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Sample records for integrated sequential injection

  1. Determination of Pb(II) by sequential injection/stripping analysis at all-plastic electrochemical fluidic cells with integrated composite electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios; Goddard, Nicholas G; Fielden, Peter R; Baldock, Sara J

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the development of a sequential injection/stripping analysis method for the determination of trace Pb(II) at injection-moulded electrochemical fluidic cells. Conducting carbon fibre-loaded polystyrene electrodes were integrated within the plastic cells. The flow-through cells were incorporated into a home-made sequential injection analysis (SIA) manifold. Different experimental parameters for the detection of Pb(II) were investigated including the type and concentration of the supporting electrolyte, the conditions of the stripping step, the volume of the sample, the flow rate and the accumulation potential. The LOD for Pb(II) was 0.5μgL(-1), the within-cell % relative standard deviation (n=8) was 3.1% and the between-cell % relative standard deviation (n=5) was 8.9% for 25μgL(-1) Pb(II). The cells were applied to the determination of Pb(II) in tapwater and a phosphate fertilizer sample. PMID:27130105

  2. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Chu, Henry S.; Novascone, Stephen R.

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  3. Application of sequential injection analysis to pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, A M; Montenegro, M C B S M; Araújo, A N; Calatayud, J Martínez

    2006-01-23

    Sequential injection analysis is a well established tool for automation of pharmaceutical analysis. A short historical background of this technique is given as well as a brief discussion on the basic principles and potentials. The current applications of SIA in the pharmaceutical analysis are also described and discussed. The manifolds developed offer good analytical characteristics and are suitable for analysis of drug formulations, process analysis, drug-dissolution, drug-release testing and functional assays for screening potential drugs. The results obtained are in good agreement with those furnished by the application of the reference methods presented in the pharmacopoeias.

  4. Sequential injection spectrophotometric determination of oxybenzone in lipsticks.

    PubMed

    Salvador, A; Chisvert, A; Camarasa, A; Pascual-Martí, M C; March, J G

    2001-08-01

    A sequential injection (SI) procedure for the spectrophotometric determination of oxybenzone in lipsticks is reported. The colorimetric reaction between nickel and oxybenzone was used. SI parameters such as sample solution volume, reagent solution volume, propulsion flow rate and reaction coil length were studied. The limit of detection was 3 microg ml(-1). The sensitivity was 0.0108+/-0.0002 ml microg(-1). The relative standard deviations of the results were between 6 and 12%. The real concentrations of samples and the values obtained by HPLC were comparable. Microwave sample pre-treatment allowed the extraction of oxybenzone with ethanol, thus avoiding the use of toxic organic solvents. Ethanol was also used as carrier in the SI system. Seventy-two injections per hour can be performed, which means a sample frequency of 24 h(-1) if three replicates are measured for each sample.

  5. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes. PMID:21641455

  6. Screening of conditions controlling spectrophotometric sequential injection analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its potential benefits over univariate, chemometrics is rarely utilized for optimizing sequential injection analysis (SIA) methods. Specifically, in previous vis-spectrophotometric SIA methods, chemometrically optimized conditions were confined within flow rate and reagent concentrations while other conditions were ignored. Results The current manuscript reports, for the first time, a comprehensive screening of conditions controlling vis-spectrophotometric SIA. A new diclofenac assay method was adopted. The method was based on oxidizing diclofenac by permanganate (a major reagent) with sulfuric acid (a minor reagent). The reaction produced a spectrophotometrically detectable diclofenac form. The 26 full-factorial design was utilized to study the effect of volumes of reagents and sample, in addition to flow rate and concentrations of reagents. The main effects and all interaction order effects on method performance, i.e. namely sensitivity, rapidity and reagent consumption, were determined. The method was validated and applied to pharmaceutical formulations (tablets, injection and gel). Conclusions Despite 64 experiments those conducted in the current study were cumbersome, the results obtained would reduce effort and time when developing similar SIA methods in the future. It is recommended to critically optimize effective and interacting conditions using other such optimization tools as fractional-factorial design, response surface and simplex, rather than full-factorial design that used at an initial optimization stage. In vis-spectrophotometric SIA methods those involve developing reactions with two reagents (major and minor), conditions affecting method performance are in the following order: sample volume > flow rate ≈ major reagent concentration >> major reagent volume ≈ minor reagent concentration >> minor reagent volume. PMID:21333024

  7. Multiplex microfluidic system integrating sequential operations of microalgal lipid production.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ho Seok; Kim, Jaoon Young Hwan; Na, Sang Cheol; Jeon, Noo Li; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-21

    The unit cost for the production of algal biofuel needs to be reduced in order to be a substitute for fossil fuel. To achieve this goal, the development of a novel system is needed for a rapid screening of numerous microalgal species to isolate superior strains with the highest lipid productivity. Here, we developed a PDMS-based multiplex microfluidic system with eight chambers and micropillar arrays to expedite multiple steps for lipid sample preparation from different microalgal strains. We could rapidly and efficiently perform sequential operations from cell culture to lipid extraction of eight different microalgal strains simultaneously on a single device without harvesting and purification steps, which are labor- and energy-intensive, by the simple injection of medium and solvent into the central inlet due to the integrated micropillar arrays connecting the chambers and central inlet. The lipid extraction efficiency using this system was comparable (94.5-102.6%) to the conventional Bligh-Dyer method. We investigated the cell growth and lipid productivity of different strains using the microfluidic device. We observed that each strain has a different lipid accumulation pattern according to stress conditions. These results demonstrate that our multiplex microfluidic approach can provide an efficient analytical tool for the rapid analysis of strain performances (e.g. cell growth and lipid productivities) and the determination of the optimal lipid induction condition for each strain. PMID:26783562

  8. Development of decision making: sequential versus integrative rules.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Brenda R J; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Huizenga, Hilde M

    2012-01-01

    Decisions can be made by applying a variety of decision-making rules-sequential rules in which decisions are based on a sequential evaluation of choice dimensions and the integrative normative rule in which decisions are based on an integration of choice dimensions. In this study, we investigated the developmental trajectory of such decision-making rules. In the Gambling Machine Task, participants choose between options that differ in three dimensions: frequency of loss, amount of loss, and certain gain. The task was administered to 231 children and adolescents (age range=8-17 years). Latent group analysis of their performance allowed precise classification of the underlying decision rules. The majority of participants used sequential decision rules, and the number of evaluated dimensions in these rules increased with age. Integrative rule use decreased with age. We discuss these results in light of traditional developmental theories and fuzzy trace theory.

  9. Sequential-Injection Analysis: Principles, Instrument Construction, and Demonstration by a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economou, A.; Tzanavaras, P. D.; Themelis, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The sequential-injection analysis (SIA) is an approach to sample handling that enables the automation of manual wet-chemistry procedures in a rapid, precise and efficient manner. The experiments using SIA fits well in the course of Instrumental Chemical Analysis and especially in the section of Automatic Methods of analysis provided by chemistry…

  10. Enzymatic Microreactors for the Determination of Ethanol by an Automatic Sequential Injection Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhadeff, Eliana M.; Salgado, Andrea M.; Cos, Oriol; Pereira, Nei; Valdman, Belkis; Valero, Francisco

    A sequential injection analysis system with two enzymatic microreactors for the determination of ethanol has been designed. Alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase were separately immobilized on glass aminopropyl beads, and packed in 0.91-mL volume microreactors, working in line with the sequential injection analysis system. A stop flow of 120 s was selected for a linear ethanol range of 0.005-0.04 g/L±0.6% relative standard deviation with a throughput of seven analyses per hour. The system was applied to measure ethanol concentrations in samples of distilled and nondistilled alcoholic beverages, and of alcoholic fermentation with good performance and no significant difference compared with other analytical procedures (gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography).

  11. An on-line potentiometric sequential injection titration process analyser for the determination of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    van Staden, J F; Mashamba, Mulalo G; Stefan, Raluca I

    2002-09-01

    An on-line potentiometric sequential injection titration process analyser for the determination of acetic acid is proposed. A solution of 0.1 mol L(-1) sodium chloride is used as carrier. Titration is achieved by aspirating acetic acid samples between two strong base-zone volumes into a holding coil and by channelling the stack of well-defined zones with flow reversal through a reaction coil to a potentiometric sensor where the peak widths were measured. A linear relationship between peak width and logarithm of the acid concentration was obtained in the range 1-9 g/100 mL. Vinegar samples were analysed without any sample pre-treatment. The method has a relative standard deviation of 0.4% with a sample frequency of 28 samples per hour. The results revealed good agreement between the proposed sequential injection and an automated batch titration method.

  12. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  13. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  14. Flow Injection/Sequential Injection Analysis Systems: Potential Use as Tools for Rapid Liver Diseases Biomarker Study

    PubMed Central

    Kradtap Hartwell, Supaporn

    2012-01-01

    Flow injection/sequential injection analysis (FIA/SIA) systems are suitable for carrying out automatic wet chemical/biochemical reactions with reduced volume and time consumption. Various parts of the system such as pump, valve, and reactor may be built or adapted from available materials. Therefore the systems can be at lower cost as compared to other instrumentation-based analysis systems. Their applications for determination of biomarkers for liver diseases have been demonstrated in various formats of operation but only a few and limited types of biomarkers have been used as model analytes. This paper summarizes these applications for different types of reactions as a guide for using flow-based systems in more biomarker and/or multibiomarker studies. PMID:22518319

  15. Sequential injection system for on-line analysis of total nitrogen with UV-mineralization.

    PubMed

    Oms, M T; Cerdà, A; Cerdà, V

    2003-02-01

    An automatic method for the determination of total nitrogen in wastewater by sequential injection analysis and mineralization with UV radiation has been developed. The method is based on the mineralization of the samples with sodium persulphate in basic medium under UV radiation. Small volumes of sample and reagents are firstly aspirated into a single channel and then propelled by flow reversal to the UV reactor and then to the detector. The organic and inorganic nitrogen compounds are oxidized to nitrate that is then measured at 226 nm. The sequential injection procedure has been optimized and the factors affecting the efficiency of the oxidation have been studied with a number of test substances with different chemical structures and properties. Solutions in the concentration range 1-56 gl(-1) of nitrogen can be analyzed with the described procedure. The sample rate is of 30-40 samples h(-1). The LOD is 0.6 mgl(-1) N and the reproducibility is 1.8% (28 mgl(-1) N). Organic carbon in the form of glucose was added to a number of test solutions to study the potential interference of organic matter. The method was compared with the Kjeldahl digestion method by analyzing 15 wastewater samples with both methods. The nitrate and nitrite content of the non-oxidized samples were subtracted from the corresponding nitrogen content determined after photo-oxidation and the value compared with the Kjeldahl nitrogen content.

  16. Titration of strong and weak acids by sequential injection analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Maskula, S; Nyman, J; Ivaska, A

    2000-05-31

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) titration method has been developed for acid-base titrations. Strong and weak acids in different concentration ranges have been titrated with a strong base. The method is based on sequential aspiration of an acidic sample zone and only one zone of the base into a carrier stream of distilled water. On their way to the detector, the sample and the reagent zones are partially mixed due to the dispersion and thereby the base is partially neutralised by the acid. The base zone contains the indicator. An LED-spectrophotometer is used as detector. It senses the colour of the unneutralised base and the signal is recorded as a typical SIA peak. The peak area of the unreacted base was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the acid concentration. Calibration curves with good linearity were obtained for a strong acid in the concentration ranges of 10(-4)-10(-2) and 0.1-3 M. Automatic sample dilution was implemented when sulphuric acid at concentration of 6-13 M was titrated. For a weak acid, i.e. acetic acid, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 3x10(-4)-8x10(-2) M. By changing the volumes of the injected sample and the reagent, different acids as well as different concentration ranges of the acids can be titrated without any other adjustments in the SIA manifold or the titration protocol. PMID:18967966

  17. Titration of strong and weak acids by sequential injection analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Maskula, S; Nyman, J; Ivaska, A

    2000-05-31

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) titration method has been developed for acid-base titrations. Strong and weak acids in different concentration ranges have been titrated with a strong base. The method is based on sequential aspiration of an acidic sample zone and only one zone of the base into a carrier stream of distilled water. On their way to the detector, the sample and the reagent zones are partially mixed due to the dispersion and thereby the base is partially neutralised by the acid. The base zone contains the indicator. An LED-spectrophotometer is used as detector. It senses the colour of the unneutralised base and the signal is recorded as a typical SIA peak. The peak area of the unreacted base was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the acid concentration. Calibration curves with good linearity were obtained for a strong acid in the concentration ranges of 10(-4)-10(-2) and 0.1-3 M. Automatic sample dilution was implemented when sulphuric acid at concentration of 6-13 M was titrated. For a weak acid, i.e. acetic acid, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 3x10(-4)-8x10(-2) M. By changing the volumes of the injected sample and the reagent, different acids as well as different concentration ranges of the acids can be titrated without any other adjustments in the SIA manifold or the titration protocol.

  18. Sequential Injection/Electrochemical Immunoassay for Quantifying the Pesticide Metabolite 3, 5, 6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Riechers, Shawn L.; Timchalk, Chuck; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-12-04

    An automated and sensitive sequential injection electrochemical immunoassay was developed to monitor a potential insecticide biomarker, 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol. The current method involved a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system equipped with a thin-layer electrochemical flow cell and permanent magnet, which was used to fix 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) antibody coated magnetic beads (TCP-Ab-MBs) in the reaction zone. After competitive immunoreactions among TCP-Ab-MBs, TCP analyte, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled TCP, a 3, 3?, 5, 5?-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride and hydrogen peroxide (TMB-H2O2) substrate solution was injected to produce an electroactive enzymatic product. The activity of HRP tracers was monitored by a square wave voltammetric scanning electroactive enzymatic product in the thin-layer flow cell. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate and the enzymatic product were investigated under batch conditions, and the parameters of the immunoassay were optimized in the SIA system. Under the optimal conditions, the system was used to measure as low as 6 ng L-1 (ppt) TCP, which is around 50-fold lower than the value indicated by the manufacturer of the TCP RaPID Assay? kit (0.25 ug/L, colorimetric detection). The performance of the developed immunoassay system was successfully evaluated on tap water and river water samples spiked with TCP. This technique could be readily used for detecting other environmental contaminants by developing specific antibodies against contaminants and is expected to open new opportunities for environmental and biological monitoring.

  19. A sequential injection system for the spectrophotometric determination of calcium, magnesium and alkalinity in water samples.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Raquel B R; Rangel, António O S S

    2004-08-01

    A sequential injection methodology for the spectrophotometric determination of calcium, magnesium and alkalinity in water samples is proposed. A single manifold is used for the determination of the three analytes, and the same protocol sequence allows the sequential determination of calcium and magnesium (the sum corresponds to the water hardness). The determination of both metals is based on their reaction with cresolphtalein complexone; mutual interference is minimized by using 8-hydroxyquinoline for the determination of calcium and ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) for the determination of magnesium. Alkalinity determination is based on a reaction with acetic acid, and corresponding color change of Bromcresol Green. Working ranges of 0.5 - 5 mg dm(-3) for Ca, 0.5 - 10 mg dm(-3) for Mg, and 10 - 100 mg HCO3- dm(-3), for alkalinity have been achieved. The results for water samples were comparable to those of the reference methods and to a certified reference water sample. RSDs lower than 5% were obtained, a low reagent consumption and a reduced volume of effluent have been accomplished. The determination rate for calcium and magnesium is 80 h(-1), corresponding to 40 h(-1) per element, while 65 determinations of alkalinity per hour could be carried out.

  20. Fluorimetric sequential injection determination of magnesium using 8-hydroxiquinoline-5-sulfonic acid in a micellar medium.

    PubMed

    de Armas, G; Cladera, A; Becerra, E; Estela, J M; Cerdà, V

    2000-05-31

    A fluorimetric sequential injection method for the determination of magnesium is proposed. The system is based on the complex formation between Mg(II) and 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQS). The reaction was carried out in the presence of ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) as a masking agent. Cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (HTAC) was employed as a fluorescence enhancer. The influence of several variables, such as reagent concentration, volumes and pH has been investigated. The reagent was prepared in a 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer solution (pH 9). A detection limit of 12 mug l(-1) magnesium was obtained. The proposed method was applied to the determination of magnesium in natural waters.

  1. Automated IR determination of petroleum products in water based on sequential injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Falkova, Marina; Vakh, Christina; Shishov, Andrey; Zubakina, Ekaterina; Moskvin, Aleksey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    The simple and easy performed automated method for the IR determination of petroleum products (PP) in water using extraction-chromatographic cartridges has been developed. The method assumes two stages: on-site extraction of PP during a sampling by using extraction-chromatographic cartridges and subsequent determination of the extracted PP using sequential injection analysis (SIA) with IR detection. The appropriate experimental conditions for extraction of the dissolved in water PP and for automated SIA procedure were investigated. The calibration plot constructed using the developed procedure was linear in the range of 3-200 μg L(-1). The limit of detection (LOD), calculated from a blank test based on 3σ was 1 µg L(-1). The sample volume was 1L. The system throughput was found to be 12 h(-1). PMID:26653498

  2. Implementation of terbium-sensitized luminescence in sequential-injection analysis for automatic analysis of orbifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Llorent-Martínez, E J; Ortega-Barrales, P; Molina-Díaz, A; Ruiz-Medina, A

    2008-12-01

    Orbifloxacin (ORBI) is a third-generation fluoroquinolone developed exclusively for use in veterinary medicine, mainly in companion animals. This antimicrobial agent has bactericidal activity against numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. A few chromatographic methods for its analysis have been described in the scientific literature. Here, coupling of sequential-injection analysis and solid-phase spectroscopy is described in order to develop, for the first time, a terbium-sensitized luminescent optosensor for analysis of ORBI. The cationic resin Sephadex-CM C-25 was used as solid support and measurements were made at 275/545 nm. The system had a linear dynamic range of 10-150 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 3.3 ng mL(-1) and an R.S.D. below 3% (n = 10). The analyte was satisfactorily determined in veterinary drugs and dog and horse urine.

  3. Experimental Design Optimization of a Sequential Injection Method for Promazine Assay in Bulk and Pharmaceutical Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Abubakr M.; Assubaie, Fahad N.; Sultan, Salah M.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental design optimization approach was utilized to develop a sequential injection analysis (SIA) method for promazine assay in bulk and pharmaceutical formulations. The method was based on the oxidation of promazine by Ce(IV) in sulfuric acidic media resulting in a spectrophotometrically detectable species at 512 nm. A 33 full factorial design and response surface methods were applied to optimize experimental conditions potentially controlling the analysis. The optimum conditions obtained were 1.0 × 10−4 M sulphuric acid, 0.01 M Ce(IV), and 10 μL/s flow rate. Good analytical parameters were obtained including range of linearity 1–150 μg/mL, linearity with correlation coefficient 0.9997, accuracy with mean recovery 98.2%, repeatability with RSD 1.4% (n = 7 consequent injections), intermediate precision with RSD 2.1% (n = 5 runs over a week), limits of detection 0.34 μg/mL, limits of quantification 0.93 μg/mL, and sampling frequency 23 samples/h. The obtained results were realized by the British Pharmacopoeia method and comparable results were obtained. The provided SIA method enjoys the advantages of the technique with respect to rapidity, reagent/sample saving, and safety in solution handling and to the environment. PMID:18350124

  4. Identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices using sequential injection capillary electrophoresis and contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Gustavo A; Nai, Yi H; Hilder, Emily F; Shellie, Robert A; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R; Breadmore, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    A simple sequential injection capillary electrophoresis (SI-CE) instrument with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) has been developed for the rapid separation of anions relevant to the identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Four of the most common explosive tracer ions, nitrate, perchlorate, chlorate, and azide, and the most common background ions, chloride, sulfate, thiocyanate, fluoride, phosphate, and carbonate, were chosen for investigation. Using a separation electrolyte comprising 50 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane, 50 mM cyclohexyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid, pH 8.9 and 0.05% poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) in a hexadimethrine bromide (HDMB)-coated capillary it was possible to partially separate all 10 ions within 90 s. The combination of two cationic polymer additives (PEI and HDMB) was necessary to achieve adequate selectivity with a sufficiently stable electroosmotic flow (EOF), which was not possible with only one polymer. Careful optimization of variables affecting the speed of separation and injection timing allowed a further reduction of separation time to 55 s while maintaining adequate efficiency and resolution. Software control makes high sample throughput possible (60 samples/h), with very high repeatability of migration times [0.63-2.07% relative standard deviation (RSD) for 240 injections]. The separation speed does not compromise sensitivity, with limits of detection ranging from 23 to 50 μg·L(-1) for all the explosive residues considered, which is 10× lower than those achieved by indirect absorbance detection and 2× lower than those achieved by C(4)D using portable benchtop instrumentation. The combination of automation, high sample throughput, high confidence of peak identification, and low limits of detection makes this methodology ideal for the rapid identification of inorganic IED residues.

  5. Exploring Liquid Sequential Injection Chromatography to Teach Fundamentals of Separation Methods: A Very Fast Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penteado, Jose C.; Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Influence of the solvent strength determined by the addition of a mobile-phase organic modifier and pH on chromatographic separation of sorbic acid and vanillin has been investigated by the relatively new technique, liquid sequential injection chromatography (SIC). This technique uses reversed-phase monolithic stationary phase to execute fast…

  6. Separation of proteins by cation-exchange sequential injection chromatography using a polymeric monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2016-02-01

    Since sequential injection chromatography (SIC) emerged in 2003, it has been used for separation of small molecules in diverse samples, but separations of high molar mass compounds such as proteins have not yet been described. In the present work a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (GMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column was prepared by free radical polymerization inside a 2.1-mm-i.d. activated fused silica-lined stainless steel tubing and modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA). The column was prepared from a mixture of 24% GMA, 16% EDMA, 20% cyclohexanol, and 40% 1-dodecanol (all% as w/w) containing 1% of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) (in relation to monomers). Polymerization was done at 60 °C for 24 h. The polymer was modified with 1.0 M IDA (in 2 M Na2CO3, pH 10.5) at 80 °C for 16 h. Separation of myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was achieved at pH 7.0 (20 mM KH2PO4/K2HPO4) using a salt gradient (NaCl). Myoglobin was not retained, and the other proteins were separated by a gradient of NaCl created inside the holding coil (4 m of 0.8-mm-i.d. PTFE tubing) by sequential aspiration of 750 and 700 μL of 0.2 and 0.1 M NaCl, respectively. As the flow was reversed toward the column (5 μL s(-1)) the interdispersion of these solutions created a reproducible gradient which separated the proteins in 10 min, with the following order of retention: ribonuclease A < cytochrome C < lysozyme. The elution order was consistent with a cation-exchange mechanism as the retention increased with the isoelectric points.

  7. Sequential injection chemiluminescence immunoassay for anionic surfactants using magnetic microbeads immobilized with an antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiqi; Hirakawa, Koji; Seto, Daisuke; Soh, Nobuaki; Nakano, Koji; Masadome, Takashi; Nagata, Kazumi; Sakamoto, Kazuhira; Imato, Toshihiko

    2005-12-15

    A rapid and sensitive immunoassay for the determination of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) is described. The method involves a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system equipped with a chemiluminescence detector and a neodymium magnet. Magnetic beads, to which an anti-LAS monoclonal antibody was immobilized, were used as a solid support in an immunoassay. The introduction, trapping and release of the magnetic beads in the flow cell were controlled by means of a neodymium magnet and adjusting the flow of the carrier solution. The immunoassay was based on an indirect competitive immunoreaction of an anti-LAS monoclonal antibody on the magnetic beads and the LAS sample and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled LAS, and was based on the subsequent chemiluminscence reaction of HRP with hydrogen peroxide and p-iodophenol, in a luminol solution. The anti-LAS antibody was immobilized on the beads by coupling the antibody with the magnetic beads after activation of a carboxylate moiety on the surface of magnetic beads that had been coated with a polylactic acid film. The antibody immobilized magnetic beads were introduced, and trapped in the flow cell equipped with the neodymium magnet, an LAS solution containing HRP-labeled LAS at constant concentration and the luminol solution were sequentially introduced into the flow cell based on an SIA programmed sequence. Chemiluminescence emission was monitored by means of a photon counting unit located at the upper side of the flow cell by collecting the emitted light with a lens. A typical sigmoid calibration curve was obtained, when the logarithm of the concentration of LAS was plotted against the chemiluminescence intensity using various concentrations of standard LAS samples (0-500ppb) under optimum conditions. The time required for analysis is less than 15min. PMID:18970310

  8. A multisyringe sequential injection method for monitoring water in the energy cogeneration system of a municipal waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    de Mirabó, F M Bauzá; Forteza, R; Cerdà, V

    2009-09-15

    Leading-edge urban solid waste ashing plants use burning heat energy to obtain electrical power. Water fed to their boilers for conversion into steam should be highly pure in order to minimize corrosion, scaling and similar phenomena, which can lead to malfunctioning and a reduced useful life but can be avoided by proper management and control of the water supply. In this work, we developed a multiparameter monitor based on multisyringe sequential injection for the sequential determination of up to eight important parameters, namely: pH, specific and acid conductivity, hydrazine, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and total iron. Acid conductivity was determined by passing the sample through a cation-exchange resin in order to retain ammonium ion and release protons. This parameter was deemed the most accurate indicator of dissolved solids in boiler water. Chemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically: hydrazine by reaction with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, ammonium by the modified Berthelot reaction, iron with o-phenanthroline, and phosphate and silica by formation of a molybdoheteropoly blue dye in the presence of ascorbic acid as reductant. Use of the optimum chemical and physical operating conditions provided 3s(blank) detection limits of 0.01 mg l(-1) N(2)H(4), 0.13 mg l(-1) NH(4)(+), 0.04 mg l(-1) Fe, 0.03 mg l(-1) SiO2 and 0.05 mg l(-1) PO(4)(3-), and relative standard deviations not greater than 2.5%. The methods integrated in the proposed monitor were successfully applied to real samples from the water-steam cycle at the Son Reus ashing plant in Palma de Mallorca (Spain). PMID:19615501

  9. A multisyringe sequential injection method for monitoring water in the energy cogeneration system of a municipal waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    de Mirabó, F M Bauzá; Forteza, R; Cerdà, V

    2009-09-15

    Leading-edge urban solid waste ashing plants use burning heat energy to obtain electrical power. Water fed to their boilers for conversion into steam should be highly pure in order to minimize corrosion, scaling and similar phenomena, which can lead to malfunctioning and a reduced useful life but can be avoided by proper management and control of the water supply. In this work, we developed a multiparameter monitor based on multisyringe sequential injection for the sequential determination of up to eight important parameters, namely: pH, specific and acid conductivity, hydrazine, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and total iron. Acid conductivity was determined by passing the sample through a cation-exchange resin in order to retain ammonium ion and release protons. This parameter was deemed the most accurate indicator of dissolved solids in boiler water. Chemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically: hydrazine by reaction with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, ammonium by the modified Berthelot reaction, iron with o-phenanthroline, and phosphate and silica by formation of a molybdoheteropoly blue dye in the presence of ascorbic acid as reductant. Use of the optimum chemical and physical operating conditions provided 3s(blank) detection limits of 0.01 mg l(-1) N(2)H(4), 0.13 mg l(-1) NH(4)(+), 0.04 mg l(-1) Fe, 0.03 mg l(-1) SiO2 and 0.05 mg l(-1) PO(4)(3-), and relative standard deviations not greater than 2.5%. The methods integrated in the proposed monitor were successfully applied to real samples from the water-steam cycle at the Son Reus ashing plant in Palma de Mallorca (Spain).

  10. Sequential dermal-peritumoral radiocolloid injection for sentinel node biopsy for breast cancer: the University of Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Feezor, Robert J; Kasraeian, Ali; Copeland, Edward M; Schell, Scott R; Hochwald, Steven N; Cendan, Juan; Drane, Walter; Mastin, Suzanne; Wilkinson, Edward; Lind, D Scott

    2002-08-01

    Although sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is rapidly becoming the standard of care for small breast cancers the optimal radiocolloid injection technique remains controversial. We report our experience with sequential dermal-peritumoral radiocolloid injection that takes advantage of both techniques. One hundred eighteen patients with clinical stage T(is), T1, T2 and N0 breast cancer underwent SLN biopsy at the University of Florida. Twelve to 18 hours before surgery patients received either an injection of 0.5 to 1.0 mCi 50:50 filtered:unfiltered technetium sulfur colloid into the dermis overlying the tumor and/or a peritumoral injection of a 3 to 4-mCi of radiocolloid 30 minutes later. Dynamic lymphoscintigraphy was performed and the topographical location of all imaged lymph nodes was marked on the skin. The next morning the surgeon utilized a hand-held gamma probe to remove all SLN(s) defined as any lymph node with radioactive counts 10 per cent or more of the ex vivo counts of the most radioactive SLN [internal mammary (IM) nodes were not removed]. The SLN identification rate was 98.5 per cent (3 IM nodes) for dermal injection (d.), 83.3 per cent (1 IM node) for peritumoral injection (p.), and 100 per cent (14 IM nodes) for sequential dermal-peritumoral injection (d.p.) (p < 0.05 DP versus D). Sequential d.p. 50:50 filtered:unfiltered technetium sulfur colloid injection results in a rapid, high SLN identification rate that persists until surgery the next morning. Delineation of nonaxillary SLNs may lead to more accurate breast cancer staging and may also influence the delivery of IM node radiation.

  11. Visual detection and sequential injection determination of aluminium using a cinnamoyl derivative.

    PubMed

    Elečková, Lenka; Alexovič, Michal; Kuchár, Juraj; Balogh, Ioseph S; Andruch, Vasil

    2015-02-01

    A cinnamoyl derivative, 3-[4-(dimethylamino)cinnamoyl]-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-3,4-2H-pyran-2-one, was used as a ligand for the determination of aluminium. Upon the addition of an acetonitrile solution of the ligand to an aqueous solution containing Al(III) and a buffer solution at pH 8, a marked change in colour from yellow to orange is observed. The colour intensity is proportional to the concentration of Al(III); thus, the 'naked-eye' detection of aluminium is possible. The reaction is also applied for sequential injection determination of aluminium. Beer׳s law is obeyed in the range from 0.055 to 0.66 mg L(-1) of Al(III). The limit of detection, calculated as three times the standard deviation of the blank test (n=10), was found to be 4 μg L(-1) for Al(III). The method was applied for the determination of aluminium in spiked water samples and pharmaceutical preparations.

  12. Sequential injection 90Sr determination in environmental samples using a wetting-film extraction method.

    PubMed

    Miró, Manuel; Gómez, Enrique; Estela, José Manuel; Casas, Montserrat; Cerdà, Victor

    2002-02-15

    A sequential injection procedure involving a flow-reversal wetting-film extraction method for the determination of the radionuclide 90Sr has been developed. The methodology is based on the coating of the inner walls of an open tubular reactor with a film prepared from a 0.14 M 4,4'(5')-bis(tert-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (BCHC) solution in 1-octanol, which allows the selective isolation of strontium from the sample matrix. Selection of the optimum extractant diluent attending its physical properties, investigation of the extraction kinetics features, and choice of the proper elution procedure are discussed in detail in this paper. The noteworthy aspects of using a wetting-film phase instead of a solid-phase material described to date in the literature are the reduction of crown ether consumption and the simplification of both the operational sequence and the automation of the extractant-phase renewal between consecutive samples, which is of interest to avoid analyte carryover and reduction of the resin capacity factor caused by irreversible interferences. The proposed method has been successfully applied to different spiked environmental samples (water, milk, and soil), with 90Sr total activities ranging between 0.07 and 0.30 Bq, measured using a low-background proportional counter. The standard deviation of the automated analytical separation procedure is lower than 3% (n = 10), and the 90Sr isolation process under the studied conditions may be carried out with a yield up to 80%.

  13. Sequential injection spectrophotometric system for evaluation of mushroom tyrosinase-inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Moonrungsee, Nuntaporn; Shimamura, Tomoko; Kashiwagi, Takehiro; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Higuchi, Keiro; Ukeda, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-15

    A sequential injection (SI) spectrophotometric method with absorbance detection at 475 nm has been developed for evaluating activity of some compounds on an inhibition of the mushroom tyrosinase. The method involved a reaction of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and mushroom tyrosinase to form the o-dopaquinone. The decrease of the o-dopaquinone was related to an increase of tyrosinase-inhibitory activity. Under the optimum conditions (concentration and volume of L-DOPA and mushroom tyrosinase of 2.0 mM, 60 μL and 142 U mL(-1), 15 μL, respectively), some antioxidant compounds were examined for the tyrosinase-inhibitory activity. A batch enzymatic assay of tyrosinase-inhibitory activity was applied as the reference method for comparison. The results of IC(50) values obtained from the proposed method and the batch method were correlated well, with r(2) of 0.969. The SIA provides higher precision and degrees of automation, consumes smaller amounts of chemicals and it is simpler and faster than the batch method.

  14. Sequential injection fluorimetric determination of Sn in juices of canned fruits.

    PubMed

    Morte, Elane S Boa; Korn, Maria Graças A; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S; Lima, José L F C; Pinto, Paula C A G

    2009-09-15

    The present work describes the development of a fast and robust sequential injection fluorimetric procedure for the determination of Sn in juices of canned fruits. The developed automatic methodology is based on the complexation of Sn with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQSA) to form a fluorimetric product (lambda(exc)=354 nm; lambda(em)=510 nm). The influence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) on the sensitivity of the fluorimetric determination was evaluated. Linear calibration plots were obtained for Sn concentrations between 1 and 10 mg L(-1), with a detection limit of 0.38 mg L(-1). In each analytical cycle 0.006 mg of HQSA and 0.47 mg of CPB were consumed and 1.5 mL of effluent was generated. The developed methodology was applied to the determination of Sn in juices of canned fruits and the results complied with those furnished by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry comparison procedure, with relative deviations lower than 5.2%. The automatic procedure exhibited good precision (R.S.D.<1.4%) and the sampling rate was about 70 determinations per hour.

  15. Miniaturized sequential injection analyzer for the monitoring and quantitation of chemical weapons degradation compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Herbert L., III; Postlethwaite, Timothy A.; Zhang, Peng; Sorrells, Richard

    2002-06-01

    The ability to monitor and detect chemical warfare agents and their degradation compounds continues to be of utmost importance. Remote on-site field analysis of these compounds is also extremely important as it relates to treaty verification for the Chemical Weapons Convention, as well as the minimization and elimination of human exposure. A portable instrument has been developed and miniaturized that allows for the detection of these compounds in the field with better quantitative results and higher reproducibility than traditional field test kits. All sample and reagent manipulations are conducted in a completely automated fashion. Quantitative results may be determined colorimetrically using the molybdenum blue reaction for the final degradation product of phosphonic acid based chemical warfare agents with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. The instrument is based on the flow analysis technique of sequential injection analysis (SIA). The benefits of this approach are that the method provides rapid response, high reproducibility of results, high sensitivity and minimal waste production.

  16. Native fluorescent detection with sequential injection chromatography for doping control analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sequential injection chromatography (SIC) is a young, ten years old, separation technique. It was proposed with the benefits of reagent-saving, rapid analysis, system miniaturization and simplicity. SIC with UV detection has proven to be efficient mostly for pharmaceutical analysis. In the current study, a stand-alone multi-wavelength fluorescence (FL) detector was coupled to an SIC system. The hyphenation was exploited for developing an SIC-FL method for the separation and quantification of amiloride (AML) and furosemide (FSM) in human urine and tablet formulation. Results AML and FSM were detected using excitation maxima at 380 and 270 nm, respectively, and emission maxima at 413 and 470 nm, respectively. The separation was accomplished in less than 2.0 min into a C18 monolithic column (50 × 4.6 nm) with a mobile phase containing 25 mmol/L phosphate buffer (pH 4.0): acetonitrile: (35:65, v/v). The detection limits were found to be 12 and 470 ng/mL for AML and FSM, respectively. Conclusions The proposed SIC-FL method features satisfactory sensitivity for AML and FSM in urine samples for the minimum required performance limits recommended by the World Anti-Doping Agency, besides a downscaled consumption of reagents and high rapidity for industrial-scale analysis of pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:23985079

  17. Deferiprone, a non-toxic reagent for determination of iron in samples via sequential injection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pragourpun, Kraivinee; Sakee, Uthai; Fernandez, Carlos; Kruanetr, Senee

    2015-05-01

    We present for the first time the use of deferiprone as a non-toxic complexing agent for the determination of iron by sequential injection analysis in pharmaceuticals and food samples. The method was based on the reaction of Fe(III) and deferiprone in phosphate buffer at pH 7.5 to give a Fe(III)-deferiprone complex, which showed a maximum absorption at 460 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the linearity range for iron determination was found over the range of 0.05-3.0 μg mL-1 with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.9993. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.032 μg mL-1 and 0.055 μg mL-1, respectively. The relative standard deviation (%RSD) of the method was less than 5.0% (n = 11), and the percentage recovery was found in the range of 96.0-104.0%. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of Fe(III) in pharmaceuticals, water and food samples with a sampling rate of 60 h-1.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of magnesium in pharmaceutical preparations by cost-effective sequential injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Tesfaldet, Zeriet O; van Staden, Jacobus F; Stefan, Raluca I

    2004-11-15

    A simple and rapid, inexpensive spectrophotometric method was proposed for magnesium assay in pharmaceutical preparations by sequential injection analysis (SIA). The method is based on the reaction between o-cresolphthalein complexone (CPC) and Mg(II) in alkaline media, yielding a pink colored complex with absorption maximum at 570nm. Since the formation constant between Ca-CPC and Mg-CPC is similar, initially a sample/standard solution was aspirated into the holding coil followed by a mixture of masking-buffer solutions. This was done because masking of calcium should be accomplished before Mg-CPC complexation. Then the reagent was introduced into the reaction coil to produce a colored complex, which is measured spectrophotometrically at 570nm. In this way the interference of calcium was reduced. Furthermore, all the parameters that affect the reaction were evaluated. The calibration curve is linear over a range of 0-20mgl(-1) of Mg(II) with a detection limit of 0.24mgl(-1). A sample throughput of 80 samples per hour and relative standard deviation <2.0% were achieved. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assay of magnesium in three different compositions of pharmaceutical preparations (tablets). The results were found to be in good agreement with the manual flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry methods and with the claimed values by the manufactures. The t-test shows no significant difference at 95% confidence level.

  19. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-01

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  20. Sequential circuit design for radiation hardened multiple voltage integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Lawrence T.; McIver, III, John K.

    2009-11-24

    The present invention includes a radiation hardened sequential circuit, such as a bistable circuit, flip-flop or other suitable design that presents substantial immunity to ionizing radiation while simultaneously maintaining a low operating voltage. In one embodiment, the circuit includes a plurality of logic elements that operate on relatively low voltage, and a master and slave latches each having storage elements that operate on a relatively high voltage.

  1. Potentiometric determination of urea by sequential injection using Jack bean meal crude extract as a source of urease.

    PubMed

    Silva, F V; Nogueira, A R; Souza, G B; Reis, B F; Araújo, A N; Montenegro, M C; Lima, J L

    2000-11-01

    A sequential injection system was proposed to accomplish the potentiometric determination of urea. This procedure used an ammonium tubular selective electrode to assess ammonium concentration produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of urea from Jack bean meal (Canavalia ensiformis DC) crude extract. A gaseous diffusion device was coupled to the flow set-up allowing on-line sampling and suitable selectivity for determinations. A detection limit of 6.0x10(-4) mol urea l(-1), a relative standard deviation of 1.9% (n=10) and a sampling rate of 20 samples h(-1) were observed when 172 Sumner units (SU) of urease and 900 mul of sample were used. Results agreeing with a comparative method were obtained by the proposed procedure and the use of the crude extract solution combined with the sequential injection approach improved the performance, producing reproducible results and low costs in comparison with procedures using commercial enzymes. PMID:18968118

  2. Mechanical System Reliability and Cost Integration Using a Sequential Linear Approximation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowal, Michael T.

    1997-01-01

    The development of new products is dependent on product designs that incorporate high levels of reliability along with a design that meets predetermined levels of system cost. Additional constraints on the product include explicit and implicit performance requirements. Existing reliability and cost prediction methods result in no direct linkage between variables affecting these two dominant product attributes. A methodology to integrate reliability and cost estimates using a sequential linear approximation method is proposed. The sequential linear approximation method utilizes probability of failure sensitivities determined from probabilistic reliability methods as well a manufacturing cost sensitivities. The application of the sequential linear approximation method to a mechanical system is demonstrated.

  3. Determination of ambroxol hydrochloride, methylparaben and benzoic acid in pharmaceutical preparations based on sequential injection technique coupled with monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Satínský, Dalibor; Huclová, Jitka; Ferreira, Raquel L C; Montenegro, Maria Conceição B S M; Solich, Petr

    2006-02-13

    The porous monolithic columns show high performance at relatively low pressure. The coupling of short monoliths with sequential injection technique (SIA) results in a new approach to implementation of separation step to non-separation low-pressure method. In this contribution, a new separation method for simultaneous determination of ambroxol, methylparaben and benzoic acid was developed based on a novel reversed-phase sequential injection chromatography (SIC) technique with UV detection. A Chromolith SpeedROD RP-18e, 50-4.6 mm column with 10 mm precolumn and a FIAlab 3000 system with a six-port selection valve and 5 ml syringe were used for sequential injection chromatographic separations in our study. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran-0.05M acetic acid (10:10:90, v/v/v), pH 3.75 adjusted with triethylamine, flow rate 0.48 mlmin(-1), UV-detection was at 245 nm. The analysis time was <11 min. A new SIC method was validated and compared with HPLC. The method was found to be useful for the routine analysis of the active compounds ambroxol and preservatives (methylparaben or benzoic acid) in various pharmaceutical syrups and drops.

  4. Use of solid phase extraction for the sequential injection determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Bordalo, Adriano A; Rangel, António O S S

    2012-08-30

    In this work, a solid phase extraction sequential injection methodology for the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems was developed. The determination of the enzymatic activity was based on the spectrophotometric detection of a coloured product, p-nitrophenol, at 405 nm. The p-nitrophenol is the product of the catalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, a non-coloured substrate. Considering the low levels expected in natural waters and exploiting the fact of alkaline phosphatase being a metalloprotein, the enzyme was pre-concentrated in-line using a NTA Superflow resin charged with Zn(2+) ions. The developed sequential injection method enabled a quantification range of 0.044-0.441 unit mL(-1) of enzyme activity with a detection limit of 0.0082 unit mL(-1) enzyme activity (1.9 μmol L(-1) of pNP) and a determination rate of 17 h(-1). Recovery tests confirmed the accuracy of the developed sequential injection method and it was effectively applied to different natural waters and to plant root extracts. PMID:22939148

  5. A study of the effect of sequential injection of 5-androstenediol on irradiation-induced myelosuppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Jang, Won Suk; Lee, Sunjoo; Son, Yeonghoon; Park, Sunhoo; Lee, Seung Sook

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we aimed at examining the therapeutic effects of 5-androstenediol (5-AED), a natural hormone produced in the adrenal cortex, on radiation-induced myelosuppression in C3H/HeN mice. The mice were subjected to whole-body irradiation with a sublethal dose of 5 Gy gamma-irradiation to induce severe myelosuppression, and 5-AED (50 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously. 5-AED was administrated 1 day before irradiation (pre-treatment) or twice weekly for 3 weeks starting from 1 h after irradiation (post-treatment). Treatment with 5-AED significantly ameliorated the decrease in the peripheral blood neutrophil and platelet populations in irradiated myelosuppressive mice, but had no effect on the lymphocyte population. It also ameliorated hypocellularity and disruption of bone marrow induced by irradiation and led to rapid recovery of myeloid cells. Further, it attenuated the decrease in spleen weight and megakaryocyte and myeloid cell populations in the spleen and promoted multilineage hematopoietic recovery. We found that a single injection of 5-AED produced only a temporary therapeutic effect, while sequential injection of 5-AED after irradiation had a more pronounced and prolonged therapeutic effect and reduced myelosuppression by irradiation. Thus, sequential injection of 5-AED after irradiation has therapeutic potential for radiation-induced myelosuppression when administered continuously and can be a significant therapeutic candidate for the management of acute radiation syndrome, particularly in a mass casualty scenario where rapid and economic intervention is important. PMID:25234002

  6. Solutions of TEAM Problem No. 13 using integral equations in a sequential and parallel computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kettunen, L.; Forsman, K.; Levine, D.; Gropp, W.

    1993-12-31

    In this paper a brief discussion of h-type volume integral formulations implemented in GFUNET/CORAL code is given and solutions of TEAM benchmark No. 13 are shown. GFUNET/CORAL is a general purpose code for 2D and 3D magnetostatics. Solutions of TEAM problem No. 13 are computed using both a sequential and parallel version of GFUNET/CORAL.

  7. Monitoring Lipase/Esterase Activity by Stopped Flow in a Sequential Injection Analysis System Using p-Nitrophenyl Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Pliego, Jorge; Mateos, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez, Jorge; Valero, Francisco; Baeza, Mireia; Femat, Ricardo; Camacho, Rosa; Sandoval, Georgina; Herrera-López, Enrique J.

    2015-01-01

    Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05–1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed. PMID:25633600

  8. Monitoring lipase/esterase activity by stopped flow in a sequential injection analysis system using p-nitrophenyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    Pliego, Jorge; Mateos, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez, Jorge; Valero, Francisco; Baeza, Mireia; Femat, Ricardo; Camacho, Rosa; Sandoval, Georgina; Herrera-López, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05-1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed. PMID:25633600

  9. The efficiency of intratympanic dexamethasone injection as a sequential treatment after initial systemic steroid therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Bin; Choi, Seong Jun; Park, Keehyun; Park, Hun Yi; Choo, Oak-Sung; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2011-06-01

    The effect of intratympanic steroid injection is controversial as salvage or initial treatment option for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and almost unknown if it is consecutively to use after initial systemic steroids. This study aimed to analyze the efficiency of intratympanic dexamethasone injection (ITDI) as a sequential treatment in the patients who failed initial systemic steroid treatments for SSNHL. Forty-six patients with SSNHL who did not respond to initial systemic steroids were prospectively included in the study. The patients were randomly classified into two groups; the ITDI group (21 patients) did not take four sequential ITDI within 2 weeks after systemic steroids, and the control group (25 patients) took any more medications. Hearing improvement was defined as a 10 dB or more decrease in the pure tone average (PTA) of the four-frequencies (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz). Hearing improvement was observed in 10 (47.6%) of 21 ITDI patients and in 4 (16.0%) of 25 control patients (P = 0.027). An improvement of the mean PTA was 11.4 dB in the ITDI group and 1.7 dB in the control group (P = 0.004). The ITDI group showed significant hearing improvement at low frequency (500 Hz) than the control group. The patients with 70 or more dB in PTA before ITDI showed significant hearing improvement than the other patients with better PTAs (P = 0.038). The sequential ITDI, which is performed immediately after initial systemic steroid therapy, may be a simple, effective second-line treatment of choice for the patients who show poor response to initial treatments for SSNHL.

  10. Mechanical integrity test methods for Class 2 injection wells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.P.

    1991-03-01

    Mechanical integrity testing of injection wells to ensure that they do not threaten an underground source of drinking water (USDW) is a key component of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program of the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974. Approximately 55% of all active injection wells are classified as Class II wells. These wells are used by the oil and gas industry primarily to dispose of waste fluids or to enhance production of hydrocarbons. Mechanical integrity is defined as the absence of significant leaks in the casing, tubing, or packers (internal integrity); and the absence of significant fluid movement into a USDW through cement channels behind the casing (external integrity). A wide variety of mechanical integrity test (MIT) methods have been developed to meet federal and primacy state program requirements. The internal mechanical integrity of standard injection wells can be evaluated by radioactive tracer surveys, standard annular pressure tests, annulus pressure monitoring, and continuous injection pressure versus injection rate monitoring. These tests are listed in order of decreasing reliability and increasing detection limits. 28 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Breast Conserving Treatment for Breast Cancer: Dosimetric Comparison of Sequential versus Simultaneous Integrated Photon Boost

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Truus; Heuninckx, Karina; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background. Breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation is widely accepted as standard of care for early breast cancer. Addition of a boost dose to the initial tumor area further reduces local recurrences. We investigated the dosimetric benefits of a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) compared to a sequential boost to hypofractionate the boost volume, while maintaining normofractionation on the breast. Methods. For 10 patients 4 treatment plans were deployed, 1 with a sequential photon boost, and 3 with different SIB techniques: on a conventional linear accelerator, helical TomoTherapy, and static TomoDirect. Dosimetric comparison was performed. Results. PTV-coverage was good in all techniques. Conformity was better with all SIB techniques compared to sequential boost (P = 0.0001). There was less dose spilling to the ipsilateral breast outside the PTVboost (P = 0.04). The dose to the organs at risk (OAR) was not influenced by SIB compared to sequential boost. Helical TomoTherapy showed a higher mean dose to the contralateral breast, but less than 5 Gy for each patient. Conclusions. SIB showed less dose spilling within the breast and equal dose to OAR compared to sequential boost. Both helical TomoTherapy and the conventional technique delivered acceptable dosimetry. SIB seems a safe alternative and can be implemented in clinical routine. PMID:25162031

  12. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  13. Rapid Self-Integrating, Injectable Hydrogel for Tissue Complex Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sen; Wang, Xuefei; Park, Sean; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-07-15

    A novel rapid self-integrating, injectable, and bioerodible hydrogel is developed for bone-cartilage tissue complex regeneration. The hydrogels are able to self-integrate to form various structures, as can be seen after dying some hydrogel disks pink with rodamine. This hydrogel is demonstrated to engineer cartilage-bone complex.

  14. Analysis of wastewater for anionic and cationic nutrients by ion chromatography in a single run with sequential flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, S V

    1999-07-30

    To prevent nutrient enrichment and, hence the undesirable ecological impacts, the nutrients monitored in wastewater samples include two anionic species, i.e., nitrate and orthophosphate, and a cationic species, ammonium. Ion chromatography (IC) is one of the popularly used techniques for determinations of nitrate and phosphate in these samples, whereas determination of ammonium in wastewater samples is typically done using manual or automated wet chemistry, e.g., flow injection analysis (FIA). We have developed a sequential IC-FIA method, using Lachat's QC8000 IC system, which allows determinations of nitrate, phosphate and ammonia in a single injection. In this system, a QuickChem Small Suppressor cartridge is regenerated in between the samples. A sample is injected while leaving the suppressor off-line. Ammonium, a cation, elutes in the void volume of an anion-exchange column. The unsuppressed column effluent, exiting the conductivity flow cell, up to this point is used for FIA determination of ammonia. When ammonia exits the conductivity flow cell, a fully regenerated suppressor is brought in-line for conductometric detection of the anions. Analog data are simultaneously acquired from colorimetric and conductometric detectors, for the cationic and anionic nutrients, respectively. The method is accurate with spike recoveries in wastewater samples ranging from 91% for nitrate to 114% for chloride. It is precise with RSD values, for replicate analyses (n = 7) of a mid-range standard, ranging from 0.4% for phosphate to 1% for nitrate.

  15. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence induced by sequential hot electron and hole injection into aqueous electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Kalle; Kuosmanen, Päivi; Pusa, Matti; Kulmala, Oskari; Håkansson, Markus; Kulmala, Sakari

    2016-03-17

    Hole injection into aqueous electrolyte solution is proposed to occur when oxide-coated aluminum electrode is anodically pulse-polarized by a voltage pulse train containing sufficiently high-voltage anodic pulses. The effects of anodic pulses are studied by using an aromatic Tb(III) chelate as a probe known to produce intensive hot electron-induced electrochemiluminescence (HECL) with plain cathodic pulses and preoxidized electrodes. The presently studied system allows injection of hot electrons and holes successively into aqueous electrolyte solutions and can be utilized in detecting electrochemiluminescent labels in fully aqueous solutions, and actually, the system is suggested to be quite close to a pulse radiolysis system providing hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals as the primary radicals in aqueous solution without the problems and hazards of ionizing radiation. The analytical power of the present excitation waveforms are that they allow detection of electrochemiluminescent labels at very low detection limits in bioaffinity assays such as in immunoassays or DNA probe assays. The two important properties of the present waveforms are: (i) they provide in situ oxidation of the electrode surface resulting in the desired oxide film thickness and (ii) they can provide one-electron oxidants for the system by hole injection either via F- and F(+)-center band of the oxide or by direct hole injection to valence band of water at highly anodic pulse amplitudes.

  16. Sequential injection titration method using second-order signals: determination of acidity in plant oils and biodiesel samples.

    PubMed

    del Río, Vanessa; Larrechi, M Soledad; Callao, M Pilar

    2010-06-15

    A new concept of flow titration is proposed and demonstrated for the determination of total acidity in plant oils and biodiesel. We use sequential injection analysis (SIA) with a diode array spectrophotometric detector linked to chemometric tools such as multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). This system is based on the evolution of the basic specie of an acid-base indicator, alizarine, when it comes into contact with a sample that contains free fatty acids. The gradual pH change in the reactor coil due to diffusion and reaction phenomenona allows the sequential appearance of both species of the indicator in the detector coil, recording a data matrix for each sample. The SIA-MCR-ALS method helps to reduce the amounts of sample, the reagents and the time consumed. Each determination consumes 0.413ml of sample, 0.250ml of indicator and 3ml of carrier (ethanol) and generates 3.333ml of waste. The frequency of the analysis is high (12 samples h(-1) including all steps, i.e., cleaning, preparing and analysing). The utilized reagents are of common use in the laboratory and it is not necessary to use the reagents of perfect known concentration. The method was applied to determine acidity in plant oil and biodiesel samples. Results obtained by the proposed method compare well with those obtained by the official European Community method that is time consuming and uses large amounts of organic solvents.

  17. Chemiluminescence determination of chlorpheniramine using tris(1,10-phenanthroline)-ruthenium(II) peroxydisulphate system and sequential injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Al-Hinai, Mohammed M; Al-Kindy, Salma M Z; Salama, Salama B

    2009-01-01

    A sequential injection (SI) method was developed for the determination of chlorpheniramine (CPA), based on the reaction of this drug with tris(1,10-phenanthroline)-ruthenium(II) [Ru(phen)(3)(2+)] and peroxydisulphate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) in the presence of light. The instrumental set-up utilized a syringe pump and a multiposition valve to aspirate the reagents [Ru(phen)(3)(2+) and S(2)O(8)(2-)] and a peristaltic pump to propel the sample. The experimental conditions affecting the chemiluminescence reaction were systematically optimized, using the univariate approach. Under the optimum conditions linear calibration curves of 0.1-10 microg/ml were obtained. The detection limit was 0.04 microg/ml and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was always < 5%. The procedure was applied to the analysis of CPA in pharmaceutical products and was found to be free from interferences from concomitants usually present in these preparations.

  18. Sequential injection of domain walls into ferroelectrics at different bias voltages: Paving the way for “domain wall memristors”

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, J. R.; McQuaid, R. G. P.; Einsle, J. F.; Gregg, J. M.; Ashcroft, C. M.; Canalias, C.; Gruverman, A.

    2014-08-14

    Simple meso-scale capacitor structures have been made by incorporating thin (∼300 nm) single crystal lamellae of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) between two coplanar Pt electrodes. The influence that either patterned protrusions in the electrodes or focused ion beam milled holes in the KTP have on the nucleation of reverse domains during switching was mapped using piezoresponse force microscopy imaging. The objective was to assess whether or not variations in the magnitude of field enhancement at localised “hot-spots,” caused by such patterning, could be used to both control the exact locations and bias voltages at which nucleation events occurred. It was found that both the patterning of electrodes and the milling of various hole geometries into the KTP could allow controlled sequential injection of domain wall pairs at different bias voltages; this capability could have implications for the design and operation of domain wall electronic devices, such as memristors, in the future.

  19. Sequential injection system for simultaneous determination of sucrose and phosphate in cola drinks using paired emitter-detector diode sensor.

    PubMed

    Saetear, Phoonthawee; Khamtau, Kittiwut; Ratanawimarnwong, Nuanlaor; Sereenonchai, Kamonthip; Nacapricha, Duangjai

    2013-10-15

    This work presents the simultaneous determination of sucrose and phosphate by using sequential injection (SI) system with a low cost paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) light sensor. The PEDD uses two 890 nm LEDs. Measurement of sucrose in Brix unit was carried out based on the detection of light refraction occurring at the liquid interface (the schlieren effect) between the sucrose solution and water. Phosphate was measured from the formation of calcium phosphate with turbidimetric detection. With careful design of the loading sequence and volume (sample--precipitating reagent--sample), simultaneous detection of sucrose and phosphate was accomplished with the single PEDD detector. At the optimized condition, linear calibrations from 1 to 7 Brix sucrose and from 50 to 200mg PO4(3-)L(-1) were obtained. Good precision at lower than 2% RSD (n=10) for both analytes with satisfactory throughput of 21 injections h(-1) was achieved. The method was successfully applied for the determination of sucrose and phosphate in cola drinks. The proposed method is readily applicable for automation and is found to be an alternative method to conventional procedures for on-line quality control process in cola drink industry.

  20. Rapid self-integrating, injectable hydrogel for tissue complex regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Wang, Xuefei; Park, Sean; Jin, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    A novel rapid self-integrating, injectable, and bio-erodible hydrogel is developed for tissue complex regeneration. The figure shows the self-integration of the hydrogel pieces to form various structures. In the figure, some hydrogel disks were dyed pink with rodamine and the others were left with the original light yellow color to visualize the interfaces (scale bar=5mm). This hydrogel is demonstrated to engineer cartilage-bone complex. PMID:25946414

  1. Sequential injection analysis for automation of the Winkler methodology, with real-time SIMPLEX optimization and shipboard application.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Tovar Sánchez, Antonio; Duarte, Carlos M; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-01-25

    A multipurpose analyzer system based on sequential injection analysis (SIA) for the determination of dissolved oxygen (DO) in seawater is presented. Three operation modes were established and successfully applied onboard during a research cruise in the Southern ocean: 1st, in-line execution of the entire Winkler method including precipitation of manganese (II) hydroxide, fixation of DO, precipitate dissolution by confluent acidification, and spectrophotometric quantification of the generated iodine/tri-iodide (I(2)/I(3)(-)), 2nd, spectrophotometric quantification of I(2)/I(3)(-) in samples prepared according the classical Winkler protocol, and 3rd, accurate batch-wise titration of I(2)/I(3)(-) with thiosulfate using one syringe pump of the analyzer as automatic burette. In the first mode, the zone stacking principle was applied to achieve high dispersion of the reagent solutions in the sample zone. Spectrophotometric detection was done at the isobestic wavelength 466 nm of I(2)/I(3)(-). Highly reduced consumption of reagents and sample compared to the classical Winkler protocol, linear response up to 16 mg L(-1) DO, and an injection frequency of 30 per hour were achieved. It is noteworthy that for the offline protocol, sample metering and quantification with a potentiometric titrator lasts in general over 5 min without counting sample fixation, incubation, and glassware cleaning. The modified SIMPLEX methodology was used for the simultaneous optimization of four volumetric and two chemical variables. Vertex calculation and consequent application including in-line preparation of one reagent was carried out in real-time using the software AutoAnalysis. The analytical system featured high signal stability, robustness, and a repeatability of 3% RSD (1st mode) and 0.8% (2nd mode) during shipboard application. PMID:20103088

  2. Sequential injection analysis for automation of the Winkler methodology, with real-time SIMPLEX optimization and shipboard application.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Tovar Sánchez, Antonio; Duarte, Carlos M; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-01-25

    A multipurpose analyzer system based on sequential injection analysis (SIA) for the determination of dissolved oxygen (DO) in seawater is presented. Three operation modes were established and successfully applied onboard during a research cruise in the Southern ocean: 1st, in-line execution of the entire Winkler method including precipitation of manganese (II) hydroxide, fixation of DO, precipitate dissolution by confluent acidification, and spectrophotometric quantification of the generated iodine/tri-iodide (I(2)/I(3)(-)), 2nd, spectrophotometric quantification of I(2)/I(3)(-) in samples prepared according the classical Winkler protocol, and 3rd, accurate batch-wise titration of I(2)/I(3)(-) with thiosulfate using one syringe pump of the analyzer as automatic burette. In the first mode, the zone stacking principle was applied to achieve high dispersion of the reagent solutions in the sample zone. Spectrophotometric detection was done at the isobestic wavelength 466 nm of I(2)/I(3)(-). Highly reduced consumption of reagents and sample compared to the classical Winkler protocol, linear response up to 16 mg L(-1) DO, and an injection frequency of 30 per hour were achieved. It is noteworthy that for the offline protocol, sample metering and quantification with a potentiometric titrator lasts in general over 5 min without counting sample fixation, incubation, and glassware cleaning. The modified SIMPLEX methodology was used for the simultaneous optimization of four volumetric and two chemical variables. Vertex calculation and consequent application including in-line preparation of one reagent was carried out in real-time using the software AutoAnalysis. The analytical system featured high signal stability, robustness, and a repeatability of 3% RSD (1st mode) and 0.8% (2nd mode) during shipboard application.

  3. Sequential injection method for rapid and simultaneous determination of 236U, 237Np, and Pu isotopes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin

    2013-11-19

    An automated analytical method implemented in a novel dual-column tandem sequential injection (SI) system was developed for simultaneous determination of (236)U, (237)Np, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu in seawater samples. A combination of TEVA and UTEVA extraction chromatography was exploited to separate and purify target analytes, whereupon plutonium and neptunium were simultaneously isolated and purified on TEVA, while uranium was collected on UTEVA. The separation behavior of U, Np, and Pu on TEVA-UTEVA columns was investigated in detail in order to achieve high chemical yields and complete purification for the radionuclides of interest. (242)Pu was used as a chemical yield tracer for both plutonium and neptunium. (238)U was quantified in the sample before the separation for deducing the (236)U concentration from the measured (236)U/(238)U atomic ratio in the separated uranium target using accelerator mass spectrometry. Plutonium isotopes and (237)Np were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after separation. The analytical results indicate that the developed method is robust and efficient, providing satisfactory chemical yields (70-100%) of target analytes and relatively short analytical time (8 h/sample). PMID:24134480

  4. Hyphenation of sequential- and flow injection analysis with FTIR-spectroscopy for chemical analysis in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, B.; Schindler, R.; Kellner, R.

    1998-06-01

    A survey of the principles of sequential (SIA)-and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems with FTIR spectroscopic detection is presented to introduce these hyphenations as powerful techniques for performing chemical analysis in aqueous solution. The strength of FIA/SIA-FTIR systems lies in the possibility to perform highly reproducible and automated sample manipulations such as sample clean-up and/or chemical reactions prior to spectrum acquisition. It is shown that the hyphenation of FIA/SIA systems with an FTIR spectrometer enhances the problem solving capabilities of the FTIR spectrometer as also parameters which can not be measured directly (e.g. enzyme activities) can be determined. On the other hand application of FTIR spectroscopic detection in FIA or SIA is also of advantage as it allows to shorten conventional analysis procedures (e.g. sucrose or phosphate analysis) or to establish and apply a multivariate calibration model for simultaneous determinations (e.g. glucose, fructose and sucrose analysis). In addition to these examples two recent instrumental developments in miniaturized FIA/SIA-FTIR systems, a μ-Flow through cell based on IR fiber optics and a micromachined SI-enzyme reactor are presented in this paper.

  5. Use of Sequential Injection Analysis to construct a Potentiometric Electronic Tongue: Application to the Multidetermination of Heavy Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimendia, Aitor; Legin, Andrey; Merkoçi, Arben; del Valle, Manel

    2009-05-01

    An automated potentiometric electronic tongue (ET) was developed for the quantitative determination of heavy metal mixtures. The Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) technique was used in order to automate the obtaining of input data, and the combined response was modeled by means of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The sensor array was formed by four sensors: two based on chalcogenide glasses Cd sensor and Cu sensor, and the rest on poly(vinyl chloride) membranes Pb sensor and Zn sensor. The Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) sensors were first characterized with respect to one and two analytes, by means of high-dimensionality calibrations, thanks to the use of the automated flow system; this characterization enabled an interference study of great practical utility. To take profit of the dynamic nature of the sensor's response, the kinetic profile of each sensor was compacted by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and the extracted coefficients were used as inputs for the ANN in the multidetermination applications. In order to identify the ANN which provided the best model of the electrode responses, some of the network parameters were optimized. Finally analyses were performed employing synthetic samples and water samples of the river Ebro; obtained results were compared with reference methods.

  6. Use of Sequential Injection Analysis to construct a Potentiometric Electronic Tongue: Application to the Multidetermination of Heavy Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mimendia, Aitor; Merkoci, Arben; Valle, Manel del; Legin, Andrey

    2009-05-23

    An automated potentiometric electronic tongue (ET) was developed for the quantitative determination of heavy metal mixtures. The Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) technique was used in order to automate the obtaining of input data, and the combined response was modeled by means of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The sensor array was formed by four sensors: two based on chalcogenide glasses Cd sensor and Cu sensor, and the rest on poly(vinyl chloride) membranes Pb sensor and Zn sensor. The Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) sensors were first characterized with respect to one and two analytes, by means of high-dimensionality calibrations, thanks to the use of the automated flow system; this characterization enabled an interference study of great practical utility. To take profit of the dynamic nature of the sensor's response, the kinetic profile of each sensor was compacted by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and the extracted coefficients were used as inputs for the ANN in the multidetermination applications. In order to identify the ANN which provided the best model of the electrode responses, some of the network parameters were optimized. Finally analyses were performed employing synthetic samples and water samples of the river Ebro; obtained results were compared with reference methods.

  7. Iron speciation in natural waters by sequential injection analysis with a hexadentate 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelator as chromogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Joana L A; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Nunes, Ana; Rangel, Maria; Rangel, António O S S

    2016-02-01

    A sequential injection method for iron speciation in various types of natural waters was developed using a synthesised hexadentate 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelator (CP256). The denticity of the ligand that allow formation of the corresponding iron(III) complex in a 1:1 stoichiometry proved to be highly advantageous, in comparison with parent bidentate, hydroxy-4-piridinone chelators, with a two fold increase of reaction sensitivity and over 65% decrease of the LOD. A solid phase extraction approach was employed to attain matrix elimination, facilitating iron(III) determination and application to high salinity waters. The combination with the total iron determination obtained by the direct reaction of the ligand resulted in iron speciation. Two detection spectrophotometric cells were tested, a conventional flow cell (CFC) and a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC). The dynamic concentration ranges were 0.1-2 mg/L with the CFC detection and 0.005-0.1 mg/L with the LWCC, with limit of detection of 30 µg/L and 6 µg/L, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to a variety of natural waters.

  8. Spatiotemporal Form Integration: Sequentially presented inducers can lead to representations of stationary and rigidly rotating objects

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J. Daniel; Strother, Lars; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objects in the world are often occluded and in motion. The visible fragments of such objects are revealed at different times and locations in space. To form coherent representations of the surfaces of these objects, the visual system must integrate local form information over space and time. We introduce a new illusion in which a rigidly rotating square is perceived on the basis of sequentially presented Pacman inducers. The illusion highlights two fundamental processes that allow us to perceive objects whose form features are revealed over time: Spatiotemporal Form Integration (STFI) and Position Updating. STFI refers to the spatial integration of persistent representations of local form features across time. Position updating of these persistent form representations allows them to be integrated into a rigid global motion percept. We describe three psychophysical experiments designed to identify spatial and temporal constraints that underlie these two processes and a fourth experiment that extends these findings to more ecologically valid stimuli. Our results indicate that although STFI can occur across relatively long delays between successive inducers (i.e., greater than 500 ms), position updating is limited to a more restricted temporal window (i.e., ~300 ms or less) and to a confined range of spatial (mis)alignment. These findings lend insight into the limits of mechanisms underlying the visual system's capacity to integrate transient, piecemeal form information and support coherent object representations in the ever-changing environment. PMID:26269386

  9. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled,renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a “brick wall”-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length X 50 μm width X 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide X 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a “bed” or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical onchip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beadstrapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based biosensor immunoassays for clinical and othervarious applications.

  10. Single peak parameters technique for simultaneous measurements: Spectrophotometric sequential injection determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Kozak, J; Paluch, J; Węgrzecka, A; Kozak, M; Wieczorek, M; Kochana, J; Kościelniak, P

    2016-02-01

    Spectrophotometric sequential injection system (SI) is proposed to automate the method of simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on the basis of parameters of a single peak. In the developed SI system, sample and mixture of reagents (1,10-phenanthroline and sulfosalicylic acid) are introduced into a vessel, where in an acid environment (pH≅3) appropriate compounds of Fe(II) and Fe(III) with 1,10-phenanthroline and sulfosalicylic acid are formed, respectively. Then, in turn, air, sample, EDTA and sample again, are introduced into a holding coil. After the flow reversal, a segment of air is removed from the system by an additional valve and as EDTA replaces sulfosalicylic acid forming a more stable colorless compound with Fe(III), a complex signal is registered. Measurements are performed at wavelength 530 nm. The absorbance measured at minimum of the negative peak and the area or the absorbance measured at maximum of the signal can be used as measures corresponding to Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentrations, respectively. The time of the peak registration is about 2 min. Two-component calibration has been applied to analysis. Fe(II) and Fe(III) can be determined within the concentration ranges of 0.04-4.00 and 0.1-5.00 mg L(-1), with precision less than 2.8% and 1.7% (RSD), respectively and accuracy better than 7% (RE). The detection limit is 0.04 and 0.09 mg L(-1) for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively. The method was applied to analysis of artesian water samples. PMID:26653493

  11. Sequential injection approach for simultaneous determination of ultratrace plutonium and neptunium in urine with accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Lachner, Johannes; Christl, Marcus; Xu, Yihong

    2013-09-17

    An analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of ultratrace level plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np) using iron hydroxide coprecipitation in combination with automated sequential injection extraction chromatography separation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement. Several experimental parameters affecting the analytical performance were investigated and compared including sample preboiling operation, aging time, amount of coprecipitating reagent, reagent for pH adjustment, sedimentation time, and organic matter decomposition approach. The overall analytical results show that preboiling and aging are important for obtaining high chemical yields for both Pu and Np, which is possibly related to the aggregation and adsorption behavior of organic substances contained in urine. Although the optimal condition for Np and Pu simultaneous determination requires 5-day aging time, an immediate coprecipitation without preboiling and aging could also provide fairly satisfactory chemical yields for both Np and Pu (50-60%) with high sample throughput (4 h/sample). Within the developed method, (242)Pu was exploited as chemical yield tracer for both Pu and Np isotopes. (242)Pu was also used as a spike in the AMS measurement for quantification of (239)Pu and (237)Np concentrations. The results show that, under the optimal experimental condition, the chemical yields of (237)Np and (242)Pu are nearly identical, indicating the high feasibility of (242)Pu as a nonisotopic tracer for (237)Np determination in real urine samples. The analytical method was validated by analysis of a number of urine samples spiked with different levels of (237)Np and (239)Pu. The measured values of (237)Np and (239)Pu by AMS exhibit good agreement (R(2) ≥ 0.955) with the spiked ones confirming the reliability of the proposed method.

  12. Design, fabrication and test of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic bead trapping device for sequential injection analysis applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guocheng; Lu, Donglai; Fu, Zhifeng; Du, Dan; Ozanich, Richard M; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a pneumatically controlled, renewable, microfluidic device for conducting bead-based assays in an automated sequential injection analysis system. The device used a "brick wall"-like pillar array (pillar size: 20 μm length × 50 μm width × 45 μm height) with 5 μm gaps between the pillars serving as the micro filter. The flow channel where bead trapping occurred is 500 μm wide × 75 μm deep. An elastomeric membrane and an air chamber were located underneath the flow channel. By applying pressure to the air chamber, the membrane is deformed and pushed upward against the filter structure. This effectively traps beads larger than 5 μm and creates a "bed" or micro column of beads that can be perfused and washed with liquid samples and reagents. Upon completion of the assay process, the pressure is released and the beads are flushed out from underneath the filter structure to renew the device. Mouse IgG was used as a model analyte to test the feasibility of using the proposed device for immunoassay applications. Resulting microbeads from an on-chip fluorescent immunoassay were individually examined using flow cytometry. The results show that the fluorescence signal intensity distribution is fairly narrow indicating high chemical reaction uniformity among the beads population. Electrochemical on-chip assay was also conducted. A detection limit of 1 ppb was achieved and good device reliability and repeatability were demonstrated. The novel microfluidic-based beads-trapping device thus opens up a new pathway to design micro-bead based immunoassays for various applications.

  13. Exploiting the bead injection concept for sequential determination of copper and mercury ions in river-water samples.

    PubMed

    Vidotti, Eliane C; Almeida, Vitor C; Oliveira, Cláudio C

    2004-11-15

    A procedure involving bead-injection concept and sequential determination of copper and mercury ions in river-water samples is proposed. The method is based on the solid-phase extraction of both metal ions on the same beads surface (Chelex 100 resin) and in their subsequent reaction with the colorimetric reagents (APDC and Dithizone for copper and mercury ions, respectively). For this task, a resin mini-column is established in the optical path by the selection, introduction and trapping of a defined volume of the Chelex-100 resin beads suspension in the flow system. The passage of the sample solution through the resin mini-column promotes the sorption of Cu(II) ions and, making the APDC colorimetric reagent flows through the beads, the formation of the coloured complex on the solid phase surface occurs. The absorbance of the formed APDC-Cu complex is then monitored at 436nm and the spent beads are discarded. Packing another resin mini-column in the flow cell and repeating the concentration step it is possible to carried out the mercury determination by using Dithizone as reagent. The absorbance of the Dithizone-Hg complex is monitored at 500nm. After each measurement, the spent beads are wasted and a new portion of fresh one is trapped in the system, letting it ready for the next measurement. The bead injection system is versatile and can be used to concentrate different sample volumes, which permits the determination of a wide range of copper and mercury ions concentrations. When the sample-selected volumes are 100 and 1000mul the analytical ranges were 5.0 up to 500.0mugl(-1) and 2.5 up to 30.0mugl(-1) for Cu(II) and Hg(II) ions, respectively. Under these conditions, the detection limit was estimated as 0.63 and 0.25mugl(-1) for copper and mercury ions determination. The system consumes 2mg of Chelex 100 resin beads, 0.20mg of APDC or 1.25mg of Dithizone per determination and the traditional organic solvent extraction methodology, normally used in connection

  14. Middleware for Processing Message Queues with Elasticity Support and Sequential Integrity of Asynchronous Message Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Teixeira, Eduardo; Patrícia Favacho de Araújo, Aletéia

    2015-10-01

    Elasticity in computing refers to dynamically adjusting the amount of allocated resources to process a distributed application. In order to achieve this, mechanisms are needed to avoid the phenomenon of the elasticity threshold detection moving constantly up or down. The existing work fails to deliver sequential integrity of asynchronous messages processing and the asymmetries of data distribution to achieve parallel consumption. This paper fills this gaps and proposes a middleware solution to dynamically analyze the flow of message queue, and a mechanism to increase the parallelized consumption based on the output behavior. An architecture for IOD (Increase On Demand) middleware is presented, with support for the increase and decrease of thread's to cope with the growth of message queues, using the technique of limit-based heuristics over a given period of time and grouping messages into sub-queues based on classification criteria.

  15. An Integrated System for Sequential Hydrologic Data Assimilation using the Land Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. V.; Reichle, R.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Koster, R.

    2007-05-01

    The Land Information System (LIS; http:lis.gsfc.nasa.gov) is a hydrologic modeling system that integrates various community land surface models, ground and satellite-based observations, and high performance computing and data management tools to enable assessment and prediction of hydrologic conditions at various spatial and temporal scales. Recently, the LIS framework has been enhanced by developing an interoperable extension for sequential data assimilation, thereby providing a comprehensive framework that can integrate data assimilation techniques, hydrologic models, observations, and the required computing infrastructure. The extensible LIS data assimilation framework allows the incorporation and interplay of multiple observational sources, multiple data assimilation algorithms, and multiple land surface models. These capabilities are demonstrated using a suite of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) that assimilate different sources of observational data into different land surface models to propagate observational information in space and time using assimilation algorithms with varying complexity ranging from rule-based approaches to ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF). The assimilation of soil moisture, snow cover, and snow water equivalent data is demonstrated using the Noah and Catchment land surface models using a number of sequential assimilation algorithms. These experiments illustrate the sensitivity of model parameterizations and physical representations on the efficiency of the assimilation process and the relative merits of the assimilation approaches. Further, the system also provides an infrastructure to diagnose the consequences of assumptions on model and observation error properties on the accuracy of assimilated products. These experiments demonstrate the use of LIS data assimilation framework as an ideal testbed for development and evaluation of techniques in hydrologic data assimilation.

  16. Sequential injection-bead injection-lab-on-valve coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for online renewable micro-solid-phase extraction of carbamate residues in food and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vichapong, Jitlada; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax; Grudpan, Kate

    2011-07-01

    A sequential injection-bead injection-lab-on-valve system was hyphenated to HPLC for online renewable micro-solid-phase extraction of carbamate insecticides. The carbamates studied were isoprocarb, methomyl, carbaryl, carbofuran, methiocarb, promecarb, and propoxur. LiChroprep(®) RP-18 beads (25-40 μm) were employed as renewable sorbent packing in a microcolumn situated inside the LOV platform mounted above the multiposition valve of the sequential injection system. The analytes sorbed by the microcolumn were eluted using 80% acetonitrile in 0.1% acetic acid before online introduction to the HPLC system. Separation was performed on an Atlantis C-18 column (4.6 × 150 mm, 5 μm) utilizing gradient elution with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and a detection wavelength at 270 nm. The sequential injection system offers the means of performing automated handling of sample preconcentration and matrix removal. The enrichment factors ranged between 20 and 125, leading to limits of detection (LODs) in the range of 1-20 μg/L. Good reproducibility was obtained with relative standard deviations of <0.7 and 5.4% for retention time and peak area, respectively. The developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of carbamate residues in fruit, vegetable, and water samples.

  17. Proton Injection into the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, Eric; Antipov, Sergey; Piekarz, Henryk; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an experimental synchrotron being built at Fermilab to test the concept of non-linear "integrable optics". These optics are based on a lattice including non-linear elements that satisfies particular conditions on the Hamiltonian. The resulting particle motion is predicted to be stable but without a unique tune. The system is therefore insensitive to resonant instabilities and can in principle store very intense beams, with space charge tune shifts larger than those which are possible in conventional linear synchrotrons. The ring will initially be tested with pencil electron beams, but this poster describes the ultimate plan to install a 2.5 MeV RFQ to inject protons, which will produce tune shifts on the order of unity. Technical details will be presented, as well as simulations of protons in the ring.

  18. Highly sensitive determination of mercury using copper enhancer by diamond electrode coupled with sequential injection-anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Chaiyo, Sudkate; Chailapakul, Orawon; Siangproh, Weena

    2014-12-10

    A highly sensitive determination of mercury in the presence of Cu(II) using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) thin film electrode coupled with sequential injection-anodic stripping voltammetry (SI-ASV) was proposed. The Cu(II) was simultaneously deposited with Hg(II) in a 0.5 M HCl supporting electrolyte by electrodeposition. In presence of an excess of Cu(II), the sensitivity for the determination of Hg(II) was remarkably enhanced. Cu(II) and Hg(II) were on-line deposited onto the BDD electrode surface at -1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M KCl) for 150 s with a flow rate of 14 μL s(-1). An anodic stripping voltammogram was recorded from -0.4 V to 0.25 V using a frequency of 60 Hz, an amplitude of 50 mV, and a step potential of 10 mV at a stopped flow. Under the optimal conditions, well-defined peaks of Cu(II) and Hg(II) were found at -0.25 V and +0.05 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M KCl), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) showed two linear dynamic ranges (0.1-30.0 ng mL(-1) and 5.0-60.0 ng mL(-1)). The limit of detection (S/N=3) obtained from the experiment was found to be 0.04 ng mL(-1). The precision values for 10 replicate determinations were 1.1, 2.1 and 2.9% RSD for 0.5, 10 and 20 ng mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of Hg(II) in seawater, salmon, squid, cockle and seaweed samples. A comparison between the proposed method and an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) standard method was performed on the samples, and the concentrations obtained via both methods were in agreement with the certified values of Hg(II), according to the paired t-test at a 95% confidence level. PMID:25441879

  19. On-line coupling of Micro-Extraction by Packed Sorbent with Sequential Injection Chromatography system for direct extraction and determination of betaxolol in human urine.

    PubMed

    Šrámková, Ivana; Chocholouš, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2015-10-01

    A novel approach for automation of Micro-Extraction by Packed Sorbent (MEPS), a solid phase extraction technique, is presented, enabling precise and repeatable liquid handling due to the employment of sequential injection technique. The developed system was used for human urine sample clean-up and pre-concentration of betaxolol before its separation and determination. A commercial MEPS C-18 cartridge was integrated into an SIChrom™ system. The chromatographic separation was performed on a monolithic High Resolution C18 (50×4.6 mm) column which was coupled on-line in the system with Micro-Extraction using an additional selection valve. A mixture of acetonitrile and aqueous solution of 0.5% triethylamine with acetic acid, pH adjusted to 4.5 in ratio 30:70 was used as a mobile phase for elution of betaxolol from MEPS directly onto the monolithic column where the separation took place. Betaxolol was quantified by a fluorescence detector at wavelengths λ(ex)=220 nm and λ(em)=305 nm. The linear calibration range of 5-400 ng mL(-1), with limit of detection 1.5 ng mL(-1) and limit of quantification 5 ng mL(-1) and correlation r=0.9998 for both the standard and urine matrix calibration were achieved. The system recovery was 105±5%; 100±4%; 108±1% for three concentration levels of betaxolol in 10 times diluted urine - 5, 20 and 200 ng mL(-1), respectively.

  20. Evaluation of Injection Efficiency of Carbon Dioxide Using an Integrated Injection Well and Geologic Formation Numerical Simulation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, J.; Park, S.; Kim, J.; SNU CO2 GEO-SEQ TEAM

    2011-12-01

    A series of integrated injection well and geologic formation numerical simulations was performed to evaluate the injection efficiency of carbon dioxide using a multiphase thermo-hydrological numerical model. The numerical simulation results show that groundwater flow, carbon dioxide flow, and heat transport in both injection well and sandstone formation can be simultaneously analyzed, and thus the injection efficiency (i.e., injection rate and injectivity) of carbon dioxide can be quantitatively evaluated using the integrated injection well and geologic formation numerical simulation scheme. The injection rate and injectivity of carbon dioxide increase rapidly during the early period of time (about 10 days) and then increase slightly up to about 2.07 kg/s (equivalent to 0.065 Mton/year) and about 2.84 × 10-7 kg/s/Pa, respectively, until 10 years for the base case. The sensitivity test results show that the injection pressure and temperature of carbon dioxide at the wellhead have significant impacts on its injection rate and injectivity. The vertical profile of the fluid pressure in the injection well becomes almost a hydrostatical equilibrium state within 1 month for all the cases. The vertical profile of the fluid temperature in the injection well becomes a monotonously increasing profile with the depth due to isenthalpic or adiabatic compression within 6 months for all the cases. The injection rate of carbon dioxide increases linearly with the fluid pressure difference between the well bottom and the sandstone formation far from the injection well. In contrast, the injectivity of carbon dioxide varies unsystematically with the fluid pressure difference. On the other hand, the reciprocal of the kinematic viscosity of carbon dioxide at the well bottom has an excellent linear relationship with the injectivity of carbon dioxide. It indicates that the above-mentioned variation of the injectivity of carbon dioxide can be corrected using this linear relationship. The

  1. Accurate Prediction of Transposon-Derived piRNAs by Integrating Various Sequential and Physicochemical Features

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Longqiang; Li, Dingfang; Zhang, Wen; Tu, Shikui; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) is the largest class of small non-coding RNA molecules. The transposon-derived piRNA prediction can enrich the research contents of small ncRNAs as well as help to further understand generation mechanism of gamete. Methods In this paper, we attempt to differentiate transposon-derived piRNAs from non-piRNAs based on their sequential and physicochemical features by using machine learning methods. We explore six sequence-derived features, i.e. spectrum profile, mismatch profile, subsequence profile, position-specific scoring matrix, pseudo dinucleotide composition and local structure-sequence triplet elements, and systematically evaluate their performances for transposon-derived piRNA prediction. Finally, we consider two approaches: direct combination and ensemble learning to integrate useful features and achieve high-accuracy prediction models. Results We construct three datasets, covering three species: Human, Mouse and Drosophila, and evaluate the performances of prediction models by 10-fold cross validation. In the computational experiments, direct combination models achieve AUC of 0.917, 0.922 and 0.992 on Human, Mouse and Drosophila, respectively; ensemble learning models achieve AUC of 0.922, 0.926 and 0.994 on the three datasets. Conclusions Compared with other state-of-the-art methods, our methods can lead to better performances. In conclusion, the proposed methods are promising for the transposon-derived piRNA prediction. The source codes and datasets are available in S1 File. PMID:27074043

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of Mount Vesuvius with sequential integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, Rosaria; de Franco, Roberto

    2003-05-01

    A new image of Mount Vesuvius and the surrounding area is recovered from the tomographic inversion of 693 first P wave arrivals recorded by 314 receivers deployed along five profiles which intersect the crater, and gravity data collected in 17,598 stations on land and offshore. The final three-dimensional (3-D) velocity model presented here is determined by interpolation of five 2-D velocity sections obtained from sequential integrated inversion (SII) of seismic and gravity data. The inversion procedure adopts the "maximum likelihood" scheme in order to jointly optimize seismic velocities and densities. In this way we recover velocity and density models both consistent with seismic and gravity data information. The model parameterization of these 2-D models is chosen in order to keep the diagonal elements of the seismic resolution matrix in the order of 0.2-0.8. The highest values of resolution are detected under the volcano edifice. The imaged 6-km-thick crustal volume underlies a 25 × 45 km2 area. The interpolation is performed by choosing the right grid for a smoothing algorithm which prepares optimum models for asymptotic ray theory methods. Hence this model can be used as a reference model for a 3-D tomographic inversion of seismic data. The 3-D gravity modeling is straightforward. The results of this study clearly image the continuous structure of the Mesozoic carbonate basement top and the connection of the volcano conduit structure to two shallow depressions, which in terms of hazard prevention are the regions through which magma may more easily flow toward the surface and cause possible eruptions.

  3. On-line coupling of sequential injection extraction with restricted-access materials for sample clean-up and analysis of drugs in biological matrix.

    PubMed

    Satínský, Dalibor; Sklenárová, Hana; Huclová, Jitka; Karlícek, Rolf

    2003-04-01

    In this contribution, the on-line coupling of solid phase extraction (SPE), based on a restricted-access material (RAM), with sequential injection technique (SIA) for the analysis of biological samples, is described. The SIA-RAM system was tested with a new potential antileucotrienic drug (VUFB-19363 (Quinlukast)) for serum analysis. The method is based on SPE with the novel internal-surface reversed-phase column packing material-alkyl-diol silica (ADS). The supports tolerate direct and repetitive injection of proteinaceous fluids (plasma, serum) and allow reversed-phase partitioning at the internal surface. A column packed with a 25 microm C18 alkyl-diol support was used for direct serum injection. Using a 6-port selection valve and the system of three mobile phases, the polar matrix compounds and metabolites are removed by sequentially aspirated mobile phases with lower content of the organic part (methanol-water (2:98) and following acetonitrile-water (20:80)) to the waste, and then, the analyte enriched on the column is eluted by a strong mobile phase (acetonitrile-methanol-water (40:20:40)) to the UV detector without transfer loss. With the fully automated SIA system, a total analysis time of less than 10 min was achieved. The only off-line sample pre-treatment step required to remove particulate matter was centrifugation. The studies showed a range of linearity (2-40 microg ml(-1)) and a high recovery (93.6-96.8%) of drug from the biological matrix with coefficients of variation (RSD) less than 5.0% (n = 6). This paper introduces a new, simple and robust analytical technique suitable for screening determination and direct analysis of drugs in biological materials.

  4. On-line coupling of sequential injection extraction with restricted-access materials and post-column derivatization for sample clean-up and determination of propranolol in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Satínský, Dalibor; Serralheiro, Hugo S; Solich, Petr; Araújo, Alberto N; Montenegro, Maria C B S M

    2007-09-26

    The presented paper deals with a new methodology for direct determination of propranolol in human plasma. The methodology described is based on sequential injection analysis technique (SIA) coupled with solid phase extraction (SPE) column based on restricted access materials (RAM). Special RAM column containing 30 microm polymeric material-N-vinylacetamide copolymer was integrated into the sequential injection manifold. SIA-RAM system was used for selective retention of propranolol, while the plasma matrix components were eluted with two weak organic solutions to waste. Due to the acid-basic and polarity properties of propranolol molecule and principles of reversed-phase chromatography, it was possible to retain propranolol on the N-vinylacetamide copolymer sorbent (Shodex MSpak PK-2A 30 microm (2 mm x 10 mm)). Centrifuged plasma samples were aspirated into the system and loaded onto the column using acetonitrile-water (5:95, v/v), pH 11.00, adjusted by triethylamine. The analyte was retained on the column while proteins contained in the sample were removed to waste. Interfering endogenous substances complicating detection were washed out by acetonitrile-water (15:85), pH 11.00 in the next step. The extracted analyte was eluted by means of tetrahydrofuran-water (25:75), pH 11.00 to the fluorescence detector (emission filter 385 nm). The whole procedure comprising sample pre-treatment, analyte detection and column reconditioning took about 15 min. The recoveries of propranolol from undiluted plasma were in the range 96.2-97.8% for three concentration levels of analyte. The proposed SIA-RAM method has been applied for direct determination of propranolol in human plasma.

  5. Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery by Sequential Injection of Light Hydrocarbon and Nitrate in Low- And High-Pressure Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Suri, Navreet; Stanislav, Paul; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-10-20

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) often involves injection of aqueous molasses and nitrate to stimulate resident or introduced bacteria. Use of light oil components like toluene, as electron donor for nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB), offers advantages but at 1-2 mM toluene is limiting in many heavy oils. Because addition of toluene to the oil increased reduction of nitrate by NRB, we propose an MEOR technology, in which water amended with light hydrocarbon below the solubility limit (5.6 mM for toluene) is injected to improve the nitrate reduction capacity of the oil along the water flow path, followed by injection of nitrate, other nutrients (e.g., phosphate) and a consortium of NRB, if necessary. Hydrocarbon- and nitrate-mediated MEOR was tested in low- and high-pressure, water-wet sandpack bioreactors with 0.5 pore volumes of residual oil in place (ROIP). Compared to control bioreactors, those with 11-12 mM of toluene in the oil (gained by direct addition or by aqueous injection) and 80 mM of nitrate in the aqueous phase produced 16.5 ± 4.4% of additional ROIP (N = 10). Because toluene is a cheap commodity chemical, HN-MEOR has the potential to be a cost-effective method for additional oil production even in the current low oil price environment.

  6. Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery by Sequential Injection of Light Hydrocarbon and Nitrate in Low- And High-Pressure Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Suri, Navreet; Stanislav, Paul; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-10-20

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) often involves injection of aqueous molasses and nitrate to stimulate resident or introduced bacteria. Use of light oil components like toluene, as electron donor for nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB), offers advantages but at 1-2 mM toluene is limiting in many heavy oils. Because addition of toluene to the oil increased reduction of nitrate by NRB, we propose an MEOR technology, in which water amended with light hydrocarbon below the solubility limit (5.6 mM for toluene) is injected to improve the nitrate reduction capacity of the oil along the water flow path, followed by injection of nitrate, other nutrients (e.g., phosphate) and a consortium of NRB, if necessary. Hydrocarbon- and nitrate-mediated MEOR was tested in low- and high-pressure, water-wet sandpack bioreactors with 0.5 pore volumes of residual oil in place (ROIP). Compared to control bioreactors, those with 11-12 mM of toluene in the oil (gained by direct addition or by aqueous injection) and 80 mM of nitrate in the aqueous phase produced 16.5 ± 4.4% of additional ROIP (N = 10). Because toluene is a cheap commodity chemical, HN-MEOR has the potential to be a cost-effective method for additional oil production even in the current low oil price environment. PMID:26406569

  7. Miniaturizing and automation of free acidity measurements for uranium (VI)-HNO3 solutions: Development of a new sequential injection analysis for a sustainable radio-analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Néri-Quiroz, José; Canto, Fabrice; Guillerme, Laurent; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair; Dugas, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized and automated approach for the determination of free acidity in solutions containing uranium (VI) is presented. The measurement technique is based on the concept of sequential injection analysis with on-line spectroscopic detection. The proposed methodology relies on the complexation and alkalimetric titration of nitric acid using a pH 5.6 sodium oxalate solution. The titration process is followed by UV/VIS detection at 650nm thanks to addition of Congo red as universal pH indicator. Mixing sequence as well as method validity was investigated by numerical simulation. This new analytical design allows fast (2.3min), reliable and accurate free acidity determination of low volume samples (10µL) containing uranium/[H(+)] moles ratio of 1:3 with relative standard deviation of <7.0% (n=11). The linearity range of the free nitric acid measurement is excellent up to 2.77molL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.995. The method is specific, presence of actinide ions up to 0.54molL(-1) does not interfere on the determination of free nitric acid. In addition to automation, the developed sequential injection analysis method greatly improves the standard off-line oxalate complexation and alkalimetric titration method by reducing thousand fold the required sample volume, forty times the nuclear waste per analysis as well as the analysis time by eight fold. These analytical parameters are important especially in nuclear-related applications to improve laboratory safety, personnel exposure to radioactive samples and to drastically reduce environmental impacts or analytical radioactive waste. PMID:27474315

  8. Miniaturizing and automation of free acidity measurements for uranium (VI)-HNO3 solutions: Development of a new sequential injection analysis for a sustainable radio-analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Néri-Quiroz, José; Canto, Fabrice; Guillerme, Laurent; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair; Dugas, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized and automated approach for the determination of free acidity in solutions containing uranium (VI) is presented. The measurement technique is based on the concept of sequential injection analysis with on-line spectroscopic detection. The proposed methodology relies on the complexation and alkalimetric titration of nitric acid using a pH 5.6 sodium oxalate solution. The titration process is followed by UV/VIS detection at 650nm thanks to addition of Congo red as universal pH indicator. Mixing sequence as well as method validity was investigated by numerical simulation. This new analytical design allows fast (2.3min), reliable and accurate free acidity determination of low volume samples (10µL) containing uranium/[H(+)] moles ratio of 1:3 with relative standard deviation of <7.0% (n=11). The linearity range of the free nitric acid measurement is excellent up to 2.77molL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.995. The method is specific, presence of actinide ions up to 0.54molL(-1) does not interfere on the determination of free nitric acid. In addition to automation, the developed sequential injection analysis method greatly improves the standard off-line oxalate complexation and alkalimetric titration method by reducing thousand fold the required sample volume, forty times the nuclear waste per analysis as well as the analysis time by eight fold. These analytical parameters are important especially in nuclear-related applications to improve laboratory safety, personnel exposure to radioactive samples and to drastically reduce environmental impacts or analytical radioactive waste.

  9. On-line simultaneous and rapid separation of anions and cations from a single sample using dual-capillary sequential injection-capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Adam J; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Mirek; Hutchinson, Joseph P; Johns, Cameron; Hilder, Emily F; Dicinoski, Greg W; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Haddad, Paul R; Breadmore, Michael C

    2013-06-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) approach has been developed for the simultaneous rapid separation and identification of common environmental inorganic anions and cations from a single sample injection. The method utilised a sequential injection-capillary electrophoresis instrument (SI-CE) with capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) constructed in-house from commercial-off-the-shelf components. Oppositely charged analytes from a single sample plug were simultaneously injected electrokinetically onto two separate capillaries for independent separation and detection. Injection was automated and may occur from a syringe or be directly coupled to an external source in a continuous manner. Software control enabled high sample throughput (17 runs per hour for the target analyte set) and the inclusion of an isolation valve allowed the separation capillaries to be flushed, increasing throughput by removing slow migrating species as well as improving repeatability. Various environmental and industrial samples (subjected only to filtering) were analysed in the laboratory with a 3 min analysis time which allowed the separation of 23 inorganic and small organic anions and cations. Finally, the system was applied to an extended automated analysis of Hobart Southern Water tap water for a period of 48 h. The overall repeatability of the migration times of a 14 analyte standard sample was less than 0.74% under laboratory conditions. LODs ranged from 5 to 61 μg L(-1). The combination of automation, high confidence of peak identification, and low limits of detection make this a useful system for the simultaneous identification of a range of common inorganic anions and cations for discrete or continuous monitoring applications.

  10. Sequential injection chromatography with post-column reaction/derivatization for the determination of transition metal cations in natural water samples.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Jarošová, Patrícia; Chocholouš, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the applicability of Sequential Injection Chromatography for the determination of transition metals in water is evaluated for the separation of copper(II), zinc(II), and iron(II) cations. Separations were performed using a Dionex IonPAC™ guard column (50mm×2mm i.d., 9 µm). Mobile phase composition and post-column reaction were optimized by modified SIMPLEX method with subsequent study of the concentration of each component. The mobile phase consisted of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as analyte-selective compound, sodium sulfate, and formic acid/sodium formate buffer. Post-column addition of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol was carried out for spectrophotometric detection of the analytes׳ complexes at 530nm. Approaches to achieve higher robustness, baseline stability, and detection sensitivity by on-column stacking of the analytes and initial gradient implementation as well as air-cushion pressure damping for post-column reagent addition were studied. The method allowed the rapid separation of copper(II), zinc(II), and iron(II) within 6.5min including pump refilling and aspiration of sample and 1mmol HNO3 for analyte stacking on the separation column. High sensitivity was achieved applying an injection volume of up to 90µL. A signal repeatability of<2% RSD of peak height was found. Analyte recovery evaluated by spiking of different natural water samples was well suited for routine analysis with sub-micromolar limits of detection.

  11. A green analytical method for rapid determination of pectin degree of esterification using micro sequential injection lab-on-valve system.

    PubMed

    Naghshineh, Mahsa; Larsen, Jan; Georgiou, Constantinos; Olsen, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for automated determination pectin degree of esterification (DE) using micro sequential injection lab-on-valve (μSI-LOV) system is developed. A face-centered central composite response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise system parameters. A calibration graph for determination of non-esterified galacturonic acid (GalA) content in pectin solutions with linear range of 0.08-0.34% (w/v) and the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.057% (w/v) under optimal condition was achieved. The difference between concentrations (w/v, %) of total GalA and non-esterified GalA was applied to estimate DE (%) of pectin samples. Results indicated a good agreement (tstat

  12. Sequential injection system with higher dimensional electrochemical sensor signals Part 2. Potentiometric e-tongue for the determination of alkaline ions.

    PubMed

    Cortina, M; Gutés, A; Alegret, S; Del Valle, Manuel

    2005-06-15

    An intelligent, automatic system based on an array of non-specific-response chemical sensors was developed. As a great amount of information is required for its correct modelling, we propose a system generating it itself. The sequential injection analysis (SIA) technique was chosen as it enables the processes of training, calibration, validation and operation to be automated simply. Detection was carried out using an array of potentiometric sensors based on PVC membranes of different selectivity. The diluted standard solutions needed for system learning and response modelling are automatically prepared from more concentrated standards. The electrodes used were characterised with respect to one and two analytes, by means of high-dimensionality calibrations, and the response surface of each was represented; this characterisation enabled an interference study of great practical utility. The combined response was modelled by means of artificial neural networks (ANNs), and thus it was possible to obtain an automated electronic tongue based on SIA. In order to identify the ANN which provided the best model of the electrode responses, some of the network's parameters were optimised and its usefulness in determining NH(4)(+), K(+) and Na(+) ions in synthetic samples was then tested. Finally, it was used to determine these ions in commercial fertilisers, the obtained results being compared with reference methods. PMID:18970109

  13. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls in fishery and aquaculture products using sequential solid phase extraction and large volume injection gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dasheng; Lin, Yuanjie; Feng, Chao; Wang, Dongli; Qiu, Xinlei; Jin, Yu'e; Xiong, Libei; Jin, Ying; Wang, Guoquan

    2014-01-15

    A new method was developed to determine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fishery and aquaculture products. Samples were extracted by an accelerated solvent extraction system and cleaned up by sequential solid phase extraction (SPE) including dispersive SPE (D-SPE) and tandem SPE. PBDEs and PCBs were analyzed by a large-volume injection gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-QqQ-MS/MS). Good linearity (R(2)≥0.9958) was achieved. Method detection limits (MDLs) were 0.16-3.3pgg(-1) (wet weight, ww) for PBDEs and 0.13-0.97pgg(-1)ww for PCBs. Mean recoveries were 60-140% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of less than 20% in weever fish, scallop and shrimp samples spiked at a lower level of 13-31pgg(-1)ww and a higher level of 50-125pgg(-1)ww. Certified reference materials were analyzed with acceptable results. The method reduced solvent consumption, analytical time and labor, and is suitable for the routine analysis of PBDEs and PCBs in fishery and aquaculture products.

  14. A green analytical method for rapid determination of pectin degree of esterification using micro sequential injection lab-on-valve system.

    PubMed

    Naghshineh, Mahsa; Larsen, Jan; Georgiou, Constantinos; Olsen, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for automated determination pectin degree of esterification (DE) using micro sequential injection lab-on-valve (μSI-LOV) system is developed. A face-centered central composite response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise system parameters. A calibration graph for determination of non-esterified galacturonic acid (GalA) content in pectin solutions with linear range of 0.08-0.34% (w/v) and the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.057% (w/v) under optimal condition was achieved. The difference between concentrations (w/v, %) of total GalA and non-esterified GalA was applied to estimate DE (%) of pectin samples. Results indicated a good agreement (tstat

  15. Iodine speciation in coastal and inland bathing waters and seaweeds extracts using a sequential injection standard addition flow-batch method.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Bordalo, Adriano A; Rangel, António O S S

    2015-02-01

    The present work describes the development of a sequential injection standard addition method for iodine speciation in bathing waters and seaweeds extracts without prior sample treatment. Iodine speciation was obtained by assessing the iodide and iodate content, the two inorganic forms of iodine in waters. For the determination of iodide, an iodide ion selective electrode (ISE) was used. The indirect determination of iodate was based on the spectrophotometric determination of nitrite (Griess reaction). For the iodate measurement, a mixing chamber was employed (flow batch approach) to explore the inherent efficient mixing, essential for the indirect determination of iodate. The application of the standard addition method enabled detection limits of 0.14 µM for iodide and 0.02 µM for iodate, together with the direct introduction of the target water samples, coastal and inland bathing waters. The results obtained were in agreement with those obtained by ICP-MS and a colorimetric reference procedure. Recovery tests also confirmed the accuracy of the developed method which was effectively applied to bathing waters and seaweed extracts.

  16. Sequential injection kinetic spectrophotometric determination of quaternary mixtures of carbamate pesticides in water and fruit samples using artificial neural networks for multivariate calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ning; Fan, Shihua

    2009-12-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the simultaneous kinetic spectrophotometric determination of a quaternary carbamate pesticide mixture consisting of carbofuran, propoxur, metolcarb and fenobucarb using sequential injection analysis (SIA). The procedure was based upon the different kinetic properties between the analytes reacted with reagent in flow system in the non-stopped-flow mode, in which their hydrolysis products coupled with diazotized p-nitroaniline in an alkaline medium to form the corresponding colored complexes. The absorbance data from SIA peak time profile were recorded at 510 nm and resolved by the use of back-propagation-artificial neural network (BP-ANN) algorithms for multivariate quantitative analysis. The experimental variables and main network parameters were optimized and each of the pesticides could be determined in the concentration range of 0.5-10.0 μg mL -1, at a sampling frequency of 18 h -1. The proposed method was compared to other spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of mixtures of carbamate pesticides, and it was proved to be adequately reliable and was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of the four pesticide residues in water and fruit samples, obtaining the satisfactory results based on recovery studies (84.7-116.0%).

  17. Rapid automated assay of anti-oxidation/radical-scavenging activity of natural substances by sequential injection technique (SIA) using spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Polásek, Miroslav; Skála, Petr; Opletal, Lubomír; Jahodár, Ludek

    2004-07-01

    A PC-controlled sequential injection analysis (SIA) system equipped with a spectrophotometric diode-array detector is used for rapid monitoring and evaluation of antioxidation/radical scavenging activity of biological samples. The automated method is based on the known reaction of stable 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) with antioxidants in organic or aqueous-organic media resulting in bleaching of DPPH due to its "quenching" by the interaction with the analytes. The decrease of the absorbance of DPPH (compared to blank experiment carried out with water-ethanol 1:1 instead of the test solution) measured at 525 nm is related to concentration of an antioxidant in the test solution. With the optimised SIA procedure it is possible to detect down to micromolar concentrations of model antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, caffeic acid, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and rutin and to evaluate the concentration of these antioxidants in the micromolar to millimolar range. The sample throughput is 45 h(-1). Thanks to its rapidity and sensitivity, the proposed SIA method is suitable for performing routine screening tests for the presence of various antioxidants in large series of lyophilised herbal or mushroom extracts (the amount of sample needed for the analysis is several milligrams).

  18. Selected reaction monitoring LC-MS determination of idoxifene and its pyrrolidinone metabolite in human plasma using robotic high-throughput, sequential sample injection.

    PubMed

    Onorato, J M; Henion, J D; Lefebvre, P M; Kiplinger, J P

    2001-01-01

    The generation of large numbers of samples during early drug discovery has increased the demand for rapid and selective methods of analysis. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), because of its sensitivity, selectivity, and robustness, has emerged as a powerful tool in the pharmaceutical industry for many analytical needs. This work presents a high-throughput selected reaction monitoring LC-MS bioanalytical method for the determination of idoxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, and its pyrrolidinone metabolite in clinical human plasma samples. The described method uses short, small-bore columns, high flow rates, and elevated HPLC column temperatures to perform LC separations of idoxifene and its metabolite within 10 s/sample. Sequential injections were accomplished with a 215/889 multiple probe liquid handler (Gilson, Inc.), which aspirates eight samples simultaneously and performs its rinse cycle parallel to sample injection, resulting in minimum lag time between injections. This high-throughput method was applied to the determination of idoxifene and its metabolite in clinical human plasma samples. Sample preparation employed liquid/liquid extraction in the 96-well format. Method validation included determination of intra- and interassay accuracy and precision values, recovery studies, autosampler stability, and freeze-thaw stability. The LOQ obtained was 10 ng/mL for idoxifene and 30 ng/mL for the metabolite. Using idoxifene-d5 as an internal standard, idoxifene showed acceptable accuracy and precision values at QC level 1 (QC1, 15 ng/mL), level 2 (QC2, 100 ng/mL), and level 3 (QC3, 180 ng/mL) (85.0% accuracy +/- 12.0% precision, 95.1 +/- 4.9%, and 90.3 +/- 4.7%, respectively). The pyrrolidinone metabolite also showed acceptable accuracy and precision values (using no internal standard for quantitation) at QC1 (60 ng/mL), QC2 (100 ng/mL), and QC3 (180 ng/mL) (104.9 +/- 14.4%, 91.1 +/- 13.0%, and 90.8 +/- 12.2%, respectively). The

  19. Integrated injection seeded terahertz source and amplifier for time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maysonnave, J; Jukam, N; Ibrahim, M S M; Maussang, K; Madéo, J; Cavalié, P; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Steenson, D P; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Tignon, J; Dhillon, S S

    2012-02-15

    We used a terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) as an integrated injection seeded source and amplifier for THz time-domain spectroscopy. A THz input pulse is generated inside a QCL by illuminating the laser facet with a near-IR pulse from a femtosecond laser and amplified using gain switching. The THz output from the QCL is found to saturate upon increasing the amplitude of the THz input power, which indicates that the QCL is operating in an injection seeded regime.

  20. Preliminary results on the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in tea samples using a flow injection on-line solid phase extraction separation and preconcentration technique to couple with a sequential injection hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Taicheng; Song, Xuejie; Jin, Dan; Li, Hongfei; Xu, Jingwei; Chen, Hangting

    2005-10-31

    In this work, a method was developed for determination of ultra-trace levels of Cd in tea samples by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A flow injection solid phase extraction (FI-SPE) separation and preconcentration technique, to on-line couple with a sequential injection hydride generation (SI-HG) technique is employed in this study. Cd was preconcentrated on the SPE column, which was made from a neutral extractant named Cyanex 923, while other matrix ions or interfering ions were completely or mostly separated off. Conditions for the SPE separation and preconcentration, as well as conditions for the HG technique, were studied. Due to the separation of interfering elements, Cd hydride generation efficiency could be greatly enhanced with the sole presence of Co(2+) with a concentration of 200mugL(-1), which is much lower than those in other works previously reported. Interferences on both the Cd separation and preconcentration, and Cd hydride generation (HG) were investigated; it showed that both the separation and preconcentration system, and the HG system had a strong anti-interference ability. The SPE column could be repeatedly used at least 400 times, a R.S.D. of 0.97% was obtained for 6 measurements of Cd with 0.2mugL(-1) and a correlation coefficiency of 1.0000 was obtained for the measurement of a series of solutions with Cd concentrations from 0.1 to 2mugL(-1). The method has a low detection limit of 10.8ngL(-1) for a 25mL solution and was successfully validated by using two tea standard reference materials (GBW08513 and GBW07605).

  1. Sequential lateral solidification of silicon thin films on low-k dielectrics for low temperature integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, Fabio; Gates, Stephen M.; Limanov, Alexander B.; Hlaing, Htay; Im, James S.; Edelstein, Daniel C.; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    We present the excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on a low dielectric constant (low-k) insulator for very large scale integration monolithic 3D integration and demonstrate that low dielectric constant materials are suitable substrates for 3D integration through laser crystallization of silicon thin films. We crystallized 100 nm amorphous silicon on top of SiO2 and SiCOH (low-k) dielectrics, at different material thicknesses (1 μm, 0.75 μm, and 0.5 μm). The amorphous silicon crystallization on low-k dielectric requires 35% less laser energy than on an SiO2 dielectric. This difference is related to the thermal conductivity of the two materials, in agreement with one dimensional simulations of the crystallization process. We analyzed the morphology of the material through defect-enhanced microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. SEM micrographs show that polycrystalline silicon is characterized by micron-long grains with an average width of 543 nm for the SiO2 sample and 570 nm for the low-k samples. Comparison of the Raman spectra does not show any major difference in film quality for the two different dielectrics, and polycrystalline silicon peaks are closely placed around 517 cm-1. From X-ray diffraction analysis, the material crystallized on SiO2 shows a preferential (111) crystal orientation. In the SiCOH case, the 111 peak strength decreases dramatically and samples do not show preferential crystal orientation. A 1D finite element method simulation of the crystallization process on a back end of line structure shows that copper (Cu) damascene interconnects reach a temperature of 70 °C or lower with a 0.5 μm dielectric layer between the Cu and the molten Si layer, a favorable condition for monolithic 3D integration.

  2. The integration of sequential aiming movements: Switching hand and direction at the first target.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, G P; Khan, Michael A; Mottram, Thomas M; Adam, Jos J; Buckolz, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Movement times to a single target are typically shorter compared to when movement to a second target is required. This one target movement time advantage has been shown to emerge when participants use a single hand throughout the target sequence and when there is a switch between hands at the first target. Our goal was to investigate the lacuna in the movement integration literature surrounding the interactive effects between switching hands and changing movement direction at the first target. Participants performed rapid hand movements in five conditions; movements to a single target; two target movements with a single hand in which the second target required an extension or reversal in direction; and movements to two targets where the hands were switched at the first target and the second target required an extension or reversal in direction. The significance of including these latter two (multiple hand-multiple direction) movements meant that for the first time research could differentiate between peripheral and central processes within movement integration strategies. Reaction times were significantly shorter in the single task compared to the two target tasks. More importantly, movement times to the first target were significantly shorter in the single target task compared to all two target tasks (reflecting the so-called one target advantage), except when the second movement was a reversal movement with the same hand. These findings demonstrate for the first time the contrasting effects of movement integration at central and peripheral levels.

  3. Rapid determination of plutonium isotopes in environmental samples using sequential injection extraction chromatography and detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    This article presents an automated method for the rapid determination of 239Pu and 240Pu in various environmental samples. The analytical method involves the in-line separation of Pu isotopes using extraction chromatography (TEVA) implemented in a sequential injection (SI) network followed by detection of isolated analytes with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method has been devised for the determination of Pu isotopes at environmentally relevant concentrations, whereby it has been successfully applied to the analyses of large volumes/amounts of samples, for example, 100-200 g of soil and sediment, 20 g of seaweed, and 200 L of seawater following analyte preconcentration. The investigation of the separation capability of the assembled SI system revealed that up to 200 g of soil or sediment can be treated using a column containing about 0.70 g of TEVA resin. The analytical results of Pu isotopes in the reference materials showed good agreement with the certified or reference values at the 0.05 significance level. Chemical yields of Pu ranged from 80 to 105%, and the decontamination factors for uranium, thorium, mercury and lead were all above 10(4). The duration of the in-line extraction chromatographic run was <1.5 h, and the proposed setup was able to handle up to 20 samples (14 mL each) in a fully automated mode using a single chromatographic column. The SI manifold is thus suitable for rapid and automated determination of Pu isotopes in environmental risk assessment and emergency preparedness scenarios. PMID:19722516

  4. On-line sequential injection dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction system for flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper and lead in water samples.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, Aristidis N; Ioannou, Kallirroy-Ioanna G

    2009-06-30

    A simple, sensitive and powerful on-line sequential injection (SI) dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) system was developed as an alternative approach for on-line metal preconcentration and separation, using extraction solvent at microlitre volume. The potentials of this novel schema, coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), were demonstrated for trace copper and lead determination in water samples. The stream of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 2.0% (v/v) xylene (extraction solvent) and 0.3% (m/v) ammonium diethyldithiophosphate (chelating agent) was merged on-line with the stream of sample (aqueous phase), resulting a cloudy mixture, which was consisted of fine droplets of the extraction solvent dispersed entirely into the aqueous phase. By this continuous process, metal chelating complexes were formed and extracted into the fine droplets of the extraction solvent. The hydrophobic droplets of organic phase were retained into a microcolumn packed with PTFE-turnings. A portion of 300 microL isobutylmethylketone was used for quantitative elution of the analytes, which transported directly to the nebulizer of FAAS. All the critical parameters of the system such as type of extraction solvent, flow-rate of disperser and sample, extraction time as well as the chemical parameters were studied. Under the optimum conditions the enhancement factor for copper and lead was 560 and 265, respectively. For copper, the detection limit and the precision (R.S.D.) were 0.04 microg L(-1) and 2.1% at 2.0 microg L(-1) Cu(II), respectively, while for lead were 0.54 microg L(-1) and 1.9% at 30.0 microg L(-1) Pb(II), respectively. The developed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference material and applied successfully to the analysis of environmental water samples. PMID:19376348

  5. A novel dual-valve sequential injection manifold (DV-SIA) for automated liquid-liquid extraction. Application for the determination of picric acid.

    PubMed

    Skrlíková, Jana; Andruch, Vasil; Sklenárová, Hana; Chocholous, Petr; Solich, Petr; Balogh, Ioseph S

    2010-05-01

    A novel dual-valve sequential injection system (DV-SIA) for online liquid-liquid extraction which resolves the main problems of LLE utilization in SIA has been designed. The main idea behind this new design was to construct an SIA system by connecting two independent units, one for aqueous-organic mixture flow and the second specifically for organic phase flow. As a result, the DV-SIA manifold consists of an Extraction unit and a Detection unit. Processing a mixture of aqueous-organic phase in the Extraction unit and a separated organic phase in the Detection unit solves the problems associated with the change of phases having different affinities to the walls of the Teflon tubing used in the SI-system. The developed manifold is a simple, user-friendly and universal system built entirely from commercially available components. The system can be used for a variety of samples and organic solvents and is simple enough to be easily handled by operators less familiar with flow systems. The efficiency of the DV-SIA system is demonstrated by the extraction of picric acid in the form of an ion associate with 2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenylamino)-vinyl]-1,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indolium reagent, with subsequent spectrophotometric detection. The suggested DV-SIA concept can be expected to stimulate new experiments in analytical laboratories and can be applied to the elaboration of procedures for the determination of other compounds extractable by organic solvents. It could thus form a basis for the design of simple, single-purpose commercial instruments used in LLE procedures.

  6. Y-branch integrated dual wavelength laser diode for microwave generation by sideband injection locking.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Sun, Changzheng; Xiong, Bing; Luo, Yi

    2009-11-01

    A Y-branch integrated dual wavelength laser diode is fabricated for optical microwave generation based on the principle of sideband injection locking. The device integrates a master laser and a slave laser with associated Y-branch coupler. By directly modulating the master laser near its relaxation resonance frequency, multiple sidebands are generated due to enhanced modulation nonlinearity. Beat signal with high spectral purity is obtained by injection locking the slave laser to one of the modulation sidebands. A millimeter-wave carrier of 42-GHz with a phase noise of -94.6 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is demonstrated.

  7. Sequential lateral solidification of silicon thin films on low-k dielectrics for low temperature integration

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, Fabio Hlaing, Htay; Kymissis, Ioannis; Gates, Stephen M.; Edelstein, Daniel C.; Limanov, Alexander B.; Im, James S.

    2014-12-15

    We present the excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on a low dielectric constant (low-k) insulator for very large scale integration monolithic 3D integration and demonstrate that low dielectric constant materials are suitable substrates for 3D integration through laser crystallization of silicon thin films. We crystallized 100 nm amorphous silicon on top of SiO{sub 2} and SiCOH (low-k) dielectrics, at different material thicknesses (1 μm, 0.75 μm, and 0.5 μm). The amorphous silicon crystallization on low-k dielectric requires 35% less laser energy than on an SiO{sub 2} dielectric. This difference is related to the thermal conductivity of the two materials, in agreement with one dimensional simulations of the crystallization process. We analyzed the morphology of the material through defect-enhanced microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. SEM micrographs show that polycrystalline silicon is characterized by micron-long grains with an average width of 543 nm for the SiO{sub 2} sample and 570 nm for the low-k samples. Comparison of the Raman spectra does not show any major difference in film quality for the two different dielectrics, and polycrystalline silicon peaks are closely placed around 517 cm{sup −1}. From X-ray diffraction analysis, the material crystallized on SiO{sub 2} shows a preferential (111) crystal orientation. In the SiCOH case, the 111 peak strength decreases dramatically and samples do not show preferential crystal orientation. A 1D finite element method simulation of the crystallization process on a back end of line structure shows that copper (Cu) damascene interconnects reach a temperature of 70 °C or lower with a 0.5 μm dielectric layer between the Cu and the molten Si layer, a favorable condition for monolithic 3D integration.

  8. Integrated Fuel Injection and Mixing System with Impingement Cooling Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Adel B. (Inventor); Harvey, Rex J. (Inventor); Tacina, Robert R. (Inventor); Laing, Peter (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An atomizing injector includes a metering set having a swirl chamber, a spray orifice and one or more feed slots etched in a thin plate. The swirl chamber is etched in a first side of the plate and the spray orifice is etched through a second side to the center of the swirl chamber. Fuel feed slots extend non-radially to the swirl chamber. The injector also includes integral swirler structure. The swirler structure includes a cylindrical air swirler passage, also shaped by etching, through at least one other thin plate. The cylindrical air swirler passage is located in co-axial relation to the spray orifice of the plate of the fuel metering set such that fuel directed through the spray orifice passes through the air swirler passage and swirling air is imparted to the fuel such that the fuel has a swirling component of motion. At least one air feed slot is provided in fluid communication with the air swirler passage and extends in non-radial relation thereto. Air supply passages extend through the plates of the metering set and the swirler structure to feed the air feed slot in each plate of the swirler structure.

  9. Sequential elution process

    DOEpatents

    Kingsley, I.S.

    1987-01-06

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

  10. Preliminary analysis of the sequential simultaneous integrated boost technique for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ohira, Shingo; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Isono, Masaru; Masaoka, Akira; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three strategies for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for 20 head-and-neck cancer patients. For simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), doses were 66 and 54 Gy in 30 fractions for PTVboost and PTVelective, respectively. Two-phase IMRT delivered 50 Gy in 25 fractions to PTVelective in the First Plan, and 20 Gy in 10 fractions to PTVboost in the Second Plan. Sequential SIB (SEQ-SIB) delivered 55 Gy and 50 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively, to PTVboost and PTVelective using SIB in the First Plan and 11 Gy in 5 fractions to PTVboost in the Second Plan. Conformity indexes (CIs) (mean ± SD) for PTVboost and PTVelective were 1.09 ± 0.05 and 1.34 ± 0.12 for SIB, 1.39 ± 0.14 and 1.80 ± 0.28 for two-phase IMRT, and 1.14 ± 0.07 and 1.60 ± 0.18 for SEQ-SIB, respectively. CI was significantly highest for two-phase IMRT. Maximum doses (Dmax) to the spinal cord were 42.1 ± 1.5 Gy for SIB, 43.9 ± 1.0 Gy for two-phase IMRT and 40.3 ± 1.8 Gy for SEQ-SIB. Brainstem Dmax were 50.1 ± 2.2 Gy for SIB, 50.5 ± 4.6 Gy for two-phase IMRT and 47.4 ± 3.6 Gy for SEQ-SIB. Spinal cord Dmax for the three techniques was significantly different, and brainstem Dmax was significantly lower for SEQ-SIB. The compromised conformity of two-phase IMRT can result in higher doses to organs at risk (OARs). Lower OAR doses in SEQ-SIB made SEQ-SIB an alternative to SIB, which applies unconventional doses per fraction. PMID:26983983

  11. Buffer direct injection readout integrated circuit design for dual band infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Chuan; Shieh, Hsiu-Li; Tang, Shiang-Feng; Lin, Wen-Jen

    2013-05-01

    This paper proposes dual-mode buffer direct injection (BDI) and direct injection (DI) readout circuit design. The DI readout circuit has the advantage of being a simple circuit, requiring a small layout area, and low power consumption. The internal resistance of the photodetector will affect the photocurrent injection efficiency. We used a buffer amplifier to design the BDI readout circuit since it would reduce the input impedance and raise the injection efficiency. This paper will discuss and analyze the power consumption, injection efficiency, layout area, and circuit noise. The circuit is simulated using a TSMC 0.35 um Mixed Signal 2P4M CMOS 5 V process. The dimension of the pixel area is 30×30 μm. We have designed a 10×8 array for the readout circuit of the interlaced columns. The input current ranges from 1 nA to 10 nA, when the measurement current is 10 pA to 10 nA. The integration time was varied. The circuit output swing was 2 V. The total root mean square noise voltage was 4.84 mV. The signal to noise ratio was 52 dB, and the full chip circuit power consumption was 9.94 mW.

  12. Wide bandwidth chaotic signal generation in a monolithically integrated semiconductor laser via optical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Mei; Zhong, Zhu-Qiang; Zhao, Ling-Juan; Lu, Dan; Qiu, Hai-Ying; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2015-11-01

    Wide bandwidth chaotic signal generation in a three-section monolithically integrated semiconductor laser (MISL) under external optical injection is investigated experimentally. Through evaluating the effective bandwidth of chaotic signals, the influences of the optical injection on the bandwidth of chaotic signal from the MISL are analyzed. The experimental results indicate that, for the currents of the DFB section (IDFB) and the phase section (IP) are fixed at 70.00 mA and 34.00 mA, respectively, the effective bandwidth of chaos signal generated by the solitary MISL reaches its maximum value of 14.36 GHz when the current of the amplification section (IA) takes 23.22 mA. After an external optical injection is introduced into the MISL, the effective bandwidth of the generated chaotic signal can be beyond 2.5 times of the maximum value. Furthermore, the effects of the injection strength and the frequency detuning on the effective bandwidth of the generated chaotic signal are also discussed.

  13. Investigation of caprock integrity during high-volume injection into the Utsira formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, S. E.; Wangen, M.; Bjørnarå, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Utsira formation is a large offshore saline aquifer in the North Sea that is considered a likely candidate for storage of CO2 emissions. Currently, the Utsira is host to the longest operating CO2 storage project, the Sleipner project, which has injected 1 Mt CO2/y since 1996. The entire Utsira formation has an estimated storage capacity of 15 Gt, which is equal to 300 Sleipner-sized projects in simultaneous operation for the next 50 years. Injectivity into the Utsira is exceptionally good, and no pressurization has been observed at Sleipner. The formation is over 100-m thick and comprised of unconsolidated sand with high porosity and permeability (30-40% and 1-3 Darcy). The Nordland shale has been characterized as a high-quality seal that is regionally thick, extensive and absent of significant faults. Significant scale-up of CO2 injection into the Utsira is required to increase storage of regional CO2 emissions well beyond what is currently stored today. Full utilization of the Utsira storage capacity would result in injection rates >100 Mt/y, significantly larger than Sleipner. Despite the lack of pressure effects at Sleipner, higher injection rates will likely lead to pressure build-up in the Utsira. Relatively little is known about the magnitude of pressure build-up and resulting impact on caprock integrity with high-volume injection. The problem is complex, involving multiphase flow and mechanical deformation of the storage reservoir and the surrounding formations, and covers large spatial scales, ranging several hundred kilometers in lateral extent. There are significant challenges in applying fully coupled hydromechanical simulators to problems of this scale. The computational effort required to solve a resolved is significant, and efforts to reduce the complexity of the model are needed. In this study, simplified modeling approaches are investigated. A reduced order multiphase flow model coupled with a geomechanical model results in greater efficiency

  14. On-line dilution and determination of the amount of concentrated hydrochloric acid in the final products from a hydrochloric acid production plant using a sequential injection titration system.

    PubMed

    van Staden, J Koos F; Mashamba, Mulalo G; Stefan, Raluca I

    2002-12-01

    An on-line sequential injection titration system for the determination of the concentration of concentrated hydrochloric acid as final product from a hydrochloric acid production plant is described. The system involves on-line dilution of the concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to an acceptable range for direct measurement by merging the sample stream with a de-ionized water diluent stream, followed by mixing in a dilution coil, before aspiration into the sequential injection system. Concentrated standard solutions were treated in exactly the same way as the samples. The system was evaluated for reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, and sample throughput. A linear relationship between peak width and logarithm of acid concentration was found in the range 5.934-8.995 mol l(-1) and a concentration of 0.005 mol l(-1) NaOH solution was used as titrant. Samples from the production plant showed excellent agreement when compared with the manual and automated batchwise titrations. The relative standard deviation was found to be less than 0.4% with a sample frequency of 30 samples per hour.

  15. Reducing Risk in CO2 Sequestration: A Framework for Integrated Monitoring of Basin Scale Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, C. J.; Haidari, A. S.; McRae, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 is an option for stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Technical ability to safely store CO2 in the subsurface has been demonstrated through pilot projects and a long history of enhanced oil recovery and acid gas disposal operations. To address climate change, current injection operations must be scaled up by a factor of 100, raising issues of safety and security. Monitoring and verification is an essential component in ensuring safe operations and managing risk. Monitoring provides assurance that CO2 is securely stored in the subsurface, and the mechanisms governing transport and storage are well understood. It also provides an early warning mechanism for identification of anomalies in performance, and a means for intervention and remediation through the ability to locate the CO2. Through theoretical studies, bench scale experiments and pilot tests, a number of technologies have demonstrated their ability to monitor CO2 in the surface and subsurface. Because the focus of these studies has been to demonstrate feasibility, individual techniques have not been integrated to provide a more robust method for monitoring. Considering the large volumes required for injection, size of the potential footprint, length of time a project must be monitored and uncertainty, operational considerations of cost and risk must balance safety and security. Integration of multiple monitoring techniques will reduce uncertainty in monitoring injected CO2, thereby reducing risk. We present a framework for risk management of large scale injection through model based monitoring network design. This framework is applied to monitoring CO2 in a synthetic reservoir where there is uncertainty in the underlying permeability field controlling fluid migration. Deformation and seismic data are used to track plume migration. A modified Ensemble Kalman filter approach is used to estimate flow properties by jointly assimilating flow and geomechanical

  16. Impact of Thermal Stresses on Wellbore Integrity during CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P.; Walsh, S.; Morris, J.; Carroll, S.; Hao, Y.; Iyer, J.; Torsater, M.; Gawel, K.; Todorovic, J.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal stresses caused by injection of cold CO2 into warmer storage reservoirs could create leakage pathways out of the storage reservoir. Although few studies have been conducted to investigate the well bore integrity subjected to thermal cycling during CO2injection, a systematic investigation on thermally induced expansion and contraction affecting the debonding and cracking of the well barrier materials has not yet been performed. In this work, we have analyzed the thermo-mechanical characteristics of the well barrier materials undergoing repeated thermal cycling using a multiscale, multiphysics platform named GEOS. More specifically, we model the modes of failure during thermal cycling to assess the temperature range for minimal impact on well integrity. A finite element solver was used for the geomechanics and a finite volume solver was used for the thermal diffusion. Results of the initiation and propagation of fractures due to temperature variations in the cement sheath are presented. Preliminary results suggest that radial fracture develops as the cement is heated while debonding occurs in the casing-cement and cement-rock interfaces during the cooling period. The effects of different confinement conditions based on in-situ stresses were also analyzed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work has been produced with support from the BIGCCS Centre, performed under the Norwegian research program Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME) and the KPN project "Ensuring well integrity during CO2 injection". The authors acknowledge the following partners for their contributions: Gassco, Shell, Statoil, TOTAL, GDF SUEZ and the Research Council of Norway (193816/S60 and 23389).

  17. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  18. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  19. Optimal characterization of pollutant sources in contaminated aquifers by integrating sequential-monitoring-network design and source identification: methodology and an application in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Om; Datta, Bithin

    2015-09-01

    Often, when pollution is first detected in groundwater, very few spatiotemporal pollutant concentration measurements are available. The contaminant concentration measurement data initially available are generally sparse and insufficient for accurate source characterization. This requires development of a contaminant monitoring plan and its field implementation to collect more data. The location of scientifically chosen monitoring points and the number of measurements are important considerations in improving the source-characterization process, especially in a complex contamination scenario. In order to improve the efficiency of source characterization, a feedback-based methodology is implemented, integrating sequential-monitoring-network design and a source identification method. The simulated annealing (SA) optimization algorithm is used to solve the models for optimal source identification and the monitoring-network-design optimization. This sequence is repeated a few times to improve the accuracy of source characterization. The methodology is based on the premise that concentration measurements from a sequence of implemented monitoring networks provide feedback information on the actual concentration in the site. This additional information, obtained as feedback from monitoring networks designed and implemented based on intermediate source characterization, can result in sequential improvement in the resulting source characterization. The performance of this methodology is evaluated by application to a contaminated aquifer site in New South Wales, Australia, where source location, source-activity initiation time and source-flux (mass per unit time) release history are considered as unknown variables. The performance evaluation results demonstrate potential applicability of the proposed sequential methodology.

  20. Free flow isotachophoresis in an injection moulded miniaturised separation chamber with integrated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Stone, Victoria N; Baldock, Sara J; Croasdell, Laura A; Dillon, Leonard A; Fielden, Peter R; Goddard, Nick J; Thomas, C L Paul; Treves Brown, Bernard J

    2007-07-01

    An injection moulded free flow isotachophoresis (FFITP) microdevice with integrated carbon fibre loaded electrodes with a separation chamber of 36.4mm wide, 28.7 mm long and 100 microm deep is presented. The microdevice was completely fabricated by injection moulding in carbon fibre loaded polystyrene for the electrodes and crystal polystyrene for the remainder of the chip and was bonded together using ultrasonic welding. Two injection moulded electrode designs were compared, one with the electrode surface level with the separation chamber and one with a recessed electrode. Separations of two anionic dyes, 0.2mM each of amaranth and acid green and separations of 0.2mM each of amaranth, bromophenol blue and glutamate were performed on the microdevice. Flow rates of 1.25 ml min(-1) for the leading and terminating electrolytes were used and a flow rate of 0.63 ml min(-1) for the sample. Electric fields of up to 370 V cm(-1) were applied across the separation chamber. Joule heating was not found to be significant although out-gassing was observed at drive currents greater than 3 mA.

  1. Caprock Integrity during Hydrocarbon Production and CO2 Injection in the Goldeneye Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Zimmerman, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a key technology for addressing climate change and maintaining security of energy supplies, while potentially offering important economic benefits. UK offshore, depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs have the potential capacity to store significant quantities of carbon dioxide, produced during power generation from fossil fuels. The Goldeneye depleted gas condensate field, located offshore in the UK North Sea at a depth of ~ 2600 m, is a candidate for the storage of at least 10 million tons of CO2. In this research, a fully coupled, full-scale model (50×20×8 km), based on the Goldeneye reservoir, is built and used for hydro-carbon production and CO2 injection simulations. The model accounts for fluid flow, heat transfer, and deformation of the fractured reservoir. Flow through fractures is defined as two-dimensional laminar flow within the three-dimensional poroelastic medium. The local thermal non-equilibrium between injected CO2 and host reservoir has been considered with convective (conduction and advection) heat transfer. The numerical model has been developed using standard finite element method with Galerkin spatial discretisation, and finite difference temporal discretisation. The geomechanical model has been implemented into the object-oriented Imperial College Geomechanics Toolkit, in close interaction with the Complex Systems Modelling Platform (CSMP), and validated with several benchmark examples. Fifteen major faults are mapped from the Goldeneye field into the model. Modal stress intensity factors, for the three modes of fracture opening during hydrocarbon production and CO2 injection phases, are computed at the tips of the faults by computing the I-Integral over a virtual disk. Contact stresses -normal and shear- on the fault surfaces are iteratively computed using a gap-based augmented Lagrangian-Uzawa method. Results show fault activation during the production phase that may affect the fault's hydraulic conductivity

  2. Injection ionization mechanism of current instability during switching off an integrated field controlled thyristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grekhov, I. V.; Gusin, D. V.; Ivanov, B. V.; Rozhkov, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The process of switching off an integrated field-controlled thyristor chip operating in a circuit with inductive load has been experimentally and theoretically analyzed. It was established by independent measurements of the anode and cathode emitter currents that the electron injection in all unit cells of the structure cannot be instantaneously interrupted under real conditions due to the shunting of the controlled emitters through the external circuit; the maximum current that can be switched off in this mode was also determined. A numerical simulation has revealed instability of the current distribution over the operation region, which facilitates its emergency localization, and has shown an urgent need to reduce stray inductances and resistances in the chips and shunting circuit when designing high-voltage integrated thyristors and related power modules.

  3. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  4. Gigascale Silicon Photonic Transmitters Integrating HBT-based Carrier-injection Electroabsorption Modulator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Enjin

    Demand for more bandwidth is rapidly increasing, which is driven by data intensive applications such as high-definition (HD) video streaming, cloud storage, and terascale computing applications. Next-generation high-performance computing systems require power efficient chip-to-chip and intra-chip interconnect yielding densities on the order of 1Tbps/cm2. The performance requirements of such system are the driving force behind the development of silicon integrated optical interconnect, providing a cost-effective solution for fully integrated optical interconnect systems on a single substrate. Compared to conventional electrical interconnect, optical interconnects have several advantages, including frequency independent insertion loss resulting in ultra wide bandwidth and link latency reduction. For high-speed optical transmitter modules, the optical modulator is a key component of the optical I/O channel. This thesis presents a silicon integrated optical transmitter module design based on a novel silicon HBT-based carrier injection electroabsorption modulator (EAM), which has the merits of wide optical bandwidth, high speed, low power, low drive voltage, small footprint, and high modulation efficiency. The structure, mechanism, and fabrication of the modulator structure will be discussed which is followed by the electrical modeling of the post-processed modulator device. The design and realization of a 10Gbps monolithic optical transmitter module integrating the driver circuit architecture and the HBT-based EAM device in a 130nm BiCMOS process is discussed. For high power efficiency, a 6Gbps ultra-low power driver IC implemented in a 130nm BiCMOS process is presented. The driver IC incorporates an integrated 27-1 pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) generator for reliable high-speed testing, and a driver circuit featuring digitally-tuned pre-emphasis signal strength. With outstanding drive capability, the driver module can be applied to a wide range of carrier

  5. Investigations on injection molded, glass-fiber reinforced polyamide 6 integral foams using breathing mold technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, A.; Kehret, L.; Huber, T.; Henning, F.; Elsner, P.

    2015-05-01

    Investigations on PA6-GF50 integral foams have been carried out using different material systems: longfiber- and shortfiber-reinforced PA6 as well as unreinforced PA6 as a reference material. Both chemical and physical blowing agents were applied. Breathing mold technology (decompression of the mold) was selected for the foaming process. The integral foam design, which can be conceived as a sandwich structure, helps to save material in the neutral axis area and maintains a distance between load-bearing, unfoamed skin layers. For all test series an initial mold gap of 2.5 mm was chosen and the same amount of material was injected. In order to realize different density reductions, the mold opening stroke was varied. The experiments showed that, at a constant mass per unit area, integral polyamide 6 foams have a significantly higher bending stiffness than compact components, due to their higher area moment of inertia after foaming. At a constant surface weight the bending stiffness in these experiments could be increased by up to 600 %. Both shortfiber- and longfiber-reinforced polyamide 6 showed an increase in energy absorption during foaming.

  6. Reusable EGaIn-Injected Substrate-Integrated-Waveguide Resonator for Wireless Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Muhammad Usman; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    The proposed structure in this research is constructed on substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology and has a mechanism that produces 16 different and distinct resonant frequencies between 2.45 and 3.05 GHz by perturbing a fundamental TE10 mode. It is a unique method for producing multiple resonances in a radio frequency planar structure without any extra circuitry or passive elements is developed. The proposed SIW structure has four vertical fluidic holes (channels); injecting eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn), also known commonly as liquid metal (LM), into these vertical channels produces different resonant frequencies. Either a channel is empty, or it is filled with LM. In total, the combination of different frequencies produced from four vertical channels is 16. PMID:26569257

  7. Time Data Sequential Processor /TDSP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. E.; Pavlovitch, T.; Roth, R. Y.; Sturms, F. M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Time Data Sequential Processor /TDSP/ computer program provides preflight predictions for lunar trajectories from injection to impact, and for planetary escape trajectories for up to 100 hours from launch. One of the major options TDSP performs is the determination of tracking station view periods.

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Theories Used to Explain Injection Risk Behavior Among Injection Drug Users: A Review and Suggestions for the Integration of Cognitive and Environmental Models

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Andreeva, Valentina A.; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) are at risk for HIV and viral hepatitis, and risky injection behavior persists despite decades of intervention. Cognitive behavioral theories (CBT) are commonly used to help understand risky injection behavior. We review findings from CBT-based studies of injection risk behavior among IDUs. An extensive literature search was conducted in Spring 2007. In total 33 studies were reviewed—26 epidemiological and 7 intervention studies. Findings suggest that some theoretical constructs have received fairly consistent support (e.g., self-efficacy, social norms), while others have yielded inconsistent or null results (e.g., perceived susceptibility, knowledge, behavioral intentions, perceived barriers, perceived benefits, response efficacy, perceived severity). We offer some possible explanations for these inconsistent findings, including differences in theoretical constructs and measures across studies and a need to examine the environmental structures that influence risky behaviors. Greater integration of CBT with a risk environment perspective may yield more conclusive findings and more effective interventions in the future. PMID:20705809

  9. Activated Protein C Enhances Human Keratinocyte Barrier Integrity via Sequential Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Tie2*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Chow, Shu-Oi; Dervish, Suat; Chan, Yee-Ka Agnes; Julovi, Sohel M.; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier protective properties, significantly increased the barrier impedance of keratinocyte monolayers, measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran flux. In response to APC, Tie2, a tyrosine kinase receptor, was rapidly activated within 30 min, and relocated to cell-cell contacts. APC also increased junction proteins zona occludens, claudin-1 and VE-cadherin. Inhibition of Tie2 by its peptide inhibitor or small interfering RNA abolished the barrier protective effect of APC. Interestingly, APC did not activate Tie2 through its major ligand, angiopoietin-1, but instead acted by binding to endothelial protein C receptor, cleaving protease-activated receptor-1 and transactivating EGF receptor. Furthermore, when activation of Akt, but not ERK, was inhibited, the barrier protective effect of APC on keratinocytes was abolished. Thus, APC activates Tie2, via a mechanism requiring, in sequential order, the receptors, endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, and EGF receptor, which selectively enhances the PI3K/Akt signaling to enhance junctional complexes and reduce keratinocyte permeability. PMID:21173154

  10. A hybrid lightwave transmission system based on light injection/optoelectronic feedback techniques and fiber-VLLC integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Shing; Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Chen, Bo-Rui; Lin, Hung-Hsien; Lin, Dai-Hua

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid lightwave transmission system based on light injection/optoelectronic feedback techniques and fiber-visible laser light communication (VLLC) integration is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. To be the first one of its kind in employing light injection and optoelectronic feedback techniques in a fiber-VLLC integration lightwave transmission system, the light is successfully directly modulated with Community Access Television (CATV), 16-QAM, and 16-QAM-OFDM signals. Over a 40 km SMF and a 10 m free-space VLLC transport, good performances of carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR)/composite second-order (CSO)/composite triple-beat (CTB)/bit error rate (BER) are achieved for CATV/16-QAM/16-QAM-OFDM signals transmission. Such a hybrid lightwave transmission system would be very useful since it can provide broadband integrated services including CATV, Internet, and telecommunication services over both distribute fiber and in-building networks.

  11. Automated pre-column derivatization of thiolic fruit-antibrowning agents by sequential injection coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography using a monolithic stationary phase and an in-loop stopped-flow approach.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Themelis, Demetrius G

    2011-08-01

    The present study reports the very first application of ethyl propiolate (EP) as an advantageous pre-column derivatization reagent for the determination of thiols by liquid chromatography (LC). Cysteine (CYS), glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were derivatized online under stopped-flow conditions in a sequential injection (SI) system coupled to HPLC. The formed derivatives were separated isocratically with a monolithic stationary phase (100×4.6 mm id) and UV detected at 285 nm. Critical parameters that affected the online pre-column derivatization reaction (e.g. the reaction time and the amount concentration of EP) and the separation (e.g. pH and the composition of the mobile phase) were investigated. The developed analytical scheme offers a total analysis time of less than 10 min, limits of detection in the range of 0.24-0.35 μmol/L and satisfactory linearity up to 200 μmol/L for all analytes. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of the selected thiols--that are often employed as antibrowning agents--in fresh fruit samples.

  12. Determination of trace metal ions via on-line separation and preconcentration by means of chelating Sepharose beads in a sequential injection lab-on-valve (SI-LOV) system coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiangbao; Hansen, Elo Harald; Miró, Manuel

    2005-06-15

    The analytical performance of an on-line sequential injection lab-on-valve (SI-LOV) system using chelating Sepharose beads as sorbent material for the determination of ultra-trace levels of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Ni(II) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is described and discussed. The samples are adjusted to pH 5.0 on-line in the system for optimum operation. The target ions are adsorbed by chelation on the surface of the beads, contained in a 20mul microcolumn within the LOV, and following elution by 50mul 2M nitric acid, the eluate is, as sandwiched by air segments, introduced into the ETAAS. Based on the consumption of 1.8ml sample solution, retention efficiencies of 95, 75 and 90%, enrichment factors of 34, 27 and 32, and determination limits of 0.001, 0.07 and 0.02mugl(-1) were obtained for Cd(II), Pb(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The beads can be used repeatedly for at least 20 times without decrease of performance, yet can be replaced at will if the circumstances should so dictate. The optimized procedural parameters showed that 12 samples per hour could be prepared and successfully analyzed. The results obtained for three standard reference materials agreed very well with the certified values.

  13. Integration of High-Charge-Injection-Capacity Electrodes onto Polymer Softening Neural Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Arreaga-Salas, David E; Avendaño-Bolívar, Adrian; Simon, Dustin; Reit, Radu; Garcia-Sandoval, Aldo; Rennaker, Robert L; Voit, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Softening neural interfaces are implanted stiff to enable precise insertion, and they soften in physiological conditions to minimize modulus mismatch with tissue. In this work, a high-charge-injection-capacity iridium electrode fabrication process is detailed. For the first time, this process enables integration of iridium electrodes onto softening substrates using photolithography to define all features in the device. Importantly, no electroplated layers are utilized, leading to a highly scalable method for consistent device fabrication. The iridium electrode is metallically bonded to the gold conductor layer, which is covalently bonded to the softening substrate via sulfur-based click chemistry. The resulting shape-memory polymer neural interfaces can deliver more than 2 billion symmetric biphasic pulses (100 μs/phase), with a charge of 200 μC/cm(2) and geometric surface area (GSA) of 300 μm(2). A transfer-by-polymerization method is used in combination with standard semiconductor processing techniques to fabricate functional neural probes onto a thiol-ene-based, thin film substrate. Electrical stability is tested under simulated physiological conditions in an accelerated electrical aging paradigm with periodic measurement of electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and charge storage capacity (CSC) at various intervals. Electrochemical characterization and both optical and scanning electron microscopy suggest significant breakdown of the 600 nm-thick parylene-C insulation, although no delamination of the conductors or of the final electrode interface was observed. Minor cracking at the edges of the thin film iridium electrodes was occasionally observed. The resulting devices will provide electrical recording and stimulation of the nervous system to better understand neural wiring and timing, to target treatments for debilitating diseases, and to give neuroscientists spatially selective and specific tools to interact with the body. This approach has uses for

  14. Integration of High-Charge-Injection-Capacity Electrodes onto Polymer Softening Neural Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Arreaga-Salas, David E; Avendaño-Bolívar, Adrian; Simon, Dustin; Reit, Radu; Garcia-Sandoval, Aldo; Rennaker, Robert L; Voit, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Softening neural interfaces are implanted stiff to enable precise insertion, and they soften in physiological conditions to minimize modulus mismatch with tissue. In this work, a high-charge-injection-capacity iridium electrode fabrication process is detailed. For the first time, this process enables integration of iridium electrodes onto softening substrates using photolithography to define all features in the device. Importantly, no electroplated layers are utilized, leading to a highly scalable method for consistent device fabrication. The iridium electrode is metallically bonded to the gold conductor layer, which is covalently bonded to the softening substrate via sulfur-based click chemistry. The resulting shape-memory polymer neural interfaces can deliver more than 2 billion symmetric biphasic pulses (100 μs/phase), with a charge of 200 μC/cm(2) and geometric surface area (GSA) of 300 μm(2). A transfer-by-polymerization method is used in combination with standard semiconductor processing techniques to fabricate functional neural probes onto a thiol-ene-based, thin film substrate. Electrical stability is tested under simulated physiological conditions in an accelerated electrical aging paradigm with periodic measurement of electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and charge storage capacity (CSC) at various intervals. Electrochemical characterization and both optical and scanning electron microscopy suggest significant breakdown of the 600 nm-thick parylene-C insulation, although no delamination of the conductors or of the final electrode interface was observed. Minor cracking at the edges of the thin film iridium electrodes was occasionally observed. The resulting devices will provide electrical recording and stimulation of the nervous system to better understand neural wiring and timing, to target treatments for debilitating diseases, and to give neuroscientists spatially selective and specific tools to interact with the body. This approach has uses for

  15. A new numerical approach to solve Thomas-Fermi model of an atom using bio-inspired heuristics integrated with sequential quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Raja, Muhammad Asif Zahoor; Zameer, Aneela; Khan, Aziz Ullah; Wazwaz, Abdul Majid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel bio-inspired computing approach is developed to analyze the dynamics of nonlinear singular Thomas-Fermi equation (TFE) arising in potential and charge density models of an atom by exploiting the strength of finite difference scheme (FDS) for discretization and optimization through genetic algorithms (GAs) hybrid with sequential quadratic programming. The FDS procedures are used to transform the TFE differential equations into a system of nonlinear equations. A fitness function is constructed based on the residual error of constituent equations in the mean square sense and is formulated as the minimization problem. Optimization of parameters for the system is carried out with GAs, used as a tool for viable global search integrated with SQP algorithm for rapid refinement of the results. The design scheme is applied to solve TFE for five different scenarios by taking various step sizes and different input intervals. Comparison of the proposed results with the state of the art numerical and analytical solutions reveals that the worth of our scheme in terms of accuracy and convergence. The reliability and effectiveness of the proposed scheme are validated through consistently getting optimal values of statistical performance indices calculated for a sufficiently large number of independent runs to establish its significance. PMID:27610319

  16. Sequentially Integrated Optimization of the Conditions to Obtain a High-Protein and Low-Antinutritional Factors Protein Isolate from Edible Jatropha curcas Seed Cake

    PubMed Central

    León-López, Liliana; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas seed cake is a protein-rich byproduct of oil extraction which could be used to produce protein isolates. The purpose of this study was the optimization of the protein isolation process from the seed cake of an edible provenance of J. curcas by an alkaline extraction followed by isoelectric precipitation method via a sequentially integrated optimization approach. The influence of four different factors (solubilization pH, extraction temperature, NaCl addition, and precipitation pH) on the protein and antinutritional compounds content of the isolate was evaluated. The estimated optimal conditions were an extraction temperature of 20°C, a precipitation pH of 4, and an amount of NaCl in the extraction solution of 0.6 M for a predicted protein content of 93.3%. Under these conditions, it was possible to obtain experimentally a protein isolate with 93.21% of proteins, 316.5 mg 100 g−1 of total phenolics, 2891.84 mg 100 g−1 of phytates and 168 mg 100 g−1 of saponins. The protein content of the this isolate was higher than the content reported by other authors. PMID:25937971

  17. Towards the Integration of Dark- and Photo-Fermentative Waste Treatment. 4. Repeated Batch Sequential Dark- and Photofermentation using Starch as Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinavichene, T. V.; Belokopytov, B. F.; Laurinavichius, K. S.; Khusnutdinova, A. N.; Seibert, M.; Tsygankov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we demonstrated the technical feasibility of a prolonged, sequential two-stage integrated process under a repeated batch mode of starch fermentation. In this durable scheme, the photobioreactor with purple bacteria in the second stage was fed directly with dark culture from the first stage without centrifugation, filtration, or sterilization (not demonstrated previously). After preliminary optimization, both the dark- and the photo-stages were performed under repeated batch modes with different process parameters. Continuous H{sub 2} production in this system was observed at a H{sub 2} yield of up to 1.4 and 3.9 mole mole{sup -1} hexose during the dark- and photo-stage, respectively (for a total of 5.3 mole mole{sup -1} hexose), and rates of 0.9 and 0.5 L L{sup -1} d{sup -1}, respectively. Prolonged repeated batch H{sub 2} production was maintained for up to 90 days in each stage and was rather stable under non-aseptic conditions. Potential for improvements in these results are discussed.

  18. A new numerical approach to solve Thomas-Fermi model of an atom using bio-inspired heuristics integrated with sequential quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Raja, Muhammad Asif Zahoor; Zameer, Aneela; Khan, Aziz Ullah; Wazwaz, Abdul Majid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel bio-inspired computing approach is developed to analyze the dynamics of nonlinear singular Thomas-Fermi equation (TFE) arising in potential and charge density models of an atom by exploiting the strength of finite difference scheme (FDS) for discretization and optimization through genetic algorithms (GAs) hybrid with sequential quadratic programming. The FDS procedures are used to transform the TFE differential equations into a system of nonlinear equations. A fitness function is constructed based on the residual error of constituent equations in the mean square sense and is formulated as the minimization problem. Optimization of parameters for the system is carried out with GAs, used as a tool for viable global search integrated with SQP algorithm for rapid refinement of the results. The design scheme is applied to solve TFE for five different scenarios by taking various step sizes and different input intervals. Comparison of the proposed results with the state of the art numerical and analytical solutions reveals that the worth of our scheme in terms of accuracy and convergence. The reliability and effectiveness of the proposed scheme are validated through consistently getting optimal values of statistical performance indices calculated for a sufficiently large number of independent runs to establish its significance.

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Theories Used to Explain Injection Risk Behavior among Injection Drug Users: A Review and Suggestions for the Integration of Cognitive and Environmental Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Karla Dawn; Unger, Jennifer B.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Andreeva, Valentina A.; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) are at risk for HIV and viral hepatitis, and risky injection behavior persists despite decades of intervention. Cognitive behavioral theories (CBTs) are commonly used to help understand risky injection behavior. The authors review findings from CBT-based studies of injection risk behavior among IDUs. An extensive…

  20. High-throughput sequential injection method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental solids using macroporous anion-exchange chromatography, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an automated analytical method for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in soil, sediment, and seaweed, with detection via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A chromatographic column packed with a macroporous anion exchanger (AG MP-1 M) was incorporated in a sequential injection (SI) system for the efficient retrieval of plutonium, along with neptunium, from matrix elements and potential interfering nuclides. The sorption and elution behavior of plutonium and neptunium onto AG MP-1 M resin was compared with a commonly utilized AG 1-gel-type anion exchanger. Experimental results reveal that the pore structure of the anion exchanger plays a pivotal role in ensuring similar separation behavior of plutonium and neptunium along the separation protocol. It is proven that plutonium-242 ((242)Pu) performs well as a tracer for monitoring the chemical yield of neptunium when using AG MP-1 M resin, whereby the difficulties in obtaining a reliable and practicable isotopic neptunium tracer are overcome. An important asset of the SI setup is the feasibility of processing up to 100 g of solid substrates using a small-sized (ca. 2 mL) column with chemical yields of neptunium and plutonium being ≥79%. Analytical results of three certified/standard reference materials and two solid samples from intercomparison exercises are in good agreement with the reference values at the 0.05 significance level. The overall on-column separation can be completed within 3.5 h for 10 g of soil samples. Most importantly, the anion-exchange mini-column suffices to be reused up to 10-fold with satisfactory chemical yields (>70%), as demanded in environmental monitoring and emergency scenarios, making the proposed automated assembly well-suited for unattended and high-throughput analysis.

  1. Optical injection locking of monolithically integrated photonic source for generation of high purity signals above 100 GHz.

    PubMed

    Balakier, Katarzyna; Fice, Martyn J; van Dijk, Frederic; Kervella, Gael; Carpintero, Guillermo; Seeds, Alwyn J; Renaud, Cyril C

    2014-12-01

    A monolithically integrated photonic source for tuneable mm-wave signal generation has been fabricated. The source consists of 14 active components, i.e. semiconductor lasers, amplifiers and photodetectors, all integrated on a 3 mm(2) InP chip. Heterodyne signals in the range between 85 GHz and 120 GHz with up to -10 dBm output power have been successfully generated. By optically injection locking the integrated lasers to an external optical comb source, high-spectral-purity signals at frequencies >100 GHz have been generated, with phase noise spectral density below -90 dBc/Hz being achieved at offsets from the carrier greater than 10 kHz.

  2. Optical injection locking of monolithically integrated photonic source for generation of high purity signals above 100 GHz.

    PubMed

    Balakier, Katarzyna; Fice, Martyn J; van Dijk, Frederic; Kervella, Gael; Carpintero, Guillermo; Seeds, Alwyn J; Renaud, Cyril C

    2014-12-01

    A monolithically integrated photonic source for tuneable mm-wave signal generation has been fabricated. The source consists of 14 active components, i.e. semiconductor lasers, amplifiers and photodetectors, all integrated on a 3 mm(2) InP chip. Heterodyne signals in the range between 85 GHz and 120 GHz with up to -10 dBm output power have been successfully generated. By optically injection locking the integrated lasers to an external optical comb source, high-spectral-purity signals at frequencies >100 GHz have been generated, with phase noise spectral density below -90 dBc/Hz being achieved at offsets from the carrier greater than 10 kHz. PMID:25606875

  3. A Hyaluronan-Based Injectable Hydrogel Improves the Survival and Integration of Stem Cell Progeny following Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballios, Brian G.; Cooke, Michael J.; Donaldson, Laura; Coles, Brenda L.K.; Morshead, Cindi M.; van der Kooy, Derek; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The utility of stem cells and their progeny in adult transplantation models has been limited by poor survival and integration. We designed an injectable and bioresorbable hydrogel blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC) and tested it with two cell types in two animal models, thereby gaining an understanding of its general applicability for enhanced cell distribution, survival, integration, and functional repair relative to conventional cell delivery in saline. HAMC improves cell survival and integration of retinal stem cell (RSC)-derived rods in the retina. The pro-survival mechanism of HAMC is ascribed to the interaction of the CD44 receptor with HA. Transient disruption of the retinal outer limiting membrane, combined with HAMC delivery, results in significantly improved rod survival and visual function. HAMC also improves the distribution, viability, and functional repair of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs). The HAMC delivery system improves cell transplantation efficacy in two CNS models, suggesting broad applicability. PMID:25981414

  4. On-chip integrated multi-thermo-actuated microvalves of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for microflow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; He, Qiaohong; Ma, Dan; Chen, Hengwu

    2010-04-30

    An array of thermo-actuated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) multivalves was designed and fabricated to perform volume-based sample injection for microflow injection analysis on a glass microfluidic chip. The PNIPAAm monolithic plug valves were prepared inside the vinylized glass channels by photopolymerization in water-ethanol (1:1) medium using 2-hydroxy-2-methyl propiophenone (Darocure-1173) as the initiator and a photo-mask for micropattern transferring. Experimental conditions for the photopolymerization were studied, and the thermo-responsive behavior of the synthesized monolithic plug valves was investigated. To perform active heating and cooling of the on-chip integrated thermo-actuated valves, micro-Peltier devices were used and operation times of 3-s for opening and 7-s for closing were obtained. In the close status, a 2-mm long monolithic plug valve could endure a pressure of no higher than 0.45 MPa. The volume-based sample and reagent injector was composed of two groups of valves (total valve number of 5) and two loops. When the two groups of valves were alternatively opened and closed via thermo-actuation, the sampling loops were able to be switched between loading and injection position without any mechanical moving parts. Cooperating with syringe pumps, the microfluidic chip with the integrated sample injector has been demonstrated for microflow injection chemiluminescence detection of hydrogen peroxide. For a sampling volume of 6 nL, linear response was observed over the H(2)O(2) concentration range of 0-2 mmol L(-1), and a precision of 0.6% (RSD, n=11) was achieved for a standard H(2)O(2) solution 2 mmol L(-1). PMID:20417320

  5. Sequential injection anodic stripping voltammetry with monosegmented flow and in-line UV digestion for determination of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Siriangkhawut, Watsaka; Grudpan, Kate; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2011-06-15

    A cost-effective sequential injection system incorporating with an in-line UV digestion for breakdown of organic matter prior to voltammetric determination of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) of a small scale voltammetric cell was developed. A low-cost small scale voltammetric cell was fabricated from disposable pipet tip and microcentrifuge tube with volume of about 3 mL for conveniently incorporated with the SI system. A home-made UV digestion unit was fabricated employing a small size and low wattage UV lamps and flow reactor made from PTFE tubing coiled around the UV lamp. An in-line single standard calibration or a standard addition procedure was developed employing a monosegmented flow technique. Performance of the proposed system was tested for in-line digestion of model water samples containing metal ions and some organic ligands such as strong organic ligand (EDTA) or intermediate organic ligand (humic acid). The wet acid digestion method (USEPA 3010a) was used as a standard digestion method for comparison. Under the optimum conditions, with deposition time of 180 s, linear calibration graphs in range of 10-300 μg L(-1) Zn(II), 5-200 μg L(-1) Cd(II), 10-200 μg L(-1) Pb(II), 20-400 μg L(-1) Cu(II) were obtained with detection limit of 3.6, 0.1, 0.7 and 4.3 μg L(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation were 4.2, 2.6, 3.1 and 4.7% for seven replicate analyses of 27 μg L(-1) Zn(II), 13 μg L(-1) Cd(II), 13 μg L(-1) Pb(II) and 27 μg L(-1) Cu(II), respectively. The system was validated by certified reference material of trace metals in natural water (SRM 1640 NIST). The developed system was successfully applied for speciation of Cd(II) Pb(II) and Cu(II) in ground water samples collected from nearby zinc mining area.

  6. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-03-15

    A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation.

  7. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Luzio, Alessandro; Natali, Dario; Kim, Juhwan; Khim, Dongyoon; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young; Caironi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μe) and hole (μh) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μh = 0.29 cm2/V s and μe = 0.001 cm2/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μe = 0.12 cm2/V s and μh = 8 × 10-4 cm2/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  8. Organic integrated circuits for information storage based on ambipolar polymers and charge injection engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Natali, Dario; Luzio, Alessandro; Caironi, Mario E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu; Noh, Yong-Young E-mail: yynoh@dongguk.edu

    2014-04-14

    Ambipolar semiconducting polymers, characterized by both high electron (μ{sub e}) and hole (μ{sub h}) mobility, offer the advantage of realizing complex complementary electronic circuits with a single semiconducting layer, deposited by simple coating techniques. However, to achieve complementarity, one of the two conduction paths in transistors has to be suppressed, resulting in unipolar devices. Here, we adopt charge injection engineering through a specific interlayer in order to tune injection into frontier energy orbitals of a high mobility donor-acceptor co-polymer. Starting from field-effect transistors with Au contacts, showing a p-type unbalanced behaviour with μ{sub h} = 0.29 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub e} = 0.001 cm{sup 2}/V s, through the insertion of a caesium salt interlayer with optimized thickness, we obtain an n-type unbalanced transistor with μ{sub e} = 0.12 cm{sup 2}/V s and μ{sub h} = 8 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/V s. We applied this result to the development of the basic pass-transistor logic building blocks such as inverters, with high gain and good noise margin, and transmission-gates. In addition, we developed and characterized information storage circuits like D-Latches and D-Flip-Flops consisting of 16 transistors, demonstrating both their static and dynamic performances and thus the suitability of this technology for more complex circuits such as display addressing logic.

  9. Integrated gasification combined cycle and steam injection gas turbine powered by biomass joint-venture evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sterzinger, G J

    1994-05-01

    This report analyzes the economic and environmental potential of biomass integrated gasifier/gas turbine technology including its market applications. The mature technology promises to produce electricity at $55--60/MWh and to be competitive for market applications conservatively estimated at 2000 MW. The report reviews the competitiveness of the technology of a stand-alone, mature basis and finds it to be substantial and recognized by DOE, EPRI, and the World Bank Global Environmental Facility.

  10. Integration of FTTH and GI-POF in-house networks based on injection locking and direct-detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsiao-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Su, Heng-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Tai

    2011-03-28

    An integration of fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) and graded-index plastic optical fiber (GI-POF) in-house networks based on injection-locked vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and direct-detection technique is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Sufficient low bit error rate (BER) values were obtained over a combination of 20-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 50-m GI-POF links. Signal qualities satisfy the worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) requirement with data signals of 20 Mbps/5.8 GHz and 70 Mbps/10 GHz, respectively. Since our proposed network does not use sophisticated and expensive RF devices in premises, it reveals a prominent one with simpler and more economic advantages. Our proposed architecture is suitable for the SMF-based primary and GI-POF-based in-house networks. PMID:21451701

  11. Fertilizability and chromosomal integrity of frozen-thawed Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) spermatozoa intracytoplasmically injected into mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Tateno, H; Kusakabe, H; Matsuoka, T; Kamiguchi, Y; Fujise, Y; Ishikawa, H; Ohsumi, S; Fukui, Y

    2007-02-01

    Prior to attempting the in vitro production of embryos in the Bryde's whale (Balaenoputera edeni), we investigated whether spermatozoa can retain the capacity for oocyte activation and pronucleus formation as well as chromosomal integrity under cryopreservation by using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) into mouse oocytes. Regardless of motility and viability, whale spermatozoa efficiently led to the activation of mouse oocytes (90.3-97.4%), and sperm nuclei successfully transformed into male pronucleus within activated ooplasm (87.2-93.6%). Chromosome analysis at the first cleavage metaphase (M) of the hybrid zygotes revealed that a majority (95.2%) of motile spermatozoa had the normal chromosome complement, while the percentage of chromosomal normality was significantly reduced to 63.5% in immotile spermatozoa and 50.0% in dead spermatozoa due to the increase in structural chromosome aberrations. This is the first report showing that motile Bryde's whale spermatozoa are competent to support embryonic development.

  12. Integration of FTTH and GI-POF in-house networks based on injection locking and direct-detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsiao-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Su, Heng-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Tai

    2011-03-28

    An integration of fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) and graded-index plastic optical fiber (GI-POF) in-house networks based on injection-locked vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and direct-detection technique is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Sufficient low bit error rate (BER) values were obtained over a combination of 20-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 50-m GI-POF links. Signal qualities satisfy the worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) requirement with data signals of 20 Mbps/5.8 GHz and 70 Mbps/10 GHz, respectively. Since our proposed network does not use sophisticated and expensive RF devices in premises, it reveals a prominent one with simpler and more economic advantages. Our proposed architecture is suitable for the SMF-based primary and GI-POF-based in-house networks.

  13. Sector Tests of a Low-NO(sub x), Lean, Direct- Injection, Multipoint Integrated Module Combustor Concept Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.; Wey, Chang-Lie; Laing, Peter; Mansour, Adel

    2002-01-01

    The low-emissions combustor development described is directed toward advanced high pressure aircraft gas-turbine applications. The emphasis of this research is to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) at high-power conditions and to maintain carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons at their current low levels at low power conditions. Low-NOx combustors can be classified into rich-burn and lean-burn concepts. Lean-burn combustors can be further classified into lean-premixed-prevaporized (LPP) and lean direct injection (LDI) concepts. In both concepts, all the combustor air, except for liner cooling flow, enters through the combustor dome so that the combustion occurs at the lowest possible flame temperature. The LPP concept has been shown to have the lowest NOx emissions, but for advanced high-pressure-ratio engines, the possibility of autoignition or flashback precludes its use. LDI differs from LPP in that the fuel is injected directly into the flame zone, and thus, it does not have the potential for autoignition or flashback and should have greater stability. However, since it is not premixed and prevaporized, good atomization is necessary and the fuel must be mixed quickly and uniformly so that flame temperatures are low and NOx formation levels are comparable to those of LPP. The LDI concept described is a multipoint fuel injection/multiburning zone concept. Each of the multiple fuel injectors has an air swirler associated with it to provide quick mixing and a small recirculation zone for burning. The multipoint fuel injection provides quick, uniform mixing and the small multiburning zones provide for reduced burning residence time, resulting in low NOx formation. An integrated-module approach was used for the construction where chemically etched laminates, diffusion bonded together, combine the fuel injectors, air swirlers, and fuel manifold into a single element. The multipoint concept combustor was demonstrated in a 15 sector test. The configuration tested had 36

  14. Eyewitness confidence in simultaneous and sequential lineups: a criterion shift account for sequential mistaken identification overconfidence.

    PubMed

    Dobolyi, David G; Dodson, Chad S

    2013-12-01

    Confidence judgments for eyewitness identifications play an integral role in determining guilt during legal proceedings. Past research has shown that confidence in positive identifications is strongly associated with accuracy. Using a standard lineup recognition paradigm, we investigated accuracy using signal detection and ROC analyses, along with the tendency to choose a face with both simultaneous and sequential lineups. We replicated past findings of reduced rates of choosing with sequential as compared to simultaneous lineups, but notably found an accuracy advantage in favor of simultaneous lineups. Moreover, our analysis of the confidence-accuracy relationship revealed two key findings. First, we observed a sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect: despite an overall reduction in false alarms, confidence for false alarms that did occur was higher with sequential lineups than with simultaneous lineups, with no differences in confidence for correct identifications. This sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect is an expected byproduct of the use of a more conservative identification criterion with sequential than with simultaneous lineups. Second, we found a steady drop in confidence for mistaken identifications (i.e., foil identifications and false alarms) from the first to the last face in sequential lineups, whereas confidence in and accuracy of correct identifications remained relatively stable. Overall, we observed that sequential lineups are both less accurate and produce higher confidence false identifications than do simultaneous lineups. Given the increasing prominence of sequential lineups in our legal system, our data argue for increased scrutiny and possibly a wholesale reevaluation of this lineup format.

  15. Eyewitness confidence in simultaneous and sequential lineups: a criterion shift account for sequential mistaken identification overconfidence.

    PubMed

    Dobolyi, David G; Dodson, Chad S

    2013-12-01

    Confidence judgments for eyewitness identifications play an integral role in determining guilt during legal proceedings. Past research has shown that confidence in positive identifications is strongly associated with accuracy. Using a standard lineup recognition paradigm, we investigated accuracy using signal detection and ROC analyses, along with the tendency to choose a face with both simultaneous and sequential lineups. We replicated past findings of reduced rates of choosing with sequential as compared to simultaneous lineups, but notably found an accuracy advantage in favor of simultaneous lineups. Moreover, our analysis of the confidence-accuracy relationship revealed two key findings. First, we observed a sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect: despite an overall reduction in false alarms, confidence for false alarms that did occur was higher with sequential lineups than with simultaneous lineups, with no differences in confidence for correct identifications. This sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect is an expected byproduct of the use of a more conservative identification criterion with sequential than with simultaneous lineups. Second, we found a steady drop in confidence for mistaken identifications (i.e., foil identifications and false alarms) from the first to the last face in sequential lineups, whereas confidence in and accuracy of correct identifications remained relatively stable. Overall, we observed that sequential lineups are both less accurate and produce higher confidence false identifications than do simultaneous lineups. Given the increasing prominence of sequential lineups in our legal system, our data argue for increased scrutiny and possibly a wholesale reevaluation of this lineup format. PMID:24188335

  16. An Integrated Approach Linking Process to Structural Modeling With Microstructural Characterization for Injections-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of our work is to enable the optimum design of lightweight automotive structural components using injection-molded long fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). To this end, an integrated approach that links process modeling to structural analysis with experimental microstructural characterization and validation is developed. First, process models for LFTs are developed and implemented into processing codes (e.g. ORIENT, Moldflow) to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite (i.e. fiber length and orientation distributions). In parallel, characterization and testing methods are developed to obtain necessary microstructural data to validate process modeling predictions. Second, the predicted LFT composite microstructure is imported into a structural finite element analysis by ABAQUS to determine the response of the as-formed composite to given boundary conditions. At this stage, constitutive models accounting for the composite microstructure are developed to predict various types of behaviors (i.e. thermoelastic, viscoelastic, elastic-plastic, damage, fatigue, and impact) of LFTs. Experimental methods are also developed to determine material parameters and to validate constitutive models. Such a process-linked-structural modeling approach allows an LFT composite structure to be designed with confidence through numerical simulations. Some recent results of our collaborative research will be illustrated to show the usefulness and applications of this integrated approach.

  17. Direct optical injection locking of monolithically integrated In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As/In(0.52)Al(0.48)As MODFET oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Brock, T.

    1993-05-01

    The authors have fabricated monolithically integrated In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As/In(0.52)Al(0.48)As 0.25-micron gate MODFET oscillators. The results of direct optical subharmonic injection locking of these oscillator circuits at 10.159 and 19.033 GHz are presented.

  18. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E J; Candy, J V

    2007-08-13

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  19. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2008-12-08

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  20. A Low NO(x) Lean-Direct Injection, Multipoint Integrated Module Combuster Concept for Advanced Aircraft Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert; Wey, Changlie; Laing, Peter; Mansour, Adel

    2002-01-01

    A low NO(x) emissions combustor has been demonstrated in flame-tube tests. A multipoint, lean-direct injection concept was used. Configurations were tested that had 25- and 36- fuel injectors in the size of a conventional single fuel injector. An integrated-module approach was used for the construction where chemically etched laminates, diffusion bonded together, combine the fuel injectors, air swirlers and fuel manifold into a single element. Test conditions were inlet temperatures up to 810 K, inlet pressures up to 2760 kPa, and flame temperatures up to 2100 K. A correlation was developed relating the NO(x) emissions with the inlet temperature, inlet pressure, fuel-air ratio and pressure drop. Assuming that 10 percent of the combustion air would be used for liner cooling and using a hypothetical engine cycle, the NO(x) emissions using the correlation from flame-tube tests were estimated to be less than 20 percent of the 1996 ICAO standard.

  1. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system calcium-based dry sorbent injection. Test report, April 30--November 2, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomoto, G.H.; Smith, R.A.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System program, which is a Clean Coal Technology III demonstration, is being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, which is a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low sulfur Western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. The effectiveness of the integrated system on a high-sulfur coal will also be investigated. This report documents the fifth phase of the test program, where the performance of the dry sorbent injection of calcium was evaluated as an SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection with humidification was performed downstream of the air heater (in-duct). Calcium injection before the economizer was also investigated. The in-duct calcium sorbent and humidification retrofit resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 28 to 40 percent, with a Ca/S of 2, and a 25 to 30{degrees}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature. The results of the economizer calcium injection tests were disappointing with less than 10 percent SO{sub 2} removal at a Ca/S of 2. Poor sorbent distribution due to limited access into the injection cavity was partially responsible for the low overall removals. However, even in areas of high sorbent concentration (local Ca/S ratios of approximately 6), SO{sub 2} removals were limited to 30 percent. It is suspected that other factors (sorbent properties and limited residence times) also contributed to the poor performance.

  2. Sequential inductive learning

    SciTech Connect

    Gratch, J.

    1996-12-31

    This article advocates a new model for inductive learning. Called sequential induction, it helps bridge classical fixed-sample learning techniques (which are efficient but difficult to formally characterize), and worst-case approaches (which provide strong statistical guarantees but are too inefficient for practical use). Learning proceeds as a sequence of decisions which are informed by training data. By analyzing induction at the level of these decisions, and by utilizing the only enough data to make each decision, sequential induction provides statistical guarantees but with substantially less data than worst-case methods require. The sequential inductive model is also useful as a method for determining a sufficient sample size for inductive learning and as such, is relevant to learning problems where the preponderance of data or the cost of gathering data precludes the use of traditional methods.

  3. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  4. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  5. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities. PMID:26520084

  6. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J.; Beittel, R.

    1994-03-01

    The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

  7. Hyaluronan injection in murine osteoarthritis prevents TGFbeta 1-induced synovial neovascularization and fibrosis and maintains articular cartilage integrity by a CD44-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The mechanism by which intra-articular injection of hyaluronan (HA) ameliorates joint pathology is unknown. Animal studies have shown that HA can reduce synovial activation, periarticular fibrosis and cartilage erosion; however, its specific effects on the different cell types involved remain unclear. We have used the TTR (TGFbeta1 injection and Treadmill Running) model of murine osteoarthritis (OA), which exhibits many OA-like changes, including synovial activation, to examine in vivo tissue-specific effects of intra-articular HA. Methods The kinetics of clearance of fluorotagged HA from joints was examined with whole-body imaging. Naïve and treated knee joints were examined macroscopically for cartilage erosion, meniscal damage and fibrosis. Quantitative histopathology was done with Safranin O for cartilage and with Hematoxylin & Eosin for synovium. Gene expression in joint tissues for Acan, Col1a1, Col2a1, Col3a1, Col5a1, Col10a1, Adamts5 and Mmp13 was done by quantitative PCR. The abundance and distribution of aggrecan, collagen types I, II, III, V and X, ADAMTS5 and MMP13 were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results Injected HA showed a half-life of less than 2 h in the murine knee joint. At the tissue level, HA protected against neovascularization and fibrosis of the meniscus/synovium and maintained articular cartilage integrity in wild-type but not in Cd44 knockout mice. HA injection enhanced the expression of chondrogenic genes and proteins and blocked that of fibrogenic/degradative genes and proteins in cartilage/subchondral bone, whereas it blocked activation of both groups in meniscus/synovium. In all locations it reduced the expression/protein for Mmp13 and blocked Adamts5 expression but not its protein abundance in the synovial lining. Conclusions The injection of HA, 24 h after TGFbeta1 injection, inhibited the cascade of OA-like joint changes seen after treadmill use in the TTR model of OA. In terms of mechanism, tissue protection by

  8. The Activity-Integrated Method for Quality Assessment of Reduning Injection by On-Line DPPH-CE-DAD

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Li, Jin; Liu, Er-wei; He, Jun; Jiao, Xiu-cheng; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Bo-li; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive on-line DPPH-CE-DAD method was developed and validated for both screening and determining the concentration of seven antioxidants of Reduning injection. The pH and concentrations of buffer solution, SDS, β-CD and organic modifier were studied for the detection of DPPH and seven antioxidants. By on-line mixing DPPH and sample solution, a DPPH-CE method for testing the antioxidant activity of the complex matrix was successfully established and used to screen the antioxidant components of Reduning injection. Then, antioxidant components including caffeic acid, isochlorogenic acid A, isochlorogenic acid B, isochlorogenic acid C, chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid and cryptochlorogenic acid were quantified by the newly established CE–DAD method. Finally, the total antioxidant activity and the multiple active components were selected as markers to evaluate the quality of Reduning injection. The results demonstrated that the on-line DPPH-CE-DAD method was reagent-saving, rapid and feasible for on-line simultaneous determination of total pharmacological activity and contents of multi-components samples. It was also a powerful method for evaluating the quality control and mechanism of action of TCM injection. PMID:25181475

  9. Sequential-injection determination of traces of disodium phenyl dibenzimidazole tetrasulphonate in urine from users of sunscreens by on-line solid-phase extraction coupled with a fluorimetric detector.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, A; Chisvert, A; Salvador, A

    2006-03-01

    A sensitive and selective method to determine disodium phenyl dibenzimidazole tetrasulphonate (PDT) in the urine of sunscreen users, which is suitable for studies on body accumulation/excretion is proposed. On-line solid-phase extraction allows the analyte to be retained and subsequentely eluted, using a strong anion exchange (SAX) microcolumn. Standard addition calibration was carried out with only one standard. The wavelengths of excitation and emission were 330 and 454 nm, respectively. The method allows PDT to be determined in both, spiked and unspiked human urine samples, without any pre-treatment. Results obtained for spiked urine samples (40-200 ng ml(-1)) showed the accuracy of the method. The mean relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) of the results was 7%. Five volunteers applied a sunscreen lotion containing 5% PDT and their urinary excretion was controlled from the moment of application until the excreted amounts were no longer detectable. The sensitivity of the proposed method is in the order of 1900 ml microg(-1) and the detection limit (3S(y/x)/b) is in the order of 5 ng of PDT, which means 10 ng ml(-1) for a 500 microl injected volume, and this is suitable for the PDT levels found in the urine.

  10. Chord integrated neutral particle diagnostic data analysis for neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron radio frequency heated plasma in a complex Large Helical Device geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchev, E. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Ozaki, T.; Sudo, S.; Lyon, J. F.

    2006-10-15

    Energy and angle-resolved measurements of charge exchange neutral particle fluxes from the plasma provide information about T{sub i}, as well as non-Maxwellian substantially anisotropic ion distribution tails due to neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) heating. The measured chord integral neutral flux calculation scheme for the Large Helical Device magnetic surface geometry is given. Calculation results are shown for measurable atomic energy spectra corresponding to heating-induced fast ion distributions from simplified Fokker-Planck models. The behavior of calculated and experimental suprathermal particle distributions from NBI and ICRF heated plasma is discussed in the context of the experimental data interpretation.

  11. Optoelectronic cross-injection locking of a dual-wavelength photonic integrated circuit for low-phase-noise millimeter-wave generation.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Gaël; Van Dijk, Frederic; Pillet, Grégoire; Lamponi, Marco; Chtioui, Mourad; Morvan, Loïc; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    We report on the stabilization of a 90-GHz millimeter-wave signal generated from a fully integrated photonic circuit. The chip consists of two DFB single-mode lasers whose optical signals are combined on a fast photodiode to generate a largely tunable heterodyne beat note. We generate an optical comb from each laser with a microwave synthesizer, and by self-injecting the resulting signal, we mutually correlate the phase noise of each DFB and stabilize the beatnote on a multiple of the frequency delivered by the synthesizer. The performances achieved beat note linewidth below 30 Hz.

  12. Pegfilgrastim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector) to inject subcutaneously (under the skin). If you ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector), the device will usually be applied to your ...

  13. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  14. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  15. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the ... other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Integrating qualitative and quantitative characterization of traditional Chinese medicine injection by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuan-yuan; Xiao, Xue; Luo, Juan-min; Fu, Chan; Wang, Qiao-wei; Wang, Yi-ming; Liang, Qiong-lin; Luo, Guo-an

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to describe and exemplify an integrated strategy of the combination of qualitative and quantitative characterization of a multicomponent mixture for the quality control of traditional Chinese medicine injections with the example of Danhong injection (DHI). The standardized chemical profile of DHI has been established based on liquid chromatography with diode array detection. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray multistage tandem ion-trap mass spectrometry have been developed to identify the major constituents in DHI. The structures of 26 compounds including nucleotides, phenolic acids, and flavonoid glycosides were identified or tentatively characterized. Meanwhile, the simultaneous determination of seven marker constituents, including uridine, adenosine, danshensu, protocatechuic aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, and salvianolic acid B, in DHI was performed by multiwavelength detection based on high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The integrated qualitative and quantitative characterization strategy provided an effective and reliable pattern for the comprehensive and systematic characterization of the complex traditional Chinese medicine system.

  17. The structure of sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Gökaydin, Dinis; Navarro, Daniel J; Ma-Wyatt, Anna; Perfors, Amy

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of research into sequential effects, extending more than one hundred years. The pattern of sequential effects varies widely with both experimental conditions as well as for different individuals performing the same experiment. Yet this great diversity of results is poorly understood, particularly with respect to individual variation, which save for some passing mentions has largely gone unreported in the literature. Here we seek to understand the way in which sequential effects vary by identifying the causes underlying the differences observed in sequential effects. In order to achieve this goal we perform principal component analysis on a dataset of 158 individual results from participants performing different experiments with the aim of identifying hidden variables responsible for sequential effects. We find a latent structure consisting of 3 components related to sequential effects-2 main and 1 minor. A relationship between the 2 main components and the separate processing of stimuli and of responses is proposed on the basis of previous empirical evidence. It is further speculated that the minor component of sequential effects arises as the consequence of processing delays. Independently of the explanation for the latent variables encountered, this work provides a unified descriptive model for a wide range of different types of sequential effects previously identified in the literature. In addition to explaining individual differences themselves, it is demonstrated how the latent structure uncovered here is useful in understanding the classical problem of the dependence of sequential effects on the interval between successive stimuli. PMID:26523425

  18. Multi-Attribute Sequential Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, J. Neil; Connolly, Terry

    2007-01-01

    This article describes empirical and theoretical results from two multi-attribute sequential search tasks. In both tasks, the DM sequentially encounters options described by two attributes and must pay to learn the values of the attributes. In the "continuous" version of the task the DM learns the precise numerical value of an attribute when she…

  19. Feedback in sequential machine realizations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, C. A.; Coates, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described for determining the realizability of a sequential machine with trigger or set-reset flip-flop memory elements when the feedback of the machine is given by a Boolean function. Feedbacks in several types of sequential machines with different memory elements are compared, showing the memory specifications allowing the realization of such machines.

  20. Impact of 4-year CO2 injection on reservoir-rock integrity at the CO2 pilot site Ketzin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, S.; Förster, H.; Meier, A.; Pudlo, D.; Förster, A.; Gaupp, R.

    2013-12-01

    The CO2 Ketzin pilot site offers the possibility to study the short-term effects of injected CO2 on the mineralogy, geochemistry and porosity/permeability of siliciclastic reservoir rocks in a saline aquifer. Ketzin is located 30 kilometers west of Berlin in the Northeast German Basin, a sedimentary basin containing Paleozoic to Cenozoic sediments. The site is characterized by an anticlinal structure formed through halokinetic uprise of Permian salt. The reservoir in the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation, in which about 64,000 tons of CO2 are stored at depth of 630-700 m, is heterogeneous, comprising sandstones and siltstones. The Stuttgart Formation is overlain by a 200-m-thick caprock system of massive mudstones pertaining to the Upper Triassic Weser Formation and Arnstadt Formation. Argillaceous Tertiary sediments form an additional caprock in the shallow subsurface. Core material was recovered in 2007 for a baseline study and again in August 2012, almost four years after start of CO2 injection, to evaluate the fluid-rock reactions that took place. Preliminary results of an ongoing study, which focuses on petrographic-mineralogical and geochemical features, reveal negligible changes in bulk-rock composition almost in the range of the pristine natural heterogeneity of the reservoir. No significant dissolution or precipitation of minerals occurred implying that CO2 was trapped mainly structurally and residually as well as became dissolved in the formation brine. Additional studies concentrated on the fixation of CO2 by mineral trapping. Analytical work was focused on small-scale variations and reactions within and on the surface of minerals. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) supplied information about the alteration of Fe-rich grain coatings. This surface-sensitive method provides, beyond the quantitative analysis of certain elements, information on the valence state and quantity of iron. A weak tendency of transformation from hematite to goethite coatings

  1. Application of direct-injection detector integrated with the multi-pumping flow system to chemiluminescence determination of the total polyphenol index.

    PubMed

    Nalewajko-Sieliwoniuk, Edyta; Iwanowicz, Magdalena; Kalinowski, Sławomir; Kojło, Anatol

    2016-03-10

    In this work, we present a novel chemiluminescence (CL) method based on direct-injection detector (DID) integrated with the multi-pumping flow system (MPFS) to chemiluminescence determination of the total polyphenol index. In this flow system, the sample and the reagents are injected directly into the cone-shaped detection cell placed in front of the photomultiplier window. Such construction of the detection chamber allows for fast measurement of the CL signal in stopped-flow conditions immediately after mixing the reagents. The proposed DID-CL-MPFS method is based on the chemiluminescence of nanocolloidal manganese(IV)-hexametaphosphate-ethanol system. The application of ethanol as a sensitizer, eliminated the use of carcinogenic formaldehyde. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the chemiluminescence intensities are proportional to the concentration of gallic acid in the range from 5 to 350 ng mL(-1). The DID-CL-MPFS method offers a number of advantages, including low limit of detection (0.80 ng mL(-1)), high precision (RSD = 3.3%) and high sample throughput (144 samples h(-1)) as well as low consumption of reagents, energy and low waste generation. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the total polyphenol index (expressed as gallic acid equivalent) in a variety of plant-derived food samples (wine, tea, coffee, fruit and vegetable juices, herbs, spices). PMID:26893089

  2. Two order increase in the optical emission intensity of CMOS integrated circuit Si LED's (450nm - 750nm). Injection-avalanche based n +pn and p +np designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyman, Lukas W.; du Plessis, Monuko; Aharoni, Herzl

    2007-02-01

    We report on an increase in emission intensity of up to 10 nW / microns2 that has been realized with a new novel two junction, diagonal avalanche control and minority carrier injection silicon CMOS light emitting device. The device utilizes a four terminal configuration with two shallow n +p junctions, embedded in a p substrate. One junction is kept in deep avalanche and light emitting mode, while the other junction is forward biased and minority carrier electrons are injected into the avalanching junction. The device has been realized using standard 0.35 micron CMOS design rules and fabrication technology and operates at 9V in the current range 0.1 - 3mA. The optical emission intensity is anout two orders higher than that for previous single junction n + p light emitting junctions. The optical output is about three orders higher than the low frequency detectivity limit of silicon p-i-n detectors of comparable dimensions. The realized characteristics may enable diverse opto-electronic applications in standard CMOS silicon technology based integrated circuitry.

  3. Application of direct-injection detector integrated with the multi-pumping flow system to chemiluminescence determination of the total polyphenol index.

    PubMed

    Nalewajko-Sieliwoniuk, Edyta; Iwanowicz, Magdalena; Kalinowski, Sławomir; Kojło, Anatol

    2016-03-10

    In this work, we present a novel chemiluminescence (CL) method based on direct-injection detector (DID) integrated with the multi-pumping flow system (MPFS) to chemiluminescence determination of the total polyphenol index. In this flow system, the sample and the reagents are injected directly into the cone-shaped detection cell placed in front of the photomultiplier window. Such construction of the detection chamber allows for fast measurement of the CL signal in stopped-flow conditions immediately after mixing the reagents. The proposed DID-CL-MPFS method is based on the chemiluminescence of nanocolloidal manganese(IV)-hexametaphosphate-ethanol system. The application of ethanol as a sensitizer, eliminated the use of carcinogenic formaldehyde. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the chemiluminescence intensities are proportional to the concentration of gallic acid in the range from 5 to 350 ng mL(-1). The DID-CL-MPFS method offers a number of advantages, including low limit of detection (0.80 ng mL(-1)), high precision (RSD = 3.3%) and high sample throughput (144 samples h(-1)) as well as low consumption of reagents, energy and low waste generation. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the total polyphenol index (expressed as gallic acid equivalent) in a variety of plant-derived food samples (wine, tea, coffee, fruit and vegetable juices, herbs, spices).

  4. Method for sequential injection of liquid samples for radioisotope separations

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B.; Grate, Jay W.; Bray, Lane A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method of separating a short-lived daughter isotope from a longer lived parent isotope, with recovery of the parent isotope for further use. Using a system with a bi-directional pump and one or more valves, a solution of the parent isotope is processed to generate two separate solutions, one of which contains the daughter isotope, from which the parent has been removed with a high decontamination factor, and the other solution contains the recovered parent isotope. The process can be repeated on this solution of the parent isotope. The system with the fluid drive and one or more valves is controlled by a program on a microprocessor executing a series of steps to accomplish the operation. In one approach, the cow solution is passed through a separation medium that selectively retains the desired daughter isotope, while the parent isotope and the matrix pass through the medium. After washing this medium, the daughter is released from the separation medium using another solution. With the automated generator of the present invention, all solution handling steps necessary to perform a daughter/parent radionuclide separation, e.g. Bi-213 from Ac-225 "cow" solution, are performed in a consistent, enclosed, and remotely operated format. Operator exposure and spread of contamination are greatly minimized compared to the manual generator procedure described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/789,973, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,749,042, herein incorporated by reference. Using 16 mCi of Ac-225 there was no detectable external contamination of the instrument components.

  5. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  6. Integrating care for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and primary care for HIV for injection drug users coinfected with HIV and HCV.

    PubMed

    Kresina, Thomas F; Bruce, R Douglas; Cargill, Victoria A; Cheever, Laura W

    2005-07-01

    Injection drug use accounts for most of the incident infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and for at least one-third of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. Coinfection with HCV and HIV presents complex and challenging medical conditions. Ensuring access to and maintaining care for HIV and HCV for drug users presents special challenges to the health care team that require a nonjudgmental attitude, experience, and patience. Care for HCV infection, however, can be used as an instrument to engage drug-using persons in ongoing primary care relationships. Common elements to both care for HCV infection and primary care for HIV infection are testing for and counseling about HCV and HIV, substance abuse and mental health services, social support, and subspecialty referral. These elements, in particular treatment for substance abuse, can be focal points for model care systems that provide integrative care for both HCV and HIV infections. PMID:16265621

  7. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  8. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... not improved when treated with other medications, ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... adalimumab injection to treat Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  9. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denosumab injection (Prolia) is also used to treat bone loss in men with prostate cancer and in women with breast cancer who are receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection ( ...

  10. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance). Diphenhydramine injection should not be ... solution (liquid) to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). Your dosing schedule ...

  11. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... red blood cells) caused by low levels of folic acid in the body. Leucovorin injection is also used ... injection is in a class of medications called folic acid analogs. It treats people who are receiving methotrexate ...

  12. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  13. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  14. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  15. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cefazolin injection is also sometimes used for certain penicillin allergic patients who have a heart condition and ... injection is also sometimes used to treat certain penicillin allergic women who are in labor in order ...

  16. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  17. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  18. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  19. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  20. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection device.The automatic injection device has an electronic voice system that provides step by step directions ... of opiate withdrawal such as body aches, diarrhea, fast heart beat, fever, runny nose, sneezing, sweating, yawning, ...

  1. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  2. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  3. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  4. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  5. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  6. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vancomycin injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat certain serious infections such ... infections of the lungs, skin, blood, and bones. Vancomycin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  7. Integrating services for injection drug users infected with hepatitis C virus with methadone maintenance treatment: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Alain H; Soloway, Irene; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2005-04-15

    Despite the high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among drug users enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment programs, few drug users are being treated with combination therapy. The most significant barrier to treatment is lack of access to comprehensive HCV-related care. We describe a pilot program to integrate care for HCV infection with substance abuse treatment in a setting of maintenance treatment with methadone. This on-site, multidisciplinary model of care includes comprehensive screening and treatment for HCV infection, assessment of eligibility, counseling with regard to substance abuse, psychiatric services, HCV support groups, directly observed therapy, and enhanced linkages to a tertiary care system for diagnostic procedures. Our approach has led to high levels of adherence, with liver biopsy and substantial rates of initiation of antiviral therapy. Two cases illustrate the successful application of this model to patients with HCV infection complicated by active substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:15768345

  8. Self-aligned BCB planarization method for high-frequency signal injection in a VCSEL with an integrated modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo-Lombart, Ludovic; Doucet, Jean-Baptiste; Lecestre, Aurélie; Reig, Benjamin; Rousset, Bernard; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir; Almuneau, Guilhem

    2016-04-01

    The huge increase of datacom capacities requires lasers sources with more and more bandwidth performances. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) in direct modulation is a good candidate, already widely used for short communication links such as in datacenters. Recently several different approaches have been proposed to further extend the direct modulation bandwidth of these devices, by improving the VCSEL structure, or by combining the VCSEL with another high speed element such as lateral slow light modulator or transistor/laser based structure (TVCSEL). We propose to increase the modulation bandwidth by vertically integrating a continuous-wave VCSEL with a high-speed electro-modulator. This vertical structure implies multiple electrodes with sufficiently good electrical separation between the different input electrical signals. This high frequency modulation requires both good electrical insulation between metal electrodes and an optimized design of the coplanar lines. BenzoCyclobutene (BCB) thanks to its low dielectric constant, low losses, low moisture absorption and good thermal stability, is often used as insulating layer. Also, BCB planarization offers the advantages of simpler and more reliable technological process flow in such integrated VCSEL/modulator structures with important reliefs. As described by Burdeaux et al. a degree of planarization (DOP) of about 95% can be achieved by simple spin coating whatever the device thickness. In most of the cases, the BCB planarization process requires an additional photolithography step in order to open an access to the mesa surface, thus involving a tight mask alignment and resulting in a degraded planarization. In this paper, we propose a self-aligned process with improved BCB planarization by combining a hot isostatic pressing derived from nanoimprint techniques with a dry plasma etching step.

  9. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  10. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  11. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  12. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  13. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L

    2016-03-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about abstract causal constraints? Recent empirical studies have revealed that experience with one set of causal cues can dramatically alter subsequent learning and performance with entirely different cues, suggesting that learning involves abstract transfer, and such transfer effects involve sequential presentation of distinct sets of causal cues. It has been demonstrated that pre-training (or even post-training) can modulate classic causal learning phenomena such as forward and backward blocking. To account for these effects, we propose a Bayesian theory of sequential causal learning. The theory assumes that humans are able to consider and use several alternative causal generative models, each instantiating a different causal integration rule. Model selection is used to decide which integration rule to use in a given learning environment in order to infer causal knowledge from sequential data. Detailed computer simulations demonstrate that humans rely on the abstract characteristics of outcome variables (e.g., binary vs. continuous) to select a causal integration rule, which in turn alters causal learning in a variety of blocking and overshadowing paradigms. When the nature of the outcome variable is ambiguous, humans select the model that yields the best fit with the recent environment, and then apply it to subsequent learning tasks. Based on sequential patterns of cue-outcome co-occurrence, the theory can account for a range of phenomena in sequential causal learning, including various blocking effects, primacy effects in some experimental conditions, and apparently abstract transfer of causal knowledge.

  14. Time-lapse integrated geophysical imaging of magmatic injections and fluid-induced fracturing causing Campi Flegrei 1983-84 Unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Castellano, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical precursors measured during Unrest episodes are a primary source of geophysical information to forecast eruptions at the largest and most potentially destructive volcanic calderas. Despite their importance and uniqueness, these precursors are also considered difficult to interpret and unrepresentative of larger eruptive events. Here, we show how novel geophysical imaging and monitoring techniques are instead able to represent the dynamic evolution of magmatic- and fluid-induced fracturing during the largest period of Unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy (1983-1984). The time-dependent patterns drawn by microseismic locations and deformation, once integrated by 3D attenuation tomography and absorption/scattering mapping, model injections of magma- and fluid-related materials in the form of spatially punctual microseismic bursts at a depth of 3.5 km, west and offshore the city of Pozzuoli. The shallowest four kilometres of the crust work as a deformation-based dipolar system before and after each microseismic shock. Seismicity and deformation contemporaneously focus on the point of injection; patterns then progressively crack the medium directed towards the second focus, a region at depths 1-1.5 km south of Solfatara. A single high-absorption and high-scattering aseismic anomaly marks zones of fluid storage overlying the first dipolar centre. These results provide the first direct geophysical signature of the processes of aseismic fluid release at the top of the basaltic basement, producing pozzolanic activity and recently observed via rock-physics and well-rock experiments. The microseismicity caused by fluids and gasses rises to surface via high-absorption north-east rising paths connecting the two dipolar centres, finally beingq being generally expelled from the maar diatreme Solfatara structure. Geophysical precursors during Unrest depict how volcanic stress was released at the Campi Flegrei caldera during its period of highest recorded seismicity

  15. Integrated respondent-driven sampling and peer support for persons who inject drugs in Haiphong, Vietnam: a case study with implications for interventions.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don; Duong, Huong Thi; Pham Minh, Khue; Khuat, Oanh Hai Thi; Nham, Thanh Tuyet Thi; Arasteh, Kamyar; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Heckathorn, Douglas D; Peries, Marianne; Moles, Jean Pierre; Laureillard, Didier; Nagot, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Combined prevention for HIV among persons who inject drugs (PWID) has led to greatly reduced HIV transmission among PWID in many high-income settings, but these successes have not yet been replicated in resource-limited settings. Haiphong, Vietnam experienced a large HIV epidemic among PWID, with 68% prevalence in 2006. Haiphong has implemented needle/syringe programs, methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), and anti-retroviral treatment (ART), but there is an urgent need to identify high-risk PWID and link them to services. We examined integration of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) and strong peer support groups as a mechanism for identifying high-risk PWID and linking them to services. The peer support staff performed the key tasks that required building and maintaining trust with the participants, including recruiting the RDS seeds, greeting and registering participants at the research site, taking electronic copies of participant fingerprints (to prevent multiple participation in the study), and conducting urinalyses. A 6-month cohort study with 250 participants followed the RDS cross-sectional study. The peer support staff maintained contact with these participants, tracking them if they missed appointments, and providing assistance in accessing methadone and ART. The RDS recruitment was quite rapid, with 603 participants recruited in three weeks. HIV prevalence was 25%, Hepatitis C (HCV) prevalence 67%, and participants reported an average of 2.7 heroin injections per day. Retention in the cohort study was high, with 86% of participants re-interviewed at 6-month follow-up. Assistance in accessing services led to half of the participants in need of methadone enrolled in methadone clinics, and half of HIV-positive participants in need of ART enrolled in HIV clinics by the 6-month follow-up. This study suggests that integrating large-scale RDS and strong peer support may provide a method for rapidly linking high-risk PWID to combined prevention and care, and

  16. Sequential Syndrome Decoding of Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    The algebraic structure of convolutional codes are reviewed and sequential syndrome decoding is applied to those codes. These concepts are then used to realize by example actual sequential decoding, using the stack algorithm. The Fano metric for use in sequential decoding is modified so that it can be utilized to sequentially find the minimum weight error sequence.

  17. Human sympathetic and vagal baroreflex responses to sequential nitroprusside and phenylephrine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudas, L.; Crossman, A. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Halliwill, J. R.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Kuusela, T. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated a method of baroreflex testing involving sequential intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside followed by phenylephrine and phenylephrine followed by nitroprusside in 18 healthy men and women, and we drew inferences regarding human sympathetic and vagal baroreflex mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. We then contrasted least squares linear regression slopes derived from the depressor (nitroprusside) and pressor (phenylephrine) phases with 1) slopes derived from spontaneous fluctuations of systolic arterial pressures and R-R intervals, and 2) baroreflex gain derived from cross-spectral analyses of systolic pressures and R-R intervals. We calculated sympathetic baroreflex gain from integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity and diastolic pressures. We found that vagal baroreflex slopes are less when arterial pressures are falling than when they are rising and that this hysteresis exists over pressure ranges both below and above baseline levels. Although pharmacological and spontaneous vagal baroreflex responses correlate closely, pharmacological baroreflex slopes tend to be lower than those derived from spontaneous fluctuations. Sympathetic baroreflex slopes are similar when arterial pressure is falling and rising; however, small pressure elevations above baseline silence sympathetic motoneurons. Vagal, but not sympathetic baroreflex gains vary inversely with subjects' ages and their baseline arterial pressures. There is no correlation between sympathetic and vagal baroreflex gains. We recommend repeated sequential nitroprusside followed by phenylephrine doses as a simple, efficientmeans to provoke and characterize human vagal and sympathetic baroreflex responses.

  18. Evaluating the integrity of the reinforced concrete structure repaired by epoxy injection using simulated transfer function of impact-echo response

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-peng; Wu, Jiunn-Hong; Hsu, Keng-Tsan; Ke, Ying-Tsu

    2014-02-18

    Cracks and honeycombs are often found inside reinforced concrete (RC) structure caused by excessive external force, or improper casting of concrete. The repairing method usually involves epoxy injection. The impact-echo method, which is a sensitive for detecting of the interior voids, may not be applicable to assess the integrity of the repaired member as both air and epoxy are less in acoustic impedances. In this study, the repaired RC structure was evaluated by the simulated transfer function of the IE displacement waveform where the R-wave displacement waveform is used as a base of a simulated force-time function. The effect of different thickness of the epoxy layer to the amplitude corresponding to the interface is studied by testing on specimen containing repaired naturally delaminated cracks with crack widths about 1 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. The impact-echo responses were compared with the drilling cores at the test positions. The results showed the cracks were not fully filled with epoxy when the peak amplitude corresponding to the interface dropped less than 20%. The peak corresponding to the thicker epoxy layer tends to be larger in amplitude. A field study was also performed on a column damaged by earthquake before and after repairing.

  19. Integrating candidate metabolites and biochemical factors to elucidate the action mechanism of Xue-sai-tong injection based on (1)H NMR metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Xiaoping; Wang, Linli; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Li, Zheng

    2016-07-15

    A strategy of integrating candidate metabolites with crucial biochemical factors was proposed in this study to discover relevant biological functions for interpreting the action mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM). This approach was applied to Xue-Sai-Tong injection (XST) to reveal the action mechanism based on the metabolic response in an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model by analyzing NMR profile. Partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) was used to compare metabolic profiles of serum samples and revealed nine metabolites altered by I/R injury could be restored to normal status (sham-operated group) under the therapy of XST. The pathway enrichment analysis suggested the metabolic changes were mainly involved in pyruvate metabolism, glycolysis, and citrate cycle. The functional roles of the candidate metabolites were further identified by Pearson correlation analysis with the key biochemical factors in serum. The results indicated pyruvate, succinate, acetate and lysine showed significant associations with the oxidative stress factors. Elevated level of pyruvate was found as an essential metabolic response for the major effect of XST against I/R injury by enhancing glycolysis and overcoming the induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). This metabolomics approach provides a better understanding of the mechanisms of TCM and helps to develop a holistic view of TCM efficacy. PMID:26862062

  20. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to triptorelin injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about triptorelin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  1. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to leuprolide injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about leuprolide injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  2. A bit serial sequential circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    Normally a sequential circuit with n state variables consists of n unique hardware realizations, one for each state variable. All variables are processed in parallel. This paper introduces a new sequential circuit architecture that allows the state variables to be realized in a serial manner using only one next state logic circuit. The action of processing the state variables in a serial manner has never been addressed before. This paper presents a general design procedure for circuit construction and initialization. Utilizing pass transistors to form the combinational next state forming logic in synchronous sequential machines, a bit serial state machine can be realized with a single NMOS pass transistor network connected to shift registers. The bit serial state machine occupies less area than other realizations which perform parallel operations. Moreover, the logical circuit of the bit serial state machine can be modified by simply changing the circuit input matrix to develop an adaptive state machine.

  3. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  4. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-03-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239,240)Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially designed extraction column. Plutonium in the fractions from the sequential extraction was separated by ion exchange chromatography and measured using alpha spectrometry. The analytical results show a higher mobility of plutonium in bio-shielding concrete, which means attention should be paid to the treatment and disposal of nuclear waste from decommissioning. PMID:20004047

  5. Short-term BOD (BODst) as a parameter for on-line monitoring of biological treatment process; Part II: instrumentation of integrated flow injection analysis (FIA) system for BODst estimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Olsson, Gustaf; Mattiasson, Bo

    2004-10-15

    An instrument with integrated flow injection analysis (FIA) system has been developed for on-line monitoring a process for conversion of biomass under field condition. The instrument consists of a newly designed biosensor for easy renewal of the bio-receptor without disassembling the sensor, a FIA controller for controlling the analysis operations, and a computer-based data acquisition system for data recording and processing. The instrument performed a sequence operations automatically including preparation of sample in the desired concentration, sample loading, sample injection, signal recording, data processing, and self-cleaning of the system. This makes the instrument being an interesting and promising device for on-line process monitoring.

  6. A wireless sequentially actuated microvalve system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung-Ki; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Seo, Soonmin; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2013-04-01

    A wireless microvalve system was fabricated based on induction heating for flow control in microfluidics by sequential valve opening. In this approach, we used paraffin wax as a flow plug, which can be changed from solid to liquid with adjacent heating elements operated by induction heating. Programmable opening of valves was devised by using different thermal responses of metal discs to a magnetic field. Copper and nickel discs with a diameter of 2.5 mm and various thicknesses (50, 100 and 200 µm) were prepared as heating elements by a laser cutting method, and they were integrated in the microfluidic channel as part of the microvalve. A calorimetric test was used to measure the thermal properties of the discs in terms of kinds of metal and disc thickness. Sequential openings of the microvalves were performed using the difference in the thermal response of 100 µm thick copper disc and 50 µm thick nickel disc for short-interval openings and 200 µm thick copper disc and 100-µm-thick nickel disc for long-interval openings. The thermal effect on fluid samples as a result of induction heating of the discs was studied by investigating lysozyme denaturation. More heat was generated in heating elements made of copper than in those made of nickel, implying differences in the thermal response of heating elements made of copper and nickel. Also, the thickness of the heating elements affected the thermal response in the elements. Valve openings for short intervals of 1-5 s and long intervals of 15-23 s were achieved by using two sets of heating elements. There was no significant change in lysozyme activity by increasing the temperature of the heating discs. This study demonstrates that a wireless sequentially actuated microvalve system can provide programmed valve opening, portability, ease of fabrication and operation, disposability, and low cost.

  7. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  8. Sequential triangulation of orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, M.; Junkins, J. L.; Turner, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of structuring the satellite photogrammetric triangulation as an iterative Extended Kalman estimation algorithm is demonstrated. Comparative numerical results of the sequential against batch estimation algorithm are presented. Difficulty of accurately modeling of the attitude motion is overcome by utilizing the on-board angular rate measurements. Solutions of the differential equations and the evaluation of state transition matrix are carried out numerically.

  9. Manifestations of sequential electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Thurnauer, M.C.; Tang, J.

    1996-05-01

    An essential feature of efficient photo-initiated charge separation is sequential electron transfer. Charge separation is initiated by photoexcitation of an electron donor followed by rapid electron transfer steps from the excited donor through a series of electron acceptors, so that, after one or two successive steps, charge separation is stabilized by the physical separation between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor. The prime example of this process is the sequential electron transfer that takes place in the purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction center, resulting in the charge separation between P{sup +} and Q{sub A}{sup -} across a biological membrane. We have developed magnetic resonance tools to monitor sequential electron transfer. We are applying these techniques to study charge separation in natural photo-synthetic systems in order to gain insights into the features of the reaction center proteins that promote efficient charge separation. As we establish what some of these factors are, we are beginning to design artificial photosynthetic systems that undergo photoinduced sequential electron transfer steps.

  10. Diesel fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1986-04-22

    A fuel injection pump is described of the multiple plunger spill port type for an automotive type internal combustion engine, the pump including at least four axially spaced engine camshaft driven pump plungers grouped in pairs and sequentially and in succession moved in one direction through a fuel pumping stroke and oppositely through a fuel intake stroke. A fuel pressurization/supply chamber is contiquous to the end of each plunger for pressurization of the fuel therein or supply of fuel thereto from a supply passage upon coordinate movement of the plunger, fill/spill passage means connected to a single fuel return spill port and in parallel flow relationship to each of the plunger bores as a function of the position of the plungers, each plunger having a pair of internal passages connected at all times to its chamber and alternately alignable with the supply or fill/spill passage means as a function of the position of the plunger. A fuel discharge passage is operatively connecting each of the chambers to an individual engine cylinder, a single spill port control valve movable to block or permit the spill of fuel through the spill port to a return line to control the pressurization of fuel in all of the fuel chambers and associated discharge passages, a single solenoid connected to the spill control valve for moving it to block or unblock the spill port, and a single shuttle valve operatively associated with all of the fill/spill passage means and spill port reciprocably movable between positions to sequentially connect the plunger chambers one at a time in succession to the spill port during the pumping pressurization stroke of its plunger for the injection of fuel to an individual cylinder while the other chambers are in various stages of being refilled with fuel and preparing for pressurization upon successive actuation of the plungers by the camshaft.

  11. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before you plan to inject it to allow the medication to ... supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications ...

  12. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  13. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... including other medications or surgery to remove the spleen. Romiplostim injection should not be used to treat ... tell your doctor if you have had your spleen removed.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, ...

  14. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and swelling and scales on the skin). ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... you are using golimumab injection to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ...

  15. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  16. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as doxycycline injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  17. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a person who was not in the hospital), skin infections, and infections of the abdomen (area between the ... that developed in people who were in a hospital or foot infections in people who have diabetes. Tigecycline injection is ...

  18. Thiotepa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... reproductive organs where eggs are formed), breast, and bladder cancer. It is also used to treat malignant effusions ( ... how you respond to thiotepa.When used for bladder cancer, thiotepa is infused (injected slowly) into your bladder ...

  19. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  20. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  1. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  2. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  3. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  4. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  5. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Dolasetron injection is used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting that may occur after surgery. Dolasetron ... should not be used to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting in people receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. ...

  6. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  7. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to ampicillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, ...

  8. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to nafcillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  9. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxacillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  10. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... drowsiness uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body problems with coordination, balance, or walking weakness itching redness, irritation, pain, or discomfort at the injection spot Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  11. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to treat life-threatening allergic reactions caused by insect bites or stings, foods, medications, ... at the first sign of a serious allergic reaction.Use epinephrine injection exactly as directed; do not ...

  12. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  13. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  14. Bendamustine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Bendamustine injection is also used to treat a ... NHL: cancer that begins in a type of white blood cell that normally fights infection) that is slow spreading, ...

  15. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; ; and , skin, and abdominal (stomach ... antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as moxifloxacin injection ...

  16. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  17. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  18. Meropenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround ... of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection ...

  19. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  20. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  1. Telavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious skin infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Telavancin injection is in a class of medications ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or ...

  2. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  3. Aztreonam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and bronchitis), urinary ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, ...

  4. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  5. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  6. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  7. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ciprofloxacin injection is also sometimes used to treat cat scratch disease (an infection that may develop after a person is bitten or scratched by a cat), Legionnaires' disease (type of lung infection), and infections of the ...

  8. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ganciclovir injection is used to treat cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis (eye infection that can cause blindness) in people whose immune system is not working normally, including those people who have ...

  9. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air and treat and prevent ...

  10. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  11. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg), which can lead to pulmonary embolism (PE; a blood clot in the lung), in people ... with warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) to treat DVT or PE. Fondaparinux injection is in a class of medications ...

  12. Pertuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... docetaxel (Taxotere) to treat a certain type of breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Pertuzumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ...

  13. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to decrease the amount of growth hormone (a natural substance) produced by people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial ...

  14. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release injection are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual thinking, loss of ... medications); medications for anxiety, depression, irritable bowel disease, mental illness, motion sickness, Parkinson's disease, seizures, ulcers, or urinary ...

  15. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  16. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  17. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  18. Oritavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for at least 5 days after receiving oritavancin injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  19. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... hearing loss, if you are being treated for meningitis Cefuroxime injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  20. Alirocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... further decrease the amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ('bad cholesterol') in the blood. Alirocumab injection is ... antibodies. It works by blocking the production of LDL cholesterol in the body to decrease the amount of ...

  1. Secukinumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if you need to receive any vaccinations. It is important to have all vaccines appropriate ... treatment with secukinumab injection. Do not have any vaccinations during your treatment without talking to your doctor. ...

  2. Findings from Integrated Behavioral and Biologic Survey among Males Who Inject Drugs (MWID) — Vietnam, 2009–2010: Evidence of the Need for an Integrated Response to HIV, Hepatitis B Virus, and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nadol, Patrick; O’connor, Siobhan; Duong, Hao; Le, Linh-Vi N.; Thang, Pham Hong; Tram, Tran Hong; Ha, Hoang Thi Thanh; Mcconnell, Michelle S.; Partridge, Jeff; Kaldor, John; Law, Matthew; Nguyen, Tuan Anh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Given the overlapping modes of transmission of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), understanding the burden and relationship of these infections is critical for an effective response. Representative data on these infections among males who inject drugs (MWID), the key high-risk population for HIV in Vietnam, are currently lacking. Methods Data and stored specimens from Vietnam’s 2009-2010 Integrated Biologic and Behavioral Survey, a cross-sectional study among high-risk populations, were used for this analysis. Plasma samples were tested for HIV, HBV, and HCV using commercial assays. A questionnaire was administered to provide demographic, behavior, and service-uptake information. Provincial-level analyses were conducted to profile MWID enrollees and to provide estimates on the prevalence of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection. Results Among 3010 MWID sampled across 10 provinces, the median (range) HIV prevalence was 28.1% (1.0%-55.5%). Median prevalence for current HBV infection (HBsAg+) was 14.1% (11.7%-28.0%), for previous exposure to HBV (total anti-HBc+) was 71.4% (49.9%-83.1%), and for current or past HCV infection (HCV Ag/Ab+) was 53.8% (10.9%-80.8%). In adjusted analysis, HBsAg+ (aOR: 2.09, 1.01-4.34) and HCV Ag/Ab+ (aOR: 19.58, 13.07-29.33) status were significantly associated with HIV infection; the association with total anti-HBc+ approached significance (aOR: 1.29, 0.99-1.68). Conclusion The prevalence and association between HIV, HBV, and HCV are high among MWID in Vietnam. These findings indicate the need for integrated policies and practice that for the surveillance, prevention, screening, and treatment of both HIV and viral hepatitis among MWID in Vietnam. PMID:25692469

  3. Nonequilibrium structure in sequential assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander V.; Craven, Galen T.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-11-01

    The assembly of monomeric constituents into molecular superstructures through sequential-arrival processes has been simulated and theoretically characterized. When the energetic interactions allow for complete overlap of the particles, the model is equivalent to that of the sequential absorption of soft particles on a surface. In the present work, we consider more general cases by including arbitrary aggregating geometries and varying prescriptions of the connectivity network. The resulting theory accounts for the evolution and final-state configurations through a system of equations governing structural generation. We find that particle geometries differ significantly from those in equilibrium. In particular, variations of structural rigidity and morphology tune particle energetics and result in significant variation in the nonequilibrium distributions of the assembly in comparison to the corresponding equilibrium case.

  4. Robustness of the Sequential Lineup Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronlund, Scott D.; Carlson, Curt A.; Dailey, Sarah B.; Goodsell, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing movement in the United States and around the world involves promoting the advantages of conducting an eyewitness lineup in a sequential manner. We conducted a large study (N = 2,529) that included 24 comparisons of sequential versus simultaneous lineups. A liberal statistical criterion revealed only 2 significant sequential lineup…

  5. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects “trickle in” to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion. PMID:24143061

  6. Hydromorphone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, vomiting, diarrhea, or failure to gain weight.tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.if you ... Hydromorphone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... vomiting constipation dry mouth lightheadedness dizziness drowsiness ...

  7. Eculizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... which too many red blood cells are broken down in the body, so there are not enough healthy cells to bring oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS; an inherited condition in which small blood ...

  8. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), abdomen (area between the chest and waist), lungs, blood, and ... to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected ...

  9. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved or that had improved after treatment with other medications, but later returned. Tositumomab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer cells and releasing radiation to damage the cancer ...

  10. Lanreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Lanreotide injection is used to treat people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial features; joint pain; and other symptoms) who have not successfully, or cannot be treated ...

  11. Eribulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests to check your body's response to eribulin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  12. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 7 days after you receive each pegaptanib injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  13. Syringe-injectable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  14. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  15. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control systems: Advanced retractable injection lance SNCR test report. NOELL ARIL test period: April 20, 1995--December 21, 1995; DPSC test period: August 16--26, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Muzio, L.J.; Smith, R.A.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, a 100 MWe down-fired utility boiler burning a low-sulfur western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emission through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the third phase of SNCR tests, where an additional injection location was installed to increase the low-load NOx removal performance. The new injectors consist of a pair of retractable in-furnace lances which were designed to provide a high degree of load following flexibility through on-line adjustments of the injection angle. With the new lances, NOx removals in excess of 35% are achievable at the same load and HN{sub 3} slip limit. At loads of 43 to 60 MWe, NOx removals with the lances range from 37--52%. At loads greater than 60 MWe, the wall-injection location is more efficient, and at loads of 70 to 100 MWe, NOx removals range from 37--41%. The coal mill-in-service pattern was found to have a large effect on both NOx removal and NH{sub 3} slip for injection at the new lance location. At 60 MWe, the NOx removal at the 10 ppm NH{sub 3} slip limit ranges from 28--52% depending on the mill-in-service pattern. Biasing the coal mills to provide uniform combustion conditions ahead of the injection location was found to be the best option for improving SNCR system performance under these conditions.

  16. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  17. Sequential ranging: How it works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugh, Harold W.

    1993-01-01

    This publication is directed to the users of data from the Sequential Ranging Assembly (SRA), and to others who have a general interest in range measurements. It covers the hardware, the software, and the processes used in acquiring range data; it does not cover analytical aspects such as the theory of modulation, detection, noise spectral density, and other highly technical subjects. In other words, it covers how ranging is done, but not the details of why it works. The publication also includes an appendix that gives a brief discussion of PN ranging, a capability now under development.

  18. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system sodium-based dry sorbent injection test report. Test period: August 4, 1993--July 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.; Shimoto, G.H.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the sixth phase of the test program, where the performance of dry sorbent injection with sodium compounds was evaluated as a SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection was performed in-duct downstream of the air heater (ahead of the fabric filter), as well as at a higher temperature location between the economizer and air heater. Two sodium compounds were evaluated during this phase of testing: sodium sesquicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate. In-duct sodium injection with low levels of humidification was also investigated. This sixth test phase was primarily focused on a parametric investigation of sorbent type and feed rate, although boiler load and sorbent preparation parameters were also varied.

  19. Integration of a Novel Injectable Nano Calcium Sulfate/Alginate Scaffold and BMP2 Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoning; Dziak, Rosemary; Mao, Keya; Genco, Robert; Swithart, Mark; Li, Chunyi

    2013-01-01

    The repair of craniofacial bone defects is surgically challenging due to the complex anatomical structure of the craniofacial skeleton. Current strategies for bone tissue engineering using a preformed scaffold have not resulted in the expected clinical regeneration due to difficulty in seeding cells into the deep internal space of scaffold, and the inability to inject them in minimally invasive surgeries. In this study, we used the osteoconductive and mechanical properties of nano-scale calcium sulfate (nCS) and the biocompatibility of alginate to develop the injectable nCS/alginate (nCS/A) paste, and characterized the effect of this nCS/A paste loaded with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene-modified rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on bone and blood vessel growth. Our results showed that the nCS/A paste was injectable under small injection forces. The mechanical properties of the nCS/A paste were increased with an increased proportion of alginate. MSCs maintained their viability after the injection, and MSCs and BMP2 gene-modified MSCs in the injectable pastes remained viable, osteodifferentiated, and yielded high alkaline phosphatase activity. By testing the ability of this injectable paste and BMP2-gene-modified MSCs for the repair of critical-sized calvarial bone defects in a rat model, we found that BMP2-gene-modified MSCs in nCS/A (nCS/A+M/B2) showed robust osteogenic activity, which resulted in consistent bone bridging of the bone defects. The vessel density in nCS/A+M/B2 was significantly higher than that in the groups of blank control, nCS/A alone, and nCS/A mixed with MSCs (nCS/A+M). These results indicate that BMP2 promotes MSCs-mediated bone formation and vascularization in nCS/A paste. Overall, the results demonstrated that the combination of injectable nCS/A paste and BMP2-gene-modified MSCs is a new and effective strategy for the repair of bone defects. PMID:22994418

  20. Sleep memory processing: the sequential hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Giuditta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    According to the sequential hypothesis (SH) memories acquired during wakefulness are processed during sleep in two serial steps respectively occurring during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. During SWS memories to be retained are distinguished from irrelevant or competing traces that undergo downgrading or elimination. Processed memories are stored again during REM sleep which integrates them with preexisting memories. The hypothesis received support from a wealth of EEG, behavioral, and biochemical analyses of trained rats. Further evidence was provided by independent studies of human subjects. SH basic premises, data, and interpretations have been compared with corresponding viewpoints of the synaptic homeostatic hypothesis (SHY). Their similarities and differences are presented and discussed within the framework of sleep processing operations. SHY’s emphasis on synaptic renormalization during SWS is acknowledged to underline a key sleep effect, but this cannot marginalize sleep’s main role in selecting memories to be retained from downgrading traces, and in their integration with preexisting memories. In addition, SHY’s synaptic renormalization raises an unsolved dilemma that clashes with the accepted memory storage mechanism exclusively based on modifications of synaptic strength. This difficulty may be bypassed by the assumption that SWS-processed memories are stored again by REM sleep in brain subnuclear quantum particles. Storing of memories in quantum particles may also occur in other vigilance states. Hints are provided on ways to subject the quantum hypothesis to experimental tests. PMID:25565985

  1. A novel sequential process for remediating rare-earth wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Kang, Kyounglim; Kim, Dukmin; Snyder, Shane A; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2016-02-01

    A novel and economic sequential process consisting of precipitation, adsorption, and oxidation was developed to remediate actual rare-earth (RE) wastewater containing various toxic pollutants, including radioactive species. In the precipitation step, porous air stones (PAS) containing waste oyster shell (WOS), PASWOS, was prepared and used to precipitate most heavy metals with >97% removal efficiencies. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that PAS plays a key role in preventing the surface coating of precipitants on the surface of WOS and in releasing the dissolved species of WOS successively. For the adsorption step, a polyurethane (PU) impregnated by coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS), PUCMDS, was synthesized and applied to deplete fluoride (F), arsenic (As), uranium (U), and thorium (Th) that remained after precipitation. The continuous-mode sequential process using PAS(WOS), PU(CMDS), and ozone (O3) had 99.9-100% removal efficiencies of heavy metals, 99.3-99.9% of F and As, 95.8-99.4% of U and Th, and 92.4% of COD(Cr) for 100 days. The sequential process can treat RE wastewater economically and effectively without stirred-tank reactors, pH controller, continuous injection of chemicals, and significant sludge generation, as well as the quality of the outlet met the EPA recommended limits.

  2. A novel sequential process for remediating rare-earth wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Kang, Kyounglim; Kim, Dukmin; Snyder, Shane A; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2016-02-01

    A novel and economic sequential process consisting of precipitation, adsorption, and oxidation was developed to remediate actual rare-earth (RE) wastewater containing various toxic pollutants, including radioactive species. In the precipitation step, porous air stones (PAS) containing waste oyster shell (WOS), PASWOS, was prepared and used to precipitate most heavy metals with >97% removal efficiencies. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that PAS plays a key role in preventing the surface coating of precipitants on the surface of WOS and in releasing the dissolved species of WOS successively. For the adsorption step, a polyurethane (PU) impregnated by coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS), PUCMDS, was synthesized and applied to deplete fluoride (F), arsenic (As), uranium (U), and thorium (Th) that remained after precipitation. The continuous-mode sequential process using PAS(WOS), PU(CMDS), and ozone (O3) had 99.9-100% removal efficiencies of heavy metals, 99.3-99.9% of F and As, 95.8-99.4% of U and Th, and 92.4% of COD(Cr) for 100 days. The sequential process can treat RE wastewater economically and effectively without stirred-tank reactors, pH controller, continuous injection of chemicals, and significant sludge generation, as well as the quality of the outlet met the EPA recommended limits. PMID:26583290

  3. Structural features of sequential weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the abstract structure of sequential weak measurement (WM) of general observables. In all orders, the sequential WM correlations without postselection yield the corresponding correlations of the Wigner function, offering direct quantum tomography through the moments of the canonical variables. Correlations in spin-1/2 sequential weak measurements coincide with those in strong measurements, they are constrained kinematically, and they are equivalent with single measurements. In sequential WMs with postselection, an anomaly occurs, different from the weak value anomaly of single WMs. In particular, the spread of polarization σ ̂ as measured in double WMs of σ ̂ will diverge for certain orthogonal pre- and postselected states.

  4. Developing a Self-Report-Based Sequential Analysis Method for Educational Technology Systems: A Process-Based Usability Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    The development of a usability evaluation method for educational systems or applications, called the self-report-based sequential analysis, is described herein. The method aims to extend the current practice by proposing self-report-based sequential analysis as a new usability method, which integrates the advantages of self-report in survey…

  5. Anatomic diagnosis of congenital heart disease. A practical approach based on the sequentiality principle.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; Curi-Curi, Pedro; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel; Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Munoz-Castellanos, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Based on the sequentiality principle, this review proposes a practical method that allows the systematization of the anatomic diagnosis of congenital heart disease. We emphasize the need to use sequential connection between the different cardiac segments: atria, ventricles and great arteries. Five ordered steps are defined, which include determination of atrial situs and of the connection features between the ventricles and the great arteries. Related lesions and some additional special features are a second stage in the sequential analysis of congenital heart disease, which is also important for the integral diagnosis.

  6. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  7. Sequential Consequences of Therapists' Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Milbrath, Constance; Bond, Michael; Cooper, Steven; Znoj, Hans J.; Horowitz, Mardi J.; Perry, J. Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Using sequential analysis, the authors examined how therapists' actions related to the verbal disclosure and defensive patterns that followed therapists' interventions within a single therapy hour for 20 patients. At the same time, a new measure, the Psychodynamic Intervention Rating Scale (PIRS), was tested for reliability and construct validity. Results indicated that therapists fit their styles of intervention to patients' levels of distress and functioning. Within the session, patient's emotional elaboration was followed by therapist's defense interpretation, followed by more patient emotional elaboration. Patient elaboration of significance was followed by more transference interpretation, followed by more patient elaboration of significance. Noninterpretive interventions were followed by patient's disclosure of facts, not emotion. Both interpretive intervention process sequences and therapist's use of support predicted posttreatment symptom reduction. The PIRS was shown to have satisfactory reliability and construct validity. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:40–54) PMID:9888106

  8. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  9. Experimental multiparty sequential state discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís-Prosser, M. A.; González, P.; Fuenzalida, J.; Gómez, S.; Xavier, G. B.; Delgado, A.; Lima, G.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, a protocol for quantum state discrimination (QSD) in a multiparty scenario has been introduced [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 100501 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.100501]. In this protocol, Alice generates a quantum system in one of two predefined nonorthogonal qubit states, and the goal is to send the generated state information to different parties without classical communication exchanged between them during the protocol's session. The interesting feature is that, by resorting to sequential generalized measurements onto this single system, there is a nonvanishing probability that all observers identify the state prepared by Alice. Here, we present the experimental implementation of this protocol based on polarization single-photon states. Our scheme works over an optical network, and since QSD lies in the core of many protocols, it represents a step towards experimental multiparty quantum information processing.

  10. Sequential detection of web defects

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Stalker, K. Terry; Yee, Amy A.

    2001-01-01

    A system for detecting defects on a moving web having a sequential series of identical frames uses an imaging device to form a real-time camera image of a frame and a comparitor to comparing elements of the camera image with corresponding elements of an image of an exemplar frame. The comparitor provides an acceptable indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically identical; and a defective indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically not identical. If the pair of elements is neither acceptable nor defective, the comparitor recursively compares the element of said exemplar frame with corresponding elements of other frames on said web until one of the acceptable or defective indications occur.

  11. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  12. Sequential power-up circuit

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-06-02

    A sequential power-up circuit for starting several electrical load elements in series to avoid excessive current surge, comprising a voltage ramp generator and a set of voltage comparators, each comparator having a different reference voltage and interfacing with a switch that is capable of turning on one of the load elements. As the voltage rises, it passes the reference voltages one at a time and causes the switch corresponding to that voltage to turn on its load element. The ramp is turned on and off by a single switch or by a logic-level electrical signal. The ramp rate for turning on the load element is relatively slow and the rate for turning the elements off is relatively fast. Optionally, the duration of each interval of time between the turning on of the load elements is programmable. 2 figs.

  13. Sequential power-up circuit

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A sequential power-up circuit for starting several electrical load elements in series to avoid excessive current surge, comprising a voltage ramp generator and a set of voltage comparators, each comparator having a different reference voltage and interfacing with a switch that is capable of turning on one of the load elements. As the voltage rises, it passes the reference voltages one at a time and causes the switch corresponding to that voltage to turn on its load element. The ramp is turned on and off by a single switch or by a logic-level electrical signal. The ramp rate for turning on the load element is relatively slow and the rate for turning the elements off is relatively fast. Optionally, the duration of each interval of time between the turning on of the load elements is programmable.

  14. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  15. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  16. Injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1989-06-01

    The most effective, convenient, reversible method of birth control is considered to be long-acting progestogen injections. Used by over 90 countries, Depot medroxy-progesterone acetate (DMPA, Depo-Provera, Upjohn) has yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The reluctance of the FDA to approve DMPA and much of the controversy surrounding this method revolve around the results of testing done on animals who were given large doses of the progestogen over a long period of time and developed tumors. However, the large body of research and records on this method that have been compiled over the past 30 years is positive. The injectable method works like oral contraceptives, inhibiting ovulation. Changes in menstruation have been the chief complaint of women who use this method; however, the duration and frequency of spotting and bleeding diminish over time. Other side effects of DMPA and Norethindrone enanthate (NET EN, Noristerat, Schering) are discussed. Also discussed is the history of development and testing for the 2 methods and subdermal implants, specifically Norplant.

  17. Injectable biodegradable hydrogels composed of hyaluronic acid-tyramine conjugates for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kurisawa, Motoichi; Chung, Joo Eun; Yang, Yi Yan; Gao, Shu Jun; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2005-09-14

    The sequential injection of hyaluronic acid-tyramine conjugates and enzymes forms biodegradable hydrogels in vivo by enzyme-induced oxidative coupling, offering high potential as a promising biomaterial for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  18. Glucosamine loaded injectable silk-in-silk integrated system modulate mechanical properties in bovine ex-vivo degenerated intervertebral disc model.

    PubMed

    Murab, Sumit; Samal, Juhi; Shrivastava, Akshay; Ray, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Abhay; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels offer a tremendous potential for treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc due to their ability to withstand complex loading, conforming precisely to the defect spaces and eliminating the need for invasive surgical procedures. We have developed an injectable hydrogel platform of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) loaded silk hollow spheres embedded in silk hydrogel for in situ therapeutic release and enhanced mechanical strength. The assembled silk hydrogel provided adequate structural support to the ex vivo degenerated disc model in a cyclic compression test at par with the native tissue. Spatiotemporal release of GlcNAc in a controlled manner from the silk hollow microspheres trigger enhanced proteoglycan production from ADSCs embedded in the composite system. Role of MAPK and SMAD pathways in increasing proteoglycan production have been explored by immunohistological analysis as a result of the action of GlcNAc on the cells, elucidating the potential of injectable silk microsphere-in-silk hydrogel for the regeneration of degenerated disc tissue. PMID:25934453

  19. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  20. An automatic, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscio, M. R.; Pratt, G. C.; Krupa, S. V.

    The design and characteristics of an automated, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler are described. This sampler can collect rainfall on an event basis or as sequential segments within a rain event. Samples are sealed upon collection to prevent gas exchange and are refrigerated in situ at 4 ± 2° C. This sampler is commercially available.

  1. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  2. Social Influences in Sequential Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Schöbel, Markus; Rieskamp, Jörg; Huber, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    People often make decisions in a social environment. The present work examines social influence on people’s decisions in a sequential decision-making situation. In the first experimental study, we implemented an information cascade paradigm, illustrating that people infer information from decisions of others and use this information to make their own decisions. We followed a cognitive modeling approach to elicit the weight people give to social as compared to private individual information. The proposed social influence model shows that participants overweight their own private information relative to social information, contrary to the normative Bayesian account. In our second study, we embedded the abstract decision problem of Study 1 in a medical decision-making problem. We examined whether in a medical situation people also take others’ authority into account in addition to the information that their decisions convey. The social influence model illustrates that people weight social information differentially according to the authority of other decision makers. The influence of authority was strongest when an authority's decision contrasted with private information. Both studies illustrate how the social environment provides sources of information that people integrate differently for their decisions. PMID:26784448

  3. Efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for record linkage

    PubMed Central

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Mi, Tian; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Integrating data from multiple sources is a crucial and challenging problem. Even though there exist numerous algorithms for record linkage or deduplication, they suffer from either large time needs or restrictions on the number of datasets that they can integrate. In this paper we report efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for record linkage which handle any number of datasets and outperform previous algorithms. Methods Our algorithms employ hierarchical clustering algorithms as the basis. A key idea that we use is radix sorting on certain attributes to eliminate identical records before any further processing. Another novel idea is to form a graph that links similar records and find the connected components. Results Our sequential and parallel algorithms have been tested on a real dataset of 1 083 878 records and synthetic datasets ranging in size from 50 000 to 9 000 000 records. Our sequential algorithm runs at least two times faster, for any dataset, than the previous best-known algorithm, the two-phase algorithm using faster computation of the edit distance (TPA (FCED)). The speedups obtained by our parallel algorithm are almost linear. For example, we get a speedup of 7.5 with 8 cores (residing in a single node), 14.1 with 16 cores (residing in two nodes), and 26.4 with 32 cores (residing in four nodes). Conclusions We have compared the performance of our sequential algorithm with TPA (FCED) and found that our algorithm outperforms the previous one. The accuracy is the same as that of this previous best-known algorithm. PMID:24154837

  4. Multilevel sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beskos, Alexandros; Jasra, Ajay; Law, Kody; Tempone, Raul; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-24

    Here, we study the approximation of expectations w.r.t. probability distributions associated to the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs); this scenario appears routinely in Bayesian inverse problems. In practice, one often has to solve the associated PDE numerically, using, for instance finite element methods and leading to a discretisation bias, with the step-size level hL. In addition, the expectation cannot be computed analytically and one often resorts to Monte Carlo methods. In the context of this problem, it is known that the introduction of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method can reduce the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error. This is achieved via a telescoping identity associated to a Monte Carlo approximation of a sequence of probability distributions with discretisation levelsmore » $${\\infty}$$ >h0>h1 ...>hL. In many practical problems of interest, one cannot achieve an i.i.d. sampling of the associated sequence of probability distributions. A sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) version of the MLMC method is introduced to deal with this problem. In conclusion, it is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the attractive property of a reduction of the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error, can be maintained within the SMC context.« less

  5. Multienzyme kinetics and sequential metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wienkers, Larry C; Rock, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are the catalysts of biological systems and are extremely efficient. A typical enzyme accelerates the rate of a reaction by factors of at least a million compared to the rate of the same reaction in the absence of the enzyme. In contrast to traditional catalytic enzymes, the family of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are catalytically promiscuous, and thus they possess remarkable versatility in substrates. The great diversity of reactions catalyzed by CYP enzymes appears to be based on two unique properties of these heme proteins, the ability of their iron to exist under multiple oxidation states with different reactivities and a flexible active site that can accommodate a wide variety of substrates. Herein is a discussion of two distinct types of kinetics observed with CYP enzymes. The first example is of CYP complex kinetic profiles when multiple CYP enzymes form the sample product. The second is sequential metabolism, in other words, the formation of multiple products from one CYP enzyme. Given the degree of CYP enzyme promiscuity, it is hardly surprising that there is also a high degree of complex kinetic profiles generated during the catalytic cycle.

  6. Stability models for sequential storage.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Emil M; Shum, Sam C

    2011-03-01

    Some drugs are intended for sequential storage under two different storage conditions. If the data for each condition are analyzed separately, predicting assay and other responses after T1 months at one condition followed by T2 months at the other condition is non-trivial for several reasons. First, the two analyses will give different intercept terms. What should one do about that? Second, how would one calculate the confidence limits for combined storage? Third, what if prior storage at one condition affects the slope at the other condition? This paper proposes a simple ANCOVA model containing two slope terms, one for each storage condition. When multiple batches and/or packages are involved, it is easily generalized to two sets of slope terms. Confidence limits are straightforward and can be calculated using existing commercial software. With properly designed data, one can test whether prior storage at one condition affects the slope at the other condition. If no such effect is significant, very useful extrapolations can be made. Temperature excursions, model reduction and curvilinear dependencies are discussed.

  7. Geographic variability in HIV and injection drug use in Ukraine: Implications for integration and expansion of drug treatment and HIV care

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas; Mazhnaya, Alonya; Larney, Sarah; Islam, Zahed; Shost, Alyona; Prokhorova, Tatiana; Rybak, Natasha; Flanigan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Ukraine has the highest HIV burden of any European country with much of the current HIV epidemic concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) and their sexual partners. Opiate substitution therapy (OST) is limited in Ukraine and expansion of OST is urgently needed to help stem the tide of the HIV epidemic. Methods We accessed publicly available data in Ukraine in order to explore geographic variability with respect to prevalence of HIV, PWIDs and OST programmes. Results The regions of Ukraine with the largest number of opioid dependent persons (the south and eastern portions of the country) correspond to the regions with the highest HIV prevalence and HIV incidence. The number of opioid PWIDs per 100,000 population as well as the number of all OST treatment slots per 100,000 varied significantly across the three HIV prevalence categories. Overall, the proportion of individuals receiving either methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) or buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) was quite low: average across categories: 7.3% and 0.4%, respectively. Additionally, less than half of OST patients receiving MMT or BMT were HIV positive patients. Conclusion There is significant geographic variability in both numbers of HIV positive individuals and numbers of PWIDs across Ukraine, however, there may be a more concentrated epidemic among PWIDs in many regions of the country. Scale up of addiction treatment for PWID, especially OST, can have a significant impact on preventing injection related morbidity, such as HIV and HCV infection. Ukraine can learn from the mistakes other nations have made in denying critical treatment opportunities to PWID. PMID:25304049

  8. DESIGN OF A HIGH COMPRESSION, DIRECT INJECTION, SPARK-IGNITION, METHANOL FUELED RESEARCH ENGINE WITH AN INTEGRAL INJECTOR-IGNITION SOURCE INSERT, SAE PAPER 2001-01-3651

    EPA Science Inventory

    A stratified charge research engine and test stand were designed and built for this work. The primary goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using a removal integral injector ignition source insert which allows a convenient method of charging the relative locat...

  9. A universal property for sequential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerbaan, Abraham; Westerbaan, Bas

    2016-09-01

    We study the sequential product the operation p ∗ q = √{ p } q √{ p } on the set of effects, [0, 1]𝒜, of a von Neumann algebra 𝒜 that represents sequential measurement of first p and then q. In their work [J. Math. Phys. 49(5), 052106 (2008)], Gudder and Latrémolière give a list of axioms based on physical grounds that completely determines the sequential product on a von Neumann algebra of type I, that is, a von Neumann algebra ℬ(ℋ) of all bounded operators on some Hilbert space ℋ. In this paper we give a list of axioms that completely determines the sequential product on all von Neumann algebras simultaneously (Theorem 4).

  10. Integrated Biosensor Systems for Ethanol Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhadeff, Eliana M.; Salgado, Andrea M.; Cós, Oriol; Pereira, Nei; Valero, Francisco; Valdman, Belkis

    Different integrated systems with a bi-enzymatic biosensor, working with two different methods for ethanol detection—flow injection analysis (FIA) or sequential injection analysis (SIA)—were developed and applied for ethanol extracted from gasohol mixtures, as well as for samples of alcoholic beverages and fermentation medium. A detection range of 0.05-1.5 g ethanol/l, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9909, has been reached when using FIA system, working with only one microreactor packed with immobilized alcohol oxidase and injecting free horseradish peroxidase. When using both enzymes, immobilized separately in two microreactors, the detection ranges obtained varied from 0.001 to 0.066 g ethanol/l, without on-line dilution to 0.010-0.047 g ethanol/l when a 1:7,000 dilution ratio was employed, reaching correlation coefficients of 0.9897 and 0.9992, respectively. For the integrated biosensor SIA system with the stop-flow technique, the linear range was 0.005-0.04 g/l, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9922.

  11. Present-day stress analysis of the St. Lawrence Lowlands sedimentary basin (Canada) and implications for caprock integrity during CO2 injection operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinovskaya, E.; Malo, M.; Castillo, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    A geomechanical analysis of the St. Lawrence Lowlands sedimentary basin is important to reliably estimate the maximum sustainable fluid pressures for CO2 injection that will not reactivate pre-existing faults in the caprock thereby inducing a breeched CO2 reservoir. This requires the determination of prevailing stresses (orientations and magnitudes), fault and fractures geometries and rock strengths. The average maximum horizontal stress orientation (SHmax) is estimated N59°E ± 20° in the St. Lawrence Lowlands. The stress orientations were obtained from stress-induced wellbore breakouts inferred from four-arm dipmeter caliper data in 17 wells. These wellbore failure features are confined to Paleozoic lithological units of the St. Lawrence Platform succession and frontal thrusts of the Quebec Appalachians at depths from 250 m to 4 km. Our results are consistent with the regional NE-SW SHmax stress orientation trend that is generally observed in eastern Canada and the U.S. The stresses/pressure gradients estimated for the St. Lawrence Lowlands (depths < 4 km) are: Shmin 20.5 ± 3 kPa/m, Sv 25.6 kPa/m, SHmax 40 ± 7.5 kPa/m, pore pressure Pp 9.8 kPa/m indicating a strike-slip stress regime Shmin < Sv < SHmax. The high-angle NE-SW regional faults and fractures in the Paleozoic sedimentary succession and the Grenvillian basement are oblique to the SHmax stress orientations (10° to 36°) and could be reactivated (slip tendency 0.34 to 0.58) under the present-day stress field if fluid pressures exceeded the critical threshold. Further refinement of regional geomechanical model is required to estimate the maximum sustainable injection pressure necessary for shear reactivation along the regional faults. The regional pore pressure-stress coupling ratio under assumed parameters is about 0.5-0.65 and may contribute to reduce the risk of shear reactivation of faults and fractures. The maximum sustainable Pp that would not cause opening of vertical tensile fractures during

  12. Autonomous learning of sequential tasks: experiments and analyses.

    PubMed

    Sun, R; Peterson, T

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a novel learning model CLARION, which is a hybrid model based on the two-level approach proposed by Sun. The model integrates neural, reinforcement, and symbolic learning methods to perform on-line, bottom-up learning (i.e., learning that goes from neural to symbolic representations). The model utilizes both procedural and declarative knowledge (in neural and symbolic representations, respectively), tapping into the synergy of the two types of processes. It was applied to deal with sequential decision tasks. Experiments and analyzes in various ways are reported that shed light on the advantages of the model. PMID:18255804

  13. SOPIE: Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Willem D.

    2016-07-01

    SOPIE (Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation) provides functions to non-parametrically estimate the off-pulse interval of a source function originating from a pulsar. The technique is based on a sequential application of P-values obtained from goodness-of-fit tests for the uniform distribution, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramér-von Mises, Anderson-Darling and Rayleigh goodness-of-fit tests.

  14. Automated ILA design for synchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, M. N.; Liu, K. Z.; Maki, G. K.; Whitaker, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative logic array (ILA) architecture for synchronous sequential circuits is presented. This technique utilizes linear algebra to produce the design equations. The ILA realization of synchronous sequential logic can be fully automated with a computer program. A programmable design procedure is proposed to fullfill the design task and layout generation. A software algorithm in the C language has been developed and tested to generate 1 micron CMOS layouts using the Hewlett-Packard FUNGEN module generator shell.

  15. Inadequate anaesthesia in lethal injection for execution.

    PubMed

    Koniaris, Leonidas G; Zimmers, Teresa A; Lubarsky, David A; Sheldon, Jonathan P

    Anaesthesia during lethal injection is essential to minimise suffering and to maintain public acceptance of the practice. Lethal injection is usually done by sequential administration of thiopental, pancuronium, and potassium chloride. Protocol information from Texas and Virginia showed that executioners had no anaesthesia training, drugs were administered remotely with no monitoring for anaesthesia, data were not recorded and no peer-review was done. Toxicology reports from Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina showed that post-mortem concentrations of thiopental in the blood were lower than that required for surgery in 43 of 49 executed inmates (88%); 21 (43%) inmates had concentrations consistent with awareness. Methods of lethal injection anaesthesia are flawed and some inmates might experience awareness and suffering during execution.

  16. Sequential effects in face-attractiveness judgment.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Aki; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that current-trial responses are biased toward the response of the preceding trial in perceptual decisionmaking tasks (the sequential effect-Holland and Lockhead, 1968 Perception & Psychophysics 3 409-414). The sequential effect has been widely observed in evaluation of the physical properties of stimuli as well as more complex properties. However, it is unclear whether subjective decisions (e.g., attractiveness judgments) are also susceptible to the sequential effect. Here, we examined whether the sequential effect would occur in face-attractiveness judgments. Forty-eight pictures of male and female faces were presented successively. Participants rated the attractiveness of each face on a 7-point scale. The results showed that the attractiveness rating of a given face assimilated toward the rating of the preceding trial. In a separate experiment, we provided the average attractiveness rating by others for each trial as feedback. The feedback weakened the sequential effect. These findings suggest that attractiveness judgment is also biased toward the preceding judgment, and hence the sequential effect can be extended into the domain of subjective decisionmaking. PMID:22611662

  17. 3D-Printed Fluidic Devices for Nanoparticle Preparation and Flow-Injection Amperometry Using Integrated Prussian Blue Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Gregory W.; Satterwhite, Jennifer E.; Bhakta, Snehasis; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Gillette, Kelsey M.; Chen, Eric; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A consumer-grade fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer was used to construct fluidic devices for nanoparticle preparation and electrochemical sensing. Devices were printed using poly(ethylene terephthalate) and featured threaded ports to connect polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing via printed fittings prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). These devices included channels designed to have 800 × 800 µm2 square cross sections and were semitransparent to allow visualization of the solution-filled channels. A 3D-printed device with a Y-shaped mixing channel was used to prepare Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) under flow rates of 100 to 2000 µL min−1. PBNPs were then attached to gold electrodes for hydrogen peroxide sensing. 3D-printed devices used for electrochemical measurements featured threaded access ports into which a fitting equipped with reference, counter, and PBNP-modified working electrodes could be inserted. PBNP-modified electrodes enabled amperometric detection of H2O2 in the 3D-printed channel by flow-injection analysis, exhibiting a detection limit of 100 nM and linear response up to 20 µM. These experiments show that a consumer-grade FFF printer can be used to fabricate low-cost fluidic devices for applications similar to those that have been reported with more expensive 3D-printing methods. PMID:25901660

  18. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected so the provider can see where to place the medicine. The steroid medicine is slowly injected into the joint. After the injection, you will remain on the table for another 5 to 10 minutes or so. ...

  19. Trans-dimensional Bayesian inference for large sequential data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Dettmer, J.; Dosso, S. E.; Holland, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work develops a sequential Monte Carlo method to infer seismic parameters of layered seabeds from large sequential reflection-coefficient data sets. The approach provides parameter estimates and uncertainties along survey tracks with the goal to aid in the detection of unexploded ordnance in shallow water. The sequential data are acquired by a moving platform with source and receiver array towed close to the seabed. This geometry requires consideration of spherical reflection coefficients, computed efficiently by massively parallel implementation of the Sommerfeld integral via Levin integration on a graphics processing unit. The seabed is parametrized with a trans-dimensional model to account for changes in the environment (i.e. changes in layering) along the track. The method combines advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo methods (annealing) with particle filtering (resampling). Since data from closely-spaced source transmissions (pings) often sample similar environments, the solution from one ping can be utilized to efficiently estimate the posterior for data from subsequent pings. Since reflection-coefficient data are highly informative, the likelihood function can be extremely peaked, resulting in little overlap between posteriors of adjacent pings. This is addressed by adding bridging distributions (via annealed importance sampling) between pings for more efficient transitions. The approach assumes the environment to be changing slowly enough to justify the local 1D parametrization. However, bridging allows rapid changes between pings to be addressed and we demonstrate the method to be stable in such situations. Results are in terms of trans-D parameter estimates and uncertainties along the track. The algorithm is examined for realistic simulated data along a track and applied to a dataset collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle on the Malta Plateau, Mediterranean Sea. [Work supported by the SERDP, DoD.

  20. Modern Sequential Analysis and Its Applications to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartroff, Jay; Finkelman, Matthew; Lai, Tze Leung

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of recent advances in sequential analysis involving sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests, we discuss their use in psychometric testing and extend the asymptotic optimality theory of these sequential tests to the case of sequentially generated experiments, of particular interest in computerized adaptive testing. We…

  1. Development of an Ultrasonic Phased Array System for Wellbore Integrity Evaluation and Near-Wellbore Fracture Network Mapping of Injection and Production Wells in Geothermal Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Foster, Benjamin; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents our progress developing an ultrasound phased array system in combination with a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm to inspect the health of and characterize the composition of the near-wellbore region for geothermal reservoirs. The main goal for this system is to provide a near-wellbore in-situ characterization capability that will significantly improve wellbore integrity evaluation and near well-bore fracture network mapping. A more detailed image of the fracture network near the wellbore in particular will enable the selection of optimal locations for stimulation along the wellbore, provide critical data that can be used to improve stimulation design, and provide a means for measuring evolution of the fracture network to support long term management of reservoir operations. Development of such a measurement capability supports current hydrothermal operations as well as the successful demonstration of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The paper will include the design of the phased array system, the performance specifications, and characterization methodology. In addition, we will describe the MBIR forward model derived for the phased array system and the propagation of compressional waves through a pseudo-homogenous medium.

  2. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  3. Sequential Mathematics Course III. Volume One. Staff Development Program 1986-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Sequential Mathematics Sequence provides students with an integrated course of study, including lessons which interweave algebra, geometry, logic, probability, and mathematical systems. This handbook is designed to meet the needs of teachers who will be teaching Course III in the sequence. The handbook, for use with staff development programs,…

  4. Optimal sequential Bayesian analysis for degradation tests.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Narciso, Silvia; Christen, J Andrés

    2016-07-01

    Degradation tests are especially difficult to conduct for items with high reliability. Test costs, caused mainly by prolonged item duration and item destruction costs, establish the necessity of sequential degradation test designs. We propose a methodology that sequentially selects the optimal observation times to measure the degradation, using a convenient rule that maximizes the inference precision and minimizes test costs. In particular our objective is to estimate a quantile of the time to failure distribution, where the degradation process is modelled as a linear model using Bayesian inference. The proposed sequential analysis is based on an index that measures the expected discrepancy between the estimated quantile and its corresponding prediction, using Monte Carlo methods. The procedure was successfully implemented for simulated and real data.

  5. Batch sequential designs for computer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Leslie M; Williams, Brian J; Loeppky, Jason L

    2009-01-01

    Computer models simulating a physical process are used in many areas of science. Due to the complex nature of these codes it is often necessary to approximate the code, which is typically done using a Gaussian process. In many situations the number of code runs available to build the Guassian process approximation is limited. When the initial design is small or the underlying response surface is complicated this can lead to poor approximations of the code output. In order to improve the fit of the model, sequential design strategies must be employed. In this paper we introduce two simple distance based metrics that can be used to augment an initial design in a batch sequential manner. In addition we propose a sequential updating strategy to an orthogonal array based Latin hypercube sample. We show via various real and simulated examples that the distance metrics and the extension of the orthogonal array based Latin hypercubes work well in practice.

  6. Sequential sampling designs based on space reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Xu, Shengli; Wang, Xiaofang

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering design and optimization, metamodels are widely used to replace expensive simulation models in order to reduce computing costs. To improve the accuracy of metamodels effectively and efficiently, sequential sampling designs have been developed. In this article, a sequential sampling design using the Monte Carlo method and space reduction strategy (MCSR) is implemented and discussed in detail. The space reduction strategy not only maintains good sampling properties but also improves the efficiency of the sampling process. Furthermore, a local boundary search (LBS) algorithm is proposed to efficiently improve the performance of MCSR, which is called LBS-MCSR. Comparative results with several sequential sampling approaches from low to high dimensions indicate that the space reduction strategy generates samples with better sampling properties (and thus better metamodel accuracy) in less computing time.

  7. Automatic defensive control of asynchronous sequential machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Control theoretic techniques are utilised to develop automatic controllers that counteract robotic adversarial interventions in the operation of asynchronous sequential machines. The scenario centres on automatic protection against pre-programmed adversarial agents that attempt to subvert the operation of an asynchronous computing system. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of defensive controllers that automatically defeat such adversarial agents are derived. These conditions are stated in terms of skeleton matrices - matrices of zeros and ones obtained directly from the given description of the asynchronous sequential machine being protected. When defensive controllers exist, a procedure for their design is outlined.

  8. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  9. THREE-DIMENSIONAL {integral} FIELD OBSERVATIONS OF 10 GALACTIC WINDS. I. EXTENDED PHASE ({approx}>10 Myr) OF MASS/ENERGY INJECTION BEFORE THE WIND BLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R. G.; Bland-Hawthorn, J. E-mail: jbh@physics.usyd.edu.a

    2010-03-10

    In recent years, we have come to recognize the widespread importance of large-scale winds in the life cycle of galaxies. The onset and evolution of a galactic wind is a highly complex process which must be understood if we are to understand how energy and metals are recycled throughout the galaxy and beyond. Here we present three-dimensional spectroscopic observations of a sample of 10 nearby galaxies with the AAOmega-SPIRAL {integral}-field spectrograph on the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope, the largest survey of its kind to date. The double-beam spectrograph provides spatial maps in a range of spectral diagnostics: [O III]5007, Hbeta, Mg b, Na D, [O I]6300, Halpha, [N II]6583, [S II]6717, 6731. We demonstrate that these flows can often separate into highly ordered structures through the use of ionization diagnostics and kinematics. All of the objects in our survey show extensive wind-driven filamentation along the minor axis, in addition to large-scale disk rotation. Our sample can be divided into either starburst galaxies or active galactic nuclei (AGNs), although some objects appear to be a combination of these. The total ionizing photon budget available to both classes of galaxies is sufficient to ionize all of the wind-blown filamentation out to large radius. We find, however, that while AGN photoionization always dominates in the wind filaments, this is not the case in starburst galaxies where shock ionization dominates. This clearly indicates that after the onset of star formation, there is a substantial delay ({approx}>10 Myr) before a starburst wind develops. We show why this behavior is expected by deriving 'ionization' and dynamical timescales for both AGNs and starbursts. We establish a sequence of events that lead to the onset of a galactic wind. The clear signature provided by the ionization timescale is arguably the strongest evidence yet that the starburst phenomenon is an impulsive event. A well-defined ionization timescale is not expected in

  10. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  11. Issues surrounding lethal injection as a means of capital punishment.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Frank; Whisman, Tyler; Fink, Joseph L

    2008-12-01

    Lethal injection as a method of state-sanctioned capital punishment was initially proposed in the United States in 1977 and used for the first time in 1982. Most lethal injection protocols use a sequential drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride. Lethal injection was originally introduced as a more humane form of execution compared with existing mechanical methods such as electrocution, toxic gassing, hanging, or firing squad. Lethal injection has not, however, been without controversy. Several states are considering whether lethal injection meets constitutional scrutiny forbidding cruel and unusual punishment. Recently in the case of Ralph Baze and Thomas C. Bowling, Petitioners, v John D. Rees, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Corrections et al, the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the lethal injection protocol as carried out in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Most of the debate has surrounded the dosing and procedures used in lethal injection and whether the drug combinations and measures for administering the drugs truly produce a timely, pain-free, and fail-safe death. Many have also raised issues regarding the "medicalization" of execution and the ethics of health care professionals' participation in any part of the lethal injection process. As a result of all these issues, the future of lethal injection as a means of execution in the United States is under significant scrutiny. Outcomes of ongoing legislative and judicial reviews might result in cessation of lethal injection in totality or in alterations involving specific drug combinations or administration procedures.

  12. Passive Baited Sequential Filth Fly Trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted cone design to passively confi...

  13. Mathematical Problem Solving through Sequential Process Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codina, A.; Cañadas, M. C.; Castro, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The macroscopic perspective is one of the frameworks for research on problem solving in mathematics education. Coming from this perspective, our study addresses the stages of thought in mathematical problem solving, offering an innovative approach because we apply sequential relations and global interrelations between the different…

  14. Adult Word Recognition and Visual Sequential Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted investigating the role of visual sequential memory skill in the word recognition efficiency of undergraduate university students. Word recognition was assessed in a lexical decision task using regularly and strangely spelt words, and nonwords that were either standard orthographically legal strings or items made from…

  15. Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2012-01-01

    The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey…

  16. An Inexpensive Remote Sequential Air Sampler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, George A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes a remote air sampling device constructed of a number of spring loaded syringes which are released sequentially by the motion of a rotary mechanical timer. The unit can take accurate samples automatically and contain the samples without leakage for periods up to 18 hours in an outdoor environment. (SLH)

  17. Adaptive sequential testing for multiple comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Lingyun; Mehta, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Markov process theory-based adaptive sequential testing procedure for multiple comparisons. The procedure can be used for confirmative trials involving multi-comparisons, including dose selection or population enrichment. Dose or subpopulation selection and sample size modification can be made at any interim analysis. Type I error control is exact. PMID:24926848

  18. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9% reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8% sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends, sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half IDUs reported unsafe injection practices, and our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs’ perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  19. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9 % reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8 % sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends or sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half the IDUs reported unsafe injection practices. Our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs' perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  20. DETECTING WATER FLOW BEHIND PIPE IN INJECTION WELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency require that an injection well exhibit both internal and external mechanical integrity. The external mechanical integrity consideration is that there is no significant fluid movement into an underground source of drinking water ...

  1. The creation of an alternating sequential/parallel Lisp machine

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The theory, design, and fabrication of an alternating sequential/parallel Lisp machine (ASPLM) is described. The ASPLM provides an environment for symbolic computation, capable of solving artificial intelligence problems using parallel algorithms. The ASPLM is an innovative hardware/software system, resulting from the integration of the following new ideas: an extensible hardware architecture which directly supports the alternating sequential/parallel (ASP) methodology, a coordinated garbage collection mechanism for multicomputers, an efficient Lisp identifier-passing scheme, a tokenized protocol for the transmission of symbolic Lisp expressions, and Lisp language extensions which support parallel programming. This dissertation covers the following topics: Background - The critical decisions in designing the ASPLM architecture were based on a survey of existing parallel computer architectures. A comparison between the ASPLM and other modern Lisp machine architectures demonstrates the relevance and importance of this research. ASPLM architecture - The fundamental components of the ASPLM architecture are described. The host-slave communications scheme, which shows how symbolic expressions can be efficiently processed on this architecture, is presented. Hardware design - Important aspects of the ASPLM hardware organization are discussed. A complete description of the host computer, the host interface, the bus repeater, and the slave processors is provided. Schematic diagrams and photographs of the ASPLM hardware are included. Software design - An analysis of the software organization reveals the close interrelationships between the various component modules which constitute the ASPLM Lisp system. The ASPLM Lisp system software is written in the C language and 68000 assembler. All source code is included.

  2. A Sequential Shifting Algorithm for Variable Rotor Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Edwards, Jason M.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    A proof of concept of a continuously variable rotor speed control methodology for rotorcraft is described. Variable rotor speed is desirable for several reasons including improved maneuverability, agility, and noise reduction. However, it has been difficult to implement because turboshaft engines are designed to operate within a narrow speed band, and a reliable drive train that can provide continuous power over a wide speed range does not exist. The new methodology proposed here is a sequential shifting control for twin-engine rotorcraft that coordinates the disengagement and engagement of the two turboshaft engines in such a way that the rotor speed may vary over a wide range, but the engines remain within their prescribed speed bands and provide continuous torque to the rotor; two multi-speed gearboxes facilitate the wide rotor speed variation. The shifting process begins when one engine slows down and disengages from the transmission by way of a standard freewheeling clutch mechanism; the other engine continues to apply torque to the rotor. Once one engine disengages, its gear shifts, the multi-speed gearbox output shaft speed resynchronizes and it re-engages. This process is then repeated with the other engine. By tailoring the sequential shifting, the rotor may perform large, rapid speed changes smoothly, as demonstrated in several examples. The emphasis of this effort is on the coordination and control aspects for proof of concept. The engines, rotor, and transmission are all simplified linear models, integrated to capture the basic dynamics of the problem.

  3. Online Sequential Projection Vector Machine with Adaptive Data Mean Update

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Jia, Ji-Ting; Zhang, Qiong; Deng, Wan-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple online learning algorithm especial for high-dimensional data. The algorithm is referred to as online sequential projection vector machine (OSPVM) which derives from projection vector machine and can learn from data in one-by-one or chunk-by-chunk mode. In OSPVM, data centering, dimension reduction, and neural network training are integrated seamlessly. In particular, the model parameters including (1) the projection vectors for dimension reduction, (2) the input weights, biases, and output weights, and (3) the number of hidden nodes can be updated simultaneously. Moreover, only one parameter, the number of hidden nodes, needs to be determined manually, and this makes it easy for use in real applications. Performance comparison was made on various high-dimensional classification problems for OSPVM against other fast online algorithms including budgeted stochastic gradient descent (BSGD) approach, adaptive multihyperplane machine (AMM), primal estimated subgradient solver (Pegasos), online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM), and SVD + OSELM (feature selection based on SVD is performed before OSELM). The results obtained demonstrated the superior generalization performance and efficiency of the OSPVM. PMID:27143958

  4. Constrained sequential lamination: Nonconvex optimization and material microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fago, Matt

    A practical algorithm has been developed to construct, through sequential lamination, the partial relaxation of multiwell energy densities such as those characteristic of shape memory alloys. The resulting microstructures are in static and configurational equilibrium, and admit arbitrary deformations. The laminate topology evolves during deformation through branching and pruning operations, while a continuity constraint provides a simple model of metastability and hysteresis. In cases with strict separation of length scales, the method may be integrated into a finite element calculation at the subgrid level. This capability is demonstrated with a calculation of the indentation of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy by a spherical indenter. In verification tests the algorithm attained the analytic solution in the computation of three benchmark problems. In the fourth case, the four-well problem (of, e.g., Tartar), results indicate that the method for microstructural evolution imposes an energy barrier for branching, hindering microstructural development in some cases. Although this effect is undesirable for purely mathematical problems, it is reflective of the activation energies and metastabilities present in applications involving natural processes. The method was further used to model Shield's tension test experiment, with initial calculations generating reasonable transformation strains and microstructures that compared well with the sequential laminates obtained experimentally.

  5. Slit injection device

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Schlitt, Leland G.; Bradley, Laird P.

    1976-06-15

    A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

  6. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  7. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  8. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to ...

  9. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  10. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  11. Sequential Analysis: A Tool for Monitoring Program Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Holly L.; Hoff, Margaret B.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity and simplicity of Wald's sequential analysis test in monitoring a preventive health care program are discussed. Data exemplifying the usefulness and expedience of employing sequential methods are presented. (Author/GK)

  12. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  13. Wald Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Space Object Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F Landis

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how satellite owner/operators may use sequential estimates of collision probability, along with a prior assessment of the base risk of collision, in a compound hypothesis ratio test to inform decisions concerning collision risk mitigation maneuvers. The compound hypothesis test reduces to a simple probability ratio test, which appears to be a novel result. The test satisfies tolerances related to targeted false alarm and missed detection rates. This result is independent of the method one uses to compute the probability density that one integrates to compute collision probability. A well-established test case from the literature shows that this test yields acceptable results within the constraints of a typical operational conjunction assessment decision timeline. Another example illustrates the use of the test in a practical conjunction assessment scenario based on operations of the International Space Station.

  14. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-07-18

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children's toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays.

  15. Info-Greedy Sequential Adaptive Compressed Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Gabor; Pokutta, Sebastian; Xie, Yao

    2015-06-01

    We present an information-theoretic framework for sequential adaptive compressed sensing, Info-Greedy Sensing, where measurements are chosen to maximize the extracted information conditioned on the previous measurements. We show that the widely used bisection approach is Info-Greedy for a family of $k$-sparse signals by connecting compressed sensing and blackbox complexity of sequential query algorithms, and present Info-Greedy algorithms for Gaussian and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) signals, as well as ways to design sparse Info-Greedy measurements. Numerical examples demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithms using simulated and real data: Info-Greedy Sensing shows significant improvement over random projection for signals with sparse and low-rank covariance matrices, and adaptivity brings robustness when there is a mismatch between the assumed and the true distributions.

  16. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-07-01

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children's toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays.

  17. Hyperspectral target detection using sequential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskett, Hanna T.; Sood, Arun K.; Habib, Mohammad K.

    1999-08-01

    This paper describes an automatic target detection algorithm based on the sequential multi-stage approach. Each stage of the algorithm uses more spectral bands than the previous stage. To ensure high probability of detection and low false alarm rate, Chebyshev's inequality test is applied. The sequential approach enables a significant reduction in computational time of a hyperspectral detection system. The Forest Radiance I database collected with the HYDICE hyperspectral sensor at the U.S. Army Proving Ground in Aberdeen, Maryland is utilized. Scenarios include targets in the open, with footprints of 1 m and different times of day. The total area coverage and the number of targets used in this evaluation are approximately 6 km2 and 126, respectively.

  18. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children’s toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays. PMID:21863126

  19. Applying the Minimax Principle to Sequential Mastery Testing. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Hans J.

    This paper derives optimal rules for sequential mastery tests. In a sequential mastery test, the decision is to classify a subject as a master or a nonmaster or to continue sampling and administering another random item. The framework of minimax sequential decision theory (minimum information approach) is used; that is, optimal rules are obtained…

  20. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  1. GENERAL: Mutual Information and Relative Entropy of Sequential Effect Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Mei; Wu, Jun-De; Cho, Minhyung

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce and investigate the mutual information and relative entropy on the sequential effect algebra, we also give a comparison of these mutual information and relative entropy with the classical ones by the venn diagrams. Finally, a nice example shows that the entropies of sequential effect algebra depend extremely on the order of its sequential product.

  2. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  3. Sequential morphological and quantitative changes in blood and bone marrow neutrophils in dogs with acute inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Gossett, K A; MacWilliams, P S; Cleghorn, B

    1985-01-01

    Blood and bone marrow morphology were studied sequentially in dogs during experimental inflammation induced by intramuscular injection of turpentine. Depletion of the bone marrow storage pool of mature neutrophils and an increase in mitotic activity and number of early granulocyte precursors were evident within 24 hours. During the next three days, intense granulocytic hyperplasia resulted in replenishment of the bone marrow storage pool. Neutrophils with foamy vacuolation and increased basophilia of the cytoplasm (toxic neutrophils) were present in the blood by eight hours postinjection. The number of toxic neutrophils paralleled the intensity of clinical signs and changes in rectal temperature but not the number of band neutrophils. This indicates that changes in number of toxic neutrophils in sequential leukograms can be a prognostic indicator in dogs with severe inflammation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:4041973

  4. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Fouke, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross--disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-­Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-­scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-­age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-­tier international peer-­reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order

  5. Managing numerical errors in random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Nowak, Aleksandra

    2016-09-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the influence of a finite surface size and a finite simulation time on a packing fraction estimated using random sequential adsorption simulations. The goal of particular interest is providing hints on simulation setup to achieve desired level of accuracy. The analysis is based on properties of saturated random packing of disks on continuous and flat surfaces of different sizes.

  6. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury.

  7. Analytic sequential methods for detecting network intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytic sequential methods for detecting port-scan attackers which routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. In addition to rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious, our method performs significantly faster than other current solutions. We have developed explicit formulae for quick determination of the parameters of the new detection algorithm.

  8. Sequential decision making and stochastic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmaghraby, S.

    1980-01-01

    To solve the problems inherent in working with sequential decision processes, it is proposed to (1) utilize concepts of dominance through bounding in the decision processes (DP) formalism to reduce the amount of computing required. This advocates the marrying of DP recursion and Branch-and-Bound methodology; and (2) relax the requirement of strict optimality in the search over the state space, and be content with a tolerable error.

  9. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury. PMID:26334198

  10. Compressive Sequential Learning for Action Similarity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jie; Liu, Li; Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Yunhong; Shao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Human action recognition in videos has been extensively studied in recent years due to its wide range of applications. Instead of classifying video sequences into a number of action categories, in this paper, we focus on a particular problem of action similarity labeling (ASLAN), which aims at verifying whether a pair of videos contain the same type of action or not. To address this challenge, a novel approach called compressive sequential learning (CSL) is proposed by leveraging the compressive sensing theory and sequential learning. We first project data points to a low-dimensional space by effectively exploring an important property in compressive sensing: the restricted isometry property. In particular, a very sparse measurement matrix is adopted to reduce the dimensionality efficiently. We then learn an ensemble classifier for measuring similarities between pairwise videos by iteratively minimizing its empirical risk with the AdaBoost strategy on the training set. Unlike conventional AdaBoost, the weak learner for each iteration is not explicitly defined and its parameters are learned through greedy optimization. Furthermore, an alternative of CSL named compressive sequential encoding is developed as an encoding technique and followed by a linear classifier to address the similarity-labeling problem. Our method has been systematically evaluated on four action data sets: ASLAN, KTH, HMDB51, and Hollywood2, and the results show the effectiveness and superiority of our method for ASLAN.

  11. Sequential bilateral striatal lesions have additive effects on single skilled limb use in rats.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2007-02-27

    Unilateral dopamine depletion in rats induced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the nigrostriatal system causes permanent impairments in limb use. The disturbances in limb use, including impairments in skilled reaching, are most severe on the side contralateral to the lesion. A number of studies, however, have also described ipsilateral deficits in skilled reaching. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sequential bilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions on skilled reaching movements in rats to compare the contribution of contra- versus ipsilateral motor control. Rats were trained in a reaching task to grasp food pellets with their preferred paw prior to receiving an intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection on the side contralateral to the preferred paw. The lesion significantly reduced reaching success along with qualitative impairments in limb use. In addition, animals displayed asymmetry in limb use and contraversive rotation bias after an apomorphine challenge. Three weeks later, animals received a second lesion induced by intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection into the hemisphere ipsilateral to the preferred paw. This lesion exaggerated the previous impairments in limb use and further reduced reaching success of the preferred paw. In the ladder rung walking task, additional impairments were found only in the forelimb ipsilateral to the first lesion. The findings of additive effects of sequential bilateral lesions suggest that both the contra- and ipsilateral striatum control single limb use. This supports the notion of bilateral control of skilled forelimb use by the mesostriatal dopaminergic system. PMID:17182115

  12. Positive displacement electronic fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.

    1986-04-22

    A fuel injection pump is described of the plunger, spill port type, including a single plunger reciprocably and rotatably mounted in a plunger barrel, an engine driven camshaft having gear means and a number of camlobes thereon for reciprocating and rotating the plunger a number of times for each revolution of the camshaft through a number of pumping upstrokes and fuel intake downstrokes for injecting fuel sequentially into a number of engine cylinders. The plunger barrel defines a fuel fill-spill chamber at the end of the plunger connected to a solenoid valve controlled spill port for pressurization of the chamber during the upstroke of the plunger upon closure of the spill port by the valve, the plunger having a number of internal axially spaced passages connected to the chamber for filling the chamber with fuel on the fuel intake upstroke of the plunger or alternately directing fuel from the chamber to a fuel injection nozzle during pressurization of the chamber, means connecting one of the internal passages to a fuel supply passage and another passage to a fuel injection nozzle line past a check valve in the other passage. The passages are spaced such that rotation and reciprocation of the plunger through one stroke connects the chamber to one passage which disconnecting the chamber from the other passage, and vice-versa during the next successive stroke of the plunger, the other passage being connected successively one at a time to each injection line in the engine upon rotation of the camshaft, the engine having at least four cylinders, and the camshaft having four camlobes on a single cam, the lobes each being 90% in extent with a peak and an essentially long flat surface inbetween peaks providing a slower upstroke of the plunger than the downstroke thereby providing a longer time for injection than for fuel intake.

  13. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  14. An unfortunate injection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik Sandip; Yarbrough, Chase; Price, Amy; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injection has been used to administer medications for more than a hundred years. However, despite our profession's long experience with intramuscular administration, preventable complications such as injection nerve palsies are still prevalent in developing countries. Injections account for one-fifth of all traumatic nerve injuries. These injuries largely occur due to indiscriminate use of intramuscular injections for treating common illnesses, frequently by unlicensed or undertrained practitioners administering unnecessary treatment to impoverished patients. The sciatic nerve is the most commonly injured, and frequently the resulting muscle weakness and associated disability are irreversible. This case report includes a video of a patient with foot drop 6 weeks after gluteal intramuscular injection. Such injuries can be prevented by proper awareness and training, the implementation of safer injection techniques, and quality assurance methods. PMID:26931130

  15. Procedural and Physical Interventions for Vaccine Injections

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vibhuti; McMurtry, C. Meghan; MacDonald, Noni E.; Ipp, Moshe; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of physical and procedural interventions for reducing pain and related outcomes during vaccination. Design/Methods: Databases were searched using a broad search strategy to identify relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Data were extracted according to procedure phase (preprocedure, acute, recovery, and combinations of these) and pooled using established methods. Results: A total of 31 studies were included. Acute infant distress was diminished during intramuscular injection without aspiration (n=313): standardized mean difference (SMD) −0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI]: −1.18, −0.46). Injecting the most painful vaccine last during vaccinations reduced acute infant distress (n=196): SMD −0.69 (95% CI: −0.98, −0.4). Simultaneous injections reduced acute infant distress compared with sequential injections (n=172): SMD −0.56 (95% CI: −0.87, −0.25). There was no benefit of simultaneous injections in children. Less infant distress during the acute and recovery phases combined occurred with vastus lateralis (vs. deltoid) injections (n=185): SMD −0.70 (95% CI: −1.00, −0.41). Skin-to-skin contact in neonates (n=736) reduced acute distress: SMD −0.65 (95% CI: −1.05, −0.25). Holding infants reduced acute distress after removal of the data from 1 methodologically diverse study (n=107): SMD −1.25 (95% CI: −2.05, −0.46). Holding after vaccination (n=417) reduced infant distress during the acute and recovery phases combined: SMD −0.65 (95% CI: −1.08, −0.22). Self-reported fear was reduced for children positioned upright (n=107): SMD −0.39 (95% CI: −0.77, −0.01). Non-nutritive sucking (n=186) reduced acute distress in infants: SMD −1.88 (95% CI: −2.57, −1.18). Manual tactile stimulation did not reduce pain across the lifespan. An external vibrating device and cold reduced pain in children (n=145): SMD −1.23 (95% CI: −1.58, −0

  16. Preparing injectable medicines safely.

    PubMed

    Beaney, Alison M; Black, Anne

    Risks to patients are greater when injectable medicines are prepared in clinical areas (wards, theatres, clinics or even patients' homes), rather than provided in ready-to-use form. This article describes the risks involved in preparing injectable medicines in such areas and outlines key principles to ensure they are prepared safely. It also suggests that high-risk injectable medicines be provided in ready-to-use form, either in house, by pharmacy or by pharmaceutical companies. PMID:22359855

  17. A sequential nonparametric pattern classification algorithm based on the Wald SPRT. [Sequential Probability Ratio Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poage, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A sequential nonparametric pattern classification procedure is presented. The method presented is an estimated version of the Wald sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). This method utilizes density function estimates, and the density estimate used is discussed, including a proof of convergence in probability of the estimate to the true density function. The classification procedure proposed makes use of the theory of order statistics, and estimates of the probabilities of misclassification are given. The procedure was tested on discriminating between two classes of Gaussian samples and on discriminating between two kinds of electroencephalogram (EEG) responses.

  18. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  19. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers.

  20. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  1. Sequential decision rules for failure detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Willsky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The formulation of the decision making of a failure detection process as a Bayes sequential decision problem (BSDP) provides a simple conceptualization of the decision rule design problem. As the optimal Bayes rule is not computable, a methodology that is based on the Baysian approach and aimed at a reduced computational requirement is developed for designing suboptimal rules. A numerical algorithm is constructed to facilitate the design and performance evaluation of these suboptimal rules. The result of applying this design methodology to an example shows that this approach is a useful one.

  2. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  3. Estimation After a Group Sequential Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milanzi, Elasma; Molenberghs, Geert; Alonso, Ariel; Kenward, Michael G.; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.; Davidian, Marie; Verbeke, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Group sequential trials are one important instance of studies for which the sample size is not fixed a priori but rather takes one of a finite set of pre-specified values, dependent on the observed data. Much work has been devoted to the inferential consequences of this design feature. Molenberghs et al (2012) and Milanzi et al (2012) reviewed and extended the existing literature, focusing on a collection of seemingly disparate, but related, settings, namely completely random sample sizes, group sequential studies with deterministic and random stopping rules, incomplete data, and random cluster sizes. They showed that the ordinary sample average is a viable option for estimation following a group sequential trial, for a wide class of stopping rules and for random outcomes with a distribution in the exponential family. Their results are somewhat surprising in the sense that the sample average is not optimal, and further, there does not exist an optimal, or even, unbiased linear estimator. However, the sample average is asymptotically unbiased, both conditionally upon the observed sample size as well as marginalized over it. By exploiting ignorability they showed that the sample average is the conventional maximum likelihood estimator. They also showed that a conditional maximum likelihood estimator is finite sample unbiased, but is less efficient than the sample average and has the larger mean squared error. Asymptotically, the sample average and the conditional maximum likelihood estimator are equivalent. This previous work is restricted, however, to the situation in which the the random sample size can take only two values, N = n or N = 2n. In this paper, we consider the more practically useful setting of sample sizes in a the finite set {n1, n2, …, nL}. It is shown that the sample average is then a justifiable estimator , in the sense that it follows from joint likelihood estimation, and it is consistent and asymptotically unbiased. We also show why simulations

  4. Sequential quantum teleportation of optical coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Loock, Peter van

    2007-09-15

    We demonstrate a sequence of two quantum teleportations of optical coherent states, combining two high-fidelity teleporters for continuous variables. In our experiment, the individual teleportation fidelities are evaluated as F{sub 1}=0.70{+-}0.02 and F{sub 2}=0.75{+-}0.02, while the fidelity between the input and the sequentially teleported states is determined as F{sup (2)}=0.57{+-}0.02. This still exceeds the optimal fidelity of one half for classical teleportation of arbitrary coherent states and almost attains the value of the first (unsequential) quantum teleportation experiment with optical coherent states.

  5. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russel B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-11-04

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  6. Fluorimetric determination of aluminium in water by sequential injection through column extraction.

    PubMed

    Brach-Papa, C; Coulomb, B; Branger, C; Margaillan, A; Théraulaz, F; Van Loot, P; Boudenne, J L

    2004-03-01

    A fluorimetric procedure for the determination of aluminium with matrix removal in drinking water is proposed. The system is based both on the solid phase extraction of aluminium on a new chelating resin (XAD-4 modified by grafting salicylic acid) and the fluorimetric detection of a complex formed between 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (HQS) and Al(III), after elution of the resin by hydrochloric acid. The sorption and elution of aluminium were studied in both competitive and noncompetitive conditions, varying pH, flow-rates, volume and concentration of reagents, as well as time contact. The optimised procedure allows determination of Al3+ at the sub-ppb level (LOD: 0.2 microg L(-1) for 1 ml of sample) within a working range of 0.2-500 microg L(-1). The analytical procedure was successfully employed for the determination of aluminium in drinking water during and after flocculation/coagulation treatment processes.

  7. Benchtop isolation and characterization of functional exosomes by sequential filtration.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Mitja L; Ilmer, Matthias; Silva, Leslie P; Hawke, David H; Recio, Alejandro; Vorontsova, Maria A; Alt, Eckhard; Vykoukal, Jody

    2014-12-01

    Early and minimally invasive detection of malignant events or other pathologies is of utmost importance in the pursuit of improved patient care and outcomes. Recent evidence indicates that exosomes and extracellular vesicles in serum and body fluids can contain nucleic acid, protein, and other biomarkers. Accordingly, there is great interest in applying these clinically as prognostic, predictive, pharmacodynamic, and early detection indicators. Nevertheless, existing exosome isolation methods can be time-consuming, require specialized equipment, and/or present other inefficiencies regarding purity, reproducibility and assay cost. We have developed a straightforward, three-step protocol for exosome isolation of cell culture supernatants or large volumes of biofluid based on sequential steps of dead-end pre-filtration, tangential flow filtration (TFF), and low-pressure track-etched membrane filtration that we introduce here. Our approach yields exosome preparations of high purity and defined size distribution and facilitates depletion of free protein and other low-molecular-weight species, extracellular vesicles larger than 100nm, and cell debris. Samples of exosomes prepared using the approach were verified morphologically by nanoparticle tracking analysis and electron microscopy, and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the presence of previously reported exosome-associated proteins. In addition to being easy-to-implement, sequential filtration yields exosomes of high purity and, importantly, functional integrity as a result of the relatively low-magnitude manipulation forces employed during isolation. This answers an unmet need for preparation of minimally manipulated exosomes for investigations into exosome function and basic biology. Further, the strategy is amenable to translation for clinical exosome isolations because of its speed, automatability, scalability, and specificity for isolating exosomes from complex biological samples. PMID:25458527

  8. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  9. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Duracillin A-S ® ... Pfizerpen A-S® ... injection should not be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease) or early in the treatment ... serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by ...

  10. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  11. [Intra-articular injections].

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  12. Injection rate control cam

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.; Liang, E.; Yu, R.C.; Ghuman, A.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a cam for controlling the injection rate of fuel in a fuel injection system of an engine. The fuel injection system including a cyclically operating unit injector having a body, an injector plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in the injector body between an advanced position and a retracted portion to pump into the engine during each cycle a variable quantity of fuel up to a maximum quantity under rated engine conditions, and a drive train for converting rotational movement of the cam into reciprocating movement of the pumping plunger depending on the profile of the cam. The cam profile comprises at least a plunger retraction segment and a plunger advancement segment for controlling the velocity if injector plunger retraction and advancement, respectively, the plunger advancement segment including a pre-injection subsequent shaped to cause an initial quantity of fuel to be injected into the engine during each cycle at rated engine conditions while the pre-injection subsegment is in contact with the drive train, and an injection subsegment following the pre-injection subsegment.

  13. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and gauge…

  14. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  15. Efficient Controls for Finitely Convergent Sequential Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Finding a feasible point that satisfies a set of constraints is a common task in scientific computing: examples are the linear feasibility problem and the convex feasibility problem. Finitely convergent sequential algorithms can be used for solving such problems; an example of such an algorithm is ART3, which is defined in such a way that its control is cyclic in the sense that during its execution it repeatedly cycles through the given constraints. Previously we found a variant of ART3 whose control is no longer cyclic, but which is still finitely convergent and in practice it usually converges faster than ART3 does. In this paper we propose a general methodology for automatic transformation of finitely convergent sequential algorithms in such a way that (i) finite convergence is retained and (ii) the speed of convergence is improved. The first of these two properties is proven by mathematical theorems, the second is illustrated by applying the algorithms to a practical problem. PMID:20953327

  16. Continuous sequential boundaries for vaccine safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongxia; Stewart, Brock; Weintraub, Eric; McNeil, Michael M

    2014-08-30

    Various recently developed sequential methods have been used to detect signals for post-marketing surveillance in drug and vaccine safety. Among these, the maximized sequential probability ratio test (MaxSPRT) has been used to detect elevated risks of adverse events following vaccination using large healthcare databases. However, a limitation of MaxSPRT is that it only provides a time-invariant flat boundary. In this study, we propose the use of time-varying boundaries for controlling how type I error is distributed throughout the surveillance period. This is especially useful in two scenarios: (i) when we desire generally larger sample sizes before a signal is generated, for example, when early adopters are not representative of the larger population; and (ii) when it is desired for a signal to be generated as early as possible, for example, when the adverse event is considered rare but serious. We consider four specific time-varying boundaries (which we call critical value functions), and we study their statistical power and average time to signal detection. The methodology we present here can be viewed as a generalization or flexible extension of MaxSPRT. PMID:24691986

  17. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  18. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  19. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  20. Sequential Stenting for Extensive Malignant Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Tei, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant airway stenosis extending from the bronchial bifurcation to the lower lobar orifice was treated with airway stenting. We herein examine the effectiveness of airway stenting for extensive malignant airway stenosis. Methods: Twelve patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis underwent placement of a silicone Dumon Y stent (Novatech, La Ciotat, France) at the tracheal bifurcation and a metallic Spiral Z-stent (Medico’s Hirata, Osaka, Japan) at either distal side of the Y stent. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the sequential placement of these silicone and metallic stents in these 12 patients. Results: The primary disease was lung cancer in eight patients, breast cancer in two patients, tracheal cancer in one patient, and thyroid cancer in one patient. The median survival period after airway stent placement was 46 days. The Hugh–Jones classification and performance status improved in nine patients after airway stenting. One patient had prolonged hemoptysis and died of respiratory tract hemorrhage 15 days after the treatment. Conclusion: Because the initial disease was advanced and aggressive, the prognosis after sequential airway stent placement was significantly poor. However, because respiratory distress decreased after the treatment in most patients, this treatment may be acceptable for selected patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis. PMID:25273272

  1. Observation of sequential Υ suppression in PbPb collisions.

    PubMed

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Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bai, Y; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Lacroix, F; Malek, M; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Grachov, O; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tinti, G; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, A; Boutemeur, M; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; 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Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2012-11-30

    The suppression of the individual Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions with respect to their yields in pp data has been measured. The PbPb and pp data sets used in the analysis correspond to integrated luminosities of 150 μb(-1) and 230 nb(-1), respectively, collected in 2011 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. The Υ(nS) yields are measured from the dimuon invariant mass spectra. The suppression of the Υ(nS) yields in PbPb relative to the yields in pp, scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, R(AA), is measured as a function of the collision centrality. Integrated over centrality, the R(AA) values are 0.56±0.08(stat)±0.07(syst), 0.12±0.04(stat)±0.02(syst), and lower than 0.10 (at 95% confidence level), for the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) states, respectively. The results demonstrate the sequential suppression of the Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions at LHC energies.

  2. Sequential probability ratio controllers for safeguards radiation monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.L.; Nixon, K.V.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential hypothesis tests applied to nuclear safeguards accounting methods make the methods more sensitive to detecting diversion. The sequential tests also improve transient signal detection in safeguards radiation monitors. This paper describes three microprocessor control units with sequential probability-ratio tests for detecting transient increases in radiation intensity. The control units are designed for three specific applications: low-intensity monitoring with Poisson probability ratios, higher intensity gamma-ray monitoring where fixed counting intervals are shortened by sequential testing, and monitoring moving traffic where the sequential technique responds to variable-duration signals. The fixed-interval controller shortens a customary 50-s monitoring time to an average of 18 s, making the monitoring delay less bothersome. The controller for monitoring moving vehicles benefits from the sequential technique by maintaining more than half its sensitivity when the normal passage speed doubles.

  3. G-sequentially connectedness for topological groups with operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucuk, Osman; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    It is a well-known fact that for a Hausdorff topological group X, the limits of convergent sequences in X define a function denoted by lim from the set of all convergent sequences in X to X. This notion has been modified by Connor and Grosse-Erdmann for real functions by replacing lim with an arbitrary linear functional G defined on a linear subspace of the vector space of all real sequences. Recently some authors have extended the concept to the topological group setting and introduced the concepts of G-sequential continuity, G-sequential compactness and G-sequential connectedness. In this work, we present some results about G-sequentially closures, G-sequentially connectedness and fundamental system of G-sequentially open neighbourhoods for topological group with operations which include topological groups, topological rings without identity, R-modules, Lie algebras, Jordan algebras, and many others.

  4. Discrimination between sequential and simultaneous virtual channels with electrical hearing

    PubMed Central

    Landsberger, David; Galvin, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In cochlear implants (CIs), simultaneous or sequential stimulation of adjacent electrodes can produce intermediate pitch percepts between those of the component electrodes. However, it is unclear whether simultaneous and sequential virtual channels (VCs) can be discriminated. In this study, CI users were asked to discriminate simultaneous and sequential VCs; discrimination was measured for monopolar (MP) and bipolar + 1 stimulation (BP + 1), i.e., relatively broad and focused stimulation modes. For sequential VCs, the interpulse interval (IPI) varied between 0.0 and 1.8 ms. All stimuli were presented at comfortably loud, loudness-balanced levels at a 250 pulse per second per electrode (ppse) stimulation rate. On average, CI subjects were able to reliably discriminate between sequential and simultaneous VCs. While there was no significant effect of IPI or stimulation mode on VC discrimination, some subjects exhibited better VC discrimination with BP + 1 stimulation. Subjects’ discrimination between sequential and simultaneous VCs was correlated with electrode discrimination, suggesting that spatial selectivity may influence perception of sequential VCs. To maintain equal loudness, sequential VC amplitudes were nearly double those of simultaneous VCs, presumably resulting in a broader spread of excitation. These results suggest that perceptual differences between simultaneous and sequential VCs might be explained by differences in the spread of excitation. PMID:21895094

  5. Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, C.; Hammerer, K.; Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

  6. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  7. [Intravitreal injections of corticoids].

    PubMed

    Demols, P

    2007-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of triamcinolone acetonide are today widely performed as a therapeutic tool for a large variety of ocular diseases. The risk of toxicity of the product and its vehicle is quite real and is still at the center of investigations. Complications related to the substance and the technique of injections are already well-known (intraocular pressure rise, cataract, endophthalmitis, pseudo-endophthalmitis, vitreous haemorrhage and retinal detachment). Carefulness and rigor in the indication, realization and follow-up of these injections are therefore mandatory.

  8. Generic sequential sampling for metamodel approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. J.; Campbell, M. I.

    2003-01-01

    Metamodels approximate complex multivariate data sets from simulations and experiments. These data sets often are not based on an explicitly defined function. The resulting metamodel represents a complex system's behavior for subsequent analysis or optimization. Often an exhaustive data search to obtain the data for the metalnodel is impossible, so an intelligent sampling strategy is necessary. While inultiple approaches have been advocated, the majority of these approaches were developed in support of a particular class of metamodel, known as a Kriging. A more generic, cotninonsense approach to this problem allows sequential sampling techniques to be applied to other types of metamodeis. This research compares recent search techniques for Kriging inetamodels with a generic, inulti-criteria approach combined with a new type of B-spline metamodel. This B-spline metamodel is competitive with prior results obtained with a Kriging metamodel. Furthermore, the results of this research highlight several important features necessary for these techniques to be extended to more complex domains.

  9. Lipid peroxidation in experimental uveitis: sequential studies.

    PubMed

    Goto, H; Wu, G S; Chen, F; Kristeva, M; Sevanian, A; Rao, N A

    1992-06-01

    Previously we have detected the occurrence of retinal lipid peroxidation initiated by phagocyte-derived oxygen radicals in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). In the current studies, the confirmation of inflammation-mediated lipid peroxidation was proceeded further to include measurement of multiple parameters, including conjugated dienes, ketodienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and fluorescent chromolipids. The assay for myeloperoxidase, a measure for the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the inflammatory sites was also carried out. The levels of all these parameters were followed through the course of EAU development. The sequential evaluation of histologic changes using both light and electron microscopy was also carried out and the results were correlated with lipid peroxidation indices. These data suggest that the retinal lipid peroxidation plays a causative role in the subsequent retinal degeneration.

  10. Prosody and alignment: a sequential perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepek Reed, Beatrice

    2010-12-01

    In their analysis of a corpus of classroom interactions in an inner city high school, Roth and Tobin describe how teachers and students accomplish interactional alignment by prosodically matching each other's turns. Prosodic matching, and specific prosodic patterns are interpreted as signs of, and contributions to successful interactional outcomes and positive emotions. Lack of prosodic matching, and other specific prosodic patterns are interpreted as features of unsuccessful interactions, and negative emotions. This forum focuses on the article's analysis of the relation between interpersonal alignment, emotion and prosody. It argues that prosodic matching, and other prosodic linking practices, play a primarily sequential role, i.e. one that displays the way in which participants place and design their turns in relation to other participants' turns. Prosodic matching, rather than being a conversational action in itself, is argued to be an interactional practice (Schegloff 1997), which is not always employed for the accomplishment of `positive', or aligning actions.

  11. Sequential sampling and paradoxes of risky choice.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sudeep

    2014-10-01

    The common-ratio, common-consequence, reflection, and event-splitting effects are some of the best-known findings in decision-making research. They represent robust violations of expected utility theory, and together form a benchmark against which descriptive theories of risky choice are tested. These effects are not currently predicted by sequential sampling models of risky choice, such as decision field theory (Busemeyer & Townsend 1993). This paper, however, shows that a minor extension to decision field theory, which allows for stochastic error in event sampling, can provide a parsimonious, cognitively plausible explanation for these effects. Moreover, these effects are guaranteed to emerge for a large range of parameter values, including best-fit parameters obtained from preexisting choice data. PMID:24898202

  12. Particle smoothers in sequential geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-08-01

    Sequential Bayesian methods such as particle filters have been used to track a moving source in an unknown and space/time-evolving ocean environment. These methods treat both the source and the ocean parameters as non-stationary unknown random variables and track them via the multivariate posterior probability density function. Particle filters are numerical methods that can operate on nonlinear systems with non-Gaussian probability density functions. Particle smoothers are a natural extension to these filters. A smoother is appropriate in applications where data before and after the time of interest are readily available. Both past and "future" measurements are exploited in smoothers, whereas filters just use past measurements. Geoacoustic and source tracking is performed here using two smoother algorithms, the forward-backward smoother and the two-filter smoother. Smoothing is demonstrated on experimental data from both the SWellEx-96 and SW06 experiments where the parameter uncertainty is reduced relative to just filtering alone.

  13. Adaptive sequential methods for detecting network intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose new sequential methods for detecting port-scan attackers which routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. In addition to rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious, our method performs significantly faster than other current solutions. Moreover, our method guarantees that the maximum amount of observational time is bounded. In contrast to the previous most effective method, Threshold Random Walk Algorithm, which is explicit and analytical in nature, our proposed algorithm involve parameters to be determined by numerical methods. We have introduced computational techniques such as iterative minimax optimization for quick determination of the parameters of the new detection algorithm. A framework of multi-valued decision for detecting portscanners and DoS attacks is also proposed.

  14. Collaborative, Sequential and Isolated Decisions in Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Kemper; Mistree, Farrokh

    1997-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Commission on Industrial Productivity, in their report Made in America, found that six recurring weaknesses were hampering American manufacturing industries. The two weaknesses most relevant to product development were 1) technological weakness in development and production, and 2) failures in cooperation. The remedies to these weaknesses are considered the essential twin pillars of CE: 1) improved development process, and 2) closer cooperation. In the MIT report, it is recognized that total cooperation among teams in a CE environment is rare in American industry, while the majority of the design research in mathematically modeling CE has assumed total cooperation. In this paper, we present mathematical constructs, based on game theoretic principles, to model degrees of collaboration characterized by approximate cooperation, sequential decision making and isolation. The design of a pressure vessel and a passenger aircraft are included as illustrative examples.

  15. Mechanistic studies on a sequential PDT protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2016-03-01

    A low (~LD15) PDT dose resulting in selective lysosomal photodamage can markedly promote photokilling by subsequent photodamage targeted to mitochondria. Experimental data are consistent with the proposal that cleavage of the autophagyassociated protein ATG5 to a pro-apoptotic fragment is responsible for this effect. This process is known to be dependent on the proteolytic activity of calpain. We have proposed that Ca2+ released from photodamaged lysosomes is the trigger for ATG5 cleavage. We can now document the conversion of ATG5 to the truncated form after lysosomal photodamage. Photofrin, a photosensitizer that targets both mitochondria and lysosomes, can be used for either phase of the sequential PDT process. The ability of Photofrin to target both loci may explain the well-documented efficacy of this agent.

  16. Sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams.

    PubMed

    Kako, Shin'ichiro; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Magome, Shinya

    2010-05-01

    This study attempts to establish a system for the sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams placed at the Ookushi beach, Goto Islands, Japan, to establish the temporal variability in the quantities of beach litter every 90 min over a one and a half year period. The time series of the quantities of beach litter, computed by counting pixels with a greater lightness than a threshold value in photographs, shows that litter does not increase monotonically on the beach, but fluctuates mainly on a monthly time scale or less. To investigate what factors influence this variability, the time derivative of the quantity of beach litter is compared with satellite-derived wind speeds. It is found that the beach litter quantities vary largely with winds, but there may be other influencing factors. PMID:20392465

  17. Sequential composition of dynamically dexterous robot behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Burridge, R.R.; Rizzi, A.A.; Koditschek, D.E.

    1999-06-01

    The authors report on efforts to develop a sequential robot controller-composition technique in the context of dexterous batting maneuvers. A robot with a flat paddle is required to strike repeatedly at a thrown ball until the ball is brought to rest on the paddle at a specified location. The robot`s reachable workspace is blocked by an obstacle that disconnects the free space formed when the ball and paddle remain in contact, forcing the machine to let go for a time to bring the ball to the desired state. The controller compositions the authors create guarantee that a ball introduced in the safe workspace remains there and is ultimately brought to the goal. They report on experimental results from an implementation of these formal composition methods, and present descriptive statistics characterizing the experiments.

  18. Prototype color field sequential television lens assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and evaluation of a prototype modular lens assembly with a self-contained field sequential color wheel is presented. The design of a color wheel of maximum efficiency, the selection of spectral filters, and the design of a quiet, efficient wheel drive system are included. Design tradeoffs considered for each aspect of the modular assembly are discussed. Emphasis is placed on achieving a design which can be attached directly to an unmodified camera, thus permitting use of the assembly in evaluating various candidate camera and sensor designs. A technique is described which permits maintaining high optical efficiency with an unmodified camera. A motor synchronization system is developed which requires only the vertical synchronization signal as a reference frequency input. Equations and tradeoff curves are developed to permit optimizing the filter wheel aperture shapes for a variety of different design conditions.

  19. Sequential Double lonization: The Timing of Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.

    2011-05-01

    The timing of electron release in strong field double ionization poses great challenges both for conceptual definition and for conducting experimental measurement. Here we present coincidence momentum measurements of the doubly charged ion and of the two electrons arising from double ionization of Argon using elliptically (close to circularly) polarized laser pulses. Based on a semi-classical model, the ionization times are calculated from the measured electron momenta across a large intensity range. Exploiting the attoclock technique we have direct access to timings on a coarse and on a fine scale, similar to the hour and the minute hand of a clock. In our attoclock, the magnitude of the electron momenta follows the envelope of the laser pulse and gives a coarse timing for the electron releases (the hour hand), while the fine timing (the minute hand) is provided by the emission angle of the electrons. The first of our findings is that due to depletion the averaged ionization time moves towards the beginning of the pulse with increasing intensity, confirming the results of Maharjan et al., and that the ion momentum distribution projected onto the minor polarization axis shows a bifurcation from a 3-peak to a 4-peak structure. This effect can be fully understood by modeling the process semi-classically in the independent electron approximation following the simple man's model. The ionization time measurement performed with the attoclock shows that the release time of the first electron is in good agreement with the semi-classical simulation performed on the basis of Sequential Double lonization (SDI), whereas the ionization of the second electron occurs significantly earlier than predicted. This observation suggests that electron correlation and other Non-Sequential Double lonization (NSDI) mechanisms may play an important role also in the case of strong field double ionization by close-to-circularly polarized laser pulses. The timing of electron release in strong

  20. Automatic exposure control for space sequential camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcatee, G. E., Jr.; Stoap, L. J.; Solheim, C. D.; Sharpsteen, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    The final report for the automatic exposure control study for space sequential cameras, for the NASA Johnson Space Center is presented. The material is shown in the same sequence that the work was performed. The purpose of the automatic exposure control is to automatically control the lens iris as well as the camera shutter so that the subject is properly exposed on the film. A study of design approaches is presented. Analysis of the light range of the spectrum covered indicates that the practical range would be from approximately 20 to 6,000 foot-lamberts, or about nine f-stops. Observation of film available from space flights shows that optimum scene illumination is apparently not present in vehicle interior photography as well as in vehicle-to-vehicle situations. The evaluation test procedure for a breadboard, and the results, which provided information for the design of a brassboard are given.

  1. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg, David J.; Oates, Andrew C.; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentation between different animal species.

  2. Simultaneous better than sequential for brief presentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, George K.; Wilder, Joseph; Curry, Reates; Julesz, Bela

    1995-03-01

    During perceptually intensive tasks such as reading, there is a bottleneck in the information transfer between the large number of alphanumeric characters available and the acquiring of these characters. This is due mainly to the limited number of characters that one can report at a glance (also known as the "magic number 7 +/- 2") [Psychol. Rev. 63, 81 (1956)]. To examine where in the perceptual pathway this bottleneck occurred, several investigators tested and compared performance with simultaneous and with sequential target presentations [J. Exp. Psychol. 79, 1 (1969); 93, 72 (1972); Percept. Psychophys. 14, 231 (1973)]. They found that performance was nearly equal in the two cases and concluded that the bottleneck must be due to the limitation of short-term memory. However, these studies were

  3. Upper bounds on sequential decoding performance parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, F.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents the best obtainable random coding and expurgated upper bounds on the probabilities of undetectable error, of t-order failure (advance to depth t into an incorrect subset), and of likelihood rise in the incorrect subset, applicable to sequential decoding when the metric bias G is arbitrary. Upper bounds on the Pareto exponent are also presented. The G-values optimizing each of the parameters of interest are determined, and are shown to lie in intervals that in general have nonzero widths. The G-optimal expurgated bound on undetectable error is shown to agree with that for maximum likelihood decoding of convolutional codes, and that on failure agrees with the block code expurgated bound. Included are curves evaluating the bounds for interesting choices of G and SNR for a binary-input quantized-output Gaussian additive noise channel.

  4. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice.

    PubMed

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-28

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically. PMID:27369530

  5. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-01

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically.

  6. Sequential scintigraphic staging of small cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.D.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1981-04-15

    Thirty patients with small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung were sequentially staged following a history and physical exam with liver, bran, bone, and gallium-67 citrate scans. Scintigraphic evaluation disclosed 7 of 30 patients (23%) with advanced disease, stage IIIM1. When Gallium-67 scans were used as the sole criteria for staging, they proved to be accurate and identified six of the seven patients with occult metastatic disease. Gallium-67 scans proved to be accurate in detecting thoracic and extrathoracic metastases in the 30 patients with SCC, especially within the liver and lymph node-bearing area. The diagnostic accuracy of gallium-67 fell in regions such as bone or brain. Despite the limitations of gallium-67 scanning, the authors conclude that these scans are useful in staging patients with SCC and should be the initial scans used in staging such patients.

  7. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... onabotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  8. AbobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abobotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body; blurred vision; or drooping eyelids. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  9. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... incobotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.if ...

  10. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rimabotulinumtoxinB injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  11. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... RR, Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  12. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  13. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. It is usually given once every 2 ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for about 30 minutes afterwards. A doctor ...

  14. Interferon Alfacon-1 Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ordered interferon alfacon-1 to help treat your hepatitis C infection. The drug will be injected under your ... a synthetic interferon that helps to prevent the hepatitis C virus from growing inside your body. This medication ...

  15. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxymaltose injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... medication is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to ...

  16. Penicillin G Benzathine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine injection is in a class of antibiotics called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  17. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... position or distract the child with a noisy toy while you are injecting the medication. You can ... recognizing reality vision problems excessive tiredness increased thirst ... the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  18. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  19. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... often you receive iron sucrose injection and your total number of doses based on your condition and ... hands or feet; swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. ...

  20. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  1. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  2. Sequential multiple analyses of atmospheric nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Hato, Yuki; Mori, Kotaro; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Namihira, Takao

    2007-03-15

    Sequential injection analysis (SIA) was applied to multi-gas monitoring for atmospheric analysis. HONO, NO(2) or NO was collected in an individual diffusion scrubber in which the channel array was filled with either HCl or triethanolamine solution. All analytes were collected in the form of nitrite ions in the scrubber, and were transferred via a 12-port selection valve into a 2.5-ml syringe. The reagent, 3-amino-1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (C-acid) solution was subsequently introduced into the syringe, and inter-mixed with the nitrite sample, whereafter the mixed solution was transferred to a heated reactor and held for 3min at 100 degrees C. After that, the sample/reagent solution was returned to the syringe and alkalinized. Then, the final solution was analyzed using a homemade fluorescence detector. Atmospheric HONO, NO(2) and NO were successfully monitored 3 or 4times/h. The limits of detection were 0.22, 0.28 and 0.35ppbv for HONO, NO(2) and NO, respectively. It was demonstrated for the first time that SIA is a good tool for multi-gas atmospheric analysis. These nitrogen-oxygen compounds are interconvertible, and the simultaneous measurement of these gases is important. Especially, HONO is a source of OH radicals which contribute greatly to atmospheric pollution, and indeed atmospheric chemistry. This method allows the three gases to be measured using one system. The NO(2) and NO data obtained by SIA was compared with those obtained using chemiluminescence instrument. SIA has been successfully applied to atmospheric measurements. Interestingly, it was observed that HONO levels rose toward the end of periods of rain.

  3. Injections--how safe.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2005-04-01

    Injection, is a skin-piercing event performed by a syringe and needle with the purpose of introducing a curative substance or vaccine in a patient. According to WHO, safe injection is one which does not harm to the recepient, does not expose the health worker to any risk and does not result in waste that is dangerous for the community. To achieve this injection should be prepared on a clean workspace, provider should clean his hands appropriately, sterility of the syringe and needle to be maintained, skin of the recipient should be cleaned and above all sharps waste should be managed appropriately. Common danger of unsafe injection is infection. Most medication used in primary care can be administered orally. So firstly the behaviour of healthcare providers and patients must be changed so as to decrease overuse of injections, secondly provision of sufficient quantities of appropriate injection equipment and infection control supplies should be made available and thirdly a sharp waste management system should be set up. PMID:16173426

  4. Derivation of sequential, real-time, process-control programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith; Schneider, Fred B.; Budhiraja, Navin

    1991-01-01

    The use of weakest-precondition predicate transformers in the derivation of sequential, process-control software is discussed. Only one extension to Dijkstra's calculus for deriving ordinary sequential programs was found to be necessary: function-valued auxiliary variables. These auxiliary variables are needed for reasoning about states of a physical process that exists during program transitions.

  5. Applications of Bayesian Decision Theory to Sequential Mastery Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Formulates optimal sequential rules for mastery testing using an approach derived from Bayesian sequential decision theory to consider both threshold and linear loss structures. Adopts the binomial probability distribution as the psychometric model. Provides an empirical example for concept-learning in medicine. (SLD)

  6. A sequential procedure for monitoring clinical trials against historical controls.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoping; Tan, Ming; Boyett, James

    2007-03-30

    In this paper, we develop a sequential procedure to monitor clinical trials against historical controls. When there is a strong ethical concern about randomizing patients to existing treatment because biological and medical evidence suggests that the new treatment is potentially superior to the existing one, or when the enrollment is too limited for randomization of subjects into experimental and control groups, one can monitor the trial sequentially against historical controls if the historical data with required quality and sample size are available to form a valid reference for the trial. This design of trial is sometimes the only alternative to a randomized phase III trial design that is intended but not feasible in situations such as above. Monitoring this type of clinical trial leads to a statistical problem of comparing two population means in a situation in which data from one population are sequentially collected and compared with all data from the other population at each interim look. The proposed sequential procedures is based on the sequential conditional probability ratio test (SCPRT) by which the conclusion of the sequential test would be virtually the same as that arrived at by a non-sequential test based on all data at the planned end of the trial. We develop the sequential procedure by proposing a Brownian motion that emulates the test statistic, and then proposing an SCPRT that is adapted to the special properties of the trial. PMID:16900551

  7. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about…

  8. The Relevance of Visual Sequential Memory to Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispin, Lisa; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Results of three visual sequential memory tests and a group reading test given to 19 elementary students are discussed in terms of task analysis and structuralist approaches to analysis of reading skills. Relation of visual sequential memory to other reading subskills is considered in light of current reasearch. (CMG)

  9. Induction of simultaneous and sequential malolactic fermentation in durian wine.

    PubMed

    Taniasuri, Fransisca; Lee, Pin-Rou; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2016-08-01

    This study represented for the first time the impact of malolactic fermentation (MLF) induced by Oenococcus oeni and its inoculation strategies (simultaneous vs. sequential) on the fermentation performance as well as aroma compound profile of durian wine. There was no negative impact of simultaneous inoculation of O. oeni and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the growth and fermentation kinetics of S. cerevisiae as compared to sequential fermentation. Simultaneous MLF did not lead to an excessive increase in volatile acidity as compared to sequential MLF. The kinetic changes of organic acids (i.e. malic, lactic, succinic, acetic and α-ketoglutaric acids) varied with simultaneous and sequential MLF relative to yeast alone. MLF, regardless of inoculation mode, resulted in higher production of fermentation-derived volatiles as compared to control (alcoholic fermentation only), including esters, volatile fatty acids, and terpenes, except for higher alcohols. Most indigenous volatile sulphur compounds in durian were decreased to trace levels with little differences among the control, simultaneous and sequential MLF. Among the different wines, the wine with simultaneous MLF had higher concentrations of terpenes and acetate esters while sequential MLF had increased concentrations of medium- and long-chain ethyl esters. Relative to alcoholic fermentation only, both simultaneous and sequential MLF reduced acetaldehyde substantially with sequential MLF being more effective. These findings illustrate that MLF is an effective and novel way of modulating the volatile and aroma compound profile of durian wine. PMID:27104664

  10. Lineup Composition, Suspect Position, and the Sequential Lineup Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Curt A.; Gronlund, Scott D.; Clark, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    N. M. Steblay, J. Dysart, S. Fulero, and R. C. L. Lindsay (2001) argued that sequential lineups reduce the likelihood of mistaken eyewitness identification. Experiment 1 replicated the design of R. C. L. Lindsay and G. L. Wells (1985), the first study to show the sequential lineup advantage. However, the innocent suspect was chosen at a lower rate…

  11. Decision Making and Learning while Taking Sequential Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleskac, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    A sequential risk-taking paradigm used to identify real-world risk takers invokes both learning and decision processes. This article expands the paradigm to a larger class of tasks with different stochastic environments and different learning requirements. Generalizing a Bayesian sequential risk-taking model to the larger set of tasks clarifies…

  12. Optical flip-flops and sequential logic circuits using a liquid crystal light valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatehi, M. T.; Collins, S. A., Jr.; Wasmundt, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of optics to digital computing. A Hughes liquid crystal light valve is used as an active optical element where a weak light beam can control a strong light beam with either a positive or negative gain characteristic. With this device as the central element the ability to produce bistable states from which different types of flip-flop can be implemented is demonstrated. In this paper, some general comments are first presented on digital computing as applied to optics. This is followed by a discussion of optical implementation of various types of flip-flop. These flip-flops are then used in the design of optical equivalents to a few simple sequential circuits such as shift registers and accumulators. As a typical sequential machine, a schematic layout for an optical binary temporal integrator is presented. Finally, a suggested experimental configuration for an optical master-slave flip-flop array is given.

  13. Control of sequential fluid delivery in a fully autonomous capillary microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Novo, Pedro; Volpetti, Francesca; Chu, Virginia; Conde, João Pedro

    2013-02-21

    Microfluidics and miniaturization of biosensors are fundamental for the development of point-of-care (PoC) diagnostic and analytical tools with the potential of decreasing reagent consumption and time of analysis while increasing portability. However, interfacing microfluidics with fluid control systems is still a limiting factor in practical implementation. We demonstrate an innovative capillary microfluidic design that allows sequential insertion of controlled volumes of liquids into a microfluidic channel with general applicability. The system requires only the placing of liquids at the corresponding inlets. Subsequently, the different solutions flow inside the microfluidic device sequentially and autonomously without the use of valves using integrated capillary pumps. The capillary microfluidic system is demonstrated with a model immunoassay. PMID:23263650

  14. Blast furnace injection developments in British Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jukes, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    British Steel has four integrated steel works, i.e., Llanwern, Port Talbot, Scunthorpe, Teesside, with a total of ten blast furnaces, nine of which are currently operating. The furnaces range in size from the 14 meters (45 feet 11 inches) hearth diameter Redcar No. 1 furnace at Teesside (a single furnace works) to the 8.33 meters (27 feet 4 inches) hearth Queen Mary and Queen Bess furnaces at Schunthorpe, with a total of four furnaces at that works. All have injection systems installed, those at Scunthorpe being equipped with granular coal injection and all others currently working with oil injection. The driving force behind the development of blast furnace injection has been as a means for introducing reducing agents (British Steel now refers to coke plus hydrocarbon injectants as total reductants) into the process as a part substitute/supplement for top charged coke and the technology is still being developed and used for that purpose. By utilizing practical experience and observing the work of others, British Steel has been assessing blast furnace injection technology experimentally for purposes other than the introduction of reducing agents.

  15. Magnetic detection of ferrofluid injection zones

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, S.; Moridis, G.; Becker, A.

    1998-03-01

    Ferrofluids are stable colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles that can be stabilized in various carrier liquids. In this study the authors investigate the potential of ferrofluids to trace the movement and position of liquids injected in the subsurface using geophysical methods. An ability to track and monitor the movement and position of injected liquids is essential in assessing the effectiveness of the delivery system and the success of the process. Ferrofluids can also provide a significant detection and verification tool in containment technologies, where they can be injected with the barrier liquids to provide a strong signature allowing determination of the barrier geometry, extent, continuity and integrity. Finally, ferrofluids may have unique properties as tracers for detecting preferential flow features (such as fractures) in the subsurface, and thus allow the design of more effective remediation systems. In this report the authors review the results of the investigation of the potential of ferrofluids to trace the movement and position of liquids injected in the subsurface using geophysical methods. They demonstrate the feasibility of using conventional magnetometry for detecting subsurface zones of injected ferrofluids used to trace liquids injected for remediation or barrier formation. The geometrical shapes considered were a sphere, a thin disk, a rectangular horizontal slab, and a cylinder. Simple calculations based on the principles of magnetometry are made to determine the detection depths of FTs. Experiments involving spherical, cylindrical and horizontal slabs show a very good agreement between predictions and measurements.

  16. Optical injection of mammalian cells using a microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Marchington, Robert F.; Arita, Yoshihiko; Tsampoula, Xanthi; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-01-01

    The use of a focused laser beam to create a sub-micron hole in the plasma membrane of a cell (photoporation), for the selective introduction of membrane impermeable substances (optical injection) including nucleic acids (optical transfection), is a powerful technique most commonly applied to treat single cells. However, particularly for femtosecond photoporation, these studies have been limited to low throughput, small-scale studies, because they require sequential dosing of individual cells. Herein, we describe a microfluidic photoporation system for increased throughput and automated optical injection of cells. Hydrodynamic focusing is employed to direct a flow of single-file cells through a focused femtosecond laser beam for photoporation. Upon traversing the beam, a number of transient pores potentially open across the extracellular membrane, which allows the uptake of the surrounding fluid media into the cytoplasm, also containing the chosen injection agent. The process is entirely automated and a rate of 1 cell/sec could readily be obtained, enabling several thousand cells to be injected per hour using this system. The efficiency of optically injecting propidium iodide into HEK293 mammalian cells was found to be 42 ± 8%, or 28 ± 4% taking into account the requirement of post-injection viability, as tested using Calcein AM. This work now opens the way for combining photoporation with microfluidic analyses, sorting, purification or on-chip cell culture studies. PMID:21258487

  17. Influence of gender membership on sequential decisions of face attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Aki; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-10-01

    Responses in a current trial are biased by the stimulus and response in the preceding trial. In a mixed-category sequence, the sequential dependency is weaker when the stimuli of the current and preceding trials fall under different categories. In the present study, we investigated the influence of the gender membership of faces on the sequential dependency. Forty-eight pictures of male and female faces were presented successively. Participants rated the attractiveness, roundness, or intelligence of each face on a 7-point scale. The sequential effect was robustly observed, irrespective of the property to be judged. However, between-gender sequential dependency was weaker than within-gender dependency only in the attractiveness judgment. These findings suggest that the gender of faces serves as a cue for forming category representations when face attractiveness is of interest, and hence that the formation of categories in sequential decisions is an adaptive process that depends on the property to be judged.

  18. Influence of gender membership on sequential decisions of face attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Aki; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-10-01

    Responses in a current trial are biased by the stimulus and response in the preceding trial. In a mixed-category sequence, the sequential dependency is weaker when the stimuli of the current and preceding trials fall under different categories. In the present study, we investigated the influence of the gender membership of faces on the sequential dependency. Forty-eight pictures of male and female faces were presented successively. Participants rated the attractiveness, roundness, or intelligence of each face on a 7-point scale. The sequential effect was robustly observed, irrespective of the property to be judged. However, between-gender sequential dependency was weaker than within-gender dependency only in the attractiveness judgment. These findings suggest that the gender of faces serves as a cue for forming category representations when face attractiveness is of interest, and hence that the formation of categories in sequential decisions is an adaptive process that depends on the property to be judged. PMID:24037595

  19. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-07-22

    A fuel injection nozzle is described connected to a fuel injection pump to inject fuel into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a nozzle housing defining therein a fuel sump chamber, an injection hole communicating with the sump chamber and opened at the outer surface of the nozzle housing, a stepped cylinder bore having a smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter bore section and a fuel passage communicating at one end with the sump chamber and at the other end with the smaller diameter bore section of the stepped cylinder bore; a stepped plunger fitted in the stepped cylinder bore and having a smaller diameter plunger section fitted into the smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter plunger section fitted into the larger diameter bore section in which the smaller diameter bore section together with the end face of the smaller diameter plunger section defines a pump chamber communicating with the fuel passage and the larger diameter bore section together with the end face of the larger diameter plunger section defines a main fuel chamber into which a main fuel is supplied from the fuel injection pump; auxiliary fuel supply means for supplying an auxiliary fuel into the sump chamber and pump chamber through the fuel passage; valve means for opening and closing an injection hole; communication means for permitting the main fuel chamber to communicate with the fuel passage when the main fuel is supplied from the injection pump into the main fuel chamber to cause the stepped plunger to be moved a predetermined distance in a direction in which the auxiliary fuel in the pump chamber is pressurized.

  20. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  1. Spatial pattern and sequential sampling of squash bug (Heteroptera: Coreidae) adults in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Dogramaci, Mahmut; Shrefler, James W; Giles, Kristopher; Edelson, J V

    2006-04-01

    Spatial distribution patterns of adult squash bugs were determined in watermelon, Citrullus lanatus (Thunberg) Matsumura and Nakai, during 2001 and 2002. Results of analysis using Taylor's power law regression model indicated that squash bugs were aggregated in watermelon. Taylor's power law provided a good fit with r2 = 0.94. A fixed precision sequential sampling plan was developed for estimating adult squash bug density at fixed precision levels in watermelon. The plan was tested using a resampling simulation method on nine and 13 independent data sets ranging in density from 0.15 to 2.52 adult squash bugs per plant. Average estimated means obtained in 100 repeated simulation runs were within the 95% CI of the true means for all the data. Average estimated levels of precision were similar to the desired level of precision, particularly when the sampling plan was tested on data having an average mean density of 1.19 adult squash bugs per plant. Also, a sequential sampling for classifying adult squash bug density as below or above economic threshold was developed to assist in the decision-making process. The classification sampling plan is advantageous in that it requires smaller sample sizes to estimate the population status when the population density differs greatly from the action threshold. However, the plan may require excessively large sample sizes when the density is close to the threshold. Therefore, an integrated sequential sampling plan was developed using a combination of a fixed precision and classification sequential sampling plans. The integration of sampling plans can help reduce sampling requirements. PMID:16686160

  2. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  3. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  4. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, J. Matthew; Titiz, Ali S.; Hernan, Amanda E.; Scott, Rod C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  5. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  6. Developing semianalytical solutions for multispecies transport coupled with a sequential first-order reaction network under variable flow velocities and dispersion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Heejun

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a semianalytical method to solve the multispecies reactive solute transport equation coupled with a sequential first-order reaction network under spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients. This method employs the generalized integral transform technique and general linear transformation method by Clement (2001) to transform the set of coupled multispecies reactive transport equations into a set of independent uncoupled equations and to solve these independent equations for spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients, as well as for a temporally varying inlet concentration. The proposed semianalytical solution is compared against previously published analytical solutions of Srinivasan and Clement (2008b) and van Genuchten (1985). An example is used to show application of the solution to a hypothetical multilayered medium. The solution of proposed approach is also compared with a numerical solution using the 2DFATMIC (Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals Model). Three scenarios are illustrated to show the capabilities of the proposed semianalytical method to deal with aquifer heterogeneity and transient situations. We also show a practical implementation of the solution to an actual field, single-well push-pull test example designed to obtain the concentration distribution of reactants consumed and products formed at the end of the injection phase.

  7. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. Results For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid) to incorporate advanced structures. Conclusions The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element. PMID:22099392

  8. Multifunctional Magnetoliposomes for Sequential Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Annalisa; Montis, Costanza; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2016-08-23

    The simultaneous or sequential delivery of multiple therapeutic active principles to a specific target is one of the main challenges of nanomedicine. This goal requires the construction of complex devices often extremely time and cost consuming. Supramolecular self-assemblies, with building blocks of different nature, each providing a specific function to the final construct, can combine a facile synthetic route with a high tunability and structural control. In this study we provide the proof-of-principle of a drug delivery system, DDS, constituted of (i) liposomes, providing a fully biocompatible lipid scaffold suitable to host both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs; (ii) a double-stranded DNA conjugated with a cholesteryl unit that spontaneously inserts into the lipid membrane; and (iii) hydrophobic and hydrophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) embedded inside the lipid membrane of liposomes or connected to the DNA, respectively. Upon application of an alternating magnetic field, the SPIONs can trigger, through thermal activation, the release of a DNA strand or of the liposomal payload, depending on the frequency and the application time of the field, as proved by both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. This feature is due to the different localization of the two kinds of SPIONS within the construct and demonstrates the feasibility of a multifunctional DDS, built up from self-assembly of biocompatible building blocks. PMID:27504891

  9. Sequential detection of learning in cognitive diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sangbeak; Fellouris, Georgios; Culpepper, Steven; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-05-01

    In order to look more closely at the many particular skills examinees utilize to answer items, cognitive diagnosis models have received much attention, and perhaps are preferable to item response models that ordinarily involve just one or a few broadly defined skills, when the objective is to hasten learning. If these fine-grained skills can be identified, a sharpened focus on learning and remediation can be achieved. The focus here is on how to detect when learning has taken place for a particular attribute and efficiently guide a student through a sequence of items to ultimately attain mastery of all attributes while administering as few items as possible. This can be seen as a problem in sequential change-point detection for which there is a long history and a well-developed literature. Though some ad hoc rules for determining learning may be used, such as stopping after M consecutive items have been successfully answered, more efficient methods that are optimal under various conditions are available. The CUSUM, Shiryaev-Roberts and Shiryaev procedures can dramatically reduce the time required to detect learning while maintaining rigorous Type I error control, and they are studied in this context through simulation. Future directions for modelling and detection of learning are discussed.

  10. Sequential dynamical systems with threshold functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Ravi, S. S.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Stearns, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    A sequential dynamical system (SDS) (see [BH+01] and the references therein) consists of an undirected graph G(V,E) where each node {nu} {epsilon} V is associated with a Boolean state (s{sub {nu}}) and a symmetric Boolean function f{sub {nu}} (called the local transition function at {nu}). The inputs to f{sub {nu}} are s{sub {nu}} and the states of all the nodes adjacent to {nu}. In each step of the SDS, the nodes update their state values using their local transition functions in the order specified by a given permutation {pi} of the nodes. A configuration of the SDS is an n-tuple (b{sub 1}, b{sub 2}...,b{sub n}) where n = |V| and b{sub i} {epsilon} {l_brace}0,1{r_brace} is the state value of node {nu}{sub i}. The system starts in a specified initial configuration and each step of the SDS produces a (possibly new) configuration.

  11. Sequential Auctions in Uncertain Information Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Shaheen; Wooldridge, Michael; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    This paper analyzes sequential auctions for private value objects using second-price sealed-bid rules. Now, the equilibrium bids for such auctions depend on the information uncertainty of the bidders. Specifically, there are three key auction parameters that the bidders could be uncertain about: the valuations of the objects for sale, the number of objects for sale, and the number of participating bidders. We analyse the bidding behaviour for each of these three sources of uncertainty. For each setting, we first find the equilibrium bidding strategies for the individual auctions that comprise a series. Then we analyze the effect of these uncertainties on the computational and economic properties of the equilibrium solution. The former analysis is essential if we want to use software agents to bid on our behalf. The latter is essential because both the auctioneer and the bidders want to know how these uncertainties affect their profits. Thus we compare the outcomes for these settings from the perspective of the bidders (i.e., in terms of their profits), from the perspective of the auctioneer (i.e., in terms of his revenue), and from a global perspective (i.e., in terms of auction efficiency).

  12. Multiscale sequentially-coupled arterial FSI technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Takizawa, Kenji; Moorman, Creighton; Wright, Samuel; Christopher, Jason

    2009-10-01

    Multiscale versions of the Sequentially-Coupled Arterial Fluid-Structure Interaction (SCAFSI) technique are presented. The SCAFSI technique was introduced as an approximate FSI approach in arterial fluid mechanics. It is based on the assumption that the arterial deformation during a cardiac cycle is driven mostly by the blood pressure. First we compute a “reference” arterial deformation as a function of time, driven only by the blood pressure profile of the cardiac cycle. Then we compute a sequence of updates involving mesh motion, fluid dynamics calculations, and recomputing the arterial deformation. The SCAFSI technique was developed and tested in conjunction with the stabilized space-time FSI (SSTFSI) technique. Beyond providing a computationally more economical alternative to the fully coupled arterial FSI approach, the SCAFSI technique brings additional flexibility, such as being able to carry out the computations in a spatially or temporally multiscale fashion. In the test computations reported here for the spatially multiscale versions of the SCAFSI technique, we focus on a patient-specific middle cerebral artery segment with aneurysm, where the arterial geometry is based on computed tomography images. The arterial structure is modeled with the continuum element made of hyperelastic (Fung) material.

  13. Optimal power flow using sequential quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejdawi, Imad M.

    1999-11-01

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is an operational as well as a planning tool used by electric utilities to help them operate their network in the most economic and secure mode of operation. Various algorithms to solve the OPF problem evolved over the past three decades; linear programming (LP) techniques were among the major mathematical programming methods utilized. The linear models of the objective function and the linearization of the constraints are the main features of these techniques. The main advantages of the LP approach are simplicity and speed. Nonlinear programming techniques have been applied to OPF solution. The major drawback is the expensive solution of large sparse systems of equations. This research is concerned with the development of a new OPF solution algorithm using sequential quadratic programming (SQP). In this formulation, a small dense system the size of which is equal to the number of control variables is solved in an inner loop. The Jacobian and Hessian terms are calculated in an outer loop. The total number of outer loop iterations is comparable to those in an ordinary load flow in contrast to 20--30 iterations in other nonlinear methods. In addition, the total number of floating point operations is less than that encountered in direct methods by two orders of magnitude. We also model dispatch over a twenty four-hour time horizon in a transmission constrained power network that includes price-responsive loads where large energy customers can operate their loads in time intervals with lowest spot prices.

  14. Testing constrained sequential dominance models of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    Constrained sequential dominance (CSD) is a natural framework for implementing the see-saw mechanism of neutrino masses which allows the mixing angles and phases to be accurately predicted in terms of relatively few input parameters. We analyze a class of CSD(n) models where, in the flavour basis, two right-handed neutrinos are dominantly responsible for the ‘atmospheric’ and ‘solar’ neutrino masses with Yukawa couplings to ({ν }e,{ν }μ ,{ν }τ ) proportional to (0,1,1) and (1,n,n-2), respectively, where n is a positive integer. These coupling patterns may arise in indirect family symmetry models based on A 4. With two right-handed neutrinos, using a χ 2 test, we find a good agreement with data for CSD(3) and CSD(4) where the entire Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing matrix is controlled by a single phase η, which takes simple values, leading to accurate predictions for mixing angles and the magnitude of the oscillation phase | {δ }{CP}| . We carefully study the perturbing effect of a third ‘decoupled’ right-handed neutrino, leading to a bound on the lightest physical neutrino mass {m}1{{≲ }}1 meV for the viable cases, corresponding to a normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss a direct link between the oscillation phase {δ }{CP} and leptogenesis in CSD(n) due to the same see-saw phase η appearing in both the neutrino mass matrix and leptogenesis.

  15. Bilingual control: sequential memory in language switching.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Mathieu; Philipp, Andrea M; Koch, Iring

    2013-11-01

    To investigate bilingual language control, prior language switching studies presented visual objects, which had to be named in different languages, typically indicated by a visual cue. The present study examined language switching of predictable responses by introducing a novel sequence-based language switching paradigm. In 4 experiments, sequential responses (i.e., weekdays, numbers or new sequences) and an alternating language sequence (e.g., L1-L1-L2-L2) were implemented, both of which were memory based. Our data revealed switch costs, showing that a language switch is associated with worse performance compared with a language repetition, and mixing costs, which constitutes the performance difference between pure and mixed language blocks, even while producing entirely predictable responses (i.e., language and concept). Additionally, we found these switch costs with overlearned and new sequences and found that switch costs were reduced with longer preparation time. The obtained data are consistent with a proactive interference account, such as the inhibitory control model.

  16. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Souvik; Chowdhury, Rajib

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  17. Cooperation induced by random sequential exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a common and powerful tool to penalize deviators in human societies, and thus to effectively elevate collaborative efforts. Current models on the evolution of exclusion behaviors mostly assume that each peer excluder independently makes the decision to expel the defectors, but has no idea what others in the group would do or how the actual punishment effect will be. Thus, a more realistic model, random sequential exclusion, is proposed. In this mechanism, each excluder has to pay an extra scheduling cost and then all the excluders are arranged in a random order to implement the exclusion actions. If one free rider has already been excluded by an excluder, the remaining excluders will not participate in expelling this defector. We find that this mechanism can help stabilize cooperation under more unfavorable conditions than the normal peer exclusion can do, either in well-mixed population or on social networks. However, too large a scheduling cost may undermine the advantage of this mechanism. Our work validates the fact that collaborative practice among punishers plays an important role in further boosting cooperation.

  18. Random sequential adsorption on partially covered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1998-06-01

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach was used to analyze adsorption of hard spheres at surfaces precovered with smaller sized particles. Numerical simulations were performed to determine the available surface function φl of larger particles for various particle size ratios λ=al/as and surface concentration of smaller particles θs. It was found that the numerical results were in a reasonable agreement with the formula stemming from the scaled particle theory with the modification for the sphere/sphere geometry. Particle adsorption kinetics was also determined in terms of the RSA simulations. By extrapolating the θl vs τ-1/2 dependencies, the jamming concentrations of larger spheres θl∞ were determined as a function of the initial smaller sphere concentration. It was found that θl∞ were considerably reduced by the presence of smaller sized particles, especially for λ≫1. The pair correlation function g of larger particles in the jamming state was also determined, showing more short range ordering (at the same θl) in comparison with monodisperse systems. The theoretical predictions stemming from our calculations suggest that the presence of trace amounts of very small particles may exert a decisive influence on adsorption of larger particles.

  19. Sequential half-body irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkin, R.D.T.; Berry, M.P.

    1983-12-01

    Single-dose half-body irradiation (HBI), introduced for the palliation of pain from widespread bone metastases in adults, has proved to be successful. The dose-limiting toxicity has proved to be acute radiation pneumonitis, with bone marrow tolerance of lesser importance, in spite of the fact that many patients received previous local irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Palliative HBI has not become a valuable treatment in pediatric malignancies, because of a shorter metastatic phase. Results are described in selected institutions, where HBI has been used in the treatment of pediatric malignancies. A single institution plot study was undertaken at the Princess Margaret Hospital involving 17 patients with Ewing's sarcoma of bone, without overt metastases at diagnosis. Results to date have not been obviously different from overall survival in the first intergroup Ewing's sarcoma study. Overall, the treatment has been shown to be well tolerated and can be given entirely on an out-patient basis. When compared on a historical basis with a previous single dose total body irradiation study, the one year survival rate was increased. HBI appears to be tolerable treatment, when given concurrently with or sequential to local and systemic treatment.

  20. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013