edu/DMINDA2. qin.ma@sdstate.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Engineering Proteins with Enhanced Mechanical Stability by Force Specific Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenzhe; Negi, Surendra; Oberhauser, Andres F.; Braun, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the unfolding process by mechanical forces; however, the rational design of novel proteins with specific mechanical strength remains challenging. We have approached this problem from a new perspective that generates linear physical-chemical properties (PCP) motifs from a limited AFM data set. Guided by our linear sequence analysis we designed and analyzed four new mutants of the titin I1 domain with the goal of increasing the domain's mechanical strength. All four mutants could be cloned and expressed as soluble proteins. AFM data indicate that at least two of the mutants have increased molecular mechanical strength. This observation suggests that the PCP method is useful to graft sequences specific for high mechanical stability to weak proteins to increase their mechanical stability, and represents an additional tool in the design of novel proteins besides steered molecular dynamics calculations, coarse grained simulations and phi-value analysis of the transition state. PMID:22274941

  18. Detecting Remote Sequence Homology in Disordered Proteins: Discovery of Conserved Motifs in the N-Termini of Mononegavirales phosphoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, David; Belshaw, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Paramyxovirinae are a large group of viruses that includes measles virus and parainfluenza viruses. The viral Phosphoprotein (P) plays a central role in viral replication. It is composed of a highly variable, disordered N-terminus and a conserved C-terminus. A second viral protein alternatively expressed, the V protein, also contains the N-terminus of P, fused to a zinc finger. We suspected that, despite their high variability, the N-termini of P/V might all be homologous; however, using standard approaches, we could previously identify sequence conservation only in some Paramyxovirinae. We now compared the N-termini using sensitive sequence similarity search programs, able to detect residual similarities unnoticeable by conventional approaches. We discovered that all Paramyxovirinae share a short sequence motif in their first 40 amino acids, which we called soyuz1. Despite its short length (11–16aa), several arguments allow us to conclude that soyuz1 probably evolved by homologous descent, unlike linear motifs. Conservation across such evolutionary distances suggests that soyuz1 plays a crucial role and experimental data suggest that it binds the viral nucleoprotein to prevent its illegitimate self-assembly. In some Paramyxovirinae, the N-terminus of P/V contains a second motif, soyuz2, which might play a role in blocking interferon signaling. Finally, we discovered that the P of related Mononegavirales contain similarly overlooked motifs in their N-termini, and that their C-termini share a previously unnoticed structural similarity suggesting a common origin. Our results suggest several testable hypotheses regarding the replication of Mononegavirales and suggest that disordered regions with little overall sequence similarity, common in viral and eukaryotic proteins, might contain currently overlooked motifs (intermediate in length between linear motifs and disordered domains) that could be detected simply by comparing orthologous proteins. PMID:22403617

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of a Novel Globular Domain in RBM10 Containing OCRE, the Octamer Repeat Sequence Motif.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan T; Serrano, Pedro; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-05

    The OCtamer REpeat (OCRE) has been annotated as a 42-residue sequence motif with 12 tyrosine residues in the spliceosome trans-regulatory elements RBM5 and RBM10 (RBM [RNA-binding motif]), which are known to regulate alternative splicing of Fas and Bcl-x pre-mRNA transcripts. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure determination showed that the RBM10 OCRE sequence motif is part of a 55-residue globular domain containing 16 aromatic amino acids, which consists of an anti-parallel arrangement of six β strands, with the first five strands containing complete or incomplete Tyr triplets. This OCRE globular domain is a distinctive component of RBM10 and is more widely conserved in RBM10s across the animal kingdom than the ubiquitous RNA recognition components. It is also found in the functionally related RBM5. Thus, it appears that the three-dimensional structure of the globular OCRE domain, rather than the 42-residue OCRE sequence motif alone, confers specificity on RBM10 intermolecular interactions in the spliceosome.

  20. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  1. Viroids: from genotype to phenotype just relying on RNA sequence and structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson-Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures - either global or local - determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs.

  2. Viroids: From Genotype to Phenotype Just Relying on RNA Sequence and Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson–Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures – either global or local – determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs. PMID:22719735

  3. Modeling of the Ebola Virus Delta Peptide Reveals a Potential Lytic Sequence Motif

    PubMed Central

    Gallaher, William R.; Garry, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP) and the full length glycoprotein (GP), which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the “delta peptide”, a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis. PMID:25609303

  4. Integrative analysis of tissue-specific methylation and alternative splicing identifies conserved transcription factor binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jun; Oliver, Verity F.; Zhu, Heng; Zack, Donald J.; Qian, Jiang; Merbs, Shannath L.

    2013-01-01

    The exact role of intragenic DNA methylation in regulating tissue-specific gene regulation is unclear. Recently, the DNA-binding protein CTCF has been shown to participate in the regulation of alternative splicing in a DNA methylation-dependent manner. To globally evaluate the relationship between DNA methylation and tissue-specific alternative splicing, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of mouse retina and brain. In protein-coding genes, tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) were preferentially located in exons and introns. Gene ontology and evolutionary conservation analysis suggest that these T-DMRs are likely to be biologically relevant. More than 14% of alternatively spliced genes were associated with a T-DMR. T-DMR-associated genes were enriched for developmental genes, suggesting that a specific set of alternatively spliced genes may be regulated through DNA methylation. Novel DNA sequences motifs overrepresented in T-DMRs were identified as being associated with positive and/or negative regulation of alternative splicing in a position-dependent context. The majority of these evolutionarily conserved motifs contain a CpG dinucleotide. Some transcription factors, which recognize these motifs, are known to be involved in splicing. Our results suggest that DNA methylation-dependent alternative splicing is widespread and lay the foundation for further mechanistic studies of the role of DNA methylation in tissue-specific splicing regulation. PMID:23887936

  5. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

    2016-07-12

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. Triazine-Based Sequence-Defined Polymers with Side-Chain Diversity and Backbone-Backbone Interaction Motifs.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Daily, Michael D

    2016-03-14

    Sequence control in polymers, well-known in nature, encodes structure and functionality. Here we introduce a new architecture, based on the nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry of cyanuric chloride, that creates a new class of sequence-defined polymers dubbed TZPs. Proof of concept is demonstrated with two synthesized hexamers, having neutral and ionizable side chains. Molecular dynamics simulations show backbone-backbone interactions, including H-bonding motifs and pi-pi interactions. This architecture is arguably biomimetic while differing from sequence-defined polymers having peptide bonds. The synthetic methodology supports the structural diversity of side chains known in peptides, as well as backbone-backbone hydrogen-bonding motifs, and will thus enable new macromolecules and materials with useful functions.

  8. DNA recognition for virus assembly through multiple sequence-independent interactions with a helix-turn-helix motif

    PubMed Central

    Greive, Sandra J.; Fung, Herman K.H.; Chechik, Maria; Jenkins, Huw T.; Weitzel, Stephen E.; Aguiar, Pedro M.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Glousieau, Matthieu; Gladyshev, Grigory V.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    The helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif features frequently in protein DNA-binding assemblies. Viral pac site-targeting small terminase proteins possess an unusual architecture in which the HTH motifs are displayed in a ring, distinct from the classical HTH dimer. Here we investigate how such a circular array of HTH motifs enables specific recognition of the viral genome for initiation of DNA packaging during virus assembly. We found, by surface plasmon resonance and analytical ultracentrifugation, that individual HTH motifs of the Bacillus phage SF6 small terminase bind the packaging regions of SF6 and related SPP1 genome weakly, with little local sequence specificity. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation studies with an arbitrary single-site substrate suggest that the HTH motif contacts DNA similarly to how certain HTH proteins contact DNA non-specifically. Our observations support a model where specificity is generated through conformational selection of an intrinsically bent DNA segment by a ring of HTHs which bind weakly but cooperatively. Such a system would enable viral gene regulation and control of the viral life cycle, with a minimal genome, conferring a major evolutionary advantage for SPP1-like viruses. PMID:26673721

  9. Defining RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure-activity relationships through sequencing.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-15

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluable insights into potential bystander targets of these clinically used drugs. We utilized two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS), a library-versus-library screening approach, to select the motifs displayed in a 3×3 nucleotide internal loop library and in a 6-nucleotide hairpin library that bind with high affinity and selectivity to six aminoglycoside derivatives. The selected RNA motifs were then analyzed using structure-activity relationships through sequencing (StARTS), a statistical approach that defines the privileged RNA motif space that binds a small molecule. StARTS allowed for the facile annotation of the selected RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions in terms of affinity and selectivity. The interactions selected by 2DCS generally have nanomolar affinities, which is higher affinity than the binding of aminoglycosides to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA A-site.

  10. DNA consensus sequence motif for binding response regulator PhoP, a virulence regulator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Shuishu

    2014-12-30

    Tuberculosis has reemerged as a serious threat to human health because of the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains and synergetic infection with HIV, prompting an urgent need for new and more efficient treatments. The PhoP-PhoR two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in the virulence of the pathogen and thus represents a potential drug target. To study the mechanism of gene transcription regulation by response regulator PhoP, we identified a high-affinity DNA sequence for PhoP binding using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The sequence contains a direct repeat of two 7 bp motifs separated by a 4 bp spacer, TCACAGC(N4)TCACAGC. The specificity of the direct-repeat sequence for PhoP binding was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PhoP binds to the direct repeat as a dimer in a highly cooperative manner. We found many genes previously identified to be regulated by PhoP that contain the direct-repeat motif in their promoter sequences. Synthetic DNA fragments at the putative promoter-binding sites bind PhoP with variable affinity, which is related to the number of mismatches in the 7 bp motifs, the positions of the mismatches, and the spacer and flanking sequences. Phosphorylation of PhoP increases the affinity but does not change the specificity of DNA binding. Overall, our results confirm the direct-repeat sequence as the consensus motif for PhoP binding and thus pave the way for identification of PhoP directly regulated genes in different mycobacterial genomes.

  11. SVM2Motif—Reconstructing Overlapping DNA Sequence Motifs by Mimicking an SVM Predictor

    PubMed Central

    Vidovic, Marina M. -C.; Görnitz, Nico; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rätsch, Gunnar; Kloft, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Identifying discriminative motifs underlying the functionality and evolution of organisms is a major challenge in computational biology. Machine learning approaches such as support vector machines (SVMs) achieve state-of-the-art performances in genomic discrimination tasks, but—due to its black-box character—motifs underlying its decision function are largely unknown. As a remedy, positional oligomer importance matrices (POIMs) allow us to visualize the significance of position-specific subsequences. Although being a major step towards the explanation of trained SVM models, they suffer from the fact that their size grows exponentially in the length of the motif, which renders their manual inspection feasible only for comparably small motif sizes, typically k ≤ 5. In this work, we extend the work on positional oligomer importance matrices, by presenting a new machine-learning methodology, entitled motifPOIM, to extract the truly relevant motifs—regardless of their length and complexity—underlying the predictions of a trained SVM model. Our framework thereby considers the motifs as free parameters in a probabilistic model, a task which can be phrased as a non-convex optimization problem. The exponential dependence of the POIM size on the oligomer length poses a major numerical challenge, which we address by an efficient optimization framework that allows us to find possibly overlapping motifs consisting of up to hundreds of nucleotides. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach on a synthetic data set as well as a real-world human splice site data set. PMID:26690911

  12. A combined sequence and structure based method for discovering enriched motifs in RNA from in vivo binding data.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Maya; Paz, Inbal; Kohen, Refael; Mesika, Rona; Yakhini, Zohar; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2017-04-15

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in regulating many processes in the cell. RBPs often recognize their RNA targets in a specific manner. In addition to the RNA primary sequence, the structure of the RNA has been shown to play a central role in RNA recognition by RBPs. In recent years, many experimental approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, were developed and employed to identify and characterize RBP targets and extract their binding specificities. In vivo binding techniques, such as CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (CLIP)-based methods, enable the characterization of protein binding sites on RNA targets. However, these methods do not provide information regarding the structural preferences of the protein. While methods to obtain the structure of RNA are available, inferring both the sequence and the structure preferences of RBPs remains a challenge. Here we present SMARTIV, a novel computational tool for discovering combined sequence and structure binding motifs from in vivo RNA binding data relying on the sequences of the target sites, the ranking of their binding scores and their predicted secondary structure. The combined motifs are provided in a unified representation that is informative and easy for visual perception. We tested the method on CLIP-seq data from different platforms for a variety of RBPs. Overall, we show that our results are highly consistent with known binding motifs of RBPs, offering additional information on their structural preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A sequence-specific transcription activator motif and powerful synthetic variants that bind Mediator using a fuzzy protein interface

    PubMed Central

    Warfield, Linda; Tuttle, Lisa M.; Pacheco, Derek; Klevit, Rachel E.; Hahn, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although many transcription activators contact the same set of coactivator complexes, the mechanism and specificity of these interactions have been unclear. For example, do intrinsically disordered transcription activation domains (ADs) use sequence-specific motifs, or do ADs of seemingly different sequence have common properties that encode activation function? We find that the central activation domain (cAD) of the yeast activator Gcn4 functions through a short, conserved sequence-specific motif. Optimizing the residues surrounding this short motif by inserting additional hydrophobic residues creates very powerful ADs that bind the Mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 with high affinity via a “fuzzy” protein interface. In contrast to Gcn4, the activity of these synthetic ADs is not strongly dependent on any one residue of the AD, and this redundancy is similar to that of some natural ADs in which few if any sequence-specific residues have been identified. The additional hydrophobic residues in the synthetic ADs likely allow multiple faces of the AD helix to interact with the Gal11 activator-binding domain, effectively forming a fuzzier interface than that of the wild-type cAD. PMID:25122681

  14. Fine Scale Analysis of Crossover and Non-Crossover and Detection of Recombination Sequence Motifs in the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Bessoltane, Nadia; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Solignac, Michel; Mougel, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Background Meiotic exchanges are non-uniformly distributed across the genome of most studied organisms. This uneven distribution suggests that recombination is initiated by specific signals and/or regulations. Some of these signals were recently identified in humans and mice. However, it is unclear whether or not sequence signals are also involved in chromosomal recombination of insects. Methodology We analyzed recombination frequencies in the honeybee, in which genome sequencing provided a large amount of SNPs spread over the entire set of chromosomes. As the genome sequences were obtained from a pool of haploid males, which were the progeny of a single queen, an oocyte method (study of recombination on haploid males that develop from unfertilized eggs and hence are the direct reflect of female gametes haplotypes) was developed to detect recombined pairs of SNP sites. Sequences were further compared between recombinant and non-recombinant fragments to detect recombination-specific motifs. Conclusions Recombination events between adjacent SNP sites were detected at an average distance of 92 bp and revealed the existence of high rates of recombination events. This study also shows the presence of conversion without crossover (i. e. non-crossover) events, the number of which largely outnumbers that of crossover events. Furthermore the comparison of sequences that have undergone recombination with sequences that have not, led to the discovery of sequence motifs (CGCA, GCCGC, CCGCA), which may correspond to recombination signals. PMID:22567142

  15. MSDmotif: exploring protein sites and motifs

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Adel; Henrick, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein structures have conserved features – motifs, which have a sufficient influence on the protein function. These motifs can be found in sequence as well as in 3D space. Understanding of these fragments is essential for 3D structure prediction, modelling and drug-design. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the source of this information however present search tools have limited 3D options to integrate protein sequence with its 3D structure. Results We describe here a web application for querying the PDB for ligands, binding sites, small 3D structural and sequence motifs and the underlying database. Novel algorithms for chemical fragments, 3D motifs, ϕ/ψ sequences, super-secondary structure motifs and for small 3D structural motif associations searches are incorporated. The interface provides functionality for visualization, search criteria creation, sequence and 3D multiple alignment options. MSDmotif is an integrated system where a results page is also a search form. A set of motif statistics is available for analysis. This set includes molecule and motif binding statistics, distribution of motif sequences, occurrence of an amino-acid within a motif, correlation of amino-acids side-chain charges within a motif and Ramachandran plots for each residue. The binding statistics are presented in association with properties that include a ligand fragment library. Access is also provided through the distributed Annotation System (DAS) protocol. An additional entry point facilitates XML requests with XML responses. Conclusion MSDmotif is unique by combining chemical, sequence and 3D data in a single search engine with a range of search and visualisation options. It provides multiple views of data found in the PDB archive for exploring protein structures. PMID:18637174

  16. Sequence and Spatiotemporal Expression Analysis of CLE-Motif Containing Genes from the Reniform Nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira).

    PubMed

    Wubben, Martin J; Gavilano, Lily; Baum, Thomas J; Davis, Eric L

    2015-06-01

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic species with a host range that encompasses more than 77 plant families. Nematode effector proteins containing plant-ligand motifs similar to CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides have been identified in the Heterodera, Globodera, and Meloidogyne genera of sedentary endoparasites. Here, we describe the isolation, sequence analysis, and spatiotemporal expression of three R. reniformis genes encoding putative CLE motifs named Rr-cle-1, Rr-cle-2, and Rr-cle-3. The Rr-cle cDNAs showed >98% identity with each other and the predicted peptides were identical with the exception of a short stretch of residues at the carboxy(C)-terminus of the variable domain (VD). Each RrCLE peptide possessed an amino-terminal signal peptide for secretion and a single C-terminal CLE motif that was most similar to Heterodera CLE motifs. Aligning the Rr-cle cDNAs with their corresponding genomic sequences showed three exons with an intron separating the signal peptide from the VD and a second intron separating the VD from the CLE motif. An alignment of the RrCLE1 peptide with Heterodera glycines and Heterodera schachtii CLE proteins revealed a high level of homology within the VD region associated with regulating in planta trafficking of the processed CLE peptide. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) showed similar expression profiles for each Rr-cle transcript across the R. reniformis life-cycle with the greatest transcript abundance being in sedentary parasitic female nematodes. In situ hybridization showed specific Rr-cle expression within the dorsal esophageal gland cell of sedentary parasitic females.

  17. A self-assembling peptide RADA16-I integrated with spider fibroin uncrystalline motifs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijuan; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical strength of nanofiber scaffolds formed by the self-assembling peptide RADA16-I or its derivatives is not very good and limits their application. To address this problem, we inserted spidroin uncrystalline motifs, which confer incomparable elasticity and hydrophobicity to spider silk GGAGGS or GPGGY, into the C-terminus of RADA16-I to newly design two peptides: R3 (n-RADARADARADARADA-GGAGGS-c) and R4 (n-RADARADARADARADA-GPGGY-c), and then observed the effect of these motifs on biophysical properties of the peptide. Atomic force microscopy, transmitting electron microscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm that R3 and R4 display β-sheet structure and self-assemble into long nanofibers. Compared with R3, the β-sheet structure and nanofibers formed by R4 are more stable; they change to random coil and unordered aggregation at higher temperature. Rheology measurements indicate that novel peptides form hydrogel when induced by DMEM, and the storage modulus of R3 and R4 hydrogel is 0.5 times and 3 times higher than that of RADA16-I, respectively. Furthermore, R4 hydrogel remarkably promotes growth of liver cell L02 and liver cancer cell SMCC7721 compared with 2D culture, determined by MTT assay. Novel peptides still have potential as hydrophobic drug carriers; they can stabilize pyrene microcrystals in aqueous solution and deliver this into a lipophilic environment, identified by fluorescence emission spectra. Altogether, the spider fibroin motif GPGGY most effectively enhances mechanical strength and hydrophobicity of the peptide. This study provides a new method in the design of nanobiomaterials and helps us to understand the role of the amino acid sequence in nanofiber formation. PMID:22346352

  18. A DNA-binding protein containing two widely separated zinc finger motifs that recognize the same DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fan, C M; Maniatis, T

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated a full-length cDNA clone encoding a protein (PRDII-BF1) that binds specifically to a positive regulatory domain (PRDII) of the human IFN-beta gene promoter, and to a similar sequence present in a number of other promoters and enhancers. The sequence of this protein reveals two novel structural features. First, it is the largest sequence-specific DNA-binding protein reported to date (298 kD). Second, it contains two widely separated sets of C2-H2-type zinc fingers. Remarkably, each set of zinc fingers binds to the same DNA sequence motif with similar affinities and methylation interference patterns. Thus, this protein may act by binding simultaneously to reiterated copies of the same recognition sequence. Although the function of PRDII-BF1 is not known, the level of its mRNA is inducible by serum and virus, albeit with different kinetics.

  19. An amino acid sequence motif sufficient for subnuclear localization of an arginine/serine-rich splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Hedley, M L; Amrein, H; Maniatis, T

    1995-12-05

    We have identified an amino acid sequence in the Drosophila Transformer (Tra) protein that is capable of directing a heterologous protein to nuclear speckles, regions of the nucleus previously shown to contain high concentrations of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs and splicing factors. This sequence contains a nucleoplasmin-like bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a repeating arginine/serine (RS) dipeptide sequence adjacent to a short stretch of basic amino acids. Sequence comparisons from a number of other splicing factors that colocalize to nuclear speckles reveal the presence of one or more copies of this motif. We propose a two-step subnuclear localization mechanism for splicing factors. The first step is transport across the nuclear envelope via the nucleoplasmin-like NLS, while the second step is association with components in the speckled domain via the RS dipeptide sequence.

  20. microRNAs with AAGUGC seed motif constitute an integral part of an oncogenic signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y; Frings, O; Branca, R M; Boekel, J; le Sage, C; Fredlund, E; Agami, R; Orre, L M

    2017-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is a common feature of cancer cells, but the complex roles of miRNAs in cancer are not fully elucidated. Here, we used functional genomics to identify oncogenic miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer and evaluate their impact on response to epidermal growth factor (EGFR)-targeting therapy. Our data demonstrate that miRNAs with an AAGUGC motif in their seed sequence increase both cancer cell proliferation and sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors. Global transcriptomics, proteomics and target prediction resulted in the identification of several tumor suppressors involved in the G1/S transition as AAGUGC-miRNA targets. The clinical implications of our findings were evaluated by analysis of AAGUGC-miRNA expression in multiple cancer types, supporting the link between this miRNA seed family, their tumor suppressor targets and cancer cell proliferation. In conclusion, we propose the AAGUGC seed motif as an oncomotif and that oncomotif-miRNAs promote cancer cell proliferation. These findings have potential therapeutic implications, especially in selecting patients for EGFR-targeting therapy. PMID:27477696

  1. A sequence upstream of canonical PDZ-binding motif within CFTR COOH-terminus enhances NHERF1 interaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; LaRusch, Jessica; Sosnay, Patrick R; Gottschalk, Laura B; Lopez, Andrea P; Pellicore, Matthew J; Evans, Taylor; Davis, Emily; Atalar, Melis; Na, Chan-Hyun; Rosson, Gedge D; Belchis, Deborah; Milewski, Michal; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-12-01

    The development of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) targeted therapy for cystic fibrosis has generated interest in maximizing membrane residence of mutant forms of CFTR by manipulating interactions with scaffold proteins, such as sodium/hydrogen exchange regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1). In this study, we explored whether COOH-terminal sequences in CFTR beyond the PDZ-binding motif influence its interaction with NHERF1. NHERF1 displayed minimal self-association in blot overlays (NHERF1, Kd = 1,382 ± 61.1 nM) at concentrations well above physiological levels, estimated at 240 nM from RNA-sequencing and 260 nM by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in sweat gland, a key site of CFTR function in vivo. However, NHERF1 oligomerized at considerably lower concentrations (10 nM) in the presence of the last 111 amino acids of CFTR (20 nM) in blot overlays and cross-linking assays and in coimmunoprecipitations using differently tagged versions of NHERF1. Deletion and alanine mutagenesis revealed that a six-amino acid sequence (1417)EENKVR(1422) and the terminal (1478)TRL(1480) (PDZ-binding motif) in the COOH-terminus were essential for the enhanced oligomerization of NHERF1. Full-length CFTR stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells fostered NHERF1 oligomerization that was substantially reduced (∼5-fold) on alanine substitution of EEN, KVR, or EENKVR residues or deletion of the TRL motif. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that the EENKVR and TRL sequences contribute to preferential localization of CFTR to the apical membrane. Together, these results indicate that COOH-terminal sequences mediate enhanced NHERF1 interaction and facilitate the localization of CFTR, a property that could be manipulated to stabilize mutant forms of CFTR at the apical surface to maximize the effect of CFTR-targeted therapeutics.

  2. Prevalent Sequences in the Human Genome Can Form Mini i-Motif Structures at Physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Mir, Bartomeu; Serrano, Israel; Buitrago, Diana; Orozco, Modesto; Escaja, Núria; González, Carlos

    2017-10-11

    We report here the solution structure of several repetitive DNA sequences containing d(TCGTTCCGT) and related repeats. At physiological pH, these sequences fold into i-motif like quadruplexes in which every two repeats a globular structure is stabilized by two hemiprotonated C:C(+) base pairs, flanked by two minor groove tetrads resulting from the association of G:C or G:T base pairs. The interaction between the minor groove tetrads and the nearby C:C(+) base pairs affords a strong stabilization, which results in effective pHT values above 7.5. Longer sequences with more than two repeats are able to fold in tandem, forming a rosary bead-like structure. Bioinformatics analysis shows that these sequences are prevalent in the human genome, and are present in development-related genes.

  3. ML2Motif—Reliable extraction of discriminative sequence motifs from learning machines

    PubMed Central

    Kloft, Marius; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Görnitz, Nico

    2017-01-01

    High prediction accuracies are not the only objective to consider when solving problems using machine learning. Instead, particular scientific applications require some explanation of the learned prediction function. For computational biology, positional oligomer importance matrices (POIMs) have been successfully applied to explain the decision of support vector machines (SVMs) using weighted-degree (WD) kernels. To extract relevant biological motifs from POIMs, the motifPOIM method has been devised and showed promising results on real-world data. Our contribution in this paper is twofold: as an extension to POIMs, we propose gPOIM, a general measure of feature importance for arbitrary learning machines and feature sets (including, but not limited to, SVMs and CNNs) and devise a sampling strategy for efficient computation. As a second contribution, we derive a convex formulation of motifPOIMs that leads to more reliable motif extraction from gPOIMs. Empirical evaluations confirm the usefulness of our approach on artificially generated data as well as on real-world datasets. PMID:28346487

  4. Bayesian Markov models consistently outperform PWMs at predicting motifs in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Matthias; Söding, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Position weight matrices (PWMs) are the standard model for DNA and RNA regulatory motifs. In PWMs nucleotide probabilities are independent of nucleotides at other positions. Models that account for dependencies need many parameters and are prone to overfitting. We have developed a Bayesian approach for motif discovery using Markov models in which conditional probabilities of order k − 1 act as priors for those of order k. This Bayesian Markov model (BaMM) training automatically adapts model complexity to the amount of available data. We also derive an EM algorithm for de-novo discovery of enriched motifs. For transcription factor binding, BaMMs achieve significantly (P    =  1/16) higher cross-validated partial AUC than PWMs in 97% of 446 ChIP-seq ENCODE datasets and improve performance by 36% on average. BaMMs also learn complex multipartite motifs, improving predictions of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, bacterial pause sites, and RNA binding sites by 26–101%. BaMMs never performed worse than PWMs. These robust improvements argue in favour of generally replacing PWMs by BaMMs. PMID:27288444

  5. The amino acid motif L/IIxxFE defines a novel actin-binding sequence in PDZ-RhoGEF.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jayashree; Fischer, Christopher C; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2009-08-25

    PDZ-RhoGEF is a member of the regulator family of G protein signaling (RGS) domain-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) that link activated heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits of the G12 family to activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Unique among the RGS-RhoGEFs, PDZ-RhoGEF contains a short sequence that localizes the protein to the actin cytoskeleton. In this report, we demonstrate that the actin-binding domain, located between amino acids 561 and 585, directly binds to F-actin in vitro. Extensive mutagenesis identifies isoleucine 568, isoleucine 569, phenylalanine 572, and glutamic acid 573 as being necessary for binding to actin and for colocalization with the actin cytoskeleton in cells. These results define a novel actin-binding sequence in PDZ-RhoGEF with a critical amino acid motif of IIxxFE. Moreover, sequence analysis identifies a similar actin-binding motif in the N-terminus of the RhoGEF frabin, and as with PDZ-RhoGEF, mutagenesis and actin interaction experiments demonstrate an LIxxFE motif, consisting of the key amino acids leucine 23, isoleucine 24, phenylalanine 27, and glutamic acid 28. Taken together, results with PDZ-RhoGEF and frabin identify a novel actin-binding sequence. Lastly, inducible dimerization of the actin-binding region of PDZ-RhoGEF revealed a dimerization-dependent actin bundling activity in vitro. PDZ-RhoGEF exists in cells as a dimer, raising the possibility that PDZ-RhoGEF could influence actin structure in a manner independent of its ability to activate RhoA.

  6. Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Definition of the tempo of sequence diversity across an alignment and automatic identification of sequence motifs: Application to protein homologous families and superfamilies.

    PubMed

    May, Alex C W

    2002-12-01

    It is often possible to identify sequence motifs that characterize a protein family in terms of its fold and/or function from aligned protein sequences. Such motifs can be used to search for new family members. Partitioning of sequence alignments into regions of similar amino acid variability is usually done by hand. Here, I present a completely automatic method for this purpose: one that is guaranteed to produce globally optimal solutions at all levels of partition granularity. The method is used to compare the tempo of sequence diversity across reliable three-dimensional (3D) structure-based alignments of 209 protein families (HOMSTRAD) and that for 69 superfamilies (CAMPASS). (The mean alignment length for HOMSTRAD and CAMPASS are very similar.) Surprisingly, the optimal segmentation distributions for the closely related proteins and distantly related ones are found to be very similar. Also, optimal segmentation identifies an unusual protein superfamily. Finally, protein 3D structure clues from the tempo of sequence diversity across alignments are examined. The method is general, and could be applied to any area of comparative biological sequence and 3D structure analysis where the constraint of the inherent linear organization of the data imposes an ordering on the set of objects to be clustered.

  8. Conserved sequence motifs upstream from the co-ordinately expressed vitellogenin and apoVLDLII genes of chicken.

    PubMed

    van het Schip, F; Strijker, R; Samallo, J; Gruber, M; Geert, A B

    1986-11-11

    The vitellogenin and apoVLDLII yolk protein genes of chicken are transcribed in the liver upon estrogenization. To get information on putative regulatory elements, we compared more than 2 kb of their 5' flanking DNA sequences. Common sequence motifs were found in regions exhibiting estrogen-induced changes in chromatin structure. Stretches of alternating pyrimidines and purines of about 30-nucleotides long are present at roughly similar positions. A distinct box of sequence homology in the chicken genes also appears to be present at a similar position in front of the vitellogenin genes of Xenopus laevis, but is absent from the estrogen-responsive egg-white protein genes expressed in the oviduct. In front of the vitellogenin (position -595) and the VLDLII gene (position -548), a DNA element of about 300 base-pairs was found, which possesses structural characteristics of a mobile genetic element and bears homology to the transposon-like Vi element of Xenopus laevis.

  9. Sequence-specific DNA binding by MYC/MAX to low-affinity non-E-box motifs

    PubMed Central

    Allevato, Michael; Bolotin, Eugene; Grossman, Mark; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Sladek, Frances M.

    2017-01-01

    The MYC oncoprotein regulates transcription of a large fraction of the genome as an obligatory heterodimer with the transcription factor MAX. The MYC:MAX heterodimer and MAX:MAX homodimer (hereafter MYC/MAX) bind Enhancer box (E-box) DNA elements (CANNTG) and have the greatest affinity for the canonical MYC E-box (CME) CACGTG. However, MYC:MAX also recognizes E-box variants and was reported to bind DNA in a “non-specific” fashion in vitro and in vivo. Here, in order to identify potential additional non-canonical binding sites for MYC/MAX, we employed high throughput in vitro protein-binding microarrays, along with electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and bioinformatic analyses of MYC-bound genomic loci in vivo. We identified all hexameric motifs preferentially bound by MYC/MAX in vitro, which include the low-affinity non-E-box sequence AACGTT, and found that the vast majority (87%) of MYC-bound genomic sites in a human B cell line contain at least one of the top 21 motifs bound by MYC:MAX in vitro. We further show that high MYC/MAX concentrations are needed for specific binding to the low-affinity sequence AACGTT in vitro and that elevated MYC levels in vivo more markedly increase the occupancy of AACGTT sites relative to CME sites, especially at distal intergenic and intragenic loci. Hence, MYC binds diverse DNA motifs with a broad range of affinities in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that MYC overexpression has more selective effects on the tumor transcriptome than previously thought. PMID:28719624

  10. A Glance at Microsatellite Motifs from 454 Sequencing Reads of Watermelon Genomic DNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A single 454 (Life Sciences Sequencing Technology) run of Charleston Gray watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) genomic DNA was performed and sequence data were assembled. A large scale identification of simple sequence repeat (SSR) was performed and SSR sequence data were used for the develo...

  11. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  12. Viral sequences integrated into plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Harper, Glyn; Hull, Roger; Lockhart, Ben; Olszewski, Neil

    2002-01-01

    Sequences of various DNA plant viruses have been found integrated into the host genome. There are two forms of integrant, those that can form episomal viral infections and those that cannot. Integrants of three pararetroviruses, Banana streak virus (BSV), Tobacco vein clearing virus (TVCV), and Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), can generate episomal infections in certain hybrid plant hosts in response to stress. In the case of BSV and TVCV, one of the parents contains the integrant but is has not been seen to be activated in that parent; the other parent does not contain the integrant. The number of integrant loci is low for BSV and PVCV and high in TVCV. The structure of the integrants is complex, and it is thought that episomal virus is released by recombination and/or reverse transcription. Geminiviral and pararetroviral sequences are found in plant genomes although not so far associated with a virus disease. It appears that integration of viral sequences is widespread in the plant kingdom and has been occurring for a long period of time.

  13. Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Conserved Sequence Motifs between Helices E and H: Prediction of Critical Motifs and Residues in Enzyme Functions

    PubMed Central

    Oezguen, Numan; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Rational approaches have been extensively used to investigate the role of active site residues in cytochrome P450 (CYP) functions. However, recent studies using random mutagenesis suggest an important role for non-active site residues in CYP functions. Meta-analysis of the random mutants showed that 75% of the functionally important non-active site residues are present in 20% of the entire protein between helices E and H (E-H) and conserved sequence motif (CSM) between 7 and 11. The CSM approach was developed recently to investigate the functional role of non-active site residues in CYP2B4. Furthermore, we identified and analyzed the CSM in multiple CYP families and subfamilies in the E-H region. Results from CSM analysis showed that CSM 7, 8, 10, and 11 are conserved in CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 families, while CSM 9 is conserved only in CYP2 family. Analysis of different CYP2 subfamilies showed that CYP2B and CYP2C have similar characteristics in the CSM, while the characteristics of CYP2A and CYP2D subfamilies are different. Finally, we analyzed CSM 7, 8, 10, and 11, which are common in all the CYP families/subfamilies analyzed, in fifteen important drug-metabolizing CYPs. The results showed that while CSM 8 is most conserved among these CYPs, CSM 7, 9, and 10 have significant variations. We suggest that CSM8 has a common role in all the CYPs that have been analyzed, while CSM 7, 10, and 11 may have relatively specific role within the subfamily. We further suggest that these CSM play important role in opening and closing of the substrate access/egress channel by modulating the flexible/plastic region of the protein. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of these CSM can be used to study structure-function and dynamic/plasticity-function relationships and to design CYP biocatalysts. PMID:25426333

  14. Examination of the transcription factor NtcA-binding motif by in vitro selection of DNA sequences from a random library.

    PubMed

    Jiang, F; Wisén, S; Widersten, M; Bergman, B; Mannervik, B

    2000-08-25

    A recursive in vitro selection among random DNA sequences was used for analysis of the cyanobacterial transcription factor NtcA-binding motifs. An eight-base palindromic sequence, TGTA-(N(8))-TACA, was found to be the optimal NtcA-binding sequence. The more divergent the binding sequences, compared to this consensus sequence, the lower the NtcA affinity. The second and third bases in each four-nucleotide half of the consensus sequence were crucial for NtcA binding, and they were in general highly conserved. The most frequently occurring sequence in the middle weakly conserved region was similar to that of the NtcA-binding motif of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 glnA gene, previously known to have high affinity for NtcA. This indicates that the middle sequences were selected for high NtcA affinity. Analysis of natural NtcA-binding motifs showed that these could be classified into two groups based on differences in recognition consensus sequences. It is suggested that NtcA naturally recognizes different DNA-binding motifs, or has differential affinities to these sequences under different physiological conditions.

  15. New melanocortin 1 receptor binding motif based on the C-terminal sequence of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Muceniece, Ruta; Mutule, Ilga; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2006-10-01

    The C-terminal tripeptide of the alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH11-13) possesses strong antiinflammatory activity without known cellular target. In order to better understand the structural requirements for function of such motif, we designed, synthesized and tested out Trp- and Tyr-containing analogues of the alpha-MSH11-13. Seven alpha-MSH11-13 analogues were synthesized and characterized for their binding to the melanocortin receptors recombinantly expressed in insect (Sf9) cells, infected with baculovirus carrying corresponding MC receptor DNA. We also tested these analogues on B16-F1 mouse melanoma cells endogenously expressing the MC1 receptor for binding and for ability to increase cAMP levels as well as on COS-7 cells transfected with the human MC receptors. The data indicate that HS401 (Ac-Tyr-Lys-Pro-Val-NH2) and HS402 (Ac-Lys-Pro-Val-Tyr-NH2) selectively bound to the MC1 receptor and stimulated cAMP generation in a concentration dependent way while the other Tyr- and Trp-containing alpha-MSH11-13 analogues neither bound to MC receptors nor stimulated cAMP. We have thus identified new MC receptor binding motif derived from the C-terminal sequence of alpha-MSH. The tetrapeptides have novel properties as the both act via MC-ergic pathways and also carry the anti-inflammatory alpha-MSH11-13 message sequence.

  16. A conserved sequence extending motif III of the motor domain in the Snf2-family DNA translocase Rad54 is critical for ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Janke, Ryan; Kingsley, James; Luo, Jerry; Fasching, Clare; Ehmsen, Kirk T; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is a dsDNA-dependent ATPase that translocates on duplex DNA. Its ATPase function is essential for homologous recombination, a pathway critical for meiotic chromosome segregation, repair of complex DNA damage, and recovery of stalled or broken replication forks. In recombination, Rad54 cooperates with Rad51 protein and is required to dissociate Rad51 from heteroduplex DNA to allow access by DNA polymerases for recombination-associated DNA synthesis. Sequence analysis revealed that Rad54 contains a perfect match to the consensus PIP box sequence, a widely spread PCNA interaction motif. Indeed, Rad54 interacts directly with PCNA, but this interaction is not mediated by the Rad54 PIP box-like sequence. This sequence is located as an extension of motif III of the Rad54 motor domain and is essential for full Rad54 ATPase activity. Mutations in this motif render Rad54 non-functional in vivo and severely compromise its activities in vitro. Further analysis demonstrated that such mutations affect dsDNA binding, consistent with the location of this sequence motif on the surface of the cleft formed by two RecA-like domains, which likely forms the dsDNA binding site of Rad54. Our study identified a novel sequence motif critical for Rad54 function and showed that even perfect matches to the PIP box consensus may not necessarily identify PCNA interaction sites.

  17. Functional importance of GGXG sequence motifs in putative reentrant loops of 2HCT and ESS transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Adam; Lolkema, Juke S

    2009-08-11

    The 2HCT and ESS families are two families of secondary transporters. Members of the two families are unrelated in amino acid sequence but share similar hydropathy profiles, which suggest a similar folding of the proteins in membranes. Structural models show two homologous domains containing five transmembrane segments (TMSs) each, with a reentrant or pore loop between the fourth and fifth TMSs in each domain. Here we show that GGXG sequence motifs present in the putative reentrant loops are important for the activity of the transporters. Mutation of the conserved Gly residues to Cys in the motifs of the Na(+)-citrate transporter CitS in the 2HCT family and the Na(+)-glutamate transporter GltS in the ESS family resulted in strongly reduced transport activity. Similarly, mutation of the variable residue "X" to Cys in the N-terminal half of GltS essentially inactivated the transporter. The corresponding mutations in the N- and C-terminal halves of CitS reduced transport activity to 60 and 25% of that of the wild type, respectively. Residual activity of any of the mutants could be further reduced by treatment with the membrane permeable thiol reagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The X to Cys mutation (S405C) in the cytoplasmic loop in the C-terminal half of CitS rendered the protein sensitive to the bulky, membrane impermeable thiol reagent 4-acetamido-4'-maleimidylstilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (AmdiS) added at the periplasmic side of the membrane, providing further evidence that this part of the loop is positioned between the transmembrane segments. The putative reentrant loop in the C-terminal half of the ESS family does not contain the GGXG motif, but a conserved stretch rich in Gly residues. Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of a stretch of 18 residues in the GltS protein revealed two residues important for function. Mutant N356C was completely inactivated by treatment with NEM, and mutant P351C appeared to be the counterpart of mutant S405C of CitS; the mutant was

  18. Rapid characterization of CRISPR-Cas9 protospacer adjacent motif sequence elements.

    PubMed

    Karvelis, Tautvydas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Young, Joshua; Bigelyte, Greta; Silanskas, Arunas; Cigan, Mark; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-11-19

    To expand the repertoire of Cas9s available for genome targeting, we present a new in vitro method for the simultaneous examination of guide RNA and protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) requirements. The method relies on the in vitro cleavage of plasmid libraries containing a randomized PAM as a function of Cas9-guide RNA complex concentration. Using this method, we accurately reproduce the canonical PAM preferences for Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3 (Sth3), and CRISPR1 (Sth1). Additionally, PAM and sgRNA solutions for a novel Cas9 protein from Brevibacillus laterosporus are provided by the assay and are demonstrated to support functional activity in vitro and in plants.

  19. Interaction of the N-Terminal Tandem Domains of hnRNP LL with the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif DNA Sequence.

    PubMed

    Lannes, Laurie; Young, Phoebe; Richter, Christian; Morgner, Nina; Schwalbe, Harald

    2017-08-14

    The human genome contains GC-rich sequences able to form tetraplex secondary structures known as the G-quadruplex and i-motif. Such sequences are notably present in the promoter region of oncogenes and are proposed to function as regulatory elements of gene expression. The P1 promoter of BCL2 contains a 39-mer C-rich sequence (Py39wt) that can fold into a hairpin or an i-motif in a pH-dependent manner in vitro. The protein hnRNP LL was identified to recognise the i-motif over the hairpin conformation and act as an activating transcription factor. Thus, the Py39wt sequence would act as an ON/OFF switch, according to the secondary structure adopted. Herein, a structural study of the interaction between hnRNP LL and Py39wt is reported. Both N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRM12) cooperatively recognise one Py39wt DNA sequence and engage their β-sheet to form a large binding platform. In contrast, the C-terminal RRMs show no binding capacity. It is observed that RRM12 binds to Py39wt regardless of the DNA conformation. We propose that RRM12 recognises a single-stranded CTCCC element present in loop 1 of the i-motif and in the apical loop of the hairpin conformation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Sequence motifs associated with paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA in the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus (Bivalvia: Mytilidae).

    PubMed

    Robicheau, Brent M; Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2017-03-20

    In the majority of metazoans paternal mitochondria represent evolutionary dead-ends. In many bivalves, however, this paradigm does not hold true; both maternal and paternal mitochondria are inherited. Herein, we characterize maternal and paternal mitochondrial control regions of the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus (Bivalvia: Mytilidae). The maternal control region is 808bp long, while the paternal control region is longer at 2.3kb. We hypothesize that the size difference is due to a combination of repeated duplications within the control region of the paternal mtDNA genome, as well as an evolutionarily ancient recombination event between two sex-associated mtDNA genomes that led to the insertion of a second control region sequence in the genome that is now transmitted via males. In a comparison to other mytilid male control regions, we identified two evolutionarily Conserved Motifs, CMA and CMB, associated with paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA. CMA is characterized by a conserved purine/pyrimidine pattern, while CMB exhibits a specific 13bp nucleotide string within a stem and loop structure. The identification of motifs CMA and CMB in M. modiolus extends our understanding of Sperm Transmission Elements (STEs) that have recently been identified as being associated with the paternal transmission of mitochondria in marine bivalves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  2. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  3. 'Traffic light rules': Chromatin states direct miRNA-mediated network motifs running by integrating epigenome and regulatome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Lan, Yujia; Wang, Li; Yu, Fulong; Hu, Jing; Li, Feng; Zhao, Tingting; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic marks can cooperatively regulate chromatin accessibility and in turn facilitate or impede the binding of regulatory factors to various elements, suggesting their important roles in regulatory circuits. However, it remains elusive as to how epigenetic marks cooperate in the operations of regulatory network. Here, we systematically characterized chromatin states of 26 epigenetic marks on different elements of protein-coding genes and miRNAs. We comprehensively analyzed, by using an integrative regulatory network, how cooperation among epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional regulations came about. We observed extensive cooperation of epigenetic marks on local functional elements and complex epigenetic patterns corresponding to different biological functions. By identifying the significantly epigenetic state-modified motifs, we found that multiple combinations of epigenetic states were associated with a specific type of motif. Interestingly, miRNA-mediated motifs were linked to stable epigenetic states of downstream targets. Changes in epigenetic states of downstream targets in miRNA-mediated motifs can buffer the effects of upstream regulator on target genes, suggesting that miRNA-mediated motifs require the cooperation of epigenetic marks. Overall, epigenetic marks are involved in the running of regulatory motifs in the way traffic lights control traffic flows and hence should be part of the architecture of complex regulatory circuits. We demonstrated a detailed analysis of the cooperation of multiple epigenetic marks and how epigenetic regulation was organized into a human regulatory network. The findings form a basis for further understanding of the complicated roles of epigenetic marks on regulatory circuits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alignment of U3 region sequences of mammalian type C viruses: identification of highly conserved motifs and implications for enhancer design.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Speck, N A; Hopkins, N

    1990-01-01

    We aligned published sequences for the U3 region of 35 type C mammalian retroviruses. The alignment reveals that certain sequence motifs within the U3 region are strikingly conserved. A number of these motifs correspond to previously identified sites. In particular, we found that the enhancer region of most of the viruses examined contains a binding site for leukemia virus factor b, a viral corelike element, the consensus motif for nuclear factor 1, and the glucocorticoid response element. Most viruses containing more than one copy of enhancer sequences include these binding sites in both copies of the repeat. We consider this set of binding sites to constitute a framework for the enhancers of this set of viruses. Other highly conserved motifs in the U3 region include the retrovirus inverted repeat sequence, a negative regulatory element, and the CCAAT and TATA boxes. In addition, we identified two novel motifs in the promoter region that were exceptionally highly conserved but have not been previously described. PMID:2153223

  5. De novo computational identification of stress-related sequence motifs and microRNA target sites in untranslated regions of a plant translatome

    PubMed Central

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Zolotarov, Yevgen; Meteignier, Louis-Valentin; Moffett, Peter; Strömvik, Martina V.

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level leads to diversity in phenotypes and function in organisms. Regulatory DNA or RNA sequence motifs adjacent to the gene coding sequence act as binding sites for proteins that in turn enable or disable expression of the gene. Whereas the known DNA and RNA binding proteins range in the thousands, only a few motifs have been examined. In this study, we have predicted putative regulatory motifs in groups of untranslated regions from genes regulated at the translational level in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal and stressed conditions. The test group of sequences was divided into random subgroups and subjected to three de novo motif finding algorithms (Seeder, Weeder and MEME). In addition to identifying sequence motifs, using an in silico tool we have predicted microRNA target sites in the 3′ UTRs of the translationally regulated genes, as well as identified upstream open reading frames located in the 5′ UTRs. Our bioinformatics strategy and the knowledge generated contribute to understanding gene regulation during stress, and can be applied to disease and stress resistant plant development. PMID:28276452

  6. A sequence motif enriched in regions bound by the Drosophila dosage compensation complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Drosophila melanogaster, dosage compensation is mediated by the action of the dosage compensation complex (DCC). How the DCC recognizes the fly X chromosome is still poorly understood. Characteristic sequence signatures at all DCC binding sites have not hitherto been found. Results In this study, we compare the known binding sites of the DCC with oligonucleotide profiles that measure the specificity of the sequences of the D. melanogaster X chromosome. We show that the X chromosome regions bound by the DCC are enriched for a particular type of short, repetitive sequences. Their distribution suggests that these sequences contribute to chromosome recognition, the generation of DCC binding sites and/or the local spreading of the complex. Comparative data indicate that the same sequences may be involved in dosage compensation in other Drosophila species. Conclusions These results offer an explanation for the wild-type binding of the DCC along the Drosophila X chromosome, contribute to delineate the forces leading to the establishment of dosage compensation and suggest new experimental approaches to understand the precise biochemical features of the dosage compensation system. PMID:20226017

  7. Structural Analysis of a Repetitive Protein Sequence Motif in Strepsirrhine Primate Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  8. CORE-SINEs: Eukaryotic short interspersed retroposing elements with common sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicolas; Labuda, Damian

    1999-01-01

    A 65-bp “core” sequence is dispersed in hundreds of thousands copies in the human genome. This sequence was found to constitute the central segment of a group of short interspersed elements (SINEs), referred to as mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, that proliferated before the radiation of placental mammals. Here, we propose that the core identifies an ancient tRNA-like SINE element, which survived in different lineages such as mammals, reptiles, birds, and fish, as well as mollusks, presumably for >550 million years. This element gave rise to a number of sequence families (CORE-SINEs), including mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, whose distinct 3′ ends are shared with different families of long interspersed elements (LINEs). The evolutionary success of the generic CORE-SINE element can be related to the recruitment of the internal promoter from highly transcribed host RNA as well as to its capacity to adapt to changing retropositional opportunities by sequence exchange with actively amplifying LINEs. It reinforces the notion that the very existence of SINEs depends on the cohabitation with both LINEs and the host genome. PMID:10077603

  9. CORE-SINEs: eukaryotic short interspersed retroposing elements with common sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, N; Labuda, D

    1999-03-16

    A 65-bp "core" sequence is dispersed in hundreds of thousands copies in the human genome. This sequence was found to constitute the central segment of a group of short interspersed elements (SINEs), referred to as mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, that proliferated before the radiation of placental mammals. Here, we propose that the core identifies an ancient tRNA-like SINE element, which survived in different lineages such as mammals, reptiles, birds, and fish, as well as mollusks, presumably for >550 million years. This element gave rise to a number of sequence families (CORE-SINEs), including mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, whose distinct 3' ends are shared with different families of long interspersed elements (LINEs). The evolutionary success of the generic CORE-SINE element can be related to the recruitment of the internal promoter from highly transcribed host RNA as well as to its capacity to adapt to changing retropositional opportunities by sequence exchange with actively amplifying LINEs. It reinforces the notion that the very existence of SINEs depends on the cohabitation with both LINEs and the host genome.

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Geographically Diverse Radopholus similis via rDNA Sequence Reveals a Monomorphic Motif.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Thomas, W K; Frisse, L M; Sarah, J L; Stanton, J M; Speijer, P R; Marin, D H; Opperman, C H

    2000-06-01

    The nucleic acid sequences of rDNA ITS1 and the rDNA D2/D3 expansion segment were compared for 57 burrowing nematode isolates collected from Australia, Cameroon, Central America, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Florida, Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Nigeria, Honduras, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Puerto Rico, South Africa, and Uganda. Of the 57 isolates, 55 were morphologically similar to Radopholus similis and seven were citrus-parasitic. The nucleic acid sequences for PCR-amplified ITS1 and for the D2/D3 expansion segment of the 28S rDNA gene were each identical for all putative R. similis. Sequence divergence for both the ITS1 and the D2/D3 was concordant with morphological differences that distinguish R. similis from other burrowing nematode species. This result substantiates previous observations that the R. similis genome is highly conserved across geographic regions. Autapomorphies that would delimit phylogenetic lineages of non-citrus-parasitic R. similis from those that parasitize citrus were not observed. The data presented herein support the concept that R. similis is comprised of two pathotypes-one that parasitizes citrus and one that does not.

  11. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  12. i-motif structures in long cytosine-rich sequences found upstream of the promoter region of the SMARCA4 gene.

    PubMed

    Benabou, Sanae; Aviñó, Anna; Lyonnais, S; González, C; Eritja, Ramon; De Juan, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2017-09-01

    Cytosine-rich oligonucleotides are capable of forming complex structures known as i-motif with increasingly studied biological properties. The study of sequences prone to form i-motifs located near the promoter region of genes may be difficult because these sequences not only contain repeats of cytosine tracts of disparate length but also these may be separated by loops of varied nature and length. In this work, the formation of intramolecular i-motif structures by a long sequence located upstream of the promoter region of the SMARCA4 gene has been demonstrated. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism, Gel Electrophoresis, Size-Exclusion Chromatography, and multivariate analysis have been used. Not only the wild sequence (5'-TC3T2GCTATC3TGTC2TGC2TCGC3T2G2TCATGA2C4-3') has been studied but also several other truncated and mutated sequences. Despite the apparent complex sequence, the results showed that the wild sequence may form a relatively stable and homogeneous unimolecular i-motif structure, both in terms of pH or temperature. The model ligand TMPyP4 destabilizes the structure, whereas the presence of 20% (w/v) PEG200 stabilized it slightly. This finding opens the door to the study of the interaction of these kind of i-motif structures with stabilizing ligands or proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  14. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V; Hansen, Christian S; Bøgh, Katrine L; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; de Masi, Federico; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-08-06

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds.

  15. CpG island erosion, polycomb occupancy and sequence motif enrichment at bivalent promoters in mammalian embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mantsoki, Anna; Devailly, Guillaume; Joshi, Anagha

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem (ES) cells, developmental regulators have a characteristic bivalent chromatin signature marked by simultaneous presence of both activation (H3K4me3) and repression (H3K27me3) signals and are thought to be in a ‘poised’ state for subsequent activation or silencing during differentiation. We collected eleven pairs (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) of ChIP sequencing datasets in human ES cells and eight pairs in murine ES cells, and predicted high-confidence (HC) bivalent promoters. Over 85% of H3K27me3 marked promoters were bivalent in human and mouse ES cells. We found that (i) HC bivalent promoters were enriched for developmental factors and were highly likely to be differentially expressed upon transcription factor perturbation; (ii) murine HC bivalent promoters were occupied by both polycomb repressive component classes (PRC1 and PRC2) and grouped into four distinct clusters with different biological functions; (iii) HC bivalent and active promoters were CpG rich while H3K27me3-only promoters lacked CpG islands. Binding enrichment of distinct sets of regulators distinguished bivalent from active promoters. Moreover, a ‘TCCCC’ sequence motif was specifically enriched in bivalent promoters. Finally, this analysis will serve as a resource for future studies to further understand transcriptional regulation during embryonic development. PMID:26582124

  16. CpG island erosion, polycomb occupancy and sequence motif enrichment at bivalent promoters in mammalian embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mantsoki, Anna; Devailly, Guillaume; Joshi, Anagha

    2015-11-19

    In embryonic stem (ES) cells, developmental regulators have a characteristic bivalent chromatin signature marked by simultaneous presence of both activation (H3K4me3) and repression (H3K27me3) signals and are thought to be in a 'poised' state for subsequent activation or silencing during differentiation. We collected eleven pairs (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) of ChIP sequencing datasets in human ES cells and eight pairs in murine ES cells, and predicted high-confidence (HC) bivalent promoters. Over 85% of H3K27me3 marked promoters were bivalent in human and mouse ES cells. We found that (i) HC bivalent promoters were enriched for developmental factors and were highly likely to be differentially expressed upon transcription factor perturbation; (ii) murine HC bivalent promoters were occupied by both polycomb repressive component classes (PRC1 and PRC2) and grouped into four distinct clusters with different biological functions; (iii) HC bivalent and active promoters were CpG rich while H3K27me3-only promoters lacked CpG islands. Binding enrichment of distinct sets of regulators distinguished bivalent from active promoters. Moreover, a 'TCCCC' sequence motif was specifically enriched in bivalent promoters. Finally, this analysis will serve as a resource for future studies to further understand transcriptional regulation during embryonic development.

  17. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V.; Hansen, Christian S.; Bøgh, Katrine L.; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M.; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Masi, Federico de; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds. PMID:26246327

  18. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  19. Pool sequencing of natural HLA-DR, DQ, and DP ligands reveals detailed peptide motifs, constraints of processing, and general rules.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; Rötzschke, O; Stevanović, S; Jung, G; Rammensee, H G

    1994-01-01

    We have approached the problem of MHC class II ligand motifs by pool sequencing natural peptides eluted from HLA-DR, DQ, and DP molecules. The results indicate surprisingly clear patterns, although not quite as clear as with natural class I ligands. The most striking feature is a highly dominant Proline at position 2. We interpret this to be a consequence of aminopeptidase N-like activity in processing. Another general aspect is the existence of three to four hydrophobic or aromatic anchors, whereby the first and the last are separated by five to eight residues. The peptide motifs for HLA-DR1, DR5, DQ7, and DPw4 are allele-specific and differ by spacing and occupancy of anchors. The anchors tend to be flanked by clusters of charged residues, and small residues, especially Ala, are frequent in the motif centers. These detailed motifs allow one to interpret most previous (DR-) motifs as fitting one or more of the anchors or conserved clusters. The relative motif symmetry suggests the possibility of bidirectional binding of peptides in the class II groove.

  20. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA “intrinsic properties” (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome. PMID:26291518

  1. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  2. Spatial clustering of binding motifs and charges reveals conserved functional features in disordered nucleoporin sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, David; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) gates the only channel through which cells exchange material between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Traffic is regulated by transport receptors bound to cargo which interact with numerous of disordered phenylalanine glycine (FG) repeat containing proteins (FG nups) that line this channel. The precise physical mechanism of transport regulation has remained elusive primarily due to the difficulty in understanding the structure and dynamics of such a large assembly of interacting disordered proteins. Here we have performed a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis, specifically tailored towards disordered proteins, on thousands of nuclear pore proteins from a variety of species revealing a set of highly conserved features in the sequence structure among FG nups. Contrary to the general perception that these proteins are functionally equivalent to homogeneous polymers, we show that biophysically important features within individual nups like the separation, spatial localization and ordering along the chain of FG and charge domains are highly conserved. Our current understanding of NPC structure and function should therefore be revised to account for these common features that are functionally relevant for the underlying physical mechanism of NPC gating.

  3. Modification of Cyclic NGR Tumor Neovasculature-Homing Motif Sequence to Human Plasminogen Kringle 5 Improves Inhibition of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiwei; Jin, Guanghui; Ma, Dingyuan; Wang, Feng; Fu, Tong; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Xiwen; Jia, Kunzhi; Marikar, Faiz M. M. T.; Hua, Zichun

    2012-01-01

    Background Blood vessels in tumors express higher level of aminopeptidase N (APN) than normal tissues. Evidence suggests that the CNGRC motif is an APN ligand which targets tumor vasculature. Increased expression of APN in tumor vascular endothelium, therefore, offers an opportunity for targeted delivery of NGR peptide-linked drugs to tumors. Methods/Principal Findings To determine whether an additional cyclic CNGRC sequence could improve endothelial cell homing and antitumor effect, human plasminogen kringle 5 (hPK5) was modified genetically to introduce a CNGRC motif (NGR-hPK5) and was subsequently expressed in yeast. The biological activity of NGR-hPK5 was assessed and compared with that of wild-type hPK5, in vitro and in vivo. NGR-hPK5 showed more potent antiangiogenic activity than wild-type hPK5: the former had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and cord formation of vascular endothelial cells, and produced a stronger antiangiogenic response in the CAM assay. To evaluate the tumor-targeting ability, both wild-type hPK5 and NGR-hPK5 were 99 mTc-labeled, for tracking biodistribution in the in vivo tumor model. By planar imaging and biodistribution analyses of major organs, NGR-hPK5 was found localized to tumor tissues at a higher level than wild-type hPK5 (approximately 3-fold). Finally, the effects of wild-type hPK5 and NGR-modified hPK5 on tumor growth were investigated in two tumor model systems. NGR modification improved tumor localization and, as a consequence, effectively inhibited the growth of mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Colo 205) cells in tumor-bearing mice. Conclusions/Significance These studies indicated that the addition of an APN targeting peptide NGR sequence could improve the ability of hPK5 to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:22590653

  4. Flow Cytometry-assisted Cloning of Specific Sequence Motifs fromComplex 16S ribosomal RNA Gene Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.L.; Schramm, A.; Bernhard, A.E.; van den Engh, G.J.; Stahl, D.A.

    2004-07-21

    A flow cytometry method was developed for rapid screeningand recovery of cloned DNA containing common sequence motifs. Thisapproach, termed fluorescence-activated cell sorting-assisted cloning,was used to recover sequences affiliated with a unique lineage within theBacteroidetes not abundant in a clone library of environmental 16S rRNAgenes. Retrieval and sequence analysis of phylogenetically informativegenes has become a standard cultivation-independent technique toinvestigate microbial diversity in nature (7, 18). Genes encoding the 16SrRNA, because of the relative ease of their selective amplification, havebeen most frequently employed for general diversity surveys (16).Environmental studies have also focused on specific subpopulationsaffiliated with a phylogenetic group or identified by genes encodingspecific metabolic functions (e.g., ammonia oxidation, sulfaterespiration, and nitrate reduction) (8,15,20). However, specificpopulations may be of low abundance (1,23), or the genes encodingspecific metabolic functions may be insufficiently conserved to providepriming sites for general PCR amplification. Three general approacheshave been used to obtain 16S rRNA sequence information from low-abundancepopulations: screening hundreds to thousands of clones in a general 16SrRNA gene library (21), flow cytometric sorting of a subpopulation ofenvironmentally derived cells labeled by fluorescent in situhybridization (FISH) (27), or selective PCR amplification using primersspecific for the subpopulation (2,23). While the first approach is simplytime-consuming and tedious, the second has been restricted to fairlylarge and strongly fluorescent cells from aquatic samples (5, 27). Thethird approach often generates fragments of only a few hundred bases dueto the limited number of specific priming sites. Partial sequenceinformation often degrades analysis, obscuring or distorting thephylogenetic placement of the new sequences (11, 20). A more robustcharacterization of environ

  5. Localization and trafficking of an isoform of the AtPRA1 family to the Golgi apparatus depend on both N- and C-terminal sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chan Jin; Lee, Myoung Hui; Min, Myung Ki; Hwang, Inhwan

    2011-02-01

    Prenylated Rab acceptors (PRAs) bind to prenylated Rab proteins and possibly aid in targeting Rabs to their respective compartments. In Arabidopsis, 19 isoforms of PRA1 have been identified and, depending upon the isoforms, they localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus and endosomes. Here, we investigated the localization and trafficking of AtPRA1.B6, an isoform of the Arabidopsis PRA1 family. In colocalization experiments with various organellar markers, AtPRA1.B6 tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminus localized to the Golgi apparatus in protoplasts and transgenic plants. The valine residue at the C-terminal end and an EEE motif in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain were critical for anterograde trafficking from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The N-terminal region contained a sequence motif for retention of AtPRA1.B6 at the Golgi apparatus. In addition, anterograde trafficking of AtPRA1.B6 from the ER to the Golgi apparatus was highly sensitive to the HA:AtPRA1.B6 level. The region that contains the sequence motif for Golgi retention also conferred the abundance-dependent trafficking inhibition. On the basis of these results, we propose that AtPRA1.B6 localizes to the Golgi apparatus and its ER-to-Golgi trafficking and localization to the Golgi apparatus are regulated by multiple sequence motifs in both the C- and N-terminal cytoplasmic domains.

  6. Temporal Integration Windows for Naturalistic Visual Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Scott L.; Albi, Angela; Melcher, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the brain possesses mechanisms to integrate incoming sensory information as it unfolds over time-periods of 2–3 seconds. The ubiquity of this mechanism across modalities, tasks, perception and production has led to the proposal that it may underlie our experience of the subjective present. A critical test of this claim is that this phenomenon should be apparent in naturalistic visual experiences. We tested this using movie-clips as a surrogate for our day-to-day experience, temporally scrambling them to require (re-) integration within and beyond the hypothesized 2–3 second interval. Two independent experiments demonstrate a step-wise increase in the difficulty to follow stimuli at the hypothesized 2–3 second scrambling condition. Moreover, only this difference could not be accounted for by low-level visual properties. This provides the first evidence that this 2–3 second integration window extends to complex, naturalistic visual sequences more consistent with our experience of the subjective present. PMID:25010517

  7. Rare k-mer DNA: Identification of sequence motifs and prediction of CpG island and promoter.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Hashim, Ezzeddin Kamil; Abdullah, Rosni

    2015-12-21

    Empirical analysis on k-mer DNA has been proven as an effective tool in finding unique patterns in DNA sequences which can lead to the discovery of potential sequence motifs. In an extensive study of empirical k-mer DNA on hundreds of organisms, the researchers found unique multi-modal k-mer spectra occur in the genomes of organisms from the tetrapod clade only which includes all mammals. The multi-modality is caused by the formation of the two lowest modes where k-mers under them are referred as the rare k-mers. The suppression of the two lowest modes (or the rare k-mers) can be attributed to the CG dinucleotide inclusions in them. Apart from that, the rare k-mers are selectively distributed in certain genomic features of CpG Island (CGI), promoter, 5' UTR, and exon. We correlated the rare k-mers with hundreds of annotated features using several bioinformatic tools, performed further intrinsic rare k-mer analyses within the correlated features, and modeled the elucidated rare k-mer clustering feature into a classifier to predict the correlated CGI and promoter features. Our correlation results show that rare k-mers are highly associated with several annotated features of CGI, promoter, 5' UTR, and open chromatin regions. Our intrinsic results show that rare k-mers have several unique topological, compositional, and clustering properties in CGI and promoter features. Finally, the performances of our RWC (rare-word clustering) method in predicting the CGI and promoter features are ranked among the top three, in eight of the CGI and promoter evaluations, among eight of the benchmarked datasets. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protospacer recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shiraz A.; Erdmann, Susanne; Mojica, Francisco J.M.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) were originally characterized for CRISPR-Cas systems that were classified on the basis of their CRISPR repeat sequences. A few short 2–5 bp sequences were identified adjacent to one end of the protospacers. Experimental and bioinformatical results linked the motif to the excision of protospacers and their insertion into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, evidence accumulated from different virus- and plasmid-targeting assays, suggesting that these motifs were also recognized during DNA interference, at least for the recently classified type I and type II CRISPR-based systems. The two processes, spacer acquisition and protospacer interference, employ different molecular mechanisms, and there is increasing evidence to suggest that the sequence motifs that are recognized, while overlapping, are unlikely to be identical. In this article, we consider the properties of PAM sequences and summarize the evidence for their dual functional roles. It is proposed to use the terms protospacer associated motif (PAM) for the conserved DNA sequence and to employ spacer acqusition motif (SAM) and target interference motif (TIM), respectively, for acquisition and interference recognition sites. PMID:23403393

  9. Bases of motifs for generating repeated patterns with wild cards.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Nadia; Crochemore, Maxime; Grossi, Roberto; Sagot, Marie-France

    2005-01-01

    Motif inference represents one of the most important areas of research in computational biology, and one of its oldest ones. Despite this, the problem remains very much open in the sense that no existing definition is fully satisfying, either in formal terms, or in relation to the biological questions that involve finding such motifs. Two main types of motifs have been considered in the literature: matrices (of letter frequency per position in the motif) and patterns. There is no conclusive evidence in favor of either, and recent work has attempted to integrate the two types into a single model. In this paper, we address the formal issue in relation to motifs as patterns. This is essential to get at a better understanding of motifs in general. In particular, we consider a promising idea that was recently proposed, which attempted to avoid the combinatorial explosion in the number of motifs by means of a generator set for the motifs. Instead of exhibiting a complete list of motifs satisfying some input constraints, what is produced is a basis of such motifs from which all the other ones can be generated. We study the computational cost of determining such a basis of repeated motifs with wild cards in a sequence. We give new upper and lower bounds on such a cost, introducing a notion of basis that is provably contained in (and, thus, smaller) than previously defined ones. Our basis can be computed in less time and space, and is still able to generate the same set of motifs. We also prove that the number of motifs in all bases defined so far grows exponentially with the quorum, that is, with the minimal number of times a motif must appear in a sequence, something unnoticed in previous work. We show that there is no hope to efficiently compute such bases unless the quorum is fixed.

  10. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life.

  11. Integrating motif, DNA accessibility and gene expression data to build regulatory maps in an organism

    PubMed Central

    Blatti, Charles; Kazemian, Majid; Wolfe, Scot; Brodsky, Michael; Sinha, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of cell type specific regulatory networks and elements is a major challenge in genomics, and emerging strategies frequently employ high-throughput genome-wide assays of transcription factor (TF) to DNA binding, histone modifications or chromatin state. However, these experiments remain too difficult/expensive for many laboratories to apply comprehensively to their system of interest. Here, we explore the potential of elucidating regulatory systems in varied cell types using computational techniques that rely on only data of gene expression, low-resolution chromatin accessibility, and TF–DNA binding specificities (‘motifs’). We show that static computational motif scans overlaid with chromatin accessibility data reasonably approximate experimentally measured TF–DNA binding. We demonstrate that predicted binding profiles and expression patterns of hundreds of TFs are sufficient to identify major regulators of ∼200 spatiotemporal expression domains in the Drosophila embryo. We are then able to learn reliable statistical models of enhancer activity for over 70 expression domains and apply those models to annotate domain specific enhancers genome-wide. Throughout this work, we apply our motif and accessibility based approach to comprehensively characterize the regulatory network of fruitfly embryonic development and show that the accuracy of our computational method compares favorably to approaches that rely on data from many experimental assays. PMID:25791631

  12. Formation and Dissociation of the Interstrand i-Motif by the Sequences d(XnC4Ym) Monitored with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanwei; Qin, Yujiao; Bruist, Michael; Gao, Shang; Wang, Bing; Wang, Huixin; Guo, Xinhua

    2015-06-01

    Formation and dissociation of the interstrand i-motifs by DNA with the sequence d(XnC4Ym) (X and Y represent thymine, adenine, or guanine, and n, m range from 0 to 2) are studied with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and UV spectrophotometry. The ion complexes detected in the gas phase and the melting temperatures (Tm) obtained in solution show that a non-C base residue located at 5' end favors formation of the four-stranded structures, with T > A > G for imparting stability. Comparatively, no rule is found when a non-C base is located at the 3' end. Detection of penta- and hexa-stranded ions indicates the formation of i-motifs with more than four strands. In addition, the i-motifs seen in our mass spectra are accompanied by single-, double-, and triple-stranded ions, and the trimeric ions were always less abundant during annealing and heat-induced dissociation process of the DNA strands in solution (pH = 4.5). This provides a direct evidence of a strand-by-strand formation and dissociation pathway of the interstrand i-motif and formation of the triple strands is the rate-limiting step. In contrast, the trimeric ions are abundant when the tetramolecular ions are subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) in the gas phase, suggesting different dissociation behaviors of the interstrand i-motif in the gas phase and in solution. Furthermore, hysteretic UV absorption melting and cooling curves reveal an irreversible dissociation and association kinetic process of the interstrand i-motif in solution.

  13. Modeling and analysis of MH1 domain of Smads and their interaction with promoter DNA sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Pooja; Metpally, Raghu Prasad R; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B

    2009-04-01

    The Smads are a group of related intracellular proteins critical for transmitting the signals to the nucleus from the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of proteins at the cell surface. The prototypic members of the Smad family, Mad and Sma, were first described in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. Related proteins in Xenopus, Humans, Mice and Rats were subsequently identified, and are now known as Smads. Smad protein family members act downstream in the TGF-beta signaling pathway mediating various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, matrix production, apoptosis and development. Smads range from about 400-500 amino acids in length and are grouped into the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), the common Smads (Co-Smads) and the inhibitory Smads (I-Smads). There are eight Smads in mammals, Smad1/5/8 (bone morphogenetic protein regulated) and Smad2/3 (TGF-beta/activin regulated) are termed R-Smads, Smad4 is denoted as Co-Smad and Smad6/7 are inhibitory Smads. A typical Smad consists of a conserved N-terminal Mad Homology 1 (MH1) domain and a C-terminal Mad Homology 2 (MH2) domain connected by a proline rich linker. The MH1 domain plays key role in DNA recognition and also facilitates the binding of Smad4 to the phosphorylated C-terminus of R-Smads to form activated complex. The MH2 domain exhibits transcriptional activation properties. In order to understand the structural basis of interaction of various Smads with their target proteins and the promoter DNA, we modeled MH1 domain of the remaining mammalian Smads based on known crystal structures of Smad3-MH1 domain bound to GTCT Smad box DNA sequence (1OZJ). We generated a B-DNA structure using average base-pair parameters of Twist, Tilt, Roll and base Slide angles. We then modeled interaction pose of the MH1 domain of Smad1/5/8 to their corresponding DNA sequence motif GCCG. These models provide the structural basis towards understanding functional

  14. Phylogenomic analysis of integral diiron membrane histidine motif-containing enzymes in ciliates provides insights into their function and evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Cid, Nicolas G; Sanchez Granel, María L; Montes, María G; Elguero, María E; Nudel, Clara B; Nusblat, Alejandro D

    2017-09-01

    The Integral Membrane Histidine Motif-containing Enzymes (IMHME) are a class of binuclear non-heme iron proteins widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are characterized by a conserved tripartite motif consisting of eight to ten histidine residues. Their known function is the activation of the dioxygen moiety to serve as efficient catalysts for reactions of hydroxylation, desaturation or reduction. To date most studies on IMHME were carried out in metazoan, phototrophic or parasitic organisms, whereas genome-wide analysis in heterotrophic free living protozoa, such as the Ciliophora phylum, has not been undertaken. In the seven fully sequenced genomes available we retrieved 118 putative sequences of the IMHME type, albeit with large differences in number among the ciliates: 11 sequences in Euplotes octocarinatus, 7 in Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, 13 in Oxytricha trifallax, 18 in Stylonychia lemnae, 25 in Tetrahymena thermophila, 31 in Paramecium tetraurelia and 13 in Pseudocohnilembus persalinus. The pool of putative sequences was classified in 16 orthologous groups from which 11 were related to fatty acid desaturase (FAD) and 5 to the fatty acid hydroxylase (FAH) superfamilies. Noteworthy, a large diversity on the number and type of FAD / FAH proteins were found among the ciliates, a feature that, in principle, may be attributed to peculiarities of the evolutionary process, such as gene expansion and reduction, but also to horizontal gene transfer, as we demonstrate in this work. We identified twelve putative enzymatic activities, from which four were newly assigned activities: sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase, ω3/Δ15 fatty acid desaturase, a large group of alkane 1-monooxygenases, and acylamide-delta-3(E)-desaturase, although unequivocal allocation would require additional experiments. We also combined the phylogenetics analysis with lipids analysis, thereby allowing the detection of two enzymatic activities not previously reported: a C-5 sterol

  15. Using Weeder, Pscan, and PscanChIP for the Discovery of Enriched Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs in Nucleotide Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2014-09-08

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern molecular biology is understanding the complex mechanisms regulating gene expression. A fundamental step in this process requires the characterization of sequence motifs involved in the regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In particular, transcription is modulated by the interaction of transcription factors (TFs) with their corresponding binding sites. Weeder, Pscan, and PscanChIP are software tools freely available for noncommercial users as a stand-alone or Web-based applications for the automatic discovery of conserved motifs in a set of DNA sequences likely to be bound by the same TFs. Input for the tools can be promoter sequences from co-expressed or co-regulated genes (for which Weeder and Pscan are suitable), or regions identified through genome wide ChIP-seq or similar experiments (Weeder and PscanChIP). The motifs are either found by a de novo approach (Weeder) or by using descriptors of the binding specificity of TFs (Pscan and PscanChIP). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Extracting DNA words based on the sequence features: non-uniform distribution and integrity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Cao, Hongyan; Cui, Yuehua; Zhang, Yanbo

    2016-01-25

    DNA sequence can be viewed as an unknown language with words as its functional units. Given that most sequence alignment algorithms such as the motif discovery algorithms depend on the quality of background information about sequences, it is necessary to develop an ab initio algorithm for extracting the "words" based only on the DNA sequences. We considered that non-uniform distribution and integrity were two important features of a word, based on which we developed an ab initio algorithm to extract "DNA words" that have potential functional meaning. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for consistency test of uniform distribution of DNA sequences, and the integrity was judged by the sequence and position alignment. Two random base sequences were adopted as negative control, and an English book was used as positive control to verify our algorithm. We applied our algorithm to the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 10 strains of Escherichia coli to show the utility of the methods. The results provide strong evidences that the algorithm is a promising tool for ab initio building a DNA dictionary. Our method provides a fast way for large scale screening of important DNA elements and offers potential insights into the understanding of a genome.

  17. Retinoic acid-induced down-regulation of the interleukin-2 promoter via cis-regulatory sequences containing an octamer motif.

    PubMed Central

    Felli, M P; Vacca, A; Meco, D; Screpanti, I; Farina, A R; Maroder, M; Martinotti, S; Petrangeli, E; Frati, L; Gulino, A

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is known to influence the proliferation and differentiation of a wide variety of transformed and developing cells. We found that RA and the specific RA receptor (RAR) ligand Ch55 inhibited the phorbol ester and calcium ionophore-induced expression of the T-cell growth factor interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene. Expression of transiently transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase vectors containing the 5'-flanking region of the IL-2 gene was also inhibited by RA. RA-induced down-regulation of the IL-2 enhancer is mediated by RAR, since overexpression of transfected RARs increased RA sensitivity of the IL-2 promoter. Functional analysis of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase vectors containing either internal deletion mutants of the region from -317 to +47 bp of the IL-2 enhancer or multimerized cis-regulatory elements showed that the RA-responsive element in the IL-2 promoter mapped to sequences containing an octamer motif. RAR also inhibited the transcriptional activity of the octamer motif of the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer. In spite of the transcriptional inhibition of the IL-2 octamer motif, RA did not decrease the in vitro DNA-binding capability of octamer-1 protein. These results identify a regulatory pathway within the IL-2 promoter which involves the octamer motif and RAR. Images PMID:1652063

  18. Loop Sequence Context Influences the Formation and Stability of the i-Motif for DNA Oligomers of Sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, under Slightly Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    McKim, Mikeal; Buxton, Alexander; Johnson, Courtney; Metz, Amanda; Sheardy, Richard D

    2016-08-11

    The structure and stability of DNA is highly dependent upon the sequence context of the bases (A, G, C, and T) and the environment under which the DNA is prepared (e.g., buffer, temperature, pH, ionic strength). Understanding the factors that influence structure and stability of the i-motif conformation can lead to the design of DNA sequences with highly tunable properties. We have been investigating the influence of pH and temperature on the conformations and stabilities for all permutations of the DNA sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, using spectroscopic approaches. All oligomers undergo transitions from single-stranded structures at pH 7.0 to i-motif conformations at pH 5.0 as evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) studies. These folded structures possess stacked C:CH(+) base pairs joined by loops of 5'-XXX-3'. Although the pH at the midpoint of the transition (pHmp) varies slightly with loop sequence, the linkage between pH and log K for the proton induced transition is highly loop sequence dependent. All oligomers also undergo the thermally induced i-motif to single-strand transition at pH 5.0 as the temperature is increased from 25 to 95 °C. The temperature at the midpoint of this transition (Tm) is also highly dependent on loop sequence context effects. For seven of eight possible permutations, the pH induced, and thermally induced transitions appear to be highly cooperative and two state. Analysis of the CD optical melting profiles via a van't Hoff approach reveals sequence-dependent thermodynamic parameters for the unfolding as well. Together, these data reveal that the i-motif conformation exhibits exquisite sensitivity to loop sequence context with respect to formation and stability.

  19. The stabilized supralinear network: a unifying circuit motif underlying multi-input integration in sensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel B; Van Hooser, Stephen D; Miller, Kenneth D

    2015-01-21

    Neurons in sensory cortex integrate multiple influences to parse objects and support perception. Across multiple cortical areas, integration is characterized by two neuronal response properties: (1) surround suppression--modulatory contextual stimuli suppress responses to driving stimuli; and (2) "normalization"--responses to multiple driving stimuli add sublinearly. These depend on input strength: for weak driving stimuli, contextual influences facilitate or more weakly suppress and summation becomes linear or supralinear. Understanding the circuit operations underlying integration is critical to understanding cortical function and disease. We present a simple, general theory. A wealth of integrative properties, including the above, emerge robustly from four cortical circuit properties: (1) supralinear neuronal input/output functions; (2) sufficiently strong recurrent excitation; (3) feedback inhibition; and (4) simple spatial properties of intracortical connections. Integrative properties emerge dynamically as circuit properties, with excitatory and inhibitory neurons showing similar behaviors. In new recordings in visual cortex, we confirm key model predictions.

  20. The stabilized supralinear network: A unifying circuit motif underlying multi-input integration in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Daniel B.; Van Hooser, Stephen D.; Miller, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurons in sensory cortex integrate multiple influences to parse objects and support perception. Across multiple cortical areas, integration is characterized by two neuronal response properties: (1) surround suppression: modulatory contextual stimuli suppress responses to driving stimuli; (2) “normalization”: responses to multiple driving stimuli add sublinearly. These properties depend on input strength: for weak driving stimuli, contextual influences more weakly suppress or facilitate and summation becomes linear or supralinear. Understanding the circuit operations underlying integration is critical to understanding cortical function and disease. We present a simple, general theory. A wealth of integrative properties including the above emerge robustly from four properties of cortical circuitry: (1) supralinear neuronal input/output functions; (2) sufficiently strong recurrent excitation; (3) feedback inhibition; (4) simple spatial properties of intracortical connections. Integrative properties emerge dynamically as circuit properties, with excitatory and inhibitory neurons showing similar behaviors. In new recordings in visual cortex, we confirm key model predictions. PMID:25611511

  1. Immune Selection In Vitro Reveals Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Sequence Motifs Important for Its Immune Evasion Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patricia; Ng, Hwee L.; Yang, Otto O.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef downregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), impairing the clearance of infected cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). While sequence motifs mediating this function have been determined by in vitro mutagenesis studies of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 molecular clones, it is unclear whether the highly variable Nef sequences of primary isolates in vivo rely on the same sequence motifs. To address this issue, nef quasispecies from nine chronically HIV-1-infected persons were examined for sequence evolution and altered MHC-I downregulatory function under Gag-specific CTL immune pressure in vitro. This selection resulted in decreased nef diversity and strong purifying selection. Site-by-site analysis identified 13 codons undergoing purifying selection and 1 undergoing positive selection. Of the former, only 6 have been reported to have roles in Nef function, including 4 associated with MHC-I downregulation. Functional testing of naturally occurring in vivo polymorphisms at the 7 sites with no previously known functional role revealed 3 mutations (A84D, Y135F, and G140R) that ablated MHC-I downregulation and 3 (N52A, S169I, and V180E) that partially impaired MHC-I downregulation. Globally, the CTL pressure in vitro selected functional Nef from the in vivo quasispecies mixtures that predominately lacked MHC-I downregulatory function at the baseline. Overall, these data demonstrate that CTL pressure exerts a strong purifying selective pressure for MHC-I downregulation and identifies novel functional motifs present in Nef sequences in vivo. PMID:22553319

  2. An Appraisal of Human Mitochondrial DNA Instability: New Insights into the Role of Non-Canonical DNA Structures and Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Pedro H.; Lobato da Silva, Cláudia; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations are frequently observed in aged postmitotic tissues and are the cause of a wide range of human disorders. Presently, the molecular bases underlying mtDNA deletion formation remain a matter of intense debate, and it is commonly accepted that several mechanisms contribute to the spectra of mutations in the mitochondrial genome. In this work we performed an extensive screening of human mtDNA deletions and evaluated the association between breakpoint density and presence of non-canonical DNA elements and over-represented sequence motifs. Our observations support the involvement of helix-distorting intrinsically curved regions and long G-tetrads in eliciting instability events. In addition, higher breakpoint densities were consistently observed within GC-skewed regions and in the close vicinity of the degenerate sequence motif YMMYMNNMMHM. A parallelism is also established with hot spot motifs previously identified in the nuclear genome, as well as with the minimal binding site for the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF. This study extends the current knowledge on the mechanisms driving mitochondrial rearrangements and opens up exciting avenues for further research. PMID:23555828

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structural Mapping Reveals Promiscuous Interactions between Clathrin-Box Motif Sequences and the N-Terminal Domain of the Clathrin Heavy Chain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment and organization of clathrin at endocytic sites first to form coated pits and then clathrin-coated vesicles depend on interactions between the clathrin N-terminal domain (TD) and multiple clathrin binding sequences on the cargo adaptor and accessory proteins that are concentrated at such sites. Up to four distinct protein binding sites have been proposed to be present on the clathrin TD, with each site proposed to interact with a distinct clathrin binding motif. However, an understanding of how such interactions contribute to clathrin coat assembly must take into account observations that any three of these four sites on clathrin TD can be mutationally ablated without causing loss of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To take an unbiased approach to mapping binding sites for clathrin-box motifs on clathrin TD, we used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our ITC experiments revealed that a canonical clathrin-box motif peptide from the AP-2 adaptor binds to clathrin TD with a stoichiometry of 3:1. Assignment of 90% of the total visible amide resonances in the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-labeled TD40 allowed us to map these three binding sites by analyzing the chemical shift changes as clathrin-box motif peptides were titrated into clathrin TD. We found that three different clathrin-box motif peptides can each simultaneously bind not only to the previously characterized clathrin-box site but also to the W-box site and the β-arrestin splice loop site on a single TD. The promiscuity of these binding sites can help explain why their mutation does not lead to larger effects on clathrin function and suggests a mechanism by which clathrin may be transferred between different proteins during the course of an endocytic event. PMID:25844500

  4. Stably integrated mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat DNA requires the octamer motifs for basal promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Buetti, E

    1994-01-01

    In the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, a tandem of octamer motifs, recognized by ubiquitous and tissue-restricted Oct transcription factors, is located upstream of the TATA box and next to a binding site for the transcription factor nuclear factor I (NF-I). Their function was investigated with mutant long terminal repeats under different transfection conditions in mouse Ltk- cells and quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. In stable transfectants, which are most representative of the state of proviral DNA with respect to both number of integrated DNA templates and chromatin organization, a long terminal repeat mutant of both octamer sites showed an average 50-fold reduction of the basal transcription level, while the dexamethasone-stimulated level was unaffected. DNase I in vitro footprinting assays with L-cell nuclear protein extracts showed that the mutant DNA was unable to bind octamer factors but had a normal footprint in the NF-I site. I conclude that mouse mammary tumor virus employs the tandem octamer motifs of the viral promoter, recognized by the ubiquitous transcription factor Oct-1, for its basal transcriptional activity and the NF-I binding site, as previously shown, for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription. A deletion mutant with only one octamer site showed a marked base-level reduction at high copy number but little reduction at low copies of integrated plasmids. The observed transcription levels may depend both on the relative ratio of transcription factors to DNA templates and on the relative affinity of binding sites, as determined by oligonucleotide competition footprinting. Images PMID:8289800

  5. Crystal structure of interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) bound to IL-21 reveals that sugar chain interacting with WSXWS motif is integral part of IL-21R.

    PubMed

    Hamming, Ole J; Kang, Lishan; Svensson, Anders; Karlsen, Jesper L; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Paludan, Søren R; Hjorth, Siv A; Bondensgaard, Kent; Hartmann, Rune

    2012-03-16

    IL-21 is a class I cytokine that exerts pleiotropic effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) and the common γ-chain. A hallmark of the class I cytokine receptors is the class I cytokine receptor signature motif (WSXWS). The exact role of this motif has not been determined yet; however, it has been implicated in diverse functions, including ligand binding, receptor internalization, proper folding, and export, as well as signal transduction. Furthermore, the WXXW motif is known to be a consensus sequence for C-mannosylation. Here, we present the crystal structure of IL-21 bound to IL-21R and reveal that the WSXWS motif of IL-21R is C-mannosylated at the first tryptophan. We furthermore demonstrate that a sugar chain bridges the two fibronectin domains that constitute the extracellular domain of IL-21R and anchors at the WSXWS motif through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, including mannosylation. The glycan thus transforms the V-shaped receptor into an A-frame. This finding offers a novel structural explanation of the role of the class I cytokine signature motif.

  6. Crystal Structure of Interleukin-21 Receptor (IL-21R) Bound to IL-21 Reveals That Sugar Chain Interacting with WSXWS Motif Is Integral Part of IL-21R*

    PubMed Central

    Hamming, Ole J.; Kang, Lishan; Svensson, Anders; Karlsen, Jesper L.; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Paludan, Søren R.; Hjorth, Siv A.; Bondensgaard, Kent; Hartmann, Rune

    2012-01-01

    IL-21 is a class I cytokine that exerts pleiotropic effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) and the common γ-chain. A hallmark of the class I cytokine receptors is the class I cytokine receptor signature motif (WSXWS). The exact role of this motif has not been determined yet; however, it has been implicated in diverse functions, including ligand binding, receptor internalization, proper folding, and export, as well as signal transduction. Furthermore, the WXXW motif is known to be a consensus sequence for C-mannosylation. Here, we present the crystal structure of IL-21 bound to IL-21R and reveal that the WSXWS motif of IL-21R is C-mannosylated at the first tryptophan. We furthermore demonstrate that a sugar chain bridges the two fibronectin domains that constitute the extracellular domain of IL-21R and anchors at the WSXWS motif through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, including mannosylation. The glycan thus transforms the V-shaped receptor into an A-frame. This finding offers a novel structural explanation of the role of the class I cytokine signature motif. PMID:22235133

  7. Sequence and spatiotemporal expression analysis of CLE-motif containing genes from the reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic species with a host range that encompasses more than 77 plant families. Nematode effector proteins containing plant-ligand motifs similar to CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides have been identified in the Heterodera, Globode...

  8. Helicobacter pylori CagA: analysis of sequence diversity in relation to phosphorylation motifs and implications for the role of CagA as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G

    2001-09-01

    CagA is transported into host target cells and subsequently phosphorylated. Clearly this is a mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori could take control of one or more host cell signal transduction pathways. Presumably the end result of this interaction favors survival of H. pylori, irrespective of eventual damage to the host cell. CagA is noted for its amino acid (AA) sequence diversity, both within and outside the variable region of the molecule. The primary purpose of this review is to examine how variation in the type and number of CagA phosphorylation sites might determine the outcome of infection by different strains of H. pylori. The answer to this question could help to explain the widely disparate results obtained when H. pylori CagA status has been compared to type and severity of disease outcome in different populations, that is in different countries. Analysis of all available CagA sequences revealed that CagA contains both tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) and cyclic-AMP-dependent phosphorylation motifs (CPMs). There are two potential CPMs near the N-terminus of CagA and at least two in the repeat region; these are not all equally well conserved. We also defined a 48-residue AA sequence, which includes the N-terminal TPM at tyrosine (Y)-122, which distinguishes between Eastern (Hong Kong-Taiwan-Japan-Thailand) H. pylori isolates and those from the West (Europe-Africa-the Americas-Australia). All 28 of the Eastern type CagA proteins have a functional N-terminal TPM whereas 11 of 47 (23.4%) of the Western type contain an inactive motif, with threonine (T) replacing the critical aspartic acid (D) residue. Only 13 of 24 (54%) known CagA sequences have an active TPM in the repeat region and only one has two TPMs in this region. The potential TPM near the C-terminus of CagA is not likely to be important since only 3 of 24 (12.5%) sequences were found to be intact. Protein database searches revealed that the AA sequence immediately following the TPM at Y

  9. Functional analysis reveals the possible role of the C-terminal sequences and PI motif in the function of lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Kun; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Two lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) genes, Lily MADS Box Gene 8 and 9 (LMADS8/9), were characterized. LMADS9 lacked 29 C-terminal amino acids including the PI motif that was present in LMADS8. Both LMADS8/9 mRNAs were prevalent in the first and second whorl tepals during all stages of development and were expressed in the stamen only in young flower buds. LMADS8/9 could both form homodimers, but the ability of LMADS8 homodimers to bind to CArG1 was relatively stronger than that of LMADS9 homodimers. 35S:LMADS8 completely, and 35S:LMADS9 only partially, rescued the second whorl petal formation and partially converted the first whorl sepal into a petal-like structure in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutants. Ectopic expression of LMADS8-C (with deletion of the 29 amino acids of the C-terminal sequence) or LMADS8-PI (with only the PI motif deleted) only partially rescued petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS9/pi plants. In contrast, 35:LMADS9+L8C (with the addition of the 29 amino acids of the LMADS8 C-terminal sequence) or 35S:LMADS9+L8PI (with the addition of the LMADS8 PI motif) demonstrated an increased ability to rescue petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS8/pi plants. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LMADS8-M (with the MADS domain truncated) generated more severe dominant negative phenotypes than those seen in 35S:LMADS9-M flowers. These results revealed that the 29 amino acids including the PI motif in the C-terminal region of the lily PI orthologue are valuable for its function in regulating perianth organ formation. PMID:22068145

  10. Large Putative PEST-like Sequence Motif at the Carboxyl Tail of Human Calcium Receptor Directs Lysosomal Degradation and Regulates Cell Surface Receptor Level*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Northup, John K.; Ray, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    A deletion between amino acid residues Ser895 and Val1075 in the carboxyl terminus of the human calcium receptor (hCaR), which causes autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, showed enhanced signaling activity and increased cell surface expression in HEK293 cells (Lienhardt, A., Garabédian, M. G., Bai, M., Sinding, C., Zhang, Z., Lagarde, J. P., Boulesteix, J., Rigaud, M., Brown, E. M., and Kottler, M. L. (2000) J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 85, 1695–1702). To identify the underlying mechanism(s) for these increases, we investigated the effects of carboxyl tail truncation and deletion in hCaR mutants using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging approaches to define motifs that participate in regulating cell surface numbers of this G protein-coupled receptor. Our data indicate a rapid constitutive receptor internalization of the cell surface hCaR, accumulating in early (Rab7 positive) and late endosomal (LAMP1 positive) sorting compartments, before targeting to lysosomes for degradation. Recycling of hCaR back to the cell surface was also evident. Truncation and deletion mapping defined a 51-amino acid sequence between residues 920 and 970 that is required for targeting to lysosomes and degradation but not for internalization or recycling of the receptor. No singular sequence motif was identified, instead the required sequence elements seem to distribute throughout this entire interval. This interval includes a high proportion of acidic and hydroxylated amino acid residues, suggesting a similarity to PEST-like degradation motif (PESTfind score of +10) and several glutamine repeats. The results define a novel large PEST-like sequence that participates in the sorting of internalized hCaR routed to the lysosomal/degradation pathway that regulates cell surface receptor numbers. PMID:22158862

  11. Localization of Proteins to the 1,2-Propanediol Utilization Microcompartment by Non-native Signal Sequences Is Mediated by a Common Hydrophobic Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jakobson, Christopher M.; Kim, Edward Y.; Slininger, Marilyn F.; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs. PMID:26283792

  12. Localization of proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment by non-native signal sequences is mediated by a common hydrophobic motif.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Kim, Edward Y; Slininger, Marilyn F; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-10-02

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs.

  13. Comparison of loline alkaloid gene clusters across fungal endophytes: predicting the co-regulatory sequence motifs and the evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Kutil, Brandi L; Greenwald, Charles; Liu, Gang; Spiering, Martin J; Schardl, Christopher L; Wilkinson, Heather H

    2007-10-01

    LOL, a fungal secondary metabolite gene cluster found in Epichloë and Neotyphodium species, is responsible for production of insecticidal loline alkaloids. To analyze the genetic architecture and to predict the evolutionary history of LOL, we compared five clusters from four fungal species (single clusters from Epichloë festucae, Neotyphodium sp. PauTG-1, Neotyphodium coenophialum, and two clusters we previously characterized in Neotyphodium uncinatum). Using PhyloCon to compare putative lol gene promoter regions, we have identified four motifs conserved across the lol genes in all five clusters. Each motif has significant similarity to known fungal transcription factor binding sites in the TRANSFAC database. Conservation of these motifs is further support for the hypothesis that the lol genes are co-regulated. Interestingly, the history of asexual Neotyphodium spp. includes multiple interspecific hybridization events. Comparing clusters from three Neotyphodium species and E. festucae allowed us to determine which Epichloë ancestors are the most likely contributors of LOL in these asexual species. For example, while no present day Epichloë typhina isolates are known to produce lolines, our data support the hypothesis that the E. typhina ancestor(s) of three asexual endophyte species contained a LOL gene cluster. Thus, these data support a model of evolution in which the polymorphism in loline alkaloid production phenotypes among endophyte species is likely due to the loss of the trait over time.

  14. Sequence motif upstream of the Hendra virus fusion protein cleavage site is not sufficient to promote efficient proteolytic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Willie Warren; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2005-10-10

    The Hendra virus fusion (HeV F) protein is synthesized as a precursor, F{sub 0}, and proteolytically cleaved into the mature F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} heterodimer, following an HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif. This cleavage event is required for fusogenic activity. To determine the amino acid requirements for processing of the HeV F protein, we constructed multiple mutants. Individual and simultaneous alanine substitutions of the eight residues immediately upstream of the cleavage site did not eliminate processing. A chimeric SV5 F protein in which the furin site was substituted for the VDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein was not processed but was expressed on the cell surface. Another chimeric SV5 F protein containing the HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein underwent partial cleavage. These data indicate that the upstream region can play a role in protease recognition, but is neither absolutely required nor sufficient for efficient processing of the HeV F protein.

  15. Linear array of conserved sequence motifs to discriminate protein subfamilies: study on pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductases

    PubMed Central

    Avila, César L; Rapisarda, Viviana A; Farías, Ricardo N; De Las Rivas, Javier; Chehín, Rosana

    2007-01-01

    Background The pyridine nucleotide disulfide reductase (PNDR) is a large and heterogeneous protein family divided into two classes (I and II), which reflect the divergent evolution of its characteristic disulfide redox active site. However, not all the PNDR members fit into these categories and this suggests the need of further studies to achieve a more comprehensive classification of this complex family. Results A workflow to improve the clusterization of protein families based on the array of linear conserved motifs is designed. The method is applied to the PNDR large family finding two main groups, which correspond to PNDR classes I and II. However, two other separate protein clusters, previously classified as class I in most databases, are outgrouped: the peroxide reductases (NAOX, NAPE) and the type II NADH dehydrogenases (NDH-2). In this way, two novel PNDR classes III and IV for NAOX/NAPE and NDH-2 respectively are proposed. By knowledge-driven biochemical and functional data analyses done on the new class IV, a linear array of motifs putatively related to Cu(II)-reductase activity is detected in a specific subset of NDH-2. Conclusion The results presented are a novel contribution to the classification of the complex and large PNDR protein family, supporting its reclusterization into four classes. The linear array of motifs detected within the class IV PNDR subfamily could be useful as a signature for a particular subgroup of NDH-2. PMID:17367536

  16. The Effect of Orthology and Coregulation on Detecting Regulatory Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Storms, Valerie; Claeys, Marleen; Sanchez, Aminael; De Moor, Bart; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Marchal, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Background Computational de novo discovery of transcription factor binding sites is still a challenging problem. The growing number of sequenced genomes allows integrating orthology evidence with coregulation information when searching for motifs. Moreover, the more advanced motif detection algorithms explicitly model the phylogenetic relatedness between the orthologous input sequences and thus should be well adapted towards using orthologous information. In this study, we evaluated the conditions under which complementing coregulation with orthologous information improves motif detection for the class of probabilistic motif detection algorithms with an explicit evolutionary model. Methodology We designed datasets (real and synthetic) covering different degrees of coregulation and orthologous information to test how well Phylogibbs and Phylogenetic sampler, as representatives of the motif detection algorithms with evolutionary model performed as compared to MEME, a more classical motif detection algorithm that treats orthologs independently. Results and Conclusions Under certain conditions detecting motifs in the combined coregulation-orthology space is indeed more efficient than using each space separately, but this is not always the case. Moreover, the difference in success rate between the advanced algorithms and MEME is still marginal. The success rate of motif detection depends on the complex interplay between the added information and the specificities of the applied algorithms. Insights in this relation provide information useful to both developers and users. All benchmark datasets are available at http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/~kmarchal/Supplementary_Storms_Valerie_PlosONE. PMID:20140085

  17. The effect of orthology and coregulation on detecting regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Storms, Valerie; Claeys, Marleen; Sanchez, Aminael; De Moor, Bart; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Marchal, Kathleen

    2010-02-03

    Computational de novo discovery of transcription factor binding sites is still a challenging problem. The growing number of sequenced genomes allows integrating orthology evidence with coregulation information when searching for motifs. Moreover, the more advanced motif detection algorithms explicitly model the phylogenetic relatedness between the orthologous input sequences and thus should be well adapted towards using orthologous information. In this study, we evaluated the conditions under which complementing coregulation with orthologous information improves motif detection for the class of probabilistic motif detection algorithms with an explicit evolutionary model. We designed datasets (real and synthetic) covering different degrees of coregulation and orthologous information to test how well Phylogibbs and Phylogenetic sampler, as representatives of the motif detection algorithms with evolutionary model performed as compared to MEME, a more classical motif detection algorithm that treats orthologs independently. Under certain conditions detecting motifs in the combined coregulation-orthology space is indeed more efficient than using each space separately, but this is not always the case. Moreover, the difference in success rate between the advanced algorithms and MEME is still marginal. The success rate of motif detection depends on the complex interplay between the added information and the specificities of the applied algorithms. Insights in this relation provide information useful to both developers and users. All benchmark datasets are available at http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/~kmarchal/Supplementary_Storms_Valerie_PlosONE.

  18. A common structural motif in immunopotentiating peptides with sequences present in human autoantigens. Elicitation of a response mediated by monocytes and Th1 cells.

    PubMed

    López-Moratalla, N; Ruíz, E; López-Zabalza, M J; Santiago, E

    1996-12-16

    We have found a common structural motif in human autoantigens, heat shock proteins and viral proteins. Peptides modelled after sequences present in those molecules were synthesized and immunomodulating properties tested. They share a core of 15 amino acid residues and a common pattern ('2-6-11' motif) characterized by requirements at fixed positions with respect to a Pro (position 6); an apolar residue or a Lys at position 2; and a Glu, Asp or Lys at position 11. Any of these peptides, when added to cultures of lymphomononuclear cells, caused the activation of monocytes manifested by a release of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF alpha. A release of INF gamma and IL-2 took also place; this release was abolished by anti-DR antibodies. Neither IL-4 nor IL-5 could be detected. This suggests a presentation by APCs and the appearance of cells with a Th1 phenotype. Monocytes and Th1 cells freshly obtained from 12 patients of Graves' disease, 8 of Hashimoto's disease and 8 of primary biliary cirrhosis exhibited activation features similar to those found in cells from healthy subjects incubated in the presence of peptides with a "2-6-11' motif and representing fragments of autoantigens. Their immunopotentiating properties suggest their involvement in the initiation or progression of the autoimmune response mediated by activated monocytes and Th1 cells.

  19. Basal lamina strengthens cell membrane integrity via the laminin G domain-binding motif of α-dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Han, Renzhi; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yoshida-Moriguchi, Takako; Rader, Erik P.; Ng, Rainer A.; Michele, Daniel E.; Muirhead, David E.; Kunz, Stefan; Moore, Steven A.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.; Mayer, Ulrike; Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Faulkner, John A.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle basal lamina is linked to the sarcolemma through transmembrane receptors, including integrins and dystroglycan. The function of dystroglycan relies critically on posttranslational glycosylation, a common target shared by a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular dystrophies characterized by α-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation. Here we show that both dystroglycan and integrin α7 contribute to force-production of muscles, but that only disruption of dystroglycan causes detachment of the basal lamina from the sarcolemma and renders muscle prone to contraction-induced injury. These phenotypes of dystroglycan-null muscles are recapitulated by Largemyd muscles, which have an intact dystrophin–glycoprotein complex and lack only the laminin globular domain-binding motif on α-dystroglycan. Compromised sarcolemmal integrity is directly shown in Largemyd muscles and similarly in normal muscles when arenaviruses compete with matrix proteins for binding α-dystroglycan. These data provide direct mechanistic insight into how the dystroglycan-linked basal lamina contributes to the maintenance of sarcolemmal integrity and protects muscles from damage. PMID:19633189

  20. Integration of Bioinformatics and Synthetic Promoters Leads to the Discovery of Novel Elicitor-Responsive cis-Regulatory Sequences in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, Jeannette; Machens, Fabian; Becker, Marlies; Niemeyer, Julia; Schulze, Jutta; Bülow, Lorenz; Stahl, Dietmar J.; Hehl, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    A combination of bioinformatic tools, high-throughput gene expression profiles, and the use of synthetic promoters is a powerful approach to discover and evaluate novel cis-sequences in response to specific stimuli. With Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray data annotated to the PathoPlant database, 732 different queries with a focus on fungal and oomycete pathogens were performed, leading to 510 up-regulated gene groups. Using the binding site estimation suite of tools, BEST, 407 conserved sequence motifs were identified in promoter regions of these coregulated gene sets. Motif similarities were determined with STAMP, classifying the 407 sequence motifs into 37 families. A comparative analysis of these 37 families with the AthaMap, PLACE, and AGRIS databases revealed similarities to known cis-elements but also led to the discovery of cis-sequences not yet implicated in pathogen response. Using a parsley (Petroselinum crispum) protoplast system and a modified reporter gene vector with an internal transformation control, 25 elicitor-responsive cis-sequences from 10 different motif families were identified. Many of the elicitor-responsive cis-sequences also drive reporter gene expression in an Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection assay in Nicotiana benthamiana. This work significantly increases the number of known elicitor-responsive cis-sequences and demonstrates the successful integration of a diverse set of bioinformatic resources combined with synthetic promoter analysis for data mining and functional screening in plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:22744985

  1. GeneMarkS: a self-training method for prediction of gene starts in microbial genomes. Implications for finding sequence motifs in regulatory regions

    PubMed Central

    Besemer, John; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Improving the accuracy of prediction of gene starts is one of a few remaining open problems in computer prediction of prokaryotic genes. Its difficulty is caused by the absence of relatively strong sequence patterns identifying true translation initiation sites. In the current paper we show that the accuracy of gene start prediction can be improved by combining models of protein-coding and non-coding regions and models of regulatory sites near gene start within an iterative Hidden Markov model based algorithm. The new gene prediction method, called GeneMarkS, utilizes a non-supervised training procedure and can be used for a newly sequenced prokaryotic genome with no prior knowledge of any protein or rRNA genes. The GeneMarkS implementation uses an improved version of the gene finding program GeneMark.hmm, heuristic Markov models of coding and non-coding regions and the Gibbs sampling multiple alignment program. GeneMarkS predicted precisely 83.2% of the translation starts of GenBank annotated Bacillus subtilis genes and 94.4% of translation starts in an experimentally validated set of Escherichia coli genes. We have also observed that GeneMarkS detects prokaryotic genes, in terms of identifying open reading frames containing real genes, with an accuracy matching the level of the best currently used gene detection methods. Accurate translation start prediction, in addition to the refinement of protein sequence N-terminal data, provides the benefit of precise positioning of the sequence region situated upstream to a gene start. Therefore, sequence motifs related to transcription and translation regulatory sites can be revealed and analyzed with higher precision. These motifs were shown to possess a significant variability, the functional and evolutionary connections of which are discussed. PMID:11410670

  2. Retrotransposon-like sequences integrated into the genome of pineapple, Ananas comosus.

    PubMed

    Thomson, K G; Thomas, J E; Dietzgen, R G

    1998-10-01

    Retrotransposon-like sequences have been serendipitously detected in the genome of commercial pineapple, Ananas comosus. The sequence from a 2.6 kb cloned fragment of this element had greatest similarity to the del1 Lilium henryi retrotransposon and the gypsy/Ty3 group of retroelements. The order of the genes from 5' to 3' was reverse transcriptase, ribonuclease H and integrase. The integrase domain contained the amino acid sequence motifs which have been associated with recognition of the long terminal repeats and with the cutting/joining reactions required for integration of similar retroelements into the host genome. The retrotransposon existed as a population of variable sequences which were dispersed throughout the genome of pineapple. Southern hybridisation showed that the retrotransposon had integrated repeatedly into the pineapple genome. The reading frame of the element was not interrupted by stop codons, suggesting that it is still potentially capable of transposing. This is the first report of a retrotransposon in pineapple, which we have called deal (for dispersed element of Ananas).

  3. Microfabricated bioprocessor for integrated nanoliter-scale Sanger DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Blazej, Robert G; Kumaresan, Palani; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-05-09

    An efficient, nanoliter-scale microfabricated bioprocessor integrating all three Sanger sequencing steps, thermal cycling, sample purification, and capillary electrophoresis, has been developed and evaluated. Hybrid glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wafer-scale construction is used to combine 250-nl reactors, affinity-capture purification chambers, high-performance capillary electrophoresis channels, and pneumatic valves and pumps onto a single microfabricated device. Lab-on-a-chip-level integration enables complete Sanger sequencing from only 1 fmol of DNA template. Up to 556 continuous bases were sequenced with 99% accuracy, demonstrating read lengths required for de novo sequencing of human and other complex genomes. The performance of this miniaturized DNA sequencer provides a benchmark for predicting the ultimate cost and efficiency limits of Sanger sequencing.

  4. Analysis of sequences involved in IE2 transactivation of a baculovirus immediate-early gene promoter and identification of a new regulatory motif.

    PubMed

    Shippam-Brett, C E; Willis, L G; Theilmann, D A

    2001-05-01

    Opep-2 is a unique baculovirus early gene that has only been identified in the Orgyia pseudotsugata multiple capsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV). Previous analyses have shown this gene is expressed at very early times post-infection (p.i.) but is shut down by 36-48 h p.i. The promoter of opep-2 therefore, represents a class of early genes that is temporally regulated. In this study, a detailed analysis of the opep-2 promoter is performed to analyze the role individual motifs play in early gene expression. A new 13 base pair regulatory element was identified and shown to be essential in controlling high-level expression of this gene. In addition, mutational analysis revealed that GATA and CACGTG motifs, which have been shown to bind cellular factors in Sf9 and Ld652Y cells, played minor roles in influencing opep-2 expression in the absence of other viral factors. The OpMNPV transactivator IE2 causes a significant activation of the opep-2 promoter. Cotransfection of an extensive number of promoter deletions and mutations did not show any sequence specificity for IE2 transactivation. This is the first detailed analysis of the sequence requirements for IE2 transactivation, and these results suggest that IE2 does not bind directly to specific elements in the opep-2 promoter.

  5. Building dictionaries of 1D and 3D motifs by mining the Unaligned 1D sequences of 17 archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Rigoutsos, I; Gao, Y; Floratos, A; Parida, L

    1999-01-01

    We have used the Teiresias algorithm to carry out unsupervised pattern discovery in a database containing the unaligned ORFs from the 17 publicly available complete archaeal and bacterial genomes and build a 1D dictionary of motifs. These motifs which we refer to as seqlets account for and cover 97.88% of this genomic input at the level of amino acid positions. Each of the seqlets in this 1D dictionary was located among the sequences in Release 38.0 of the Protein Data Bank and the structural fragments corresponding to each seqlet's instances were identified and aligned in three dimensions: those of the seqlets that resulted in RMSD errors below a pre-selected threshold of 2.5 Angstroms were entered in a 3D dictionary of structurally conserved seqlets. These two dictionaries can be thought of as cross-indices that facilitate the tackling of tasks such as automated functional annotation of genomic sequences, local homology identification, local structure characterization, comparative genomics, etc.

  6. Integrating Sequence Evolution into Probabilistic Orthology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Sjöstrand, Joel; Andersson, Peter; Sennblad, Bengt; Lagergren, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Orthology analysis, that is, finding out whether a pair of homologous genes are orthologs - stemming from a speciation - or paralogs - stemming from a gene duplication - is of central importance in computational biology, genome annotation, and phylogenetic inference. In particular, an orthologous relationship makes functional equivalence of the two genes highly likely. A major approach to orthology analysis is to reconcile a gene tree to the corresponding species tree, (most commonly performed using the most parsimonious reconciliation, MPR). However, most such phylogenetic orthology methods infer the gene tree without considering the constraints implied by the species tree and, perhaps even more importantly, only allow the gene sequences to influence the orthology analysis through the a priori reconstructed gene tree. We propose a sound, comprehensive Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, DLRSOrthology, to compute orthology probabilities. It efficiently sums over the possible gene trees and jointly takes into account the current gene tree, all possible reconciliations to the species tree, and the, typically strong, signal conveyed by the sequences. We compare our method with PrIME-GEM, a probabilistic orthology approach built on a probabilistic duplication-loss model, and MrBayesMPR, a probabilistic orthology approach that is based on conventional Bayesian inference coupled with MPR. We find that DLRSOrthology outperforms these competing approaches on synthetic data as well as on biological data sets and is robust to incomplete taxon sampling artifacts.

  7. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM signaling and vascular integrity in inflammation and development.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Bergmeier, W

    2016-04-01

    Platelets are essential for maintaining hemostasis following mechanical injury to the vasculature. Besides this established function, novel roles of platelets are becoming increasingly recognized, which are critical in non-injury settings to maintain vascular barrier integrity. For example, during embryogenesis platelets act to support the proper separation of blood and lymphatic vessels. This role continues beyond birth, where platelets prevent leakage of blood into the lymphatic vessel network. During the course of inflammation, platelets are necessary to prevent local hemorrhage due to neutrophil diapedesis and disruption of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, platelets also work to secure tumor-associated blood vessels, inhibiting excessive vessel permeability and intra-tumor hemorrhaging. Interestingly, many of these novel platelet functions depend on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling but not on signaling via G protein-coupled receptors, which plays a crucial role in platelet plug formation at sites of mechanical injury. Murine platelets express two ITAM-containing receptors: the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which functionally associates with the collagen receptor GPVI, and the C-type lectin-like 2 (CLEC-2) receptor, a hemITAM receptor for the mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin. Human platelets express an additional ITAM receptor, FcγRIIA. These receptors share common downstream effectors, including Syk, SLP-76 and PLCγ2. Here we will review the recent literature that highlights a critical role for platelet GPVI/FcRγ and CLEC-2 in vascular integrity during development and inflammation in mice and discuss the relevance to human disease.

  8. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed). PMID:22638583

  9. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-07-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed).

  10. Origin replication complex binding, nucleosome depletion patterns, and a primary sequence motif can predict origins of replication in a genome with epigenetic centromeres.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Ji; Baller, Joshua A; Liachko, Ivan; Koren, Amnon; Burrack, Laura S; Hickman, Meleah A; Thevandavakkam, Mathuravani A; Rusche, Laura N; Berman, Judith

    2014-09-02

    Origins of DNA replication are key genetic elements, yet their identification remains elusive in most organisms. In previous work, we found that centromeres contain origins of replication (ORIs) that are determined epigenetically in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. In this study, we used origin recognition complex (ORC) binding and nucleosome occupancy patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis to train a machine learning algorithm to predict the position of active arm (noncentromeric) origins in the C. albicans genome. The model identified bona fide active origins as determined by the presence of replication intermediates on nondenaturing two-dimensional (2D) gels. Importantly, these origins function at their native chromosomal loci and also as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) on a linear plasmid. A "mini-ARS screen" identified at least one and often two ARS regions of ≥100 bp within each bona fide origin. Furthermore, a 15-bp AC-rich consensus motif was associated with the predicted origins and conferred autonomous replicating activity to the mini-ARSs. Thus, while centromeres and the origins associated with them are epigenetic, arm origins are dependent upon critical DNA features, such as a binding site for ORC and a propensity for nucleosome exclusion. DNA replication machinery is highly conserved, yet the definition of exactly what specifies a replication origin differs in different species. Here, we utilized computational genomics to predict origin locations in Candida albicans by combining locations of binding sites for the conserved origin replication complex, necessary for replication initiation, together with chromatin organization patterns. We identified predicted sequences that exhibited bona fide origin function and developed a linear plasmid assay to delimit the DNA fragments necessary for origin function. Additionally, we found that a short AC-rich motif, which is enriched in predicted origins, is required for

  11. Relation between mRNA expression and sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Combinatorial contributions of upstream regulatory motifs and coding sequence features to variations in mRNA abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Nie, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-26

    ABSTRACT-The context-dependent expression of genes is the core for biological activities, and significant attention has been given to identification of various factors contributing to gene expression at genomic scale. However, so far this type of analysis has been focused whether on relation between mRNA expression and non-coding sequence features such as upstream regulatory motifs or on correlation between mRN abundance and non-random features in coding sequences (e.g. codon usage and amino acid usage). In this study multiple regression analyses of the mRNA abundance and all sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris were performed, with the goal to investigate how much coding and non-coding sequence features contribute to the variations in mRNA expression, and in what manner they act together...

  12. Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures and sequence motifs of ITS2 rDNA of Paragonimus westermani (Kerbert, 1878) Braun, 1899 (Digenea: Paragonimidae) and related species

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    motifs allowed an accurate in-silico distinction of lung flukes. Conclusion Data indicate that ITS2 motifs (≤ 50 bp in size) can be considered a promising tool for trematode species identification. RNA secondary structure analysis could be a valuable tool for distinguishing new species and completing Paragonimus systematics, more so because ITS2 secondary structure contains more information than the usual primary sequence alignment. PMID:19958489

  13. Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures and sequence motifs of ITS2 rDNA of Paragonimus westermani (Kerbert, 1878) Braun, 1899 (Digenea: Paragonimidae) and related species.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Pramod Kumar; Tandon, Veena; Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Goswami, Lalit Mohan; Chatterjee, Anupam

    2009-12-03

    Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics that give "morphological" information, not found in the primary sequence. In several mountainous regions of Northeastern India, foci of Paragonimus (lung fluke) infection reportedly involve species that are known to prevail in neighbouring countries. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate the sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA (ITS2) of the infective (metacercarial) stage of the lung fluke collected from the edible crab hosts that are abundant in a mountain stream of the area (Miao, Changlang District in Arunachal Pradesh) and to construct its phylogeny. Using the approach of molecular morphometrics that is based on ITS2 secondary structure homologies, phylogenetic relationships of the various isolates of Paragonimus species that are prevalent in the neighbouring Near-eastern countries have been discussed. Initially, ten predicted RNA secondary structures were reconstructed and the topology based only on the predicted RNA secondary structure of the ITS2 region resolved most relationships among the species studied. We obtained three similar topologies for seven species of the genus Paragonimus on the basis of traditional primary sequence analysis using MEGA and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics; each data partition was allowed to have a different evolution rate. Paragonimus westermani was found to group with P. siamensis of Thailand; this was best supported by both the molecular morphometrics and combined analyses. P. heterotremus, P. proliferus, P. skrjabini, P. bangkokensis and P. harinasutai formed a separate clade in the molecular phylogenies, and were reciprocally monophyletic with respect to other species. ITS2 sequence motifs allowed an

  14. ICAP-1, a Novel β1 Integrin Cytoplasmic Domain–associated Protein, Binds to a Conserved and Functionally Important NPXY Sequence Motif of β1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David D.; Wong, Carol; Smith, Healy; Liu, Jenny

    1997-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of integrins are essential for cell adhesion. We report identification of a novel protein, ICAP-1 (integrin cytoplasmic domain– associated protein-1), which binds to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain. The interaction between ICAP-1 and β1 integrins is highly specific, as demonstrated by the lack of interaction between ICAP-1 and the cytoplasmic domains of other β integrins, and requires a conserved and functionally important NPXY sequence motif found in the COOH-terminal region of the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain. Mutational studies reveal that Asn and Tyr of the NPXY motif and a Val residue located NH2-terminal to this motif are critical for the ICAP-1 binding. Two isoforms of ICAP-1, a 200–amino acid protein (ICAP-1α) and a shorter 150–amino acid protein (ICAP-1β), derived from alternatively spliced mRNA, are expressed in most cells. ICAP-1α is a phosphoprotein and the extent of its phosphorylation is regulated by the cell–matrix interaction. First, an enhancement of ICAP-1α phosphorylation is observed when cells were plated on fibronectin-coated but not on nonspecific poly-l-lysine–coated surface. Second, the expression of a constitutively activated RhoA protein that disrupts the cell–matrix interaction results in dephosphorylation of ICAP-1α. The regulation of ICAP-1α phosphorylation by the cell–matrix interaction suggests an important role of ICAP-1 during integrin-dependent cell adhesion. PMID:9281591

  15. Identification of a Novel Sequence Motif Recognized by the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of zDHHC17/13 S-Acyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Lemonidis, Kimon; Sanchez-Perez, Maria C.; Chamberlain, Luke H.

    2015-01-01

    S-Acylation is a major post-translational modification affecting several cellular processes. It is particularly important for neuronal functions. This modification is catalyzed by a family of transmembrane S-acyltransferases that contain a conserved zinc finger DHHC (zDHHC) domain. Typically, eukaryote genomes encode for 7–24 distinct zDHHC enzymes, with two members also harboring an ankyrin repeat (AR) domain at their cytosolic N termini. The AR domain of zDHHC enzymes is predicted to engage in numerous interactions and facilitates both substrate recruitment and S-acylation-independent functions; however, the sequence/structural features recognized by this module remain unknown. The two mammalian AR-containing S-acyltransferases are the Golgi-localized zDHHC17 and zDHHC13, also known as Huntingtin-interacting proteins 14 and 14-like, respectively; they are highly expressed in brain, and their loss in mice leads to neuropathological deficits that are reminiscent of Huntington's disease. Here, we report that zDHHC17 and zDHHC13 recognize, via their AR domain, evolutionary conserved and closely related sequences of a [VIAP][VIT]XXQP consensus in SNAP25, SNAP23, cysteine string protein, Huntingtin, cytoplasmic linker protein 3, and microtubule-associated protein 6. This novel AR-binding sequence motif is found in regions predicted to be unstructured and is present in a number of zDHHC17 substrates and zDHHC17/13-interacting S-acylated proteins. This is the first study to identify a motif recognized by AR-containing zDHHCs. PMID:26198635

  16. RIKEN integrated sequence analysis (RISA) system--384-format sequencing pipeline with 384 multicapillary sequencer.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Itoh, M; Aizawa, K; Nagaoka, S; Sasaki, N; Carninci, P; Konno, H; Akiyama, J; Nishi, K; Kitsunai, T; Tashiro, H; Itoh, M; Sumi, N; Ishii, Y; Nakamura, S; Hazama, M; Nishine, T; Harada, A; Yamamoto, R; Matsumoto, H; Sakaguchi, S; Ikegami, T; Kashiwagi, K; Fujiwake, S; Inoue, K; Togawa, Y

    2000-11-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto sequencer (RISA sequencer), a 384-multicapillary array assembler (CAS), and a 384-multicapillary casting device. The RISA sequencer can simultaneously analyze 384 independent sequencing products. The optical system is a scanning system chosen after careful comparison with an image detection system for the simultaneous detection of the 384-capillary array. This scanning system can be used with any fluorescent-labeled sequencing reaction (chain termination reaction), including transcriptional sequencing based on RNA polymerase, which was originally developed by us, and cycle sequencing based on thermostable DNA polymerase. For long-read sequencing, 380 out of 384 sequences (99.2%) were successfully analyzed and the average read length, with more than 99% accuracy, was 654.4 bp. A single RISA sequencer can analyze 216 kb with >99% accuracy in 2.7 h (90 kb/h). For short-read sequencing to cluster the 3' end and 5' end sequencing by reading 350 bp, 384 samples can be analyzed in 1.5 h. We have also developed a RISA inoculator, RISA filtrator and densitometer, RISA plasmid preparator which can handle throughput of 40,000 samples in 17.5 h, and a high-throughput RISA thermal cycler which has four 384-well sites. The combination of these technologies allowed us to construct the RISA system consisting of 16 RISA sequencers, which can process 50,000 DNA samples per day. One haploid genome shotgun sequence of a higher organism, such as human, mouse, rat, domestic animals, and plants, can be

  17. RIKEN Integrated Sequence Analysis (RISA) System—384-Format Sequencing Pipeline with 384 Multicapillary Sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Sasaki, Nobuya; Carninci, Piero; Konno, Hideaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nishi, Katsuo; Kitsunai, Tokuji; Tashiro, Hideo; Itoh, Mari; Sumi, Noriko; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Shin; Hazama, Makoto; Nishine, Tsutomu; Harada, Akira; Yamamoto, Rintaro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Sumito; Ikegami, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Katsuya; Fujiwake, Syuji; Inoue, Kouji; Togawa, Yoshiyuki; Izawa, Masaki; Ohara, Eiji; Watahiki, Masanori; Yoneda, Yuko; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Ozawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Takumi; Matsuura, Shuji; Kawai, Jun; Okazaki, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Masami; Inoue, Yorinao; Kira, Akira; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2000-01-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto sequencer (RISA sequencer), a 384-multicapillary array assembler (CAS), and a 384-multicapillary casting device. The RISA sequencer can simultaneously analyze 384 independent sequencing products. The optical system is a scanning system chosen after careful comparison with an image detection system for the simultaneous detection of the 384-capillary array. This scanning system can be used with any fluorescent-labeled sequencing reaction (chain termination reaction), including transcriptional sequencing based on RNA polymerase, which was originally developed by us, and cycle sequencing based on thermostable DNA polymerase. For long-read sequencing, 380 out of 384 sequences (99.2%) were successfully analyzed and the average read length, with more than 99% accuracy, was 654.4 bp. A single RISA sequencer can analyze 216 kb with >99% accuracy in 2.7 h (90 kb/h). For short-read sequencing to cluster the 3′ end and 5′ end sequencing by reading 350 bp, 384 samples can be analyzed in 1.5 h. We have also developed a RISA inoculator, RISA filtrator and densitometer, RISA plasmid preparator which can handle throughput of 40,000 samples in 17.5 h, and a high-throughput RISA thermal cycler which has four 384-well sites. The combination of these technologies allowed us to construct the RISA system consisting of 16 RISA sequencers, which can process 50,000 DNA samples per day. One haploid genome shotgun sequence of a higher organism, such as human, mouse, rat, domestic animals, and plants, can

  18. A coordination polymer for the site-specific integration of semiconducting sequences into DNA-based materials.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahamad, Lamia L G; El-Zubir, Osama; Smith, David G; Horrocks, Benjamin R; Houlton, Andrew

    2017-09-28

    Advances in bottom-up material design have been significantly progressed through DNA-based approaches. However, the routine integration of semiconducting properties, particularly long-range electrical conduction, into the basic topological motif of DNA remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate this with a coordination polymer derived from 6-thioguanosine (6-TG-H), a sulfur-containing analog of a natural nucleoside. The complexation reaction with Au(I) ions spontaneously assembles luminescent one-dimensional helical chains, characterized as {Au(I)(μ-6-TG)} n , extending many μm in length that are structurally analogous to natural DNA. Uniquely, for such a material, this gold-thiolate can be transformed into a wire-like conducting form by oxidative doping. We also show that this self-assembly reaction is compatible with a 6-TG-modified DNA duplex and provides a straightforward method by which to integrate semiconducting sequences, site-specifically, into the framework of DNA materials, transforming their properties in a fundamental and technologically useful manner.Integration of semiconducting properties into the basic topological motif of DNA remains challenging. Here, the authors show a coordination polymer derived from 6-thioguanosine that complexes with Au(I) ions to form a wire-like material that can also integrate semiconducting sequences into the framework of DNA materials.

  19. A common sequence motif determines the Cajal body-specific localization of box H/ACA scaRNAs.

    PubMed

    Richard, Patricia; Darzacq, Xavier; Bertrand, Edouard; Jády, Beáta E; Verheggen, Céline; Kiss, Tamás

    2003-08-15

    Post-transcriptional synthesis of 2'-O-methylated nucleotides and pseudouridines in Sm spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs takes place in the nucleoplasmic Cajal bodies and it is directed by guide RNAs (scaRNAs) that are structurally and functionally indistinguishable from small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) directing rRNA modification in the nucleolus. The scaRNAs are synthesized in the nucleoplasm and specifically targeted to Cajal bodies. Here, mutational analysis of the human U85 box C/D-H/ACA scaRNA, followed by in situ localization, demonstrates that box H/ACA scaRNAs share a common Cajal body-specific localization signal, the CAB box. Two copies of the evolutionarily conserved CAB consensus (UGAG) are located in the terminal loops of the 5' and 3' hairpins of the box H/ACA domains of mammalian, Drosophila and plant scaRNAs. Upon alteration of the CAB boxes, mutant scaRNAs accumulate in the nucleolus. In turn, authentic snoRNAs can be targeted into Cajal bodies by addition of exogenous CAB box motifs. Our results indicate that scaRNAs represent an ancient group of small nuclear RNAs which are localized to Cajal bodies by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism.

  20. Small yet effective: the ethylene responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif.

    PubMed

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2010-06-01

    The Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif is a small yet distinct regulatory motif that is conserved in many plant transcriptional regulator (TR) proteins associated with diverse biological functions. We have previously established a list of high-confidence Arabidopsis EAR repressors, the EAR repressome, comprising 219 TRs belonging to 21 different TR families. This class of proteins and the sequence context of the EAR motif exhibited a high degree of conservation across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Our comprehensive genome-wide analysis enabled refining EAR motifs as comprising either LxLxL or DLNxxP. Comparing the representation of these sequence signatures in TRs to that of other repressor motifs we show that the EAR motif is the one most frequently represented, detected in 10 to 25% of the TRs from diverse plant species. The mechanisms involved in regulation of EAR motif function and the cellular fates of EAR repressors are currently not well understood. Our earlier analysis had implicated amino acid residues flanking the EAR motifs in regulation of their functionality. Here, we present additional evidence supporting possible regulation of EAR motif function by phosphorylation of integral or adjacent Ser and/or Thr residues. Additionally, we discuss potential novel roles of EAR motifs in plant-pathogen interaction and processes other than transcriptional repression.

  1. Nucleophosmin integrates within the nucleolus via multi-modal interactions with proteins displaying R-rich linear motifs and rRNA

    DOE PAGES

    Mitrea, Diana M.; Cika, Jaclyn A.; Guy, Clifford S.; ...

    2016-02-02

    The nucleolus is a membrane-less organelle formed through liquid-liquid phase separation of its components from the surrounding nucleoplasm. Here, we show that nucleophosmin (NPM1) integrates within the nucleolus via a multi-modal mechanism involving multivalent interactions with proteins containing arginine-rich linear motifs (R-motifs) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Importantly, these R-motifs are found in canonical nucleolar localization signals. Based on a novel combination of biophysical approaches, we propose a model for the molecular organization within liquid-like droplets formed by the N-terminal domain of NPM1 and R-motif peptides, thus providing insights into the structural organization of the nucleolus. We identify multivalency of acidicmore » tracts and folded nucleic acid binding domains, mediated by N-terminal domain oligomerization, as structural features required for phase separation of NPM1 with other nucleolar components in vitro and for localization within mammalian nucleoli. We propose that one mechanism of nucleolar localization involves phase separation of proteins within the nucleolus.« less

  2. Nucleophosmin integrates within the nucleolus via multi-modal interactions with proteins displaying R-rich linear motifs and rRNA.

    PubMed

    Mitrea, Diana M; Cika, Jaclyn A; Guy, Clifford S; Ban, David; Banerjee, Priya R; Stanley, Christopher B; Nourse, Amanda; Deniz, Ashok A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2016-02-02

    The nucleolus is a membrane-less organelle formed through liquid-liquid phase separation of its components from the surrounding nucleoplasm. Here, we show that nucleophosmin (NPM1) integrates within the nucleolus via a multi-modal mechanism involving multivalent interactions with proteins containing arginine-rich linear motifs (R-motifs) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Importantly, these R-motifs are found in canonical nucleolar localization signals. Based on a novel combination of biophysical approaches, we propose a model for the molecular organization within liquid-like droplets formed by the N-terminal domain of NPM1 and R-motif peptides, thus providing insights into the structural organization of the nucleolus. We identify multivalency of acidic tracts and folded nucleic acid binding domains, mediated by N-terminal domain oligomerization, as structural features required for phase separation of NPM1 with other nucleolar components in vitro and for localization within mammalian nucleoli. We propose that one mechanism of nucleolar localization involves phase separation of proteins within the nucleolus.

  3. Nucleophosmin integrates within the nucleolus via multi-modal interactions with proteins displaying R-rich linear motifs and rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mitrea, Diana M; Cika, Jaclyn A; Guy, Clifford S; Ban, David; Banerjee, Priya R; Stanley, Christopher B; Nourse, Amanda; Deniz, Ashok A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a membrane-less organelle formed through liquid-liquid phase separation of its components from the surrounding nucleoplasm. Here, we show that nucleophosmin (NPM1) integrates within the nucleolus via a multi-modal mechanism involving multivalent interactions with proteins containing arginine-rich linear motifs (R-motifs) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Importantly, these R-motifs are found in canonical nucleolar localization signals. Based on a novel combination of biophysical approaches, we propose a model for the molecular organization within liquid-like droplets formed by the N-terminal domain of NPM1 and R-motif peptides, thus providing insights into the structural organization of the nucleolus. We identify multivalency of acidic tracts and folded nucleic acid binding domains, mediated by N-terminal domain oligomerization, as structural features required for phase separation of NPM1 with other nucleolar components in vitro and for localization within mammalian nucleoli. We propose that one mechanism of nucleolar localization involves phase separation of proteins within the nucleolus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13571.001 PMID:26836305

  4. Role of repetitive nine-residue sequence motifs in secretion, enzymatic activity, and protein conformation of a family I.3 lipase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Ju; Haruki, Mitsuru; Morikawa, Masaaki; Omori, Kenji; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2002-01-01

    A family I.3 lipase from Pseudomonas sp. MIS38 (PML) contains 12 repeats of a nine-residue sequence motif in the C-terminal region. To elucidate the role of these repetitive sequences, mutant proteins PML5, PML4, PML1, and PML0, in which 7, 8, 11, and all 12 of the repetitive sequences are deleted, and PMLdelta19, in which 19 C-terminal residues are truncated, were constructed. Escherichia coli DH5 cells carrying the Serratia marcescens Lip system permitted the secretion of the wild-type and all of the mutant proteins except for PMLdelta19, although they were partially accumulated in the cells in an insoluble form as well. Both the secretion level and cellular content of the proteins decreased in the order PML > PML5 > PML4 > PML1 > PML0, indicating that repetitive sequences are not required for secretion of PML but are important for its stability in the cells. All the mutant proteins were purified in a refolded form and their biochemical properties were characterized. CD spectra, the Ca2+ contents, and susceptibility to chymotryptic digestion strongly suggested that the five repetitive sequences remaining in PML5 are sufficient to form a beta-roll structure, whereas the four in PML4 are not. PML5 and PMLdelta19 showed both lipase and esterase activities, whereas PML4, PML1, and PML0 were inactive. These results suggest that the enzymatic activity of PML is not seriously affected by a deletion or truncation at the C-terminal region as long as a succession of repetitive sequences can build a beta-roll structure.

  5. Limb body wall complex, amniotic band sequence, or new syndrome caused by mutation in IQ Motif containing K (IQCK)?

    PubMed Central

    Kruszka, Paul; Uwineza, Annette; Mutesa, Leon; Martinez, Ariel F; Abe, Yu; Zackai, Elaine H; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Chung, Brian; Stevenson, Roger E; Adelstein, Robert S; Ma, Xuefei; Mullikin, James C; Hong, Sung-Kook; Muenke, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) and amniotic band sequence (ABS) are multiple congenital anomaly conditions with craniofacial, limb, and ventral wall defects. LBWC and ABS are considered separate entities by some, and a continuum of severity of the same condition by others. The etiology of LBWC/ABS remains unknown and multiple hypotheses have been proposed. One individual with features of LBWC and his unaffected parents were whole exome sequenced and Sanger sequenced as confirmation of the mutation. Functional studies were conducted using morpholino knockdown studies followed by human mRNA rescue experiments. Using whole exome sequencing, a de novo heterozygous mutation was found in the gene IQCK: c.667C>G; p.Q223E and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in an individual with LBWC. Morpholino knockdown of iqck mRNA in the zebrafish showed ventral defects including failure of ventral fin to develop and cardiac edema. Human wild-type IQCK mRNA rescued the zebrafish phenotype, whereas human p.Q223E IQCK mRNA did not, but worsened the phenotype of the morpholino knockdown zebrafish. This study supports a genetic etiology for LBWC/ABS, or potentially a new syndrome. PMID:26436108

  6. Spectrometric study of the folding process of i-motif-forming DNA sequences upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site.

    PubMed

    Bucek, Pavel; Gargallo, Raimundo; Kudrev, Andrei

    2010-12-17

    The c-kit oncogene shows a cytosine-rich DNA region upstream of the transcription initiation site which forms an i-motif structure at slightly acidic pH values (Bucek et al. [5]). In the present study, the pH-induced formation of i-motif - forming sequences 5'-CCC CTC CCT CGC GCC CGC CCG-3' (ckitC1, native), 5'-CCC TTC CCT TGT GCC CGC CCG-3' (ckitC2) and 5'-CCCTT CCC TTTTT CCC T CCC T-3' (ckitC3) was studied by spectroscopic techniques, such as UV molecular absorption and circular dichroism (CD), in tandem with two multivariate data analysis methods, the hard modelling-based matrix method and the soft modelling-based MCR-ALS approach. Use of the hard chemical modelling enabled us to propose the equilibrium model, which describes spectral changes as functions of solution acidity. Additionally, the intrinsic protonation constant, K(in), and the cooperativity parameters, ω(c), and ω(a), were calculated from the fitting procedure of the coupled CD and molecular absorption spectra. In the case of ckitC2 and ckitC3, the hard model correctly reproduced the spectral variations observed experimentally. The results indicated that folding was accompanied by a cooperative process, i.e. the enhancement of protonated structure stability upon protonation. In contrast, unfolding was accompanied by an anticooperative process. Finally, folding of the native sequence, ckitC1, seemed to follow a more complex mechanism.

  7. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Foulk, Michael S.; Urban, John M.; Casella, Cinzia; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent strands intact. We used genomics and biochemical approaches to determine if λ-exo digests all parental DNA sequences equally. We report that λ-exo does not efficiently digest G-quadruplex (G4) structures in a plasmid. Moreover, λ-exo digestion of nonreplicating genomic DNA (LexoG0) enriches GC-rich DNA and G4 motifs genome-wide. We used LexoG0 data to control for nascent strand–independent λ-exo biases in NS-seq and validated this approach at the rDNA locus. The λ-exo–controlled NS-seq peaks are not GC-rich, and only 35.5% overlap with 6.8% of all G4s, suggesting that G4s are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na+ instead of K+ in the λ-exo digestion buffer reduced the effect of G4s on λ-exo digestion and discuss ways to increase both the sensitivity and specificity of NS-seq. PMID:25695952

  8. Construction of an integrated database to support genomic sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.; Overbeek, R.

    1994-11-01

    The central goal of this project is to develop an integrated database to support comparative analysis of genomes including DNA sequence data, protein sequence data, gene expression data and metabolism data. In developing the logic-based system GenoBase, a broader integration of available data was achieved due to assistance from collaborators. Current goals are to easily include new forms of data as they become available and to easily navigate through the ensemble of objects described within the database. This report comments on progress made in these areas.

  9. Tools for integrated sequence-structure analysis with UCSF Chimera

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Elaine C; Pettersen, Eric F; Couch, Gregory S; Huang, Conrad C; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Background Comparing related structures and viewing the structures in the context of sequence alignments are important tasks in protein structure-function research. While many programs exist for individual aspects of such work, there is a need for interactive visualization tools that: (a) provide a deep integration of sequence and structure, far beyond mapping where a sequence region falls in the structure and vice versa; (b) facilitate changing data of one type based on the other (for example, using only sequence-conserved residues to match structures, or adjusting a sequence alignment based on spatial fit); (c) can be used with a researcher's own data, including arbitrary sequence alignments and annotations, closely or distantly related sets of proteins, etc.; and (d) interoperate with each other and with a full complement of molecular graphics features. We describe enhancements to UCSF Chimera to achieve these goals. Results The molecular graphics program UCSF Chimera includes a suite of tools for interactive analyses of sequences and structures. Structures automatically associate with sequences in imported alignments, allowing many kinds of crosstalk. A novel method is provided to superimpose structures in the absence of a pre-existing sequence alignment. The method uses both sequence and secondary structure, and can match even structures with very low sequence identity. Another tool constructs structure-based sequence alignments from superpositions of two or more proteins. Chimera is designed to be extensible, and mechanisms for incorporating user-specific data without Chimera code development are also provided. Conclusion The tools described here apply to many problems involving comparison and analysis of protein structures and their sequences. Chimera includes complete documentation and is intended for use by a wide range of scientists, not just those in the computational disciplines. UCSF Chimera is free for non-commercial use and is available for Microsoft

  10. Cations Form Sequence Selective Motifs within DNA Grooves via a Combination of Cation-Pi and Ion-Dipole/Hydrogen Bond Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela; Dunlap, Tori; Dourlain, Elizabeth; Grant, Bryce; McFail-Isom, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The fine conformational subtleties of DNA structure modulate many fundamental cellular processes including gene activation/repression, cellular division, and DNA repair. Most of these cellular processes rely on the conformational heterogeneity of specific DNA sequences. Factors including those structural characteristics inherent in the particular base sequence as well as those induced through interaction with solvent components combine to produce fine DNA structural variation including helical flexibility and conformation. Cation-pi interactions between solvent cations or their first hydration shell waters and the faces of DNA bases form sequence selectively and contribute to DNA structural heterogeneity. In this paper, we detect and characterize the binding patterns found in cation-pi interactions between solvent cations and DNA bases in a set of high resolution x-ray crystal structures. Specifically, we found that monovalent cations (Tl+) and the polarized first hydration shell waters of divalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) form cation-pi interactions with DNA bases stabilizing unstacked conformations. When these cation-pi interactions are combined with electrostatic interactions a pattern of specific binding motifs is formed within the grooves. PMID:23940752

  11. TdIF1 recognizes a specific DNA sequence through its Helix-Turn-Helix and AT-hook motifs to regulate gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takashi; Koiwai, Osamu; Hori, Katsutoshi; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Koiwai, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    TdIF1 was originally identified as a protein that directly binds to DNA polymerase TdT. TdIF1 is also thought to function in transcription regulation, because it binds directly to the transcriptional factor TReP-132, and to histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2. Here we show that TdIF1 recognizes a specific DNA sequence and regulates gene transcription. By constructing TdIF1 mutants, we identify amino acid residues essential for its interaction with DNA. An in vitro DNA selection assay, SELEX, reveals that TdIF1 preferentially binds to the sequence 5'-GNTGCATG-3' following an AT-tract, through its Helix-Turn-Helix and AT-hook motifs. We show that four repeats of this recognition sequence allow TdIF1 to regulate gene transcription in a plasmid-based luciferase reporter assay. We demonstrate that TdIF1 associates with the RAB20 promoter, and RAB20 gene transcription is reduced in TdIF1-knocked-down cells, suggesting that TdIF1 stimulates RAB20 gene transcription.

  12. A Novel Bayesian DNA Motif Comparison Method for Clustering and Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Margalit, Hanah; Friedman, Nir

    2008-01-01

    Characterizing the DNA-binding specificities of transcription factors is a key problem in computational biology that has been addressed by multiple algorithms. These usually take as input sequences that are putatively bound by the same factor and output one or more DNA motifs. A common practice is to apply several such algorithms simultaneously to improve coverage at the price of redundancy. In interpreting such results, two tasks are crucial: clustering of redundant motifs, and attributing the motifs to transcription factors by retrieval of similar motifs from previously characterized motif libraries. Both tasks inherently involve motif comparison. Here we present a novel method for comparing and merging motifs, based on Bayesian probabilistic principles. This method takes into account both the similarity in positional nucleotide distributions of the two motifs and their dissimilarity to the background distribution. We demonstrate the use of the new comparison method as a basis for motif clustering and retrieval procedures, and compare it to several commonly used alternatives. Our results show that the new method outperforms other available methods in accuracy and sensitivity. We incorporated the resulting motif clustering and retrieval procedures in a large-scale automated pipeline for analyzing DNA motifs. This pipeline integrates the results of various DNA motif discovery algorithms and automatically merges redundant motifs from multiple training sets into a coherent annotated library of motifs. Application of this pipeline to recent genome-wide transcription factor location data in S. cerevisiae successfully identified DNA motifs in a manner that is as good as semi-automated analysis reported in the literature. Moreover, we show how this analysis elucidates the mechanisms of condition-specific preferences of transcription factors. PMID:18463706

  13. Composite Structural Motifs of Binding Sites for Delineating Biological Functions of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes are described as a series of interactions between proteins and other molecules, and interactions are in turn described in terms of atomic structures. To annotate protein functions as sets of interaction states at atomic resolution, and thereby to better understand the relation between protein interactions and biological functions, we conducted exhaustive all-against-all atomic structure comparisons of all known binding sites for ligands including small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids, and identified recurring elementary motifs. By integrating the elementary motifs associated with each subunit, we defined composite motifs that represent context-dependent combinations of elementary motifs. It is demonstrated that function similarity can be better inferred from composite motif similarity compared to the similarity of protein sequences or of individual binding sites. By integrating the composite motifs associated with each protein function, we define meta-composite motifs each of which is regarded as a time-independent diagrammatic representation of a biological process. It is shown that meta-composite motifs provide richer annotations of biological processes than sequence clusters. The present results serve as a basis for bridging atomic structures to higher-order biological phenomena by classification and integration of binding site structures. PMID:22347478

  14. An Integrated Enzyme Kinetics Laboratory Sequence for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucholtz, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a three-week sequence to take undergraduate students through the study of enzyme kinetics in an integrated manner that reinforces the basic concepts of initial velocity and the effects of varying operational parameters. Discusses laboratory sessions and the use of a microcomputer in instruction. (CW)

  15. An Integrated Enzyme Kinetics Laboratory Sequence for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucholtz, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a three-week sequence to take undergraduate students through the study of enzyme kinetics in an integrated manner that reinforces the basic concepts of initial velocity and the effects of varying operational parameters. Discusses laboratory sessions and the use of a microcomputer in instruction. (CW)

  16. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-02-20

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

  17. BayesMotif: de novo protein sorting motif discovery from impure datasets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein sorting is the process that newly synthesized proteins are transported to their target locations within or outside of the cell. This process is precisely regulated by protein sorting signals in different forms. A major category of sorting signals are amino acid sub-sequences usually located at the N-terminals or C-terminals of protein sequences. Genome-wide experimental identification of protein sorting signals is extremely time-consuming and costly. Effective computational algorithms for de novo discovery of protein sorting signals is needed to improve the understanding of protein sorting mechanisms. Methods We formulated the protein sorting motif discovery problem as a classification problem and proposed a Bayesian classifier based algorithm (BayesMotif) for de novo identification of a common type of protein sorting motifs in which a highly conserved anchor is present along with a less conserved motif regions. A false positive removal procedure is developed to iteratively remove sequences that are unlikely to contain true motifs so that the algorithm can identify motifs from impure input sequences. Results Experiments on both implanted motif datasets and real-world datasets showed that the enhanced BayesMotif algorithm can identify anchored sorting motifs from pure or impure protein sequence dataset. It also shows that the false positive removal procedure can help to identify true motifs even when there is only 20% of the input sequences containing true motif instances. Conclusion We proposed BayesMotif, a novel Bayesian classification based algorithm for de novo discovery of a special category of anchored protein sorting motifs from impure datasets. Compared to conventional motif discovery algorithms such as MEME, our algorithm can find less-conserved motifs with short highly conserved anchors. Our algorithm also has the advantage of easy incorporation of additional meta-sequence features such as hydrophobicity or charge of the motifs which

  18. Kaiso uses all three zinc fingers and adjacent sequence motifs for high affinity binding to sequence-specific and methyl-CpG DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2012-03-23

    Kaiso is a Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger (ZF) protein that mediates methyl-CpG-dependent and sequence-specific transcriptional repression. As a first step towards elucidating the structural and molecular basis for recognition of these disparate DNA sequences, the minimal binding region of Kaiso was identified and optimal DNA sequences for high-affinity interactions were characterized. Contrary to previous findings, Kaiso requires all three zinc fingers plus adjacent protein regions for DNA recognition. An N-terminal extension contributes to structural stability, while an extended C-terminal region augments DNA binding. Complexes formed between the optimized Kaiso construct and both DNA sequences are suitable for future structural evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane requires a conserved C-terminal sequence motif and a proximal polybasic domain.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Meirav; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2006-06-01

    Plant ROPs (or RACs) are soluble Ras-related small GTPases that are attached to cell membranes by virtue of the post-translational lipid modifications of prenylation and S-acylation. ROPs (RACs) are subdivided into two major subgroups called type-I and type-II. Whereas type-I ROPs terminate with a conserved CaaL box and undergo prenylation, type-II ROPs undergo S-acylation on two or three C-terminal cysteines. In the present work we determined the sequence requirement for association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane. We identified a conserved sequence motif, designated the GC-CG box, in which the modified cysteines are flanked by glycines. The GC-CG box cysteines are separated by five to six mostly non-polar residues. Deletion of this sequence or the introduction of mutations that change its nature disrupted the association of ROPs with the membrane. Mutations that changed the GC-CG box glycines to alanines also interfered with membrane association. Deletion of a polybasic domain proximal to the GC-CG box disrupted the plasma membrane association of AtROP10. A green fluorescent protein fusion protein containing the C-terminal 25 residues of AtROP10, including its polybasic domain and GC-CG box, was primarily associated with the plasma membrane but a similar fusion protein lacking the polybasic domain was exclusively localized in the soluble fraction. These data provide evidence for the minimal sequence required for plasma membrane association of type-II ROPs in Arabidopsis and other plant species.

  20. Radiation Desiccation Response Motif-Like Sequences Are Involved in Transcriptional Activation of the Deinococcal ssb Gene by Ionizing Radiation but Not by Desiccation▿

    PubMed Central

    Ujaoney, Aman Kumar; Potnis, Akhilesh A.; Kane, Pratiksha; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Single-stranded-DNA binding protein (SSB) levels during poststress recovery of Deinococcus radiodurans were significantly enhanced by 60Co gamma rays or mitomycin C treatment but not by exposure to UV rays, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), or desiccation. Addition of rifampin prior to postirradiation recovery blocked such induction. In silico analysis of the ssb promoter region revealed a 17-bp palindromic radiation/desiccation response motif (RDRM1) at bp −114 to −98 and a somewhat similar sequence (RDRM2) at bp −213 to −197, upstream of the ssb open reading frame. Involvement of these cis elements in radiation-responsive ssb gene expression was assessed by constructing transcriptional fusions of edited versions of the ssb promoter region with a nonspecific acid phosphatase encoding reporter gene, phoN. Recombinant D. radiodurans strains carrying such constructs clearly revealed (i) transcriptional induction of the ssb promoter upon irradiation and mitomycin C treatment but not upon UV or H2O2 treatment and (ii) involvement of both RDRM-like sequences in such activation of SSB expression, in an additive manner. PMID:20802034

  1. Rice MEL2, the RNA recognition motif (RRM) protein, binds in vitro to meiosis-expressed genes containing U-rich RNA consensus sequences in the 3'-UTR.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Saori; Sato, Yutaka; Asano, Tomoya; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Nonomura, Ken-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins through binding to cis-elements in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) is widely used in eukaryotes to complete various biological processes. Rice MEIOSIS ARRESTED AT LEPTOTENE2 (MEL2) is the RRM protein that functions in the transition to meiosis in proper timing. The MEL2 RRM preferentially associated with the U-rich RNA consensus, UUAGUU[U/A][U/G][A/U/G]U, dependently on sequences and proportionally to MEL2 protein amounts in vitro. The consensus sequences were located in the putative looped structures of the RNA ligand. A genome-wide survey revealed a tendency of MEL2-binding consensus appearing in 3'-UTR of rice genes. Of 249 genes that conserved the consensus in their 3'-UTR, 13 genes spatiotemporally co-expressed with MEL2 in meiotic flowers, and included several genes whose function was supposed in meiosis; such as Replication protein A and OsMADS3. The proteome analysis revealed that the amounts of small ubiquitin-related modifier-like protein and eukaryotic translation initiation factor3-like protein were dramatically altered in mel2 mutant anthers. Taken together with transcriptome and gene ontology results, we propose that the rice MEL2 is involved in the translational regulation of key meiotic genes on 3'-UTRs to achieve the faithful transition of germ cells to meiosis.

  2. A mechanism of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-like sequences in the capsid protein VP2 in viral growth and pathogenesis of Coxsackievirus B3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Park, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Dokeun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2012-04-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is an RNA virus that mainly causes myocarditis. We have reported previously that immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-like sequences are contained in the capsid protein VP2 of CVB3. The substitution of two tyrosines for phenylalanines in the ITAM-like region causes attenuation of CVB3, possibly via defective viral assembly. In this study, we found that Syk, a downstream molecule of ITAM, interacts with the wild-type (WT) CVB3 VP0 protein, but not with the mutant CVB3 VP0 (called YYFF), and that an inhibitor of Syk reduced the growth of CVB3. The WT CVB3 activated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a protein activated by ITAM, and eventually induced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6)-one of the proinflammatory cytokines induced by NF-κB-in macrophages. However, the YYFF form did not. In addition, viral VP2 protein may be dependent on the phosphorylation of an ITAM-like region that affected the activation of NF-κB. Taken together, these results suggest that the ITAM-like sequences in CVB3 VP2 can not only affect viral structure but also act as signals in pathogenesis.

  3. Motifs from the deep

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tony W; Codrea, Vlad; Ellington, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    Because of the increasing recognition of the importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation, there is considerable interest in identifying RNA motifs in genomic data. In a recent report in BMC Genomics, Breaker and colleagues describe a new algorithm for identifying functional noncoding RNAs in metagenomic sequences of marine organisms, a strategy that may be particularly effective for discovering new and unique riboswitches. PMID:19735583

  4. Papillomavirus sequences integrate near cellular oncogenes in some cervical carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Duerst, M.; Croce, C.M.; Gissmann, L.; Schwarz, E.; Huebner, K.

    1987-02-01

    The chromosomal locations of cellular sequences flanking integrated papillomavirus DNA in four cervical cell lines and a primary cervical carcinoma have been determined. The two human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 flanking sequences derived from the tumor were localized to chromosomes regions 20pter..-->..20q13 and 3p25..-->..3qter, regions that also contain the protooncogenes c-src-1 and c-raf-1, respectively. The HPV 16 integration site in the SiHa cervical carcinoma-derived cell line is in chromosome region 13q14..-->..13q32. The HPV 18 integration site in SW756 cervical carcinoma cells is in chromosome 12 but is not closely linked to the Ki-ras2 gene. Finally, in two cervical carcinoma cell lines, HeLa and C4-I, HPV 18 DNA is integrated in chromosome 8, 5' of the c-myc gene. The HeLaHPV 18 integration site is within 40 kilobases 5' of the c-myc gene, inside the HL60 amplification unit surrounding and including the c-myc gene. Additionally, steady-state levels of c-myc mRNA are elevated in HeLa and C4-I cells relative to other cervical carcinoma cell lines. Thus, in at least some genital tumors, cis-activation of cellular oncogenes by HPV may be involved in malignant transformation of cervical cells.

  5. Structural Integrity of the Greek Key Motif in βγ-Crystallins Is Vital for Central Eye Lens Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Vendra, Venkata Pulla Rao; Agarwal, Garima; Chandani, Sushil; Talla, Venu; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Balasubramanian, Dorairajan

    2013-01-01

    Background We highlight an unrecognized physiological role for the Greek key motif, an evolutionarily conserved super-secondary structural topology of the βγ-crystallins. These proteins constitute the bulk of the human eye lens, packed at very high concentrations in a compact, globular, short-range order, generating transparency. Congenital cataract (affecting 400,000 newborns yearly worldwide), associated with 54 mutations in βγ-crystallins, occurs in two major phenotypes nuclear cataract, which blocks the central visual axis, hampering the development of the growing eye and demanding earliest intervention, and the milder peripheral progressive cataract where surgery can wait. In order to understand this phenotypic dichotomy at the molecular level, we have studied the structural and aggregation features of representative mutations. Methods Wild type and several representative mutant proteins were cloned, expressed and purified and their secondary and tertiary structural details, as well as structural stability, were compared in solution, using spectroscopy. Their tendencies to aggregate in vitro and in cellulo were also compared. In addition, we analyzed their structural differences by molecular modeling in silico. Results Based on their properties, mutants are seen to fall into two classes. Mutants A36P, L45PL54P, R140X, and G165fs display lowered solubility and structural stability, expose several buried residues to the surface, aggregate in vitro and in cellulo, and disturb/distort the Greek key motif. And they are associated with nuclear cataract. In contrast, mutants P24T and R77S, associated with peripheral cataract, behave quite similar to the wild type molecule, and do not affect the Greek key topology. Conclusion When a mutation distorts even one of the four Greek key motifs, the protein readily self-aggregates and precipitates, consistent with the phenotype of nuclear cataract, while mutations not affecting the motif display ‘native state

  6. Tiered Human Integrated Sequence Search Databases for Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S.; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Farrah, Terry; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The results of analysis of shotgun proteomics mass spectrometry data can be greatly affected by the selection of the reference protein sequence database against which the spectra are matched. For many species there are multiple sources from which somewhat different sequence sets can be obtained. This can lead to confusion about which database is best in which circumstances – a problem especially acute in human sample analysis. All sequence databases are genome-based, with sequences for the predicted gene and their protein translation products compiled. Our goal is to create a set of primary sequence databases that comprise the union of sequences from many of the different available sources and make the result easily available to the community. We have compiled a set of four sequence databases of varying sizes, from a small database consisting of only the ~20,000 primary isoforms plus contaminants to a very large database that includes almost all non-redundant protein sequences from several sources. This set of tiered, increasingly complete human protein sequence databases suitable for mass spectrometry proteomics sequence database searching is called the Tiered Human Integrated Search Proteome set. In order to evaluate the utility of these databases, we have analyzed two different data sets, one from the HeLa cell line and the other from normal human liver tissue, with each of the four tiers of database complexity. The result is that approximately 0.8%, 1.1%, and 1.5% additional peptides can be identified for Tiers 2, 3, and 4, respectively, as compared with the Tier 1 database, at substantially increasing computational cost. This increase in computational cost may be worth bearing if the identification of sequence variants or the discovery of sequences that are not present in the reviewed knowledge base entries is an important goal of the study. We find that it is useful to search a data set against a simpler database, and then check the uniqueness of the

  7. Tiered Human Integrated Sequence Search Databases for Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Farrah, Terry; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Omenn, Gilbert S; Moritz, Robert L

    2016-11-04

    The results of analysis of shotgun proteomics mass spectrometry data can be greatly affected by the selection of the reference protein sequence database against which the spectra are matched. For many species there are multiple sources from which somewhat different sequence sets can be obtained. This can lead to confusion about which database is best in which circumstances-a problem especially acute in human sample analysis. All sequence databases are genome-based, with sequences for the predicted gene and their protein translation products compiled. Our goal is to create a set of primary sequence databases that comprise the union of sequences from many of the different available sources and make the result easily available to the community. We have compiled a set of four sequence databases of varying sizes, from a small database consisting of only the ∼20,000 primary isoforms plus contaminants to a very large database that includes almost all nonredundant protein sequences from several sources. This set of tiered, increasingly complete human protein sequence databases suitable for mass spectrometry proteomics sequence database searching is called the Tiered Human Integrated Search Proteome set. In order to evaluate the utility of these databases, we have analyzed two different data sets, one from the HeLa cell line and the other from normal human liver tissue, with each of the four tiers of database complexity. The result is that approximately 0.8%, 1.1%, and 1.5% additional peptides can be identified for Tiers 2, 3, and 4, respectively, as compared with the Tier 1 database, at substantially increasing computational cost. This increase in computational cost may be worth bearing if the identification of sequence variants or the discovery of sequences that are not present in the reviewed knowledge base entries is an important goal of the study. We find that it is useful to search a data set against a simpler database, and then check the uniqueness of the

  8. Music and language perception: expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, showing that music cognition research provides insight into the understanding of not only music processing but also language processing and the processing of other structured stimuli. The hypothesis of shared resources between music and language processing and of domain-general dynamic attention has motivated the development of research to test music as a means to stimulate sensory, cognitive, and motor processes. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  9. Recombination sites on hybrid chromosomes in Saccharomyces pastorianus share common sequence motifs and define a complex evolutionary relationship between group I and II lager yeasts.

    PubMed

    Monerawela, Chandre; Bond, Ursula

    2017-08-01

    Saccharomyces pastorianus, referred to as lager yeasts, are hybrids of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus. Isolates within the species are divided into two groups (I and II) based on chromosome structure and composition. Following the hybridisation, the parental chromosomes underwent homeologous recombination, generating a set of hybrid chromosomes unique to the species. Here, we assessed the recombination events in seven lager yeast genomes to more clearly define the evolutionary route of lager yeasts. Meta-analysis of the recombination epicentres, as well as a detailed analysis of recombination events at the MAT locus, reveals a more complex evolutionary relationship between the group I and II lager yeasts than previously considered and identifies several divergent routes of evolution leading to the current S. pastorianus strains. We show that recombination epicentres contain sequential runs of pyrimidines, often flanked by purines, on one strand of the DNA, and identify two common sequence motifs present in >80% of the recombination epicentres, indicating that a common mechanism might account for the recombination events. Taken together, the data support a sequential hybridisation model of evolution for the two types of lager yeasts and suggest that the genomes of this newly emerged species are highly dynamic and continually evolving. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Origin Replication Complex Binding, Nucleosome Depletion Patterns, and a Primary Sequence Motif Can Predict Origins of Replication in a Genome with Epigenetic Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hung-Ji; Baller, Joshua A.; Liachko, Ivan; Koren, Amnon; Burrack, Laura S.; Hickman, Meleah A.; Thevandavakkam, Mathuravani A.; Rusche, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Origins of DNA replication are key genetic elements, yet their identification remains elusive in most organisms. In previous work, we found that centromeres contain origins of replication (ORIs) that are determined epigenetically in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. In this study, we used origin recognition complex (ORC) binding and nucleosome occupancy patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis to train a machine learning algorithm to predict the position of active arm (noncentromeric) origins in the C. albicans genome. The model identified bona fide active origins as determined by the presence of replication intermediates on nondenaturing two-dimensional (2D) gels. Importantly, these origins function at their native chromosomal loci and also as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) on a linear plasmid. A “mini-ARS screen” identified at least one and often two ARS regions of ≥100 bp within each bona fide origin. Furthermore, a 15-bp AC-rich consensus motif was associated with the predicted origins and conferred autonomous replicating activity to the mini-ARSs. Thus, while centromeres and the origins associated with them are epigenetic, arm origins are dependent upon critical DNA features, such as a binding site for ORC and a propensity for nucleosome exclusion. PMID:25182328

  11. Function of a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat of feline leukemia virus isolated from an unusual set of naturally occurring tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Athas, G B; Lobelle-Rich, P; Levy, L S

    1995-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviruses have been characterized from naturally occurring non-B-cell, non-T-cell tumors occurring in the spleens of infected cats. These proviruses exhibit a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat (LTR), namely, a 21-bp tandem triplication beginning 25 bp downstream of the enhancer. The repeated finding of the triplication-containing LTR in non-B-cell, non-T-cell lymphomas of the spleen suggests that the unique LTR is an essential participant in the development of tumors of this particular phenotype. The nucleotide sequence of the triplication-containing LTR most closely resembles that of FeLV subgroup C. Studies performed to measure the ability of the triplication-containing LTR to modulate gene expression indicate that the 21-bp triplication provides transcriptional enhancer function to the LTR that contains it and that it substitutes at least in part for the duplication of the enhancer. The 21-bp triplication confers a bona fide enhancer function upon LTR-directed reporter gene expression; however, the possibility of a spacer function was not eliminated. The studies demonstrate further that the triplication-containing LTR acts preferentially in a cell-type-specific manner, i.e., it is 12-fold more active in K-562 cells than is an LTR lacking the triplication. A recombinant, infectious FeLV bearing the 21-bp triplication in U3 was constructed. Cells infected with the recombinant were shown to accumulate higher levels of viral RNA transcripts and virus particles in culture supernatants than did cells infected with the parental type. The triplication-containing LTR is implicated in the induction of tumors of a particular phenotype, perhaps through transcriptional regulation of the virus and/or adjacent cellular genes, in the appropriate target cell. PMID:7745680

  12. A short sequence motif in the 5' leader of the HIV-1 genome modulates extended RNA dimer formation and virus replication.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E M; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-12-19

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication.

  13. Temporal control of i-motif switch lifetimes for autonomous operation of transient DNA nanostructures† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures, materials and methods, a list of all oligonucleotide sequences and supporting figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00646b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, L.

    2017-01-01

    Functional DNA nanotechnology creates increasingly complex behaviors useful for sensing, actuation or computation, as enabled via the integration of dynamic and responsive structural DNA motifs. However, temporally controlled and dynamic DNA structures with programmable lifetimes, that are able to operate autonomously and self-revert to the starting state are challenging to achieve due to tedious and very system-specific sequence design. Here, we present a straightforward concept to program transient lifetimes into DNA duplexes based on the pH-sensitive DNA i-motif switch. We integrate the i-motif switch with an internal, non-linear pH-resetting function using a rationally designed chemical reaction framework, by which the switch autonomously undergoes a complete “off–on–off”-cycle without the use of additional external triggers. The lifetime of the activated “on”-state (i.e. the hybridized state) can be systematically programmed over several hours. The system can be readily implemented into hybrid DNA structures on larger length scales. Focusing on autonomous materials, we demonstrate temporal control of transient fluorescence signals and temporary aggregation of gold nanoparticles. PMID:28580123

  14. Graph-based sequence annotation using a data integration approach.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Robert; Lysenko, Artem; Hindle, Matthew; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Thiele, Ralf; Rawlings, Christopher; Köhler, Jacob; Taubert, Jan

    2008-08-25

    The automated annotation of data from high throughput sequencing and genomics experiments is a significant challenge for bioinformatics. Most current approaches rely on sequential pipelines of gene finding and gene function prediction methods that annotate a gene with information from different reference data sources. Each function prediction method contributes evidence supporting a functional assignment. Such approaches generally ignore the links between the information in the reference datasets. These links, however, are valuable for assessing the plausibility of a function assignment and can be used to evaluate the confidence in a prediction. We are working towards a novel annotation system that uses the network of information supporting the function assignment to enrich the annotation process for use by expert curators and predicting the function of previously unannotated genes. In this paper we describe our success in the first stages of this development. We present the data integration steps that are needed to create the core database of integrated reference databases (UniProt, PFAM, PDB, GO and the pathway database Ara-Cyc) which has been established in the ONDEX data integration system. We also present a comparison between different methods for integration of GO terms as part of the function assignment pipeline and discuss the consequences of this analysis for improving the accuracy of gene function annotation. The methods and algorithms presented in this publication are an integral part of the ONDEX system which is freely available from http://ondex.sf.net/.

  15. The NS1 polypeptide of the murine parvovirus minute virus of mice binds to DNA sequences containing the motif [ACCA]2-3.

    PubMed

    Cotmore, S F; Christensen, J; Nüesch, J P; Tattersall, P

    1995-03-01

    A DNA fragment containing the minute virus of mice 3' replication origin was specifically coprecipitated in immune complexes containing the virally coded NS1, but not the NS2, polypeptide. Antibodies directed against the amino- or carboxy-terminal regions of NS1 precipitated the NS1-origin complexes, but antibodies directed against NS1 amino acids 284 to 459 blocked complex formation. Using affinity-purified histidine-tagged NS1 preparations, we have shown that the specific protein-DNA interaction is of moderate affinity, being stable in 0.1 M salt but rapidly lost at higher salt concentrations. In contrast, generalized (or nonspecific) DNA binding by NS1 could be demonstrated only in low salt. Addition of ATP or gamma S-ATP enhanced specific DNA binding by wild-type NS1 severalfold, but binding was lost under conditions which favored ATP hydrolysis. NS1 molecules with mutations in a critical lysine residue (amino acid 405) in the consensus ATP-binding site bound to the origin, but this binding could not be enhanced by ATP addition. DNase I protection assays carried out with wild-type NS1 in the presence of gamma S-ATP gave footprints which extended over 43 nucleotides on both DNA strands, from the middle of the origin bubble sequence to a position some 14 bp beyond the nick site. The DNA-binding site for NS1 was mapped to a 22-bp fragment from the middle of the 3' replication origin which contains the sequence ACCAACCA. This conforms to a reiterated motif (ACCA)2-3, which occurs, in more or less degenerate form, at many sites throughout the minute virus of mice genome (J. W. Bodner, Virus Genes 2:167-182, 1989). Insertion of a single copy of the sequence (ACCA)3 was shown to be sufficient to confer NS1 binding on an otherwise unrecognized plasmid fragment. The functions of NS1 in the viral life cycle are reevaluated in the light of this result.

  16. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates withtranslational efficiency across bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; Francino, M. Pilar

    2007-05-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the {sigma}{sup 70} subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also implies that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria.

  17. Motif-based construction of a functional map for mammalian olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Agatha H; Zhang, Xinmin; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A; Califano, Andrea; Firestein, Stuart J

    2003-05-01

    We applied an automatic and unsupervised system to a nearly complete database of mammalian odor receptor genes. The generated motifs and gene classification were subjected to extensive and systematic downstream analysis to obtain biological insights. Two major results from this analysis were: (1) a map of sequence motifs that may correlate with function and (2) the corresponding receptor classes in which members of each class are likely to share specific functions. We have discovered motifs that have been implicated in structural integrity and posttranslational modification, as well as motifs very likely to be directly involved in ligand binding. We further propose a combinatorial molecular hypothesis, based on unique combinations of the observed motifs, that provides a foundation for understanding the generation of a large number of ligand binding sites.

  18. Unsupervised statistical discovery of spaced motifs in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hao; Schliekelman, Paul; Mrázek, Jan

    2017-01-05

    DNA sequences contain repetitive motifs which have various functions in the physiology of the organism. A number of methods have been developed for discovery of such sequence motifs with a primary focus on detection of regulatory motifs and particularly transcription factor binding sites. Most motif-finding methods apply probabilistic models to detect motifs characterized by unusually high number of copies of the motif in the analyzed sequences. We present a novel method for detection of pairs of motifs separated by spacers of variable nucleotide sequence but conserved length. Unlike existing methods for motif discovery, the motifs themselves are not required to occur at unusually high frequency but only to exhibit a significant preference to occur at a specific distance from each other. In the present implementation of the method, motifs are represented by pentamers and all pairs of pentamers are evaluated for statistically significant preference for a specific distance. An important step of the algorithm eliminates motif pairs where the spacers separating the two motifs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity; such motif pairs likely arise from duplications of the whole segment including the motifs and the spacer rather than due to selective constraints indicative of a functional importance of the motif pair. The method was used to scan 569 complete prokaryotic genomes for novel sequence motifs. Some motifs detected were previously known but other motifs found in the search appear to be novel. Selected motif pairs were subjected to further investigation and in some cases their possible biological functions were proposed. We present a new motif-finding technique that is applicable to scanning complete genomes for sequence motifs. The results from analysis of 569 genomes suggest that the method detects previously known motifs that are expected to be found as well as new motifs that are unlikely to be discovered by traditional motif-finding methods. We conclude

  19. Integrative analysis of environmental sequences using MEGAN4

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Daniel H.; Mitra, Suparna; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Weber, Nico; Schuster, Stephan C.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in the analysis of environmental sequences is data integration. The question is how to analyze different types of data in a unified approach, addressing both the taxonomic and functional aspects. To facilitate such analyses, we have substantially extended MEGAN, a widely used taxonomic analysis program. The new program, MEGAN4, provides an integrated approach to the taxonomic and functional analysis of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, metaproteomic, and rRNA data. While taxonomic analysis is performed based on the NCBI taxonomy, functional analysis is performed using the SEED classification of subsystems and functional roles or the KEGG classification of pathways and enzymes. A number of examples illustrate how such analyses can be performed, and show that one can also import and compare classification results obtained using others' tools. MEGAN4 is freely available for academic purposes, and installers for all three major operating systems can be downloaded from www-ab.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/software/megan. PMID:21690186

  20. Efficient motif search in ranked lists and applications to variable gap motifs.

    PubMed

    Leibovich, Limor; Yakhini, Zohar

    2012-07-01

    Sequence elements, at all levels-DNA, RNA and protein, play a central role in mediating molecular recognition and thereby molecular regulation and signaling. Studies that focus on -measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition make use of statistical and computational tools, including approaches to searching sequence motifs. State-of-the-art motif searching tools are limited in their coverage and ability to address large motif spaces. We develop and present statistical and algorithmic approaches that take as input ranked lists of sequences and return significant motifs. The efficiency of our approach, based on suffix trees, allows searches over motif spaces that are not covered by existing tools. This includes searching variable gap motifs-two half sites with a flexible length gap in between-and searching long motifs over large alphabets. We used our approach to analyze several high-throughput measurement data sets and report some validation results as well as novel suggested motifs and motif refinements. We suggest a refinement of the known estrogen receptor 1 motif in humans, where we observe gaps other than three nucleotides that also serve as significant recognition sites, as well as a variable length motif related to potential tyrosine phosphorylation.

  1. Use of sequence motifs as barcodes and secondary structures of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA) for identification of the Indian liver fluke, Fasciola (Trematoda: Fasciolidae).

    PubMed

    Prasad, P K; Tandon, V; Biswal, D K; Goswami, L M; Chatterjee, A

    2009-01-01

    Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics that give "morphological" information which is not found in the primary sequence. Also DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat are useful for identification of trematodes. The species of liver flukes of the genus Fasciola (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Fasciolidae) are obligate parasitic trematodes residing in the large biliary ducts of herbivorous mammals. While Fasciola hepatica has a cosmopolitan distribution, the other major species, i.e., F. gigantica is reportedly prevalent in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and Asia. To determine the Fasciola sp. of Assam (India) origin based on rDNA molecular data, ribosomal ITS2 region was sequenced (EF027103) and analysed. NCBI databases were used for sequence homology analysis and the phylogenetic trees were constructed based upon the ITS2 using MEGA and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics and revealed a close relationship with isolates of F. gigantica from China, Indonesia and Japan, the isolate from China with significant bootstrap values being the closest. ITS2 sequence motifs allowed an accurate in silico distinction of liver flukes. The data indicate that ITS2 motifs (

  2. Use of sequence motifs as barcodes and secondary structures of Internal Transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA) for identification of the Indian liver fluke, Fasciola (Trematoda: Fasciolidae)

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, PK; Tandon, V; Biswal, DK; Goswami, LM; Chatterjee, A

    2009-01-01

    Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics that give “morphological” information which is not found in the primary sequence. Also DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat are useful for identification of trematodes. The species of liver flukes of the genus Fasciola (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Fasciolidae) are obligate parasitic trematodes residing in the large biliary ducts of herbivorous mammals. While Fasciola hepatica has a cosmopolitan distribution, the other major species, i.e., F. gigantica is reportedly prevalent in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and Asia. To determine the Fasciola sp. of Assam (India) origin based on rDNA molecular data, ribosomal ITS2 region was sequenced (EF027103) and analysed. NCBI databases were used for sequence homology analysis and the phylogenetic trees were constructed based upon the ITS2 using MEGA and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics and revealed a close relationship with isolates of F. gigantica from China, Indonesia and Japan, the isolate from China with significant bootstrap values being the closest. ITS2 sequence motifs allowed an accurate in silico distinction of liver flukes. The data indicate that ITS2 motifs (≤ 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tool for trematode species identification. Using the novel approach of molecular morphometrics that is based on ITS2 secondary structure homologies, phylogenetic relationships of the various isolates of fasciolid species have been discussed. PMID:19294000

  3. MEME SUITE: tools for motif discovery and searching.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Timothy L; Boden, Mikael; Buske, Fabian A; Frith, Martin; Grant, Charles E; Clementi, Luca; Ren, Jingyuan; Li, Wilfred W; Noble, William S

    2009-07-01

    The MEME Suite web server provides a unified portal for online discovery and analysis of sequence motifs representing features such as DNA binding sites and protein interaction domains. The popular MEME motif discovery algorithm is now complemented by the GLAM2 algorithm which allows discovery of motifs containing gaps. Three sequence scanning algorithms--MAST, FIMO and GLAM2SCAN--allow scanning numerous DNA and protein sequence databases for motifs discovered by MEME and GLAM2. Transcription factor motifs (including those discovered using MEME) can be compared with motifs in many popular motif databases using the motif database scanning algorithm TOMTOM. Transcription factor motifs can be further analyzed for putative function by association with Gene Ontology (GO) terms using the motif-GO term association tool GOMO. MEME output now contains sequence LOGOS for each discovered motif, as well as buttons to allow motifs to be conveniently submitted to the sequence and motif database scanning algorithms (MAST, FIMO and TOMTOM), or to GOMO, for further analysis. GLAM2 output similarly contains buttons for further analysis using GLAM2SCAN and for rerunning GLAM2 with different parameters. All of the motif-based tools are now implemented as web services via Opal. Source code, binaries and a web server are freely available for noncommercial use at http://meme.nbcr.net.

  4. MEME Suite: tools for motif discovery and searching

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Timothy L.; Boden, Mikael; Buske, Fabian A.; Frith, Martin; Grant, Charles E.; Clementi, Luca; Ren, Jingyuan; Li, Wilfred W.; Noble, William S.

    2009-01-01

    The MEME Suite web server provides a unified portal for online discovery and analysis of sequence motifs representing features such as DNA binding sites and protein interaction domains. The popular MEME motif discovery algorithm is now complemented by the GLAM2 algorithm which allows discovery of motifs containing gaps. Three sequence scanning algorithms—MAST, FIMO and GLAM2SCAN—allow scanning numerous DNA and protein sequence databases for motifs discovered by MEME and GLAM2. Transcription factor motifs (including those discovered using MEME) can be compared with motifs in many popular motif databases using the motif database scanning algorithm Tomtom. Transcription factor motifs can be further analyzed for putative function by association with Gene Ontology (GO) terms using the motif-GO term association tool GOMO. MEME output now contains sequence LOGOS for each discovered motif, as well as buttons to allow motifs to be conveniently submitted to the sequence and motif database scanning algorithms (MAST, FIMO and Tomtom), or to GOMO, for further analysis. GLAM2 output similarly contains buttons for further analysis using GLAM2SCAN and for rerunning GLAM2 with different parameters. All of the motif-based tools are now implemented as web services via Opal. Source code, binaries and a web server are freely available for noncommercial use at http://meme.nbcr.net. PMID:19458158

  5. CIPHER: a flexible and extensive workflow platform for integrative next-generation sequencing data analysis and genomic regulatory element prediction.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Carlos; D'Orso, Iván

    2017-08-08

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches are commonly used to identify key regulatory networks that drive transcriptional programs. Although these technologies are frequently used in biological studies, NGS data analysis remains a challenging, time-consuming, and often irreproducible process. Therefore, there is a need for a comprehensive and flexible workflow platform that can accelerate data processing and analysis so more time can be spent on functional studies. We have developed an integrative, stand-alone workflow platform, named CIPHER, for the systematic analysis of several commonly used NGS datasets including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, MNase-seq, DNase-seq, GRO-seq, and ATAC-seq data. CIPHER implements various open source software packages, in-house scripts, and Docker containers to analyze and process single-ended and pair-ended datasets. CIPHER's pipelines conduct extensive quality and contamination control checks, as well as comprehensive downstream analysis. A typical CIPHER workflow includes: (1) raw sequence evaluation, (2) read trimming and adapter removal, (3) read mapping and quality filtering, (4) visualization track generation, and (5) extensive quality control assessment. Furthermore, CIPHER conducts downstream analysis such as: narrow and broad peak calling, peak annotation, and motif identification for ChIP-seq, differential gene expression analysis for RNA-seq, nucleosome positioning for MNase-seq, DNase hypersensitive site mapping, site annotation and motif identification for DNase-seq, analysis of nascent transcription from Global-Run On (GRO-seq) data, and characterization of chromatin accessibility from ATAC-seq datasets. In addition, CIPHER contains an "analysis" mode that completes complex bioinformatics tasks such as enhancer discovery and provides functions to integrate various datasets together. Using public and simulated data, we demonstrate that CIPHER is an efficient and comprehensive workflow platform that can analyze several NGS

  6. The Pichia pastoris PER6 gene product is a peroxisomal integral membrane protein essential for peroxisome biogenesis and has sequence similarity to the Zellweger syndrome protein PAF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Waterham, H R; de Vries, Y; Russel, K A; Xie, W; Veenhuis, M; Cregg, J M

    1996-01-01

    We report the cloning of PER6, a gene essential for peroxisome biogenesis in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The PER6 sequence predicts that its product Per6p is a 52-kDa polypeptide with the cysteine-rich C3HC4 motif. Per6p has significant overall sequence similarity with the human peroxisome assembly factor PAF-1, a protein that is defective in certain patients suffering from the peroxisomal disorder Zellweger syndrome, and with car1, a protein required for peroxisome biogenesis and caryogamy in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. In addition, the C3HC4 motif and two of the three membrane-spanning segments predicted for Per6p align with the C3HC4 motifs and the two membrane-spanning segments predicted for PAF-1 and car1. Like PAF-1, Per6p is a peroxisomal integral membrane protein. In methanol- or oleic acid-induced cells of per6 mutants, morphologically recognizable peroxisomes are absent. Instead, peroxisomal remnants are observed. In addition, peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized but located in the cytosol. The similarities between Per6p and PAF-1 in amino acid sequence and biochemical properties, and between mutants defective in their respective genes, suggest that Per6p is the putative yeast homolog of PAF-1. PMID:8628321

  7. In Vitro HIV-1 Selective Integration into the Target Sequence and Decoy-Effect of the Modified Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Hiratsuka, Takuya; Jin, Guang; Nakamura, Takuro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Although there have been a few reports that the HIV-1 genome can be selectively integrated into the genomic DNA of cultured host cell, the biochemistry of integration selectivity has not been fully understood. We modified the in vitro integration reaction protocol and developed a reaction system with higher efficiency. We used a substrate repeat, 5′-(GTCCCTTCCCAGT)n(ACTGGGAAGGGAC)n-3′, and a modified sequence DNA ligated into a circular plasmid. CAGT and ACTG (shown in italics in the above sequence) in the repeat units originated from the HIV-1 proviral genome ends. Following the incubation of the HIV-1 genome end cDNA and recombinant integrase for the formation of the pre-integration (PI) complex, substrate DNA was reacted with this complex. It was confirmed that the integration selectively occurred in the middle segment of the repeat sequence. In addition, integration frequency and selectivity were positively correlated with repeat number n. On the other hand, both frequency and selectivity decreased markedly when using sequences with deletion of CAGT in the middle position of the original target sequence. Moreover, on incubation with the deleted DNAs and original sequence, the integration efficiency and selectivity for the original target sequence were significantly reduced, which indicated interference effects by the deleted sequence DNAs. Efficiency and selectivity were also found to vary discontinuously with changes in manganese dichloride concentration in the reaction buffer, probably due to its influence on the secondary structure of substrate DNA. Finally, integrase was found to form oligomers on the binding site and substrate DNA formed a loop-like structure. In conclusion, there is a considerable selectivity in HIV-integration into the specified sequence; however, similar DNA sequences can interfere with the integration process, and it is therefore difficult for in vivo integration to occur selectively in the actual host genome DNA. PMID:21079805

  8. Mutation of the aspartic acid residues of the GDD sequence motif of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase results in enzymes with altered metal ion requirements for activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, S A; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, is known to share a region of sequence homology with all RNA polymerases centered at the GDD amino acid motif. The two aspartic acids have been postulated to be involved in the catalytic activity and metal ion coordination of the enzyme. To test this hypothesis, we have utilized oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to generate defined mutations in the aspartic acids of the GDD motif of the 3Dpol gene. The codon for the first aspartate (3D-D-328 [D refers to the single amino acid change, and the number refers to its position in the polymerase]) was changed to that for glutamic acid, histidine, asparagine, or glutamine; the codons for both aspartic acids were simultaneously changed to those for glutamic acids; and the codon for the second aspartic acid (3D-D-329) was changed to that for glutamic acid or asparagine. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the in vitro poly(U) polymerase activity was characterized. All of the mutant 3Dpol enzymes were enzymatically inactive in vitro when tested over a range of Mg2+ concentrations. However, when Mn2+ was substituted for Mg2+ in the in vitro assays, the mutant that substituted the second aspartic acid for asparagine (3D-N-329) was active. To further substantiate this finding, a series of different transition metal ions were substituted for Mg2+ in the poly(U) polymerase assay. The wild-type enzyme was active with all metals except Ca2+, while the 3D-N-329 mutant was active only when FeC6H7O5 was used in the reaction. To determine the effects of the mutations on poliovirus replication, the mutant 3Dpol genes were subcloned into an infectious cDNA of poliovirus. The cDNAs containing the mutant 3Dpol genes did not produce infectious virus when transfected into tissue culture cells under standard conditions. Because of the activity of the 3D-N-329 mutant in the presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+, transfections were also performed in the presence of the

  9. Mining, compressing and classifying with extensible motifs

    PubMed Central

    Apostolico, Alberto; Comin, Matteo; Parida, Laxmi

    2006-01-01

    Background Motif patterns of maximal saturation emerged originally in contexts of pattern discovery in biomolecular sequences and have recently proven a valuable notion also in the design of data compression schemes. Informally, a motif is a string of intermittently solid and wild characters that recurs more or less frequently in an input sequence or family of sequences. Motif discovery techniques and tools tend to be computationally imposing, however, special classes of "rigid" motifs have been identified of which the discovery is affordable in low polynomial time. Results In the present work, "extensible" motifs are considered such that each sequence of gaps comes endowed with some elasticity, whereby the same pattern may be stretched to fit segments of the source that match all the solid characters but are otherwise of different lengths. A few applications of this notion are then described. In applications of data compression by textual substitution, extensible motifs are seen to bring savings on the size of the codebook, and hence to improve compression. In germane contexts, in which compressibility is used in its dual role as a basis for structural inference and classification, extensible motifs are seen to support unsupervised classification and phylogeny reconstruction. Conclusion Off-line compression based on extensible motifs can be used advantageously to compress and classify biological sequences. PMID:16722593

  10. DNA motifs determining the accuracy of repeat duplication during CRISPR adaptation in Haloarcula hispanica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Li, Ming; Gong, Luyao; Hu, Songnian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) acquire new spacers to generate adaptive immunity in prokaryotes. During spacer integration, the leader-preceded repeat is always accurately duplicated, leading to speculations of a repeat-length ruler. Here in Haloarcula hispanica, we demonstrate that the accurate duplication of its 30-bp repeat requires two conserved mid-repeat motifs, AACCC and GTGGG. The AACCC motif was essential and needed to be ∼10 bp downstream from the leader-repeat junction site, where duplication consistently started. Interestingly, repeat duplication terminated sequence-independently and usually with a specific distance from the GTGGG motif, which seemingly served as an anchor site for a molecular ruler. Accordingly, altering the spacing between the two motifs led to an aberrant duplication size (29, 31, 32 or 33 bp). We propose the adaptation complex may recognize these mid-repeat elements to enable measuring the repeat DNA for spacer integration. PMID:27085805

  11. The C-Terminal Sequence and PI motif of the Orchid (Oncidium Gower Ramsey) PISTILLATA (PI) Ortholog Determine its Ability to Bind AP3 Orthologs and Enter the Nucleus to Regulate Downstream Genes Controlling Petal and Stamen Formation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Hsing-Fun; Hsu, Wei-Han; Li, Jen-Ying; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-11-01

    This study focused on the investigation of the effects of the PI motif and C-terminus of the Oncidium Gower Ramsey MADS box gene 8 (OMADS8), a PISTILLATA (PI) ortholog, on floral organ formation. 35S::OMADS8 completely rescued and 35S::OMADS8-PI (with the PI motif deleted) partially rescued petal/stamen formation, whereas these deficiencies were not rescued by 35S::OMADS8-C (C-terminal 29 amino acids deleted) in pi-1 mutants. OMADS8 could interact with Arabidopsis APETALA3 (AP3) and enter the nucleus. The nuclear entry efficiency was reduced for OMADS8-PI/AP3 and OMADS8-C/AP3. OMADS8 could also interact with OMADS5/OMADS9 (the Oncidium AP3 ortholog) and enter the nucleus with an efficiency only slightly affected by the deletion of the C-terminal sequence or PI motif. However, the stability of the OMADS8/OMADS5 and OMADS8/OMADS9 complexes was significantly reduced by deletion of the C-terminal sequence or PI motif. Further analysis indicated that the expression of genes downstream of AP3/PI (BNQ1/BNQ2/GNC/At4g30270) was compensated by 35S::OMADS8 and 35S::OMADS8-PI to a level similar to wild-type plants but was not affected by 35S::OMADS8-C in the pi-1 mutants. A similar FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) efficiency was observed for Arabidopsis AGAMOUS (AG) and the Oncidium AG ortholog OMADS4 for OMADS8, OMADS8-PI and OMADS8-C. These results indicated that the OMADS8 PI motif and C-terminus were valuable for the interaction of OMADS8 with the AP3 orthologs to form higher order heterotetrameric complexes that regulated petal/stamen formation in both Oncidium orchids and transgenic Arabidopsis. However, the C-terminal sequence and PI motif were dispensable for the interaction of OMADS8 with the AG orthologs.

  12. Efficient motif search in ranked lists and applications to variable gap motifs

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, Limor; Yakhini, Zohar

    2012-01-01

    Sequence elements, at all levels—DNA, RNA and protein, play a central role in mediating molecular recognition and thereby molecular regulation and signaling. Studies that focus on measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition make use of statistical and computational tools, including approaches to searching sequence motifs. State-of-the-art motif searching tools are limited in their coverage and ability to address large motif spaces. We develop and present statistical and algorithmic approaches that take as input ranked lists of sequences and return significant motifs. The efficiency of our approach, based on suffix trees, allows searches over motif spaces that are not covered by existing tools. This includes searching variable gap motifs—two half sites with a flexible length gap in between—and searching long motifs over large alphabets. We used our approach to analyze several high-throughput measurement data sets and report some validation results as well as novel suggested motifs and motif refinements. We suggest a refinement of the known estrogen receptor 1 motif in humans, where we observe gaps other than three nucleotides that also serve as significant recognition sites, as well as a variable length motif related to potential tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:22416066

  13. Integration of Ixodes ricinus genome sequencing with transcriptome and proteome annotation of the naïve midgut.

    PubMed

    Cramaro, Wibke J; Revets, Dominique; Hunewald, Oliver E; Sinner, Regina; Reye, Anna L; Muller, Claude P

    2015-10-28

    In Europe, Ixodes ricinus ticks are the most important vectors of diseases threatening humans, livestock, wildlife and companion animals. Nevertheless, genomic sequence information is missing and functional annotation of transcripts and proteins is limited. This lack of information is restricting studies of the vector and its interactions with pathogens and hosts. Here we present and integrate the first analysis of the I. ricinus genome with the transcriptome and proteome of the unfed I. ricinus midgut. Whole genome sequencing was performed on I. ricinus ticks and the sequences were de novo assembled. In parallel, I. ricinus ticks were dissected and the midgut transcriptome sequenced. Both datasets were integrated by transcript discovery analysis to identify putative genes and genome contigs were screened for homology. An alignment-based and a motif-search-based approach were combined for the annotation of the midgut transcriptome. Additionally, midgut proteins were identified and annotated by mass spectrometry with public databases and the in-house built transcriptome database as references and results were cross-validated. The de novo assembly of 1 billion DNA sequences to a reference genome of 393 Mb length provides an unprecedented insight into the I. ricinus genome. A homology search revealed sequences in the assembled genome contigs homologous to 89% of the I. scapularis genome scaffolds indicating coverage of most genome regions. We identified moreover 6,415 putative genes. More than 10,000 transcripts from naïve midgut were annotated with respect of predicted function and/or cellular localization. By combining an alignment-based with a motif-search-based annotation approach, we doubled the number of annotations throughout all functional categories. In addition, 574 gel spots were significantly identified by mass spectrometry (p<0.05) and 285 distinct proteins expressed in the naïve midgut were annotated functionally and/or for cellular localization. Our

  14. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    DOE PAGES

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; ...

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28,000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. We report that as this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of knownmore » natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.« less

  15. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28,000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. We report that as this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.

  16. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28 000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. As this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy. Database URL: www.hfv.lanl.gov PMID:27103629

  17. Ovodefensins, an Oviduct-Specific Antimicrobial Gene Family, Have Evolved in Birds and Reptiles to Protect the Egg by Both Sequence and Intra-Six-Cysteine Sequence Motif Spacing.

    PubMed

    Whenham, Natasha; Lu, Tian Chee; Maidin, Maisarah B M; Wilson, Peter W; Bain, Maureen M; Stevenson, M Lynn; Stevens, Mark P; Bedford, Michael R; Dunn, Ian C

    2015-06-01

    Ovodefensins are a novel beta defensin-related family of antimicrobial peptides containing conserved glycine and six cysteine residues. Originally thought to be restricted to the albumen-producing region of the avian oviduct, expression was found in chicken, turkey, duck, and zebra finch in large quantities in many parts of the oviduct, but this varied between species and between gene forms in the same species. Using new search strategies, the ovodefensin family now has 35 members, including reptiles, but no representatives outside birds and reptiles have been found. Analysis of their evolution shows that ovodefensins divide into six groups based on the intra-cysteine amino acid spacing, representing a unique mechanism alongside traditional evolution of sequence. The groups have been used to base a nomenclature for the family. Antimicrobial activity for three ovodefensins from chicken and duck was confirmed against Escherichia coli and a pathogenic E. coli strain as well as a Gram-positive organism, Staphylococcus aureus, for the first time. However, activity varied greatly between peptides, with Gallus gallus OvoDA1 being the most potent, suggesting a link with the different structures. Expression of Gallus gallus OvoDA1 (gallin) in the oviduct was increased by estrogen and progesterone and in the reproductive state. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that ovodefensins evolved to protect the egg, but they are not necessarily restricted to the egg white. Therefore, divergent motif structure and sequence present an interesting area of research for antimicrobial peptide design and understanding protection of the cleidoic egg.

  18. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  19. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Del Moral-Chávez, Víctor; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-04

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for 'neighborhood' genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments.

  20. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Moral-Chávez, Víctor Del; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for ‘neighborhood’ genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments. PMID:26527724

  1. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  2. Identification of a human cDNA sequence which encodes a novel membrane-associated protein containing a zinc metalloprotease motif.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ying-Chun; Tsuruga, Hiromichi; Hirai, Momoki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Yokoi, Norihide; Kitamura, Toshio; Kumagai, Hidetoshi

    2003-06-30

    We report the cloning and characterization of a human cDNA predicted to encode a novel hydrophobic protein containing four transmembrane domains and a zinc metalloprotease motif, HEXXH, between the third and fourth transmembrane domains, and have named the molecule metalloprotease-related protein-1 (MPRP-1). The MPRP-1 gene was localized to chromosome 1-p32.3 by radiation hybrid mapping, and Northern blot analysis revealed expression in many organs, with strong expression in the heart, skeletal muscle, kidney and liver. Immunohistochemical analyisis showed that MPRP-1 was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and not in the Golgi compartment. Fragments of DNA encoding a segment homologous to the HEXXH motif of MPRP-1 are widely found in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals. These results suggest that the MPRP-1 may have highly conserved functions, such as in intracellular proteolytic processing in the ER.

  3. SIFTS: Structure Integration with Function, Taxonomy and Sequences resource

    PubMed Central

    Velankar, Sameer; Dana, José M.; Jacobsen, Julius; van Ginkel, Glen; Gane, Paul J.; Luo, Jie; Oldfield, Thomas J.; O’Donovan, Claire; Martin, Maria-Jesus; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The Structure Integration with Function, Taxonomy and Sequences resource (SIFTS; http://pdbe.org/sifts) is a close collaboration between the Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) and UniProt. The two teams have developed a semi-automated process for maintaining up-to-date cross-reference information to UniProt entries, for all protein chains in the PDB entries present in the UniProt database. This process is carried out for every weekly PDB release and the information is stored in the SIFTS database. The SIFTS process includes cross-references to other biological resources such as Pfam, SCOP, CATH, GO, InterPro and the NCBI taxonomy database. The information is exported in XML format, one file for each PDB entry, and is made available by FTP. Many bioinformatics resources use SIFTS data to obtain cross-references between the PDB and other biological databases so as to provide their users with up-to-date information. PMID:23203869

  4. Localization of the labile disulfide bond between SU and TM of the murine leukemia virus envelope protein complex to a highly conserved CWLC motif in SU that resembles the active-site sequence of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, A; Kopelman, R; Li, Z; Kayman, S C; Sanders, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the envelope protein (Env) of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are joined by a labile disulfide bond that can be stabilized by treatment of virions with thiol-specific reagents. In the present study this observation was extended to the Envs of additional classes of MuLV, and the cysteines of SU involved in this linkage were mapped by proteolytic fragmentation analyses to the CWLC sequence present at the beginning of the C-terminal domain of SU. This sequence is highly conserved across a broad range of distantly related retroviruses and resembles the CXXC motif present at the active site of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes. A model is proposed in which rearrangements of the SU-TM intersubunit disulfide linkage, mediated by the CWLC sequence, play roles in the assembly and function of the Env complex. PMID:9311907

  5. TMalphaDB and TMbetaDB: web servers to study the structural role of sequence motifs in α-helix and β-barrel domains of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Perea, Marc; Lugtenburg, Ivar; Mayol, Eduardo; Cordomí, Arnau; Deupí, Xavier; Pardo, Leonardo; Olivella, Mireia

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins represent over 25 % of human protein genes and account for more than 60 % of drug targets due to their accessibility from the extracellular environment. The increasing number of available crystal structures of these proteins in the Protein Data Bank permits an initial estimation of their structural properties. We have developed two web servers-TMalphaDB for α-helix bundles and TMbetaDB for β-barrels-to analyse the growing repertoire of available crystal structures of membrane proteins. TMalphaDB and TMbetaDB permit to search for these specific sequence motifs in a non-redundant structure database of transmembrane segments and quantify structural parameters such as ϕ and ψ backbone dihedral angles, χ1 side chain torsion angle, unit bend and unit twist. The structural information offered by TMalphaDB and TMbetaDB permits to quantify structural distortions induced by specific sequence motifs, and to elucidate their role in the 3D structure. This specific structural information has direct implications in homology modeling of the growing sequences of membrane proteins lacking experimental structure. TMalphaDB and TMbetaDB are freely available at http://lmc.uab.cat/TMalphaDB and http://lmc.uab.cat/TMbetaDB.

  6. Integrated and Independent Learning of Hand-Related Constituent Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berner, Michael P.; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In almost all daily activities fingers of both hands are used in coordinated succession. The present experiments explored whether learning in such tasks pertains not only to the overall sequence spanning both hands but also to the constituent sequences of each hand. In a serial reaction time task, 2 repeating hand-related sequences were…

  7. Integrated and Independent Learning of Hand-Related Constituent Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berner, Michael P.; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In almost all daily activities fingers of both hands are used in coordinated succession. The present experiments explored whether learning in such tasks pertains not only to the overall sequence spanning both hands but also to the constituent sequences of each hand. In a serial reaction time task, 2 repeating hand-related sequences were…

  8. RSAT peak-motifs: motif analysis in full-size ChIP-seq datasets.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Herrmann, Carl; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Thieffry, Denis; van Helden, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    ChIP-seq is increasingly used to characterize transcription factor binding and chromatin marks at a genomic scale. Various tools are now available to extract binding motifs from peak data sets. However, most approaches are only available as command-line programs, or via a website but with size restrictions. We present peak-motifs, a computational pipeline that discovers motifs in peak sequences, compares them with databases, exports putative binding sites for visualization in the UCSC genome browser and generates an extensive report suited for both naive and expert users. It relies on time- and memory-efficient algorithms enabling the treatment of several thousand peaks within minutes. Regarding time efficiency, peak-motifs outperforms all comparable tools by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate its accuracy by analyzing data sets ranging from 4000 to 1,28,000 peaks for 12 embryonic stem cell-specific transcription factors. In all cases, the program finds the expected motifs and returns additional motifs potentially bound by cofactors. We further apply peak-motifs to discover tissue-specific motifs in peak collections for the p300 transcriptional co-activator. To our knowledge, peak-motifs is the only tool that performs a complete motif analysis and offers a user-friendly web interface without any restriction on sequence size or number of peaks.

  9. RSAT peak-motifs: motif analysis in full-size ChIP-seq datasets

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Herrmann, Carl; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Thieffry, Denis; van Helden, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-seq is increasingly used to characterize transcription factor binding and chromatin marks at a genomic scale. Various tools are now available to extract binding motifs from peak data sets. However, most approaches are only available as command-line programs, or via a website but with size restrictions. We present peak-motifs, a computational pipeline that discovers motifs in peak sequences, compares them with databases, exports putative binding sites for visualization in the UCSC genome browser and generates an extensive report suited for both naive and expert users. It relies on time- and memory-efficient algorithms enabling the treatment of several thousand peaks within minutes. Regarding time efficiency, peak-motifs outperforms all comparable tools by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate its accuracy by analyzing data sets ranging from 4000 to 1 28 000 peaks for 12 embryonic stem cell-specific transcription factors. In all cases, the program finds the expected motifs and returns additional motifs potentially bound by cofactors. We further apply peak-motifs to discover tissue-specific motifs in peak collections for the p300 transcriptional co-activator. To our knowledge, peak-motifs is the only tool that performs a complete motif analysis and offers a user-friendly web interface without any restriction on sequence size or number of peaks. PMID:22156162

  10. Integration of Temporal and Ordinal Information During Serial Interception Sequence Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gobel, Eric W.; Sanchez, Daniel J.; Reber, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The expression of expert motor skills typically involves learning to perform a precisely timed sequence of movements (e.g., language production, music performance, athletic skills). Research examining incidental sequence learning has previously relied on a perceptually-cued task that gives participants exposure to repeating motor sequences but does not require timing of responses for accuracy. Using a novel perceptual-motor sequence learning task, learning a precisely timed cued sequence of motor actions is shown to occur without explicit instruction. Participants learned a repeating sequence through practice and showed sequence-specific knowledge via a performance decrement when switched to an unfamiliar sequence. In a second experiment, the integration of representation of action order and timing sequence knowledge was examined. When either action order or timing sequence information was selectively disrupted, performance was reduced to levels similar to completely novel sequences. Unlike prior sequence-learning research that has found timing information to be secondary to learning action sequences, when the task demands require accurate action and timing information, an integrated representation of these types of information is acquired. These results provide the first evidence for incidental learning of fully integrated action and timing sequence information in the absence of an independent representation of action order, and suggest that this integrative mechanism may play a material role in the acquisition of complex motor skills. PMID:21417511

  11. CompleteMOTIFs: DNA motif discovery platform for transcription factor binding experiments.

    PubMed

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Hsing, Michael; Liu, Yongchao; Schmidt, Bertil; Maskell, Douglas L; Lee, Kyungjoon; He, Aibin; Pu, William T; Kong, Sek Won

    2011-03-01

    CompleteMOTIFs (cMOTIFs) is an integrated web tool developed to facilitate systematic discovery of overrepresented transcription factor binding motifs from high-throughput chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. Comprehensive annotations and Boolean logic operations on multiple peak locations enable users to focus on genomic regions of interest for de novo motif discovery using tools such as MEME, Weeder and ChIPMunk. The pipeline incorporates a scanning tool for known motifs from TRANSFAC and JASPAR databases, and performs an enrichment test using local or precalculated background models that significantly improve the motif scanning result. Furthermore, using the cMOTIFs pipeline, we demonstrated that multiple transcription factors could cooperatively bind to the upstream of important stem cell differentiation regulators. http://cmotifs.tchlab.org.

  12. Dynamic MLC leaf sequencing for integrated linear accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A.; Brezovich, Ivan A.

    2011-11-15

    closing leaf bank trajectories, the TrueBeam control system reduced the dose rate such that the leaf velocity was less than the maximum. Dose deviations relative to the 2.4 cm/s trajectory were less than 3%. For the conventional controller, the leaves repeatedly fell behind the planned positions until the beam hold threshold was reached, resulting in deviations of up to 19% relative to the 2.4 cm/s trajectory. For the two clinical fluence maps, reducing the planned dose rate reduced the dose in the zero fluence regions by 15% and 24% and increased the delivery time by 5 s and 14 s. No significant differences were noted in the high and intermediate dose regions measured using film. The DVHs for the head and neck plan showed a 10% reduction in cord dose for 20 MU/min relative to 600 MU/min sequencing dose rate, which was confirmed by measurement. No difference in target DVHs were observed. The reduction in cord dose increased total treatment time by 1.8 min. Conclusions: Leaf sequencing algorithms for integrated control systems should be modified to reflect the reduced importance of maximum leaf velocity for accurate dose delivery.

  13. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuta; Fujino, Kaien; Ogawa, Kana; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1) and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1. PMID:24616728

  14. Autographa californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus Ac76: a Dimeric Type II Integral Membrane Protein That Contains an Inner Nuclear Membrane-Sorting Motif

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Denghui; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaomei; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that the Autographa californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac76 gene is essential for both budded virion (BV) and occlusion-derived virion (ODV) development. More importantly, deletion of ac76 affects intranuclear microvesicle formation. However, the exact role by which ac76 affects virion morphogenesis remains unknown. In this report, we characterized the expression, distribution, and topology of Ac76 to further understand the functional role of Ac76 in virion morphogenesis. Ac76 contains an α-helical transmembrane domain, and phase separation showed that it was an integral membrane protein. In AcMNPV-infected cells, Ac76 was detected as a stable dimer that was resistant to SDS and thermal denaturation, and only a trace amount of monomer was detected. A coimmunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the dimerization of Ac76 by high-affinity self-association. Western blot analyses of purified virions and their nucleocapsid and envelope fractions showed that Ac76 was associated with the envelope fractions of both BVs and ODVs. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that Ac76 was localized to the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), nuclear membrane, intranuclear microvesicles, and ODV envelope. Amino acids 15 to 48 of Ac76 were identified as an atypical inner nuclear membrane-sorting motif because it was sufficient to target fusion proteins to the ER and nuclear membrane in the absence of viral infection and to the intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelope during infection. Topology analysis of Ac76 by selective permeabilization showed that Ac76 was a type II integral membrane protein with an N terminus exposed to the cytosol and a C terminus hidden in the ER lumen. PMID:24198428

  15. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  16. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Anton I; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access.

  17. MotifNet: a web-server for network motif analysis.

    PubMed

    Smoly, Ilan Y; Lerman, Eugene; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-06-15

    Network motifs are small topological patterns that recur in a network significantly more often than expected by chance. Their identification emerged as a powerful approach for uncovering the design principles underlying complex networks. However, available tools for network motif analysis typically require download and execution of computationally intensive software on a local computer. We present MotifNet, the first open-access web-server for network motif analysis. MotifNet allows researchers to analyze integrated networks, where nodes and edges may be labeled, and to search for motifs of up to eight nodes. The output motifs are presented graphically and the user can interactively filter them by their significance, number of instances, node and edge labels, and node identities, and view their instances. MotifNet also allows the user to distinguish between motifs that are centered on specific nodes and motifs that recur in distinct parts of the network. MotifNet is freely available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/motifnet . The website was implemented using ReactJs and supports all major browsers. The server interface was implemented in Python with data stored on a MySQL database. estiyl@bgu.ac.il or michaluz@cs.bgu.ac.il. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. MAR characteristic motifs mediate episomal vector in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Li, Zhaoxi; Wang, Tianyun; Wang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li; Dong, Weihua; Jing, Changqin; Yang, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    An ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent transgene expression without limitations in safety and reproducibility. Recent researches' insight into the ability of chromosomal matrix attachment regions (MARs) to mediate episomal maintenance of genetic elements allowed the development of a circular episomal vector. Although a MAR-mediated engineered vector has been developed, little is known on which motifs of MAR confer this function during interaction with the host genome. Here, we report an artificially synthesized DNA fragment containing only characteristic motif sequences that served as an alternative to human beta-interferon matrix attachment region sequence. The potential of the vector to mediate gene transfer in CHO cells was investigated. The short synthetic MAR motifs were found to mediate episomal vector at a low copy number for many generations without integration into the host genome. Higher transgene expression was maintained for at least 4 months. In addition, MAR was maintained episomally and conferred sustained EGFP expression even in nonselective CHO cells. All the results demonstrated that MAR characteristic sequence-based vector can function as stable episomes in CHO cells, supporting long-term and effective transgene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Unitary circular code motifs in genomes of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    El Soufi, Karim; Michel, Christian J

    A set X of 20 trinucleotides was identified in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses, which has in average the highest occurrence in reading frame compared to its two shifted frames (Michel, 2015; Arquès and Michel, 1996). This set X has an interesting mathematical property as X is a circular code (Arquès and Michel, 1996). Thus, the motifs from this circular code X, called X motifs, have the property to always retrieve, synchronize and maintain the reading frame in genes. The origin of this circular code X in genes is an open problem since its discovery in 1996. Here, we first show that the unitary circular codes (UCC), i.e. sets of one word, allow to generate unitary circular code motifs (UCC motifs), i.e. a concatenation of the same motif (simple repeats) leading to low complexity DNA. Three classes of UCC motifs are studied here: repeated dinucleotides (D(+) motifs), repeated trinucleotides (T(+) motifs) and repeated tetranucleotides (T(+) motifs). Thus, the D(+), T(+) and T(+) motifs allow to retrieve, synchronize and maintain a frame modulo 2, modulo 3 and modulo 4, respectively, and their shifted frames (1 modulo 2; 1 and 2 modulo 3; 1, 2 and 3 modulo 4 according to the C(2), C(3) and C(4) properties, respectively) in the DNA sequences. The statistical distribution of the D(+), T(+) and T(+) motifs is analyzed in the genomes of eukaryotes. A UCC motif and its comp lementary UCC motif have the same distribution in the eukaryotic genomes. Furthermore, a UCC motif and its complementary UCC motif have increasing occurrences contrary to their number of hydrogen bonds, very significant with the T(+) motifs. The longest D(+), T(+) and T(+) motifs in the studied eukaryotic genomes are also given. Surprisingly, a scarcity of repeated trinucleotides (T(+) motifs) in the large eukaryotic genomes is observed compared to the D(+) and T(+) motifs. This result has been investigated and may be explained by two outcomes. Repeated trinucleotides (T(+) motifs

  20. Identifying DNA Binding Motifs by Combining Data from Different Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Linyong; Resat, Haluk; Nagib Callaos; Katsuhisa Horimoto; Jake Chen; Amy Sze Chan

    2004-07-19

    A transcription factor regulates the expression of its target genes by binding to their operator regions. It functions by affecting the interactions between RNA polymerases and the gene's promoter. Many transcription factors bind to their targets by recognizing a specific DNA sequence pattern, which is referred to as a consensus sequence or a motif. Since it would remove the possible biases, combining biological data from different sources can be expected to improve the quality of the information extracted from the biological data. We analyzed the microarray gene expression data and the organism's genome sequence jointly to determine the transcription factor recognition sequences with more accuracy. Utilizing such a data integration approach, we have investigated the regulation of the photosynthesis genes of the purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The photosynthesis genes in this organism are tightly regulated as a function of environmental growth conditions by three major regulatory systems, PrrB/PrrA, AppA/PpsR and FnrL. In this study, we have detected a previously undefined PrrA consensus sequence, improved the previously known DNA-binding motif of PpsR, and confirmed the consensus sequence of the global regulator FnrL.

  1. Two overlapping sequence motifs within the polyomavirus enhancer are independently the targets of stimulation by both the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and the Ha-ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Y; Satake, M; Ito, Y

    1989-01-01

    A tumor-promoting phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), strongly stimulates the activity of polyomavirus enhancer in a human erythroleukemia cell line, K562. The target of stimulation was the previously defined A element (from nucleotides 5107 to 5130) of the enhancer. We found that within the A element, two partly overlapping sequence motifs (one from nucleotides 5107 to 5117, the other from nucleotides 5113 to 5121) were independently the targets of TPA stimulation. The former is homologous to the enhancer core sequence of the adenovirus type 5 E1A gene, and the latter shares the consensus AP-1-binding site. In addition, transiently expressed Ha-ras oncogene also stimulated these two subelements in K562 cells, as we reported for NIH 3T3 cells previously. Images PMID:2536818

  2. Two overlapping sequence motifs within the polyomavirus enhancer are independently the targets of stimulation by both the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-3-acetate and the Ha-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Yyko; Satake, Masanobu; Ito, Yoshiaki

    1989-03-01

    A tumor-promoting phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), strongly stimulates the activity of polyomavirus enhancer in a human erythroleukemia cell line, K562. The target of stimulation was the previously defined A element (from nucleotides 5107 to 5130) of the enhancer. The authors found that within the A element, two partly overlapping sequence motifs (one from nucleotides 5107 to 5117, the other from nucleotides 5113 to 5121) were independently the targets of TPA stimulation. The former is homologous to the enhancer core sequence of the adenovirus type 5 E1A gene, and the latter shares the consensus AP-1-binding site. In addition, transiently expressed Ha-ras oncogene also stimulated these two subelements in K562 cells, as they reported for NIH 3T3 cells previously.

  3. DNA Sequences from Formalin-Fixed Nematodes: Integrating Molecular and Morphological Approaches to Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, W. Kelley; Vida, J. T.; Frisse, Linda M.; Mundo, Manuel; Baldwin, James G.

    1997-01-01

    To effectively integrate DNA sequence analysis and classical nematode taxonomy, we must be able to obtain DNA sequences from formalin-fixed specimens. Microdissected sections of nematodes were removed from specimens fixed in formalin, using standard protocols and without destroying morphological features. The fixed sections provided sufficient template for multiple polymerase chain reaction-based DNA sequence analyses. PMID:19274156

  4. Protein structural motifs in prediction and design.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Craig O; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2017-06-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has been an integral resource for shaping our fundamental understanding of protein structure and for the advancement of such applications as protein design and structure prediction. Over the years, information from the PDB has been used to generate models ranging from specific structural mechanisms to general statistical potentials. With accumulating structural data, it has become possible to mine for more complete and complex structural observations, deducing more accurate generalizations. Motif libraries, which capture recurring structural features along with their sequence preferences, have exposed modularity in the structural universe and found successful application in various problems of structural biology. Here we summarize recent achievements in this arena, focusing on subdomain level structural patterns and their applications to protein design and structure prediction, and suggest promising future directions as the structural database continues to grow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sampling Motif-Constrained Ensembles of Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rico; Leitão, Jorge C.; Peixoto, Tiago P.; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2015-10-01

    The statistical significance of network properties is conditioned on null models which satisfy specified properties but that are otherwise random. Exponential random graph models are a principled theoretical framework to generate such constrained ensembles, but which often fail in practice, either due to model inconsistency or due to the impossibility to sample networks from them. These problems affect the important case of networks with prescribed clustering coefficient or number of small connected subgraphs (motifs). In this Letter we use the Wang-Landau method to obtain a multicanonical sampling that overcomes both these problems. We sample, in polynomial time, networks with arbitrary degree sequences from ensembles with imposed motifs counts. Applying this method to social networks, we investigate the relation between transitivity and homophily, and we quantify the correlation between different types of motifs, finding that single motifs can explain up to 60% of the variation of motif profiles.

  6. Integrating alignment-based and alignment-free sequence similarity measures for biological sequence classification.

    PubMed

    Borozan, Ivan; Watt, Stuart; Ferretti, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Alignment-based sequence similarity searches, while accurate for some type of sequences, can produce incorrect results when used on more divergent but functionally related sequences that have undergone the sequence rearrangements observed in many bacterial and viral genomes. Here, we propose a classification model that exploits the complementary nature of alignment-based and alignment-free similarity measures with the aim to improve the accuracy with which DNA and protein sequences are characterized. Our model classifies sequences using a combined sequence similarity score calculated by adaptively weighting the contribution of different sequence similarity measures. Weights are determined independently for each sequence in the test set and reflect the discriminatory ability of individual similarity measures in the training set. Because the similarity between some sequences is determined more accurately with one type of measure rather than another, our classifier allows different sets of weights to be associated with different sequences. Using five different similarity measures, we show that our model significantly improves the classification accuracy over the current composition- and alignment-based models, when predicting the taxonomic lineage for both short viral sequence fragments and complete viral sequences. We also show that our model can be used effectively for the classification of reads from a real metagenome dataset as well as protein sequences. All the datasets and the code used in this study are freely available at https://collaborators.oicr.on.ca/vferretti/borozan_csss/csss.html. ivan.borozan@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Integrating alignment-based and alignment-free sequence similarity measures for biological sequence classification

    PubMed Central

    Borozan, Ivan; Watt, Stuart; Ferretti, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Alignment-based sequence similarity searches, while accurate for some type of sequences, can produce incorrect results when used on more divergent but functionally related sequences that have undergone the sequence rearrangements observed in many bacterial and viral genomes. Here, we propose a classification model that exploits the complementary nature of alignment-based and alignment-free similarity measures with the aim to improve the accuracy with which DNA and protein sequences are characterized. Results: Our model classifies sequences using a combined sequence similarity score calculated by adaptively weighting the contribution of different sequence similarity measures. Weights are determined independently for each sequence in the test set and reflect the discriminatory ability of individual similarity measures in the training set. Because the similarity between some sequences is determined more accurately with one type of measure rather than another, our classifier allows different sets of weights to be associated with different sequences. Using five different similarity measures, we show that our model significantly improves the classification accuracy over the current composition- and alignment-based models, when predicting the taxonomic lineage for both short viral sequence fragments and complete viral sequences. We also show that our model can be used effectively for the classification of reads from a real metagenome dataset as well as protein sequences. Availability and implementation: All the datasets and the code used in this study are freely available at https://collaborators.oicr.on.ca/vferretti/borozan_csss/csss.html. Contact: ivan.borozan@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25573913

  8. NG6: Integrated next generation sequencing storage and processing environment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing platforms are now well implanted in sequencing centres and some laboratories. Upcoming smaller scale machines such as the 454 junior from Roche or the MiSeq from Illumina will increase the number of laboratories hosting a sequencer. In such a context, it is important to provide these teams with an easily manageable environment to store and process the produced reads. Results We describe a user-friendly information system able to manage large sets of sequencing data. It includes, on one hand, a workflow environment already containing pipelines adapted to different input formats (sff, fasta, fastq and qseq), different sequencers (Roche 454, Illumina HiSeq) and various analyses (quality control, assembly, alignment, diversity studies,…) and, on the other hand, a secured web site giving access to the results. The connected user will be able to download raw and processed data and browse through the analysis result statistics. The provided workflows can easily be modified or extended and new ones can be added. Ergatis is used as a workflow building, running and monitoring system. The analyses can be run locally or in a cluster environment using Sun Grid Engine. Conclusions NG6 is a complete information system designed to answer the needs of a sequencing platform. It provides a user-friendly interface to process, store and download high-throughput sequencing data. PMID:22958229

  9. Fitting a mixture model by expectation maximization to discover motifs in biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.L.; Elkan, C.

    1994-12-31

    The algorithm described in this paper discovers one or more motifs in a collection of DNA or protein sequences by using the technique of expectation maximization to fit a two-component finite mixture model to the set of sequences. Multiple motifs are found by fitting a mixture model to the data, probabilistically erasing the occurrences of the motif thus found, and repeating the process to find successive motifs. The algorithm requires only a set of unaligned sequences and a number specifying the width of the motifs as input. It returns a model of each motif and a threshold which together can be used as a Bayes-optimal classifier for searching for occurrences of the motif in other databases. The algorithm estimates how many times each motif occurs in each sequence in the dataset and outputs an alignment of the occurrences of the motif. The algorithm is capable of discovering several different motifs with differing numbers of occurrences in a single dataset.

  10. ATtRACT—a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available at http://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid–F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discovering de novo motifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database. Database URL: http:// attract. cnic. es PMID:27055826

  11. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  12. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof. Sandor Pongor, Dr. Yuriy Gusev, and Dr. Shyam Prabhakar (nominated by Prof. Limsoon Wong). PMID:24555784

  13. VARUN: discovering extensible motifs under saturation constraints.

    PubMed

    Apostolico, Alberto; Comin, Matteo; Parida, Laxmi

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of motifs in biosequences is frequently torn between the rigidity of the model on one hand and the abundance of candidates on the other hand. In particular, motifs that include wild cards or "don't cares" escalate exponentially with their number, and this gets only worse if a don't care is allowed to stretch up to some prescribed maximum length. In this paper, a notion of extensible motif in a sequence is introduced and studied, which tightly combines the structure of the motif pattern, as described by its syntactic specification, with the statistical measure of its occurrence count. It is shown that a combination of appropriate saturation conditions and the monotonicity of probabilistic scores over regions of constant frequency afford us significant parsimony in the generation and testing of candidate overrepresented motifs. A suite of software programs called Varun is described, implementing the discovery of extensible motifs of the type considered. The merits of the method are then documented by results obtained in a variety of experiments primarily targeting protein sequence families. Of equal importance seems the fact that the sets of all surprising motifs returned in each experiment are extracted faster and come in much more manageable sizes than would be obtained in the absence of saturation constraints.

  14. The DNA-binding domain of BenM reveals the structural basis for the recognition of a T-N11-A sequence motif by LysR-type transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Amer M; Neidle, Ellen L; Momany, Cory

    2013-10-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) play critical roles in metabolism and constitute the largest family of bacterial regulators. To understand protein-DNA interactions, atomic structures of the DNA-binding domain and linker-helix regions of a prototypical LTTR, BenM, were determined by X-ray crystallography. BenM structures with and without bound DNA reveal a set of highly conserved amino acids that interact directly with DNA bases. At the N-terminal end of the recognition helix (α3) of a winged-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, several residues create hydrophobic pockets (Pro30, Pro31 and Ser33). These pockets interact with the methyl groups of two thymines in the DNA-recognition motif and its complementary strand, T-N11-A. This motif usually includes some dyad symmetry, as exemplified by a sequence that binds two subunits of a BenM tetramer (ATAC-N7-GTAT). Gln29 forms hydrogen bonds to adenine in the first position of the recognition half-site (ATAC). Another hydrophobic pocket defined by Ala28, Pro30 and Pro31 interacts with the methyl group of thymine, complementary to the base at the third position of the half-site. Arg34 interacts with the complementary base of the 3' position. Arg53, in the wing, provides AT-tract recognition in the minor groove. For DNA recognition, LTTRs use highly conserved interactions between amino acids and nucleotide bases as well as numerous less-conserved secondary interactions.

  15. Sharing of four DR-beta sequence motifs between HLA-DRB1*1601 and DRB1*1101 correlates with frequent degenerate T-cell recognition of HA306-320 peptide complexed to these two molecules.

    PubMed

    Zeliszewski, D; Dorval, I; Golvano, J J; Prevost, A; Borras-Cuesta, F; Sterkers, G

    1996-02-01

    This paper shows that the seven HA306-320 specific T-cell clones isolated from one individual recognize the peptide complexed to both autologous HLA-DRB1*1101 and allogeneic HLA-DRB1*1601 (or DRB5*0201) molecules. For each T-cell clone, a single T-cell receptor (TCR) is involved in the recognition of these two different peptide-DR complexes as evidenced by cold target competition experiments. Yet, the seven T-cell clones express several different TCRs as judged by V beta-J beta usage and fine specificities. Furthermore, one representative clone has the same fine specificity for HA306-320 analogues mutated at epitopic residues irrespective of the use of DR1101 or DR1601 APC. These results suggest that structural differences between DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1601 (or DRB5*0201) do not dramatically influence the orientation of HA306-320 in the grooves such that most residues interacting with TCRs are conserved. In another individual, the same pattern of restriction, i.e. DR1101 + DR1601, was found for several HA306-320 specific clones. Two additional patterns, DR1101 + DR0801 and DR1101 + DR0801 + DR1601, were identified. By comparing DR sequences the authors found that DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1601 share four important motifs, i.e. beta 85-86, beta 67-71, beta 57 and beta 28-31 supposed to line three distinct HLA-DR pockets. Three of these motifs are also shared with DRB1*0801. All the results further support that the motif similarities allow the peptide to adopt very similar orientations in the cross-reacting DR molecules.

  16. Characteristic motifs for families of allergenic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Torres, Miguel; Schein, Catherine H.; Braun, Werner

    2008-01-01

    The identification of potential allergenic proteins is usually done by scanning a database of allergenic proteins and locating known allergens with a high sequence similarity. However, there is no universally accepted cut-off value for sequence similarity to indicate potential IgE cross-reactivity. Further, overall sequence similarity may be less important than discrete areas of similarity in proteins with homologous structure. To identify such areas, we first classified all allergens and their subdomains in the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP, http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/) to their closest protein families as defined in Pfam, and identified conserved physicochemical property motifs characteristic of each group of sequences. Allergens populate only a small subset of all known Pfam families, as all allergenic proteins in SDAP could be grouped to only 130 (of 9318 total) Pfams, and 31 families contain more than four allergens. Conserved physicochemical property motifs for the aligned sequences of the most populated Pfam families were identified with the PCPMer program suite and catalogued in the webserver Motif-Mate (http://born.utmb.edu/motifmate/summary.php). We also determined specific motifs for allergenic members of a family that could distinguish them from non-allergenic ones. These allergen specific motifs should be most useful in database searches for potential allergens. We found that sequence motifs unique to the allergens in three families (seed storage proteins, Bet v 1, and tropomyosin) overlap with known IgE epitopes, thus providing evidence that our motif based approach can be used to assess the potential allergenicity of novel proteins. PMID:18951633

  17. DNA Motif Databases and Their Uses.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2015-09-03

    Transcription factors (TFs) recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. The specificity of a TF is usually represented as a position weight matrix (PWM). Several databases of DNA motifs exist and are used in biological research to address important biological questions. This overview describes PWMs and some of the most commonly used motif databases, as well as a few of their common applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Control of Integrated Task Sequences Shapes Components of Reaching.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priya; Whitall, Jill; Kagerer, Florian A

    2016-01-01

    Reaching toward an object usually consists of a sequence of elemental actions. Using a reaching task sequence, the authors investigated how task elements of that sequence affected feedforward and feedback components of the reaching phase of the movement. Nine right-handed adults performed, with their dominant and nondominant hands, 4 tasks of different complexities: a simple reaching task; a reach-to-grasp task; a reach-to-grasp and lift object task; and a reach-to-grasp, lift, and place object task. Results showed that in the reach-to-grasp and lift object task more time was allocated to the feedforward component of the reach phase, while latency between the task elements decreased. We also found between-hand differences, supporting previous findings of increased efficiency of processing planning-related information in the preferred hand. The presence of task-related modifications supports the concept of contextual effects when planning a movement.

  19. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  20. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  1. Allele drop-out in the MECP2 gene due to G-quadruplex and i-motif sequences when using polymerase chain reaction-based diagnosis for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Carol J; Friez, Michael J; Patterson, Melanie; Nzabi, Masha; Zhao, Weiwei; Bi, Chengpeng

    2010-04-01

    Although few examples are formally documented, all polymerase chain reaction-based testing is theoretically vulnerable to allele drop-out (ADO), the failure to amplify one of the two alleles present in a cell. In a clinical setting, this can lead to false positive or negative diagnosis. We investigated the mechanisms leading to ADO in the MECP2 gene in two unrelated female patients undergoing testing for Rett syndrome. Both the patients had two benign DNA variations, c.819G > T and c.1161C > T, that appeared homozygous due to ADO. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that this region of the MECP2 gene is rich in complex tertiary structures called G-quadruplex and i-motifs, the disruption of which by the c.819G > T and c.1161C > T variants leads to preferential amplification of the variant allele. Other examples of ADO likely occur, and consideration of disrupting G-quadruplex and i-motif structures should be given when this phenomenon is unexpected. We identify factors in both the polymerase chain reaction amplification and the sequencing steps that help overcome ADO.

  2. MannDB - a microbial database of automated protein sequence analyses and evidence integration for protein characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Carol L Ecale; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Zemla, Adam T; Dyer, Matthew D; Kuczmarski, Thomas A; Vitalis, Elizabeth A; Slezak, Thomas R

    2006-10-17

    MannDB was created to meet a need for rapid, comprehensive automated protein sequence analyses to support selection of proteins suitable as targets for driving the development of reagents for pathogen or protein toxin detection. Because a large number of open-source tools were needed, it was necessary to produce a software system to scale the computations for whole-proteome analysis. Thus, we built a fully automated system for executing software tools and for storage, integration, and display of automated protein sequence analysis and annotation data. MannDB is a relational database that organizes data resulting from fully automated, high-throughput protein-sequence analyses using open-source tools. Types of analyses provided include predictions of cleavage, chemical properties, classification, features, functional assignment, post-translational modifications, motifs, antigenicity, and secondary structure. Proteomes (lists of hypothetical and known proteins) are downloaded and parsed from Genbank and then inserted into MannDB, and annotations from SwissProt are downloaded when identifiers are found in the Genbank entry or when identical sequences are identified. Currently 36 open-source tools are run against MannDB protein sequences either on local systems or by means of batch submission to external servers. In addition, BLAST against protein entries in MvirDB, our database of microbial virulence factors, is performed. A web client browser enables viewing of computational results and downloaded annotations, and a query tool enables structured and free-text search capabilities. When available, links to external databases, including MvirDB, are provided. MannDB contains whole-proteome analyses for at least one representative organism from each category of biological threat organism listed by APHIS, CDC, HHS, NIAID, USDA, USFDA, and WHO. MannDB comprises a large number of genomes and comprehensive protein sequence analyses representing organisms listed as high

  3. Functional region prediction with a set of appropriate homologous sequences-an index for sequence selection by integrating structure and sequence information with spatial statistics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of conserved residue clusters on a protein structure is one of the effective strategies for the prediction of functional protein regions. Various methods, such as Evolutionary Trace, have been developed based on this strategy. In such approaches, the conserved residues are identified through comparisons of homologous amino acid sequences. Therefore, the selection of homologous sequences is a critical step. It is empirically known that a certain degree of sequence divergence in the set of homologous sequences is required for the identification of conserved residues. However, the development of a method to select homologous sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues has not been sufficiently addressed. An objective and general method to select appropriate homologous sequences is desired for the efficient prediction of functional regions. Results We have developed a novel index to select the sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues, and implemented the index within our method to predict the functional regions of a protein. The implementation of the index improved the performance of the functional region prediction. The index represents the degree of conserved residue clustering on the tertiary structure of the protein. For this purpose, the structure and sequence information were integrated within the index by the application of spatial statistics. Spatial statistics is a field of statistics in which not only the attributes but also the geometrical coordinates of the data are considered simultaneously. Higher degrees of clustering generate larger index scores. We adopted the set of homologous sequences with the highest index score, under the assumption that the best prediction accuracy is obtained when the degree of clustering is the maximum. The set of sequences selected by the index led to higher functional region prediction performance than the sets of sequences selected by other sequence

  4. Functional region prediction with a set of appropriate homologous sequences--an index for sequence selection by integrating structure and sequence information with spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Wataru; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-29

    The detection of conserved residue clusters on a protein structure is one of the effective strategies for the prediction of functional protein regions. Various methods, such as Evolutionary Trace, have been developed based on this strategy. In such approaches, the conserved residues are identified through comparisons of homologous amino acid sequences. Therefore, the selection of homologous sequences is a critical step. It is empirically known that a certain degree of sequence divergence in the set of homologous sequences is required for the identification of conserved residues. However, the development of a method to select homologous sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues has not been sufficiently addressed. An objective and general method to select appropriate homologous sequences is desired for the efficient prediction of functional regions. We have developed a novel index to select the sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues, and implemented the index within our method to predict the functional regions of a protein. The implementation of the index improved the performance of the functional region prediction. The index represents the degree of conserved residue clustering on the tertiary structure of the protein. For this purpose, the structure and sequence information were integrated within the index by the application of spatial statistics. Spatial statistics is a field of statistics in which not only the attributes but also the geometrical coordinates of the data are considered simultaneously. Higher degrees of clustering generate larger index scores. We adopted the set of homologous sequences with the highest index score, under the assumption that the best prediction accuracy is obtained when the degree of clustering is the maximum. The set of sequences selected by the index led to higher functional region prediction performance than the sets of sequences selected by other sequence-based methods

  5. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    PubMed

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes.

  6. Integration of new alternative reference strain genome sequences into the Saccharomyces genome database.

    PubMed

    Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C; Dalusag, Kyla; Demeter, Janos; Engel, Stacia; Hellerstedt, Sage T; Karra, Kalpana; Hitz, Benjamin C; Nash, Robert S; Paskov, Kelley; Sheppard, Travis; Skrzypek, Marek; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith; Michael Cherry, J

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. To provide a wider scope of genetic and phenotypic variation in yeast, the genome sequences and their corresponding annotations from 11 alternative S. cerevisiae reference strains have been integrated into SGD. Genomic and protein sequence information for genes from these strains are now available on the Sequence and Protein tab of the corresponding Locus Summary pages. We illustrate how these genome sequences can be utilized to aid our understanding of strain-specific functional and phenotypic differences.Database URL: www.yeastgenome.org.

  7. Prediction and prioritization of neoantigens: integration of RNA sequencing data with whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Kuwano, Hideki; Nitadori, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Masaaki; Anraku, Masaki; Hosoi, Akihiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Takazawa, Masaki; Ohara, Osamu; Nakajima, Jun; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    The importance of neoantigens for cancer immunity is now well-acknowledged. However, there are diverse strategies for predicting and prioritizing candidate neoantigens, and thus reported neoantigen loads vary a great deal. To clarify this issue, we compared the numbers of neoantigen candidates predicted by four currently utilized strategies. Whole-exome sequencing and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of four non-small-cell lung cancer patients was carried out. We identified 361 somatic missense mutations from which 224 candidate neoantigens were predicted using MHC class I binding affinity prediction software (strategy I). Of these, 207 exceeded the set threshold of gene expression (fragments per kilobase of transcript per million fragments mapped ≥1), resulting in 124 candidate neoantigens (strategy II). To verify mutant mRNA expression, sequencing of amplicons from tumor cDNA including each mutation was undertaken; 204 of the 207 mutations were successfully sequenced, yielding 121 mutant mRNA sequences, resulting in 75 candidate neoantigens (strategy III). Sequence information was extracted from RNA-Seq to confirm the presence of mutated mRNA. Variant allele frequencies ≥0.04 in RNA-Seq were found for 117 of the 207 mutations and regarded as expressed in the tumor, and finally, 72 candidate neoantigens were predicted (strategy IV). Without additional amplicon sequencing of cDNA, strategy IV was comparable to strategy III. We therefore propose strategy IV as a practical and appropriate strategy to predict candidate neoantigens fully utilizing currently available information. It is of note that different neoantigen loads were deduced from the same tumors depending on the strategies applied.

  8. The complete sequence of a Spanish isolate of Broad bean wilt virus 1 (BBWV-1) reveals a high variability and conserved motifs in the genus Fabavirus.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, R M; Guerri, J; Luis-Arteaga, M S; Moreno, P; Rubio, L

    2005-10-01

    The genome of a Spanish isolate of Broad bean wilt virus-1 (BBWV-1) was completely sequenced and compared with available sequences of other isolates of the genus Fabavirus (BBWV-1 and BBWV-2). This consisted of two RNAs of 5814 and 3431 nucleotides, respectively, and their organization was similar to that of other members of the family Comoviridae. Its mean nucleotide identity with a BBWV-1 American isolate was 81.5%, and between 59.8 and 63.5% with seven BBWV-2 isolates. Our analysis showed sequence stretches in the 5' non-coding regions which are conserved in both genomic RNAs and in BBWV-1 and BBWV-2 isolates.

  9. Sequence motifs characteristic of DNA[cytosine-N4]methyltransferases: similarity to adenine and cytosine-C5 DNA-methylases.

    PubMed Central

    Klimasauskas, S; Timinskas, A; Menkevicius, S; Butkienè, D; Butkus, V; Janulaitis, A

    1989-01-01

    The sequences coding for DNA[cytosine-N4]methyltransferases MvaI (from Micrococcus varians RFL19) and Cfr9I (from Citrobacter freundii RFL9) have been determined. The predicted methylases are proteins of 454 and 300 amino acids, respectively. Primary structure comparison of M.Cfr9I and another m4C-forming methylase, M.Pvu II, revealed extended regions of homology. The sequence comparison of the three DNA[cytosine-N4]-methylases using originally developed software revealed two conserved patterns, DPF-GSGT and TSPPY, which were found similar also to those of adenine and DNA[cytosine-C5]-methylases. These data provided a basis for global alignment and classification of DNA-methylase sequences. Structural considerations led us to suggest that the first region could be the binding site of AdoMet, while the second is thought to be directly involved in the modification of the exocyclic amino group. PMID:2690010

  10. Process sequence optimization for digital microfluidic integration using EWOD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Supriya; Joyce, Robin; Sharma, Akash Kumar; Sharma, Himani; Sharma, Niti Nipun; Varghese, Soney; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-04-01

    Micro/nano-fluidic MEMS biosensors are the devices that detects the biomolecules. The emerging micro/nano-fluidic devices provide high throughput and high repeatability with very low response time and reduced device cost as compared to traditional devices. This article presents the experimental details for process sequence optimization of digital microfluidics (DMF) using "electrowetting-on-dielectric" (EWOD). Stress free thick film deposition of silicon dioxide using PECVD and subsequent process for EWOD techniques have been optimized in this work.

  11. Integrated visual analysis of protein structures, sequences, and feature data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background To understand the molecular mechanisms that give rise to a protein's function, biologists often need to (i) find and access all related atomic-resolution 3D structures, and (ii) map sequence-based features (e.g., domains, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, post-translational modifications) onto these structures. Results To streamline these processes we recently developed Aquaria, a resource offering unprecedented access to protein structure information based on an all-against-all comparison of SwissProt and PDB sequences. In this work, we provide a requirements analysis for several frequently occuring tasks in molecular biology and describe how design choices in Aquaria meet these requirements. Finally, we show how the interface can be used to explore features of a protein and gain biologically meaningful insights in two case studies conducted by domain experts. Conclusions The user interface design of Aquaria enables biologists to gain unprecedented access to molecular structures and simplifies the generation of insight. The tasks involved in mapping sequence features onto structures can be conducted easier and faster using Aquaria. PMID:26329268

  12. Ichnofabric and siliciclastic depositional systems: Integration for sequence stratigraphic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottjer, D.J. ); Droser, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Much previous research on biogenic sedimentary structures has established how ichnofacies (assemblages of discrete trace fossils) vary within marine depositional systems. However, studies aimed at understanding the distribution of ichnofabric (sedimentary rock fabric resulting from biogenic reworking) have only recently been attempted. Because ichnofabric can be recorded using a semi-quantitative series of ichnofabric indices (ii), its distribution in marine sedimentary rocks can be easily recorded through vertical sequence analysis. Thicknesses of strata recording different ichnofabric indices can be logged from stratigraphic sections or cores. These data are best displayed in histograms as percent of ii recorded from the total thickness measured. These ichnofabric histograms (ichnograms) show variable but distinctive distributions for genetic units such as facies within systems tracts of siliciclastic depositional sequences. An average ichnofabric index for any genetic sedimentary unit can also be computed from the data used to construct ichnograms. Because skeletal fossils are typically much less commonly preserved in siliciclastic than carbonate depositional systems, such ichnofabric analyses have the potential of providing an important new line of evidence for depositional systems and sequence stratigraphic analysis of siliciclastic strata. In petroleum exploration results from completing analyses of ichnofabric distribution could provide important information including: (1) systems tracts with fine-grained facies that have relatively low ichnofabric values are potential source beds; and (2) petroleum reservoirs that occur in coarse episodically deposited beds are more likely to from in systems tracts with facies that have low rather than high ichnofabric values.

  13. Evolutionary Analysis and Classification of OATs, OCTs, OCTNs, and Other SLC22 Transporters: Structure-Function Implications and Analysis of Sequence Motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Christopher; Nigam, Kabir B; Date, Rishabh C; Bush, Kevin T; Springer, Stevan A; Saier, Milton H; Wu, Wei; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2015-01-01

    The SLC22 family includes organic anion transporters (OATs), organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic carnitine and zwitterion transporters (OCTNs). These are often referred to as drug transporters even though they interact with many endogenous metabolites and signaling molecules (Nigam, S.K., Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, 14:29-44, 2015). Phylogenetic analysis of SLC22 supports the view that these transporters may have evolved over 450 million years ago. Many OAT members were found to appear after a major expansion of the SLC22 family in mammals, suggesting a physiological and/or toxicological role during the mammalian radiation. Putative SLC22 orthologs exist in worms, sea urchins, flies, and ciona. At least six groups of SLC22 exist. OATs and OCTs form two Major clades of SLC22, within which (apart from Oat and Oct subclades), there are also clear Oat-like, Octn, and Oct-related subclades, as well as a distantly related group we term "Oat-related" (which may have different functions). Based on available data, it is arguable whether SLC22A18, which is related to bacterial drug-proton antiporters, should be assigned to SLC22. Disease-causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other functionally analyzed mutations in OAT1, OAT3, URAT1, OCT1, OCT2, OCTN1, and OCTN2 map to the first extracellular domain, the large central intracellular domain, and transmembrane domains 9 and 10. These regions are highly conserved within subclades, but not between subclades, and may be necessary for SLC22 transporter function and functional diversification. Our results not only link function to evolutionarily conserved motifs but indicate the need for a revised sub-classification of SLC22.

  14. Evolutionary Analysis and Classification of OATs, OCTs, OCTNs, and Other SLC22 Transporters: Structure-Function Implications and Analysis of Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Date, Rishabh C.; Bush, Kevin T.; Springer, Stevan A.; Saier, Milton H.; Wu, Wei; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2015-01-01

    The SLC22 family includes organic anion transporters (OATs), organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic carnitine and zwitterion transporters (OCTNs). These are often referred to as drug transporters even though they interact with many endogenous metabolites and signaling molecules (Nigam, S.K., Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, 14:29–44, 2015). Phylogenetic analysis of SLC22 supports the view that these transporters may have evolved over 450 million years ago. Many OAT members were found to appear after a major expansion of the SLC22 family in mammals, suggesting a physiological and/or toxicological role during the mammalian radiation. Putative SLC22 orthologs exist in worms, sea urchins, flies, and ciona. At least six groups of SLC22 exist. OATs and OCTs form two Major clades of SLC22, within which (apart from Oat and Oct subclades), there are also clear Oat-like, Octn, and Oct-related subclades, as well as a distantly related group we term “Oat-related” (which may have different functions). Based on available data, it is arguable whether SLC22A18, which is related to bacterial drug-proton antiporters, should be assigned to SLC22. Disease-causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other functionally analyzed mutations in OAT1, OAT3, URAT1, OCT1, OCT2, OCTN1, and OCTN2 map to the first extracellular domain, the large central intracellular domain, and transmembrane domains 9 and 10. These regions are highly conserved within subclades, but not between subclades, and may be necessary for SLC22 transporter function and functional diversification. Our results not only link function to evolutionarily conserved motifs but indicate the need for a revised sub-classification of SLC22. PMID:26536134

  15. Phylogenetic analysis, based on EPIYA repeats in the cagA gene of Indian Helicobacter pylori, and the implications of sequence variation in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs on determining the clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Santosh K; Sharma, Vishwas; Sharma, Varun Kumar; Gopi, Manoj; Saikant, R; Nandan, Amrita; Bardia, Avinash; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Katikala, Prasanth; Habeeb, Md Aejaz; Khan, Aleem A; Habibullah, C M

    2011-04-01

    The population of India harbors one of the world's most highly diverse gene pools, owing to the influx of successive waves of immigrants over regular periods in time. Several phylogenetic studies involving mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal variation have demonstrated Europeans to have been the first settlers in India. Nevertheless, certain controversy exists, due to the support given to the thesis that colonization was by the Austro-Asiatic group, prior to the Europeans. Thus, the aim was to investigate pre-historic colonization of India by anatomically modern humans, using conserved stretches of five amino acid (EPIYA) sequences in the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori. Simultaneously, the existence of a pathogenic relationship of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs), in 32 H. pylori strains isolated from subjects with several forms of gastric diseases, was also explored. High resolution sequence analysis of the above described genes was performed. The nucleotide sequences obtained were translated into amino acids using MEGA (version 4.0) software for EPIYA. An MJ-Network was constructed for obtaining TPM haplotypes by using NETWORK (version 4.5) software. The findings of the study suggest that Indian H. pylori strains share a common ancestry with Europeans. No specific association of haplotypes with the outcome of disease was revealed through additional network analysis of TPMs.

  16. The carboxyl-terminal part of the putative Berne virus polymerase is expressed by ribosomal frameshifting and contains sequence motifs which indicate that toro- and coronaviruses are evolutionarily related.

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, E J; den Boon, J A; Bredenbeek, P J; Horzinek, M C; Rijnbrand, R; Spaan, W J

    1990-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the 3' part (8 kb) of the polymerase gene of the torovirus prototype Berne virus (BEV) revealed that this area contains at least two open reading frames (provisionally designated ORF1a and ORF1b) which overlap by 12 nucleotides. The complete sequence of ORF1b (6873 nucleotides) was determined. Like the coronaviruses, BEV was shown to express its ORF1b by ribosomal frameshifting during translation of the genomic RNA. The predicted tertiary RNA structure (a pseudoknot) in the toro- and coronaviral frameshift-directing region is similar. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the predicted BEV ORF1b translation product revealed homology with the ORF1b product of coronaviruses. Four conserved domains were identified: the putative polymerase domain, an area containing conserved cysteine and histidine residues, a putative helicase motif, and a domain which seems to be unique for toro- and coronaviruses. The data on the 3' part of the polymerase gene of BEV supplement previously observed similarities between toro- and coronaviruses at the level of genome organization and expression. The two virus families are more closely related to each other than to other families of positive-stranded RNA viruses. Images PMID:2388833

  17. Phylogenetic analysis, based on EPIYA repeats in the cagA gene of Indian Helicobacter pylori, and the implications of sequence variation in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs on determining the clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Santosh K.; Sharma, Vishwas; Sharma, Varun Kumar; Gopi, Manoj; Saikant, R; Nandan, Amrita; Bardia, Avinash; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Katikala, Prasanth; Habeeb, Md. Aejaz; Khan, Aleem A.; Habibullah, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The population of India harbors one of the world’s most highly diverse gene pools, owing to the influx of successive waves of immigrants over regular periods in time. Several phylogenetic studies involving mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal variation have demonstrated Europeans to have been the first settlers in India. Nevertheless, certain controversy exists, due to the support given to the thesis that colonization was by the Austro-Asiatic group, prior to the Europeans. Thus, the aim was to investigate pre-historic colonization of India by anatomically modern humans, using conserved stretches of five amino acid (EPIYA) sequences in the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori. Simultaneously, the existence of a pathogenic relationship of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs), in 32 H. pylori strains isolated from subjects with several forms of gastric diseases, was also explored. High resolution sequence analysis of the above described genes was performed. The nucleotide sequences obtained were translated into amino acids using MEGA (version 4.0) software for EPIYA. An MJ-Network was constructed for obtaining TPM haplotypes by using NETWORK (version 4.5) software. The findings of the study suggest that Indian H. pylori strains share a common ancestry with Europeans. No specific association of haplotypes with the outcome of disease was revealed through additional network analysis of TPMs. PMID:21734830

  18. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  19. An Integrated Sequence-Structure Database incorporating matching mRNA sequence, amino acid sequence and protein three-dimensional structure data.

    PubMed Central

    Adzhubei, I A; Adzhubei, A A; Neidle, S

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a non-homologous database, termed the Integrated Sequence-Structure Database (ISSD) which comprises the coding sequences of genes, amino acid sequences of the corresponding proteins, their secondary structure and straight phi,psi angles assignments, and polypeptide backbone coordinates. Each protein entry in the database holds the alignment of nucleotide sequence, amino acid sequence and the PDB three-dimensional structure data. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each entry are selected on the basis of exact matches of the source organism and cell environment. The current version 1.0 of ISSD is available on the WWW at http://www.protein.bio.msu.su/issd/ and includes 107 non-homologous mammalian proteins, of which 80 are human proteins. The database has been used by us for the analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in mRNA sequences showing their correlation with the three-dimensional structure features in the encoded proteins. Possible ISSD applications include optimisation of protein expression, improvement of the protein structure prediction accuracy, and analysis of evolutionary aspects of the nucleotide sequence-protein structure relationship. PMID:9399866

  20. Import of desired nucleic acid sequences using addressing motif of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA for fluorescent in vivo hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Alán, Lukáš; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2014-04-01

    Based on the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mitochondria, we have constructed an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mt-mRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. Thus DNA oligonucleotides were constructed, containing the 5'-flanked T7 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro transcription and fluorescent labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 or 647 dye, we obtained the fluorescent "L-ND5 probe" containing MAM and exemplar cargo, i.e., annealing sequence to a short portion of ND5 mRNA and to the light-strand mtDNA complementary to the heavy strand nd5 mt gene (5'-end 21 base pair sequence). For mitochondrial in vivo fluorescent hybridization, HepG2 cells were treated with dequalinium micelles, containing the fluorescent probes, bringing the probes proximally to the mitochondrial outer membrane and to the natural import system. A verification of import into the mitochondrial matrix of cultured HepG2 cells was provided by confocal microscopy colocalizations. Transfections using lipofectamine or probes without 5S-rRNA addressing MAM sequence or with MAM only were ineffective. Alternatively, the same DNA oligonucleotides with 5'-CACC overhang (substituting T7 promoter) were transcribed from the tetracycline-inducible pENTRH1/TO vector in human embryonic kidney T-REx®-293 cells, while mitochondrial matrix localization after import of the resulting unlabeled RNA was detected by PCR. The MAM-containing probe was then enriched by three-order of magnitude over the natural ND5 mRNA in the mitochondrial matrix. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-principle for mitochondrial in vivo hybridization and mitochondrial nucleic acid import.

  1. Model peptide studies of sequence regions in the elastomeric biomineralization protein, Lustrin A. I. The C-domain consensus-PG-, -NVNCT-motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel; Evans, John Spencer

    2002-05-01

    The lustrin superfamily represents a unique group of biomineralization proteins localized between layered aragonite mineral plates (i.e., nacre layer) in mollusk shell. Recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) pulling studies have demonstrated that the lustrin-containing organic nacre layer in the abalone, Haliotis rufescens, exhibits a typical sawtooth force-extension curve with hysteretic recovery. This force extension behavior is reminiscent of reversible unfolding and refolding in elastomeric proteins such as titin and tenascin. Since secondary structure plays an important role in force-induced protein unfolding and refolding, the question is, What secondary structure(s) exist within the major domains of Lustrin A? Using a model peptide (FPGKNVNCTSGE) representing the 12-residue consensus sequence found near the N-termini of the first eight cysteine-rich domains (C-domains) within the Lustrin A protein, we employed CD, NMR spectroscopy, and simulated annealing/minimization to determine the secondary structure preferences for this sequence. At pH 7.4, we find that the 12-mer sequence adopts a loop conformation, consisting of a "bend" or "turn" involving residues G3-K4 and N7-C8-T9, with extended conformations arising at F1-G3; K4-V6; T9-S10-G11 in the sequence. Minor pH-dependent conformational effects were noted for this peptide; however, there is no evidence for a salt-bridge interaction between the K4 and E12 side chains. The presence of a loop conformation within the highly conserved -PG-, -NVNCT- sequence of C1-C8 domains may have important structural and mechanistic implications for the Lustrin A protein with regard to elastic behavior.

  2. DNA motifs determining the efficiency of adaptation into the Escherichia coli CRISPR array.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Shitrit, Dror; Goren, Moran G; Burstein, David; Pupko, Tal; Qimron, Udi

    2013-08-27

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated proteins constitute a recently identified prokaryotic defense system against invading nucleic acids. DNA segments, termed protospacers, are integrated into the CRISPR array in a process called adaptation. Here, we establish a PCR-based assay that enables evaluating the adaptation efficiency of specific spacers into the type I-E Escherichia coli CRISPR array. Using this assay, we provide direct evidence that the protospacer adjacent motif along with the first base of the protospacer (5'-AAG) partially affect the efficiency of spacer acquisition. Remarkably, we identified a unique dinucleotide, 5'-AA, positioned at the 3' end of the spacer, that enhances efficiency of the spacer's acquisition. Insertion of this dinucleotide increased acquisition efficiency of two different spacers. DNA sequencing of newly adapted CRISPR arrays revealed that the position of the newly identified motif with respect to the 5'-AAG is important for affecting acquisition efficiency. Analysis of approximately 1 million spacers showed that this motif is overrepresented in frequently acquired spacers compared with those acquired rarely. Our results represent an example of a short nonprotospacer adjacent motif sequence that affects acquisition efficiency and suggest that other as yet unknown motifs affect acquisition efficiency in other CRISPR systems as well.

  3. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the putative regeneration and tolerance factor (RTF/TJ6) as a functional vacuolar ATPase proton pump regulatory subunit with a conserved sequence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Babichev, Yael; Tamir, Ami; Park, Meeyoug; Muallem, Shmuel; Isakov, Noah

    2005-10-01

    In an attempt to identify new immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing human molecules that may regulate hitherto unknown immune cell functions, we BLAST searched the National Center for Biotechnology Information database for ITAM-containing sequences. A human expressed sequence tag showing partial homology to the murine TJ6 (mTJ6) gene and encoding a putative ITAM sequence has been identified and used to clone the human TJ6 (hTJ6) gene from an HL-60-derived cDNA library. hTJ6 was found to encode a protein of 856 residues with a calculated mass of 98 155 Da. Immunolocalization and sequence analysis revealed that hTJ6 is a membrane protein with predicted six transmembrane-spanning regions, typical of ion channels, and a single putative ITAM (residues 452-466) in a juxtamembrane or hydrophobic intramembrane region. hTJ6 is highly homologous to Bos taurus 116-kDa subunit of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase. Over-expression of hTJ6 in HEK 293 cells increased H+ uptake into intracellular organelles, an effect that was sensitive to inhibition by bafilomycin, a selective inhibitor of vacuolar H+ pump. Northern blot analysis demonstrated three different hybridizing mRNA transcripts corresponding to 3.2, 5.0 and 7.3 kb, indicating the presence of several splice variants. Significant differences in hTJ6 mRNA levels in human tissues of different origins point to possible tissue-specific function. Although hTJ6 was found to be a poor substrate for tyrosine-phosphorylating enzymes, suggesting that its ITAM sequence is non-functional in protein tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways, its role in organellar H+ pumping suggests that hTJ6 function may participate in protein trafficking/processing.

  4. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd motifs whose structural features can be understood in terms of simple principles of helix-helix packing. Thus, the universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  5. Sequence-Based Screening for Rare Enzymes: New Insights into the World of AMDases Reveal a Conserved Motif and 58 Novel Enzymes Clustering in Eight Distinct Families

    PubMed Central

    Maimanakos, Janine; Chow, Jennifer; Gaßmeyer, Sarah K.; Güllert, Simon; Busch, Florian; Kourist, Robert; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Arylmalonate Decarboxylases (AMDases, EC 4.1.1.76) are very rare and mostly underexplored enzymes. Currently only four known and biochemically characterized representatives exist. However, their ability to decarboxylate α-disubstituted malonic acid derivatives to optically pure products without cofactors makes them attractive and promising candidates for the use as biocatalysts in industrial processes. Until now, AMDases could not be separated from other members of the aspartate/glutamate racemase superfamily based on their gene sequences. Within this work, a search algorithm was developed that enables a reliable prediction of AMDase activity for potential candidates. Based on specific sequence patterns and screening methods 58 novel AMDase candidate genes could be identified in this work. Thereby, AMDases with the conserved sequence pattern of Bordetella bronchiseptica’s prototype appeared to be limited to the classes of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria. Amino acid homologies and comparison of gene surrounding sequences enabled the classification of eight enzyme clusters. Particularly striking is the accumulation of genes coding for different transporters of the tripartite tricarboxylate transporters family, TRAP transporters and ABC transporters as well as genes coding for mandelate racemases/muconate lactonizing enzymes that might be involved in substrate uptake or degradation of AMDase products. Further, three novel AMDases were characterized which showed a high enantiomeric excess (>99%) of the (R)-enantiomer of flurbiprofen. These are the recombinant AmdA and AmdV from Variovorax sp. strains HH01 and HH02, originated from soil, and AmdP from Polymorphum gilvum found by a data base search. Altogether our findings give new insights into the class of AMDases and reveal many previously unknown enzyme candidates with high potential for bioindustrial processes. PMID:27610105

  6. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  7. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  8. The Thiamine-Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a cofactor for enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production including the well known decarboxylation of a-keto acid dehydrogenases followed by transketolation. TPP-dependent enzymes constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group exhibiting multimeric subunit organization, multiple domains and two chemically equivalent catalytic centers. Annotation of functional TPP-dependcnt enzymes, therefore, has not been trivial due to low sequence similarity related to this complex organization. Our approach to analysis of structures of known TPP-dependent enzymes reveals for the first time features common to this group, which we have termed the TPP-motif. The TPP-motif consists of specific spatial arrangements of structural elements and their specific contacts to provide for a flip-flop, or alternate site, enzymatic mechanism of action. Analysis of structural elements entrained in the flip-flop action displayed by TPP-dependent enzymes reveals a novel definition of the common amino acid sequences. These sequences allow for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes, thus advancing functional proteomics. Further details of three-dimensional structures of TPP-dependent enzymes will be discussed.

  9. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos.

    PubMed

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013-15 infected more than 28 000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. As this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family ITALIC! Filoviridaesequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.Database URL:www.hfv.lanl.gov.

  10. Accelerated integrated science sequence: an interdisciplinary introductory course for science majors.

    PubMed

    Copp, Newton H; Black, Kersey; Gould, Scot

    2012-01-01

    We report here on our development of an introductory science course sequence that integrates biology, chemistry and physics in order to foster an interdisciplinary perspective in future science majors. Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence (AISS) is a two semester, double credit sequence co-taught by a biologist, a physicist and a chemist to first year undergraduates who plan to major in a natural science field. Topics are organized within a thematic framework. The course sequence also features integration of various pedagogical approaches as students shift from one type of activity to another within the same class session. The presence of AISS in our curriculum over the past five years has been correlated with increased recruitment and graduation of students in science majors and a perception within the department that AISS has helped improve the culture of learning. These benefits outweigh the difficulties of developing such a course and encourage us that interdisciplinary introductory courses can make important contributions to training versatile scientists.

  11. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  12. The European Classical Swine Fever Virus Database: Blueprint for a Pathogen-Specific Sequence Database with Integrated Sequence Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Bernd; Becher, Paul

    2016-11-07

    Molecular epidemiology has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis of diseases and in tracing the infection routes of pathogens. Due to advances in conventional sequencing and the development of high throughput technologies, the field of sequence determination is in the process of being revolutionized. Platforms for sharing sequence information and providing standardized tools for phylogenetic analyses are becoming increasingly important. The database (DB) of the European Union (EU) and World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Reference Laboratory for classical swine fever offers one of the world's largest semi-public virus-specific sequence collections combined with a module for phylogenetic analysis. The classical swine fever (CSF) DB (CSF-DB) became a valuable tool for supporting diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of this highly contagious disease in pigs with high socio-economic impacts worldwide. The DB has been re-designed and now allows for the storage and analysis of traditionally used, well established genomic regions and of larger genomic regions including complete viral genomes. We present an application example for the analysis of highly similar viral sequences obtained in an endemic disease situation and introduce the new geographic "CSF Maps" tool. The concept of this standardized and easy-to-use DB with an integrated genetic typing module is suited to serve as a blueprint for similar platforms for other human or animal viruses.

  13. The European Classical Swine Fever Virus Database: Blueprint for a Pathogen-Specific Sequence Database with Integrated Sequence Analysis Tools

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Bernd; Becher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis of diseases and in tracing the infection routes of pathogens. Due to advances in conventional sequencing and the development of high throughput technologies, the field of sequence determination is in the process of being revolutionized. Platforms for sharing sequence information and providing standardized tools for phylogenetic analyses are becoming increasingly important. The database (DB) of the European Union (EU) and World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Reference Laboratory for classical swine fever offers one of the world’s largest semi-public virus-specific sequence collections combined with a module for phylogenetic analysis. The classical swine fever (CSF) DB (CSF-DB) became a valuable tool for supporting diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of this highly contagious disease in pigs with high socio-economic impacts worldwide. The DB has been re-designed and now allows for the storage and analysis of traditionally used, well established genomic regions and of larger genomic regions including complete viral genomes. We present an application example for the analysis of highly similar viral sequences obtained in an endemic disease situation and introduce the new geographic “CSF Maps” tool. The concept of this standardized and easy-to-use DB with an integrated genetic typing module is suited to serve as a blueprint for similar platforms for other human or animal viruses. PMID:27827988

  14. Systematic reconstruction of RNA functional motifs with high-throughput microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lance; Meier, Matthias; Lyons, Shawn M; Sit, Rene V; Marzluff, William F; Quake, Stephen R; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-12-01

    We present RNA-mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions (RNA-MITOMI), a microfluidic platform that allows integrated synthesis and functional assays for programmable RNA libraries. The interaction of a comprehensive library of RNA mutants with stem-loop-binding protein precisely defined the RNA structural and sequence features that govern affinity. The functional motif reconstructed in a single experiment on our platform uncovers new binding specificities and enriches interpretation of phylogenetic data.

  15. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  16. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy. PMID:26347887

  17. ATtRACT-a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available athttp://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid-F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discoveringde novomotifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database.Database URL:http:// attract. cnic. es.

  18. CISA: Contig Integrator for Sequence Assembly of Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Hung; Liao, Yu-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of algorithmic assemblers have been proposed for the de novo assembly of genomes, however, no individual assembler guarantees the optimal assembly for diverse species. Optimizing various parameters in an assembler is often performed in order to generate the most optimal assembly. However, few efforts have been pursued to take advantage of multiple assemblies to yield an assembly of high accuracy. In this study, we employ various state-of-the-art assemblers to generate different sets of contigs for bacterial genomes. A tool, named CISA, has been developed to integrate the assemblies into a hybrid set of contigs, resulting in assemblies of superior contiguity and accuracy, compared with the assemblies generated by the state-of-the-art assemblers and the hybrid assemblies merged by existing tools. This tool is implemented in Python and requires MUMmer and BLAST+ to be installed on the local machine. The source code of CISA and examples of its use are available at http://sb.nhri.org.tw/CISA/. PMID:23556006

  19. CISA: contig integrator for sequence assembly of bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Hung; Liao, Yu-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of algorithmic assemblers have been proposed for the de novo assembly of genomes, however, no individual assembler guarantees the optimal assembly for diverse species. Optimizing various parameters in an assembler is often performed in order to generate the most optimal assembly. However, few efforts have been pursued to take advantage of multiple assemblies to yield an assembly of high accuracy. In this study, we employ various state-of-the-art assemblers to generate different sets of contigs for bacterial genomes. A tool, named CISA, has been developed to integrate the assemblies into a hybrid set of contigs, resulting in assemblies of superior contiguity and accuracy, compared with the assemblies generated by the state-of-the-art assemblers and the hybrid assemblies merged by existing tools. This tool is implemented in Python and requires MUMmer and BLAST+ to be installed on the local machine. The source code of CISA and examples of its use are available at http://sb.nhri.org.tw/CISA/.

  20. Serial number tagging reveals a prominent sequence preference of retrotransposon integration.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Atreyi Ghatak; Esnault, Caroline; Guo, Yabin; Hung, Stevephen; McQueen, Philip G; Levin, Henry L

    2014-07-01

    Transposable elements (TE) have both negative and positive impact on the biology of their host. As a result, a balance is struck between the host and the TE that relies on directing integration to specific genome territories. The extraordinary capacity of DNA sequencing can create ultra dense maps of integration that are being used to study the mechanisms that position integration. Unfortunately, the great increase in the numbers of insertion sites detected comes with the cost of not knowing which positions are rare targets and which sustain high numbers of insertions. To address this problem we developed the serial number system, a TE tagging method that measures the frequency of integration at single nucleotide positions. We sequenced 1 million insertions of retrotransposon Tf1 in the genome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and obtained the first profile of integration with frequencies for each individual position. Integration levels at individual nucleotides varied over two orders of magnitude and revealed that sequence recognition plays a key role in positioning integration. The serial number system is a general method that can be applied to determine precise integration maps for retroviruses and gene therapy vectors.

  1. DNA sequencing by denaturation: experimental proof of concept with an integrated fluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Ja; Roller, Eric E.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    We report the proof of concept of a novel DNA sequencing technology called sequencing by denaturation (SBD). SBD is based on the Sanger sequencing reaction performed on amplified target templates immobilized on a solid surface followed by the denaturation of these Sanger fragments. As these fluorescently labeled fragments denature sequentially, the fluorescence intensities in the four channels corresponding to the four base types are monitored in a flow cell. A sequencing instrument with a microfluidic flowcell has been custom-designed to integrate automated fluidics, temperature control, and fluorescence imaging. The denaturation profiles of several synthetic oligonucleotides were measured with this system and our data demonstrated the ability to sequence short DNA by SBD. SBD is a simple and fast method with the potential to improve the speed and cost of large-scale genome re-sequencing. PMID:20390134

  2. Golden Ratio Versus Pi as Random Sequence Sources for Monte Carlo Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Agarwal, Ravi P.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    We discuss here the relative merits of these numbers as possible random sequence sources. The quality of these sequences is not judged directly based on the outcome of all known tests for the randomness of a sequence. Instead, it is determined implicitly by the accuracy of the Monte Carlo integration in a statistical sense. Since our main motive of using a random sequence is to solve real world problems, it is more desirable if we compare the quality of the sequences based on their performances for these problems in terms of quality/accuracy of the output. We also compare these sources against those generated by a popular pseudo-random generator, viz., the Matlab rand and the quasi-random generator ha/ton both in terms of error and time complexity. Our study demonstrates that consecutive blocks of digits of each of these numbers produce a good random sequence source. It is observed that randomly chosen blocks of digits do not have any remarkable advantage over consecutive blocks for the accuracy of the Monte Carlo integration. Also, it reveals that pi is a better source of a random sequence than theta when the accuracy of the integration is concerned.

  3. Rapid fixation of a distinctive sequence motif in the 3' noncoding region of the clade of West Nile virus invading North America.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L; Piontkivska, Helen; Foppa, Ivo

    2007-09-15

    Phylogenetic analysis of complete genomes of West Nile virus (WNV) by a variety of methods supported the hypothesis that North American isolates of WNV constitute a monophyletic group, together with an isolate from Israel and one from Hungary. We used ancestral sequence reconstruction in order to obtain evidence for evolutionary changes that might be correlated with increased virulence in this clade (designated the N.A. clade). There was one amino acid change (I-->T at residue 356 of the NS3 protein) that occurred in the ancestor of the N.A. clade and remained conserved in all N.A. clade genomes analyzed. There were four changes in the upstream portion of the 3' noncoding region (the AT-enriched region) that occurred in the ancestor of the N.A. clade and remained conserved in all N.A. clade genomes analyzed, changes predicted to alter RNA secondary structure. The AT-enriched region showed a higher rate of substitution in the branch ancestral to the N.A. clade, relative to polymorphism, than did the remainder of the noncoding regions, synonymous sites in coding regions, or nonsynonymous sites in coding regions. The high rate of occurrence of fixed nucleotide substitutions in this region suggests that positive Darwinian selection may have acted on this portion of the 3'NCR and that these fixed changes, possibly in concert with the amino acid change in NS3, may underlie phenotypic effects associated with increased virulence in North American WNV.

  4. Rapid Fixation of a Distinctive Sequence Motif in the 3′Noncoding Region of the Clade of West Nile Virus Invading North America

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.; Piontkivska, Helen; Foppa, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of complete genomes of West Nile virus (WNV) by a variety of methods supported the hypothesis that North American isolates of WNV constitute a monophyletic group, together with an isolate from Israel and one from Hungary. We used ancestral sequence reconstruction in order to obtain evidence for evolutionary changes that might be correlated with increased virulence in this clade (designated the N.A. clade). There was one amino acid change (I→T at residue 356 of the NS3 protein) that occurred in the ancestor of the N.A. clade and remained conserved in all N.A. clade genomes analyzed. There were four changes in the upstream portion of the 3′ noncoding region (the AT-enriched region) that occurred in the ancestor of the N.A. clade and remained conserved in all N.A. clade genomes analyzed, changes predicted to alter RNA secondary structure. The AT-enriched region showed a higher rate of substitution in the branch ancestral to the N.A. clade, relative to polymorphism, than did the remainder of the non-coding regions, synonymous sites in coding regions, or nonsynonymous sites in coding regions. The high rate of occurrence of fixed nucleotide substitutions in this region suggests that positive Darwinian selection may have acted on this portion of the 3′NCR and that these fixed changes, possibly in concert with the amino acid change in NS3, may underlie phenotypic effects associated with increased virulence in North American WNV. PMID:17587514

  5. An integrated computational pipeline and database to support whole-genome sequence annotation.

    PubMed

    Mungall, C J; Misra, S; Berman, B P; Carlson, J; Frise, E; Harris, N; Marshall, B; Shu, S; Kaminker, J S; Prochnik, S E; Smith, C D; Smith, E; Tupy, J L; Wiel, C; Rubin, G M; Lewis, S E

    2002-01-01

    We describe here our experience in annotating the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence, in the course of which we developed several new open-source software tools and a database schema to support large-scale genome annotation. We have developed these into an integrated and reusable software system for whole-genome annotation. The key contributions to overall annotation quality are the marshalling of high-quality sequences for alignments and the design of a system with an adaptable and expandable flexible architecture.

  6. An Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) Pipeline for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Sarwar; Rathore, Abhishek; Shah, Trushar M.; Telluri, Mohan; Amindala, BhanuPrakash; Ruperao, Pradeep; Katta, Mohan A. V. S. K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Open source single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery pipelines for next generation sequencing data commonly requires working knowledge of command line interface, massive computational resources and expertise which is a daunting task for biologists. Further, the SNP information generated may not be readily used for downstream processes such as genotyping. Hence, a comprehensive pipeline has been developed by integrating several open source next generation sequencing (NGS) tools along with a graphical user interface called Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) for SNP discovery and their utilization by developing genotyping assays. The pipeline features functionalities such as pre-processing of raw data, integration of open source alignment tools (Bowtie2, BWA, Maq, NovoAlign and SOAP2), SNP prediction (SAMtools/SOAPsnp/CNS2snp and CbCC) methods and interfaces for developing genotyping assays. The pipeline outputs a list of high quality SNPs between all pairwise combinations of genotypes analyzed, in addition to the reference genome/sequence. Visualization tools (Tablet and Flapjack) integrated into the pipeline enable inspection of the alignment and errors, if any. The pipeline also provides a confidence score or polymorphism information content value with flanking sequences for identified SNPs in standard format required for developing marker genotyping (KASP and Golden Gate) assays. The pipeline enables users to process a range of NGS datasets such as whole genome re-sequencing, restriction site associated DNA sequencing and transcriptome sequencing data at a fast speed. The pipeline is very useful for plant genetics and breeding community with no computational expertise in order to discover SNPs and utilize in genomics, genetics and breeding studies. The pipeline has been parallelized to process huge datasets of next generation sequencing. It has been developed in Java language and is available at http://hpc.icrisat.cgiar.org/ISMU as a standalone

  7. Developing an Integrated DNA Sequencing System for Research and Education at Virginia State University

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The funded project to establish an integrated DNA sequencing system for education and research at Virginia State...University has been successfully completed. A facility consisting of two next-generation DNA sequencers, which work in complement to each other, as well as a...series of instruments essential for DNA sample preparation and quality control, has been established in a dedicated laboratory at Virginia State

  8. An integrated SNP mining and utilization (ISMU) pipeline for next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Azam, Sarwar; Rathore, Abhishek; Shah, Trushar M; Telluri, Mohan; Amindala, BhanuPrakash; Ruperao, Pradeep; Katta, Mohan A V S K; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Open source single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery pipelines for next generation sequencing data commonly requires working knowledge of command line interface, massive computational resources and expertise which is a daunting task for biologists. Further, the SNP information generated may not be readily used for downstream processes such as genotyping. Hence, a comprehensive pipeline has been developed by integrating several open source next generation sequencing (NGS) tools along with a graphical user interface called Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) for SNP discovery and their utilization by developing genotyping assays. The pipeline features functionalities such as pre-processing of raw data, integration of open source alignment tools (Bowtie2, BWA, Maq, NovoAlign and SOAP2), SNP prediction (SAMtools/SOAPsnp/CNS2snp and CbCC) methods and interfaces for developing genotyping assays. The pipeline outputs a list of high quality SNPs between all pairwise combinations of genotypes analyzed, in addition to the reference genome/sequence. Visualization tools (Tablet and Flapjack) integrated into the pipeline enable inspection of the alignment and errors, if any. The pipeline also provides a confidence score or polymorphism information content value with flanking sequences for identified SNPs in standard format required for developing marker genotyping (KASP and Golden Gate) assays. The pipeline enables users to process a range of NGS datasets such as whole genome re-sequencing, restriction site associated DNA sequencing and transcriptome sequencing data at a fast speed. The pipeline is very useful for plant genetics and breeding community with no computational expertise in order to discover SNPs and utilize in genomics, genetics and breeding studies. The pipeline has been parallelized to process huge datasets of next generation sequencing. It has been developed in Java language and is available at http://hpc.icrisat.cgiar.org/ISMU as a standalone

  9. Automatic annotation of protein motif function with Gene Ontology terms

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinghua; Zhai, Chengxiang; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Buchanan, Bruce G

    2004-01-01

    Background Conserved protein sequence motifs are short stretches of amino acid sequence patterns that potentially encode the function of proteins. Several sequence pattern searching algorithms and programs exist foridentifying candidate protein motifs at the whole genome level. However, amuch needed and importanttask is to determine the functions of the newly identified protein motifs. The Gene Ontology (GO) project is an endeavor to annotate the function of genes or protein sequences with terms from a dynamic, controlled vocabulary and these annotations serve well as a knowledge base. Results This paperpresents methods to mine the GO knowledge base and use the association between the GO terms assigned to a sequence and the motifs matched by the same sequence as evidence for predicting the functions of novel protein motifs automatically. The task of assigning GO terms to protein motifsis viewed as both a binary classification and information retrieval problem, where PROSITE motifs are used as samples for mode training and functional prediction. The mutual information of a motif and aGO term association isfound to be a very useful feature. We take advantageof the known motifs to train a logistic regression classifier, which allows us to combine mutual information with other frequency-based features and obtain a probability of correctassociation. The trained logistic regression model has intuitively meaningful and logically plausible parameter values, and performs very well empirically according to our evaluation criteria. Conclusions In this research, different methods for automatic annotation of protein motifs have been investigated. Empirical result demonstrated that the methods have a great potential for detecting and augmenting information about thefunctions of newly discovered candidate protein motifs. PMID:15345032

  10. Motif enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-07-01

    The Motif Enrichment Tool (MET) provides an online interface that enables users to find major transcriptional regulators of their gene sets of interest. MET searches the appropriate regulatory region around each gene and identifies which transcription factor DNA-binding specificities (motifs) are statistically overrepresented. Motif enrichment analysis is currently available for many metazoan species including human, mouse, fruit fly, planaria and flowering plants. MET also leverages high-throughput experimental data such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq from ENCODE and ModENCODE to identify the regulatory targets of a transcription factor with greater precision. The results from MET are produced in real time and are linked to a genome browser for easy follow-up analysis. Use of the web tool is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. ADDRESS: http://veda.cs.uiuc.edu/MET/.

  11. Integrated next-generation sequencing analysis of whole exome and 409 cancer-related genes.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yuji; Nagashima, Takeshi; Urakami, Kenichi; Tanabe, Tomoe; Saito, Junko; Naruoka, Akane; Serizawa, Masakuni; Mochizuki, Tohru; Ohshima, Keiichi; Ohnami, Sumiko; Ohnami, Shumpei; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to analyze the genomes of cancer cells has identified numerous genomic alterations, including single-base substitutions, small insertions and deletions, amplification, recombination, and epigenetic modifications. NGS contributes to the clinical management of patients as well as new discoveries that identify the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Moreover, analysis of gene panels targeting actionable mutations enhances efforts to optimize the selection of chemotherapeutic regimens. However, whole genome sequencing takes several days and costs at least $10,000, depending on sequence coverage. Therefore, laboratories with relatively limited resources must employ a more economical approach. For this purpose, we conducted an integrated nucleotide sequence analysis of a panel of 409-cancer related genes (409-CRG) combined with whole exome sequencing (WES). Analysis of the 409-CRG panel detected low-frequency variants with high sensitivity, and WES identified moderate and high frequency somatic variants as well as germline variants.

  12. The limits of de novo DNA motif discovery.

    PubMed

    Simcha, David; Price, Nathan D; Geman, Donald

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular biology is reverse-engineering the cis-regulatory logic that plays a major role in the control of gene expression. This program includes searching through DNA sequences to identify "motifs" that serve as the binding sites for transcription factors or, more generally, are predictive of gene expression across cellular conditions. Several approaches have been proposed for de novo motif discovery-searching sequences without prior knowledge of binding sites or nucleotide patterns. However, unbiased validation is not straightforward. We consider two approaches to unbiased validation of discovered motifs: testing the statistical significance of a motif using a DNA "background" sequence model to represent the null hypothesis and measuring performance in predicting membership in gene clusters. We demonstrate that the background models typically used are "too null," resulting in overly optimistic assessments of significance, and argue that performance in predicting TF binding or expression patterns from DNA motifs should be assessed by held-out data, as in predictive learning. Applying this criterion to common motif discovery methods resulted in universally poor performance, although there is a marked improvement when motifs are statistically significant against real background sequences. Moreover, on synthetic data where "ground truth" is known, discriminative performance of all algorithms is far below the theoretical upper bound, with pronounced "over-fitting" in training. A key conclusion from this work is that the failure of de novo discovery approaches to accurately identify motifs is basically due to statistical intractability resulting from the fixed size of co-regulated gene clusters, and thus such failures do not necessarily provide evidence that unfound motifs are not active biologically. Consequently, the use of prior knowledge to enhance motif discovery is not just advantageous but necessary. An implementation of the LR and ALR

  13. Protein chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli exhibit thioredoxin-like structures despite lack of canonical thioredoxin active site sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Parish, David; Benach, Jordi; Liu, Goahua; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Su, Min; Bansal, Sonal; Prestegard, James H; Hunt, John; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25_SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE_ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE_ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE_ECOLI was previously classified as a [NiFe] hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides.

  14. Protein Chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella Typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli Exhibit Thioredoxin-like Structures Despite Lack of Canonical Thioredoxin Active Site Sequence Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, D.; Benach, J; Liu, G; Singarapu, K; Xiao, R; Acton, T; Hunt, J; Montelione, G; Szyperski, T; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25 SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE ECOLI was previously classified as a (NiFe) hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides.

  15. Sequence analysis of the 47-kilodalton major integral membrane immunogen of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, P L; Chamberlain, N R; Orth, K; Moomaw, C R; Zhang, L Q; Slaughter, C A; Radolf, J D; Sell, S; Norgard, M V

    1989-01-01

    The complete primary amino acid sequence for the 47-kilodalton (kDa) major integral membrane immunogen of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum was obtained by using a combined strategy of DNA sequencing (of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli) and N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the native (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum-derived) antigen. An open reading frame believed to encode the 47-kDa antigen comprised 367 amino acid codons, which gave rise to a calculated molecular weight for the corresponding antigen of 40,701. Of the 367 amino acids, 113 (31%) were sequenced by N-terminal amino acid sequencing of trypsin and hydroxylamine cleavage fragments of the native molecule isolated from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum; amino acid sequence data had a 100% correlation with that of the amino acid sequence predicted from DNA sequencing of the cloned gene in E. coli. Although no consensus sequences for the initiation of transcription or translation were readily identifiable immediately 5' to the putative methionine start codon, a 63-base-pair PstI fragment located 159 nucleotides upstream was required for expression of the 47-kDa antigen in E. coli. The 47-kDa antigen sequence did not reveal a typical leader sequence. The overall G+C content for the DNA corresponding to the structural gene was 53%. Hydrophilicity analysis identified at least one major hydrophilic domain of the protein near the N terminus of the molecule which potentially represents an immunodominant epitope. No repetitive primary sequence epitopes were found. The combined data provide the molecular basis for further structural and functional studies regarding the role of the antigen in the immunopathogenesis of treponemal disease. PMID:2642466

  16. Evidence for integration of retroviral vectors in a novel human repeat sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdi-Haidar, B.; Friedmann, T.

    1994-09-01

    Retroviruses have become attractive vehicles for the introduction of foreign genes into mammalian cells not only for gene therapy but also to serve as anchor points for long-range mapping purposes. The information relating to retroviral integration in mammalian cells is derived mostly from studies of rodent genomes. The absence of information regarding integration sites of murine-based retroviral vectors in human cells has prompted us to investigate the characteristics of integration sites in the human genome. We have constructed a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector that carries the pUC8 origin of replication and the chloramphenicol resistance gene to allow the rescue of the flanking genomic sequences in plasmid form. We have infected human primary fibroblasts and myoblasts with this retroviral vector and isolated independently transduced clones. Genomic DNA was obtained from independent clones and the genomic fragment carrying the provirus-host sequence boundary was isolated after digestion of the genomic DNA, circularization, and transformation by electroporation of E. coli C cells to chloramphenicol resistance. Restriction map and nucleotide sequence analysis of the rescued plasmids showed that a number of the clones shared the same integration site within the human genome. We have used the nucleotide sequence information about the human DNA adjacent to the 3{prime}LTR to design a PCR-based assay diagnostic for this common integration site. Analysis revealed the presence of the same integration site in four out of twelve human primary fibroblast clones infected with this specific retroviral vector, and in one out of twelve human primary myoblast clones infected with a second retroviral vector. Further analysis revealed the common integration site to be a previously unreported primate repeat present in monkey and human genomes and absent from rodent, bovine and avian genomes.

  17. FEATnotator: A tool for integrated annotation of sequence features and variation, facilitating interpretation in genomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Podicheti, Ram; Mockaitis, Keithanne

    2015-06-01

    As approaches are sought for more efficient and democratized uses of non-model and expanded model genomics references, ease of integration of genomic feature datasets is especially desirable in multidisciplinary research communities. Valuable conclusions are often missed or slowed when researchers refer experimental results to a single reference sequence that lacks integrated pan-genomic and multi-experiment data in accessible formats. Association of genomic positional information, such as results from an expansive variety of next-generation sequencing experiments, with annotated reference features such as genes or predicted protein binding sites, provides the context essential for conclusions and ongoing research. When the experimental system includes polymorphic genomic inputs, rapid calculation of gene structural and protein translational effects of sequence variation from the reference can be invaluable. Here we present FEATnotator, a lightweight, fast and easy to use open source software program that integrates and reports overlap and proximity in genomic information from any user-defined datasets including those from next generation sequencing applications. We illustrate use of the tool by summarizing whole genome sequence variation of a widely used natural isolate of Arabidopsis thaliana in the context of gene models of the reference accession. Previous discovery of a protein coding deletion influencing root development is replicated rapidly. Appropriate even in investigations of a single gene or genic regions such as QTL, comprehensive reports provided by FEATnotator better prepare researchers for interpretation of their experimental results. The tool is available for download at http://featnotator.sourceforge.net.

  18. Perception and Quantification, Part One of an Integrated Science Sequence, Student Guide, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Project Committee, OR.

    This student guide contains part one of the first year in the Portland Project, a three-year high school integrated science curriculum sequence. Part one, the first of four parts, involves the student in a series of activities intended to increase his understanding of his perceptual abilities and their limitations. Organization and classification…

  19. Sequenced Integration and the Identification of a Problem-Solving Approach through a Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormas, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Preservice teachers (N = 27) in two sections of a sequenced, methodological and process integrated mathematics/science course solved a levers problem with three similar learning processes and a problem-solving approach, and identified a problem-solving approach through one different learning process. Similar learning processes used included:…

  20. The Practice Integrated Learning Sequence: Linking Education with the Practice of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanzilotti, Salvatore S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Practice Integrated Learning Sequence (PILS) process was used in an educational program on hypertension management involving 1,013 physicians. Data suggest that PILS can help physicians assess practice needs by evaluating practice behaviors. Results indicate the importance of designing programs that facilitate physicians' development of…

  1. The Practice Integrated Learning Sequence: Linking Education with the Practice of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanzilotti, Salvatore S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Practice Integrated Learning Sequence (PILS) process was used in an educational program on hypertension management involving 1,013 physicians. Data suggest that PILS can help physicians assess practice needs by evaluating practice behaviors. Results indicate the importance of designing programs that facilitate physicians' development of…

  2. Sequenced Integration and the Identification of a Problem-Solving Approach through a Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormas, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Preservice teachers (N = 27) in two sections of a sequenced, methodological and process integrated mathematics/science course solved a levers problem with three similar learning processes and a problem-solving approach, and identified a problem-solving approach through one different learning process. Similar learning processes used included:…

  3. [Personal motif in art].

    PubMed

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy.

  4. Integrated and sequence-ordered BAC- and YAC-based physical maps for the rat genome.

    PubMed

    Krzywinski, Martin; Wallis, John; Gösele, Claudia; Bosdet, Ian; Chiu, Readman; Graves, Tina; Hummel, Oliver; Layman, Dan; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Zhu, Baoli; Albracht, Derek; Asano, Jennifer; Barber, Sarah; Brown-John, Mabel; Chan, Susanna; Chand, Steve; Cloutier, Alison; Davito, Jonathon; Fjell, Chris; Gaige, Tony; Ganten, Detlev; Girn, Noreen; Guggenheimer, Kurtis; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kreitler, Thomas; Leach, Stephen; Lee, Darlene; Lehrach, Hans; Mayo, Michael; Mead, Kelly; Olson, Teika; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Shin, Heesun; Tänzer, Simone; Thompson, Jason; Tsai, Miranda; Walker, Jason; Yang, George; Sekhon, Mandeep; Hillier, LaDeana; Zimdahl, Heike; Marziali, Andre; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhao, Shaying; Siddiqui, Asim; de Jong, Pieter J; Warren, Wes; Mardis, Elaine; McPherson, John D; Wilson, Richard; Hübner, Norbert; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline

    2004-04-01

    As part of the effort to sequence the genome of Rattus norvegicus, we constructed a physical map comprised of fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the CHORI-230 BAC library. These BAC clones provide approximately 13-fold redundant coverage of the genome and have been assembled into 376 fingerprint contigs. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) map was also constructed and aligned with the BAC map via fingerprinted BAC and P1 artificial chromosome clones (PACs) sharing interspersed repetitive sequence markers with the YAC-based physical map. We have annotated 95% of the fingerprint map clones in contigs with coordinates on the version 3.1 rat genome sequence assembly, using BAC-end sequences and in silico mapping methods. These coordinates have allowed anchoring 358 of the 376 fingerprint map contigs onto the sequence assembly. Of these, 324 contigs are anchored to rat genome sequences localized to chromosomes, and 34 contigs are anchored to unlocalized portions of the rat sequence assembly. The remaining 18 contigs, containing 54 clones, still require placement. The fingerprint map is a high-resolution integrative data resource that provides genome-ordered associations among BAC, YAC, and PAC clones and the assembled sequence of the rat genome.

  5. Large-scale collection and analysis of full-length cDNAs from Brachypodium distachyon and integration with Pooideae sequence resources.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Keiichi; Uehara-Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Takahashi, Fuminori; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive collection of full-length cDNAs is essential for correct structural gene annotation and functional analyses of genes. We constructed a mixed full-length cDNA library from 21 different tissues of Brachypodium distachyon Bd21, and obtained 78,163 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from both ends of ca. 40,000 clones (including 16,079 contigs). We updated gene structure annotations of Brachypodium genes based on full-length cDNA sequences in comparison with the latest publicly available annotations. About 10,000 non-redundant gene models were supported by full-length cDNAs; ca. 6,000 showed some transcription unit modifications. We also found ca. 580 novel gene models, including 362 newly identified in Bd21. Using the updated transcription start sites, we searched a total of 580 plant cis-motifs in the -3 kb promoter regions and determined a genome-wide Brachypodium promoter architecture. Furthermore, we integrated the Brachypodium full-length cDNAs and updated gene structures with available sequence resources in wheat and barley in a web-accessible database, the RIKEN Brachypodium FL cDNA database. The database represents a "one-stop" information resource for all genomic information in the Pooideae, facilitating functional analysis of genes in this model grass plant and seamless knowledge transfer to the Triticeae crops.

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database: an expanded data model integrating natural language text and sequence analysis programs.

    PubMed

    Kantor, R; Machekano, R; Gonzales, M J; Dupnik, K; Schapiro, J M; Shafer, R W

    2001-01-01

    The HIV Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database is an on-line relational database that catalogs evolutionary and drug-related sequence variation in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease enzymes, the molecular targets of anti-HIV therapy (http://hivdb.stanford.edu). The database contains a compilation of nearly all published HIV RT and protease sequences, including submissions from International Collaboration databases and sequences published in journal articles. Sequences are linked to data about the source of the sequence sample and the antiretroviral drug treatment history of the individual from whom the isolate was obtained. During the past year 3500 sequences have been added and the data model has been expanded to include drug susceptibility data on sequenced isolates. Database content has also been integrated with didactic text and the output of two sequence analysis programs.

  7. The MIGenAS integrated bioinformatics toolkit for web-based sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rampp, Markus; Soddemann, Thomas; Lederer, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    We describe a versatile and extensible integrated bioinformatics toolkit for the analysis of biological sequences over the Internet. The web portal offers convenient interactive access to a growing pool of chainable bioinformatics software tools and databases that are centrally installed and maintained by the RZG. Currently, supported tasks comprise sequence similarity searches in public or user-supplied databases, computation and validation of multiple sequence alignments, phylogenetic analysis and protein–structure prediction. Individual tools can be seamlessly chained into pipelines allowing the user to conveniently process complex workflows without the necessity to take care of any format conversions or tedious parsing of intermediate results. The toolkit is part of the Max-Planck Integrated Gene Analysis System (MIGenAS) of the Max Planck Society available at (click ‘Start Toolkit’). PMID:16844980

  8. T-DNA integration into the Arabidopsis genome depends on sequences of pre-insertion sites

    PubMed Central

    Brunaud, Véronique; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Aubourg, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Chauvin, Stéphanie; Bechtold, Nicole; Cruaud, Corinne; DeRose, Richard; Pelletier, Georges; Lepiniec, Loïc; Caboche, Michel; Lecharny, Alain

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of 9000 flanking sequence tags characterizing transferred DNA (T-DNA) transformants in Arabidopsis sheds new light on T-DNA insertion by illegitimate recombination. T-DNA integration is favoured in plant DNA regions with an A-T-rich content. The formation of a short DNA duplex between the host DNA and the left end of the T-DNA sets the frame for the recombination. The sequence immediately downstream of the plant A-T-rich region is the master element for setting up the DNA duplex, and deletions into the left end of the integrated T-DNA depend on the location of a complementary sequence on the T-DNA. Recombination at the right end of the T-DNA with the host DNA involves another DNA duplex, 2–3 base pairs long, that preferentially includes a G close to the right end of the T-DNA. PMID:12446565

  9. Integration of complete chloroplast genome sequences with small amplicon datasets improves phylogenetic resolution in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna V; Miller, Joseph T; Small, Ian; Nevill, Paul G; Boykin, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Combining whole genome data with previously obtained amplicon sequences has the potential to increase the resolution of phylogenetic analyses, particularly at low taxonomic levels or where recent divergence, rapid speciation or slow genome evolution has resulted in limited sequence variation. However, the integration of these types of data for large scale phylogenetic studies has rarely been investigated. Here we conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the whole chloroplast genome and two nuclear ribosomal loci for 65 Acacia species from across the most recent Acacia phylogeny. We then combine this data with previously generated amplicon sequences (four chloroplast loci and two nuclear ribosomal loci) for 508 Acacia species. We use several phylogenetic methods, including maximum likelihood bootstrapping (with and without constraint) and ExaBayes, in order to determine the success of combining a dataset of 4000bp with one of 189,000bp. The results of our study indicate that the inclusion of whole genome data gave a far better resolved and well supported representation of the phylogenetic relationships within Acacia than using only amplicon sequences, with the greatest support observed when using a whole genome phylogeny as a constraint on the amplicon sequences. Our study therefore provides methods for optimal integration of genomic and amplicon sequences.

  10. Discriminative Motif Finding for Predicting Protein Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-ho; Murphy, Robert F.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2010-01-01

    Many methods have been described to predict the subcellular location of proteins from sequence information. However, most of these methods either rely on global sequence properties or use a set of known protein targeting motifs to predict protein localization. Here we develop and test a novel method that identifies potential targeting motifs using a discriminative approach based on hidden Markov models (discriminative HMMs). These models search for motifs that are present in a compartment but absent in other, nearby, compartments by utilizing an hierarchical structure that mimics the protein sorting mechanism. We show that both discriminative motif finding and the hierarchical structure improves localization prediction on a benchmark dataset of yeast proteins. The motifs identified can be mapped to known targeting motifs and they are more conserved than the average protein sequence. Using our motif-based predictions we can identify potential annotation errors in public databases for the location of some of the proteins. A software implementation and the dataset described in this paper are available from http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/software/2009_TCBB_motif/ PMID:21233524

  11. The telomere repeat motif of basal Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Traut, Walther; Szczepanowski, Monika; Vítková, Magda; Opitz, Christian; Marec, Frantisek; Zrzavý, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In most eukaryotes the telomeres consist of short DNA tandem repeats and associated proteins. Telomeric repeats are added to the chromosome ends by telomerase, a specialized reverse transcriptase. We examined telomerase activity and telomere repeat sequences in representatives of basal metazoan groups. Our results show that the 'vertebrate' telomere motif (TTAGGG)( n ) is present in all basal metazoan groups, i.e. sponges, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Placozoa, and also in the unicellular metazoan sister group, the Choanozoa. Thus it can be considered the ancestral telomere repeat motif of Metazoa. It has been conserved from the metazoan radiation in most animal phylogenetic lineages, and replaced by other motifs-according to our present knowledge-only in two major lineages, Arthropoda and Nematoda.

  12. EXTREME: an online EM algorithm for motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Daniel; Xie, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying regulatory elements is a fundamental problem in the field of gene transcription. Motif discovery—the task of identifying the sequence preference of transcription factor proteins, which bind to these elements—is an important step in this challenge. MEME is a popular motif discovery algorithm. Unfortunately, MEME’s running time scales poorly with the size of the dataset. Experiments such as ChIP-Seq and DNase-Seq are providing a rich amount of information on the binding preference of transcription factors. MEME cannot discover motifs in data from these experiments in a practical amount of time without a compromising strategy such as discarding a majority of the sequences. Results: We present EXTREME, a motif discovery algorithm designed to find DNA-binding motifs in ChIP-Seq and DNase-Seq data. Unlike MEME, which uses the expectation-maximization algorithm for motif discovery, EXTREME uses the online expectation-maximization algorithm to discover motifs. EXTREME can discover motifs in large datasets in a practical amount of time without discarding any sequences. Using EXTREME on ChIP-Seq and DNase-Seq data, we discover many motifs, including some novel and infrequent motifs that can only be discovered by using the entire dataset. Conservation analysis of one of these novel infrequent motifs confirms that it is evolutionarily conserved and possibly functional. Availability and implementation: All source code is available at the Github repository http://github.com/uci-cbcl/EXTREME. Contact: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24532725

  13. Using the Gibbs Motif Sampler for Phylogenetic Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, William; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann; Lawrence, Charles

    2007-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler (Gibbs) (1) is a software package used to predict conserved elements in biopolymer sequences. While the software can be used to locate conserved motifs in protein sequences, its most common use is the prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoters upstream of gene sequences. We will describe approaches that use Gibbs to locate TFBSs in a collection of orthologous nucleotide sequences, i.e. phylogenetic footprinting. To illustrate this technique, we present examples that use Gibbs to detect binding sites for the transcription factor LexA in orthologous sequence data from representative species belonging to two different proteobacterial divisions.

  14. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  15. Co-transcribed 3' host sequences augment expression of integrated hepatitis B virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    von Loringhoven, A F; Koch, S; Hofschneider, P H; Koshy, R

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported the cloning and structural analysis of integrated hepatitis B virus DNA copies from the human hepatoma cell line PLC/PRF/5. Here we show that the cloned DNA fragments of 10.7 kb and 10.5 kb contain intact coding sequences for HBsAg since Ltk- cells transfected with these DNAs secrete considerable amounts of HBsAg. We show for the 10.7-kb fragment that multiple readthrough messages composed of viral as well as cellular sequences are transcribed. These RNAs differ only in their 3' sequences. Furthermore, the 10.7-kb insert leads to a substantial increase in HBsAg produced compared with HBV DNA and with the 10.5-kb insert. We provide evidence that the different 3' sequences on the HBsAg transcripts account for the augmentation of expression. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2990895

  16. A physical map of the papaya genome with integrated genetic map and genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide and has primitive sex chromosomes controlling sex determination in this trioecious species. The papaya genome was recently sequenced because of its agricultural importance, unique biological features, and successful application of transgenic papaya for resistance to papaya ringspot virus. As a part of the genome sequencing project, we constructed a BAC-based physical map using a high information-content fingerprinting approach to assist whole genome shotgun sequence assembly. Results The physical map consists of 963 contigs, representing 9.4× genome equivalents, and was integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence using BAC end sequences and a sequence-tagged high-density genetic map. The estimated genome coverage of the physical map is about 95.8%, while 72.4% of the genome was aligned to the genetic map. A total of 1,181 high quality overgo (overlapping oligonucleotide) probes representing conserved sequences in Arabidopsis and genetically mapped loci in Brassica were anchored on the physical map, which provides a foundation for comparative genomics in the Brassicales. The integrated genetic and physical map aligned with the genome sequence revealed recombination hotspots as well as regions suppressed for recombination across the genome, particularly on the recently evolved sex chromosomes. Suppression of recombination spread to the adjacent region of the male specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY), and recombination rates were recovered gradually and then exceeded the genome average. Recombination hotspots were observed at about 10 Mb away on both sides of the MSY, showing 7-fold increase compared with the genome wide average, demonstrating the dynamics of recombination of the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A BAC-based physical map of papaya was constructed and integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence. The integrated map facilitated the draft genome assembly

  17. DivergentSet, a tool for picking non-redundant sequences from large sequence collections.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Jeremy; Hamady, Micah; Knight, Rob

    2006-08-01

    DivergentSet addresses the important but so far neglected bioinformatics task of choosing a representative set of sequences from a larger collection. We found that using a phylogenetic tree to guide the construction of divergent sets of sequences can be up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than the naive method of using a full distance matrix. By providing a user-friendly interface (available online) that integrates the tasks of finding additional sequences, building and refining the divergent set, producing random divergent sets from the same sequences, and exporting identifiers, this software facilitates a wide range of bioinformatics analyses including finding significant motifs and covariations. As an example application of DivergentSet, we demonstrate that the motifs identified by the motif-finding package MEME (Motif Elicitation by Maximum Entropy) are highly unstable with respect to the specific choice of sequences. This instability suggests that the types of sensitivity analysis enabled by DivergentSet may be widely useful for identifying the motifs of biological significance.

  18. IMSA: integrated metagenomic sequence analysis for identification of exogenous reads in a host genomic background.

    PubMed

    Dimon, Michelle T; Wood, Henry M; Rabbitts, Pamela H; Arron, Sarah T

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics, the study of microbial genomes within diverse environments, is a rapidly developing field. The identification of microbial sequences within a host organism enables the study of human intestinal, respiratory, and skin microbiota, and has allowed the identification of novel viruses in diseases such as Merkel cell carcinoma. There are few publicly available tools for metagenomic high throughput sequence analysis. We present Integrated Metagenomic Sequence Analysis (IMSA), a flexible, fast, and robust computational analysis pipeline that is available for public use. IMSA takes input sequence from high throughput datasets and uses a user-defined host database to filter out host sequence. IMSA then aligns the filtered reads to a user-defined universal database to characterize exogenous reads within the host background. IMSA assigns a score to each node of the taxonomy based on read frequency, and can output this as a taxonomy report suitable for cluster analysis or as a taxonomy map (TaxMap). IMSA also outputs the specific sequence reads assigned to a taxon of interest for downstream analysis. We demonstrate the use of IMSA to detect pathogens and normal flora within sequence data from a primary human cervical cancer carrying HPV16, a primary human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma carrying HPV 16, the CaSki cell line carrying HPV16, and the HeLa cell line carrying HPV18.

  19. The value of prior knowledge in discovering motifs with MEME

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.L.; Elkan, C.

    1995-12-31

    MEME is a tool for discovering motifs in sets of protein or DNA sequences. This paper describes several extensions to MEME which increase its ability to find motifs in a totally unsupervised fashion, but which also allow it to benefit when prior knowledge is available. When no background knowledge is asserted, MEME obtains increased robustness from a method for determining motif widths automatically, and from probabilistic models that allow motifs to be absent in some input sequences. On the other hand, MEME can exploit prior knowledge about a motif being present in all input sequences, about the length of a motif and whether it is a palindrome, and (using Dirichlet mixtures) about expected patterns in individual motif positions. Extensive experiments are reported which support the claim that MEME benefits from, but does not require, background knowledge. The experiments use seven previously studied DNA and protein sequence families and 75 of the protein families documented in the Prosite database of sites and patterns, Release 11.1.

  20. Identifying combinatorial regulation of transcription factors and binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Hata, Naoya; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Futcher, Bruce; Zhang, Michael Q

    2004-01-01

    Background Combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs) is important for gene regulation. Although various genomic datasets are relevant to this issue, each dataset provides relatively weak evidence on its own. Developing methods that can integrate different sequence, expression and localization data have become important. Results Here we use a novel method that integrates chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data with microarray expression data and with combinatorial TF-motif analysis. We systematically identify combinations of transcription factors and of motifs. The various combinations of TFs involved multiple binding mechanisms. We reconstruct a new combinatorial regulatory map of the yeast cell cycle in which cell-cycle regulation can be drawn as a chain of extended TF modules. We find that the pairwise combination of a TF for an early cell-cycle phase and a TF for a later phase is often used to control gene expression at intermediate times. Thus the number of distinct times of gene expression is greater than the number of transcription factors. We also see that some TF modules control branch points (cell-cycle entry and exit), and in the presence of appropriate signals they can allow progress along alternative pathways. Conclusions Combining different data sources can increase statistical power as demonstrated by detecting TF interactions and composite TF-binding motifs. The original picture of a chain of simple cell-cycle regulators can be extended to a chain of composite regulatory modules: different modules may share a common TF component in the same pathway or a TF component cross-talking to other pathways. PMID:15287978

  1. Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence: An Interdisciplinary Introductory Course for Science Majors

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Newton H.; Black, Kersey; Gould, Scot

    2012-01-01

    We report here on our development of an introductory science course sequence that integrates biology, chemistry and physics in order to foster an interdisciplinary perspective in future science majors. Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence (AISS) is a two semester, double credit sequence co-taught by a biologist, a physicist and a chemist to first year undergraduates who plan to major in a natural science field. Topics are organized within a thematic framework. The course sequence also features integration of various pedagogical approaches as students shift from one type of activity to another within the same class session. The presence of AISS in our curriculum over the past five years has been correlated with increased recruitment and graduation of students in science majors and a perception within the department that AISS has helped improve the culture of learning. These benefits outweigh the difficulties of developing such a course and encourage us that interdisciplinary introductory courses can make important contributions to training versatile scientists. PMID:23494601

  2. Integrated tools for biomolecular sequence-based function prediction as exemplified by the ANNOTATOR software environment.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Georg; Wildpaner, Michael; Sirota, Fernanda L; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Given the amount of sequence data available today, in silico function prediction, which often includes detecting distant evolutionary relationships, requires sophisticated bioinformatic workflows. The algorithms behind these workflows exhibit complex data structures; they need the ability to spawn subtasks and tend to demand large amounts of resources. Performing sequence analytic tasks by manually invoking individual function prediction algorithms having to transform between differing input and output formats has become increasingly obsolete. After a period of linking individual predictors using ad hoc scripts, a number of integrated platforms are finally emerging. We present the ANNOTATOR software environment as an advanced example of such a platform.

  3. An integrated computational pipeline and database to support whole-genome sequence annotation

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, CJ; Misra, S; Berman, BP; Carlson, J; Frise, E; Harris, N; Marshall, B; Shu, S; Kaminker, JS; Prochnik, SE; Smith, CD; Smith, E; Tupy, JL; Wiel, C; Rubin, GM; Lewis, SE

    2002-01-01

    We describe here our experience in annotating the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence, in the course of which we developed several new open-source software tools and a database schema to support large-scale genome annotation. We have developed these into an integrated and reusable software system for whole-genome annotation. The key contributions to overall annotation quality are the marshalling of high-quality sequences for alignments and the design of a system with an adaptable and expandable flexible architecture. PMID:12537570

  4. Sequence stratigraphy: An integrated technique for exploration and exploitation, Part 2: Seismic examples

    SciTech Connect

    Burgis, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    Exxon`s concepts of sequence stratigraphy developed from the stratigraphic interpretation of reflection seismic data, a technique referred to as seismic stratigraphy. Differentiation of chronostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy is critical in interpreting sequences on seismic data, as well as in outcrops, logs, and cores. Extensive experience indicates that reflection geometries follow time lines in the rock record and that facies variations are recorded by lateral changes in reflection attributes, such as amplitude and continuity. Integration of all available well, outcrop, and literature data into a seismic interpretation is essential to reducing the risks associated with predictions of play parameters using seismic stratigraphy.

  5. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses. PMID:26166306

  6. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-07-13

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses.

  7. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL,

    2016-07-12

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Kamlesh D; SNL,

    2012-06-01

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. Weak Palindromic Consensus Sequences Are a Common Feature Found at the Integration Target Sites of Many Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolin; Li, Yuan; Crise, Bruce; Burgess, Shawn M.; Munroe, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Integration into the host genome is one of the hallmarks of the retroviral life cycle and is catalyzed by virus-encoded integrases. While integrase has strict sequence requirements for the viral DNA ends, target site sequences have been shown to be very diverse. We carefully examined a large number of integration target site sequences from several retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, simian immunodeficiency virus, murine leukemia virus, and avian sarcoma-leukosis virus, and found that a statistical palindromic consensus, centered on the virus-specific duplicated target site sequence, was a common feature at integration target sites for these retroviruses. PMID:15795304

  10. MADMX: a strategy for maximal dense motif extraction.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Roberto; Pietracaprina, Andrea; Pisanti, Nadia; Pucci, Geppino; Upfal, Eli; Vandin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    We develop, analyze, and experiment with a new tool, called MADMX, which extracts frequent motifs from biological sequences. We introduce the notion of density to single out the "significant" motifs. The density is a simple and flexible measure for bounding the number of don't cares in a motif, defined as the fraction of solid (i.e., different from don't care) characters in the motif. A maximal dense motif has density above a certain threshold, and any further specialization of a don't care symbol in it or any extension of its boundaries decreases its number of occurrences in the input sequence. By extracting only maximal dense motifs, MADMX reduces the output size and improves performance, while enhancing the quality of the discoveries. The efficiency of our approach relies on a newly defined combining operation, dubbed fusion, which allows for the construction of maximal dense motifs in a bottom-up fashion, while avoiding the generation of nonmaximal ones. We provide experimental evidence of the efficiency and the quality of the motifs returned by MADMX.

  11. Promzea: a pipeline for discovery of co-regulatory motifs in maize and other plant species and its application to the anthocyanin and phlobaphene biosynthetic pathways and the Maize Development Atlas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The discovery of genetic networks and cis-acting DNA motifs underlying their regulation is a major objective of transcriptome studies. The recent release of the maize genome (Zea mays L.) has facilitated in silico searches for regulatory motifs. Several algorithms exist to predict cis-acting elements, but none have been adapted for maize. Results A benchmark data set was used to evaluate the accuracy of three motif discovery programs: BioProspector, Weeder and MEME. Analysis showed that each motif discovery tool had limited accuracy and appeared to retrieve a distinct set of motifs. Therefore, using the benchmark, statistical filters were optimized to reduce the false discovery ratio, and then remaining motifs from all programs were combined to improve motif prediction. These principles were integrated into a user-friendly pipeline for motif discovery in maize called Promzea, available at http://www.promzea.org and on the Discovery Environment of the iPlant Collaborative website. Promzea was subsequently expanded to include rice and Arabidopsis. Within Promzea, a user enters cDNA sequences or gene IDs; corresponding upstream sequences are retrieved from the maize genome. Predicted motifs are filtered, combined and ranked. Promzea searches the chosen plant genome for genes containing each candidate motif, providing the user with the gene list and corresponding gene annotations. Promzea was validated in silico using a benchmark data set: the Promzea pipeline showed a 22% increase in nucleotide sensitivity compared to the best standalone program tool, Weeder, with equivalent nucleotide specificity. Promzea was also validated by its ability to retrieve the experimentally defined binding sites of transcription factors that regulate the maize anthocyanin and phlobaphene biosynthetic pathways. Promzea predicted additional promoter motifs, and genome-wide motif searches by Promzea identified 127 non-anthocyanin/phlobaphene genes that each contained all five

  12. A Bioinformatics Approach for Detecting Repetitive Nested Motifs using Pattern Matching

    PubMed Central

    Romero, José R.; Carballido, Jessica A.; Garbus, Ingrid; Echenique, Viviana C.; Ponzoni, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The identification of nested motifs in genomic sequences is a complex computational problem. The detection of these patterns is important to allow the discovery of transposable element (TE) insertions, incomplete reverse transcripts, deletions, and/or mutations. In this study, a de novo strategy for detecting patterns that represent nested motifs was designed based on exhaustive searches for pairs of motifs and combinatorial pattern analysis. These patterns can be grouped into three categories, motifs within other motifs, motifs flanked by other motifs, and motifs of large size. The methodology used in this study, applied to genomic sequences from the plant species Aegilops tauschii and Oryza sativa, revealed that it is possible to identify putative nested TEs by detecting these three types of patterns. The results were validated through BLAST alignments, which revealed the efficacy and usefulness of the new method, which is called Mamushka. PMID:27812277

  13. Convergent evolution and mimicry of protein linear motifs in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Chemes, Lucía Beatriz; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Ignacio Enrique

    2015-06-01

    Pathogen linear motif mimics are highly evolvable elements that facilitate rewiring of host protein interaction networks. Host linear motifs and pathogen mimics differ in sequence, leading to thermodynamic and structural differences in the resulting protein-protein interactions. Moreover, the functional output of a mimic depends on the motif and domain repertoire of the pathogen protein. Regulatory evolution mediated by linear motifs can be understood by measuring evolutionary rates, quantifying positive and negative selection and performing phylogenetic reconstructions of linear motif natural history. Convergent evolution of linear motif mimics is widespread among unrelated proteins from viral, prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens and can also take place within individual protein phylogenies. Statistics, biochemistry and laboratory models of infection link pathogen linear motifs to phenotypic traits such as tropism, virulence and oncogenicity. In vitro evolution experiments and analysis of natural sequences suggest that changes in linear motif composition underlie pathogen adaptation to a changing environment.

  14. A Bioinformatics Approach for Detecting Repetitive Nested Motifs using Pattern Matching.

    PubMed

    Romero, José R; Carballido, Jessica A; Garbus, Ingrid; Echenique, Viviana C; Ponzoni, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The identification of nested motifs in genomic sequences is a complex computational problem. The detection of these patterns is important to allow the discovery of transposable element (TE) insertions, incomplete reverse transcripts, deletions, and/or mutations. In this study, a de novo strategy for detecting patterns that represent nested motifs was designed based on exhaustive searches for pairs of motifs and combinatorial pattern analysis. These patterns can be grouped into three categories, motifs within other motifs, motifs flanked by other motifs, and motifs of large size. The methodology used in this study, applied to genomic sequences from the plant species Aegilops tauschii and Oryza sativa, revealed that it is possible to identify putative nested TEs by detecting these three types of patterns. The results were validated through BLAST alignments, which revealed the efficacy and usefulness of the new method, which is called Mamushka.

  15. Discriminative motif analysis of high-throughput dataset

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zizhen; MacQuarrie, Kyle L.; Fong, Abraham P.; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Gentleman, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput ChIP-seq studies typically identify thousands of peaks for a single transcription factor (TF). It is common for traditional motif discovery tools to predict motifs that are statistically significant against a naïve background distribution but are of questionable biological relevance. Results: We describe a simple yet effective algorithm for discovering differential motifs between two sequence datasets that is effective in eliminating systematic biases and scalable to large datasets. Tested on 207 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets, our method identifies correct motifs in 78% of the datasets with known motifs, demonstrating improvement in both accuracy and efficiency compared with DREME, another state-of-art discriminative motif discovery tool. More interestingly, on the remaining more challenging datasets, we identify common technical or biological factors that compromise the motif search results and use advanced features of our tool to control for these factors. We also present case studies demonstrating the ability of our method to detect single base pair differences in DNA specificity of two similar TFs. Lastly, we demonstrate discovery of key TF motifs involved in tissue specification by examination of high-throughput DNase accessibility data. Availability: The motifRG package is publically available via the bioconductor repository. Contact: yzizhen@fhcrc.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24162561

  16. Ballast: A Ball-based Algorithm for Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu; Vandin, Fabio; Pandurangan, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Structural motifs encapsulate local sequence-structure-function relationships characteristic of related proteins, enabling the prediction of functional characteristics of new proteins, providing molecular-level insights into how those functions are performed, and supporting the development of variants specifically maintaining or perturbing function in concert with other properties. Numerous computational methods have been developed to search through databases of structures for instances of specified motifs. However, it remains an open problem how best to leverage the local geometric and chemical constraints underlying structural motifs in order to develop motif-finding algorithms that are both theoretically and practically efficient. We present a simple, general, efficient approach, called Ballast (ball-based algorithm for structural motifs), to match given structural motifs to given structures. Ballast combines the best properties of previously developed methods, exploiting the composition and local geometry of a structural motif and its possible instances in order to effectively filter candidate matches. We show that on a wide range of motif-matching problems, Ballast efficiently and effectively finds good matches, and we provide theoretical insights into why it works well. By supporting generic measures of compositional and geometric similarity, Ballast provides a powerful substrate for the development of motif-matching algorithms. PMID:23383999

  17. Using random forest algorithm to predict β-hairpin motifs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shao-Chun; Hu, Xiu-Zhen

    2011-06-01

    A novel method is presented for predicting β-hairpin motifs in protein sequences. That is Random Forest algorithm on the basis of the multi-characteristic parameters, which include amino acids component of position, hydropathy component of position, predicted secondary structure information and value of auto-correlation function. Firstly, the method is trained and tested on a set of 8,291 β-hairpin motifs and 6,865 non-β-hairpin motifs. The overall accuracy and Matthew's correlation coefficient achieve 82.2% and 0.64 using 5-fold cross-validation, while they achieve 81.7% and 0.63 using the independent test. Secondly, the method is also tested on a set of 4,884 β-hairpin motifs and 4,310 non-β-hairpin motifs which is used in previous studies. The overall accuracy and Matthew's correlation coefficient achieve 80.9% and 0.61 for 5-fold cross-validation, while they achieve 80.6% and 0.60 for the independent test. Compared with the previous, the present result is better. Thirdly, 4,884 β-hairpin motifs and 4,310 non-β-hairpin motifs selected as the training set, and 8,291 β-hairpin motifs and 6,865 non-β-hairpin motifs selected as the independent testing set, the overall accuracy and Matthew's correlation coefficient achieve 81.5% and 0.63 with the independent test.

  18. Repetitive genomic sequences as a substrate for homologous integration in the Rhizopus oryzae genome.

    PubMed

    Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Larina, Anna S; Vybornaya, Tatiana V; Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Y; Gvilava, Ilia T; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2015-06-01

    The vast number of repetitive genomic elements was identified in the genome of Rhizopus oryzae. Such genomic repeats can be used as homologous regions for integration of plasmids. Here, we evaluated the use of two different repeats: the short (575 bp) rptZ, widely distributed (about 34 copies per genome) and the long (2053 bp) rptH, less prevalent (about 15 copies). The plasmid carrying rptZ integrated, but did so through a 2256-bp region of homology to the pyrG locus, a unique genomic sequence. Thus, the length of rptZ was below the minimal requirements for homologous strand exchange in this fungus. In contrast, rptH was used efficiently for homologous integration. The plasmid bearing this repeat integrated in multicopy fashion, with up to 25 copies arranged in tandem. The latter vector, pPyrG-H, could be a valuable tool for integration at homologous sequences, for such purposes as high-level expression of proteins. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An IcmF family protein, ImpLM, is an integral inner membrane protein interacting with ImpKL, and its walker a motif is required for type VI secretion system-mediated Hcp secretion in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lay-Sun; Lin, Jer-Sheng; Lai, Erh-Min

    2009-07-01

    An intracellular multiplication F (IcmF) family protein is a conserved component of a newly identified type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in many animal and plant-associated Proteobacteria. We have previously identified ImpL(M), an IcmF family protein that is required for the secretion of the T6SS substrate hemolysin-coregulated protein (Hcp) from the plant-pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In this study, we characterized the topology of ImpL(M) and the importance of its nucleotide-binding Walker A motif involved in Hcp secretion from A. tumefaciens. A combination of beta-lactamase-green fluorescent protein fusion and biochemical fractionation analyses revealed that ImpL(M) is an integral polytopic inner membrane protein comprising three transmembrane domains bordered by an N-terminal domain facing the cytoplasm and a C-terminal domain exposed to the periplasm. impL(M) mutants with substitutions or deletions in the Walker A motif failed to complement the impL(M) deletion mutant for Hcp secretion, which provided evidence that ImpL(M) may bind and/or hydrolyze nucleoside triphosphates to mediate T6SS machine assembly and/or substrate secretion. Protein-protein interaction and protein stability analyses indicated that there is a physical interaction between ImpL(M) and another essential T6SS component, ImpK(L). Topology and biochemical fractionation analyses suggested that ImpK(L) is an integral bitopic inner membrane protein with an N-terminal domain facing the cytoplasm and a C-terminal OmpA-like domain exposed to the periplasm. Further comprehensive yeast two-hybrid assays dissecting ImpL(M)-ImpK(L) interaction domains suggested that ImpL(M) interacts with ImpK(L) via the N-terminal cytoplasmic domains of the proteins. In conclusion, ImpL(M) interacts with ImpK(L), and its Walker A motif is required for its function in mediation of Hcp secretion from A. tumefaciens.

  20. High-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons for barcoding and integrative taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Rodriguez, Lillian Jennifer; Cruaud, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Until now, the potential of NGS for the construction of barcode libraries or integrative taxonomy has been seldom realised. Here, we amplified (two-step PCR) and simultaneously sequenced (MiSeq) multiple markers from hundreds of fig wasp specimens. We also developed a workflow for quality control of the data. Illumina and Sanger sequences accumulated in the past years were compared. Interestingly, primers and PCR conditions used for the Sanger approach did not require optimisation to construct the MiSeq library. After quality controls, 87% of the species (76% of the specimens) had a valid MiSeq sequence for each marker. Importantly, major clusters did not always correspond to the targeted loci. Nine specimens exhibited two divergent sequences (up to 10%). In 95% of the species, MiSeq and Sanger sequences obtained from the same sampling were similar. For the remaining 5%, species were paraphyletic or the sequences clustered into divergent groups on the Sanger + MiSeq trees (>7%). These problematic cases may represent coding NUMTS or heteroplasms. Our results illustrate that Illumina approaches are not artefact-free and confirm that Sanger databases can contain non-target genes. This highlights the importance of quality controls, working with taxonomists and using multiple markers for DNA-taxonomy or species diversity assessment. PMID:28165046

  1. High-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons for barcoding and integrative taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Cruaud, Perrine; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Rodriguez, Lillian Jennifer; Cruaud, Astrid

    2017-02-06

    Until now, the potential of NGS for the construction of barcode libraries or integrative taxonomy has been seldom realised. Here, we amplified (two-step PCR) and simultaneously sequenced (MiSeq) multiple markers from hundreds of fig wasp specimens. We also developed a workflow for quality control of the data. Illumina and Sanger sequences accumulated in the past years were compared. Interestingly, primers and PCR conditions used for the Sanger approach did not require optimisation to construct the MiSeq library. After quality controls, 87% of the species (76% of the specimens) had a valid MiSeq sequence for each marker. Importantly, major clusters did not always correspond to the targeted loci. Nine specimens exhibited two divergent sequences (up to 10%). In 95% of the species, MiSeq and Sanger sequences obtained from the same sampling were similar. For the remaining 5%, species were paraphyletic or the sequences clustered into divergent groups on the Sanger + MiSeq trees (>7%). These problematic cases may represent coding NUMTS or heteroplasms. Our results illustrate that Illumina approaches are not artefact-free and confirm that Sanger databases can contain non-target genes. This highlights the importance of quality controls, working with taxonomists and using multiple markers for DNA-taxonomy or species diversity assessment.

  2. Classification and assessment tools for structural motif discovery algorithms.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ghada; Al-Turaiki, Isra; Mathkour, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Motif discovery is the problem of finding recurring patterns in biological data. Patterns can be sequential, mainly when discovered in DNA sequences. They can also be structural (e.g. when discovering RNA motifs). Finding common structural patterns helps to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of action (e.g. post-transcriptional regulation). Unlike DNA motifs, which are sequentially conserved, RNA motifs exhibit conservation in structure, which may be common even if the sequences are different. Over the past few years, hundreds of algorithms have been developed to solve the sequential motif discovery problem, while less work has been done for the structural case. In this paper, we survey, classify, and compare different algorithms that solve the structural motif discovery problem, where the underlying sequences may be different. We highlight their strengths and weaknesses. We start by proposing a benchmark dataset and a measurement tool that can be used to evaluate different motif discovery approaches. Then, we proceed by proposing our experimental setup. Finally, results are obtained using the proposed benchmark to compare available tools. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to compare tools solely designed for structural motif discovery. Results show that the accuracy of discovered motifs is relatively low. The results also suggest a complementary behavior among tools where some tools perform well on simple structures, while other tools are better for complex structures. We have classified and evaluated the performance of available structural motif discovery tools. In addition, we have proposed a benchmark dataset with tools that can be used to evaluate newly developed tools.

  3. cWINNOWER Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy DNA Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if multiple mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) are present in the DNA sequence in sufficient abundance. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum number of detectable motifs qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc, by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12000 for (l,d) = (15,4).

  4. An efficient algorithm for integrated task sequencing and path planning for robotic remote laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Anna; Popov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    Different planning problems for robotic remote laser welding are of considerable interest. In this paper, we consider the problem of integrated task sequencing and path planning for robotic remote laser welding. We propose an efficient approach to solve the problem. In particular, we consider an explicit reduction from the decision version of the problem to the satisfiability problem. We present the results of computational experiments for different satisfiability algorithms.

  5. Personalized Oncology Through Integrative High-Throughput Sequencing: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury, Sameek; Iyer, Matthew K.; Robinson, Dan R.; Lonigro, Robert J.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Sam, Lee; Balbin, O. Alejandro; Quist, Michael J.; Barrette, Terrence; Everett, Jessica; Siddiqui, Javed; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Navone, Nora; Araujo, John C.; Troncoso, Patricia; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Smith, David C.; Lao, Christopher D.; Kim, Scott Y.; Roberts, J. Scott; Gruber, Stephen B.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Talpaz, Moshe; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2012-01-01

    Individual cancers harbor a set of genetic aberrations that can be informative for identifying rational therapies currently available or in clinical trials. We implemented a pilot study to explore the practical challenges of applying high-throughput sequencing in clinical oncology. We enrolled patients with advanced or refractory cancer who were eligible for clinical trials. For each patient, we performed whole-genome sequencing of the tumor, targeted whole-exome sequencing of tumor and normal DNA, and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) of the tumor to identify potentially informative mutations in a clinically relevant time frame of 3 to 4 weeks. With this approach, we detected several classes of cancer mutations including structural rearrangements, copy number alterations, point mutations, and gene expression alterations. A multidisciplinary Sequencing Tumor Board (STB) deliberated on the clinical interpretation of the sequencing results obtained. We tested our sequencing strategy on human prostate cancer xenografts. Next, we enrolled two patients into the clinical protocol and were able to review the results at our STB within 24 days of biopsy. The first patient had metastatic colorectal cancer in which we identified somatic point mutations in NRAS, TP53, AURKA, FAS, and MYH11, plus amplification and overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). The second patient had malignant melanoma, in which we identified a somatic point mutation in HRAS and a structural rearrangement affecting CDKN2C. The STB identified the CDK8 amplification and Ras mutation as providing a rationale for clinical trials with CDK inhibitors or MEK (mitogenactivated or extracellular signal–regulated protein kinase kinase) and PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase) inhibitors, respectively. Integrative high-throughput sequencing of patients with advanced cancer generates a comprehensive, individual mutational landscape to facilitate biomarker-driven clinical trials in oncology. PMID

  6. RNA motif search with data-driven element ordering.

    PubMed

    Rampášek, Ladislav; Jimenez, Randi M; Lupták, Andrej; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    2016-05-18

    In this paper, we study the problem of RNA motif search in long genomic sequences. This approach uses a combination of sequence and structure constraints to uncover new distant homologs of known functional RNAs. The problem is NP-hard and is traditionally solved by backtracking algorithms. We have designed a new algorithm for RNA motif search and implemented a new motif search tool RNArobo. The tool enhances the RNAbob descriptor language, allowing insertions in helices, which enables better characterization of ribozymes and aptamers. A typical RNA motif consists of multiple elements and the running time of the algorithm is highly dependent on their ordering. By approaching the element ordering problem in a principled way, we demonstrate more than 100-fold speedup of the search for complex motifs compared to previously published tools. We have developed a new method for RNA motif search that allows for a significant speedup of the search of complex motifs that include pseudoknots. Such speed improvements are crucial at a time when the rate of DNA sequencing outpaces growth in computing. RNArobo is available at http://compbio.fmph.uniba.sk/rnarobo .

  7. Integrating ChIP-sequencing and digital gene expression profiling to identify BRD7 downstream genes and construct their regulating network.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Heran; Yang, Jing; Li, Xiayu; Chen, Pan; Liao, Qianjin; Deng, Hao; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-01

    BRD7 is a single bromodomain-containing protein that functions as a subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex to regulate transcription. It also interacts with the well-known tumor suppressor protein p53 to trans-activate genes involved in cell cycle arrest. In this paper, we report an integrative analysis of genome-wide chromatin occupancy of BRD7 by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling by RNA-sequencing upon the overexpression of BRD7 in human cells. We localized 156 BRD7-binding peaks representing 184 genes by ChIP-sequencing, and most of these peaks were co-localized with histone modification sites. Four novel motifs were significantly represented in these BRD7-enriched regions. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that 22 of these BRD7 target genes were involved in a network regulating cell death and survival. DGE profiling identified 560 up-regulated genes and 1088 down-regulated genes regulated by BRD7. Using Gene Ontology and pathway analysis, we found significant enrichment of the cell cycle and apoptosis pathway genes. For the integrative analysis of the ChIP-seq and DEG data, we constructed a regulating network of BRD7 downstream genes, and this network suggests multiple feedback regulations of the pathways. Furthermore, we validated BIRC2, BIRC3, TXN2, and NOTCH1 genes as direct, functional BRD7 targets, which were involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. These results provide a genome-wide view of chromatin occupancy and the gene regulation network of the BRD7 signaling pathway.

  8. Genome puzzle master (GPM): an integrated pipeline for building and editing pseudomolecules from fragmented sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; Kudrna, Dave; Mu, Ting; Li, Weiming; Copetti, Dario; Yu, Yeisoo; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Lei, Yang; Wing, Rod A.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Next generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to rapidly and affordably generate vast quantities of sequence data. Once generated, raw sequences are assembled into contigs or scaffolds. However, these assemblies are mostly fragmented and inaccurate at the whole genome scale, largely due to the inability to integrate additional informative datasets (e.g. physical, optical and genetic maps). To address this problem, we developed a semi-automated software tool—Genome Puzzle Master (GPM)—that enables the integration of additional genomic signposts to edit and build ‘new-gen-assemblies’ that result in high-quality ‘annotation-ready’ pseudomolecules. Results: With GPM, loaded datasets can be connected to each other via their logical relationships which accomplishes tasks to ‘group,’ ‘merge,’ ‘order and orient’ sequences in a draft assembly. Manual editing can also be performed with a user-friendly graphical interface. Final pseudomolecules reflect a user’s total data package and are available for long-term project management. GPM is a web-based pipeline and an important part of a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) which can be easily deployed on local servers for any genome research laboratory. Availability and Implementation: The GPM (with LIMS) package is available at https://github.com/Jianwei-Zhang/LIMS Contacts: jzhang@mail.hzau.edu.cn or rwing@mail.arizona.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27318200

  9. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic v