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Sample records for integrating human indoor

  1. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  2. Indoor air quality and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Turiel, I.

    1985-01-01

    The air inside buildings can contain various threats to human health: cigarette smoke, fumes from fires and cookers, microbes, gases, allergens and fumes produced by household products or building materials. Higher standards of insulation and draught-proofing and more use of air conditioning can increase the problems. This book provides a summary of indoor air quality problems in homes, offices and public buildings. Contents: Preface; Introduction; Formaledhyde and other household contaminants; Radon; Particulates; Combustion products; Involuntary smoking; Energy-efficient buildings and indoor air quality; Control of indoor air pollutants; Indoor air quality problems in office buildings; Legal and regulatory issues; Appendices; Sources and suggested reading; Glossary; Index.

  3. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Humans Indoors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaochen; Misztal, Pawel K; Nazaroff, William W; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-12-06

    Research on the sources of indoor airborne chemicals has traditionally focused on outdoor air, building materials, furnishings, and activities such as smoking, cooking, and cleaning. Relatively little research has examined the direct role of occupant emissions, even though this source clearly contributes to indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and influences indoor chemistry. In this work, we quantify occupant-related gaseous VOC emissions in a university classroom using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Time-resolved concentrations of VOCs in room air and supply air were measured continuously during occupied and unoccupied periods. The emission factor for each human-emitted VOC was determined by dividing the occupant-associated source rate by the corresponding occupancy. Among the most abundant species detected were compounds associated with personal care products. Also prominent were human metabolic emissions, such as isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetic acid. Additional sources included human skin oil oxidation by ozone, producing compounds such as 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO). By mass, human-emitted VOCs were the dominant source (57%) during occupied periods in a well-ventilated classroom, with ventilation supply air the second most important (35%), and indoor nonoccupant emissions the least (8%). The total occupant-associated VOC emission factor was 6.3 mg h(-1) per person.

  4. Toward the development of an in silico human model for indoor environmental design

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    In modern society where people spend more than 90% of their time in indoor spaces, the indoor air quality (IAQ) created by buildings has the potential of greatly influencing quality of life. Because the time spent by workers/residents in indoor spaces has increased over time, the importance of IAQ issues in terms of public health is also increasing. Additionally, the quality of the indoor thermal environment also has great impact on human comfort and performance; hence, the development of a comprehensive prediction method integrating indoor air quality/thermal environment assessment and human physiological responses, is crucial for creating a healthy, comfortable, and productive indoor environment. Accordingly, the overarching objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive and universal computer simulated person (i.e., in silico human model), integrating computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to be used in indoor environmental design and quality assessment. This paper presents and discusses the development of this computer-simulated person and its application to indoor environmental design. PMID:27477455

  5. Toward the development of an in silico human model for indoor environmental design.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    In modern society where people spend more than 90% of their time in indoor spaces, the indoor air quality (IAQ) created by buildings has the potential of greatly influencing quality of life. Because the time spent by workers/residents in indoor spaces has increased over time, the importance of IAQ issues in terms of public health is also increasing. Additionally, the quality of the indoor thermal environment also has great impact on human comfort and performance; hence, the development of a comprehensive prediction method integrating indoor air quality/thermal environment assessment and human physiological responses, is crucial for creating a healthy, comfortable, and productive indoor environment. Accordingly, the overarching objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive and universal computer simulated person (i.e., in silico human model), integrating computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to be used in indoor environmental design and quality assessment. This paper presents and discusses the development of this computer-simulated person and its application to indoor environmental design.

  6. Integration of GIS and Bim for Indoor Geovisual Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B.; Zhang, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an endeavour of integration of GIS (Geographical Information System) and BIM (Building Information Modelling) for indoor geovisual analytics. The merits of two types of technologies, GIS and BIM are firstly analysed in the context of indoor environment. GIS has well-developed capabilities of spatial analysis such as network analysis, while BIM has the advantages for indoor 3D modelling and dynamic simulation. This paper firstly investigates the important aspects for integrating GIS and BIM. Different data standards and formats such as the IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) and GML (Geography Markup Language) are discussed. Their merits and limitations in data transformation between GIS and BIM are analysed in terms of semantic and geometric information. An optimized approach for data exchange between GIS and BIM datasets is then proposed. After that, a strategy of using BIM for 3D indoor modelling, GIS for spatial analysis, and BIM again for visualization and dynamic simulation of the analysis results is presented. Based on the developments, this paper selects a typical problem, optimized indoor emergency evacuation, to demonstrate the integration of GIS and BIM for indoor geovisual analytics. The block Z of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University is selected as a test site. Detailed indoor and outdoor 3D models of the block Z are created using a BIM software Revit. The 3D models are transferred to a GIS software ArcGIS to carry out spatial analysis. Optimized evacuation plans considering dynamic constraints are generated based on network analysis in ArcGIS assuming there is a fire accident inside the building. The analysis results are then transferred back to BIM software for visualization and dynamic simulation. The developed methods and results are of significance to facilitate future development of GIS and BIM integrated solutions in various applications.

  7. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  8. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W.; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total particle mass concentration, bacterial genome concentration, and bacterial phylogenetic populations were characterized in indoor, outdoor, and ventilation duct supply air, as well as in the dust of ventilation system filters and in floor dust. Occupancy increased the total aerosol mass and bacterial genome concentration in indoor air PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions, with an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in airborne bacterial genome concentration in PM10. On a per mass basis, floor dust was enriched in bacterial genomes compared to airborne particles. Quantitative comparisons between bacterial populations in indoor air and potential sources suggest that resuspended floor dust is an important contributor to bacterial aerosol populations during occupancy. Experiments that controlled for resuspension from the floor implies that direct human shedding may also significantly impact the concentration of indoor airborne particles. The high content of bacteria specific to the skin, nostrils, and hair of humans found in indoor air and in floor dust indicates that floors are an important reservoir of human-associated bacteria, and that the direct particle shedding of desquamated skin cells and their subsequent resuspension strongly influenced the airborne bacteria population structure in this human-occupied environment. Inhalation exposure to microbes shed by other current or previous human occupants may occur in communal indoor environments. PMID:22529946

  9. Human occupancy as a source of indoor airborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total particle mass concentration, bacterial genome concentration, and bacterial phylogenetic populations were characterized in indoor, outdoor, and ventilation duct supply air, as well as in the dust of ventilation system filters and in floor dust. Occupancy increased the total aerosol mass and bacterial genome concentration in indoor air PM(10) and PM(2.5) size fractions, with an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in airborne bacterial genome concentration in PM(10). On a per mass basis, floor dust was enriched in bacterial genomes compared to airborne particles. Quantitative comparisons between bacterial populations in indoor air and potential sources suggest that resuspended floor dust is an important contributor to bacterial aerosol populations during occupancy. Experiments that controlled for resuspension from the floor implies that direct human shedding may also significantly impact the concentration of indoor airborne particles. The high content of bacteria specific to the skin, nostrils, and hair of humans found in indoor air and in floor dust indicates that floors are an important reservoir of human-associated bacteria, and that the direct particle shedding of desquamated skin cells and their subsequent resuspension strongly influenced the airborne bacteria population structure in this human-occupied environment. Inhalation exposure to microbes shed by other current or previous human occupants may occur in communal indoor environments.

  10. Indoor human thermal adaptation: dynamic processes and weighting factors.

    PubMed

    Luo, M; Cao, B; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we explore the correlations between indoor climate change and human thermal adaptation, especially with regard to the timescale and weighting factors of physiological adaptation. A comparative experiment was conducted in China where wintertime indoor climate in the southern region (devoid of space heating) is much colder than in the northern region (with pervasive district heating). Four subject groups with different indoor thermal experiences participated in this climate chamber experiment. The results indicate that previous indoor thermal exposure is an important contributor to occupants' physiological adaptation. More specifically, subjects acclimated to neutral-warm indoors tended to have stronger physiological responses and felt more uncomfortable in moderate cold exposures than those adapted to the cold. As for the driving force of thermal adaptation, physiological acclimation is an important aspect among all the supposed adaptive layers. However, the physiological adaptation speed lags behind changes in the overall subjective perception.

  11. Monocular camera and IMU integration for indoor position estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinlong; Tan, Jindong; Zeng, Ziming; Liang, Wei; Xia, Ye

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a monocular camera (MC) and inertial measurement unit (IMU) integrated approach for indoor position estimation. Unlike the traditional estimation methods, we fix the monocular camera downward to the floor and collect successive frames where textures are orderly distributed and feature points robustly detected, rather than using forward oriented camera in sampling unknown and disordered scenes with pre-determined frame rate and auto-focus metric scale. Meanwhile, camera adopts the constant metric scale and adaptive frame rate determined by IMU data. Furthermore, the corresponding distinctive image feature point matching approaches are employed for visual localizing, i.e., optical flow for fast motion mode; Canny Edge Detector & Harris Feature Point Detector & Sift Descriptor for slow motion mode. For superfast motion and abrupt rotation where images from camera are blurred and unusable, the Extended Kalman Filter is exploited to estimate IMU outputs and to derive the corresponding trajectory. Experimental results validate that our proposed method is effective and accurate in indoor positioning. Since our system is computationally efficient and in compact size, it's well suited for visually impaired people indoor navigation and wheelchaired people indoor localization.

  12. Human exposure to mutagens from indoor combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lewtas, J.; Claxton, L.D.; Mumford, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors measured human exposure to mutagens, using indoor medium-volume samplers and personal samplers, in targeted field studies of homes in the U.S. The combustion sources included in these studies were woodstoves, fireplaces, gas appliances, cooking, and tobacco smoking. These studies demonstrate that the presence of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) consistently results in human exposure to mutagens which are significantly higher than outdoor air or non-smoking indoor spaces. The mutagenic emission rates from the other indoor combustion sources (e.g., kerosene heaters) as determined in chamber studies are more variable than ETS and are dependent on the combustion source design and operation. Woodstoves and fireplaces result in higher concentrations of mutagens outdoors, which may indirectly influence the concentration of mutagens indoors.

  13. Human physiological responses to wooden indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Lian, Zhiwei; Wu, Yong

    2017-03-02

    Previous studies are mainly focused on non-wooden environments, whereas few are concerned with wooden ones. How wooden indoor environments impact the physiology of the occupants is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore the distinct physiological responses to wooden and non-wooden indoor environments, assessed by physiological parameters tests including blood pressure, electrocardiogram measurements, electro-dermal activity, oxyhemoglobin saturation, skin temperature, and near distance vision. Twenty healthy adults participated in this experiment, and their physiological responses were evaluated in a 90minute investigation. The results illustrated that; less tension and fatigue were generated in the wooden rooms than in the non-wooden rooms when the participants did their work. In addition, the study also found that the wooden environments benefit the autonomic nervous system, respiratory system, and visual system. Moreover, wooden rooms play a valuable role in physiological regulation and ease function especially after a consecutive period of work. These results provide an experimental basis to support that wooden environment is beneficial to indoor occupants than the non-wooden indoor environment.

  14. Indoor Navigation Design Integrated with Smart Phones and Rfid Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortakci, Y.; Demiral, E.; Atila, U.; Karas, I. R.

    2015-10-01

    High rise, complex and huge buildings in the cities are almost like a small city with their tens of floors, hundreds of corridors and rooms and passages. Due to size and complexity of these buildings, people need guidance to find their way to the destination in these buildings. In this study, a mobile application is developed to visualize pedestrian's indoor position as 3D in their smartphone and RFID Technology is used to detect the position of pedestrian. While the pedestrian is walking on his/her way on the route, smartphone will guide the pedestrian by displaying the photos of indoor environment on the route. Along the tour, an RFID (Radio-Frequency Identification) device is integrated to the system. The pedestrian will carry the RFID device during his/her tour in the building. The RFID device will send the position data to the server directly in every two seconds periodically. On the other side, the pedestrian will just select the destination point in the mobile application on smartphone and sent the destination point to the server. The shortest path from the pedestrian position to the destination point is found out by the script on the server. This script also sends the environment photo of the first node on the acquired shortest path to the client as an indoor navigation module.

  15. Roles of the human occupant in indoor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Weschler, C J

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, influences of the human occupant on indoor chemistry have been investigated in environments ranging from simulated aircraft cabins to actual classrooms. We have learned that ozone reacts rapidly with constituents of skin surface lipids on exposed skin, hair, and clothing, substantially reducing indoor ozone concentrations but increasing airborne levels of mono- and bifunctional compounds that contain carbonyl, carboxyl, or α-hydroxy ketone groups. Moreover, occupants transfer skin oils to and shed skin flakes (desquamation) onto indoor surfaces. Evidence for the presence of skin flakes/oils has been found in airborne particles, settled dust, and wipes of indoor surfaces. These occupant residues are also anticipated to scavenge ozone and produce byproducts. Under typical conditions, occupancy is anticipated to decrease the net level of oxidants in indoor air. When occupants scavenge ozone, the level of SOA derived from ozone/terpene chemistry decreases; the fraction of SVOCs in the gas-phase increases, and the fraction associated with airborne particles decreases. Occupants also remove organic compounds, including certain chemically active species, via bodily intake. Studies reviewed in this paper demonstrate the pronounced influences of humans on chemistry within the spaces they inhabit and the consequences of these influences on their subsequent chemical exposures. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Moving Human Path Tracking Based on Video Surveillance in 3d Indoor Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Zlatanova, Sisi; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yeting; Liu, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Video surveillance systems are increasingly used for a variety of 3D indoor applications. We can analyse human behaviour, discover and avoid crowded areas, monitor human traffic and so forth. In this paper we concentrate on use of surveillance cameras to track and reconstruct the path a person has followed. For the purpose we integrated video surveillance data with a 3D indoor model of the building and develop a single human moving path tracking method. We process the surveillance videos to detected single human moving traces; then we match the depth information of 3D scenes to the constructed 3D indoor network model and define the human traces in the 3D indoor space. Finally, the single human traces extracted from multiple cameras are connected with the help of the connectivity provided by the 3D network model. Using this approach, we can reconstruct the entire walking path. The provided experiments with a single person have verified the effectiveness and robustness of the method.

  17. Small scale spatial gradients of outdoor and indoor benzene in proximity of an integrated steel plant.

    PubMed

    Licen, Sabina; Tolloi, Arianna; Briguglio, Sara; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Adami, Gianpiero; Barbieri, Pierluigi

    2016-05-15

    Benzene is known as a human carcinogen, whose annual mean concentration exceeded the EU limit value (5 μg/m(3)) only in very few locations in Europe during 2012. Nevertheless 10% to 12% of the EU-28 urban population was still exposed to benzene concentrations above the WHO reference level of 1.7 μg/m(3). WHO recommended a wise choice of monitoring stations positioning in proximity of "hot spots" to define and assess the representativeness of each site paying attention to micro-scale conditions. In this context benzene and other VOCs of health concern (toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) concentrations have been investigated, with weekly passive sampling for one year, both in outdoor and indoor air in inhabited buildings in close proximity (180 m far up to 1100 m) of an integrated steel plant in NE of Italy. Even though the outdoor mean annual benzene concentration was below the EU limit in every site, in the site closest to the works the benzene concentration was above 5 μg/m(3) in 14 weeks. These events were related to a benzene over toluene ratio above one, which is diagnostic for the presence of an industrial source, and to meteorological factors. These information pointed at the identification of the coke ovens of the plant as the dominant outdoor source of benzene. Benzene gradients with the increasing distance from coke ovens have been found for both outdoor and indoor air. Linear models linking outdoor to indoor benzene concentrations have been then identified, allowing to estimate indoor exposure from ambient air benzene data. In the considered period, a narrow area of about 250 m appeared impacted at a higher degree than the other sites both considering outdoor and indoor air. Passive BTEX sampling permits to collect information on both ambient air and daily life settings, allowing to assemble a valuable data support for further environmental cost-benefit analyses.

  18. Power Management Integrated Circuit for Indoor Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vipul

    In today's world, power dissipation is a main concern for battery operated mobile devices. Key design decisions are being governed by power rather than area/delay because power requirements are growing more stringent every year. Hence, a hybrid power management system is proposed, which uses both a solar panel to harvest energy from indoor lighting and a battery to power the load. The system tracks the maximum power point of the solar panel and regulates the battery and microcontroller output load voltages through the use of an on-chip switched-capacitor DC-DC converter. System performance is verified through simulation at the 180nm technology node and is made to be integrated on-chip with 0.25 second startup time, 79% efficiency, --8/+14% ripple on the load, an average 1micro A of quiescent current (3.7micro W of power) and total on-chip area of 1.8mm2 .

  19. D Topological Indoor Building Modeling Integrated with Open Street Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Rahman, A. Abdul; Boguslawski, P.

    2016-09-01

    Considering various fields of applications for building surveying and various demands, geometry representation of a building is the most crucial aspect of a building survey. The interiors of the buildings need to be described along with the relative locations of the rooms, corridors, doors and exits in many kinds of emergency response, such as fire, bombs, smoke, and pollution. Topological representation is a challenging task within the Geography Information Science (GIS) environment, as the data structures required to express these relationships are particularly difficult to develop. Even within the Computer Aided Design (CAD) community, the structures for expressing the relationships between adjacent building parts are complex and often incomplete. In this paper, an integration of 3D topological indoor building modeling in Dual Half Edge (DHE) data structure and outdoor navigation network from Open Street Map (OSM) is presented.

  20. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  1. Evaluations of indoor noise criteria systems based on human response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this research is to examine human response to background noise, and relate results to indoor noise criteria. In previous work by the authors, subjects completed perception surveys, typing tasks, and proofreading tasks under typical heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) noise conditions. Results were correlated with commonly used indoor noise criteria systems including noise criteria (NC), room criteria (RC) and others. The findings suggested that the types of tasks used and the length of exposure can impact the results. To examine these two issues, the authors conducted a new study in which each test subject completed 38 total hours of testing over multiple days. Subjects were exposed to several background noise exposures over 20, 40, 80, and 240 minute trials. During the trials, subjects completed a variety of performance tasks and answered questions about their perception of the noise, the thermal environment, and various other factors. Findings from this study were used to determine optimum testing conditions for on-going research examining the effects of tonal or fluctuating background noise on performance, annoyance, and spectral perception. Results are being used to evaluate the effectiveness of commonly used indoor noise criteria systems. [Work supported by INCE and ASHRAE.

  2. Robust Indoor Human Activity Recognition Using Wireless Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Xinli; Cao, Rongyu; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    Wireless signals–based activity detection and recognition technology may be complementary to the existing vision-based methods, especially under the circumstance of occlusions, viewpoint change, complex background, lighting condition change, and so on. This paper explores the properties of the channel state information (CSI) of Wi-Fi signals, and presents a robust indoor daily human activity recognition framework with only one pair of transmission points (TP) and access points (AP). First of all, some indoor human actions are selected as primitive actions forming a training set. Then, an online filtering method is designed to make actions’ CSI curves smooth and allow them to contain enough pattern information. Each primitive action pattern can be segmented from the outliers of its multi-input multi-output (MIMO) signals by a proposed segmentation method. Lastly, in online activities recognition, by selecting proper features and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based multi-classification, activities constituted by primitive actions can be recognized insensitive to the locations, orientations, and speeds. PMID:26184231

  3. Indoor Map Aided Wi-Fi Integrated Lbs on Smartphone Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2017-09-01

    In this research, an indoor map aided INS/Wi-Fi integrated location based services (LBS) applications is proposed and implemented on smartphone platforms. Indoor map information together with measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) value from Wi-Fi are collected to obtain an accurate, continuous, and low-cost position solution. The main challenge of this research is to make effective use of various measurements that complement each other without increasing the computational burden of the system. The integrated system in this paper includes three modules: INS, Wi-Fi (if signal available) and indoor maps. A cascade structure Particle/Kalman filter framework is applied to combine the different modules. Firstly, INS position and Wi-Fi fingerprint position integrated through Kalman filter for estimating positioning information. Then, indoor map information is applied to correct the error of INS/Wi-Fi estimated position through particle filter. Indoor tests show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the accumulation positioning errors of stand-alone INS systems, and provide stable, continuous and reliable indoor location service.

  4. Wi-Fi/MARG Integration for Indoor Pedestrian Localization

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zengshan; Jin, Yue; Zhou, Mu; Wu, Zipeng; Li, Ze

    2016-01-01

    With the wide deployment of Wi-Fi networks, Wi-Fi based indoor localization systems that are deployed without any special hardware have caught significant attention and have become a currently practical technology. At the same time, the Magnetic, Angular Rate, and Gravity (MARG) sensors installed in commercial mobile devices can achieve highly-accurate localization in short time. Based on this, we design a novel indoor localization system by using built-in MARG sensors and a Wi-Fi module. The innovative contributions of this paper include the enhanced Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) and Wi-Fi localization approaches, and an Extended Kalman Particle Filter (EKPF) based fusion algorithm. A new Wi-Fi/MARG indoor localization system, including an Android based mobile client, a Web page for remote control, and a location server, is developed for real-time indoor pedestrian localization. The extensive experimental results show that the proposed system is featured with better localization performance, with the average error 0.85 m, than the one achieved by using the Wi-Fi module or MARG sensors solely. PMID:27973412

  5. Wi-Fi/MARG Integration for Indoor Pedestrian Localization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zengshan; Jin, Yue; Zhou, Mu; Wu, Zipeng; Li, Ze

    2016-12-10

    With the wide deployment of Wi-Fi networks, Wi-Fi based indoor localization systems that are deployed without any special hardware have caught significant attention and have become a currently practical technology. At the same time, the Magnetic, Angular Rate, and Gravity (MARG) sensors installed in commercial mobile devices can achieve highly-accurate localization in short time. Based on this, we design a novel indoor localization system by using built-in MARG sensors and a Wi-Fi module. The innovative contributions of this paper include the enhanced Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) and Wi-Fi localization approaches, and an Extended Kalman Particle Filter (EKPF) based fusion algorithm. A new Wi-Fi/MARG indoor localization system, including an Android based mobile client, a Web page for remote control, and a location server, is developed for real-time indoor pedestrian localization. The extensive experimental results show that the proposed system is featured with better localization performance, with the average error 0.85 m, than the one achieved by using the Wi-Fi module or MARG sensors solely.

  6. Perchlorate in indoor dust and human urine in China: contribution of indoor dust to total daily intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Xiaojia; Wang, Dou; Li, Rudan; Ma, Yufang; Mo, Weiwen; Sun, Hongwen; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-17

    Perchlorate is used in fireworks and China is the largest fireworks producer and consumer in the world. Information regarding human exposure to perchlorate is scarce in China, and exposure via indoor dust ingestion (EDI indoor dust) has rarely been evaluated. In this study, perchlorate was found in indoor dust (detection rate: 100%, median: 47.4 μg/g), human urine (99%, 26.2 ng/mL), drinking water (100%, 3.99 ng/mL), and dairy milk (100%, 12.3 ng/mL) collected from cities that have fireworks manufacturing areas (Yueyang and Nanchang) and in cities that do not have fireworks manufacturing industries (Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Yuxi and Guilin) in China. In comparison with perchlorate levels reported for other countries, perchlorate levels in urine samples from fireworks sites and nonfireworks sites in China were higher. Median indoor dust perchlorate concentrations were positively correlated (r = 0.964, p < 0.001) with outdoor dust perchlorate levels reported previously. The total daily intake (EDI total) of perchlorate, estimated based on urinary levels, ranged from 0.090 to 27.72 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for all studied participants; the percentage of donors who had EDI total exceeding the reference dose (RfD) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) was 79%, 48%, and 25% for toddlers (median: 1.829 μg/kg bw/day), adults (0.669 μg/kg bw/day), and children (median: 0.373 μg/kg bw/day), respectively. Toddlers (0.258 μg/kg bw/day) had the highest median EDI indoor dust, which was 2 to 5 times greater than the EDI indoor dust calculated for other age groups (the range of median values: 0.044 to 0.127 μg/kg bw/day). Contribution of indoor dust to EDItotal was 26%, 28%, and 7% for toddlers, children, and adults, respectively. Indoor dust contributed higher percentage to EDI total than that by dairy milk (0.5-5%).

  7. An Integrated Approach to Indoor and Outdoor Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-17

    SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AF Office of Scientific Research 875 N. Randolph St. Room 3112 Arlington, VA 22203 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...spaces. Several systems have been able to demonstrate room level accuracy e.g. approximately 5 to 10m using this method. At the Microsoft Indoor...and change in orientation. b) The state of particles prior to a step update. c) The state of the particles after a step update. 7a the red arrow

  8. Human Systems Integration Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION OFFICE HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION REQUIREMENTS POCKET GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2009 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2009 2. REPORT TYPE Pocket Guide 3. DATES...COVERED 00-09-2009 to 00-12-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Systems Integration Requirements Pocket Guide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  9. Model for screening-level assessment of near-field human exposure to neutral organic chemicals released indoors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Arnot, Jon A; Wania, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Screening organic chemicals for hazard and risk to human health requires near-field human exposure models that can be readily parametrized with available data. The integration of a model of human exposure, uptake, and bioaccumulation into an indoor mass balance model provides a quantitative framework linking emissions in indoor environments with human intake rates (iRs), intake fractions (iFs) and steady-state concentrations in humans (C) through consideration of dermal permeation, inhalation, and nondietary ingestion exposure pathways. Parameterized based on representative indoor and adult human characteristics, the model is applied here to 40 chemicals of relevance in the context of human exposure assessment. Intake fractions and human concentrations (C(U)) calculated with the model based on a unit emission rate to air for these 40 chemicals span 2 and 5 orders of magnitude, respectively. Differences in priority ranking based on either iF or C(U) can be attributed to the absorption, biotransformation and elimination processes within the human body. The model is further applied to a large data set of hypothetical chemicals representative of many in-use chemicals to show how the dominant exposure pathways, iF and C(U) change as a function of chemical properties and to illustrate the capacity of the model for high-throughput screening. These simulations provide hypotheses for the combination of chemical properties that may result in high exposure and internal dose. The model is further exploited to highlight the role human contaminant uptake plays in the overall fate of certain chemicals indoors and consequently human exposure.

  10. Relating human productivity and annoyance to indoor noise criteria systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this research is to determine a noise criteria system which best relates the effects of background noise to human productivity and annoyance. A number of indoor noise criteria systems are currently used to rate the background noise in built environments, including noise criteria (NC), balanced noise criteria (NCB), room criteria (RC), room criteria Mark II (RC-Mark II), and others. Many questions still remain about the accuracy of these predictors in assessing human response to background noise under the variety of ambient noise situations encountered. To support the use of any individual criterion, subjective testing was performed under a range of background noise situations and statistically related to the various noise criteria predictors listed above. Subjects completed an annoyance survey and performed typing and proofreading tasks in an acoustically controlled environment under 12 simulated background noise settings. These settings varied across three sound levels and four spectral qualities. Subjective testing methodology and results are presented. [Work supported by INCE and ASHRAE.

  11. Integrated algorithms for RFID-based multi-sensor indoor/outdoor positioning solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mi.; Retscher, G.; Zhang, K.

    2011-12-01

    Position information is very important as people need it almost everywhere all the time. However, it is a challenging task to provide precise positions indoor/outdoor seamlessly. Outdoor positioning has been widely studied and accurate positions can usually be achieved by well developed GPS techniques but these techniques are difficult to be used indoors since GPS signal reception is limited. The alternative techniques that can be used for indoor positioning include, to name a few, Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), bluetooth and Ultra Wideband (UWB) etc.. However, all of these have limitations. The main objectives of this paper are to investigate and develop algorithms for a low-cost and portable indoor personal positioning system using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and its integration with other positioning systems. An RFID system consists of three components, namely a control unit, an interrogator and a transponder that transmits data and communicates with the reader. An RFID tag can be incorporated into a product, animal or person for the purpose of identification and tracking using radio waves. In general, for RFID positioning in urban and indoor environments three different methods can be used, including cellular positioning, trilateration and location fingerprinting. In addition, the integration of RFID with other technologies is also discussed in this paper. A typical combination is to integrate RFID with relative positioning technologies such as MEMS INS to bridge the gaps between RFID tags for continuous positioning applications. Experiments are shown to demonstrate the improvements of integrating multiple sensors with RFID which can be employed successfully for personal positioning.

  12. A Map/INS/Wi-Fi Integrated System for Indoor Location-Based Service Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunyang; Lan, Haiyu; Gu, Fuqiang; Yu, Fei; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2017-06-02

    In this research, a new Map/INS/Wi-Fi integrated system for indoor location-based service (LBS) applications based on a cascaded Particle/Kalman filter framework structure is proposed. Two-dimension indoor map information, together with measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) value, are integrated for estimating positioning information. The main challenge of this research is how to make effective use of various measurements that complement each other in order to obtain an accurate, continuous, and low-cost position solution without increasing the computational burden of the system. Therefore, to eliminate the cumulative drift caused by low-cost IMU sensor errors, the ubiquitous Wi-Fi signal and non-holonomic constraints are rationally used to correct the IMU-derived navigation solution through the extended Kalman Filter (EKF). Moreover, the map-aiding method and map-matching method are innovatively combined to constrain the primary Wi-Fi/IMU-derived position through an Auxiliary Value Particle Filter (AVPF). Different sources of information are incorporated through a cascaded structure EKF/AVPF filter algorithm. Indoor tests show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the accumulation of positioning errors of a stand-alone Inertial Navigation System (INS), and provide a stable, continuous and reliable indoor location service.

  13. A Map/INS/Wi-Fi Integrated System for Indoor Location-Based Service Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunyang; Lan, Haiyu; Gu, Fuqiang; Yu, Fei; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2017-01-01

    In this research, a new Map/INS/Wi-Fi integrated system for indoor location-based service (LBS) applications based on a cascaded Particle/Kalman filter framework structure is proposed. Two-dimension indoor map information, together with measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) value, are integrated for estimating positioning information. The main challenge of this research is how to make effective use of various measurements that complement each other in order to obtain an accurate, continuous, and low-cost position solution without increasing the computational burden of the system. Therefore, to eliminate the cumulative drift caused by low-cost IMU sensor errors, the ubiquitous Wi-Fi signal and non-holonomic constraints are rationally used to correct the IMU-derived navigation solution through the extended Kalman Filter (EKF). Moreover, the map-aiding method and map-matching method are innovatively combined to constrain the primary Wi-Fi/IMU-derived position through an Auxiliary Value Particle Filter (AVPF). Different sources of information are incorporated through a cascaded structure EKF/AVPF filter algorithm. Indoor tests show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the accumulation of positioning errors of a stand-alone Inertial Navigation System (INS), and provide a stable, continuous and reliable indoor location service. PMID:28574471

  14. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  15. Indoor air as a vehicle for human pathogens: Introduction, objectives, and expectation of outcome.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Syed A

    2016-09-02

    Airborne spread of pathogens can be rapid, widespread, and difficult to prevent. In this international workshop, a panel of 6 experts will expound on the following: (1) the potential for indoor air to spread a wide range of human pathogens, plus engineering controls to reduce the risk for exposure to airborne infectious agents; (2) the behavior of aerosolized infectious agents indoors and the use of emerging air decontamination technologies; (3) a survey of quantitative methods to recover infectious agents and their surrogates from indoor air with regard to survival and inactivation of airborne pathogens; (4) mathematical models to predict the movement of pathogens indoors and the use of such information to optimize the benefits of air decontamination technologies; and (5) synergy between different infectious agents, such as legionellae and fungi, in the built environment predisposing to possible transmission-related health impacts of aerosolized biofilm-based opportunistic pathogens. After the presentations, the panel will address a set of preformulated questions on selection criteria for surrogate microbes to study the survival and inactivation of airborne human pathogens, desirable features of technologies for microbial decontamination of indoor air, knowledge gaps, and research needs. It is anticipated that the deliberations of the workshop will provide the attendees with an update on the significance of indoor air as a vehicle for transmitting human pathogens with a brief on what is currently being done to mitigate the risks from airborne infectious agents.

  16. A UWB/Improved PDR Integration Algorithm Applied to Dynamic Indoor Positioning for Pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengzhan; Kuang, Ye; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2017-09-08

    Inertial sensors are widely used in various applications, such as human motion monitoring and pedestrian positioning. However, inertial sensors cannot accurately define the process of human movement, a limitation that causes data drift in the process of human body positioning, thus seriously affecting positioning accuracy and stability. The traditional pedestrian dead-reckoning algorithm, which is based on a single inertial measurement unit, can suppress the data drift, but fails to accurately calculate the number of walking steps and heading value, thus it cannot meet the application requirements. This study proposes an indoor dynamic positioning method with an error self-correcting function based on the symmetrical characteristics of human motion to obtain the definition basis of human motion process quickly and to solve the abovementioned problems. On the basis of this proposed method, an ultra-wide band (UWB) method is introduced. An unscented Kalman filter is applied to fuse inertial sensors and UWB data, inertial positioning is applied to compensation for the defects of susceptibility to UWB signal obstacles, and UWB positioning is used to overcome the error accumulation of inertial positioning. The above method can improve both the positioning accuracy and the response of the positioning results. Finally, this study designs an indoor positioning test system to test the static and dynamic performances of the proposed indoor positioning method. Results show that the positioning system both has high accuracy and good real-time performance.

  17. Human Performance: Does Indoor Environmental Quality Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, E. Ken

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that the primary objective of every school must be an indoor environment that creates a sense of wellbeing in order to facilitate learning (e.g., adequate space, good lighting, friendly conditions, an inviting exterior, a consistent climate/temperature, traffic control and parking, and sanitary conditions), noting that the messages sent to…

  18. Human Performance: Does Indoor Environmental Quality Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, E. Ken

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that the primary objective of every school must be an indoor environment that creates a sense of wellbeing in order to facilitate learning (e.g., adequate space, good lighting, friendly conditions, an inviting exterior, a consistent climate/temperature, traffic control and parking, and sanitary conditions), noting that the messages sent to…

  19. Indoors forensic entomology: colonization of human remains in closed environments by specific species of sarcosaprophagous flies.

    PubMed

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Saukko, Pekka; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2010-06-15

    Fly species that are commonly recovered on human corpses concealed in houses or other dwellings are often dependent on human created environments and might have special features in their biology that allow them to colonize indoor cadavers. In this study we describe nine typical cases involving forensically relevant flies on human remains found indoors in southern Finland. Eggs, larvae and puparia were reared to adult stage and determined to species. Of the five species found the most common were Lucilia sericata Meigen, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Protophormia terraenovae Robineau-Desvoidy. The flesh fly Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt is reported for the first time to colonize human cadavers inside houses and a COI gene sequence based DNA barcode is provided for it to help facilitate identification in the future. Fly biology, colonization speed and the significance of indoors forensic entomological evidence are discussed.

  20. Indoor integrated navigation and synchronous data acquisition method for Android smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chunsheng; Wei, Wenjian; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Habib, Ayman; Wang, Ruisheng

    2015-08-01

    Smartphones are widely used at present. Most smartphones have cameras and kinds of sensors, such as gyroscope, accelerometer and magnet meter. Indoor navigation based on smartphone is very important and valuable. According to the features of the smartphone and indoor navigation, a new indoor integrated navigation method is proposed, which uses MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), camera and magnet meter of smartphone. The proposed navigation method mainly involves data acquisition, camera calibration, image measurement, IMU calibration, initial alignment, strapdown integral, zero velocity update and integrated navigation. Synchronous data acquisition of the sensors (gyroscope, accelerometer and magnet meter) and the camera is the base of the indoor navigation on the smartphone. A camera data acquisition method is introduced, which uses the camera class of Android to record images and time of smartphone camera. Two kinds of sensor data acquisition methods are introduced and compared. The first method records sensor data and time with the SensorManager of Android. The second method realizes open, close, data receiving and saving functions in C language, and calls the sensor functions in Java language with JNI interface. A data acquisition software is developed with JDK (Java Development Kit), Android ADT (Android Development Tools) and NDK (Native Development Kit). The software can record camera data, sensor data and time at the same time. Data acquisition experiments have been done with the developed software and Sumsang Note 2 smartphone. The experimental results show that the first method of sensor data acquisition is convenient but lost the sensor data sometimes, the second method is much better in real-time performance and much less in data losing. A checkerboard image is recorded, and the corner points of the checkerboard are detected with the Harris method. The sensor data of gyroscope, accelerometer and magnet meter have

  1. Integrated CMOS transceiver for indoor optical wireless links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holburn, David M.; Lalithambika, Vinod A.; Joyner, Valencia M.; Samsudin, Rina J.; Mears, Robert J.

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop integrated CMOS designs for optical transceivers at 1.55um wavelength that both meet the current system specification of 155Mb/s and provide a viable upgrade path to higher bit-rates. We present the design and implementation of an integrated multi-channel CMOS transceiver for use in a cellular 155Mb/s Manchester-coded optical wireless link. The receiver is an angle-diversity design and consists of multiple sectors with relatively small field of view; each driving an individual pre-amplifier channel. An on-chip selector selects signals to be passed to the combiner depending on the signal level and external control signals. The outputs of all the selected channels are combined using a current summing junction, implemented using a transconductance-transimpedance approach. In order to achieve a receiver design that will be robust in the face of process variations, an on-chip circuit is provided to maintain the operating point of the amplifier chain. The design has been optimized to achieve -30dBm sensitivity at a BER of 10-9. The CMOS transmitter circuit is tailored to match the electro-optic response of the resonant cavity LEDs being used. The transmitter driver incorporates current-peaking and charge-extraction circuitry using a novel timing generator, and has been designed to achieve rise and fall times of better than 0.2ns. Considerable effort is being directed towards the development of integrated designs which do not require significant numbers of discrete components. The prototype designs are being realised in a 0.7μm commodity mixed-signal CMOS process by Alcatel Microelectronics. We report results from the first prototype multi-channel demonstrator system and discuss future research directions.

  2. Particulate matter from indoor environments of classroom induced higher cytotoxicity and leakiness in human microvascular endothelial cells in comparison with those collected from corridor.

    PubMed

    Chua, M L; Setyawati, M I; Li, H; Fang, C H Y; Gurusamy, S; Teoh, F T L; Leong, D T; George, S

    2016-09-23

    We investigated the physicochemical properties (size, shape, elemental composition, and endotoxin) of size resolved particulate matter (PM) collected from the indoor and corridor environments of classrooms. A comparative hazard profiling of these PM was conducted using human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Oxidative stress-dependent cytotoxicity responses were assessed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and high content screening (HCS), and disruption of monolayer cell integrity was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and transwell assay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed differences in the morphology and elemental composition of PM of different sizes and origins. While the total mass of PM collected from indoor environment was lower in comparison with those collected from the corridor, the endotoxin content was substantially higher in indoor PM (e.g., ninefold higher endotoxin level in indoor PM8.1-20 ). The ability to induce oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity and leakiness in cell monolayer were higher for indoor PM compared to those collected from the corridor. In conclusion, this comparative analysis suggested that indoor PM is relatively more hazardous to the endothelial system possibly because of higher endotoxin content.

  3. Human health risks of formaldehyde indoor levels: An issue of concern.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Joaquim; Roig, Neus; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a carcinogenic substance for humans. Exposure to formaldehyde may also cause eye and respiratory tract irritation, as well as skin sensitization. The main indoor sources of formaldehyde are wood-pressed products, insulation materials, paints, varnishes, household cleaning products and cigarettes, among others. Although this chemical is a well-known indoor pollutant, data on indoor concentrations of formaldehyde are still scarce in some countries. In February 2014, 10 homes in Catalonia, Spain, were randomly selected to collect indoor (bedroom and living room) and outdoor air samples. Ten additional samples were also collected at different workplaces (e.g., offices, shops, classrooms, etc.). Formaldehyde air levels found in homes ranged from 10.7 to 47.7 μg m(-3), from 9.65 to 37.2 μg m(-3), and from 0.96 to 3.37 μg m(-3) in bedrooms, living rooms, and outdoors, respectively. Meanwhile, at workplaces, indoor air levels ranged from 5.86 to 40.4 μg m(-3). These levels are in agreement with data found in the scientific literature. Non-carcinogenic risks were above the threshold limit (HQ > 1), and carcinogenic risks were not acceptable either (>10(-4)). Despite the current study limitations, the results confirm that formaldehyde indoor levels are a matter of health concern, which must be taken into account by policymakers and regulatory bodies.

  4. Occurrence, sources and human exposure assessment of SCCPs in indoor dust of northeast China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Hua; Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Huo, Chun-Yan; Li, Wen-Long; Gao, Chong-Jing; Li, Hai-Ling; Li, Yi-Fan; Chan, Hing Man

    2017-06-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are widely used chemicals in household products and might cause adverse human health effects. However, limited information is available on the occurrence of SCCPs in indoor environments and their exposure risks on humans. In this study the concentrations, profiles and human exposure of SCCPs in indoor dust from five different indoor environments, including commercial stores, residential apartments, dormitories, offices and laboratories were characterized. The SCCPs levels ranged from 10.1 to 173.0 μg/g, with the median and mean concentration of 47.2 and 53.6 μg/g, respectively. No significant difference was found on concentrations among the five microenvironments. The most abundant compounds in indoor dust samples were homologues of C13 group, Cl7 group and N20 (N is the total number of C and Cl) group. In the five microenvironments, commercial stores were more frequently exposed to shorter carbon chained and higher chlorinated homologues. Three potential sources for SCCPs were identified by the multiple linear regression of factor score model and correspondence analysis. The major sources of SCCPs in indoor dust were technical mixtures of CP-42 (42% chlorine, w/w) and CP-52 b (52% chlorine, w/w). The total daily exposure doses and hazard quotients (HQ) were calculated by the human exposure models, and they were all below the reference doses and threshold values, respectively. Monte Carlo simulation was applied to predict the human exposure risk of SCCPs. Infants and toddlers were at risk of SCCPs based on predicted HQ values, which were exceeded the threshold for neoplastic effects in the worst case. Our results on the occurrences, sources and human exposures of SCCPs will be useful to provide a better understanding of SCCPs behaviors in indoor environment in China, and to support environmental risk evaluation and regulation of SCCPs in the world. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Integrated photocatalytic filtration array for indoor air quality control.

    PubMed

    Denny, Frans; Permana, Eric; Scott, Jason; Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y H; Amal, Rose

    2010-07-15

    Photocatalytic and filtration technologies were integrated to develop a hybrid system capable of removing and oxidizing organic pollutants from an air stream. A fluidized bed aerosol generator (FBAG) was adapted to prepare TiO(2)-loaded ventilation filters for the photodegradation of gas phase ethanol. Compared to a manually loaded filter, the ethanol photodegradation rate constant for the FBAG coated filter increased by 361%. Additionally, the presence of the photogenerated intermediate product, acetaldehyde, was reduced and the time for mineralization to CO(2) was accelerated. These improvements were attributed to the FBAG system providing a more uniform distribution of TiO(2) particles across the filter surface leading to greater accessibility by the UV light. A dual-UV-lamp system, as opposed to a single-lamp system, enhanced photocatalytic filter performance demonstrating the importance of high light irradiance and light distribution across the filter surface. Substituting the blacklight blue lamps with a UV-light-emitting-diode (UV-LED) array led to further improvement as well as suppressed the electrical energy per order (EE/O) by a factor of 6. These improvements derived from the more uniform distribution of light irradiance as well as the higher efficiency of UV-LEDs in converting electrical energy to photons.

  6. A review of heavy metals in indoor dust and its human health-risk implications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sock Yin; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Abidin, Emilia Zainal; Cheema, Manraj Singh

    2016-12-01

    Indoor dust acts as a media for heavy metal deposition. Past studies have shown that heavy metal concentration in indoor dust is affected by local human activities and atmospheric transport can have harmful effects on human health. Additionally, children are more sensitive to heavy metals due to their hand-to-mouth behaviour and rapid body development. However, limited information on health risks were found in past dust studies as these studies aimed to identify heavy metal concentrations and sources of indoor dust. The objective of this review is to discuss heavy metal concentration and sources influencing its concentration in indoor dust. Accordingly, high lead (Pb) concentration (639.10 μg/g) has been reported in heavy traffic areas. In addition, this review paper aims to estimate the health risk to children from heavy metals in indoor dust via multiple exposure pathways using the health-risk assessment (HRA). Urban areas and industrial sites have revealed high heavy metal concentration in comparison to rural areas. Hazard index (HI) values found in arsenic (As), chromium (Cr) and Pb were 21.30, 1.10 and 2.40, respectively, indicate that non-carcinogenic elements are found in children. Furthermore, most of the past studies have found that carcinogenic risks for As, cadmium (Cd), Cr and Pb were below the acceptable total lifetime cancer risk (TLCR) range (1×10-6-1×10-4). The results of health risk assessment in this review show that carcinogenic risk exists among children. Hence, this proves that future studies need to focus on children's carcinogenic risk in indoor dust studies in order to find out the sources of heavy metals in indoor dust. This review highlights the importance of having the HRA application using bioavailable heavy metal concentration as it provides more accurate health-risk estimation. Moreover, this review is also useful as a reference for policy decision making in protecting children's health.

  7. Adverse human health effects associated with molds in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Bryan D; Kelman, Bruce J; Saxon, Andrew

    2003-05-01

    Molds are common and important allergens. About 5% of individuals are predicted to have some allergic airway symptoms from molds over their lifetime. However, it should be remembered that molds are not dominant allergens and that the outdoor molds, rather than indoor ones, are the most important. For almost all allergic individuals, the reactions will be limited to rhinitis or asthma; sinusitis may occur secondarily due to obstruction. Rarely do sensitized individuals develop uncommon conditions such as ABPA or AFS. To reduce the risk of developing or exacerbating allergies, mold should not be allowed to grow unchecked indoors. When mold colonization is discovered in the home, school, or office, it should be remediated after the source of the moisture that supports its growth is identified and eliminated. Authoritative guidelines for mold remediation are available. Fungi are rarely significant pathogens for humans. Superficial fungal infections of the skin and nails are relatively common in normal individuals, but those infections are readily treated and generally resolve without complication. Fungal infections of deeper tissues are rare and in general are limited to persons with severely impaired immune systems. The leading pathogenic fungi for persons with nonimpaired immune function, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Histoplasma, may find their way indoors with outdoor air but normally do not grow or propagate indoors. Due to the ubiquity of fungi in the environment, it is not possible to prevent immunecompromised individuals from being exposed to molds and fungi outside the confines of hospital isolation units. Some molds that propagate indoors may under some conditions produce mycotoxins that can adversely affect living cells and organisms by a variety of mechanisms. Adverse effects of molds and mycotoxins have been recognized for centuries following ingestion of contaminated foods. Occupational diseases are also recognized in association with

  8. Human cancer risk from the inhalation of formaldehyde in different indoor environments in Guiyang City, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Tian; Liu, Zao-Rong; Bai, Yu-Hua

    2008-08-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the risk of human cancer from the inhalation of formaldehyde in different indoor environments in Guiyang City in China. Offices had the highest mean formaldehyde concentration (0.11 mg/m(3)) and classrooms had the lowest mean formaldehyde concentration (0.04 mg/m(3)). The cancer risk levels in different indoor environments ranged from 6.96 x 10(-6 )to 2.48 x 10(-4) and were greater than the acceptable cancer risk 1 x 10(-6). High human formaldehyde risks imply a critical influence on human health in Guiyang City. The highest cancer risk values occurred in bedrooms (ranging from 1.87 in 10,000 to 2.48 in 10,000). For office workers, offices were the highest risk environment after bedrooms where formaldehyde concentration levels were identified. Students were the most sensitive population, and the highest priority should be given to protecting their health in indoor environments. Regulations and standards for low emission materials and public education in relation to indoor pollution are highly recommended in China to protect human health.

  9. A magnetometer-free indoor human localization based on loosely coupled IMU/UWB fusion.

    PubMed

    Zihajehzadeh, Shaghayegh; Yoon, Paul K; Park, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic distortions in indoor environment affects the accuracy of yaw angle estimation using magnetometer. Thus, the accuracy of indoor localization based on inertial-magnetic sensors will be affected as well. To address this issue, this paper proposes a magnetometer-free solution for indoor human localization and yaw angle estimation. The proposed algorithm fuses a wearable inertial sensor consisting of MEMS-based accelerometer and gyroscope with a portable ultra-wideband (UWB) localization system in a cascaded two-step filter consisting of a tilt Kalman filter and a localization Kalman filter. By benchmarking against an optical motion capture system, the experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately track position and velocity as well as the yaw angle without using magnetometer.

  10. Evaluation of indoor air pollution and its effect on human health in Beijing's rural areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hansheng; Liu, Youcheng )

    1989-01-01

    Average exposures to SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, Inhalable Particles (IP), common bacteria and streptococci were monitored in 1986 in 24 new and old village households in the northern suburb of Beijing. Four hundred and fifty school children were also measured and observed for chronic and acute respiratory symptoms and illnesses, pulmonary function, immune response, carboxyhemoglobin level and eye response time to signals so as to evaluate the effects of rural indoor air pollution on human health. The results of air monitoring data showed that the new heating systems were effective in reducing the indoor concentrations of the measured pollutants by 23 to 76% in winter, but present concentrations still exceed China's Standard because of inadequate house design. Health outcomes suggested that children in the new village demonstrated signs of improvement for better health. The implications of different factors affecting indoor air pollution are evaluated and discussed.

  11. Chamber bioaerosol study: outdoor air and human occupants as sources of indoor airborne microbes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Bhangar, Seema; Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward A; Taylor, John W; Lindow, Steven E; Nazaroff, William W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    Human occupants are an important source of microbes in indoor environments. In this study, we used DNA sequencing of filter samples to assess the fungal and bacterial composition of air in an environmental chamber under different levels of occupancy, activity, and exposed or covered carpeting. In this office-like, mechanically ventilated environment, results showed a strong influence of outdoor-derived particles, with the indoor microbial composition tracking that of outdoor air for the 2-hour sampling periods. The number of occupants and their activity played a significant but smaller role influencing the composition of indoor bioaerosols. Human-associated taxa were observed but were not particularly abundant, except in the case of one fungus that appeared to be transported into the chamber on the clothing of a study participant. Overall, this study revealed a smaller signature of human body-associated taxa than had been expected based on recent studies of indoor microbiomes, suggesting that occupants may not exert a strong influence on bioaerosol microbial composition in a space that, like many offices, is well ventilated with air that is moderately filtered and moderately occupied.

  12. Chamber Bioaerosol Study: Outdoor Air and Human Occupants as Sources of Indoor Airborne Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rachel I.; Bhangar, Seema; Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward A.; Taylor, John W.; Lindow, Steven E.; Nazaroff, William W.; Bruns, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Human occupants are an important source of microbes in indoor environments. In this study, we used DNA sequencing of filter samples to assess the fungal and bacterial composition of air in an environmental chamber under different levels of occupancy, activity, and exposed or covered carpeting. In this office-like, mechanically ventilated environment, results showed a strong influence of outdoor-derived particles, with the indoor microbial composition tracking that of outdoor air for the 2-hour sampling periods. The number of occupants and their activity played a significant but smaller role influencing the composition of indoor bioaerosols. Human-associated taxa were observed but were not particularly abundant, except in the case of one fungus that appeared to be transported into the chamber on the clothing of a study participant. Overall, this study revealed a smaller signature of human body-associated taxa than had been expected based on recent studies of indoor microbiomes, suggesting that occupants may not exert a strong influence on bioaerosol microbial composition in a space that, like many offices, is well ventilated with air that is moderately filtered and moderately occupied. PMID:26024222

  13. Integration of Thermal Indoor Conditions into Operational Heat Health Warning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppe, C.; Becker, P.; Pfafferott, J.

    2009-09-01

    The 2003 heat wave in Western Europe with altogether 35,000 to 50,000 deaths in Europe, several thousands of which occurred in Germany, has clearly pointed out the danger arising from long periods with high heat load. As a consequence, Germany, as many other European countries, has started to implement a Heat Health Warning System (HHWS). The German HHWS is based on the ‘Perceived Temperature'. The 'Perceived Temperature' is determined through a heat budget model of the human organism which includes the main thermophysiologically relevant mechanisms of heat exchange with the atmosphere. The most important meteorological ambience parameters included in the model are air temperature, humidity, wind speed and radiation fluxes in the short-wave and long-wave ranges. In addition to using a heat budget model for the assessment of the thermal load, the German HHWS also takes into account that the human body reacts in different ways to its thermal environment due to physiological adaptation (short-term acclimatisation) and short-term behavioural adaptation. The restriction of such an approach, like the majority of approaches used to issue heat warnings, is that the threshold for a warning is generally derived from meteorological observations and that warnings are issued on the basis of weather forecasts. Both, the observed data and the weather forecasts are only available for outside conditions. The group of people who are most at risk of suffering from a heat wave, however, are the elderly and frail who mainly stay inside. The indoor situation, which varies largely from the conditions outside, is not taken into account by most of the warning systems. To overcome this limitation the DWD, in co-operation with the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, has developed a model which simulates the thermal conditions in the indoor environment. As air-conditioning in private housing in Germany is not very common, the thermal indoor conditions depend on the outside

  14. Vapor Transport to Indoor Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indoor environment is an important microenvironment for human exposure to chemicals, both because people spend most of their time indoors and because chemicals are often at higher concentrations indoors versus outdoors. This chapter reviews the major components in estimating ...

  15. Vapor Transport to Indoor Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indoor environment is an important microenvironment for human exposure to chemicals, both because people spend most of their time indoors and because chemicals are often at higher concentrations indoors versus outdoors. This chapter reviews the major components in estimating ...

  16. [Indoor dust as a pathway of human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)].

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Struciński, Paweł; Hernik, Agnieszka; Czaja, Katarzyna; Korcz, Wojciech; Minorczyk, Maria; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2012-01-01

    The brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) belong to a class of synthetic, additive brominated flame retardants (BFRs). PBDEs are used to reduce the flammability of commercial and household products such as textiles, various plastic polymers, furnishing foam, and electronic equipment. People spend a large percentage of their life-time indoors at home, in offices and cars, etc, providing many opportunities for lengthy exposure to PBDEs from residential settings and commercial products in an indoor environment. In recent time, the foodstuffs, mainly food of animal origin, have been indicated as the main pathway of human exposure to PBDEs. However, many studies have shown that the indoor environment, mainly indoor dust, can be also a significant source of exposure to PBDEs, especially for younger children (toddlers) because of their behavioral patterns, eg. putting fingers, toys, and other items in their mouth. Numerous studies show that the median intakes of PBDEs via dust for adult range from 1.41 to 277 ng x day(-1) is lower than that via food which range from 135 to 333 ng x day-', while the median intake of these compounds via indoor dust for children range from 101 to 404 ng x day(-1) is much higher than via food: 77-190 ng x day(-1). The congener pattern observed in the indoor dust is different to that found in food. The indoor dust is dominated by the congener BDE-209 vs. food where the most dominated congeners are BDE-47 and BDE-99. Human exposure to PBDEs and other brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is widely widespread throughout the world and it depends on a country range of usage, production and legislation concerning these chemicals as well as a citizen's behavior. Generally, human exposure has been found higher in North America than in Europe and Asia. Within European countries the significant highest concentrations in dust have been found in the United Kingdom. It should be noted that many uncertainty factors such as personal habits, dietary preferences

  17. An Integrated Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Posture Recognition and Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yuan; Xiao, Xiling

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide better monitoring for the elderly or patients, we developed an integrated wireless wearable sensor system that can realize posture recognition and indoor localization in real time. Five designed sensor nodes which are respectively fixed on lower limbs and a standard Kalman filter are used to acquire basic attitude data. After the attitude angles of five body segments (two thighs, two shanks and the waist) are obtained, the pitch angles of the left thigh and waist are used to realize posture recognition. Based on all these attitude angles of body segments, we can also calculate the coordinates of six lower limb joints (two hip joints, two knee joints and two ankle joints). Then, a novel relative localization algorithm based on step length is proposed to realize the indoor localization of the user. Several sparsely distributed active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags are used to correct the accumulative error in the relative localization algorithm and a set-membership filter is applied to realize the data fusion. The experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:27809230

  18. An Integrated Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Posture Recognition and Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yuan; Xiao, Xiling

    2016-10-31

    In order to provide better monitoring for the elderly or patients, we developed an integrated wireless wearable sensor system that can realize posture recognition and indoor localization in real time. Five designed sensor nodes which are respectively fixed on lower limbs and a standard Kalman filter are used to acquire basic attitude data. After the attitude angles of five body segments (two thighs, two shanks and the waist) are obtained, the pitch angles of the left thigh and waist are used to realize posture recognition. Based on all these attitude angles of body segments, we can also calculate the coordinates of six lower limb joints (two hip joints, two knee joints and two ankle joints). Then, a novel relative localization algorithm based on step length is proposed to realize the indoor localization of the user. Several sparsely distributed active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags are used to correct the accumulative error in the relative localization algorithm and a set-membership filter is applied to realize the data fusion. The experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  19. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  20. Reactions of ozone with human skin lipids: Sources of carbonyls, dicarbonyls, and hydroxycarbonyls in indoor air

    PubMed Central

    Wisthaler, Armin; Weschler, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    This study has used proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for direct air analyses of volatile products resulting from the reactions of ozone with human skin lipids. An initial series of small-scale in vitro and in vivo experiments were followed by experiments conducted with human subjects in a simulated office. The latter were conducted using realistic ozone mixing ratios (≈15 ppb with occupants present). Detected products included mono- and bifunctional compounds that contain carbonyl, carboxyl, or α-hydroxy ketone groups. Among these, three previously unreported dicarbonyls have been identified, and two previously unreported α-hydroxy ketones have been tentatively identified. The compounds detected in this study (excepting acetone) have been overlooked in surveys of indoor pollutants, reflecting the limitations of the analytical methods routinely used to monitor indoor air. The results are fully consistent with the Criegee mechanism for ozone reacting with squalene, the single most abundant unsaturated constituent of skin lipids, and several unsaturated fatty acid moieties in their free or esterified forms. Quantitative product analysis confirms that squalene is the major scavenger of ozone at the interface between room air and the human envelope. Reactions between ozone and human skin lipids reduce the mixing ratio of ozone in indoor air, but concomitantly increase the mixing ratios of volatile products and, presumably, skin surface concentrations of less volatile products. Some of the volatile products, especially the dicarbonyls, may be respiratory irritants. Some of the less volatile products may be skin irritants. PMID:19706436

  1. Source, significance, and control of indoor microbial aerosols: human health aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Spendlove, J C; Fannin, K F

    1983-01-01

    The usual profile of indoor microbial aerosols probably has little meaning to healthy people. However, hazardous microbial aerosols can penetrate buildings or be generated within them; in either case, they can have significant adverse effects on human health. These aerosols can be controlled to some extent by eliminating or reducing their sources. In this regard, careful consideration should be given in building construction to the design of ventilation and air-conditioning systems and to the flooring material, so that these systems and the flooring material will not act as microbial reservoirs. It is evident that in spite of the considerable body of data available on indoor microbial aerosols, little is known of their true significance to human health except in terms of overt epidemic disease. Continued research is needed in this area, particularly in respect to situations of high risk in such locations as hospitals and schools for young children. PMID:6867255

  2. Indoor fungi: companions and contaminants.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, A; Täubel, M; Hyvärinen, A

    2015-04-01

    This review discusses the role of fungi and fungal products in indoor environments, especially as agents of human exposure. Fungi are present everywhere, and knowledge for indoor environments is extensive on their occurrence and ecology, concentrations, and determinants. Problems of dampness and mold have dominated the discussion on indoor fungi. However, the role of fungi in human health is still not well understood. In this review, we take a look back to integrate what cultivation-based research has taught us alongside more recent work with cultivation-independent techniques. We attempt to summarize what is known today and to point out where more data is needed for risk assessment associated with indoor fungal exposures. New data have demonstrated qualitative and quantitative richness of fungal material inside and outside buildings. Research on mycotoxins shows that just as microbes are everywhere in our indoor environments, so too are their metabolic products. Assessment of fungal exposures is notoriously challenging due to the numerous factors that contribute to the variation of fungal concentrations in indoor environments. We also may have to acknowledge and incorporate into our understanding the complexity of interactions between multiple biological agents in assessing their effects on human health and well-being.

  3. Influence of Indoor Hygrothermal Conditions on Human Quality of Life in Social Housing

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Sara; Fraga, Silvia; Delgado, Joao M.P.Q.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modern societies spend most of their time indoors, namely at home, and the indoor environment quality turns out to be a crucial factor to health, quality of life and well-being of the residents. The present study aims to understand how indoor environment relates with quality of life and how improving housing conditions impacts on individuals’ health. Design and Methods: This study case will rely on the following assessments in both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated social housing: i) field measurements, in social dwellings (namely temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, air velocity, air change rate, level of mould spores and energy consumption); ii) residents’ questionnaires on social, demogaphic, behavioural, health characteristics and quality of life. Also, iii) qualitative interviews performed with social housing residents from the rehabilitated houses, addressing the self-perception of living conditions and their influence in health status and quality of life. All the collected information will be combined and analysed in order to achieve the main objective. Expected impact It is expected to define a Predicted Human Life Quality (PHLQ) index, that combines physical parameters describing the indoor environment measured through engineering techniques with residents’ and neighbourhood quality of life characteristics assessed by health questionnaires. Improvement in social housing should be related with better health indicators and the new index might be an important tool contributing to enhance quality of life of the residents. Significance for public health This study will contribute to understand how indoor environment relates with quality of life and how improving housing conditions impacts on individuals’ health, in social housing neighbourhoods. As so, it is important to share the undertaken methodology carried out by a multidisciplinary team, in order to allow other researchers following comparable studies to

  4. Emission of ammonia from indoor concrete wall and assessment of human exposure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Z; Dong, Y; Wang, Z; Zhu, T

    2006-04-01

    Addition of urea-based antifreeze admixtures during cement mixing can make it possible to produce concrete cement in construction of buildings in cold weather; this, however, has led to increasing indoor air pollution due to continuous transformation and emission from urea to gaseous ammonia in indoor concrete wall. It is believed that ammonia is harmful to human body and exposure to ammonia can cause some serious symptoms such as headaches, burns, and even permanent damage to the eyes and lungs. In order to understand the emission of ammonia from indoor concrete wall in civil building and assess the health risk of people living in these buildings, the experimental pieces of concrete wall were first prepared by concreting cement and urea-based antifreeze admixtures to simulate the indoor wall in civil building in this work. Then environmental chamber was adopted for studying the effect of temperature, relative humility and air exchange rate on emission of ammonia from experimental pieces of concrete wall. Also the field experiment was made at selected rooms in given civil buildings. Exposure and potential dose of adult and children exposed to indoor/outdoor ammonia in summer and in winter are calculated and evaluated by using Scenario Evaluation Approach. The results indicated that high air exchange rate leads to decreased ammonia concentration, and elevation of temperature causes increasing ammonia concentration and volatilizing rate in chamber. The complete emission of ammonia from the wall containing urea-based antifreeze admixtures needs more than 10 years in general. Ventilating or improving air exchange can play a significant role in reducing ammonia concentration in actual rooms in field experiments. Urea-based antifreeze admixtures in concrete wall can give rise to high exposure and potential dose, especially in summer. Generally, adults have a high potential dose than children, while children have personal average dose rate beyond adults in the same

  5. Integrated navigation fusion strategy of INS/UWB for indoor carrier attitude angle and position synchronous tracking.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qigao; Wu, Yaheng; Hui, Jing; Wu, Lei; Yu, Zhenzhong; Zhou, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    In some GPS failure conditions, positioning for mobile target is difficult. This paper proposed a new method based on INS/UWB for attitude angle and position synchronous tracking of indoor carrier. Firstly, error model of INS/UWB integrated system is built, including error equation of INS and UWB. And combined filtering model of INS/UWB is researched. Simulation results show that the two subsystems are complementary. Secondly, integrated navigation data fusion strategy of INS/UWB based on Kalman filtering theory is proposed. Simulation results show that FAKF method is better than the conventional Kalman filtering. Finally, an indoor experiment platform is established to verify the integrated navigation theory of INS/UWB, which is geared to the needs of coal mine working environment. Static and dynamic positioning results show that the INS/UWB integrated navigation system is stable and real-time, positioning precision meets the requirements of working condition and is better than any independent subsystem.

  6. Assessing microbial decontamination of indoor air with particular focus on human pathogenic viruses.

    PubMed

    Duchaine, Caroline

    2016-09-02

    Transmission of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens is of primary importance in public and occupational health and infection control. Although several standardized protocols have been proposed to target microbes on fomites through surface decontamination, use of microbicidal agents, and cleaning processes, only limited guidance is available on microbial decontamination of indoor air to reduce the risk of pathogen transmission between individuals. This article reviews the salient aspects of airborne transmission of infectious agents, exposure assessment, in vitro assessment of microbicidal agents, and processes for air decontamination for infection prevention and control. Laboratory-scale testing (eg, rotating chambers, wind tunnels) and promising field-scale methodologies to decontaminate indoor air are also presented. The potential of bacteriophages as potential surrogates for the study of airborne human pathogenic viruses is also discussed.

  7. Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in matched samples of human milk, dust and indoor air.

    PubMed

    Toms, Leisa-Maree L; Hearn, Laurence; Kennedy, Karen; Harden, Fiona; Bartkow, Michael; Temme, Christian; Mueller, Jochen F

    2009-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are lipophilic, persistent pollutants found worldwide in environmental and human samples. Exposure pathways for PBDEs remain unclear but may include food, air and dust. The aim of this study was to conduct an integrated assessment of PBDE exposure and human body burden using 10 matched samples of human milk, indoor air and dust collected in 2007-2008 in Brisbane, Australia. In addition, temporal analysis was investigated comparing the results of the current study with PBDE concentrations in human milk collected in 2002-2003 from the same region. PBDEs were detected in all matrices and the median concentrations of BDEs -47 and -209 in human milk, air and dust were: 4.2 and 0.3 ng/g lipid; 25 and 7.8 pg/m(3); and 56 and 291 ng/g dust, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the concentrations of BDE-99 in air and human milk (r=0.661, p=0.038) and BDE-153 in dust and BDE-183 in human milk (r=0.697, p=0.025). These correlations do not suggest causal relationships - there is no hypothesis that can be offered to explain why BDE-153 in dust and BDE-183 in milk are correlated. The fact that so few correlations were found in the data could be a function of the small sample size, or because additional factors, such as sources of exposure not considered or measured in the study, might be important in explaining exposure to PBDEs. There was a slight decrease in PBDE concentrations from 2002-2003 to 2007-2008 but this may be due to sampling and analytical differences. Overall, average PBDE concentrations from these individual samples were similar to results from pooled human milk collected in Brisbane in 2002-2003 indicating that pooling may be an efficient, cost-effective strategy of assessing PBDE concentrations on a population basis. The results of this study were used to estimate an infant's daily PBDE intake via inhalation, dust ingestion and human milk consumption. Differences in PBDE intake of individual

  8. [Indoor Deposition Flux, Seasonal Variations and Human Exposure Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Xiamen, China].

    PubMed

    Han, Wen-liang; Liu, Yu; Chen, Hai-ming; Chen, Xing-tong; Fan, Tao

    2016-03-15

    Indoor dust was an important and even a major route of human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). However, the vacuum dust concentrations were less correlated with indoor residents' serum concentrations of PBDEs, thus inadequat for either estimation of human exposure dose or research of deposition flux and its seasonal variations. Passive sampling of indoo dustfall could offset these shortages. A total of 49 indoor sampling sites including homes, offices, computer rooms and furniture factor were selected in Xiamen, China to collect the four season dustfall samples with glass plates (walled by clean aluminum foil). Deposition flux, concentrations, congener profiles, seasonal variations, and human exposure to PBDEs in the dustfall were studied The geometric means of the yearly round deposition flux of ∑ PBDEs (sum of 16 BDE congeners including BDE-209) in homes offices, computer rooms and furniture factory were 6.1, 3.0, 1.1 and 179.8 ng · (m² · d)⁻¹, respectively. The geometric mea deposition flux of ∑ PBDEs in homes was 2 times of that in offices, but the concentration of ∑ PBDEs in the dustfall from home (445.5 ng · g⁻¹) was only slightly higher than that of offices (384.0 ng · g⁻¹). The ∑ PBDEs deposition flux in homes, offices and computer rooms in Xiamen were at lower level compared with other cities around the world. The PBDEs deposition flux in furnitur factory was much higher than that in the ordinary indoor environment. Autumn was the season with highest deposition flux of ∑ PBDEs. Geometric means of BDE- 209's proportion of the ∑ PBDEs in dustfall in all seasons in the four types of indoo environment were above 80% . The deposition flux of PBDEs was correlated to the dustfall deposition flux in homes, offices and computer rooms, but not that in furniture factory. ∑₁₅ PBDEs in homes and offices were significantly correlated with the age of computers, but not quantities of electrical and electronic products

  9. Spatiotemporal analysis and human exposure assessment on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air, settled house dust, and diet: A review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuning; Harrad, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    world, a pattern consistent with the spatial trends observed for concentrations of PAH in indoor air. Evaluation of human exposure to ΣPAH via inhalation, dust and diet ingestion, suggests that while intake via diet and inhalation exceeds that via dust ingestion; all three pathways contribute and merit continued assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in indoor dust and human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuan; Wang, Hong Sheng; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, settled workplace dust ( n = 55) from commercial offices, secondary schools, shopping malls, hospitals, electronic factories and manufacturing plants in Hong Kong and settled home dust ( n = 23) from Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, around the Pearl River Delta were collected. Chemical analyses showed that the total PBDEs in workplace dust ranged from 397 to 40,236 ng g -1, with the dust samples from electronic factories having the highest levels (2122-40,236 ng g -1), and dust from homes ranging from 685 to 18,385 ng g -1. The most abundant BDE congeners found were BDE-209 in both workplace dust and home dust, followed by BDE-99 and BDE-47. No significant correlations were observed between total PBDE concentrations in home dust and the age or the house ( p > 0.05), concentrations of BDE-99 + BDE-47 and the number of furniture containing foam ( p > 0.05), and concentrations of BDE-209 and the number of electronic appliances ( p > 0.05). BDE-47, -99, -100 and -183 were found in most of the hair samples collected from occupants of these homes with BDE-47 being the dominant congener (0.86-5.24 ng g -1). The BDE-183 concentration in home dust was significantly correlated with that in human hair ( r = 0.55, p < 0.05, n = 18). Risk assessment indicated that daily intake of PBDEs for children via non-dietary ingestion of dust (101-404 ng day -1) was higher than that via food consumption (77-190 ng day -1).

  11. Human Integration Design Processes (HIDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Human Integration Design Processes (HIDP) document is to provide human-systems integration design processes, including methodologies and best practices that NASA has used to meet human systems and human rating requirements for developing crewed spacecraft. HIDP content is framed around human-centered design methodologies and processes in support of human-system integration requirements and human rating. NASA-STD-3001, Space Flight Human-System Standard, is a two-volume set of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Agency-level standards established by the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer, directed at minimizing health and performance risks for flight crews in human space flight programs. Volume 1 of NASA-STD-3001, Crew Health, sets standards for fitness for duty, space flight permissible exposure limits, permissible outcome limits, levels of medical care, medical diagnosis, intervention, treatment and care, and countermeasures. Volume 2 of NASASTD- 3001, Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health, focuses on human physical and cognitive capabilities and limitations and defines standards for spacecraft (including orbiters, habitats, and suits), internal environments, facilities, payloads, and related equipment, hardware, and software with which the crew interfaces during space operations. The NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8705.2B, Human-Rating Requirements for Space Systems, specifies the Agency's human-rating processes, procedures, and requirements. The HIDP was written to share NASA's knowledge of processes directed toward achieving human certification of a spacecraft through implementation of human-systems integration requirements. Although the HIDP speaks directly to implementation of NASA-STD-3001 and NPR 8705.2B requirements, the human-centered design, evaluation, and design processes described in this document can be applied to any set of human-systems requirements and are independent of reference

  12. Assessment of human body influence on exposure measurements of electric field in indoor enclosures.

    PubMed

    de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; García, Jorge; Ramos, Victoria; Blas, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Personal exposure meters (PEMs) used for measuring exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) are typically used in epidemiological studies. As is well known, these measurement devices cause a perturbation of real EMF exposure levels due to the presence of the human body in the immediate proximity. This paper aims to model the alteration caused by the body shadow effect (BSE) in motion conditions and in indoor enclosures at the Wi-Fi frequency of 2.4 GHz. For this purpose, simulation techniques based on ray-tracing have been carried out, and their results have been verified experimentally. A good agreement exists between simulation and experimental results in terms of electric field (E-field) levels, and taking into account the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the spatial distribution of amplitude. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test provides a P-value greater than 0.05, in fact close to 1. It has been found that the influence of the presence of the human body can be characterized as an angle of shadow that depends on the dimensions of the indoor enclosure. The CDFs show that the E-field levels in indoor conditions follow a lognormal distribution in the absence of the human body and under the influence of BSE. In conclusion, the perturbation caused by BSE in PEMs readings cannot be compensated for by correction factors. Although the mean value is well adjusted, BSE causes changes in CDF that would require improvements in measurement protocols and in the design of measuring devices to subsequently avoid systematic errors.

  13. Integration of Directional Antennas in an RSS Fingerprinting-Based Indoor Localization System.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Quirós, Raúl; Martínez-Sala, Alejandro; Gómez-Tornero, José Luis; García-Haro, Joan

    2015-12-23

    In this paper, the integration of directional antennas in a room-level received signal strength (RSS) fingerprinting-based indoor localization system (ILS) is studied. The sensor reader (SR), which is in charge of capturing the RSS to infer the tag position, can be attached to an omnidirectional or directional antenna. Unlike commonly-employed omnidirectional antennas, directional antennas can receive a stronger signal from the direction in which they are pointed, resulting in a different RSS distributions in space and, hence, more distinguishable fingerprints. A simulation tool and a system management software have been also developed to control the system and assist the initial antenna deployment, reducing time-consuming costs. A prototype was mounted in a real scenario, with a number of SRs with omnidirectional and directional antennas properly positioned. Different antenna configurations have been studied, evidencing a promising capability of directional antennas to enhance the performance of RSS fingerprinting-based ILS, reducing the number of required SRs and also increasing the localization success.

  14. Integration of Directional Antennas in an RSS Fingerprinting-Based Indoor Localization System

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Quirós, Raúl; Martínez-Sala, Alejandro; Gómez-Tornero, José Luis; García-Haro, Joan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the integration of directional antennas in a room-level received signal strength (RSS) fingerprinting-based indoor localization system (ILS) is studied. The sensor reader (SR), which is in charge of capturing the RSS to infer the tag position, can be attached to an omnidirectional or directional antenna. Unlike commonly-employed omnidirectional antennas, directional antennas can receive a stronger signal from the direction in which they are pointed, resulting in a different RSS distributions in space and, hence, more distinguishable fingerprints. A simulation tool and a system management software have been also developed to control the system and assist the initial antenna deployment, reducing time-consuming costs. A prototype was mounted in a real scenario, with a number of SRs with omnidirectional and directional antennas properly positioned. Different antenna configurations have been studied, evidencing a promising capability of directional antennas to enhance the performance of RSS fingerprinting-based ILS, reducing the number of required SRs and also increasing the localization success. PMID:26703620

  15. Outdoor, indoor, and human breath content measurements of ammonia by tunable diode laser spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Konstantin L.; Nadezhdinskii, Alexander I.

    1996-10-01

    Trace contents of ammonia in outdoor, indoor and exhaled air were measured on the base of high resolution absorption spectra. Tunable diode laser system developed for this purpose possesses approximately one second time constant, approximately 200 cm3 sample volume, 5 ppb sensitivity. The calibration of unit was based on measurements of relative intensities of sQ(3,1)...sQ(3,3) absorption lines of v2s and following calculation on the base of a priori data on strength and broadening coefficients of detected lines. Measured indoor contents of ammonia was in 5-10 times higher than outdoor contents. Approximately two times drop in NH3 room content after 6 p.m. was detected. Obtained behavior of ammonia content in respiration right after the smoking demonstrates that the removing of ammonia from lungs has the ventilation character. Measured contents of NH3 in human respiration was ranged between 120 and 220 ppb. The absence of ammonia content differences from respiration of smoking and non smoking persons demonstrates that the accumulation of NH3 by human organism seems to be rather negligible for a short time exposure, e.g. like smoking.

  16. Human Movement: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Joseph R.

    The study of human movement is presented from an integrated perspective influenced by the fields of motor learning, experimental psychology, neuropsychology, kinesiology, biomechanics, and human factors engineering. The level of presentation is directed toward upperclass undergraduate and graduate students in physical education and others pursuing…

  17. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-09-23

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone's acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals.

  18. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone’s acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals. PMID:26404314

  19. Human reactions to a mixture of indoor air volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Mølhave, Lars; Pedersen, Ole F.

    A controlled experimental study of human reactions to a mixture of 22 volatile organic compounds often found in indoor air was performed in a climate chamber. Twenty-one healthy subjects were compared with a group of 14 subjects suffering from the 'sick building syndrome' (SBS subjects), i.e. having symptoms related to the indoor environment (irritated mucous membranes, headache, etc.) as defined by WHO in 1982. In groups of 4 these subjects were exposed during two successive periods to either 0 and 0 mg m -3, 25 and 0 mg m -3, or 0 and 25 mg m -3; 25 mg m -3 is equivalent to the highest concentrations expected in a new building. The study was double blinded, and a latin square design was used to balance out effects of day in the week and season. Both groups reacted subjectively to the air reporting worse odor, worse indoor air quality as defined by the subject, and more irritated mucous membranes in eye, throat and nose than in the clean environment. A tendency to a stronger response was seen among the SBS subjects. Objective measures indicated among others an exposure related reduction in lung function among SBS subjects. Both groups had an increased number of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in tear fluid as a result of exposure. This was not seen for nasal secretions. Psychological performance tests indicated an exposure related diminished ability to learn. In conclusion, the experiment indicates that exposure to volatile organic compounds in low concentrations as seen in new houses causes both subjective complaints and objective signs in normal healty subjects; but more so in subjects from the sick building syndrome.

  20. Estimating human indoor exposure to elemental mercury from broken compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs).

    PubMed

    Salthammer, T; Uhde, E; Omelan, A; Lüdecke, A; Moriske, H-J

    2012-08-01

    The 2008 EU regulation, which prohibits conventional incandescent light bulbs, is to be implemented in phases, completing in 2012. One of the possible substitutes is the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), which, however, does contain up to 5 mg of mercury in its elemental or amalgamated form. The question arises as to the possible exposure of individuals to mercury as a result of lamp breakage during operation or when disconnected from the power supply. Therefore, an apparatus was built to shatter CFLs and drop the shards onto glycol-modified polyethylene terephthalate, a carpeted floor, or laminate floor under defined climatic parameters and operating conditions. Six CFLs of different types and mercury content were studied. After the breakage of a common CFL containing liquid mercury, concentrations up to 8000 ng/m(3) were reached in the chamber. Much lower peak values were obtained with amalgam-type lamps (414 ng/m(3)) or with lamps with a shatter-proof coating (60 ng/m(3)). It was found that ventilation can considerably reduce the indoor air concentration within 20 min. Acute health effects would only be expected if the mercury is not removed immediately. Careful collection and disposal of the lamp fragments would also prevent dwellers from the risk of long-term exposure. After accidental breakage of a compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) indoors, dwellers could be exposed to high mercury concentrations. From the results of our studies in test chambers and real rooms using different lamp types and scenarios, it was possible to estimate the possible human uptake of mercury by inhalation. Immediate action is important to reduce indoor mercury concentrations to a minimum level. The first step is to maximize ventilation followed by careful collection of spilled mercury. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. {sup 210}Po as a long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Exposure to radon (Rn-222) decay products in the indoor environment is suspected of being a significant lung cancer agent in many countries. But quantification of the contemporary lung cancer risk (i.e. probability) on an individual basis is not an easy task. Only past exposures are relevant and assessing individual exposures in retrospect is associated with large uncertainties, if possible at all. One way to extend the validity of contemporary measurements to past decades is to measure long-lived decay products of radon, the long-lived radon daughters. After our laboratory had exemplified the correlation between implanted Po-210 and the estimated radon exposures in six different dwellings, the US Department of Energy and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute granted funds for a one-year study, ``{sup 210}Po as a Long-Term Integrating Radon Indicator in the Indoor Environment.`` In this report the work performed under these two contracts is reported.

  2. Autonomous Integrated Navigation for Indoor Robots Utilizing On-Line Iterated Extended Rauch-Tung-Striebel Smoothing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Chen, Xiyuan; Li, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    In order to reduce the estimated errors of the inertial navigation system (INS)/Wireless sensor network (WSN)-integrated navigation for mobile robots indoors, this work proposes an on-line iterated extended Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoothing (IERTSS) utilizing inertial measuring units (IMUs) and an ultrasonic positioning system. In this mode, an iterated Extended Kalman filter (IEKF) is used in forward data processing of the Extended Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoothing (ERTSS) to improve the accuracy of the filtering output for the smoother. Furthermore, in order to achieve the on-line smoothing, IERTSS is embedded into the average filter. For verification, a real indoor test has been done to assess the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is effective in reducing the errors compared with the conventional schemes.

  3. A Bluetooth/PDR Integration Algorithm for an Indoor Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Chunyan

    2015-09-25

    This paper proposes two schemes for indoor positioning by fusing Bluetooth beacons and a pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) technique to provide meter-level positioning without additional infrastructure. As to the PDR approach, a more effective multi-threshold step detection algorithm is used to improve the positioning accuracy. According to pedestrians' different walking patterns such as walking or running, this paper makes a comparative analysis of multiple step length calculation models to determine a linear computation model and the relevant parameters. In consideration of the deviation between the real heading and the value of the orientation sensor, a heading estimation method with real-time compensation is proposed, which is based on a Kalman filter with map geometry information. The corrected heading can inhibit the positioning error accumulation and improve the positioning accuracy of PDR. Moreover, this paper has implemented two positioning approaches integrated with Bluetooth and PDR. One is the PDR-based positioning method based on map matching and position correction through Bluetooth. There will not be too much calculation work or too high maintenance costs using this method. The other method is a fusion calculation method based on the pedestrians' moving status (direct movement or making a turn) to determine adaptively the noise parameters in an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) system. This method has worked very well in the elimination of various phenomena, including the "go and back" phenomenon caused by the instability of the Bluetooth-based positioning system and the "cross-wall" phenomenon due to the accumulative errors caused by the PDR algorithm. Experiments performed on the fourth floor of the School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics (SESSI) building in the China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT) campus showed that the proposed scheme can reliably achieve a 2-meter precision.

  4. A Bluetooth/PDR Integration Algorithm for an Indoor Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes two schemes for indoor positioning by fusing Bluetooth beacons and a pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) technique to provide meter-level positioning without additional infrastructure. As to the PDR approach, a more effective multi-threshold step detection algorithm is used to improve the positioning accuracy. According to pedestrians’ different walking patterns such as walking or running, this paper makes a comparative analysis of multiple step length calculation models to determine a linear computation model and the relevant parameters. In consideration of the deviation between the real heading and the value of the orientation sensor, a heading estimation method with real-time compensation is proposed, which is based on a Kalman filter with map geometry information. The corrected heading can inhibit the positioning error accumulation and improve the positioning accuracy of PDR. Moreover, this paper has implemented two positioning approaches integrated with Bluetooth and PDR. One is the PDR-based positioning method based on map matching and position correction through Bluetooth. There will not be too much calculation work or too high maintenance costs using this method. The other method is a fusion calculation method based on the pedestrians’ moving status (direct movement or making a turn) to determine adaptively the noise parameters in an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) system. This method has worked very well in the elimination of various phenomena, including the “go and back” phenomenon caused by the instability of the Bluetooth-based positioning system and the “cross-wall” phenomenon due to the accumulative errors caused by the PDR algorithm. Experiments performed on the fourth floor of the School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics (SESSI) building in the China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT) campus showed that the proposed scheme can reliably achieve a 2-meter precision. PMID:26404277

  5. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Gilbert, Jack A; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO2 concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ∼8×106 data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  6. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE PAGES

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; ...

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  8. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Indoor Environmental Conditions, Human Occupancy, and Operational Characteristics in a New Hospital Building

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO2 concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ∼8×106 data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  9. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  10. Integrated Navigation Fusion Strategy of INS/UWB for Indoor Carrier Attitude Angle and Position Synchronous Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yaheng; Hui, Jing; Wu, Lei; Zhou, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    In some GPS failure conditions, positioning for mobile target is difficult. This paper proposed a new method based on INS/UWB for attitude angle and position synchronous tracking of indoor carrier. Firstly, error model of INS/UWB integrated system is built, including error equation of INS and UWB. And combined filtering model of INS/UWB is researched. Simulation results show that the two subsystems are complementary. Secondly, integrated navigation data fusion strategy of INS/UWB based on Kalman filtering theory is proposed. Simulation results show that FAKF method is better than the conventional Kalman filtering. Finally, an indoor experiment platform is established to verify the integrated navigation theory of INS/UWB, which is geared to the needs of coal mine working environment. Static and dynamic positioning results show that the INS/UWB integrated navigation system is stable and real-time, positioning precision meets the requirements of working condition and is better than any independent subsystem. PMID:25121111

  11. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M.; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  12. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-09-15

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory.

  13. Electronic cigarettes and indoor air quality: a review of studies using human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zainol Abidin, Najihah; Zainal Abidin, Emilia; Zulkifli, Aziemah; Karuppiah, Karmegam; Syed Ismail, Sharifah Norkhadijah; Amer Nordin, Amer Siddiq

    2017-09-26

    This paper is primarily aimed to review articles on electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) focusing on indoor air quality (IAQ) assessment that were conducted using human volunteers under natural settings that mimic actual vaping scenarios. Such studies may give a better representation of the actual potential exposure towards e-cigarettes emissions in indoor settings. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed search engine database. Search terms such as "electronic cigarette", "e-cigarette", "electronic nicotine delivery system", and "indoor air quality" were used to identify the relevant articles to be included in this review. Articles that involved human volunteers who were asked to vape in natural settings or settings that mimic the actual vaping scenario were chosen to be reviewed. The search yielded a total of 15 published articles. Eleven articles were excluded due to 1) unavailability of its full-text (n=1), 2) did not involve human volunteers (n=5) and 3) did not involve an IAQ study (n=5). Four articles were critically reviewed in this paper. From the four selected articles, two of the papers focused on the determination of nicotine level released by e-cigarettes whereas the other two covered IAQ parameters namely; particulate matters (PM), propylene glycols, formaldehyde, metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Only two of the studies involved determination of biomarkers of exposure. The level of chemical contents released varied between studies. The differences in the brands of e-cigarette used, number of vapers recruited and the sensitivity of the methodologies employed in these studies may be the possible causes for such differences. However, studies using human volunteers conducted in a natural setting are more relevant to portray the actual exposure to vapors among e-cigarettes users and non-users compared to studies using a smoking machine/an exposure chamber. This is because such studies take into account the behavior of

  14. Long-term integrating samplers for indoor air and sub slab soil gas at VI sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion (VI) site assessments are plagued by substantial spatial and temporal variability that makes exposure and risk assessment difficult. Most risk-based decision making for volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure in the indoor environment is based on health benchmark...

  15. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  16. Human System Integration: Regulatory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy Integrated Product team. Using a Human System Integration (HIS) perspective, a regulatory analyses of the FARS (specifically Part 91), the Airman s Information Manual (AIM) and the FAA Controllers Handbook (7110.65) was conducted as part of a front-end approach needed to derive HSI requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. The review of the above aviation reference materials yielded eighty-four functions determined to be necessary or highly desirable for flight within the Air Traffic Management System. They include categories for Flight, Communications, Navigation, Surveillance, and Hazard Avoidance.

  17. Optimality of human contour integration.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Udo A; Mandon, Sunita; Schinkel-Bielefeld, Nadja; Neitzel, Simon D; Kreiter, Andreas K; Pawelzik, Klaus R

    2012-01-01

    For processing and segmenting visual scenes, the brain is required to combine a multitude of features and sensory channels. It is neither known if these complex tasks involve optimal integration of information, nor according to which objectives computations might be performed. Here, we investigate if optimal inference can explain contour integration in human subjects. We performed experiments where observers detected contours of curvilinearly aligned edge configurations embedded into randomly oriented distractors. The key feature of our framework is to use a generative process for creating the contours, for which it is possible to derive a class of ideal detection models. This allowed us to compare human detection for contours with different statistical properties to the corresponding ideal detection models for the same stimuli. We then subjected the detection models to realistic constraints and required them to reproduce human decisions for every stimulus as well as possible. By independently varying the four model parameters, we identify a single detection model which quantitatively captures all correlations of human decision behaviour for more than 2000 stimuli from 42 contour ensembles with greatly varying statistical properties. This model reveals specific interactions between edges closely matching independent findings from physiology and psychophysics. These interactions imply a statistics of contours for which edge stimuli are indeed optimally integrated by the visual system, with the objective of inferring the presence of contours in cluttered scenes. The recurrent algorithm of our model makes testable predictions about the temporal dynamics of neuronal populations engaged in contour integration, and it suggests a strong directionality of the underlying functional anatomy.

  18. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  19. Human Collaborative Localization and Mapping in Indoor Environments with Non-Continuous Stereo

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Edmundo; Munguia, Rodrigo; Bolea, Yolanda; Grau, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the monocular simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem is presented in this work. Data obtained from additional bearing-only sensors deployed as wearable devices is fully fused into an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The wearable device is introduced in the context of a collaborative task within a human-robot interaction (HRI) paradigm, including the SLAM problem. Thus, based on the delayed inverse-depth feature initialization (DI-D) SLAM, data from the camera deployed on the human, capturing his/her field of view, is used to enhance the depth estimation of the robotic monocular sensor which maps and locates the device. The occurrence of overlapping between the views of both cameras is predicted through geometrical modelling, activating a pseudo-stereo methodology which allows to instantly measure the depth by stochastic triangulation of matched points found through SIFT/SURF. Experimental validation is provided through results from experiments, where real data is captured as synchronized sequences of video and other data (relative pose of secondary camera) and processed off-line. The sequences capture indoor trajectories representing the main challenges for a monocular SLAM approach, namely, singular trajectories and close turns with high angular velocities with respect to linear velocities. PMID:26927100

  20. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema

    Charles Weschler

    2016-07-12

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  1. Human Collaborative Localization and Mapping in Indoor Environments with Non-Continuous Stereo.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Edmundo; Munguia, Rodrigo; Bolea, Yolanda; Grau, Antoni

    2016-02-24

    A new approach to the monocular simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem is presented in this work. Data obtained from additional bearing-only sensors deployed as wearable devices is fully fused into an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The wearable device is introduced in the context of a collaborative task within a human-robot interaction (HRI) paradigm, including the SLAM problem. Thus, based on the delayed inverse-depth feature initialization (DI-D) SLAM, data from the camera deployed on the human, capturing his/her field of view, is used to enhance the depth estimation of the robotic monocular sensor which maps and locates the device. The occurrence of overlapping between the views of both cameras is predicted through geometrical modelling, activating a pseudo-stereo methodology which allows to instantly measure the depth by stochastic triangulation of matched points found through SIFT/SURF. Experimental validation is provided through results from experiments, where real data is captured as synchronized sequences of video and other data (relative pose of secondary camera) and processed off-line. The sequences capture indoor trajectories representing the main challenges for a monocular SLAM approach, namely, singular trajectories and close turns with high angular velocities with respect to linear velocities.

  2. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Weschler

    2010-03-29

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  3. Human exposure to anopheline mosquitoes occurs primarily indoors, even for users of insecticide-treated nets in Luangwa Valley, South-east Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Current front line malaria vector control methods such as indoor residual spraying (IRS) and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), rely upon the preference of many primary vectors to feed and/or rest inside human habitations where they can be targeted with domestically-applied insecticidal products. We studied the human biting behaviour of the malaria vector Anopheles funestus Giles and the potential malaria vector Anopheles quadriannulatus Theobald in Luangwa valley, south-east Zambia. Methods Mosquitoes were collected by human landing catch in blocks of houses with either combined use of deltamethrin-based IRS and LLINs or LLINs alone. Human behaviour data were collected to estimate how much exposure to mosquito bites indoors and outdoors occurred at various times of the night for LLIN users and non-users. Results Anopheles funestus and An. quadriannulatus did not show preference to bite either indoors or outdoors: the proportions [95% confidence interval] caught indoors were 0.586 [0.303, 0.821] and 0.624 [0.324, 0.852], respectively. However, the overwhelming majority of both species were caught at times when most people are indoors. The proportion of mosquitoes caught at a time when most people are indoors were 0.981 [0.881, 0.997] and 0.897 [0.731, 0.965], respectively, so the proportion of human exposure to both species occuring indoors was high for individuals lacking LLINs (An. funestus: 0.983 and An. quadriannulatus: 0.970, respectively). While LLIN users were better protected, more than half of their exposure was nevertheless estimated to occur indoors (An. funestus: 0.570 and An. quadriannulatus: 0.584). Conclusions The proportion of human exposure to both An. funestus and An. quadriannulatus occuring indoors was high in the area and hence both species might be responsive to further peri-domestic measures if these mosquitoes are susceptible to insecticidal products. PMID:22647493

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor dusts of Guizhou, southwest of China: status, sources and potential human health risk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Chen, Huaguo; Li, Baizhan

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed for 136 indoor dust samples collected from Guizhou province, southwest of China. The ∑18PAHs concentrations ranged from 2.18 μg•g-1 to 14.20 μg•g-1 with the mean value of 6.78 μg•g-1. The highest Σ18PAHs concentration was found in dust samples from orefields, followed by city, town and village. Moreover, the mean concentration of Σ18PAHs in indoor dust was at least 10% higher than that of outdoors. The 4-6 rings PAHs, contributing more than 70% of ∑18PAHs, were the dominant species. PAHs ratios, principal component analysis with multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) were applied to evaluate the possible sources. Two major origins of PAHs in indoor dust were identified as vehicle emissions and coal combustion. The mean incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) due to human exposure to indoor dust PAHs in city, town, village and orefield of Guizhou province, China was 6.14×10-6, 5.00×10-6, 3.08×10-6, 6.02×10-6 for children and 5.92×10-6, 4.83×10-6, 2.97×10-6, 5.81×10-6 for adults, respectively.

  5. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Indoor Dusts of Guizhou, Southwest of China: Status, Sources and Potential Human Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baizhan

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed for 136 indoor dust samples collected from Guizhou province, southwest of China. The ∑18PAHs concentrations ranged from 2.18 μg•g-1 to 14.20 μg•g-1 with the mean value of 6.78 μg•g-1. The highest Σ18PAHs concentration was found in dust samples from orefields, followed by city, town and village. Moreover, the mean concentration of Σ18PAHs in indoor dust was at least 10% higher than that of outdoors. The 4–6 rings PAHs, contributing more than 70% of ∑18PAHs, were the dominant species. PAHs ratios, principal component analysis with multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) were applied to evaluate the possible sources. Two major origins of PAHs in indoor dust were identified as vehicle emissions and coal combustion. The mean incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) due to human exposure to indoor dust PAHs in city, town, village and orefield of Guizhou province, China was 6.14×10−6, 5.00×10−6, 3.08×10−6, 6.02×10−6 for children and 5.92×10−6, 4.83×10−6, 2.97×10−6, 5.81×10−6 for adults, respectively. PMID:25719362

  6. Going natural by design. Annual design awards show facilities are emphasizing integration of the indoors with the outdoors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C

    1996-11-04

    Modern Healthcare's annual Design Awards Competition finds that healthcare is bringing nature indoors. Several of the 12 winning facilities featured indoor courtyards and gardens, a reflection of the healing role of nature.

  7. Development and application of an integrated indoor air quality audit to an international hotel building in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nae-Wen; Chiang, Hsin-Chen; Chiang, Che-Ming

    2008-12-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) has begun to surface as an important issue that affects the comfort and health of people; however, there is little research concerned about the IAQ monitoring of hotels up to now. Hotels are designed to provide comfortable spaces for guests. However, most complaints related to uncomfortable thermal environment and inadequate indoor air quality appear. In addition, microbial pollution can affect the health of tourists such as the Legionnaire's disease and SARS problems. This study is aimed to establish the comprehensive IAQ audit approach for hotel buildings with portable equipment, and one five-star international hotel in Taiwan was selected to exam this integrated approach. Finally, four major problems are identified after the comprehensive IAQ audit. They are: (1) low room temperature (21.8 degrees C), (2) insufficient air exchange rate (<1.5 h(-1)), (3) formaldehyde contamination (>0.02 ppm), and (4) the microbial pollution (total bacteria: 2,624-3,799 CFU/m(3)). The high level of formaldehyde may be due to the emission from the detergent and cleaning agents used for housekeeping.

  8. Human requirements to the indoor air quality and the thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanger, P. Ole

    Perceived air quality, general thermal sensation of the occupants and risk of draft, aspects which human comfort in a space depends upon, are reviewed separately based on European Guidelines for Ventilation Requirements in Buildings and on a modified ISO (International Standards Organization) standard 7730 on thermal comfort. The perceived air quality is expressed in decipol or percentage of dissatisfied occupants. The general thermal sensation is expressed by the PMV/PPD indices. The perception of draft is expressed by the model of draft risk. Indoor air quality is mediocre and causes complaints in many buildings. The reason for this is often hidden pollution sources in the building, hitherto ignored in previous ventilation standards. To determine the required ventilation, a method is used in the European Guidelines. The new Guidelines acknowledge all pollution sources in the building, expressed in olfs. The method is based on the desired air quality in the space, the available quality of the outdoor air, the ventilation effectiveness and on the total pollution load in the space. The model of draft risk predicts the percentage of occupants feeling draft as a function of the mean air velocity, the turbulence intensity and the air temperature.

  9. Laboratory Headphone Studies of Human Response to Low-Amplitude Sonic Booms and Rattle Heard Indoors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loubeau, Alexandra; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Klos, Jacob; Rathsam, Jonathan; Gavin, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Human response to sonic booms heard indoors is affected by the generation of contact-induced rattle noise. The annoyance caused by sonic boom-induced rattle noise was studied in a series of psychoacoustics tests. Stimuli were divided into three categories and presented in three different studies: isolated rattles at the same calculated Perceived Level (PL), sonic booms combined with rattles with the mixed sound at a single PL, and sonic booms combined with rattles with the mixed sound at three different PL. Subjects listened to sounds over headphones and were asked to report their annoyance. Annoyance to different rattles was shown to vary significantly according to rattle object size. In addition, the combination of low-amplitude sonic booms and rattles can be more annoying than the sonic boom alone. Correlations and regression analyses for the combined sonic boom and rattle sounds identified the Moore and Glasberg Stationary Loudness (MGSL) metric as a primary predictor of annoyance for the tested sounds. Multiple linear regression models were developed to describe annoyance to the tested sounds, and simplifications for applicability to a wider range of sounds are presented.

  10. Analysis of suspected trace human remains from an indoor concrete surface.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Carolyn M; Laskay, Unige A; Jackson, Glen P

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the sequence of analyses used to determine the nature of a stain located on the floor of room in the former Athens Mental Health and Retardation Hospital in Athens, OH. The location of the stain was reported to be the position in which a decomposing body was discovered on January 11, 1979. The current stain is found to contain strong evidence for both natural decomposition products and deliberate adulteration. Microscopic analyses, solubility tests, FTIR, ICP-OES, pyrolysis-MS, and derivatization GC-MS were consistent in determining the removable parts of the stain to be composed mostly of calcium and sodium salts of free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, consistent with previous descriptions of adipocere. The free fatty acids could have been formed via known bacterial degradation pathways or via saponification through the basic environment caused through contact with the concrete. To our knowledge, adipocere formation on an exposed indoor environment has not been described before. The stain and concrete also show signs of being chemically modified with an acidic reagent, such as Blu-Lite--a phosphoric acid-based cleaner that was a commonly used cleaner in the building from the time of discovery to the present day. The chemical etching appears to have been restricted to an area resembling the shape of a human body, which is consistent with deliberate adulteration of the appearance of the stain.

  11. Unusual cases of human myiasis due to Old World screwworm fly acquired indoors in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, J C M; Lee, J S W; Dai, D L K; Woo, J

    2005-12-01

    Myiasis is the infestation of tissue by the larvae of flies. We report eight cases of human myiasis in Hong Kong. All patients were nursing home residents with an average age of 81.8 years. Seven patients were bedridden with advanced dementia. Four patients had pre-existing wounds. Five had poor oral hygiene and four of those were on tube feeding. All of the five patients with poor oral hygiene suffered from oral myiasis. Two patients had vaginal infestations and one had wound myiasis in his diabetic foot ulcer. Seven cases were infested by Chrysomya bezziana, an obligatory parasite that requires living mammalian tissue for its larval development. Larvae of the Calliphoridae family were responsible for the remaining case. Patients were managed with manual removal of larvae and irrigation of the site of infestation with saline. All infestations were nosocomial, being acquired in nursing homes. Carers of the old and debilitated should be made aware of the need for better oral care, especially for those on tube feeding. The use of window screens in nursing homes should be encouraged to reduce the chance of flies entering the vicinity of these patients. Electrocuters could also be mounted indoors to kill flies that do enter.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air and environmental tobacco smoke measured with a new integrated organic vapor-particle sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, L.A.; Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Lee, V.C. ); Stevens, R.K. . Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    To avoid sampling artifacts, an integrated organic vapor-particle sampler (IOVPS) has been developed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The ICIVPS is based on an XAD-4-coated annular denuder which strips gas phase species from the air stream before collection of particles on a filter. A second denuder downstream of the filter collects species desorbed ( blown off'') the particles during sampling. PAH are determined in extracts of both denuders and the filter. For indoor air with no combustion sources, the gas-phase concentrations of several semivolatile PAH measured with the IOVPS averaged about half of those found with a conventional filter-sorbent bed sampler. For envirorunental tobacco smoke the gas-phase concentrations of the same PAH from the IOVPS averaged 70% of those found with the sorbent bed sampler. Particulate-phase concentrations were correspondingly higher with the IOVPS, but measurable blow off' semivolatile PAH occurred.

  13. Indoor Tanning

    MedlinePlus

    ... UV radiation causes wrinkles and age spots. The theory that adding red light to an indoor tanning ... any use of indoor tanning systems. For More Information To learn more about the risks of tanning, ...

  14. Evolution of the indoor biome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura J; Adams, Rachel I; Bateman, Ashley; Bik, Holly M; Hawks, John; Hird, Sarah M; Hughes, David; Kembel, Steven W; Kinney, Kerry; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Levy, Gabriel; McClain, Craig; Meadow, James F; Medina, Raul F; Mhuireach, Gwynne; Moreau, Corrie S; Munshi-South, Jason; Nichols, Lauren M; Palmer, Clare; Popova, Laura; Schal, Coby; Täubel, Martin; Trautwein, Michelle; Ugalde, Juan A; Dunn, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Few biologists have studied the evolutionary processes at work in indoor environments. Yet indoor environments comprise approximately 0.5% of ice-free land area--an area as large as the subtropical coniferous forest biome. Here we review the emerging subfield of 'indoor biome' studies. After defining the indoor biome and tracing its deep history, we discuss some of its evolutionary dimensions. We restrict our examples to the species found in human houses--a subset of the environments constituting the indoor biome--and offer preliminary hypotheses to advance the study of indoor evolution. Studies of the indoor biome are situated at the intersection of evolutionary ecology, anthropology, architecture, and human ecology and are well suited for citizen science projects, public outreach, and large-scale international collaborations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activity Recognition and Semantic Description for Indoor Mobile Localization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Xiong, Hanjiang; Zheng, Xianwei; Zhou, Yan

    2017-03-21

    As a result of the rapid development of smartphone-based indoor localization technology, location-based services in indoor spaces have become a topic of interest. However, to date, the rich data resulting from indoor localization and navigation applications have not been fully exploited, which is significant for trajectory correction and advanced indoor map information extraction. In this paper, an integrated location acquisition method utilizing activity recognition and semantic information extraction is proposed for indoor mobile localization. The location acquisition method combines pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), human activity recognition (HAR) and landmarks to acquire accurate indoor localization information. Considering the problem of initial position determination, a hidden Markov model (HMM) is utilized to infer the user's initial position. To provide an improved service for further applications, the landmarks are further assigned semantic descriptions by detecting the user's activities. The experiments conducted in this study confirm that a high degree of accuracy for a user's indoor location can be obtained. Furthermore, the semantic information of a user's trajectories can be extracted, which is extremely useful for further research into indoor location applications.

  16. Activity Recognition and Semantic Description for Indoor Mobile Localization

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Sheng; Xiong, Hanjiang; Zheng, Xianwei; Zhou, Yan

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the rapid development of smartphone-based indoor localization technology, location-based services in indoor spaces have become a topic of interest. However, to date, the rich data resulting from indoor localization and navigation applications have not been fully exploited, which is significant for trajectory correction and advanced indoor map information extraction. In this paper, an integrated location acquisition method utilizing activity recognition and semantic information extraction is proposed for indoor mobile localization. The location acquisition method combines pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), human activity recognition (HAR) and landmarks to acquire accurate indoor localization information. Considering the problem of initial position determination, a hidden Markov model (HMM) is utilized to infer the user’s initial position. To provide an improved service for further applications, the landmarks are further assigned semantic descriptions by detecting the user’s activities. The experiments conducted in this study confirm that a high degree of accuracy for a user’s indoor location can be obtained. Furthermore, the semantic information of a user’s trajectories can be extracted, which is extremely useful for further research into indoor location applications. PMID:28335555

  17. Phthalate esters (PAEs) in indoor PM10/PM2.5 and human exposure to PAEs via inhalation of indoor air in Tianjin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leibo; Wang, Fumei; Ji, Yaqin; Jiao, Jiao; Zou, Dekun; Liu, Lingling; Shan, Chunyan; Bai, Zhipeng; Sun, Zengrong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, filter samples of six Phthalate esters (PAEs) in indoor PM10 and PM2.5 were collected from thirteen homes in Tianjin, China. The results showed that the concentrations of Σ6PAEs in indoor PM10 and PM2.5 were in the range of 13.878-1591.277 ng m-3 and 7.266-1244.178 ng m-3, respectively. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was the most abundant compounds followed by di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in indoor PM10 and PM2.5. Whereas DBP and dimethyl phthalate (DMP) were the predominant compounds in indoor air (gas-phase + particle-phase), the median values were 573.467 and 368.364 ng m-3 respectively. The earlier construction time, the lesser indoor area, the old decoration, the very crowded items coated with plastic and a lower frequency of dusting may lead to a higher level of PAEs in indoor environment. The six PAEs in indoor PM10 and PM2.5 were higher in summer than those in winter. The daily intake (DI) of six PAEs for five age groups through air inhalation in indoor air in Tianjin was estimated. The results indicated that the highest exposure dose was DBP in every age group, and infants experienced the highest total DIs (median: 664.332 ng kg-bw-1 day-1) to ∑6PAEs, whereas adults experienced the lowest total DIs (median: 155.850 ng kg-bw-1 day-1) to ∑6PAEs. So, more attention should be paid on infants in the aspect of indoor inhalation exposure to PAEs.

  18. Occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust from the United States and eleven other countries: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yanjian; Wu, Qian; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Minh, Tu Binh; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant and potent thyroid hormone disrupting compound. Despite this, very little is known with regard to the occurrence of this compound in indoor dust and the exposure of humans to perchlorate through dust ingestion. In this study, 366 indoor dust samples were collected from 12 countries, the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China, during 2010-2014. Dust samples were extracted by 1% (v/v) methylamine in water. Analyte separation was achieved by an ion exchange (AS-21) column and analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The overall concentrations of perchlorate in dust were in the range of 0.02-104μg/g (geometric mean: 0.41μg/g). The indoor dust samples from China contained the highest concentrations (geometric mean: 5.38μg/g). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations in dust were found among various microenvironments (i.e., car, home, office, and laboratory). The estimated median daily intake (EDI) of perchlorate for toddlers through dust ingestion in the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China was 1.89, 0.37, 1.71, 0.74, 4.90, 7.20, 0.60, 0.80, 1.55, 0.70, 2.15, and 21.3ng/kgbodyweight (bw)/day, respectively. Although high concentrations of perchlorate were measured in some dust samples, the contribution of dust to total perchlorate intake was <5% of the total perchlorate intake in humans. This is the first multinational survey on the occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitric oxide in exhaled and aspirated nasal air as an objective measure of human response to indoor air pollution.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, B; Lagercrantz, L; Sundell, J

    2009-04-01

    The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled and aspirated nasal air was used to objectively assess human response to indoor air pollutants in a climate chamber exposure experiment. The concentration of NO was measured before exposure, after 2, and 4.5 h of exposure, using a chemiluminescence NO analyzer. Sixteen healthy female subjects were exposed to two indoor air pollutants and to a clean reference condition for 4.5 h. Subjective assessments of the environment were obtained by questionnaires. After exposure (4.5 h) to the two polluted conditions a small increase in NO concentration in exhaled air was observed. After exposure to the reference condition the mean NO concentration was significantly reduced compared to pre-exposure. Together these changes resulted in significant differences in exhaled NO between exposure to reference and polluted conditions. NO in nasal air was not affected by the exposures. The results may indicate an association between polluted indoor air and subclinical inflammation. Measurement of nitric oxide in exhaled air is a possible objective marker of subclinical inflammation in healthy adults.

  20. Development of a multi-analyte integrated optical sensor platform for indoor air-quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaughey, Orla; Nooney, Robert; McEvoy, Aisling K.; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2005-11-01

    The major trends driving optical chemical sensor technology are miniaturisation and multi-parameter functionality on a single platform (so-called multi-analyte sensing). A multi-analyte sensor chip device based on miniature waveguide structures, porous sensor materials and compact optoelectronic components has been developed. One of the major challenges in fluorescence-based optical sensor design is the efficient capture of emitted fluorescence from a fluorophore and the effective detection of the signal. In this work, the sensor platform has been fabricated using poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, as the waveguide material. These platforms employ a novel optical configuration along with rapid prototyping technology, which facilitates the production of an effective sensor platform. Sensing films for oxygen, carbon dioxide and humidity have been developed. These films consist of a fluorescent indicator dye entrapped in a porous immobilisation matrix. The analyte diffuses through the porous matrix and reacts with the indicator dye, causing changes in the detected fluorescence. The reaction between the dye and the analyte is completely reversible with no degradation of the signal after detection of different concentrations of the analyte. A single LED excitation source is used for all three analytes, and the sensor platform is housed in a compact unit containing the excitation source, filters and detector. The simultaneous detection of several analytes is a major requirement for fields such as food packaging, environmental quality control and biomedical diagnostics. The current sensor chip is designed for use in indoor air-quality monitoring.

  1. Challenges in Wireless System Integration as Enablers for Indoor Context Aware Environments

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The advent of fully interactive environments within Smart Cities and Smart Regions requires the use of multiple wireless systems. In the case of user-device interaction, which finds multiple applications such as Ambient Assisted Living, Intelligent Transportation Systems or Smart Grids, among others, large amount of transceivers are employed in order to achieve anytime, anyplace and any device connectivity. The resulting combination of heterogeneous wireless network exhibits fundamental limitations derived from Coverage/Capacity relations, as a function of required Quality of Service parameters, required bit rate, energy restrictions and adaptive modulation and coding schemes. In this context, inherent transceiver density poses challenges in overall system operation, given by multiple node operation which increases overall interference levels. In this work, a deterministic based analysis applied to variable density wireless sensor network operation within complex indoor scenarios is presented, as a function of topological node distribution. The extensive analysis derives interference characterizations, both for conventional transceivers as well as wearables, which provide relevant information in terms of individual node configuration as well as complete network layout. PMID:28704963

  2. Challenges in Wireless System Integration as Enablers for Indoor Context Aware Environments.

    PubMed

    López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leyre; Astrain, José Javier; Villandangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2017-07-12

    The advent of fully interactive environments within Smart Cities and Smart Regions requires the use of multiple wireless systems. In the case of user-device interaction, which finds multiple applications such as Ambient Assisted Living, Intelligent Transportation Systems or Smart Grids, among others, large amount of transceivers are employed in order to achieve anytime, anyplace and any device connectivity. The resulting combination of heterogeneous wireless network exhibits fundamental limitations derived from Coverage/Capacity relations, as a function of required Quality of Service parameters, required bit rate, energy restrictions and adaptive modulation and coding schemes. In this context, inherent transceiver density poses challenges in overall system operation, given by multiple node operation which increases overall interference levels. In this work, a deterministic based analysis applied to variable density wireless sensor network operation within complex indoor scenarios is presented, as a function of topological node distribution. The extensive analysis derives interference characterizations, both for conventional transceivers as well as wearables, which provide relevant information in terms of individual node configuration as well as complete network layout.

  3. Inhalation toxicity of indoor air pollutants in Drosophila melanogaster using integrated transcriptomics and computational behavior analyses

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Yuedan; Kwak, Gyu-Suk; Heo, Muyoung; Song, Kyung Seuk; Chung, Yun Doo; Chon, Tae-Soo; Choi, Jinhee

    2017-01-01

    We conducted an inhalation toxicity test on the alternative animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate potential hazards of indoor air pollution. The inhalation toxicity of toluene and formaldehyde was investigated using comprehensive transcriptomics and computational behavior analyses. The ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) based on microarray data suggests the involvement of pathways related to immune response, stress response, and metabolism in formaldehyde and toluene exposure based on hub molecules. We conducted a toxicity test using mutants of the representative genes in these pathways to explore the toxicological consequences of alterations of these pathways. Furthermore, extensive computational behavior analysis showed that exposure to either toluene or formaldehyde reduced most of the behavioral parameters of both wild-type and mutants. Interestingly, behavioral alteration caused by toluene or formaldehyde exposure was most severe in the p38b mutant, suggesting that the defects in the p38 pathway underlie behavioral alteration. Overall, the results indicate that exposure to toluene and formaldehyde via inhalation causes severe toxicity in Drosophila, by inducing significant alterations in gene expression and behavior, suggesting that Drosophila can be used as a potential alternative model in inhalation toxicity screening. PMID:28621308

  4. Inhalation toxicity of indoor air pollutants in Drosophila melanogaster using integrated transcriptomics and computational behavior analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Yuedan; Kwak, Gyu-Suk; Heo, Muyoung; Song, Kyung Seuk; Chung, Yun Doo; Chon, Tae-Soo; Choi, Jinhee

    2017-06-01

    We conducted an inhalation toxicity test on the alternative animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate potential hazards of indoor air pollution. The inhalation toxicity of toluene and formaldehyde was investigated using comprehensive transcriptomics and computational behavior analyses. The ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) based on microarray data suggests the involvement of pathways related to immune response, stress response, and metabolism in formaldehyde and toluene exposure based on hub molecules. We conducted a toxicity test using mutants of the representative genes in these pathways to explore the toxicological consequences of alterations of these pathways. Furthermore, extensive computational behavior analysis showed that exposure to either toluene or formaldehyde reduced most of the behavioral parameters of both wild-type and mutants. Interestingly, behavioral alteration caused by toluene or formaldehyde exposure was most severe in the p38b mutant, suggesting that the defects in the p38 pathway underlie behavioral alteration. Overall, the results indicate that exposure to toluene and formaldehyde via inhalation causes severe toxicity in Drosophila, by inducing significant alterations in gene expression and behavior, suggesting that Drosophila can be used as a potential alternative model in inhalation toxicity screening.

  5. Development of an Integrated Human Factors Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resnick, Marc L.

    2003-01-01

    An effective integration of human abilities and limitations is crucial to the success of all NASA missions. The Integrated Human Factors Toolkit facilitates this integration by assisting system designers and analysts to select the human factors tools that are most appropriate for the needs of each project. The HF Toolkit contains information about a broad variety of human factors tools addressing human requirements in the physical, information processing and human reliability domains. Analysis of each tool includes consideration of the most appropriate design stage, the amount of expertise in human factors that is required, the amount of experience with the tool and the target job tasks that are needed, and other factors that are critical for successful use of the tool. The benefits of the Toolkit include improved safety, reliability and effectiveness of NASA systems throughout the agency. This report outlines the initial stages of development for the Integrated Human Factors Toolkit.

  6. Thermal Analysis--Human Comfort--Indoor Environments. NBS Special Publication 491.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Billy W., Ed.; Hill, James E., Ed.

    Included in these proceedings are 11 formal papers presented by leading researchers in the field of thermal comfort and heat stress at a symposium held for the purpose of exploring new aspects of indoor thermal environments, caused primarily by the impact of energy conservation in new and existing buildings. The contributed papers were from…

  7. Indoor-to-outdoor particle concentration ratio model for human exposure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Ryu, Sung Hee; Lee, Gwangjae; Bae, Gwi-Nam

    2016-02-01

    This study presents an indoor-to-outdoor particle concentration ratio (IOR) model for improved estimates of indoor exposure levels. This model is useful in epidemiological studies with large population, because sampling indoor pollutants in all participants' house is often necessary but impractical. As a part of a study examining the association between air pollutants and atopic dermatitis in children, 16 parents agreed to measure the indoor and outdoor PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations at their homes for 48 h. Correlation analysis and multi-step multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to develop the IOR model. Temperature and floor level were found to be powerful predictors of the IOR. Despite the simplicity of the model, it demonstrated high accuracy in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE). Especially for long-term IOR estimations, the RMSE was as low as 0.064 and 0.063 for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. When using a prediction model in an epidemiological study, understanding the consequence of the modeling error and justifying the use of the model is very important. In the last section, this paper discussed the impact of the modeling error and developed a novel methodology to justify the use of the model.

  8. INTEGRITY -- Integrated Human Exploration Mission Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, D.; Tri, T.; Daues, K.

    It is proposed to develop a high -fidelity ground facil ity to carry out long-duration human exploration mission simulations. These would not be merely computer simulations - they would in fact comprise a series of actual missions that just happen to stay on earth. These missions would include all elements of an actual mission, using actual technologies that would be used for the real mission. These missions would also include such elements as extravehicular activities, robotic systems, telepresence and teleoperation, surface drilling technology--all using a simulated planetary landscape. A sequence of missions would be defined that get progressively longer and more robust, perhaps a series of five or six missions over a span of 10 to 15 years ranging in durat ion from 180 days up to 1000 days. This high-fidelity ground facility would operate hand-in-hand with a host of other terrestrial analog sites such as the Antarctic, Haughton Crater, and the Arizona desert. Of course, all of these analog mission simulations will be conducted here on earth in 1-g, and NASA will still need the Shuttle and ISS to carry out all the microgravity and hypogravity science experiments and technology validations. The proposed missions would have sufficient definition such that definitive requirements could be derived from them to serve as direction for all the program elements of the mission. Additionally, specific milestones would be established for the "launch" date of each mission so that R&D programs would have both good requirements and solid milestones from which to build their implementation plans. Mission aspects that could not be directly incorporated into the ground facility would be simulated via software. New management techniques would be developed for evaluation in this ground test facility program. These new techniques would have embedded metrics which would allow them to be continuously evaluated and adjusted so that by the time the sequence of missions is completed

  9. Similarities in the endocrine-disrupting potencies of indoor dust and flame retardants by using human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cell-based reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Sakai, Shin-ichi; Brouwer, Abraham; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2013-03-19

    Indoor dust is a sink for many kinds of pollutants, including flame retardants (FRs), plasticizers, and their contaminants and degradation products. These pollutants can be migrated to indoor dust from household items such as televisions and computers. To reveal high-priority end points of and contaminant candidates in indoor dust, using CALUX reporter gene assays based on human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cell lines, we evaluated and characterized the endocrine-disrupting potencies of crude extracts of indoor dust collected from Japan (n = 8), the United States (n = 21), Vietnam (n = 10), the Philippines (n = 17), and Indonesia (n = 10) and for 23 selected FRs. The CALUX reporter gene assays used were specific for compounds interacting with the human androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2). Indoor dust extracts were agonistic to ERα, GR, and PPARγ2 and antagonistic against AR, PR, GR, and PPARγ2. In comparison, a majority of FRs was agonistic to ERα and PPARγ2 only, and some FRs demonstrated receptor-specific antagonism against all tested nuclear receptors. Hierarchical clustering clearly indicated that agonism of ERα and antagonism of AR and PR were common, frequently detected end points for indoor dust and tested FRs. Given our previous results regarding the concentrations of FRs in indoor dust and in light of our current results, candidate contributors to these effects include not only internationally controlled brominated FRs but also alternatives such as some phosphorus-containing FRs. In the context of indoor pollution, high-frequency effects of FRs such as agonism of ERα and antagonism of AR and PR are candidate high-priority end points for further investigation.

  10. A survey of cyclic and linear siloxanes in indoor dust and their implications for human exposures in twelve countries.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tri Manh; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Minh, Tu Binh; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-05-01

    Siloxanes are used widely in a variety of consumer products, including cosmetics, personal care products, medical and electrical devices, cookware, and building materials. Nevertheless, little is known on the occurrence of siloxanes in indoor dust. In this survey, five cyclic (D3-D7) and 11 linear (L4-L14) siloxanes were determined in 310 indoor dust samples collected from 12 countries. Dust samples collected from Greece contained the highest concentrations of total cyclic siloxanes (TCSi), ranging from 118 to 25,100ng/g (median: 1380), and total linear siloxanes (TLSi), ranging from 129 to 4990ng/g (median: 772). The median total siloxane (TSi) concentrations in dust samples from 12 countries were in the following decreasing order: Greece (2970ng/g), Kuwait (2400), South Korea (1810), Japan (1500), the USA (1220), China (1070), Romania (538), Colombia (230), Vietnam (206), Saudi Arabia (132), India (116), and Pakistan (68.3). TLSi concentrations as high as 42,800ng/g (Kuwait) and TCSi concentrations as high as 25,000ng/g (Greece) were found in indoor dust samples. Among the 16 siloxanes determined, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) was found at the highest concentration in dust samples from all countries, except for Japan and South Korea, with a predominance of L11; Kuwait, with L10; and Pakistan and Romania, with L12. The composition profiles of 16 siloxanes in dust samples varied by country. TCSi accounted for a major proportion of TSi concentrations in dust collected from Colombia (90%), India (80%) and Saudi Arabia (70%), whereas TLSi predominated in samples collected from Japan (89%), Kuwait (85%), and South Korea (78%). Based on the measured median TSi concentrations in indoor dust, we estimated human exposure doses through indoor dust ingestion for various age groups. The exposure doses ranged from 0.27 to 11.9ng/kg-bw/d for toddlers and 0.06 to 2.48ng/kg-bw/d for adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. INTEGRITY - Integrated Human Exploration Mission Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a high-fidelity ground facility to carry out long-duration human exploration mission simulations. These would not be merely computer simulations - they would in fact comprise a series of actual missions that just happen to stay on earth. These missions would include all elements of an actual mission, using actual technologies that would be used for the real mission. These missions would also include such elements as extravehicular activities, robotic systems, telepresence and teleoperation, surface drilling technology-all using a simulated planetary landscape. A sequence of missions would be defined that get progressively longer and more robust, perhaps a series of five or six missions over a span of 10 to 15 years ranging in duration from 180 days up to 1000 days. This high-fidelity ground facility would operate hand-in-hand with a host of other terrestrial analog sites such as the Antarctic, Haughton Crater, and the Arizona desert. Of course, all of these analog mission simulations will be conducted here on earth in 1-g, and NASA will still need the Shuttle and ISS to carry out all the microgravity and hypogravity science experiments and technology validations. The proposed missions would have sufficient definition such that definitive requirements could be derived from them to serve as direction for all the program elements of the mission. Additionally, specific milestones would be established for the "launch" date of each mission so that R&D programs would have both good requirements and solid milestones from which to .build their implementation plans. Mission aspects that could not be directly incorporated into the ground facility would be simulated via software. New management techniques would be developed for evaluation in this ground test facility program. These new techniques would have embedded metrics which would allow them to be continuously evaluated and adjusted so that by the time the sequence of missions is completed, the

  12. A Floor-Map-Aided WiFi/Pseudo-Odometry Integration Algorithm for an Indoor Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Hu, Andong; Liu, Chunyan; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for indoor positioning by fusing floor map, WiFi and smartphone sensor data to provide meter-level positioning without additional infrastructure. A topology-constrained K nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm based on a floor map layout provides the coordinates required to integrate WiFi data with pseudo-odometry (P-O) measurements simulated using a pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) approach. One method of further improving the positioning accuracy is to use a more effective multi-threshold step detection algorithm, as proposed by the authors. The “go and back” phenomenon caused by incorrect matching of the reference points (RPs) of a WiFi algorithm is eliminated using an adaptive fading-factor-based extended Kalman filter (EKF), taking WiFi positioning coordinates, P-O measurements and fused heading angles as observations. The “cross-wall” problem is solved based on the development of a floor-map-aided particle filter algorithm by weighting the particles, thereby also eliminating the gross-error effects originating from WiFi or P-O measurements. The performance observed in a field experiment performed on the fourth floor of the School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics (SESSI) building on the China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT) campus confirms that the proposed scheme can reliably achieve meter-level positioning. PMID:25811224

  13. A floor-map-aided WiFi/pseudo-odometry integration algorithm for an indoor positioning system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Hu, Andong; Liu, Chunyan; Li, Xin

    2015-03-24

    This paper proposes a scheme for indoor positioning by fusing floor map, WiFi and smartphone sensor data to provide meter-level positioning without additional infrastructure. A topology-constrained K nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm based on a floor map layout provides the coordinates required to integrate WiFi data with pseudo-odometry (P-O) measurements simulated using a pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) approach. One method of further improving the positioning accuracy is to use a more effective multi-threshold step detection algorithm, as proposed by the authors. The "go and back" phenomenon caused by incorrect matching of the reference points (RPs) of a WiFi algorithm is eliminated using an adaptive fading-factor-based extended Kalman filter (EKF), taking WiFi positioning coordinates, P-O measurements and fused heading angles as observations. The "cross-wall" problem is solved based on the development of a floor-map-aided particle filter algorithm by weighting the particles, thereby also eliminating the gross-error effects originating from WiFi or P-O measurements. The performance observed in a field experiment performed on the fourth floor of the School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics (SESSI) building on the China University of Mining and Technology (CUMT) campus confirms that the proposed scheme can reliably achieve meter-level positioning.

  14. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Celebi, N.; Dogan, I.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  15. Human Response to Low-Intensity Sonic Booms Heard Indoors and Outdoors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Brenda M.; Klos, Jacob; Buehrle, Ralph D.; McCurdy, David A.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Test subjects seated inside and outside a house were exposed to low-intensity N-wave sonic booms during a 3-week test period in June 2006- The house was instrumented to measure the booms both inside and out. F-18 aircraft were flown to achieve a variety of boom overpressures from approximately .1 to .6 psf During four test days, seventy-seven test subjects heard the booms while seated inside and outside the house. Using the Magnitude Estimation methodology and artificial reference sounds ; the subjects rated the annoyance of the booms. Since the same subjects heard similar booms both inside and outside the house, comparative ratings of indoor and outdoor annoyance were obtained. For a given metric level, indoor subjects gave higher annoyance scores than outdoor subjects. For a given boom; annoyance scores inside were on average the same as those outside. In a post-test questionnaire, the majority of subjects rated the indoor booms as more annoying than the outdoor ones. These results are discussed in this paper.

  16. Assessment of human exposure to Bisphenol-A, Triclosan and Tetrabromobisphenol-A through indoor dust intake in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Geens, Tinne; Roosens, Laurence; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2009-08-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), Triclosan (TCS) and Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) are phenolic organic contaminants used in a variety of household applications. Through manufacture and usage, these contaminants can leach into the environment and can be detected in indoor dust. In this study, we determined the concentrations of BPA, TCS and TBBPA in indoor dust samples from 18 houses and 2 offices in Flanders, Belgium. The analysis was performed using solid-liquid extraction, clean-up and measurement by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Median concentrations of the 18 domestic dust samples were 1460, 220 and 10 ng g(-1) dust for BPA, TCS and TBBPA, respectively. Concentrations in offices were almost 5-10 times higher for BPA and TBBPA, while TCS concentrations were comparable at both locations. An assessment of the daily intake of these contaminants through dust was made and the contribution of dust to the total human exposure was calculated. For all three contaminants, dust seems to be a minor contributor (<10% of total exposure) to the total daily exposure. Food intake appears to be the major source of human exposure to BPA and TBBPA as dermal uptake through personal care products seems to be the major contributor for TCS.

  17. A depth video sensor-based life-logging human activity recognition system for elderly care in smart indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-07-02

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital.

  18. A Depth Video Sensor-Based Life-Logging Human Activity Recognition System for Elderly Care in Smart Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital. PMID:24991942

  19. α-Pinene, 3-carene and d-limonene in indoor air of Polish apartments: the impact on air quality and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia; Namieśnik, Jacek; Zabiegała, Bożena

    2014-01-15

    Monoterpenes are among most ubiquitous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to be detected in indoor air. Since the quality of indoor air is considered important for inhabitants' well-being, the present study aimed at investigating impact of human activity on levels of selected monoterpenes applying passive sampling technique followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry. One of the objectives of the present work was to identify and characterize main emission sources as well as to investigate relationship between selected monoterpenes in indoor air. Concentration levels obtained for studied monoterpenes varied from 3 μg m(-3) for 3-carene to 1261 μg m(-3) for d-limonene. D-limonene was reported the most abundant of studied monoterpenes in indoor air. The strong correlation observed between monoterpenes suggests that studied compounds originate from same emission sources, while the I/O >1 proves the strong contribution of endogenous emission sources. The in-depth study of day-night fluctuations in concentrations of monoterpenes lead to the conclusion that human presence and specific pattern of behavior strongly influences presence and concentrations of VOCs in indoor environment. The evaluation of human exposure to selected monoterpenes via inhalation of air revealed that infants, toddlers and young children were the highly exposed individuals.

  20. Adaptive Iterated Extended Kalman Filter and Its Application to Autonomous Integrated Navigation for Indoor Robot

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyuan; Li, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    As the core of the integrated navigation system, the data fusion algorithm should be designed seriously. In order to improve the accuracy of data fusion, this work proposed an adaptive iterated extended Kalman (AIEKF) which used the noise statistics estimator in the iterated extended Kalman (IEKF), and then AIEKF is used to deal with the nonlinear problem in the inertial navigation systems (INS)/wireless sensors networks (WSNs)-integrated navigation system. Practical test has been done to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the mean root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position by about 92.53%, 67.93%, 55.97%, and 30.09% compared with the INS only, WSN, EKF, and IEKF. PMID:24693225

  1. Adaptive iterated extended Kalman filter and its application to autonomous integrated navigation for indoor robot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Chen, Xiyuan; Li, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    As the core of the integrated navigation system, the data fusion algorithm should be designed seriously. In order to improve the accuracy of data fusion, this work proposed an adaptive iterated extended Kalman (AIEKF) which used the noise statistics estimator in the iterated extended Kalman (IEKF), and then AIEKF is used to deal with the nonlinear problem in the inertial navigation systems (INS)/wireless sensors networks (WSNs)-integrated navigation system. Practical test has been done to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the mean root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position by about 92.53%, 67.93%, 55.97%, and 30.09% compared with the INS only, WSN, EKF, and IEKF.

  2. Human Systems Integration in the Federal Government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Graves, Gaye L.; Allard, Terry; Blackhurst, Jack; Fitts, David J.; Peters, Sean; Piccione, Dino; Shattuck, Lawrence G.

    2010-01-01

    Human Systems Integration principles and methods can be used to help integrate people, technology, and organizations in an effective and efficient manner. Over the past decade, a wide range of tools, techniques, and technologies have been developed by federal agencies to achieve significant cost and performance benefits. In this discussion, we will explore trends in military human systems integration and learn about the critical role being played by human performance and effectiveness research. We will also examine case studies on the planning and design of future human space flight vehicles, the national air space system and the first nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in over 30 years. And with an eye toward sustaining the discipline s principles and methods, we ll take a look at educating and training the next generation of human systems integration practitioners.

  3. [Rationale for the permissible level of carbon dioxide in indoor air in residential and public buildings with the permanent human presence].

    PubMed

    Gubernskiĭ, Iu D

    2014-01-01

    On the base of the analysis of domestic and foreign data on the issue of rating of carbon dioxide in the indoor air of residential and public buildings and results of own research there is justified an permissible level of carbon dioxide in the indoor air of residential and public buildings with a permanent human presence. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the air space, not higher 1000 ppm (0.1%) was established to have no negative impact on the human health and performance, with this content of carbon dioxide there is no accumulation of toxic chemicals and registered by devices reducing of the oxygen content in the air of spaces, it meets the regulatory requirements for content dioxide carbon in the indoor air, applicable in most of foreign countries.

  4. Detection and tracking of human targets in indoor and urban environments using through-the-wall radar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzicki, Vincent R.; Boutte, David; Taylor, Paul; Lee, Hua

    2017-05-01

    Radar based detection of human targets behind walls or in dense urban environments is an important technical challenge with many practical applications in security, defense, and disaster recovery. Radar reflections from a human can be orders of magnitude weaker than those from objects encountered in urban settings such as walls, cars, or possibly rubble after a disaster. Furthermore, these objects can act as secondary reflectors and produce multipath returns from a person. To mitigate these issues, processing of radar return data needs to be optimized for recognizing human motion features such as walking, running, or breathing. This paper presents a theoretical analysis on the modulation effects human motion has on the radar waveform and how high levels of multipath can distort these motion effects. From this analysis, an algorithm is designed and optimized for tracking human motion in heavily clutter environments. The tracking results will be used as the fundamental detection/classification tool to discriminate human targets from others by identifying human motion traits such as predictable walking patterns and periodicity in breathing rates. The theoretical formulations will be tested against simulation and measured data collected using a low power, portable see-through-the-wall radar system that could be practically deployed in real-world scenarios. Lastly, the performance of the algorithm is evaluated in a series of experiments where both a single person and multiple people are moving in an indoor, cluttered environment.

  5. Occurrence of cyclic and linear siloxanes in indoor dust from China, and implications for human exposures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Yuan, Tao; Yun, Se Hun; Wang, Wenhua; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2010-08-15

    Siloxanes are used in a wide variety of personal-care and other consumer products. Although there is clearly a potential for contamination of indoor dust with siloxanes, reports of occurrence of siloxanes in indoor dust were not available, prior to the present study. Here, we have determined the concentrations and profiles of four cyclic siloxanes, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D(4)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D(5)), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D(6)), and tetradecamethylcycloheptasiloxane (D(7)), as well as 11 linear siloxanes, from L(4)-L(14), in 100 dust samples collected in China. Cyclic and linear siloxanes were found in all dust samples, with the linear siloxanes L(9)-L(14) being the predominant compounds. Concentrations of total siloxanes in dust ranged from 21.5 to 21,000 (mean: 1540 +/- 2850) ng g(-1). The highest concentration of the individual linear siloxanes, L(9)-L(14), ranged between 2680 and 6170 ng g(-1). Concentrations of total linear siloxanes (TLS) were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than concentrations of total cyclic siloxanes (TCS), in all indoor dust samples. Siloxane concentrations in dust were associated with the number of electrical/electronic appliances, number of occupants, and smokers living in the house. Based on the measured siloxane concentrations and on estimated daily ingestion rates of dust by toddlers and adults, we calculated the daily intake of siloxanes. For adults, daily exposure to total siloxanes, based on an average dust intake rate and median exposure concentration, was calculated to be 15.9 ng day(-1); the corresponding value for toddlers was 32.8 ng d(-1).

  6. INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

  7. INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

  8. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Cost/Risk Drivers The numbers in the Activities boxes correspond to the numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements...Technology Development Phase (Inputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME References: ● DODI 5000.02 & DODD 5000.01 ● DAG ● CJCSI...Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Incorporate domain considerations into baseline

  9. NASA UAS Integration into the NAS Project: Human Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) Integration into the NAS project. The most recent simulation on DAA interoperability with Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) is discussed in the most detail. The relationship of the work to the larger UAS community and next steps are also detailed.

  10. Dynamic modeling of human thermal comfort after the transition from an indoor to an outdoor hot environment.

    PubMed

    Katavoutas, George; Flocas, Helena A; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Thermal comfort under non-steady-state conditions primarily deals with rapid environmental transients and significant alterations of the meteorological conditions, activity, or clothing pattern within the time scale of some minutes. In such cases, thermal history plays an important role in respect to time, and thus, a dynamic approach is appropriate. The present study aims to investigate the dynamic thermal adaptation process of a human individual, after his transition from a typical indoor climate to an outdoor hot environment. Three scenarios of thermal transients have been considered for a range of hot outdoor environmental conditions, employing the dynamic two-node IMEM model. The differences among them concern the radiation field, the activity level, and the body position. The temporal pattern of body temperatures as well as the range of skin wettedness and of water loss have been investigated and compared among the scenarios and the environmental conditions considered. The structure and the temporal course of human energy fluxes as well as the identification of the contribution of body temperatures to energy fluxes have also been studied and compared. In general, the simulation results indicate that the response of a person, coming from the same neutral indoor climate, varies depending on the scenario followed by the individual while being outdoors. The combination of radiation field (shade or not) with the kind of activity (sitting or walking) and the outdoor conditions differentiates significantly the thermal state of the human body. Therefore, 75% of the skin wettedness values do not exceed the thermal comfort limit at rest for a sitting individual under the shade. This percentage decreases dramatically, less than 25%, under direct solar radiation and exceeds 75% for a walking person under direct solar radiation.

  11. Organophosphate flame retardants in indoor dust from Egypt: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Covaci, Adrian

    2014-05-06

    Organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) have been proposed as alternatives for the phased out PBDE formulations. However, there exists no information on indoor dust contamination with PFRs in Africa. In this study, we report--for the first time--on levels and profiles of PFRs in dust samples from Egyptian houses (n = 20), offices (n = 20), cars (n = 20), and public microenvironments (PMEs; n = 11). Results revealed that PFR levels in Egyptian indoor dust are among the lowest reported worldwide. This may be attributed to less strict fire-safety standards and lack of regulatory actions against PBDEs. Triphenylphosphate was the only PFR detected in all samples with highest average concentration (386 ng g(-1)). While tris-2-chloroethyl phosphate, tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate and tris-1,3-dichloropropylphosphate showed higher detection frequency (DF = 69%, 57%, and 56%; average = 233, 229, and 144 ng g(-1), respectively), tri(2-butoxyexthyl)phosphate (37%; 294 ng g(-1)) displayed the second highest average concentration. Statistical analysis revealed significantly (P < 0.05) higher concentrations of ΣPFRs in cars (average = 1011 ng g(-1)) and PMEs (2167 ng g(-1)) than in houses (310 ng g(-1)) and offices (450 ng g(-1)). Estimated exposures of adults and toddlers to PFRs via dust ingestion were much lower than the reported reference doses, indicating no immediate health risk to the Egyptian population.

  12. Integration of Occupational and Humanities Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doggrell, Joan; And Others

    At Clark County Community College, efforts to integrate occupational and humanities curricula have focused on introducing humanities materials directly into selected vocational courses, which are required for program majors. In fall 1982, philosophy was introduced to students in a "Fundamentals of Nursing" course through a module…

  13. Indoor Tanning

    MedlinePlus

    ... young patients for skin cancer. Indoor Tanning vs. Sunlight The sun's rays contain two types of ultraviolet ... Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Visit the Nemours ...

  14. The Human Subsystem - Definition and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonBengston, Kristian; Twyford, Evan

    2007-01-01

    This paper will discuss the use of the human subsystem in development phases of human space flight. Any space mission has clearly defined subsystems, managed by experts attached to these. Clearly defined subsystems and correct use provide easier and more efficient development for each independent subsystem and for the relation between these subsystems. Furthermore, this paper will argue that a defined subsystem related to humans in space has not always been clearly present, and that correct implementation is perhaps missing, based on experience and survey data. Finally, the authors will discuss why the human subsystem has not been fully integrated, why it must be a mandatory part of the programming, a re-definition of the human subsystem, and suggestions of methods to improve the integration of human factors in the development.

  15. Microbial Contents of Vacuum Cleaner Bag Dust and Emitted Bioaerosols and Their Implications for Human Exposure Indoors

    PubMed Central

    Veillette, Marc; Knibbs, Luke D.; Pelletier, Ariane; Charlebois, Remi; Blais Lecours, Pascale; He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum cleaners can release large concentrations of particles, both in their exhaust air and from resuspension of settled dust. However, the size, variability, and microbial diversity of these emissions are unknown, despite evidence to suggest they may contribute to allergic responses and infection transmission indoors. This study aimed to evaluate bioaerosol emission from various vacuum cleaners. We sampled the air in an experimental flow tunnel where vacuum cleaners were run, and their airborne emissions were sampled with closed-face cassettes. Dust samples were also collected from the dust bag. Total bacteria, total archaea, Penicillium/Aspergillus, and total Clostridium cluster 1 were quantified with specific quantitative PCR protocols, and emission rates were calculated. Clostridium botulinum and antibiotic resistance genes were detected in each sample using endpoint PCR. Bacterial diversity was also analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), image analysis, and band sequencing. We demonstrated that emission of bacteria and molds (Penicillium/Aspergillus) can reach values as high as 1E5 cell equivalents/min and that those emissions are not related to each other. The bag dust bacterial and mold content was also consistent across the vacuums we assessed, reaching up to 1E7 bacterial or mold cell equivalents/g. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected in several samples. No archaea or C. botulinum was detected in any air samples. Diversity analyses showed that most bacteria are from human sources, in keeping with other recent results. These results highlight the potential capability of vacuum cleaners to disseminate appreciable quantities of molds and human-associated bacteria indoors and their role as a source of exposure to bioaerosols. PMID:23934489

  16. Effect-Directed Analysis of Human Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Nuclear Receptors (PPARγ1) Ligands in Indoor Dust.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-08-18

    Agonism of human peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor gamma (PPARγ1) was recently observed in 15 of 25 samples of indoor dust extracts at environmentally relevant exposure levels. In this study, an effect-directed analysis approach was used to identify the primary contributors of PPARγ1 activity in the dust extracts. Three dust extracts showing significant PPARγ1 activity were fractionated with normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) and each fraction was tested for PPARγ1 activity. Three dust extracts showed a similar PPARγ1 activity distribution in the NP-HPLC fractions. In most active fractions, fatty acids (FAs), including oleic acid, stearic acid, palmitic acid and myristic acid, were the primary chemicals identified using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chemical measurements of the FAs in house dust extracts revealed a positive and significant correlation with the observed PPARγ1 activity. To test the role of FAs in the activity, a mixture of four FAs was prepared in the ratios measured in the dust samples and tested for activity. The activity of this mixture was 30-50% of the activity observed in the dust extracts, suggesting they were contributing to the observed activity, but also suggesting additional unknown compounds are likely still present in the dust extracts. To tentatively identify sources of FAs in the dust samples, FAs were quantified in human/animal hair, dead skin cells, and cooking oil. FAs were abundant in all samples and our data indicate that all of these may be sources to indoor dust.

  17. Integrating Human Performance and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald K. Farris; Heather Medema

    2012-05-01

    Human error is a significant factor in the cause and/or complication of events that occur in the commercial nuclear industry. In recent years, great gains have been made using Human Performance (HU) tools focused on targeting individual behaviors. However, the cost of improving HU is growing and resistance to add yet another HU tool certainly exists, particularly for those tools that increase the paperwork for operations. Improvements in HU that are the result of leveraging existing technology, such as hand-held mobile technologies, have the potential to reduce human error in controlling system configurations, safety tag-outs, and other verifications. Operator rounds, valve line-up verifications, containment closure verifications, safety & equipment protection, and system tagging can be supported by field-deployable wireless technologies. These devices can also support the availability of critical component data in the main control room and other locations. This research pilot project reviewing wireless hand-held technology is part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The project is being performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing, and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRSP vision is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current nuclear reactor fleet.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in dust from computers : one possible indoor source of human exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yu; Cheng, Tiantao; Chen, Jianmin

    Computer is an important part of our usual life and work. The harmful exposure to the radiation of computers has been paid attention broadly. However, chemical pollution related to computers is rarely reported. Here we investigated the levels and sources of EPA 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dust samples collected from components and internal walls of computers' boxes (in-computers) in Shanghai, China. Dust samples were collected from 27 computers in different indoor environment: offices, laboratories, and one net bar. The levels of PAHs in dust samples were from 8.22 μg g -1 to 42.04 μg g -1. BbF, BgP, DbA, Chry and BaP were the most abundant PAHs. The levels of PAHs in computers in smoking rooms (mainly in the net bar) were usually 1.35-2.87 times higher than those in nonsmoking rooms, indicating that the indoor environment of different rooms affected the loading of dust PAHs significantly. To study the source of PAHs in computers, six dust samples were collected from windowsills (out-computers) in the corresponding rooms. The results indicated that most PAHs from in-computers were greater than those from out-computers, which indicated that parts of PAHs in computers may be emitted from the heated plastic material out of chips in computers when they are running, and be adsorbed on dust deposited on these components. The potential exposure of PAHs from computers was also evaluated, and our results showed that people maybe exposure particle-phase PAHs up to 2.99 ng m -3 which are just sprayed out with dust from computers.

  19. A LiDAR and IMU Integrated Indoor Navigation System for UAVs and Its Application in Real-Time Pipeline Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Ajay; Patil, Ashok Kumar; Patil, Rekha; Park, Seong Sill; Chai, Young Ho

    2017-01-01

    Mapping the environment of a vehicle and localizing a vehicle within that unknown environment are complex issues. Although many approaches based on various types of sensory inputs and computational concepts have been successfully utilized for ground robot localization, there is difficulty in localizing an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) due to variation in altitude and motion dynamics. This paper proposes a robust and efficient indoor mapping and localization solution for a UAV integrated with low-cost Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors. Considering the advantage of the typical geometric structure of indoor environments, the planar position of UAVs can be efficiently calculated from a point-to-point scan matching algorithm using measurements from a horizontally scanning primary LiDAR. The altitude of the UAV with respect to the floor can be estimated accurately using a vertically scanning secondary LiDAR scanner, which is mounted orthogonally to the primary LiDAR. Furthermore, a Kalman filter is used to derive the 3D position by fusing primary and secondary LiDAR data. Additionally, this work presents a novel method for its application in the real-time classification of a pipeline in an indoor map by integrating the proposed navigation approach. Classification of the pipeline is based on the pipe radius estimation considering the region of interest (ROI) and the typical angle. The ROI is selected by finding the nearest neighbors of the selected seed point in the pipeline point cloud, and the typical angle is estimated with the directional histogram. Experimental results are provided to determine the feasibility of the proposed navigation system and its integration with real-time application in industrial plant engineering. PMID:28574474

  20. A LiDAR and IMU Integrated Indoor Navigation System for UAVs and Its Application in Real-Time Pipeline Classification.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Ajay; Patil, Ashok Kumar; Patil, Rekha; Park, Seong Sill; Chai, Young Ho

    2017-06-02

    Mapping the environment of a vehicle and localizing a vehicle within that unknown environment are complex issues. Although many approaches based on various types of sensory inputs and computational concepts have been successfully utilized for ground robot localization, there is difficulty in localizing an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) due to variation in altitude and motion dynamics. This paper proposes a robust and efficient indoor mapping and localization solution for a UAV integrated with low-cost Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors. Considering the advantage of the typical geometric structure of indoor environments, the planar position of UAVs can be efficiently calculated from a point-to-point scan matching algorithm using measurements from a horizontally scanning primary LiDAR. The altitude of the UAV with respect to the floor can be estimated accurately using a vertically scanning secondary LiDAR scanner, which is mounted orthogonally to the primary LiDAR. Furthermore, a Kalman filter is used to derive the 3D position by fusing primary and secondary LiDAR data. Additionally, this work presents a novel method for its application in the real-time classification of a pipeline in an indoor map by integrating the proposed navigation approach. Classification of the pipeline is based on the pipe radius estimation considering the region of interest (ROI) and the typical angle. The ROI is selected by finding the nearest neighbors of the selected seed point in the pipeline point cloud, and the typical angle is estimated with the directional histogram. Experimental results are provided to determine the feasibility of the proposed navigation system and its integration with real-time application in industrial plant engineering.

  1. Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Kundaje, Anshul; Meuleman, Wouter; Ernst, Jason; Bilenky, Misha; Yen, Angela; Kheradpour, Pouya; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Liu, Yaping; Amin, Viren; Ziller, Michael J; Whitaker, John W; Schultz, Matthew D; Sandstrom, Richard S; Eaton, Matthew L; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Wang, Jianrong; Ward, Lucas D; Sarkar, Abhishek; Quon, Gerald; Pfenning, Andreas; Wang, Xinchen; Claussnitzer, Melina; Coarfa, Cristian; Harris, R Alan; Shoresh, Noam; Epstein, Charles B; Gjoneska, Elizabeta; Leung, Danny; Xie, Wei; Hawkins, R David; Lister, Ryan; Hong, Chibo; Gascard, Philippe; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard; Chuah, Eric; Tam, Angela; Canfield, Theresa K; Hansen, R Scott; Kaul, Rajinder; Sabo, Peter J; Bansal, Mukul S; Carles, Annaick; Dixon, Jesse R; Farh, Kai-How; Feizi, Soheil; Karlic, Rosa; Kim, Ah-Ram; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Li, Daofeng; Lowdon, Rebecca; Mercer, Tim R; Neph, Shane J; Onuchic, Vitor; Polak, Paz; Rajagopal, Nisha; Ray, Pradipta; Sallari, Richard C; Siebenthall, Kyle T; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas; Stevens, Michael; Thurman, Robert E; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Beaudet, Arthur E; Boyer, Laurie A; De Jager, Philip; Farnham, Peggy J; Fisher, Susan J; Haussler, David; Jones, Steven; Li, Wei; Marra, Marco; McManus, Michael T; Sunyaev, Shamil; Thomson, James A; Tlsty, Thea D; Tsai, Li-Huei; Wang, Wei; Waterland, Robert A; Zhang, Michael; Chadwick, Lisa H; Bernstein, Bradley E; Costello, Joseph F; Ecker, Joseph R; Hirst, Martin; Meissner, Alexander; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Wang, Ting; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    The reference human genome sequence set the stage for studies of genetic variation and its association with human disease, but a similar reference has lacked for epigenomic studies. To address this need, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium generated the largest collection to-date of human epigenomes for primary cells and tissues. Here, we describe the integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes generated as part of the program, profiled for histone modification patterns, DNA accessibility, DNA methylation, and RNA expression. We establish global maps of regulatory elements, define regulatory modules of coordinated activity, and their likely activators and repressors. We show that disease and trait-associated genetic variants are enriched in tissue-specific epigenomic marks, revealing biologically-relevant cell types for diverse human traits, and providing a resource for interpreting the molecular basis of human disease. Our results demonstrate the central role of epigenomic information for understanding gene regulation, cellular differentiation, and human disease. PMID:25693563

  2. Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes.

    PubMed

    Kundaje, Anshul; Meuleman, Wouter; Ernst, Jason; Bilenky, Misha; Yen, Angela; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Kheradpour, Pouya; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Wang, Jianrong; Ziller, Michael J; Amin, Viren; Whitaker, John W; Schultz, Matthew D; Ward, Lucas D; Sarkar, Abhishek; Quon, Gerald; Sandstrom, Richard S; Eaton, Matthew L; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Pfenning, Andreas R; Wang, Xinchen; Claussnitzer, Melina; Liu, Yaping; Coarfa, Cristian; Harris, R Alan; Shoresh, Noam; Epstein, Charles B; Gjoneska, Elizabeta; Leung, Danny; Xie, Wei; Hawkins, R David; Lister, Ryan; Hong, Chibo; Gascard, Philippe; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard; Chuah, Eric; Tam, Angela; Canfield, Theresa K; Hansen, R Scott; Kaul, Rajinder; Sabo, Peter J; Bansal, Mukul S; Carles, Annaick; Dixon, Jesse R; Farh, Kai-How; Feizi, Soheil; Karlic, Rosa; Kim, Ah-Ram; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Li, Daofeng; Lowdon, Rebecca; Elliott, GiNell; Mercer, Tim R; Neph, Shane J; Onuchic, Vitor; Polak, Paz; Rajagopal, Nisha; Ray, Pradipta; Sallari, Richard C; Siebenthall, Kyle T; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A; Stevens, Michael; Thurman, Robert E; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Beaudet, Arthur E; Boyer, Laurie A; De Jager, Philip L; Farnham, Peggy J; Fisher, Susan J; Haussler, David; Jones, Steven J M; Li, Wei; Marra, Marco A; McManus, Michael T; Sunyaev, Shamil; Thomson, James A; Tlsty, Thea D; Tsai, Li-Huei; Wang, Wei; Waterland, Robert A; Zhang, Michael Q; Chadwick, Lisa H; Bernstein, Bradley E; Costello, Joseph F; Ecker, Joseph R; Hirst, Martin; Meissner, Alexander; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Wang, Ting; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-02-19

    The reference human genome sequence set the stage for studies of genetic variation and its association with human disease, but epigenomic studies lack a similar reference. To address this need, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium generated the largest collection so far of human epigenomes for primary cells and tissues. Here we describe the integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes generated as part of the programme, profiled for histone modification patterns, DNA accessibility, DNA methylation and RNA expression. We establish global maps of regulatory elements, define regulatory modules of coordinated activity, and their likely activators and repressors. We show that disease- and trait-associated genetic variants are enriched in tissue-specific epigenomic marks, revealing biologically relevant cell types for diverse human traits, and providing a resource for interpreting the molecular basis of human disease. Our results demonstrate the central role of epigenomic information for understanding gene regulation, cellular differentiation and human disease.

  3. Integrated Extravehicular Activity Human Research Plan: 2017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Multiple organizations within NASA as well as industry and academia fund and participate in research related to extravehicular activity (EVA). In October 2015, representatives of the EVA Office, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), and the Human Research Program (HRP) at NASA Johnson Space Center agreed on a formal framework to improve multi-year coordination and collaboration in EVA research. At the core of the framework is an Integrated EVA Human Research Plan and a process by which it will be annually reviewed and updated. The over-arching objective of the collaborative framework is to conduct multi-disciplinary cost-effective research that will enable humans to perform EVAs safely, effectively, comfortably, and efficiently, as needed to enable and enhance human space exploration missions. Research activities must be defined, prioritized, planned and executed to comprehensively address the right questions, avoid duplication, leverage other complementary activities where possible, and ultimately provide actionable evidence-based results in time to inform subsequent tests, developments and/or research activities. Representation of all appropriate stakeholders in the definition, prioritization, planning and execution of research activities is essential to accomplishing the over-arching objective. A formal review of the Integrated EVA Human Research Plan will be conducted annually. Coordination with stakeholders outside of the EVA Office, CTSD, and HRP is already in effect on a study-by-study basis; closer coordination on multi-year planning with other EVA stakeholders including academia is being actively pursued. Details of the preliminary Integrated EVA Human Research Plan are presented including description of ongoing and planned research activities in the areas of: physiological and performance capabilities; suit design parameters; EVA human health and performance modeling; EVA tasks and concepts of operations; EVA informatics; human-suit sensors; suit

  4. Intelligent Human Tracking Based on Multimodal Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Asano, Futoshi; Nakajima, Hirofumi; Ince, Gökhan

    Localization and tracking of humans are essential research topics in robotics. In particular, Sound Source Localization (SSL) has been of great interest. Despite the numerous reported methods, SSL in a real environment had mainly three issues; robustness against noise with high power, no framework for selective listening to sound sources, and tracking of inactive and/or noisy sound sources. For the first issue, we extended Multiple SIgnal Classification by incorporating Generalized Eigen Value Decomposition (GEVD-MUSIC) so that it can deal with high power noise and can select target sound sources. For the second issue, we proposed Sound Source Identification (SSI) based on hierarchical Gaussian mixture models and integrated it with GEVD-MUSIC to realize a function to listen to a specific sound source according to the sort of the sound source. For the third issue, auditory and visual human tracking were integrated using particle filtering. These three techniques are integrated into an intelligent human tracking system. Experimental results showed that integration of SSL and SSI successfully achieved human tracking only by audition, and the audio-visual integration showed considerable improvement in tracking by compensating the loss of auditory or visual information.

  5. [The waterpipe (shisha) - indoor air quality, human biomonitoring, and health effects].

    PubMed

    Fromme, Hermann; Schober, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Waterpipe (WP) smoking, also known as shisha or hookah smoking, is growing in western countries as an alternative to cigarette smoking, especially in younger age groups. A majority of smokers mistakenly believe that shisha smoking is a social entertainment practice that leads to more social behavior and relaxation and that this type of smoking is safe or less harmful and less addictive than cigarette smoking.In reality, WP smokers are exposed to hundreds of toxic substances that include well-known carcinogens. High exposures to carbon monoxide and nicotine are major health threats. There is growing evidence that WP smoke causes adverse effects on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems and there are indications that WP smoke is associated with cancer. Persons exposed to secondhand WP smoke are also at risk.More research on the health effects of WP is urgently needed and more preventive measures for public health protection. Moreover, public WP facilities should be implemented under specific nonsmoker protection laws and consequently controlled.This review summarizes recent data on exposure to WP smoking in indoor environments, the results of biomonitoring data, and the known health effects based on currently available toxicological or epidemiological studies.

  6. Integrating Oracle Human Resources with Other Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Karl; Shope, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of implementing an enterprise-wide business system is achieving integration of the different modules to the satisfaction of diverse customers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) implementation of the Oracle application suite demonstrates the need to coordinate Oracle Human Resources Management System (HRMS) decision across the Oracle modules.

  7. An Empirical Methodology for Engineering Human Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Human factors engineering HFI ...................................... Human factors integration HMI .................................... Human...AIRPRINT AFRL/RH INCOSE Defense Acquisition Guide MANPRINT IEEE SMC ACM UK HFI Program Manpower X X X X X X X Personnel X X X “Personal...systems engineering human systems integration NATO, some use USAF, ISO HFI Human factors integration Confused with HSI, but only the interface

  8. Indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane enhances house dust mite-induced activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Canbaz, Derya; Lebre, M Cristina; Logiantara, Adrian; van Ree, Ronald; van Rijt, Leonie S

    2016-11-01

    The indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has been added as flame retardant to many consumer products but detaches and accumulates in house dust. Inhalation of house dust leads to exposure to house dust mite (HDM) allergens in the presence of HBCD. Activation of dendritic cells is crucial in the sensitization to HDM allergens. The current study examined whether exposure to HBCD affected activation/maturation of HDM-exposed human dendritic cells (DC). Human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) were exposed simultaneously to HDM and a concentration range of HBCD (0.1-20 μM) in vitro. HDM exposure of moDC induced expression of co-stimulatory molecule CD80 and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, simultaneous exposure of moDC to HBCD and HDM enhanced the expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR, co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 depending on the dose of HBCD. Our results indicate that simultaneous exposure of HDM and HBCD can enhance the antigen presentation and maturation/activation of DC.

  9. Macrocyclic-, polycyclic-, and nitro musks in cosmetics, household commodities and indoor dusts collected from Japan: implications for their human exposure.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Haruhiko; Hinosaka, Mari; Yanagimoto, Hayato

    2015-01-01

    This paper reported the occurrence and concentrations of macrocyclic-, polycyclic- and nitro musks in cosmetics and household commodities collected from Japan. The high concentrations and detection frequencies of Musk T, habanolide, and exaltolides were found in commercial products, suggesting their large amounts of production and usage in Japan. Polycyclic musks, HHCB and OTNE, also showed high concentrations in cosmetics and products. The estimated dairy intakes of Musk T and HHCB by the dermal exposure to commercial products were 7.8 and 7.9 μg/kg/day in human, respectively, and perfume and body lotion are dominant exposure sources. We also analyzed synthetic musks in house dusts. Polycyclic musks, HHCB and OTNE, showed high concentrations in samples, but macrocyclic musks were detected only in a few samples, although these types of musks were highly detected in commercial products. This is probably due to easy-degradation of macrocyclic musks in indoor environment. The dairy intakes of HHCB by dust ingestions were 0.22 ng/kg/day in human, which were approximately five orders of magnitudes lower than those of dermal absorption from commercial household commodities.

  10. Eye irritation caused by formaldehyde as an indoor air pollution--a controlled human exposure experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhang, Y P; Chen, D; Chen, W G; Wang, R

    2001-09-01

    The present study focuses on health assessment of wood based panels which are widely used in interior decoration practices over the recent years in China. Formaldehyde has been identified as chemical indicator of (IAO) and an indoor air pollutant. To test its health effects experiment was undertaken. A small environmental test chamber (60/L) was used as the generator of emission gas from new panels, and was operating at a temperature of 22.7 +/- 0.6 degrees C and a humidity of 44.4 +/- 2.5% with an air exchange rate of 1.0 +/- 0.15 h-1. On the three experimental days the values of product loading in chamber were 4, 2 and 6 m2/m3, respectively. Eight people were selected randomly from the students and employees of Wuhan Health and Anti-epidemic Station as subjects, with an average age of 21.9 +/- 5.9 years, and a gender ratio of 1:1, and two of them were smokers (one male and one female). The subjects' eyes were exposed to formaldehyde through a pair of goggles. Each goggle had its flow inlet and outlet, and connected to chamber exhaust of emission gas and to an exhaust from the room. The exposure time was very short, just 5 minutes and the formaldehyde doses were at 1.65 +/- 0.01, 2.99 +/- 0.07 and 4.31 +/- 0.02 ppm. A 60-mm linear visual analogue rating scales was used to measure the intensity of sensory eye irritation and a video tape recorder was used to record eye blinking frequency. The results demonstrated that tests of sensory eye irritation and eye blinking can be used for materials testing, and that a dose-effect as well as a time-variance of the effect can be measured. The tests showed that eye irritation was perceived at all of the three levels.

  11. Integrating Data and Networks: Human Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The development of technical linkages and interoperability between scientific networks is a necessary but not sufficient step towards integrated use and application of networked data and information for scientific and societal benefit. A range of "human factors" must also be addressed to ensure the long-term integration, sustainability, and utility of both the interoperable networks themselves and the scientific data and information to which they provide access. These human factors encompass the behavior of both individual humans and human institutions, and include system governance, a common framework for intellectual property rights and data sharing, consensus on terminology, metadata, and quality control processes, agreement on key system metrics and milestones, the compatibility of "business models" in the short and long term, harmonization of incentives for cooperation, and minimization of disincentives. Experience with several national and international initiatives and research programs such as the International Polar Year, the Group on Earth Observations, the NASA Earth Observing Data and Information System, the U.S. National Spatial Data Infrastructure, the Global Earthquake Model, and the United Nations Spatial Data Infrastructure provide a range of lessons regarding these human factors. Ongoing changes in science, technology, institutions, relationships, and even culture are creating both opportunities and challenges for expanded interoperability of scientific networks and significant improvement in data integration to advance science and the use of scientific data and information to achieve benefits for society as a whole.

  12. Contextualising merit and integrity within human research.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ian; Thomson, Colin J H

    2011-09-01

    The first consideration of any Australian Human Research Ethics Committee should be to satisfy itself that the project before them is worth undertaking. If the project does not add to the body of knowledge, if it does not improve social welfare or individual wellbeing then the use of human participants, their tissue or their data must be questioned. Sometimes, however, committees are criticised for appearing to adopt the role of scientific review committees. The intent of this paper is to provide researchers with an understanding of the ethical importance of demonstrating the merit of their research project and to help them develop protocols that show ethics committees that adequate attention has been paid to this central tenet in dealing ethically with human research participants. Any person proposing human research must be prepared to show that it is worthwhile. This paper will clarify the relationship between research merit and integrity, research ethics and the responsibilities of human research ethics committees.

  13. Integrated design environment for human performance and human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1997-05-01

    Work over the last few years at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has included a major focus on applying human performance and human reliability knowledge and methods as an integral element of system design and development. This work has been pursued in programs in a wide variety of technical domains, beginning with nuclear power plant operations. Since the mid-1980`s the laboratory has transferred the methods and tools developed in the nuclear domain to military weapons systems and aircraft, offshore oil and shipping operations, and commercial aviation operations and aircraft design. Through these diverse applications the laboratory has developed an integrated approach and framework for application of human performance analysis, human reliability analysis (HRA), operational data analysis, and simulation studies of human performance to the design and development of complex systems. This approach was recently tested in the NASA Advanced Concepts Program {open_quotes}Structured Human Error Analysis for Aircraft Design.{close_quotes} This program resulted in the prototype software tool THEA (Tool for Human Error Analysis) for incorporating human error analysis in the design of commercial aircraft, focusing on airplane maintenance tasks. Current effort is directed toward applying this framework to the development of advanced Air Traffic Management (ATM) systems as part of NASA`s Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) program. This paper summarizes the approach, describes recent and current applications in commercial aviation, and provides perspectives on how the approach could be utilized in the nuclear power industry.

  14. Development of Human System Integration at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; McGuire, Kerry; Thompson, Shelby; Vos, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Human Systems Integration seeks to design systems around the capabilities and limitations of the humans which use and interact with the system, ensuring greater efficiency of use, reduced error rates, and less rework in the design, manufacturing and operational deployment of hardware and software. One of the primary goals of HSI is to get the human factors practitioner involved early in the design process. In doing so, the aim is to reduce future budget costs and resources in redesign and training. By the preliminary design phase of a project nearly 80% of the total cost of the project is locked in. Potential design changes recommended by evaluations past this point will have little effect due to lack of funding or a huge cost in terms of resources to make changes. Three key concepts define an effective HSI program. First, systems are comprised of hardware, software, and the human, all of which operate within an environment. Too often, engineers and developers fail to consider the human capacity or requirements as part of the system. This leads to poor task allocation within the system. To promote ideal task allocation, it is critical that the human element be considered early in system development. Poor design, or designs that do not adequately consider the human component, could negatively affect physical or mental performance, as well as, social behavior. Second, successful HSI depends upon integration and collaboration of all the domains that represent acquisition efforts. Too often, these domains exist as independent disciplines due to the location of expertise within the service structure. Proper implementation of HSI through participation would help to integrate these domains and disciplines to leverage and apply their interdependencies to attain an optimal design. Via this process domain interests can be integrated to perform effective HSI through trade-offs and collaboration. This provides a common basis upon which to make knowledgeable decisions. Finally

  15. A Hybrid 3D Indoor Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Ali; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    GIS integrates spatial information and spatial analysis. An important example of such integration is for emergency response which requires route planning inside and outside of a building. Route planning requires detailed information related to indoor and outdoor environment. Indoor navigation network models including Geometric Network Model (GNM), Navigable Space Model, sub-division model and regular-grid model lack indoor data sources and abstraction methods. In this paper, a hybrid indoor space model is proposed. In the proposed method, 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. This research proposes a method of indoor space modeling for the buildings which do not have proper 2D/3D geometrical models or they lack semantic or topological information. The proposed hybrid model consists of topological, geometrical and semantical space.

  16. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building's occupants while maintaining the building's energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building's occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  17. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building`s occupants while maintaining the building`s energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building`s occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  18. Occurrence and source apportionment of halogenated flame retardants in the indoor air of Nepalese cities: Implication on human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Devi, Ningombam Linthoingmabi; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2017-07-01

    Elevated level of brominated- and chlorinated-flame retardants (FRs) have been accounted in ambient air across the globe. Despite what might be expected, restricted information is available on PBDEs and other halogenated FR contained indoor air in whole of Indian sub-continent especially in case of Nepal, sandwiched between two most populous countries i.e. India and China. It was conjectured that the level of halogenated flame retardant (HFRs) in Nepalese air would be high because they have not been liable to control in Nepal; and henceforth there is more plausibility of HFRs to be available in a diverse array of goods and consumer products. This study therefore aims to measure the occurrence, spatial distributions and sources of 15 brominated- and 2 chlorinated-FRs in indoor air from four major cities of Nepal. The overall concentrations of HFRs ranged from 16.1 to 6750 pg/m3 (median 334 pg/m3). The total concentrations of novel brominated fire retardants (NBFRs) were 20 and 100 times (13.2-6270 pg/m3) higher than PBDEs (2.2-353 pg/m3) and DPs (0.67-129 pg/m3), respectively indicating much higher usages of NBFRs in Nepal. The level of ∑PBDEs in air is identified with utilization of wide variety of consumers products and building materials containing FRs in Nepalese houses, while higher concentration of BDE-209 were subject to emission from materials containing deca-BDE formulation. Significantly higher concentrations of DBDPE than BDE-209 in air demonstrated a move to more prominent use of DBDPE as alternative to BDE-209. The lower fanti ratios suggests the DP level in this study was essentially affected by the long range atmospheric transport from remote DP source instead of commercial products. The exposure to BDE-47, -99, -153, -209 and HBB via inhalation was 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than corresponding RfD values, suggesting insignificant risk to Nepalese population. However, other modes of human exposure might still be significant in Nepal.

  19. Integrating Automated Workflows, Human Intelligence and Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Mirel, Barbara; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Kretzler, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Many methods and tools have evolved for microarray analysis such as single probe evaluation, promoter module modeling and pathway analysis. Little is known, however, about optimizing this flow of analysis for the flexible reasoning biomedical researchers need for hypothesizing about disease mechanisms. In developing and implementing a workflow, we found that workflows are not complete or valuable unless automation is well-integrated with human intelligence. We present our workflow for the translational problem of classifying new sub-types of renal diseases. Using our workflow as an example, we explain opportunities and limitations in achieving this necessary integration and propose approaches to guide such integration for the next great frontier-facilitating exploratory analysis of candidate genes. PMID:21347175

  20. Identification, characteristics and human exposure assessments of triclosan, bisphenol-A, and four commonly used organic UV filters in indoor dust collected from Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ao, Junjie; Yuan, Tao; Ma, Yuning; Gao, Li; Ni, Ni; Li, Dan

    2017-10-01

    Indoor dust is a very significant medium to understand human exposure of emerging contaminants. A novel and robust analytical method to measure the amounts of six personal care products (PCPs) (triclosan, bisphenol-A and four commonly used organic ultraviolet (UV) filters) simultaneously in indoor dust is developed in this paper. Target analytes were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction. After sample cleanup by solid-phase extraction (SPE), the extracts were derivatized and analyzed using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method detection limits achieves 0.16-0.62 pg g(-1) (except for 4-methylbenzylidene camphor with 3800 pg g(-1)). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of 110 indoor dust samples from Shanghai, China. Results showed that the PCPs were found in most of the samples analyzed. The concentrations of the most analytes are relatively lower than those reported in USA, Japan, and European countries. The median concentration of octocrylene (OC) (1170.4 ng g(-1)) was found to be nearly 5-10 times higher than those of other analytes. The significantly higher concentration of ∑PCPs was observed in indoor dusts from residences than from offices (P < 0.05). The human exposure was analyzed by calculate the estimated daily intakes (EDI) of PCPs through dust ingestion for various age groups. The EDI of the target analytes for infants ranged from 0.85 to 6.18 ng kg(-1) -bw day(-1) and 0.07-0.49 ng kg(-1) -bw day(-1) for adults, respectively. This is the first study to report the doses of human exposure to UV filters in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of cue integration in human navigation.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Marko; Jones, Peter; Bedford, Rachael; Braddick, Oliver

    2008-05-06

    Mammalian navigation depends both on visual landmarks and on self-generated (e.g., vestibular and proprioceptive) cues that signal the organism's own movement [1-5]. When these conflict, landmarks can either reset estimates of self-motion or be integrated with them [6-9]. We asked how humans combine these information sources and whether children, who use both from a young age [10-12], combine them as adults do. Participants attempted to return an object to its original place in an arena when given either visual landmarks only, nonvisual self-motion information only, or both. Adults, but not 4- to 5-year-olds or 7- to 8-year-olds, reduced their response variance when both information sources were available. In an additional "conflict" condition that measured relative reliance on landmarks and self-motion, we predicted behavior under two models: integration (weighted averaging) of the cues and alternation between them. Adults' behavior was predicted by integration, in which the cues were weighted nearly optimally to reduce variance, whereas children's behavior was predicted by alternation. These results suggest that development of individual spatial-representational systems precedes development of the capacity to combine these within a common reference frame. Humans can integrate spatial cues nearly optimally to navigate, but this ability depends on an extended developmental process.

  2. Radar micro-Doppler based human activity classification for indoor and outdoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenaldin, Matthew; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of our experimental investigation into how different environments impact the classification of human motion using radar micro-Doppler (MD) signatures. The environments studied include free space, through-thewall, leaf tree foliage, and needle tree foliage. Results on presented on classification of the following three motions: crawling, walking, and jogging. The classification task was designed how to best separate these movements. The human motion data were acquired using a monostatic coherent Doppler radar operating in the C-band at 6.5 GHz from a total of six human subjects. The received signals were analyzed in the time-frequency domain using the Short-time Fourier Transform (STFT) which was used for feature extraction. Classification was performed using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) using a Radial Basis Function (RBF). Classification accuracies in the range 80-90% were achieved to separate the three movements mentioned.

  3. Characterization of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants in the indoor and outdoor dust of e-waste workshops: implication for on-site human exposure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Yangcheng; Wang, Junxia; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Lili; Wang, Jinfu; Pan, Bishu; Lin, Kuangfei

    2015-04-01

    Forty-four indoor and outdoor dust samples were collected from e-waste workshops and were analyzed to characterize the heavy metals and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) as well as on-site human exposure. The results showed that the most abundant Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) congener from three sites was deca-BDE, and it was penta-BDE for the other site. A significant and positive association was found between BDE-209 and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE). The high percentage of nona-BDE indicated the debromination of deca-BDE during e-waste recycling. The ratio comparison of BDE-47 to (BDE-100 + BDE-99) indicated that the outdoor dust went through more physiochemical processes. The enrichment factors for Cu and Pb were high in both the indoor and outdoor samples. Cd significantly exceeded the Chinese soil guideline grade III. The PCA results combined with the enrichment factor (EF) values suggested common sources and behaviours of Cu, Pb and Sb in the indoor dust. Co, Cr, Ni, Zn and Mn in the outdoor samples were more likely affected by crust. Strong correlations were found only for Pb and Sb with polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The hazard index for on-site human exposure to Pb was at a chronic risk. Despite the low deleterious risk of BFRs, concern should be given to DBDPE; the chronic toxicity of which is not known.

  4. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem- To develop a measurable indicator of human exposure to Stachybotys chartarum.

    Methods- Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold S. chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent ass...

  5. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem- To develop a measurable indicator of human exposure to Stachybotys chartarum.

    Methods- Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold S. chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent ass...

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air and environmental tobacco smoke measured with a new integrated organic vapor-particle sampler. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, L.A.; Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Lee, V.C.; Stevens, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    To avoid sampling artifacts, an integrated organic vapor-particle sampler (IOVPS) has been developed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The ICIVPS is based on an XAD-4-coated annular denuder which strips gas phase species from the air stream before collection of particles on a filter. A second denuder downstream of the filter collects species desorbed (``blown off``) the particles during sampling. PAH are determined in extracts of both denuders and the filter. For indoor air with no combustion sources, the gas-phase concentrations of several semivolatile PAH measured with the IOVPS averaged about half of those found with a conventional filter-sorbent bed sampler. For envirorunental tobacco smoke the gas-phase concentrations of the same PAH from the IOVPS averaged 70% of those found with the sorbent bed sampler. Particulate-phase concentrations were correspondingly higher with the IOVPS, but measurable ``blow off` semivolatile PAH occurred.

  7. Multi-view indoor human behavior recognition based on 3D skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ling; Lu, Tongwei; Min, Feng

    2015-12-01

    For the problems caused by viewpoint changes in activity recognition, a multi-view interior human behavior recognition method based on 3D framework is presented. First, Microsoft's Kinect device is used to obtain body motion video in the positive perspective, the oblique angle and the side perspective. Second, it extracts bone joints and get global human features and the local features of arms and legs at the same time to form 3D skeletal features set. Third, online dictionary learning on feature set is used to reduce the dimension of feature. Finally, linear support vector machine (LSVM) is used to obtain the results of behavior recognition. The experimental results show that this method has better recognition rate.

  8. Assessment of the Indoor Odour Impact in a Naturally Ventilated Room

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Lidia; Derudi, Marco; Capelli, Laura; Nano, Giuseppe; Sironi, Selena

    2017-01-01

    Indoor air quality influences people’s lives, potentially affecting their health and comfort. Nowadays, ventilation is the only technique commonly used for regulating indoor air quality. CO2 is the reference species considered in order to calculate the air exchange rates of indoor environments. Indeed, regarding air quality, the presence of pleasant or unpleasant odours can strongly influence the environmental comfort. In this paper, a case study of indoor air quality monitoring is reported. The indoor field tests were conducted measuring both CO2 concentration, using a photoacoustic multi-gas analyzer, and odour trends, using an electronic nose, in order to analyze and compare the information acquired. The indoor air monitoring campaign was run for a period of 20 working days into a university room. The work was focused on the determination of both CO2 and odour emission factors (OEF) emitted by the human activity and on the evaluation of the odour impact in a naturally ventilated room. The results highlighted that an air monitoring and recycling system based only on CO2 concentration and temperature measurements might be insufficient to ensure a good indoor air quality, whereas its performances could be improved by integrating the existing systems with an electronic nose for odour detection. PMID:28379190

  9. Assessment of the Indoor Odour Impact in a Naturally Ventilated Room.

    PubMed

    Eusebio, Lidia; Derudi, Marco; Capelli, Laura; Nano, Giuseppe; Sironi, Selena

    2017-04-05

    Indoor air quality influences people's lives, potentially affecting their health and comfort. Nowadays, ventilation is the only technique commonly used for regulating indoor air quality. CO₂ is the reference species considered in order to calculate the air exchange rates of indoor environments. Indeed, regarding air quality, the presence of pleasant or unpleasant odours can strongly influence the environmental comfort. In this paper, a case study of indoor air quality monitoring is reported. The indoor field tests were conducted measuring both CO₂ concentration, using a photoacoustic multi-gas analyzer, and odour trends, using an electronic nose, in order to analyze and compare the information acquired. The indoor air monitoring campaign was run for a period of 20 working days into a university room. The work was focused on the determination of both CO₂ and odour emission factors (OEF) emitted by the human activity and on the evaluation of the odour impact in a naturally ventilated room. The results highlighted that an air monitoring and recycling system based only on CO₂ concentration and temperature measurements might be insufficient to ensure a good indoor air quality, whereas its performances could be improved by integrating the existing systems with an electronic nose for odour detection.

  10. Toxicants and human sperm chromatin integrity.

    PubMed

    Delbès, Geraldine; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of the paternal genome is essential as the spermatozoon can bring genetic damage into the oocyte at fertilization and contribute to the development of abnormal pregnancy outcome. During the past two decades, many assays have been developed to measure sperm DNA strand breaks, chromatin structure and compaction and assess the proteins associated with the DNA, as well as epigenetic modifications. Using these assays, it has been shown that exposure to physical agents or chemicals, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants, can affect the integrity of sperm chromatin, inducing structural, genetic and/or epigenetic abnormalities. The mechanisms by which such damage is triggered are still largely unresolved and the susceptibility of each individual will depend on their genetic background, lifestyle and exposure to various insults. Depending on the nature of the chemicals, they may directly target the DNA, induce an oxidative stress, or modify the epigenetic elements. The significance of measuring the sperm chromatin integrity comes from the fact that this end-point correlates well with the low IVF and ICSI outcomes, and idiopathic infertility. Nevertheless, it is hard to establish a direct link between the paternal sperm chromatin integrity and the health of the future generations. Thus, it seems essential to undertake studies that will resolve the impact of chemical and environmental factors on chromatin structure and epigenetic components of human spermatozoa and to elucidate what sperm nuclear end-points are predictors of the quality of progeny outcome.

  11. Sonic boom (human response and atmospheric effects) outdoor-to-indoor response to minimized sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David; Sutherland, Louis C.

    1992-01-01

    The preferred descriptor to define the spectral content of sonic booms is the Sound Exposure Spectrum Level, LE(f). This descriptor represents the spectral content of the basic noise descriptors used for describing any single event--the Sound Exposure Level, LE. The latter is equal to ten times the logarithms, to the base ten, of the integral, over the duration of the event, of the square of the instantaneous acoustic pressure, divided by the square of the reference pressure, 20 micro-Pa. When applied to the evaluation of community response to sonic booms, it is customary to use the so-called C-Weighted Sound Exposure Level, LCE, for which the frequency content of the instantaneous acoustic pressure is modified by the C-Weighting curve.

  12. A Self-Sustained Wireless Multi-Sensor Platform Integrated with Printable Organic Sensors for Indoor Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Ching-Da; Su, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Yang; Huang, Yang-Jing; Peng, Sheng-Yu; Yu, Shih-An; Lin, Chih-Ting; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2017-01-01

    A self-sustained multi-sensor platform for indoor environmental monitoring is proposed in this paper. To reduce the cost and power consumption of the sensing platform, in the developed platform, organic materials of PEDOT:PSS and PEDOT:PSS/EB-PANI are used as the sensing films for humidity and CO2 detection, respectively. Different from traditional gas sensors, these organic sensing films can operate at room temperature without heating processes or infrared transceivers so that the power consumption of the developed humidity and the CO2 sensors can be as low as 10 μW and 5 μW, respectively. To cooperate with these low-power sensors, a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) system-on-chip (SoC) is designed to amplify and to read out multiple sensor signals with low power consumption. The developed SoC includes an analog-front-end interface circuit (AFE), an analog-to-digital convertor (ADC), a digital controller and a power management unit (PMU). Scheduled by the digital controller, the sensing circuits are power gated with a small duty-cycle to reduce the average power consumption to 3.2 μW. The designed PMU converts the power scavenged from a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) module into required supply voltages for SoC circuits operation under typical indoor illuminance conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first multiple environmental parameters (Temperature/CO2/Humidity) sensing platform that demonstrates a true self-powering functionality for long-term operations. PMID:28353680

  13. A Self-Sustained Wireless Multi-Sensor Platform Integrated with Printable Organic Sensors for Indoor Environmental Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Ching-Da; Su, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Yang; Huang, Yang-Jing; Peng, Sheng-Yu; Yu, Shih-An; Lin, Chih-Ting; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2017-03-29

    A self-sustained multi-sensor platform for indoor environmental monitoring is proposed in this paper. To reduce the cost and power consumption of the sensing platform, in the developed platform, organic materials of PEDOT:PSS and PEDOT:PSS/EB-PANI are used as the sensing films for humidity and CO₂ detection, respectively. Different from traditional gas sensors, these organic sensing films can operate at room temperature without heating processes or infrared transceivers so that the power consumption of the developed humidity and the CO₂ sensors can be as low as 10 μW and 5 μW, respectively. To cooperate with these low-power sensors, a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) system-on-chip (SoC) is designed to amplify and to read out multiple sensor signals with low power consumption. The developed SoC includes an analog-front-end interface circuit (AFE), an analog-to-digital convertor (ADC), a digital controller and a power management unit (PMU). Scheduled by the digital controller, the sensing circuits are power gated with a small duty-cycle to reduce the average power consumption to 3.2 μW. The designed PMU converts the power scavenged from a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) module into required supply voltages for SoC circuits operation under typical indoor illuminance conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first multiple environmental parameters (Temperature/CO₂/Humidity) sensing platform that demonstrates a true self-powering functionality for long-term operations.

  14. Occurrence of organophosphorus flame retardants in indoor dust in multiple microenvironments of southern China and implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    He, Chun-Tao; Zheng, Jing; Qiao, Lin; Chen, She-Jun; Yang, Jun-Zhi; Yuan, Jian-Gang; Yang, Zhong-Yi; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2015-08-01

    Organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) are important alternatives to brominated flame retardants (BFRs), but information on their contamination of the environment in China is rare. We examined the occurrence of 12 OPFRs in indoor dust in four microenvironments of southern China, including a rural electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, a rural non-e-waste area, urban homes, and urban college dormitory rooms. The OPFR concentrations (with a median of 25.0 μg g(-1)) were highest in the e-waste area, and the concentrations in other three areas were lower and comparable (7.48-11.0 μg g(-1)). The levels of OPFRs in the present study were generally relatively lower than the levels of OPFRs found in Europe, Canada, and Japan because BFRs are still widely used as the major FRs in China. The composition profile of OPFRs in the e-waste area was dominated by tricresyl phosphate (TCP) (accounting for 40.7%, on average), while tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) was the most abundant OPFR (64.4%) in the urban areas (homes and college dormitories). These two distribution patterns represent two OPFR sources (i.e., emissions from past e-waste and from current household products and building materials). The difference in the OPFR profiles in the rural area relative to the OPFR profiles in the urban and e-waste areas suggests that the occurrence of OPFRs is due mainly to emissions from characteristic household products in rural homes. Although human exposures to all the OPFRs were under the reference doses, the health risk for residents in the e-waste area is a concern, considering the poor sanitary conditions in this area and exposure from other sources.

  15. Global human capital: integrating education and population.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Wolfgang; KC, Samir

    2011-07-29

    Almost universally, women with higher levels of education have fewer children. Better education is associated with lower mortality, better health, and different migration patterns. Hence, the global population outlook depends greatly on further progress in education, particularly of young women. By 2050, the highest and lowest education scenarios--assuming identical education-specific fertility rates--result in world population sizes of 8.9 and 10.0 billion, respectively. Better education also matters for human development, including health, economic growth, and democracy. Existing methods of multi-state demography can quantitatively integrate education into standard demographic analysis, thus adding the "quality" dimension.

  16. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected.

  17. Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/SP-2015-3709, Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide, also known as the "HSIPG," provides a tool for implementing HSI activities within the NASA systems engineering framework. The HSIPG is written to aid the HSI practitioner engaged in a program or project (P/P), and serves as a knowledge base to allow the practitioner to step into an HSI lead or team member role for NASA missions. Additionally, this HSIPG is written to address the role of HSI in the P/P management and systems engineering communities and aid their understanding of the value added by incorporating good HSI practices into their programs and projects. Through helping to build a community of knowledgeable HSI practitioners, this document also hopes to build advocacy across the Agency for establishing strong, consistent HSI policies and practices. Human Systems Integration (HSI) has been successfully adopted (and adapted) by several federal agencies-most notably the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-as a methodology for reducing system life cycle costs (LCCs). These cost savings manifest themselves due to reductions in required numbers of personnel, the practice of human-centered design, decreased reliance on specialized skills for operations, shortened training time, efficient logistics and maintenance, and fewer safety-related risks and mishaps due to unintended human/system interactions. The HSI process for NASA establishes how cost savings and mission success can be realized through systems engineering. Every program or project has unique attributes. This HSIPG is not intended to provide one-size-fits-all recommendations for HSI implementation. Rather, HSI processes should be tailored to the size, scope, and goals of individual situations. The instructions and processes identified here are best used as a starting point for implementing human-centered system concepts and designs across programs and projects of varying types, including

  18. Indoor Temperatures in Patient Waiting Rooms in Eight Rural Primary Health Care Centers in Northern South Africa and the Related Potential Risks to Human Health and Wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Street, Renée A; Cele, Nokulunga; Kunene, Zamantimande; Balakrishna, Yusentha; Albers, Patricia N; Mathee, Angela

    2017-01-06

    Increased temperatures affect human health and vulnerable groups including infants, children, the elderly and people with pre-existing diseases. In the southern African region climate models predict increases in ambient temperature twice that of the global average temperature increase. Poor ventilation and lack of air conditioning in primary health care clinics, where duration of waiting time may be as long as several hours, pose a possible threat to patients seeking primary health care. Drawing on information measured by temperature loggers installed in eight clinics in Giyani, Limpopo Province of South Africa, we were able to determine indoor temperatures of waiting rooms in eight rural primary health care facilities. Mean monthly temperature measurements inside the clinics were warmer during the summer months of December, January and February, and cooler during the autumn months of March, April and May. The highest mean monthly temperature of 31.4 ± 2.7 °C was recorded in one clinic during February 2016. Maximum daily indoor clinic temperatures exceeded 38 °C in some clinics. Indoor temperatures were compared to ambient (outdoor) temperatures and the mean difference between the two showed clinic waiting room temperatures were higher by 2-4 °C on average. Apparent temperature (AT) incorporating relative humidity readings made in the clinics showed 'realfeel' temperatures were >4 °C higher than measured indoor temperature, suggesting a feeling of 'stuffiness' and discomfort may have been experienced in the waiting room areas. During typical clinic operational hours of 8h00 to 16h00, mean ATs fell into temperature ranges associated with heat-health impact warning categories of 'caution' and 'extreme caution'.

  19. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance

    PubMed Central

    Satish, Usha; Shekhar, Krishnamurthy; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Sullivan, Douglas; Streufert, Siegfried; Fisk, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired work performance, increased health symptoms, and poorer perceived air quality have been attributed to correlation of indoor CO2 with concentrations of other indoor air pollutants that are also influenced by rates of outdoor-air ventilation. Objectives: We assessed direct effects of increased CO2, within the range of indoor concentrations, on decision making. Methods: Twenty-two participants were exposed to CO2 at 600, 1,000, and 2,500 ppm in an office-like chamber, in six groups. Each group was exposed to these conditions in three 2.5-hr sessions, all on 1 day, with exposure order balanced across groups. At 600 ppm, CO2 came from outdoor air and participants’ respiration. Higher concentrations were achieved by injecting ultrapure CO2. Ventilation rate and temperature were constant. Under each condition, participants completed a computer-based test of decision-making performance as well as questionnaires on health symptoms and perceived air quality. Participants and the person administering the decision-making test were blinded to CO2 level. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance models. Results: Relative to 600 ppm, at 1,000 ppm CO2, moderate and statistically significant decrements occurred in six of nine scales of decision-making performance. At 2,500 ppm, large and statistically significant reductions occurred in seven scales of decision-making performance (raw score ratios, 0.06–0.56), but performance on the focused activity scale increased. Conclusions: Direct adverse effects of CO2 on human performance may be economically important and may limit energy-saving reductions in outdoor air ventilation per person in buildings. Confirmation of these findings is needed. PMID:23008272

  20. Indoor Temperatures in Patient Waiting Rooms in Eight Rural Primary Health Care Centers in Northern South Africa and the Related Potential Risks to Human Health and Wellbeing

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Caradee Y.; Street, Renée A.; Cele, Nokulunga; Kunene, Zamantimande; Balakrishna, Yusentha; Albers, Patricia N.; Mathee, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Increased temperatures affect human health and vulnerable groups including infants, children, the elderly and people with pre-existing diseases. In the southern African region climate models predict increases in ambient temperature twice that of the global average temperature increase. Poor ventilation and lack of air conditioning in primary health care clinics, where duration of waiting time may be as long as several hours, pose a possible threat to patients seeking primary health care. Drawing on information measured by temperature loggers installed in eight clinics in Giyani, Limpopo Province of South Africa, we were able to determine indoor temperatures of waiting rooms in eight rural primary health care facilities. Mean monthly temperature measurements inside the clinics were warmer during the summer months of December, January and February, and cooler during the autumn months of March, April and May. The highest mean monthly temperature of 31.4 ± 2.7 °C was recorded in one clinic during February 2016. Maximum daily indoor clinic temperatures exceeded 38 °C in some clinics. Indoor temperatures were compared to ambient (outdoor) temperatures and the mean difference between the two showed clinic waiting room temperatures were higher by 2–4 °C on average. Apparent temperature (AT) incorporating relative humidity readings made in the clinics showed ‘realfeel’ temperatures were >4 °C higher than measured indoor temperature, suggesting a feeling of ‘stuffiness’ and discomfort may have been experienced in the waiting room areas. During typical clinic operational hours of 8h00 to 16h00, mean ATs fell into temperature ranges associated with heat–health impact warning categories of ‘caution’ and ‘extreme caution’. PMID:28067816

  1. Integrating Spaceflight Human System Risk Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of human health and performance success during exploration missions as well as to maintain the subsequent long-term health of the crew. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. "Human System Risks" (Risks) have been identified, and approximately 30 are being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  2. Integrating Spaceflight Human System Risk Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, J.; Lumpkins, S.; Anton, W.; Havenhill, M.; Shelhamer, M.; Canga, M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihoods of human health and performance success during exploration missions, and subsequent crew long-term health. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modeled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. "Human System Risks" (Risks) have been identified, and approximately 30 are being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified, however, this has been in an ad hoc fashion. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioral, vehicle, and organizational aspects of the exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. We will discuss how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information is allowing us to identify and visualize connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized way. We will discuss the applications of the visualizations and insights to research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  3. A vision-based fall detection algorithm of human in indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Guo, Yongcai

    2017-02-01

    Elderly care becomes more and more prominent in China as the population is aging fast and the number of aging population is large. Falls, as one of the biggest challenges in elderly guardianship system, have a serious impact on both physical health and mental health of the aged. Based on feature descriptors, such as aspect ratio of human silhouette, velocity of mass center, moving distance of head and angle of the ultimate posture, a novel vision-based fall detection method was proposed in this paper. A fast median method of background modeling with three frames was also suggested. Compared with the conventional bounding box and ellipse method, the novel fall detection technique is not only applicable for recognizing the fall behaviors end of lying down but also suitable for detecting the fall behaviors end of kneeling down and sitting down. In addition, numerous experiment results showed that the method had a good performance in recognition accuracy on the premise of not adding the cost of time.

  4. An Overview of the Human Systems Integration Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the Human Systems Integration Division, and will highlight some of the human performance modeling efforts undertaken in previously presented MIDAS human performance modeling efforts.

  5. Monitoring airborne fungal spores in an experimental indoor environment to evaluate sampling methods and the effects of human activity on air sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1993-01-01

    Aerobiological monitoring was conducted in an experimental room to aid in the development of standardized sampling protocols for airborne microorganisms in the indoor environment. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the relative efficiencies of selected sampling methods for the retrieval of airborne fungal spores and to determine the effect of human activity on air sampling. Dry aerosols containing known concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum spores were generated, and air samples were taken by using Andersen six-stage, Surface Air System, Burkard, and depositional samplers. The Andersen and Burkard samplers retrieved the highest numbers of spores compared with the measurement standard, an aerodynamic particle sizer located inside the room. Data from paired samplers demonstrated that the Andersen sampler had the highest levels of sensitivity and repeatability. With a carpet as the source of P. chrysogenum spores, the effects of human activity (walking or vacuuming near the sampling site) on air sampling were also examined. Air samples were taken under undisturbed conditions and after human activity in the room. Human activity resulted in retrieval of significantly higher concentrations of airborne spores. Surface sampling of the carpet revealed moderate to heavy contamination despite relatively low airborne counts. Therefore, in certain situations, air sampling without concomitant surface sampling may not adequately reflect the level of microbial contamination in indoor environments. PMID:8439150

  6. Ocular integration in the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jonathan C

    2006-10-01

    Human striate cortex contains an orderly map of the contralateral visual field, which is distorted to make a disproportionate amount of tissue available for the representation of the macula. Engrafted on the retinotopic map is a system of alternating inputs known as ocular dominance columns. These columns consist of interleaved bands of geniculocortical afferents in layer 4C serving either the right eye or the left eye. They can be revealed in humans with a history of prior visual loss in one eye by processing striate cortex for cytochrome oxidase at autopsy. Because their geniculate input is segregated, cells within ocular dominance columns in layer 4C respond to stimulation of one eye only. These monocular cells converge onto binocular cells in other layers, integrating signals from the two eyes. The columns in humans appear similar to those found in many primate species, including the macaque. In the squirrel monkey, however, the occurrence of ocular dominance columns is highly variable. Some squirrel monkeys lack columns, yet they seem to have no impairment of visual function. In animals with weakly expressed columns, one can detect a cortical pattern of metabolic activity corresponding to retinal blood vessels. It appears because visual deprivation from shadows cast by blood vessels induces remodeling of geniculocortical afferents, in a manner akin to the shrinkage of ocular dominance columns from congenital cataract. Although the function of ocular dominance columns is unknown, their metabolism is altered in strabismus, suggesting a role in visual suppression.

  7. Integrating spaceflight human system risk research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2017-10-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of exploration mission success and to maintain crew health, both during exploration missions and long term after return to Earth. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. ;Human System Risks; (Risks) have been identified, and 32 are currently being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  8. Simultaneous determination of indoor ammonia pollution and its biological metabolite in the human body with a recyclable nanocrystalline lanthanide-functionalized MOF.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ji-Na; Yan, Bing

    2016-02-07

    A Eu(3+) post-functionalized metal-organic framework of nanosized Ga(OH)bpydc(Eu(3+)@Ga(OH)bpydc, 1a) with intense luminescence is synthesized and characterized. Luminescence measurements reveal that 1a can detect ammonia gas selectively and sensitively among various indoor air pollutants. 1a can simultaneously determine a biological ammonia metabolite (urinary urea) in the human body, which is a rare example of a luminescent sensor that can monitor pollutants in the environment and also detect their biological markers. Furthermore, 1a exhibits appealing features including high selectivity and sensitivity, fast response, simple and quick regeneration, and excellent recyclability.

  9. Aerodynamic Simulation of Indoor Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leon, Nelson; De Leon, Matthew N.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional flight simulator for lightweight (less than 10 g) indoor planes. The simulator consists of four coupled time differential equations describing the plane CG, plane pitch and motor. The equations are integrated numerically with appropriate parameters and initial conditions for two planes: (1) Science Olympiad and (2)…

  10. Aerodynamic Simulation of Indoor Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leon, Nelson; De Leon, Matthew N.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional flight simulator for lightweight (less than 10 g) indoor planes. The simulator consists of four coupled time differential equations describing the plane CG, plane pitch and motor. The equations are integrated numerically with appropriate parameters and initial conditions for two planes: (1) Science Olympiad and (2)…

  11. Human Rights Education Can Be Integrated throughout the School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childhood Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Research indicates that few state departments of education have actually mandated human rights education in their schools. Clearly, individual teachers will need to take responsibility for the integration of peace education and human rights education. By integrating human rights education and peace education into the daily fabric of the school…

  12. Multistage integration model for human egomotion perception.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, G L; Miao, A X; Warren, R

    1995-01-01

    Human computational vision models that attempt to account for the dynamic perception of egomotion and relative depth typically assume a common three-stage process: first, compute the optical flow field based on the dynamically changing image; second, estimate the egomotion states based on the flow; and third, estimate the relative depth/shape based on the egomotion states and possibly on a model of the viewed surface. We propose a model more in line with recent work in human vision, employing multistage integration. Here the dynamic image is first processed to generate spatial and temporal image gradients that drive a mutually interconnected state estimator and depth/shape estimator. The state estimator uses the image gradient information in combination with a depth/shape estimate of the viewed surface and an assumed model of the viewer's dynamics to generate current state estimates; in tandem, the depth/shape estimator uses the image gradient information in combination with the viewer's state estimate and assumed shape model to generate current depth/shape estimates. In this paper, we describe the model and compare model predictions with empirical data.

  13. Relationships among Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Airborne Japanese Cedar Pollen Counts

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Matsuki, Yuuki; Yokoyama, Hiromichi; Matsuki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples) were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89) than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71), suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy. PMID:26110813

  14. Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Matsuki, Yuuki; Yokoyama, Hiromichi; Matsuki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples) were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89) than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71), suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy.

  15. Health effects of indoor odorants.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, J E; Shusterman, D

    1991-01-01

    People assess the quality of the air indoors primarily on the basis of its odors and on their perception of associated health risk. The major current contributors to indoor odorants are human occupant odors (body odor), environmental tobacco smoke, volatile building materials, bio-odorants (particularly mold and animal-derived materials), air fresheners, deodorants, and perfumes. These are most often present as complex mixtures, making measurement of the total odorant problem difficult. There is no current method of measuring human body odor, other than by human panel studies of expert judges of air quality. Human body odors have been quantitated in terms of the "olf" which is the amount of air pollution produced by the average person. Another quantitative unit of odorants is the "decipol," which is the perceived level of pollution produced by the average human ventilated by 10 L/sec of unpolluted air or its equivalent level of dissatisfaction from nonhuman air pollutants. The standard regulatory approach, focusing on individual constituents or chemicals, is not likely to be successful in adequately controlling odorants in indoor air. Besides the current approach of setting minimum ventilation standards to prevent health effects due to indoor air pollution, a standard based on the olf or decipol unit might be more efficacious as well as simpler to measure. PMID:1821378

  16. Morphological Integration of the Modern Human Mandible during Ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial integration is prevalent in anatomical modernity research. Little investigation has been done on mandibular integration. Integration patterns were quantified in a longitudinal modern human sample of mandibles. This integration pattern is one of modularization between the alveolar and muscle attachment regions, but with age-specific differences. The ascending ramus and nonalveolar portions of the corpus remain integrated throughout ontogeny. The alveolar region is dynamic, becoming modularized according to the needs of the mandible at a particular developmental stage. Early in ontogeny, this modularity reflects the need for space for the developing dentition; later, modularity is more reflective of mastication. The overall pattern of modern human mandibular integration follows the integration pattern seen in other mammals, including chimpanzees. Given the differences in craniofacial integration patterns between humans and chimpanzees, but the similarities in mandibular integration, it is likely that the mandible has played the more passive role in hominin skull evolution.

  17. Morphological Integration of the Modern Human Mandible during Ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial integration is prevalent in anatomical modernity research. Little investigation has been done on mandibular integration. Integration patterns were quantified in a longitudinal modern human sample of mandibles. This integration pattern is one of modularization between the alveolar and muscle attachment regions, but with age-specific differences. The ascending ramus and nonalveolar portions of the corpus remain integrated throughout ontogeny. The alveolar region is dynamic, becoming modularized according to the needs of the mandible at a particular developmental stage. Early in ontogeny, this modularity reflects the need for space for the developing dentition; later, modularity is more reflective of mastication. The overall pattern of modern human mandibular integration follows the integration pattern seen in other mammals, including chimpanzees. Given the differences in craniofacial integration patterns between humans and chimpanzees, but the similarities in mandibular integration, it is likely that the mandible has played the more passive role in hominin skull evolution. PMID:21716741

  18. Fungal pollution of indoor environments and its management

    PubMed Central

    Haleem Khan, A.A.; Mohan Karuppayil, S.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor environments play important roles in human health. The health hazards posed by polluted indoor environments include allergy, infections and toxicity. Life style changes have resulted in a shift from open air environments to air tight, energy efficient, environments, in which people spend a substantial portion of their time. Most indoor air pollution comes from the hazardous non biological agents and biological agents. Fungi are ubiquitous in distribution and are a serious threat to public health in indoor environments. In this communication, we have reviewed the current status on biotic indoor air pollution, role of fungi as biological contaminants and their impact on human health. PMID:23961203

  19. Simultaneous determination of indoor ammonia pollution and its biological metabolite in the human body with a recyclable nanocrystalline lanthanide-functionalized MOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ji-Na; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A Eu3+ post-functionalized metal-organic framework of nanosized Ga(OH)bpydc(Eu3+@Ga(OH)bpydc, 1a) with intense luminescence is synthesized and characterized. Luminescence measurements reveal that 1a can detect ammonia gas selectively and sensitively among various indoor air pollutants. 1a can simultaneously determine a biological ammonia metabolite (urinary urea) in the human body, which is a rare example of a luminescent sensor that can monitor pollutants in the environment and also detect their biological markers. Furthermore, 1a exhibits appealing features including high selectivity and sensitivity, fast response, simple and quick regeneration, and excellent recyclability.A Eu3+ post-functionalized metal-organic framework of nanosized Ga(OH)bpydc(Eu3+@Ga(OH)bpydc, 1a) with intense luminescence is synthesized and characterized. Luminescence measurements reveal that 1a can detect ammonia gas selectively and sensitively among various indoor air pollutants. 1a can simultaneously determine a biological ammonia metabolite (urinary urea) in the human body, which is a rare example of a luminescent sensor that can monitor pollutants in the environment and also detect their biological markers. Furthermore, 1a exhibits appealing features including high selectivity and sensitivity, fast response, simple and quick regeneration, and excellent recyclability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section; XPS spectra; N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms; ICP data; SEM image; PXRD patterns and other luminescence data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06066d

  20. A miniature shoe-mounted orientation determination system for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Liu, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking the position of pedestrian is urgently demanded when the most commonly used GPS (Global Position System) is unavailable. Benefited from the small size, low-power consumption, and relatively high reliability, micro-electro-mechanical system sensors are well suited for GPS-denied indoor pedestrian heading estimation. In this paper, a real-time miniature orientation determination system (MODS) was developed for indoor heading and trajectory tracking based on a novel dual-linear Kalman filter. The proposed filter precludes the impact of geomagnetic distortions on pitch and roll that the heading is subjected to. A robust calibration approach was designed to improve the accuracy of sensors measurements based on a unified sensor model. Online tests were performed on the MODS with an improved turntable. The results demonstrate that the average RMSE (root-mean-square error) of heading estimation is less than 1°. Indoor heading experiments were carried out with the MODS mounted on the shoe of pedestrian. Besides, we integrated the existing MODS into an indoor pedestrian dead reckoning application as an example of its utility in realistic actions. A human attitude-based walking model was developed to calculate the walking distance. Test results indicate that mean percentage error of indoor trajectory tracking achieves 2% of the total walking distance. This paper provides a feasible alternative for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking.

  1. A miniature shoe-mounted orientation determination system for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Liu, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking the position of pedestrian is urgently demanded when the most commonly used GPS (Global Position System) is unavailable. Benefited from the small size, low-power consumption, and relatively high reliability, micro-electro-mechanical system sensors are well suited for GPS-denied indoor pedestrian heading estimation. In this paper, a real-time miniature orientation determination system (MODS) was developed for indoor heading and trajectory tracking based on a novel dual-linear Kalman filter. The proposed filter precludes the impact of geomagnetic distortions on pitch and roll that the heading is subjected to. A robust calibration approach was designed to improve the accuracy of sensors measurements based on a unified sensor model. Online tests were performed on the MODS with an improved turntable. The results demonstrate that the average RMSE (root-mean-square error) of heading estimation is less than 1°. Indoor heading experiments were carried out with the MODS mounted on the shoe of pedestrian. Besides, we integrated the existing MODS into an indoor pedestrian dead reckoning application as an example of its utility in realistic actions. A human attitude-based walking model was developed to calculate the walking distance. Test results indicate that mean percentage error of indoor trajectory tracking achieves 2% of the total walking distance. This paper provides a feasible alternative for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking.

  2. Brominated and phosphate flame retardants (FRs) in indoor dust from different microenvironments: Implications for human exposure via dust ingestion and dermal contact.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Qiao, Lin; Covaci, Adrian; Sun, Runxia; Guo, Huiying; Zheng, Jing; Luo, Xiaojun; Xie, Qilai; Mai, Bixian

    2017-10-01

    Indoor dust has been widely used to monitor flame retardants (FRs) in indoor environment, but most studies only focused on floor dust. In the present study, FRs were examined in indoor dust from different locations. Dust from air conditioner (AC) filters, beddings, floor, and windows in bedrooms, and dust from AC filters, printer table surface, computer table surface, floor, and windows in offices were collected, respectively. Polybrominated diphenyl ether congener 209 (BDE 209) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were the most abundant brominated flame retardants (BFRs), and tris(chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP), and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the most abundant phosphate flame retardants (PFRs). In bedrooms, the AC filter dust had the highest median levels of BDE 209 (536 ng/g) and DBDPE (2720 ng/g), while bed dust had the highest median levels of ΣPFRs (2750 ng/g) among dust samples. In offices, printer table dust had higher median levels of BDE 209 (1330 ng/g), DBDPE (8470 ng/g), and ΣPFRs (11,000 ng/g) than those in other dust samples. The high dust ingestion values of BDE 209, DBDPE, and individual PFR were 0.28, 1.20, and <0.01-0.32 ng/kg bw/day and 7.37, 31.2, and <0.01-4.54 ng/kg bw/day for BDE 209, DBDPE, and individual PFR for adults and toddlers, respectively. The high dermal exposure values of individual PFR during sleeping were <0.01-0.23 and <0.01-0.36 ng/kg bw/day for adults and toddlers, respectively. More human exposure pathways other than dust ingestion should be considered, such as the dermal contact with beddings and furniture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Indoor Air '90: the 5th in a series of international conferences on the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Walkinshaw, D

    1992-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate: INDOOR AIR '90 continued a series of international scientific conferences begun in 1978 on a complex, interdisciplinary subject increasingly recognized to be of importance to human comfort, health and productivity, and having important implications for building design and furnishing, office equipment, appliances, cleaning, heating, ventilating, humidifying and air-conditioning. INDOOR AIR '90 constituted a week long program of 542 paper and poster presentations and forum discussions, 100 exhibits, and a public forum. This paper summarizes some of the highlights of this conference and links these to some of the studies reported at earlier INDOOR AIR Conference.

  4. Studying the microbiology of the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott T; Gilbert, Jack A

    2013-02-28

    The majority of people in the developed world spend more than 90% of their lives indoors. Here, we examine our understanding of the bacteria that co-inhabit our artificial world and how they might influence human health.

  5. Studying the microbiology of the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The majority of people in the developed world spend more than 90% of their lives indoors. Here, we examine our understanding of the bacteria that co-inhabit our artificial world and how they might influence human health. PMID:23514020

  6. Research on Extension of Sparql Ontology Query Language Considering the Computation of Indoor Spatial Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Zhu, X.; Guo, W.; Liu, Y.; Huang, H.

    2015-05-01

    A method suitable for indoor complex semantic query considering the computation of indoor spatial relations is provided According to the characteristics of indoor space. This paper designs ontology model describing the space related information of humans, events and Indoor space objects (e.g. Storey and Room) as well as their relations to meet the indoor semantic query. The ontology concepts are used in IndoorSPARQL query language which extends SPARQL syntax for representing and querying indoor space. And four types specific primitives for indoor query, "Adjacent", "Opposite", "Vertical" and "Contain", are defined as query functions in IndoorSPARQL used to support quantitative spatial computations. Also a method is proposed to analysis the query language. Finally this paper adopts this method to realize indoor semantic query on the study area through constructing the ontology model for the study building. The experimental results show that the method proposed in this paper can effectively support complex indoor space semantic query.

  7. Cancer risk assessment of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via indoor and outdoor dust based on probit model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuan; Shao, Dingding; Li, Ning; Yang, Gelin; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zeng, Lixuan; Luo, Jiwen; Zhong, Wenfeng

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor dust and outdoor dust including road and window dust around the traffic road in Hunan Province, China, were sampled and detected. The ∑PAHs in indoor dust ranged from 5007-24,236 ng g(-1), with a median of 14,049 ng g(-1). The ∑PAHs in road dust ranged from 3644-12,875 ng g(-1), with a median of 10,559 ng g(-1). The ∑PAHs in window dust ranged from 803-12,590 ng g(-1), with a median of 5459 ng g(-1). Similar pattern of PAHs was observed in road and window dust except in H3W and H4W samples, which was dominated by naphthalene (Nap), benzo(b+k)fluoranthene (B(b+k)F), phenanthrene (Phe), and fluorine (Fle). Indoor dust showed slightly different PAHs profiles, which was dominated by Nap, fluoranthene (Fla) and Phe. Risk assessment indicated that dermal contact and dust ingestion exposure pathways were more important than the inhalation pathway. Cancer risk of PAHs via dust varied from 2.73 × 10(-8)-8.04 × 10(-6), with a median of 2.06 × 10(-6) for children, and from 2 × 10(-8)-5.89 × 10(-6), with a median of 1.52 × 10(-6) for adult. Probit model showed that 76 and 71 % of samples in the sampling area would result in the risk of children and adult exposure to PAHs via dust higher than the acceptable level (1 × 10(-6)), respectively.

  8. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nero, Anthony V, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the health risks posed by indoor air pollutants, such as airborne combustion products, toxic chemicals, and radioactivity. Questions as to how indoor air might be regulated. Calls for new approaches to environmental protection. (TW)

  9. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nero, Anthony V, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the health risks posed by indoor air pollutants, such as airborne combustion products, toxic chemicals, and radioactivity. Questions as to how indoor air might be regulated. Calls for new approaches to environmental protection. (TW)

  10. Integrating Counseling and Human Development: The Example of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Anne C.

    Division E of the American Educational Research Association is concerned with counseling and human development, yet these two components often appear to be poorly integrated. The integration of counseling and human development, however, is important both for scientific advance and for the provision of better service. A major goal for both…

  11. Integrated Field Scale, Lab Scale, and Modeling Studies for Improving Our Ability to Assess the Groundwater to Indoor Air Pathway at Chlorinated Solvent Impacted Groundwater Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-07

    Chlorinated Solvent-Impacted Groundwater Sites SERDP Project ER-1686 JULY 2016 Paul C. Johnson, Ph.D. Chase Holton, Ph.D. Yuanming Guo, Ph.D...Improving the Ability to Assess the Groundwater to Indoor Air Pathway at Chlorinated Solvent-Impacted Groundwater Sites Paul C. Johnson, Ph.D. - Chase...the groundwater to indoor air vapor intrusion (VI) pathway at chlorinated solvent-impacted groundwater plume sites. Federal, state, and local agency

  12. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard D.; Aamir, Munaf Syed; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Beyeler, Walter E.; Fellner, Karen Marie; Hayden, Nancy Kay; Jeffers, Robert Fredric; Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Mitchell, Michael David; Silver, Emily; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Villa, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Engelke, Peter; Burrow, Mat; Keith, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on

  13. Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for Cognitive Human Factors (STITCH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0761 TITLE: Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for Cognitive Human Factors (STITCH) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...23 JUL 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for Cognitive Human Factors (STITCH) 5b. GRANT...Accomplishments 5 Reportable Outcomes 14 Conclusions 15 Appendices 17 References (appendix B) 18 Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for

  14. The medical humanities and the perils of curricular integration.

    PubMed

    Chiavaroli, Neville; Ellwood, Constance

    2012-12-01

    The advent of integration as a feature of contemporary medical curricula can be seen as an advantage for the medical humanities in that it provides a clear implementation strategy for the inclusion of medical humanities content and/or perspectives, while also making its relevance to medical education more apparent. This paper discusses an example of integration of humanities content into a graduate medical course, raises questions about the desirability of an exclusively integrated approach, and argues for the value of retaining a discrete and coherent disciplinary presence for the medical humanities in medical curricula.

  15. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Sinke, W.C.

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance intensity data of rendered images back into numerical data. To ensure accurate results, the solar irradiation data used as input is compared to numerical data obtained from rendered images, showing excellent agreement. As expected, also ray-tracing precision in the CAD software proves to be very high. To demonstrate PV energy yield simulations using this innovative concept, solar radiation time course data of a few days was modeled in 3-D to simulate distributions of irradiance incident on flat, single- and double-bend shapes and a PV powered computer mouse located on a window sill. Comparisons of measured to simulated PV output of the mouse show that also in practice, simulation accuracies can be very high. Theoretically, this concept has great potential, as it can be adapted to suit a wide range of solar energy applications, such as sun-tracking and concentrator systems, Building Integrated PV (BIPV) or Product Integrated PV (PIPV). However, graphical user interfaces of 'CAD-PV' software tools are not yet available. (author)

  16. Dishwashers are a major source of human opportunistic yeast-like fungi in indoor environments in Mersin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Döğen, Aylin; Kaplan, Engin; Oksüz, Zehra; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2013-07-01

    The natural habitat of opportunistic fungal pathogens is outside of the host; therefore, it is crucial to understand their ecology and routes of transmission. In this study, we investigated the presence of black and filamentous fungi in moist indoor environments in the city of Mersin in subtropical Turkey. In total, 177 private dwellings were screened and 893 samples obtained using cotton swabs and moistened with physiological saline from dishwashers, washing machines, refrigerators, bath-tubs, bathroom walls, and shower heads. These were then inoculated onto malt extract agar supplemented with chloramphenicol, followed by incubation at 37°C. Thirty samples (3.4%) were positive for fungi, which were then identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. Exophiala dermatitidis was the most common species (23), followed by E. phaeomuriformis (three), Magnusiomyces capitatus (two), and Candida parapsilosis (two). Genotype A of E. dermatitidis (14) was more prevalent than genotypes B (eight) and C (one) and E. phaeomuriformis was also represented by two genotypes. Our findings suggest that dishwashers are a major indoor niche for thermophilic black yeasts. The occurrence of the opportunistic filamentous fungus M. capitatus in dishwashers is consistent with a recent report.

  17. Compilation and analysis of types and concentrations of airborne chemicals measured in various indoor and outdoor human environments.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique; Abraham, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    The main purpose of this article is to summarize and illustrate the results of a literature search on the types, levels, relative concentrations, concentration spread of individual chemicals, and number of airborne compounds (mostly volatile organic compounds, VOCs) that have been found, measured, and reported both indoors and outdoors. Two broad categories of indoor environments are considered: (1) home/school, and (2) commercial spaces. Also, two categories of outdoor environments are considered: (1) non-industrial and (2) industrial (the latter represented by the vicinity of a pig farm and the vicinity of an oil refinery). The outcome is presented as a series of graphs and tables containing the following statistics: geometric mean, arithmetic mean, median, standard deviation, variance, standard error, interquartile distance, minimum value, maximum value, and number of data (data count) for the air concentration of each reported compound in a given environment. A Supplementary Table allows interested readers to match each single value included in this compilation with its corresponding original reference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential neural network configuration during human path integration

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Aiden E. G. F; Burles, Ford; Bray, Signe; Levy, Richard M.; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a fundamental skill for navigation in both humans and animals. Despite recent advances in unraveling the neural basis of path integration in animal models, relatively little is known about how path integration operates at a neural level in humans. Previous attempts to characterize the neural mechanisms used by humans to visually path integrate have suggested a central role of the hippocampus in allowing accurate performance, broadly resembling results from animal data. However, in recent years both the central role of the hippocampus and the perspective that animals and humans share similar neural mechanisms for path integration has come into question. The present study uses a data driven analysis to investigate the neural systems engaged during visual path integration in humans, allowing for an unbiased estimate of neural activity across the entire brain. Our results suggest that humans employ common task control, attention and spatial working memory systems across a frontoparietal network during path integration. However, individuals differed in how these systems are configured into functional networks. High performing individuals were found to more broadly express spatial working memory systems in prefrontal cortex, while low performing individuals engaged an allocentric memory system based primarily in the medial occipito-temporal region. These findings suggest that visual path integration in humans over short distances can operate through a spatial working memory system engaging primarily the prefrontal cortex and that the differential configuration of memory systems recruited by task control networks may help explain individual biases in spatial learning strategies. PMID:24808849

  19. Differential neural network configuration during human path integration.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Aiden E G F; Burles, Ford; Bray, Signe; Levy, Richard M; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a fundamental skill for navigation in both humans and animals. Despite recent advances in unraveling the neural basis of path integration in animal models, relatively little is known about how path integration operates at a neural level in humans. Previous attempts to characterize the neural mechanisms used by humans to visually path integrate have suggested a central role of the hippocampus in allowing accurate performance, broadly resembling results from animal data. However, in recent years both the central role of the hippocampus and the perspective that animals and humans share similar neural mechanisms for path integration has come into question. The present study uses a data driven analysis to investigate the neural systems engaged during visual path integration in humans, allowing for an unbiased estimate of neural activity across the entire brain. Our results suggest that humans employ common task control, attention and spatial working memory systems across a frontoparietal network during path integration. However, individuals differed in how these systems are configured into functional networks. High performing individuals were found to more broadly express spatial working memory systems in prefrontal cortex, while low performing individuals engaged an allocentric memory system based primarily in the medial occipito-temporal region. These findings suggest that visual path integration in humans over short distances can operate through a spatial working memory system engaging primarily the prefrontal cortex and that the differential configuration of memory systems recruited by task control networks may help explain individual biases in spatial learning strategies.

  20. [Humanities in medical education: between reduction and integration].

    PubMed

    Han, Taehee

    2015-09-01

    Reductive logic has been a major reasoning style in development of modern biomedical sciences. However, when "medical humanities" is developed by reductive reasoning, integrative and holistic values of humanities tend to be weakened. In that sense, identity and significance of "medical humanities" continue to be controversial despite of its literal clarity. Humanities in medical education should be established by strengthening humanistic and socialistic aspects of regular medical curriculum as well as developing individual "medical humanities" programs.

  1. Integrated Public Education, Fertility and Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azarnert, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the consequences of integration in public education. I show that the flight from the integrated multicultural public schools to private education increases private educational expenditures and, as a result, decreases fertility among more affluent parents whose children flee. In contrast, among less prosperous parents…

  2. Integrated Public Education, Fertility and Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azarnert, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the consequences of integration in public education. I show that the flight from the integrated multicultural public schools to private education increases private educational expenditures and, as a result, decreases fertility among more affluent parents whose children flee. In contrast, among less prosperous parents…

  3. Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The reference human genome sequence set the stage for studies of genetic variation and its association with human disease, but epigenomic studies lack a similar reference. To address this need, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium generated the largest collection so far of human epigenomes for pri...

  4. Sensorimotor integration in human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that human bipedal upright stance is achieved by feedback mechanisms that generate an appropriate corrective torque based on body-sway motion detected primarily by visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensory systems. Because orientation information from the various senses is not always available (eyes closed) or accurate (compliant support surface), the postural control system must somehow adjust to maintain stance in a wide variety of environmental conditions. This is the sensorimotor integration problem that we investigated by evoking anterior-posterior (AP) body sway using pseudorandom rotation of the visual surround and/or support surface (amplitudes 0.5-8 degrees ) in both normal subjects and subjects with severe bilateral vestibular loss (VL). AP rotation of body center-of-mass (COM) was measured in response to six conditions offering different combinations of available sensory information. Stimulus-response data were analyzed using spectral analysis to compute transfer functions and coherence functions over a frequency range from 0.017 to 2.23 Hz. Stimulus-response data were quite linear for any given condition and amplitude. However, overall behavior in normal subjects was nonlinear because gain decreased and phase functions sometimes changed with increasing stimulus amplitude. "Sensory channel reweighting" could account for this nonlinear behavior with subjects showing increasing reliance on vestibular cues as stimulus amplitudes increased. VL subjects could not perform this reweighting, and their stimulus-response behavior remained quite linear. Transfer function curve fits based on a simple feedback control model provided estimates of postural stiffness, damping, and feedback time delay. There were only small changes in these parameters with increasing visual stimulus amplitude. However, stiffness increased as much as 60% with increasing support surface amplitude. To maintain postural stability and avoid resonant behavior, an

  5. Sensorimotor integration in human postural control.

    PubMed

    Peterka, R J

    2002-09-01

    It is generally accepted that human bipedal upright stance is achieved by feedback mechanisms that generate an appropriate corrective torque based on body-sway motion detected primarily by visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensory systems. Because orientation information from the various senses is not always available (eyes closed) or accurate (compliant support surface), the postural control system must somehow adjust to maintain stance in a wide variety of environmental conditions. This is the sensorimotor integration problem that we investigated by evoking anterior-posterior (AP) body sway using pseudorandom rotation of the visual surround and/or support surface (amplitudes 0.5-8 degrees ) in both normal subjects and subjects with severe bilateral vestibular loss (VL). AP rotation of body center-of-mass (COM) was measured in response to six conditions offering different combinations of available sensory information. Stimulus-response data were analyzed using spectral analysis to compute transfer functions and coherence functions over a frequency range from 0.017 to 2.23 Hz. Stimulus-response data were quite linear for any given condition and amplitude. However, overall behavior in normal subjects was nonlinear because gain decreased and phase functions sometimes changed with increasing stimulus amplitude. "Sensory channel reweighting" could account for this nonlinear behavior with subjects showing increasing reliance on vestibular cues as stimulus amplitudes increased. VL subjects could not perform this reweighting, and their stimulus-response behavior remained quite linear. Transfer function curve fits based on a simple feedback control model provided estimates of postural stiffness, damping, and feedback time delay. There were only small changes in these parameters with increasing visual stimulus amplitude. However, stiffness increased as much as 60% with increasing support surface amplitude. To maintain postural stability and avoid resonant behavior, an

  6. Sensorimotor integration in human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that human bipedal upright stance is achieved by feedback mechanisms that generate an appropriate corrective torque based on body-sway motion detected primarily by visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensory systems. Because orientation information from the various senses is not always available (eyes closed) or accurate (compliant support surface), the postural control system must somehow adjust to maintain stance in a wide variety of environmental conditions. This is the sensorimotor integration problem that we investigated by evoking anterior-posterior (AP) body sway using pseudorandom rotation of the visual surround and/or support surface (amplitudes 0.5-8 degrees ) in both normal subjects and subjects with severe bilateral vestibular loss (VL). AP rotation of body center-of-mass (COM) was measured in response to six conditions offering different combinations of available sensory information. Stimulus-response data were analyzed using spectral analysis to compute transfer functions and coherence functions over a frequency range from 0.017 to 2.23 Hz. Stimulus-response data were quite linear for any given condition and amplitude. However, overall behavior in normal subjects was nonlinear because gain decreased and phase functions sometimes changed with increasing stimulus amplitude. "Sensory channel reweighting" could account for this nonlinear behavior with subjects showing increasing reliance on vestibular cues as stimulus amplitudes increased. VL subjects could not perform this reweighting, and their stimulus-response behavior remained quite linear. Transfer function curve fits based on a simple feedback control model provided estimates of postural stiffness, damping, and feedback time delay. There were only small changes in these parameters with increasing visual stimulus amplitude. However, stiffness increased as much as 60% with increasing support surface amplitude. To maintain postural stability and avoid resonant behavior, an

  7. Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous in indoor environments, redistributing from their original sources to all indoor surfaces. Exposures resulting from their indoor presence contribute to detectable body burdens of diverse SVOCs, including pesticides, plasticizers, and flame retardants. This paper critically examines equilibrium partitioning of SVOCs among indoor compartments. It proceeds to evaluate kinetic constraints on sorptive partitioning to organic matter on fixed surfaces and airborne particles. Analyses indicate that equilibrium partitioning is achieved faster for particles than for typical indoor surfaces; indeed, for a strongly sorbing SVOC and a thick sorptive reservoir, equilibrium partitioning is never achieved. Mass-balance considerations are used to develop physical-science-based models that connect source- and sink-rates to airborne concentrations for commonly encountered situations, such as the application of a pesticide or the emission of a plasticizer or flame retardant from its host material. Calculations suggest that many SVOCs have long indoor persistence, even after the primary source is removed. If the only removal mechanism is ventilation, moderately sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 10) may persist indoors for hundreds to thousands of hours, while strongly sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 12) may persist for years. The paper concludes by applying the newly developed framework to explore exposure pathways of building occupants to indoor SVOCs. Accumulation of SVOCs as a consequence of direct air-to-human transport is shown to be potentially large, with a maximum indoor-air processing rate of 10-20 m 3/h for SVOC uptake by human skin, hair and clothing. Levels on human skin calculated with a simple model of direct air-to-skin transfer agree remarkably well with levels measured in dermal hand wipes for SVOCs possessing a wide range of octanol-air partition coefficients.

  8. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  9. Integration of culture and biology in human development.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of integrating biology and culture is addressed in this chapter by emphasizing human development as involving mutually constitutive, embodied, and epigenetic processes. Heuristically rich constructs extrapolated from cultural psychology and developmental science, such as embodiment, action, and activity, are presented as promising approaches to the integration of cultural and biology in human development. These theoretical notions are applied to frame the nascent field of cultural neuroscience as representing this integration of culture and biology. Current empirical research in cultural neuroscience is then synthesized to illustrate emerging trends in this body of literature that examine the integration of biology and culture.

  10. Integrated Reproduction of Human Motion Components by Motion Copying System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, Noboru; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Currently, the development of leading-edge technology for recording and loading human motion on the basis of haptic information is required in the field of manufacturing and human support. Human movement is an assembly of motion components. Since human movements should be supported by a robot in real time, it is necessary to integrate the morion components, which were saved earlier. Once such motion integration is realized, future technology for use in daily human life is developed. This paper proposes the integrated reproduction of the decomposed components of human motion by using a motion copying system. This system is the key technology for the realization of the acquisition, saving and reproduction of the real-world haptic information. By the proposed method, it is possible not only to achieve expert skill acquisition, skill transfer to robots, and power assist for each motion component but also to open up new areas of applications.

  11. Integrative selection of human chromosome-specific yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, W.J.; Reeves, R.G. )

    1991-09-01

    Human specific integrative selection vectors (ISVs) were designed to optimize integration of a yeast-selectable marker specifically into yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) derived from human but not mouse DNA. ISVs were transformed into a YAC genomic library constructed from DNA of a human-mouse somatic cell hybrid containing chromosome 21 (HSA21) as the only human chromosome. One percent of the yeast in the original library contained HSA21-derived YACs; between 45% and 54% of the yeast recovered after transformation with ISV vectors contained human YACs. Integrative selection provides a rapid means of obtaining a highly enriched population of human chromosome-specific YACs by eliminating the labor-intensive steps of isolating and screening primary transformants. The procedure is biased toward the selection of YACs that contain a large number of targets for homologous recombination; thus, libraries constructed by this procedure will be composed primarily of the largest YACs in the population.

  12. Reducing the Risk of Human Space Missions with INTEGRITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Dillon-Merill, Robin L.; Tri, Terry O.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRITY Program will design and operate a test bed facility to help prepare for future beyond-LEO missions. The purpose of INTEGRITY is to enable future missions by developing, testing, and demonstrating advanced human space systems. INTEGRITY will also implement and validate advanced management techniques including risk analysis and mitigation. One important way INTEGRITY will help enable future missions is by reducing their risk. A risk analysis of human space missions is important in defining the steps that INTEGRITY should take to mitigate risk. This paper describes how a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of human space missions will help support the planning and development of INTEGRITY to maximize its benefits to future missions. PRA is a systematic methodology to decompose the system into subsystems and components, to quantify the failure risk as a function of the design elements and their corresponding probability of failure. PRA provides a quantitative estimate of the probability of failure of the system, including an assessment and display of the degree of uncertainty surrounding the probability. PRA provides a basis for understanding the impacts of decisions that affect safety, reliability, performance, and cost. Risks with both high probability and high impact are identified as top priority. The PRA of human missions beyond Earth orbit will help indicate how the risk of future human space missions can be reduced by integrating and testing systems in INTEGRITY.

  13. An integrated evaluation study of the ventilation rate, the exposure and the indoor air quality in naturally ventilated classrooms in the Mediterranean region during spring.

    PubMed

    Dorizas, Paraskevi Vivian; Assimakopoulos, Margarita-Niki; Helmis, Constantinos; Santamouris, Mattheos

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation rates and indoor air pollutants have been extensively monitored in nine naturally ventilated primary schools of Athens, Greece during spring. The ventilation rates and pollutant levels were studied during the teaching and non-teaching periods and ventilation profiles were created for each of the schools. The median ventilation rates per school ranged between 0.7 and 8 ACH while the average ventilation rate in all schools (11.7l/s/p) was greater than the minimum recommended rates by ASHRAE for school classrooms. The average carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations per school varied between 893 and 2082ppm, while the majority of the cases were slightly above the recommended limit values. CO2 concentrations were also positively correlated to the number of students and negatively correlated to the ventilation rates. Particles of several size ranges (PM10, PM5, PM2.5, PM1, PM0.5 and UFP) were also measured and analyzed. PM10 concentrations exceeded the recommended limit values by more than 10 times for the majority of the cases. There were also many cases that the PM2.5 concentrations exceeded their limit values. PM concentrations were significantly affected by the ventilation rates and the presence of students. All of the measured particle sizes were greater during teaching than the non-teaching hours. For most of the cases the indoor to outdoor (I/O) concentrations ratios of PM10 and PM2.5 were much greater than one, indicating that the indoor environment was being mostly affected by indoor sources instead of the outdoor air. Furthermore it was found that chalk and marker boards' usage significantly affect indoor pollutant concentrations. Overall, the measured levels of exposure were for most of the cases greater than the recommended guideline values due to the intense presence of indoor pollution sources, even though the ventilation rates were in general satisfactory.

  14. Integration of spatial relationships and temporal relationships in humans

    PubMed Central

    Molet, Mikaël; Jozefowiez, Jeremie; Miller, Ralph R.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments tested human participants on a two-dimensional, computer, landmark-based search task to assess the integration of independently acquired spatial and temporal relationships. Experiment 1 showed that A–B spatial training followed by B–outcome spatial training resulted in spatial integration in such a way that A was effectively associated with the outcome. Experiment 2 showed that A–B spatial and temporal training followed by B–outcome spatial and temporal training resulted in integration that created both spatial and temporal relationships between A and the outcome. Experiment 3 refuted an alternative explanation, one that is based on decision-making speed, to the temporal-integration strategy that was suggested by Experiment 2. These results replicate in humans the observations regarding spatial integration made by Sawa, Leising, and Blaisdell (2005) using a spatial-search task with pigeons, and they extend those observations to temporal integration. PMID:20065346

  15. Organic contaminants and heavy metals in indoor dust from e-waste recycling, rural, and urban areas in South China: Spatial characteristics and implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    He, Chun-Tao; Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Yan, Xiao; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Mei-Huan; Tan, Xiao; Qiao, Lin; Chen, She-Jun; Yang, Zhong-Yi; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2017-06-01

    The concentrations of several organic contaminants (OCs) and heavy metals were measured in indoor dust from e-waste recycling, rural, and urban areas in South China to illustrate the spatial characteristics of these pollutants and to further evaluate human exposure risks. The median concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and dechlorane plus (DPs) were 38.6-3560, 2360-30,100, 665-2720, and 19.5-1860ng/g, while the median concentrations of Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Zn were 2.46-40.4, 206-1380, 217- 1200, 25.3-134, and 176-212μg/g in indoor dust. The levels of all pollutants, except Zn, in dust from the e-waste recycling area were significantly higher than those from the other areas. Cd, Pb, and most OCs exhibited similar pollution patterns in the three areas, indicating that e-waste recycling activities are the major pollution source. In contrast, Cu, Cr, Zn, and penta-BDE are likely derived from household products in the rural and urban areas. The highest estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of PCBs, PBDEs, DBDPE, and DPs were 0.15-163, 3.97-1470, 1.26-169, and 0.11-134ng/kg bw/day for toddlers and adults. The highest EDIs of BDE 209 and Pb in toddlers in the e-waste recycling area were 16% and 18 times higher than the reference doses, indicating the high exposure risk of these pollutants in the e-waste recycling area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition. Management Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Outputs boxes. Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements Guide ● IMPRINT Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Collect domain requirements inputs 1.1 Ensure...numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Technology Development Phase (Inputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME...Outputs boxes. Technology Development Phase (Outputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME Activities for Each Output: 1.0

  17. Human Systems Integration: Requirements and Functional Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berson, Barry; Gershzohn, Gary; Boltz, Laura; Wolf, Russ; Schultz, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This deliverable was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy and Simulation Integrated Product Teams. This document contains high-level pilot functionality for operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. Based on the derived pilot functions the associated pilot information and control requirements are given.

  18. [Teaching experience in integrated course of human development and genetics].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guang-Rong; Li, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Fang-Jie; Li, Chun-Yi; Liu, Hong; Li, Fu-Cai; Jin, Chun-Lian; Sun, Gui-Yuan; Liu, Cai-Xia; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Sun, Kai-Lai

    2010-04-01

    Establishment of integrated course system in human development and genetics is an important part of course reformation, and the improvement of this system is achieved by integrating the content of course, stabilizing teaching force, building teaching materials and applying problem-based learning. Integrity-PBL teaching model is founded and proved to be feasible and effective by teaching practice. Therefore, it maybe play an important role in improving teaching effect and cultivating ability of students to analyse and solve problems.

  19. Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for Cognitive Human Factors (STITCH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-24

    Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0761 TITLE: Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for Cognitive Human Factors (STITCH) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: W...COVERED (From - To) 25 Sep 2007 - 24 Sep 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Surgical Technology Integration with Tools for Cognitive

  20. Integrating Workforce Planning, Human Resources, and Service Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Birch, Stephen; Baumann, Andrea; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    The feasibility of integrated health human resources planning (IHHRP) was examined. The analysis focused on the following topics: ways of integrating labor market indicators into service planning; whether planning is sufficiently responsive and flexible to retain relevance and validity in rapidly changing health systems; different models and…

  1. Adult Education, Basic Human Needs, and Integrated Development Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Reginald Herbold

    1976-01-01

    This paper argues for an integrated approach to adult education which would require an examination of basic human needs and national development planning each in its own terms. The paper's argument is centered on liberation and participation as ends, not means: Education, development, and planning must be seen and acted on as an integrated whole.…

  2. Indoor air pollution: an edifice complex.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B O; Utter, G M; DeBroy, J A; Schimke, R D

    1991-01-01

    The collision of escalating technological sophistication and surging environmental awareness has caused the reexamination of many societal paradigms. Horror stories about lethal chemical exposures involving isolated cases of ignorance, carelessness or greed have caused the public to demand constant vigilance to prevent exposure to potentially hazardous substances. Accordingly, much time and resource has been expanded by the U.S. government and citizens to abate and prevent air and water pollution. While these efforts have met with measurable success, there is increasing public concern about a new generation of pollution-related human illness in office, home and transportation environments. New instances of Sick Building Syndrome or Building Related Illness are reported daily by the popular press. Human health effects such as cancer, infectious disease, allergy and irritation have been ascribed to indoor air pollution. The clinical aspects of indoor air pollution are often discounted by consulting engineers and industrial hygienists involved in indoor air quality. Physicians and clinically-trained scientists have received a "Macedonian call" to sift clinical relevance from the emotional aspects of indoor air quality problems. Point sources of pollutants, associated human health effects, and problem solving approaches associated with indoor air pollution are described. Regulatory and litigational aspects of indoor air pollution are also discussed.

  3. Human Systems Integration in Practice: Constellation Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program provided a unique testbed for Human Systems Integration (HSI) as a fundamental element of the Systems Engineering process. Constellation was the first major program to have HSI mandated by NASA's Human Rating document. Proper HSI is critical to the success of any project that relies on humans to function as operators, maintainers, or controllers of a system. HSI improves mission, system and human performance, significantly reduces lifecycle costs, lowers risk and minimizes re-design. Successful HSI begins with sufficient project schedule dedicated to the generation of human systems requirements, but is by no means solely a requirements management process. A top-down systems engineering process that recognizes throughout the organization, human factors as a technical discipline equal to traditional engineering disciplines with authority for the overall system. This partners with a bottoms-up mechanism for human-centered design and technical issue resolution. The Constellation Human Systems Integration Group (HSIG) was a part of the Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) organization within the program office, and existed alongside similar groups such as Flight Performance, Environments & Constraints, and Integrated Loads, Structures and Mechanisms. While the HSIG successfully managed, via influence leadership, a down-and-in Community of Practice to facilitate technical integration and issue resolution, it lacked parallel top-down authority to drive integrated design. This presentation will discuss how HSI was applied to Constellation, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers. This presentation will discuss how Human Systems Integration (HSI) was applied to NASA's Constellation program, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers on how to accomplish this critical function.

  4. Analysis of Indoor Air Pollution of Decoration and Control Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the human health is closely related to quality of indoor air. This article analyzes the main types of pollution to indoor air and their harms to human health, and on this basis, it sets forth the prevention measures comprehensively and proposes advices to normalize industry standards.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION EXPOSURES AND SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to indoor and outdoor pollutants vary depending on the sources and concentrations of pollutants as well as human behavioral factors that determine the extent of an individual's contact with indoor or outdoor pollutants. In general, the older populations spend more...

  6. Contribution of indoor-generated particles to residential exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaxon, C.; Gudmundsson, A.; Nordin, E. Z.; Lönnblad, L.; Dahl, A.; Wieslander, G.; Bohgard, M.; Wierzbicka, A.

    2015-04-01

    The majority of airborne particles in residences, when expressed as number concentrations, are generated by the residents themselves, through combustion/thermal related activities. These particles have a considerably smaller diameter than 2.5 μm and, due to the combination of their small size, chemical composition (e.g. soot) and intermittently very high concentrations, should be regarded as having potential to cause adverse health effects. In this study, time resolved airborne particle measurements were conducted for seven consecutive days in 22 randomly selected homes in the urban area of Lund in southern Sweden. The main purpose of the study was to analyze the influence of human activities on the concentration of particles in indoor air. Focus was on number concentrations of particles with diameters <300 nm generated by indoor activities, and how these contribute to the integrated daily residential exposure. Correlations between these particles and soot mass concentration in total dust were also investigated. It was found that candle burning and activities related to cooking (using a frying pan, oven, toaster, and their combinations) were the major particle sources. The frequency of occurrence of a given concentration indoors and outdoors was compared for ultrafine particles. Indoor data was sorted into non-occupancy and occupancy time, and the occupancy time was further divided into non-activity and activity influenced time. It was found that high levels (above 104 cm-3) indoors mainly occur during active periods of occupancy, while the concentration during non-activity influenced time differs very little from non-occupancy time. Total integrated daily residential exposure of ultrafine particles was calculated for 22 homes, the contribution from known activities was 66%, from unknown activities 20%, and from background/non-activity 14%. The collected data also allowed for estimates of particle source strengths for specific activities, and for some activities

  7. Source Attribution of Personal Exposure to Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixture Using Concurrent Personal, Indoor, and Outdoor Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyunok; Spengler, John

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Relative importance of multiple indoor and outdoor venues on personal exposure concentrations to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) remains poorly understood. This is particularly challenging because many c-PAHs share sources and occur as a complex mixture. Accurate and precise apportionment of personal exposure according to exposure venues could aid in understanding of human health effects due to given source. Here, we partitioned indoor and personal exposure concentrations to seven c-PAHs and pyrene according to the indoor- and outdoor- origins. Methods A simultaneous, integrated monitoring of personal, indoor and outdoor concentrations of nine PAHs was conducted in 75 homes for a consecutive 48-hour period across a two-year period in Kraków, Poland. Due to few known indoor sources for chrysene, we used this PAH species as a tracer for infiltration of outdoor PAHs. Personal and indoor concentrations of seven c-PAHs and pyrene were apportioned to home indoor, non-home indoor and outdoor origin. Results Using Chrysenein / Chryseneout as proxy for an infiltration factor, Finf, infiltrated PAHs of outdoor origin are overall higher in concentration than those emitted from the indoor origin. Average contribution by the outdoor sources on B[a]A, B[b]F, and B[k]F were 92%, 79%, and 78% across all seasons. In contrast, in homes where a household members smoked, average contribution by the outdoor sources on B[ghi]P, B[a]P, D[ah]A, and IP were lower (i.e., 67%, 65%, 67%, and 66%, respectively). Season-averaged contribution by the outdoor sources on personal exposure to B[a]A, B[b]F, and B[k]F were 92%, 74%, and 77%, respectively. On the other hand, season-averaged home indoor source contribution on personal exposure to B[a]A, B[b]F, and B[k]F were estimated at 6%, 15%, and 19%, respectively. Similar contributions by season-averaged home indoor sources on personal exposure were estimated at 28% for B[ghi]P, 31% for B[a]P, 25% for D

  8. Ability of humans to smell geosmin, 2-MIB and nonadienal in indoor air when using contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Omür-Ozbek, P; Little, J C; Dietrich, A M

    2007-01-01

    The most common compounds responsible for off flavours are geosmin, 2-MIB, and nonadienal which are poorly removed by conventional water treatment operations and hence result in customer complaints. Because these odourants are moderately volatile and have very low odour threshold values, it is necessary to determine their concentrations in air when water is used indoors. If the detectable aqueous concentrations for these odourants are known, the utilities may take action to treat their water at times when the concentration of the raw water exceeds the threshold concentration. To predict the concentration in the shower stall and bathroom air after showering, recently published Henry's law constants for the selected odourants and a model developed to determine the volatilization of the odourous compounds by applying two-resistance theory were used. Then the results were compared with the odour threshold concentration data to determine under which conditions the odourants become detectable. For parameters representing a typical bathroom and shower stall setting, the results showed that the odourants become detectable when the aqueous concentration of geosmin and nonadienal exceed 10 ng/L at 42 degrees C. As the aqueous concentration increases, geosmin and nonadienal become detectable at lower temperatures, however 2-MIB is only detectable above 20 ng/L and at 42 degrees C.

  9. Chemical kinetics of multiphase reactions between ozone and human skin lipids: Implications for indoor air quality and health effects.

    PubMed

    Lakey, P S J; Wisthaler, A; Berkemeier, T; Mikoviny, T; Pöschl, U; Shiraiwa, M

    2016-12-10

    Ozone reacts with skin lipids such as squalene, generating an array of organic compounds, some of which can act as respiratory or skin irritants. Thus, it is important to quantify and predict the formation of these products under different conditions in indoor environments. We developed the kinetic multilayer model that explicitly resolves mass transport and chemical reactions at the skin and in the gas phase (KM-SUB-Skin). It can reproduce the concentrations of ozone and organic compounds in previous measurements and new experiments. This enabled the spatial and temporal concentration profiles in the skin oil and underlying skin layers to be resolved. Upon exposure to ~30 ppb ozone, the concentrations of squalene ozonolysis products in the gas phase and in the skin reach up to several ppb and on the order of ~10 mmol m(-3) . Depending on various factors including the number of people, room size, and air exchange rates, concentrations of ozone can decrease substantially due to reactions with skin lipids. Ozone and dicarbonyls quickly react away in the upper layers of the skin, preventing them from penetrating deeply into the skin and hence reaching the blood.

  10. Phthalate Esters in Indoor Window Films in a Northeastern Chinese Urban Center: Film Growth and Implications for Human Exposure.

    PubMed

    Huo, Chun-Yan; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Ma, Wan-Li; Song, Wei-Wei; Li, Hai-Ling; Li, Wen-Long; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Wu, Yong-Kai; Han, Ya-Meng; Peng, Zhi-Xiang; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-07-19

    Indoor window film samples were collected in buildings during 2014-2015 for the determination of six phthalate diesters (PAEs). Linear regression analysis suggested that the film mass was positively and significantly correlated with the duration of film growth (from 7 to 77 days). PAEs were detected in all window film samples (n = 64). For all the samples with growth days ranged from 7 to 77 days, the median concentrations of total six PAEs (∑6PAEs) in winter and summer window film samples were 9900 ng/m(2) film (2000 μg/g film) and 4700 ng/m(2) film (650 μg/g film), respectively. Among PAEs analyzed, di-2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate (DEHP) was the major compound (71 ± 9.7%), followed by di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP; 20 ± 7.4%) and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP; 5.1 ± 2.2%). Positive correlations among PAEs suggested their common sources in the window film samples. Room temperature and relative humidity were negatively and significantly correlated with PAEs concentations (in ng/m(2)). Poor ventilation in cold winter in Noreastern China significantly influenced the concentrations of PAEs in window film which suggested higher inhalation exposure dose in winter. The median hazard quotient (HQ) values from PAEs exposure were below 1, suggesting that the intake of PAEs via three exposure pathways was considered as acceptable.

  11. Use of integrated indoor concentrations of tracer gases and volatile organic compounds to distinguish soil sources from above-ground sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion refers to the situation in which harmful chemicals [such as halogenated or chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC) or petroleum products] in the groundwater or soil volatilize in the vadose zone and migrate into the indoor environment. These chemicals typical...

  12. Use of integrated indoor concentrations of tracer gases and volatile organic compounds to distinguish soil sources from above-ground sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion refers to the situation in which harmful chemicals [such as halogenated or chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC) or petroleum products] in the groundwater or soil volatilize in the vadose zone and migrate into the indoor environment. These chemicals typical...

  13. Integrated Visualization of Human Brain Connectome Data.

    PubMed

    Li, Huang; Fang, Shiaofen; Goni, Joaquin; Contreras, Joey A; Liang, Yanhua; Cai, Chengtao; West, John D; Risacher, Shannon L; Wang, Yang; Sporns, Olaf; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Visualization plays a vital role in the analysis of multi-modal neuroimaging data. A major challenge in neuroimaging visualization is how to integrate structural, functional and connectivity data to form a comprehensive visual context for data exploration, quality control, and hypothesis discovery. We develop a new integrated visualization solution for brain imaging data by combining scientific and information visualization techniques within the context of the same anatomic structure. New surface texture techniques are developed to map non-spatial attributes onto the brain surfaces from MRI scans. Two types of non-spatial information are represented: (1) time-series data from resting-state functional MRI measuring brain activation; (2) network properties derived from structural connectivity data for different groups of subjects, which may help guide the detection of differentiation features. Through visual exploration, this integrated solution can help identify brain regions with highly correlated functional activations as well as their activation patterns. Visual detection of differentiation features can also potentially discover image based phenotypic biomarkers for brain diseases.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus integration in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, V; Abrams, H; Roe, T; Lifson, J; Brown, P

    1990-01-01

    Integration of the viral genome into the nuclear DNA of a host cell plays a pivotal role in the replication of retroviruses. We have developed an in vitro method for studying the biochemistry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration by using extracts from HIV-infected cells. Analysis of the reaction products showed that HIV integration in vitro accurately reproduces the in vivo process. Integration occurred without apparent specificity for the target sequence, and the integrated provirus was directly flanked by a 5-base-pair duplication of DNA from the target site. HIV integration did not require a high-energy cofactor, and the enzymatic activities required for integration were recovered with the viral DNA when cell extracts were fractionated by gel exclusion chromatography. Images PMID:2335814

  15. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  16. Human gesture recognition using three-dimensional integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Javier Traver, V; Latorre-Carmona, Pedro; Salvador-Balaguer, Eva; Pla, Filiberto; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integral imaging allows one to reconstruct a 3D scene, including range information, and provides sectional refocused imaging of 3D objects at different ranges. This paper explores the potential use of 3D passive sensing integral imaging for human gesture recognition tasks from sequences of reconstructed 3D video scenes. As a preliminary testbed, the 3D integral imaging sensing is implemented using an array of cameras with the appropriate algorithms for 3D scene reconstruction. Recognition experiments are performed by acquiring 3D video scenes of multiple hand gestures performed by ten people. We analyze the capability and performance of gesture recognition using 3D integral imaging representations at given distances and compare its performance with the use of standard two-dimensional (2D) single-camera videos. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using 3D integral imaging for human gesture recognition.

  17. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

  18. An integrated model of human-wildlife interdependence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, Kun H.; Walsh, Richard G.; Johnson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper attempts to integrate wildlife-related ecologic and economic variables into an econometric model. The model reveals empirical evidence of the presumed interdependence of human-wildlife and the holistic nature of humanity's relationship to the ecosystem. Human use of biologic resources varies not only with income, education, and population, but also with sustainability of humankind's action relative to the quality and quantity of the supporting ecological base.

  19. Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web site will educate the public about indoor environmental issues specific to educational facilities and the importance of developing and sustaining comprehensive indoor air quality management programs.

  20. Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology.

    PubMed

    Kohl, J V; Atzmueller, M; Fink, B; Grammer, K

    2001-10-01

    The effect of sensory input on hormones is essential to any explanation of mammalian behavior, including aspects of physical attraction. The chemical signals we send have direct and developmental effects on hormone levels in other people. Since we don t know either if, or how, visual cues might have direct and developmental effects on hormone levels in other people, the biological basis for the development of visually perceived human physical attraction is currently somewhat questionable. In contrast, the biological basis for the development of physical attraction based on chemical signals is well detailed.

  1. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  2. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  3. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  4. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  5. Your Indoor Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In the July 24, 2007 edition of "ExchangeEveryday", readers were asked to submit great indoor space elements from their early childhood programs. Readers sent photographs and brief descriptions of creative elements of their indoor environments. A sampling of ideas are shown on this article.

  6. The Health Protection Act, national guidelines for indoor air quality and development of the national indoor air programs in Finland.

    PubMed

    Husman, T M

    1999-06-01

    This article presents the current handling of disease related to moldy buildings in Finland as an example of an integrated health strategy. It describes the role of the Finnish Health Protection Act for indoor environments and how cases of indoor air problems are dealt with by local, regional, and national authorities.

  7. The Health Protection Act, national guidelines for indoor air quality and development of the national indoor air programs in Finland.

    PubMed Central

    Husman, T M

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the current handling of disease related to moldy buildings in Finland as an example of an integrated health strategy. It describes the role of the Finnish Health Protection Act for indoor environments and how cases of indoor air problems are dealt with by local, regional, and national authorities. PMID:10347001

  8. Pervasive genetic integration directs the evolution of human skull shape.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel; Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2012-04-01

    It has long been unclear whether the different derived cranial traits of modern humans evolved independently in response to separate selection pressures or whether they resulted from the inherent morphological integration throughout the skull. In a novel approach to this issue, we combine evolutionary quantitative genetics and geometric morphometrics to analyze genetic and phenotypic integration in human skull shape. We measured human skulls in the ossuary of Hallstatt (Austria), which offer a unique opportunity because they are associated with genealogical data. Our results indicate pronounced covariation of traits throughout the skull. Separate simulations of selection for localized shape changes corresponding to some of the principal derived characters of modern human skulls produced outcomes that were similar to each other and involved a joint response in all of these traits. The data for both genetic and phenotypic shape variation were not consistent with the hypothesis that the face, cranial base, and cranial vault are completely independent modules but relatively strongly integrated structures. These results indicate pervasive integration in the human skull and suggest a reinterpretation of the selective scenario for human evolution where the origin of any one of the derived characters may have facilitated the evolution of the others. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), as evidenced by data from a duplicate diet study, indoor air, house dust, and biomonitoring in Germany.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Hermann; Körner, Wolfgang; Shahin, Nabil; Wanner, Antonia; Albrecht, Michael; Boehmer, Sigrun; Parlar, Harun; Mayer, Richard; Liebl, Bernhard; Bolte, Gabriele

    2009-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are used as flame retardants in a wide variety of products. As part of the Integrated Exposure Assessment Survey (INES), this study aimed to characterize the exposure of an adult German population using duplicate diet samples, which were collected daily over seven consecutive days, and indoor air and house dust measurements. Our study population consisted of 27 female and 23 male healthy subjects, aged 14-60 years, all of whom resided in 34 homes in southern Bavaria. In these 34 residences the air was sampled using glass fiber filters and polyurethane foams and the dust was collected from used vacuum cleaner bags. The median (95th percentile) daily dietary intake of six Tetra- to HeptaBDE congeners was 1.2 ng/kg b.w. (3.3 ng/kg b.w.) or 67.8 ng/day (208 ng/day) (calculated from the 7-day median values of each study subject). Concentrations in indoor air and dust (cumulative Tri- to DecaBDE congener readings) ranged from 8.2 to 477 pg/m(3) (median: 37.8 pg/m(3)) and 36.6 to 1580 ng/g (median: 386 ng/g), respectively. For some congeners, we identified a significant correlation between air and dust levels. The median (95th percentile) blood concentration of total Tetra- to HexaBDE congener readings was 5.6 (13.2)ng/g lipid. No significant sex differences were observed, but higher blood concentrations were found in younger participants. Using a simplified toxicokinetic model to predict the body burden from exposure doses led to results that were of the same order of magnitude as the measured blood concentrations. Based on these measurements and given our exposure assumptions, we estimated for the total tetra- to heptabrominated congener count an average (high) comprehensive total daily intake of 1.2 ng/kg b.w. (2.5 ng/kg b.w.). Overall, our results suggest that dietary exposure is the dominant intake pathway at least in our study population, responsible for 97% (average intake) and 95% (high intake) of the total intake of an adult

  10. Integral hair lipid in human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Soo

    2011-12-01

    Integral hair lipid (IHL) is bound to the keratinized cell surface to make an environmentally resistant lipid envelope. It is mainly positioned on the hair cuticle and inner root sheath. IHL in the hair follicle may regard as hair barrier to be similar to the epidermal lipid layer functioning as skin barrier. Major constituents of IHL are fatty acid, phytosphingosine, ceramide in decreasing order. Minor constituents of IHL are cholesterol, cholesterol sulfate and cholesterol oleate. Cuticle or cortical cell surface in hair are abundant in fatty acids unlike the keratinized area of epidermis or sebaceous gland, and about 30-40% of such fatty acids are composed of 18-methyl-eicosanoic acid which is known to be bound to proteins by ester or thioester bond. Various factors including moisture, solvent, oxidative damage during bleaching or permanent waving affect IHL. Photochemical changes also can occur in IHL as well as in hair protein and hair pigment. Lipid metabolism is thought to play an essential role in lipid envelope of hair, but also involvement in hair development and function. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Research Program Integrated Research Plan. Revision A January 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Research Plan (IRP) describes the portfolio of Human Research Program (HRP) research and technology tasks. The IRP is the HRP strategic and tactical plan for research necessary to meet HRP requirements. The need to produce an IRP is established in HRP-47052, Human Research Program - Program Plan, and is under configuration management control of the Human Research Program Control Board (HRPCB). Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) is essential to enabling extended periods of space exploration because it provides knowledge and tools to mitigate risks to human health and performance. Risks include physiological and behavioral effects from radiation and hypogravity environments, as well as unique challenges in medical support, human factors, and behavioral or psychological factors. The Human Research Program (HRP) delivers human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. Without HRP results, NASA will face unknown and unacceptable risks for mission success and post-mission crew health. This Integrated Research Plan (IRP) describes HRP s approach and research activities that are intended to address the needs of human space exploration and serve HRP customers and how they are integrated to provide a risk mitigation tool. The scope of the IRP is limited to the activities that can be conducted with the resources available to the HRP; it does not contain activities that would be performed if additional resources were available. The timescale of human space exploration is envisioned to take many decades. The IRP illustrates the program s research plan through the timescale of early lunar missions of extended duration.

  12. Human Systems Integration for Network Centric Warfare (Integration des systemes humains dans les operations reseaux centrees)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    with Network Size Structure into an OpNet Model 3-27 Figure 3-21 Human Information Processing as Probabilistic Transfer Model 3-29 Figure 3-22...integrates human capabilities and limitations into system definition, design, development, and evaluation to optimize total system performance in...representation of how the human operator works within a large socio-technical system. That is, specific display technologies might be evaluated without a clear

  13. Integrated 10 Gb/s multilevel multiband passive optical network and 500 Mb/s indoor visible light communication system based on Nyquist single carrier frequency domain equalization modulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanquan; Shi, Jianyang; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yiguang; Chi, Nan

    2014-05-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel integrated passive optical network (PON) and indoor visible light communication (VLC) system based on Nyquist single carrier frequency domain equalization (N-SC-FDE) modulation with direct detection. In this system, a directly modulated laser and a commercially available red light emitting diode are served as the transmitters of the PON and VLC, respectively. To enable high spectral efficiency, high-speed transmission, and flexible multiple access with simplified optical network unit-side digital signal processing, multilevel, multiband quadrature amplitude modulations 128/64/16 are implemented here. VLC N-SC-FDE signals are successfully delivered a further 30 cm indoor distance after transmitting over a span of 40 km single mode fiber (SMF) together with 3 sub-band PON signals. As a proof of concept, a 10 Gb/s PON and 500 Mb/s VLC integrated system for three wired users and one wireless user is successfully achieved, which shows the promising potential and feasibility of this proposal to extend multiple services from metropolitan to suburban areas.

  14. Estimation of exposure to atmospheric pollutants during pregnancy integrating space-time activity and indoor air levels: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Marion; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Lyon-Caen, Sarah; Morelli, Xavier; Cracowski, Claire; Pontet, Sabrina; Pin, Isabelle; Lepeule, Johanna; Siroux, Valérie; Slama, Rémy

    2015-11-01

    Studies of air pollution effects during pregnancy generally only consider exposure in the outdoor air at the home address. We aimed to compare exposure models differing in their ability to account for the spatial resolution of pollutants, space-time activity and indoor air pollution levels. We recruited 40 pregnant women in the Grenoble urban area, France, who carried a Global Positioning System (GPS) during up to 3 weeks; in a subgroup, indoor measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted at home (n=9) and personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was assessed using passive air samplers (n=10). Outdoor concentrations of NO2, and PM2.5 were estimated from a dispersion model with a fine spatial resolution. Women spent on average 16 h per day at home. Considering only outdoor levels, for estimates at the home address, the correlation between the estimate using the nearest background air monitoring station and the estimate from the dispersion model was high (r=0.93) for PM2.5 and moderate (r=0.67) for NO2. The model incorporating clean GPS data was less correlated with the estimate relying on raw GPS data (r=0.77) than the model ignoring space-time activity (r=0.93). PM2.5 outdoor levels were not to moderately correlated with estimates from the model incorporating indoor measurements and space-time activity (r=-0.10 to 0.47), while NO2 personal levels were not correlated with outdoor levels (r=-0.42 to 0.03). In this urban area, accounting for space-time activity little influenced exposure estimates; in a subgroup of subjects (n=9), incorporating indoor pollution levels seemed to strongly modify them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of exposure to atmospheric pollutants during pregnancy integrating space-time activity and indoor air levels: does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Marion, OUIDIR; Lise, GIORGIS-ALLEMAND; Sarah, LYON-CAEN; Xavier, MORELLI; Claire, CRACOWSKI; Sabrina, PONTET; Isabelle, PIN; Johanna, LEPEULE; Valérie, SIROUX; Rémy, SLAMA

    2016-01-01

    Studies of air pollution effects during pregnancy generally only consider exposure in the outdoor air at the home address. We aimed to compare exposure models differing in their ability to account for the spatial resolution of pollutants, space-time activity and indoor air pollution levels. We recruited 40 pregnant women in the Grenoble urban area, France, who carried a Global Positioning System (GPS) during up to 3 weeks; in a subgroup, indoor measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted at home (n=9) and personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was assessed using passive air samplers (n=10). Outdoor concentrations of NO2, and PM2.5 were estimated from a dispersion model with a fine spatial resolution. Women spent on average 16 h per day at home. Considering only outdoor levels, for estimates at the home address, the correlation between the estimate using the nearest background air monitoring station and the estimate from the dispersion model was high (r=0.93) for PM2.5 and moderate (r=0.67) for NO2. The model incorporating clean GPS data was less correlated with the estimate relying on raw GPS data (r=0.77) than the model ignoring space-time activity (r=0.93). PM2.5 outdoor levels were not to moderately correlated with estimates from the model incorporating indoor measurements and space-time activity (r=−0.10 to 0.47), while NO2 personal levels were not correlated with outdoor levels (r=−0.42 to 0.03). In this urban area, accounting for space-time activity little influenced exposure estimates; in a subgroup of subjects (n=9), incorporating indoor pollution levels seemed to strongly modify them. PMID:26300245

  16. Dietary integration with oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) essential oil improves growth rate and oxidative status in outdoor-reared, but not indoor-reared, pigs.

    PubMed

    Forte, C; Ranucci, D; Beghelli, D; Branciari, R; Acuti, G; Todini, L; Cavallucci, C; Trabalza-Marinucci, M

    2017-01-09

    The effects of a diet supplemented with oregano essential oil on performance, oxidative status, pork quality traits and sensorial properties were evaluated. In two studies, 72 pigs in indoor or outdoor conditions were assigned to either a control diet or an identical diet supplemented with 0.2% oregano essential oil. Pigs reared outdoor showed lower live weight, average daily gain and average gain:feed ratio compared to indoor pigs. The oregano supplementation improved the growth performance of the outdoor- but not the indoor-reared animals. The serum oxidative status was influenced by the diet. A higher oxidative stability was observed in the oregano-supplemented groups. As for the rearing conditions, the data suggest that after an initial adapting period, the free-range farming systems could be better tolerated by pigs. Meat derived from pigs reared outdoor showed higher pH and a* values. Lightness was influenced by both the diet and the rearing conditions. The control group reared indoor showed shear force values higher than both supplemented groups, while no differences were detected with the control group reared outdoor. In the consumer test performed under blind conditions, the oregano groups achieved higher consistency scores compared with the control. Under informed conditions, the meat derived from the oregano-supplemented pigs reared outdoor received the highest scores for consistency and overall liking regardless of the rearing system. The same result for the overall liking score was obtained in the expectation test. The data obtained showed that dietary oregano essential oil can be effective in reducing performance losses due to the outdoor-rearing system, increasing the oxidative status of the animal and oxidative stability of the meat, without modifying the meat quality traits and improving consumer perceptions of the meat quality.

  17. Workgroup Report: Indoor Chemistry and Health

    PubMed Central

    Weschler, Charles J.; Wells, J.R.; Poppendieck, Dustin; Hubbard, Heidi; Pearce, Terri A.

    2006-01-01

    Chemicals present in indoor air can react with one another, either in the gas phase or on surfaces, altering the concentrations of both reactants and products. Such chemistry is often the major source of free radicals and other short-lived reactive species in indoor environments. To what extent do the products of indoor chemistry affect human health? To address this question, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health sponsored a workshop titled “Indoor Chemistry and Health” on 12–15 July 2004 at the University of California–Santa Cruz. Approximately 70 experts from eight countries participated. Objectives included enhancing communications between researchers in indoor chemistry and health professionals, as well as defining a list of priority research needs related to the topic of the workshop. The ultimate challenges in this emerging field are defining exposures to the products of indoor chemistry and developing an understanding of the links between these exposures and various health outcomes. The workshop was a step toward meeting these challenges. This summary presents the issues discussed at the workshop and the priority research needs identified by the attendees. PMID:16507469

  18. In vitro assessment of the bioaccessibility of brominated flame retardants in indoor dust using a colon extended model of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Tilston, Emma; Harrad, Stuart; Collins, Chris

    2012-12-01

    An in vitro colon extended physiologically based extraction test (CEPBET) which incorporates human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) parameters (including pH and chemistry, solid-to-fluid ratio, mixing and emptying rates) was applied for the first time to study the bioaccessibility of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from the 3 main GIT compartments (stomach, small intestine and colon) following ingestion of indoor dust. Results revealed the bioaccessibility of γ-HBCD (72%) was less than that for α- and β-isomers (92% and 80% respectively) which may be attributed to the lower aqueous solubility of the γ-isomer (2 μg L⁻¹) compared to the α- and β-isomers (45 and 15 μg L⁻¹ respectively). No significant change in the enantiomeric fractions of HBCDs was observed in any of the studied samples. However, this does not completely exclude the possibility of in vivo enantioselective absorption of HBCDs, as the GIT cell lining and bacterial flora--which may act enantioselectively--are not included in the current CE-PBET model. While TBBP-A was almost completely (94%) bioaccessible, BDE-209 was the least (14%) bioaccessible of the studied BFRs. Bioaccessibility of tri-hepta BDEs ranged from 32-58%. No decrease in the bioaccessibility with increasing level of bromination was observed in the studied PBDEs.

  19. Integration of social information by human groups

    PubMed Central

    Granovskiy, Boris; Gold, Jason M.; Sumpter, David; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a situation in which individuals search for accurate decisions without direct feedback on their accuracy but with information about the decisions made by peers in their group. The “wisdom of crowds” hypothesis states that the average judgment of many individuals can give a good estimate of, for example, the outcomes of sporting events and the answers to trivia questions. Two conditions for the application of wisdom of crowds are that estimates should be independent and unbiased. Here, we study how individuals integrate social information when answering trivia questions with answers that range between 0 and 100% (e.g., ‘What percentage of Americans are left-handed?’). We find that, consistent with the wisdom of crowds hypothesis, average performance improves with group size. However, individuals show a consistent bias to produce estimates that are insufficiently extreme. We find that social information provides significant, albeit small, improvement to group performance. Outliers with answers far from the correct answer move towards the position of the group mean. Given that these outliers also tend to be nearer to 50% than do the answers of other group members, this move creates group polarization away from 50%. By looking at individual performance over different questions we find that some people are more likely to be affected by social influence than others. There is also evidence that people differ in their competence in answering questions, but lack of competence is not significantly correlated with willingness to change guesses. We develop a mathematical model based on these results that postulates a cognitive process in which people first decide whether to take into account peer guesses, and if so, to move in the direction of these guesses. The size of the move is proportional to the distance between their own guess and the average guess of the group. This model closely approximates the distribution of guess movements and shows how

  20. Integration of Social Information by Human Groups.

    PubMed

    Granovskiy, Boris; Gold, Jason M; Sumpter, David J T; Goldstone, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    We consider a situation in which individuals search for accurate decisions without direct feedback on their accuracy, but with information about the decisions made by peers in their group. The "wisdom of crowds" hypothesis states that the average judgment of many individuals can give a good estimate of, for example, the outcomes of sporting events and the answers to trivia questions. Two conditions for the application of wisdom of crowds are that estimates should be independent and unbiased. Here, we study how individuals integrate social information when answering trivia questions with answers that range between 0% and 100% (e.g., "What percentage of Americans are left-handed?"). We find that, consistent with the wisdom of crowds hypothesis, average performance improves with group size. However, individuals show a consistent bias to produce estimates that are insufficiently extreme. We find that social information provides significant, albeit small, improvement to group performance. Outliers with answers far from the correct answer move toward the position of the group mean. Given that these outliers also tend to be nearer to 50% than do the answers of other group members, this move creates group polarization away from 50%. By looking at individual performance over different questions we find that some people are more likely to be affected by social influence than others. There is also evidence that people differ in their competence in answering questions, but lack of competence is not significantly correlated with willingness to change guesses. We develop a mathematical model based on these results that postulates a cognitive process in which people first decide whether to take into account peer guesses, and if so, to move in the direction of these guesses. The size of the move is proportional to the distance between their own guess and the average guess of the group. This model closely approximates the distribution of guess movements and shows how outlying

  1. Human Research Program Integrated Research Plan. Revision C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Crew health and performance are critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) is essential to enabling extended periods of space exploration because it provides knowledge and tools to mitigate risks to human health and performance. Risks include physiological effects from radiation and hypogravity environments, as well as unique challenges in medical support, human factors, and behavioral or psychological factors. The Human Research Program (HRP) delivers human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. Without HRP results, NASA will face unknown and unacceptable risks for mission success and post-mission crew health. This Integrated Research Plan (IRP) describes (1) HRP's approach and research activities that are intended to address the needs of human space exploration and serve HRP customers and (2) the method of integration for risk mitigation. The scope of the IRP is limited to the activities that can be conducted with the resources available to the HRP; it does not contain activities that would be performed if additional resources were available. The timescale of human space exploration is envisioned to take many decades. The IRP illustrates the program s research plan through the timescale of early lunar missions of extended duration.

  2. Analyzing Human-Landscape Interactions: Tools That Integrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvoleff, Alex; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Humans have transformed much of Earth's land surface, giving rise to loss of biodiversity, climate change, and a host of other environmental issues that are affecting human and biophysical systems in unexpected ways. To confront these problems, environmental managers must consider human and landscape systems in integrated ways. This means making use of data obtained from a broad range of methods (e.g., sensors, surveys), while taking into account new findings from the social and biophysical science literatures. New integrative methods (including data fusion, simulation modeling, and participatory approaches) have emerged in recent years to address these challenges, and to allow analysts to provide information that links qualitative and quantitative elements for policymakers. This paper brings attention to these emergent tools while providing an overview of the tools currently in use for analysis of human-landscape interactions. Analysts are now faced with a staggering array of approaches in the human-landscape literature—in an attempt to bring increased clarity to the field, we identify the relative strengths of each tool, and provide guidance to analysts on the areas to which each tool is best applied. We discuss four broad categories of tools: statistical methods (including survival analysis, multi-level modeling, and Bayesian approaches), GIS and spatial analysis methods, simulation approaches (including cellular automata, agent-based modeling, and participatory modeling), and mixed-method techniques (such as alternative futures modeling and integrated assessment). For each tool, we offer an example from the literature of its application in human-landscape research. Among these tools, participatory approaches are gaining prominence for analysts to make the broadest possible array of information available to researchers, environmental managers, and policymakers. Further development of new approaches of data fusion and integration across sites or disciplines

  3. Analyzing human-landscape interactions: tools that integrate.

    PubMed

    Zvoleff, Alex; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Humans have transformed much of Earth's land surface, giving rise to loss of biodiversity, climate change, and a host of other environmental issues that are affecting human and biophysical systems in unexpected ways. To confront these problems, environmental managers must consider human and landscape systems in integrated ways. This means making use of data obtained from a broad range of methods (e.g., sensors, surveys), while taking into account new findings from the social and biophysical science literatures. New integrative methods (including data fusion, simulation modeling, and participatory approaches) have emerged in recent years to address these challenges, and to allow analysts to provide information that links qualitative and quantitative elements for policymakers. This paper brings attention to these emergent tools while providing an overview of the tools currently in use for analysis of human-landscape interactions. Analysts are now faced with a staggering array of approaches in the human-landscape literature--in an attempt to bring increased clarity to the field, we identify the relative strengths of each tool, and provide guidance to analysts on the areas to which each tool is best applied. We discuss four broad categories of tools: statistical methods (including survival analysis, multi-level modeling, and Bayesian approaches), GIS and spatial analysis methods, simulation approaches (including cellular automata, agent-based modeling, and participatory modeling), and mixed-method techniques (such as alternative futures modeling and integrated assessment). For each tool, we offer an example from the literature of its application in human-landscape research. Among these tools, participatory approaches are gaining prominence for analysts to make the broadest possible array of information available to researchers, environmental managers, and policymakers. Further development of new approaches of data fusion and integration across sites or disciplines pose

  4. Integrative regulation of human brain blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Fisher, Joseph A; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we review mechanisms regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF), with specific focus on humans. We revisit important concepts from the older literature and describe the interaction of various mechanisms of cerebrovascular control. We amalgamate this broad scope of information into a brief review, rather than detailing any one mechanism or area of research. The relationship between regulatory mechanisms is emphasized, but the following three broad categories of control are explicated: (1) the effect of blood gases and neuronal metabolism on CBF; (2) buffering of CBF with changes in blood pressure, termed cerebral autoregulation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system in CBF regulation. With respect to these control mechanisms, we provide evidence against several canonized paradigms of CBF control. Specifically, we corroborate the following four key theses: (1) that cerebral autoregulation does not maintain constant perfusion through a mean arterial pressure range of 60–150 mmHg; (2) that there is important stimulatory synergism and regulatory interdependence of arterial blood gases and blood pressure on CBF regulation; (3) that cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular sensitivity to changes in arterial blood gases are not modulated solely at the pial arterioles; and (4) that neurogenic control of the cerebral vasculature is an important player in autoregulatory function and, crucially, acts to buffer surges in perfusion pressure. Finally, we summarize the state of our knowledge with respect to these areas, outline important gaps in the literature and suggest avenues for future research. PMID:24396059

  5. Simulation of a steady-state integrated human thermal system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, F. T.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical model of an integrated human thermal system is formulated. The system consists of an external thermal regulation device on the human body. The purpose of the device (a network of cooling tubes held in contact with the surface of the skin) is to maintain the human body in a state of thermoneutrality. The device is controlled by varying the inlet coolant temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The differential equations of the model are approximated by a set of algebraic equations which result from the application of the explicit forward finite difference method to the differential equations. The integrated human thermal system is simulated for a variety of combinations of the inlet coolant temperature, coolant mass flow rate, and metabolic rates.

  6. Simulation of a steady-state integrated human thermal system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, F. T.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical model of an integrated human thermal system is formulated. The system consists of an external thermal regulation device on the human body. The purpose of the device (a network of cooling tubes held in contact with the surface of the skin) is to maintain the human body in a state of thermoneutrality. The device is controlled by varying the inlet coolant temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The differential equations of the model are approximated by a set of algebraic equations which result from the application of the explicit forward finite difference method to the differential equations. The integrated human thermal system is simulated for a variety of combinations of the inlet coolant temperature, coolant mass flow rate, and metabolic rates.

  7. Low Cost and Efficient 3d Indoor Mapping Using Multiple Consumer Rgb-D Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Yang, B. S.; Song, S.

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the miniaturization, lightweight of positioning and remote sensing sensors as well as the urgent needs for fusing indoor and outdoor maps for next generation navigation, 3D indoor mapping from mobile scanning is a hot research and application topic. The point clouds with auxiliary data such as colour, infrared images derived from 3D indoor mobile mapping suite can be used in a variety of novel applications, including indoor scene visualization, automated floorplan generation, gaming, reverse engineering, navigation, simulation and etc. State-of-the-art 3D indoor mapping systems equipped with multiple laser scanners product accurate point clouds of building interiors containing billions of points. However, these laser scanner based systems are mostly expensive and not portable. Low cost consumer RGB-D Cameras provides an alternative way to solve the core challenge of indoor mapping that is capturing detailed underlying geometry of the building interiors. Nevertheless, RGB-D Cameras have a very limited field of view resulting in low efficiency in the data collecting stage and incomplete dataset that missing major building structures (e.g. ceilings, walls). Endeavour to collect a complete scene without data blanks using single RGB-D Camera is not technic sound because of the large amount of human labour and position parameters need to be solved. To find an efficient and low cost way to solve the 3D indoor mapping, in this paper, we present an indoor mapping suite prototype that is built upon a novel calibration method which calibrates internal parameters and external parameters of multiple RGB-D Cameras. Three Kinect sensors are mounted on a rig with different view direction to form a large field of view. The calibration procedure is three folds: 1, the internal parameters of the colour and infrared camera inside each Kinect are calibrated using a chess board pattern, respectively; 2, the external parameters between the colour and infrared camera inside each

  8. Indoor particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nazaroff, W W

    2004-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter is a diverse pollutant class whose excessive presence in indoor air contributes to an array of adverse health and material-damage effects. Particles are classified according to their diameter into three size modes: ultrafine (0.1 microm), accumulation (0.1-2 microm), and coarse (= 2 microm). These modes have largely distinct sources and composition, and they exhibit different dynamic behaviors. The concept of mass conservation or material balance provides a foundation for quantitatively and mechanistically linking important outcome variables, such as concentrations and exposures, to the influencing input parameters. The factors governing indoor particle concentrations include direct emissions from indoor sources, ventilation supply from outdoor air, filtration, deposition onto indoor surfaces, and removal from indoor air by means of ventilation. In some circumstances, transport and transformation processes within indoor environments may also play an important role in influencing particle concentrations and consequences. Such processes include mixing, interzonal transport, resuspension, coagulation, and phase change. The paper gives a practical overview of issues related to particulate matter indoors, as well as valuable information for understanding filtration and how particles contribute to adverse health effects.

  9. Flame retardants and organochlorines in indoor dust from several e-waste recycling sites in South China: composition variations and implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Xu, Fuchao; Chen, Kehui; Zeng, Yanhong; Luo, Xiaojun; Chen, Shejun; Mai, Bixian; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    Several classes of flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), dechlorane plus (DPs), and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), together with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in indoor dust from five villages located in three e-waste recycling regions in Guangdong Province, South China. The medians of PBDEs, NBFRs, and PFRs in dust in five sites ranged from 685-67,500, 1460-50,010, and 2180-29,000ng/g, respectively. These concentrations were much higher than the medians of PCBs (52-2900ng/g). BDE 209 and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were the two major halogen flame retardants in dust, while tris-(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were the major PFRs. Principle component analysis revealed the different pollutant patterns among different sites. The estimated median human exposures of PBDEs, NBFRs, PFRs, and PCBs via dust ingestion were 1.1-24.1, 0.73-20.3, 1.36-23.5, and 0.04-0.93ng/kgbw/day for adults, and 16.2-352, 10.7-296, 19.9-343, 0.05-0.61, 0.65-13.6ng/kgbw/day for toddlers, respectively. Residents from Site 5 had the highest exposure (95 percentile levels and high dust ingestion for toddlers) of PBDEs (3920ng/kgbw/day), NBFRs (3200ng/kgbw/day), and PFRs (5280ng/kgbw/day). More attention should be paid to the contamination with NBFRs and PFRs, instead of PCBs, in these e-waste recycling regions, and local public health threat from PBDE alternatives should remain of concern. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on human exposure assessment of PFRs at e-waste sites.

  10. Integrating Action Theory and Human Agency in Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2002-01-01

    Paper discusses and analyzes the correlation between action theory and the notion of human agency in a life career development context. Theoretical and research background of the two perspectives are discussed. Connections between the two perspectives are identified. Career counseling implications that enhance integration of individuals' action…

  11. The Astonishing Curriculum: Integrating Science and Humanities through Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchudi, Stephen, Ed.

    This book probes the possibilities of interdisciplinary learning and integrated curriculum through the structuring and expressive powers of language. The 15 essays in the book explore the issues of bridging the gap between the two cultures of science and humanities, demystifying science for learners, teaching students to construct and explain…

  12. Driving Performance Improvements by Integrating Competencies with Human Resource Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jin Gu; Park, Yongho; Yang, Gi Hun

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issues in the development and application of a competency model and provides implications for more precise integration of competencies into human resource (HR) functions driving performance improvement. This research is based on a case study from a Korean consumer corporation. This study employed document reviews,…

  13. Human in the Loop Integrated Life Support Systems Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald L.; Marmolejo, Jose A.; Seaman, Calvin H.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will be long duration with abort scenarios of days to months. This necessitates provisioning the crew with all the things they will need to sustain themselves while carrying out mission objectives. Systems engineering and integration is critical to the point where extensive integrated testing of life support systems on the ground is required to identify and mitigate risks. Ground test facilities (human-rated altitude chambers) at the Johnson Space Center are being readied to integrate all the systems for a mission along with a human test crew. The relevant environment will include deep space habitat human accommodations, sealed atmosphere capable of 14.7 to 8 psi total pressure and 21 to 32% oxygen concentration, life support systems (food, air, and water), communications, crew accommodations, medical, EVA, tools, etc. Testing periods will approximate those of the expected missions (such as a near Earth asteroid, Earth-Moon L2 or L1, the moon, Mars). This type of integrated testing is needed for research and technology development as well as later during the mission design, development, test, and evaluation (DDT&E) phases of an approved program. Testing will evolve to be carried out at the mission level fly the mission on the ground . Mission testing will also serve to inform the public and provide the opportunity for active participation by international, industrial and academic partners.

  14. Driving Performance Improvements by Integrating Competencies with Human Resource Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jin Gu; Park, Yongho; Yang, Gi Hun

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issues in the development and application of a competency model and provides implications for more precise integration of competencies into human resource (HR) functions driving performance improvement. This research is based on a case study from a Korean consumer corporation. This study employed document reviews,…

  15. How Do Volcanoes Affect Human Life? Integrated Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton, Rebecca; Edwards, Carrie; Sisler, Michelle

    This packet contains a unit on teaching about volcanoes. The following question is addressed: How do volcanoes affect human life? The unit covers approximately three weeks of instruction and strives to present volcanoes in an holistic form. The five subject areas of art, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are integrated into…

  16. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN (TM) IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold Stachybotryis chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods for the analysis of stachylysin in human and rat sera and environmental sa...

  17. Indoor-Outdoor Space; the Transitional Areas and Their Effect on Human Behavior. Exchange Bibliography No. 517.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, Robert

    This brief bibliography lists publications about the transitional areas between buildings or leading into or out of buildings. These spaces are usually public spaces, at least in urban areas, that perform functions influencing human behavior, including visual separation or connection, territorial definition, and control of traffic and climatic…

  18. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN (TM) IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold Stachybotryis chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods for the analysis of stachylysin in human and rat sera and environmental sa...

  19. Integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy A.

    1992-01-01

    The integration of human and machine intelligence in space systems is outlined with respect to the contributions of artificial intelligence. The current state-of-the-art in intelligent assistant systems (IASs) is reviewed, and the requirements of some real-world applications of the technologies are discussed. A concept of integrated human-machine intelligence is examined in the contexts of: (1) interactive systems that tolerate human errors; (2) systems for the relief of workloads; and (3) interactive systems for solving problems in abnormal situations. Key issues in the development of IASs include the compatibility of the systems with astronauts in terms of inputs/outputs, processing, real-time AI, and knowledge-based system validation. Real-world applications are suggested such as the diagnosis, planning, and control of enginnered systems.

  20. Integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy A.

    1992-01-01

    The integration of human and machine intelligence in space systems is outlined with respect to the contributions of artificial intelligence. The current state-of-the-art in intelligent assistant systems (IASs) is reviewed, and the requirements of some real-world applications of the technologies are discussed. A concept of integrated human-machine intelligence is examined in the contexts of: (1) interactive systems that tolerate human errors; (2) systems for the relief of workloads; and (3) interactive systems for solving problems in abnormal situations. Key issues in the development of IASs include the compatibility of the systems with astronauts in terms of inputs/outputs, processing, real-time AI, and knowledge-based system validation. Real-world applications are suggested such as the diagnosis, planning, and control of enginnered systems.

  1. Integrating medical humanities into a pharmaceutical care seminar on dementia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2013-02-12

    Objective. To design, integrate, and assess the effectiveness of a medical humanities teaching module that focuses on pharmaceutical care for dementia patients.Design. Visual and textual dementia narratives were presented using a combination of teacher and learner-centered approaches with the aim being to highlight patients' and caregivers' needs for empathy and counselling.Assessment. As gauged from pre- and post-experience questionnaires, students highly rated this approach to teaching medical humanities. In-class presentations demonstrated students' increased sensitivity to patient and caregiver needs, while objective learning outcomes demonstrated students' increased knowledge and awareness.Conclusions. Pharmacy students were open to and successfully learned from reading and discussing patient and caregiver narratives, which furthers the discussion on the value of integrating the medical humanities into the curricula of pharmacy and other health sciences.

  2. Integrating Medical Humanities into a Pharmaceutical Care Seminar on Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To design, integrate, and assess the effectiveness of a medical humanities teaching module that focuses on pharmaceutical care for dementia patients. Design. Visual and textual dementia narratives were presented using a combination of teacher and learner-centered approaches with the aim being to highlight patients’ and caregivers’ needs for empathy and counselling. Assessment. As gauged from pre- and post-experience questionnaires, students highly rated this approach to teaching medical humanities. In-class presentations demonstrated students’ increased sensitivity to patient and caregiver needs, while objective learning outcomes demonstrated students’ increased knowledge and awareness. Conclusions. Pharmacy students were open to and successfully learned from reading and discussing patient and caregiver narratives, which furthers the discussion on the value of integrating the medical humanities into the curricula of pharmacy and other health sciences. PMID:23459365

  3. Indoor radon measurements in Turkey dwellings.

    PubMed

    Celebi, N; Ataksor, B; Taskın, H; Bingoldag, N Albayrak

    2015-12-01

    In this work, indoor radon radioactivity concentration levels have been measured in dwellings of Turkey within the frame of the National Radon Monitoring Programme. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured with time-integrating passive nuclear etched track detectors in 7293 dwellings in 153 residential units of 81 provinces, and the radon map of Turkey was prepared. Indoor radon concentrations were distributed in the range of 1-1400 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic mean of the radon gas concentration was found to be 81 Bq m(-3); the geometric mean was 57 Bq m(-3) with a geometric standard deviation of 2.3.

  4. Improving Indoor Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Usually the most effective way to improve indoor air quality is to eliminate individual sources of pollution or to reduce their emissions. Some sources, like those that contain asbestos, can be sealed or enclosed.

  5. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  6. Indoor Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution include Mold and pollen Tobacco smoke Household products ...

  7. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  8. Humane Letters: Notes on the Concept of Integrity and the Meanings of Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author calls for an analysis of integrity and contends that attempting to describe wholeness precisely and incisively is not necessarily a contradiction in terms. The author makes some distinctions about integrity using two moves, one inspired by Plato, and one by Aristotle. The author uses the phrase "humane letters" to name…

  9. Perspectives for integrating human and environmental exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Péry, A R R; Roth, N

    2016-10-15

    Integrated Risk Assessment (IRA) has been defined by the EU FP7 HEROIC Coordination action as "the mutual exploitation of Environmental Risk Assessment for Human Health Risk Assessment and vice versa in order to coherently and more efficiently characterize an overall risk to humans and the environment for better informing the risk analysis process" (Wilks et al., 2015). Since exposure assessment and hazard characterization are the pillars of risk assessment, integrating Environmental Exposure assessment (EEA) and Human Exposure assessment (HEA) is a major component of an IRA framework. EEA and HEA typically pursue different targets, protection goals and timeframe. However, human and wildlife species also share the same environment and they similarly inhale air and ingest water and food through often similar overlapping pathways of exposure. Fate models used in EEA and HEA to predict the chemicals distribution among physical and biological media are essentially based on common properties of chemicals, and internal concentration estimations are largely based on inter-species (i.e. biota-to-human) extrapolations. Also, both EEA and HEA are challenged by increasing scientific complexity and resources constraints. Altogether, these points create the need for a better exploitation of all currently existing data, experimental approaches and modeling tools and it is assumed that a more integrated approach of both EEA and HEA may be part of the solution. Based on the outcome of an Expert Workshop on Extrapolations in Integrated Exposure Assessment organized by the HEROIC project in January 2014, this paper identifies perspectives and recommendations to better harmonize and extrapolate exposure assessment data, models and methods between Human Health and Environmental Risk Assessments to support the further development and promotion of the concept of IRA. Ultimately, these recommendations may feed into guidance showing when and how to apply IRA in the regulatory decision

  10. Medial Temporal Lobe Roles in Human Path Integration

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Philbeck, John W.; Woods, Adam J.; Gajewski, Daniel A.; Arthur, Joeanna C.; Potolicchio, Samuel J.; Levy, Lucien; Caputy, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a process in which observers derive their location by integrating self-motion signals along their locomotion trajectory. Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is thought to take part in path integration, the scope of its role for path integration remains unclear. To address this issue, we administered a variety of tasks involving path integration and other related processes to a group of neurosurgical patients whose MTL was unilaterally resected as therapy for epilepsy. These patients were unimpaired relative to neurologically intact controls in many tasks that required integration of various kinds of sensory self-motion information. However, the same patients (especially those who had lesions in the right hemisphere) walked farther than the controls when attempting to walk without vision to a previewed target. Importantly, this task was unique in our test battery in that it allowed participants to form a mental representation of the target location and anticipate their upcoming walking trajectory before they began moving. Thus, these results put forth a new idea that the role of MTL structures for human path integration may stem from their participation in predicting the consequences of one's locomotor actions. The strengths of this new theoretical viewpoint are discussed. PMID:24802000

  11. Medial temporal lobe roles in human path integration.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Philbeck, John W; Woods, Adam J; Gajewski, Daniel A; Arthur, Joeanna C; Potolicchio, Samuel J; Levy, Lucien; Caputy, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a process in which observers derive their location by integrating self-motion signals along their locomotion trajectory. Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is thought to take part in path integration, the scope of its role for path integration remains unclear. To address this issue, we administered a variety of tasks involving path integration and other related processes to a group of neurosurgical patients whose MTL was unilaterally resected as therapy for epilepsy. These patients were unimpaired relative to neurologically intact controls in many tasks that required integration of various kinds of sensory self-motion information. However, the same patients (especially those who had lesions in the right hemisphere) walked farther than the controls when attempting to walk without vision to a previewed target. Importantly, this task was unique in our test battery in that it allowed participants to form a mental representation of the target location and anticipate their upcoming walking trajectory before they began moving. Thus, these results put forth a new idea that the role of MTL structures for human path integration may stem from their participation in predicting the consequences of one's locomotor actions. The strengths of this new theoretical viewpoint are discussed.

  12. Intracranial Cortical Responses during Visual–Tactile Integration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Brian T.; Carlson, Chad; Doyle, Werner; Cash, Sydney S.; Devinsky, Orrin; Spence, Charles; Halgren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Sensory integration of touch and sight is crucial to perceiving and navigating the environment. While recent evidence from other sensory modality combinations suggests that low-level sensory areas integrate multisensory information at early processing stages, little is known about how the brain combines visual and tactile information. We investigated the dynamics of multisensory integration between vision and touch using the high spatial and temporal resolution of intracranial electrocorticography in humans. We present a novel, two-step metric for defining multisensory integration. The first step compares the sum of the unisensory responses to the bimodal response as multisensory responses. The second step eliminates the possibility that double addition of sensory responses could be misinterpreted as interactions. Using these criteria, averaged local field potentials and high-gamma-band power demonstrate a functional processing cascade whereby sensory integration occurs late, both anatomically and temporally, in the temporo–parieto–occipital junction (TPOJ) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Results further suggest two neurophysiologically distinct and temporally separated integration mechanisms in TPOJ, while providing direct evidence for local suppression as a dominant mechanism for synthesizing visual and tactile input. These results tend to support earlier concepts of multisensory integration as relatively late and centered in tertiary multimodal association cortices. PMID:24381279

  13. The effect of outdoor air and indoor human activity on mass concentrations of PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1) in a classroom.

    PubMed

    Branis, Martin; Rezácová, Pavla; Domasová, Markéta

    2005-10-01

    The 12-h mass concentration of PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1) was measured in a lecturing room by means of three co-located Harvard impactors. The filters were changed at 8 AM and at 8 PM to cover the periods of presence and absence of students. Concentrations were assessed by gravimetry. Ambient PM(10) data were available for corresponding 12-h intervals from the nearest state air-quality-monitoring network station. The data were pooled into four periods according to the presence and absence of students-Monday-Thursday day (workday daytime), Monday-Thursday night (workday night), Friday-Sunday day (weekend daytime), and Friday-Sunday night (weekend night). Average indoor workday daytime concentrations were 42.3, 21.9 and 13.7 microgm(-3), workday night were 20.9, 19.1 and 15.2 microgm(-3), weekend daytime were 21.9, 18.1 and 11.4 microgm(-3), and weekend night were 24.5, 21.3, and 15.6 microgm(-3) for PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1), respectively. The highest 12-h mean, median, and maximum (42.3, 43.0, and 76.2 microgm(-3), respectively) indoor concentrations were recorded on workdays during the daytime for PM(10). The statistically significant (r=0.68,P<0.0009) correlation between the number of students per hour per day and the indoor coarse fraction calculated as PM(10--2.5) during daytime on workdays indicates that the presence of people is an important source of coarse particles indoor. On workdays, the daytime PM(10) indoor/outdoor ratio was positively associated (r=0.93) with an increasing indoor coarse fraction (PM(10--2.5)), also indicating that an important portion of indoor PM(10) had its source inside the classroom. With the exception of the calculated coarse fraction (PM(10--2.5)), all of the measured indoor particulate matter fractions were significantly highly correlated with outdoor PM(10) and negatively correlated with wind velocity, showing that outdoor levels of particles influence their indoor concentrations.

  14. Human systems integration in remotely piloted aircraft operations.

    PubMed

    Tvaryanas, Anthony P

    2006-12-01

    The role of humans in remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) is qualitatively different from manned aviation, lessening the applicability of aerospace medicine human factors knowledge derived from traditional cockpits. Aerospace medicine practitioners should expect to be challenged in addressing RPA crewmember performance. Human systems integration (HSI) provides a model for explaining human performance as a function of the domains of: human factors engineering; personnel; training; manpower; environment, safety, and occupational health (ESOH); habitability; and survivability. RPA crewmember performance is being particularly impacted by issues involving the domains of human factors engineering, personnel, training, manpower, ESOH, and habitability. Specific HSI challenges include: 1) changes in large RPA operator selection and training; 2) human factors engineering deficiencies in current RPA ground control station design and their impact on human error including considerations pertaining to multi-aircraft control; and 3) the combined impact of manpower shortfalls, shiftwork-related fatigue, and degraded crewmember effectiveness. Limited experience and available research makes it difficult to qualitatively or quantitatively predict the collective impact of these issues on RPA crewmember performance. Attending to HSI will be critical for the success of current and future RPA crewmembers. Aerospace medicine practitioners working with RPA crewmembers should gain first-hand knowledge of their task environment while the larger aerospace medicine community needs to address the limited information available on RPA-related aerospace medicine human factors. In the meantime, aeromedical decisions will need to be made based on what is known about other aerospace occupations, realizing this knowledge may have only partial applicability.

  15. Combining efficiency and concerns about integrity when using human biobanks.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Mats G

    2006-09-01

    In the debate about human bio-sampling the interests of patients and other sample donors are believed to stand against the interests of scientists and of their freedom of research. Scientists want efficient access to and use of human biological samples. Patients and other donors of blood or tissue materials want protection of their integrity. This dichotomy is reflected in the Swedish law on biobanks, which came into effect 1 January 2003. In this article I argue that if the basic interest of scientists using human biological samples is in increasing knowledge and developing better treatments, and if the concept 'integrity' is properly understood, then sample donors should also be interested in promotion of efficiency as well as in the protection of their integrity. The basic premise of this argument is that donors of samples have interests related to the donation and use of samples as well as to the use of the results of the research, that is, new medical products and treatments. They have a role both as donors or participants in research and as end users of the research. I conclude that if (i) access to information acquired through biobank research is strictly limited to researchers, (ii) the information is protected by secrecy safeguards through coding and (iii) the procedures governing the research are open to public and democratic control, then most research using human biobanks may be carried out on the basis of making general information available when collecting biological samples, without further contact with participants.

  16. An Integrated Simulation Tool for Modeling the Human Circulatory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Ken'ichi; Kitamura, Tadashi

    This paper presents an integrated simulation of the circulatory system in physiological movement. The large circulatory system model includes principal organs and functional units in modules in which comprehensive physiological changes such as nerve reflexes, temperature regulation, acid/base balance, O2/CO2 balance, and exercise are simulated. A beat-by-beat heart model, in which the corresponding electrical circuit problems are solved by a numerical analytic method, enables calculation of pulsatile blood flow to the major organs. The integration of different perspectives on physiological changes makes this simulation model applicable for the microscopic evaluation of blood flow under various conditions in the human body.

  17. [Evolutionary development of human psyche in Wilber's integral psychology].

    PubMed

    Koberda, Przemysław

    2008-01-01

    Darwin's evolution theory is fundamental for modern biology. But the logic of evolutionary development seems to have a wider context. Several observations and psychological investigations show convincingly that the extent of the development of human psyche is a continuation of the biological evolution. Developmental levels of consciousness, seen both from the individual and collective perspective, are discussed in the writings by the American investigator and philosopher Ken Wilber. His integral model, which has evoIved into integral psychology, forms a logical and inspiring basis for further scientific deliberations in the fields of psychology and medical sciences.

  18. NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and HIDH (Human Integration Design Handbook)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis; Fitts, David; Stroud, Kenneth; Boyer, Jennifer; Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the review and re-issuance of the NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and the Human Integration Design Handbook. These standards were last updated in 1995. The target date for the release is September 2009.

  19. Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banker, Brian F.; Robinson, Travis

    2016-01-01

    The proposed paper will cover ongoing effort named HESTIA (Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement), led at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to promote a cross-subsystem approach to developing Mars-enabling technologies with the ultimate goal of integrated system optimization. HESTIA also aims to develop the infrastructure required to rapidly test these highly integrated systems at a low cost. The initial focus is on the common fluids architecture required to enable human exploration of mars, specifically between life support and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) subsystems. An overview of the advancements in both integrated technologies, in infrastructure, in simulation, and in modeling capabilities will be presented, as well as the results and findings of integrated testing,. Due to the enormous mass gear-ratio required for human exploration beyond low-earth orbit, (for every 1 kg of payload landed on Mars, 226 kg will be required on Earth), minimization of surface hardware and commodities is paramount. Hardware requirements can be minimized by reduction of equipment performing similar functions though for different subsystems. If hardware could be developed which meets the requirements of both life support and ISRU it could result in the reduction of primary hardware and/or reduction in spares. Minimization of commodities to the surface of mars can be achieved through the creation of higher efficiency systems producing little to no undesired waste, such as a closed-loop life support subsystem. Where complete efficiency is impossible or impractical, makeup commodities could be manufactured via ISRU. Although, utilization of ISRU products (oxygen and water) for crew consumption holds great promise of reducing demands on life support hardware, there exist concerns as to the purity and transportation of commodities. To date, ISRU has been focused on production rates and purities for

  20. Constructing Worlds: Cosmovisions as Integral Parts of Human Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    Archaeological and ethnological records worldwide give evidence that cosmovisions played an important role in the life of man since Paleolithic epochs. Parallel to the reduction of instincts man developed cultural systems to establish and maintain order and rhythm in his personal and social life and to organize the world into a meaningful system. Cosmovisions helped man to integrate and orientate himself within changing human ecosystems. These concepts were also useful to answer fundamental human questions about the whys and wherefores of man and the world. Some of the main features of archaic cosmovisions in different cultures across the world and throughout the epochs are discussed with focus on human ecosystems and the human mind.

  1. Can we use indoor fungi as bioindicators of indoor air quality? Historical perspectives and open questions.

    PubMed

    Cabral, João P S

    2010-09-15

    Microbiological analysis of atmospheres witnessed substantial technical improvements in the 1940s to 1960s. May's cascade impactor and Hirst's spore trap allowed the counting of total cells but had limited capacity for identification of the spores. Bourdillon's sampler enabled the counting of cultivable fungi and their identification. A great step forward was given with the Andersen's six-stage impactor, which allowed discrimination of particles by size, counting of cultivable cells, and species identification. This period also witnessed the development of impingers, namely, the AGI-30 described by Malligo and Idoine, and the three-stage model designed by K. R. May. The 1990s to 2000s witnessed innovative discoveries on the biology of indoor fungi. Work carried out in several laboratories showed that indoor fungi can release groups of spores, individual spores and fungal fragments, and produce volatile organic compounds and mycotoxins. Integrating all findings a holistic interpretation emerged for the sick building syndrome. Healthy houses and buildings, with low indoor humidity, display no appreciable indoor fungal growth, and outdoor Cladosporium dominates. On the contrary, in sick houses and buildings, high indoor humidity allows fungal growth (mainly of Penicillium and Aspergillus), with concomitant release of conidia and fragments into the atmosphere. The intoxication probably results from a chronic exposure to volatile organic compounds and mycotoxins produced by Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Stachybotrys. Very clean atmospheres are difficult to study by conventional methods. However, some of these atmospheres, namely, those of hospital rooms, should be monitored. Sedimentary sampling, chemical methods applied to impinger's collection liquid, and selected molecular methods can be useful in this context. It was concluded that fungi can be useful indicators of indoor air quality and that it is important to deepen the studies of indoor atmospheres in order to

  2. NASA Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH): Revitalization of Space-Related Human Factors, Environmental, and Habitability Data and Design Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Kenneth; Pickett, Lynn; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH). It provides guidance and data to aid vehicle / habitat designers in human-system integration It also aids requirements writers in development of human-system integration requirements from SFHSS Standards

  3. Social network diversity and white matter microstructural integrity in humans.

    PubMed

    Molesworth, Tara; Sheu, Lei K; Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J; Verstynen, Timothy D

    2015-09-01

    Diverse aspects of physical, affective and cognitive health relate to social integration, reflecting engagement in social activities and identification with diverse roles within a social network. However, the mechanisms by which social integration interacts with the brain are unclear. In healthy adults (N = 155), we tested the links between social integration and measures of white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging. Across the brain, there was a predominantly positive association between a measure of white matter integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA), and social network diversity. This association was particularly strong in a region near the anterior corpus callosum and driven by a negative association with the radial component of the diffusion signal. This callosal region contained projections between bilateral prefrontal cortices, as well as cingulum and corticostriatal pathways. FA within this region was weakly associated with circulating levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), but IL-6 did not mediate the social network and FA relationship. Finally, variation in FA indirectly mediated the relationship between social network diversity and intrinsic functional connectivity of medial corticostriatal pathways. These findings suggest that social integration relates to myelin integrity in humans, which may help explain the diverse aspects of health affected by social networks. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Social network diversity and white matter microstructural integrity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Molesworth, Tara; Sheu, Lei K.; Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse aspects of physical, affective and cognitive health relate to social integration, reflecting engagement in social activities and identification with diverse roles within a social network. However, the mechanisms by which social integration interacts with the brain are unclear. In healthy adults (N = 155), we tested the links between social integration and measures of white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging. Across the brain, there was a predominantly positive association between a measure of white matter integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA), and social network diversity. This association was particularly strong in a region near the anterior corpus callosum and driven by a negative association with the radial component of the diffusion signal. This callosal region contained projections between bilateral prefrontal cortices, as well as cingulum and corticostriatal pathways. FA within this region was weakly associated with circulating levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), but IL-6 did not mediate the social network and FA relationship. Finally, variation in FA indirectly mediated the relationship between social network diversity and intrinsic functional connectivity of medial corticostriatal pathways. These findings suggest that social integration relates to myelin integrity in humans, which may help explain the diverse aspects of health affected by social networks. PMID:25605966

  5. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.51 Section 3.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment and Transportation of...

  6. Simulation of a steady-state integrated human thermal system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, F. T.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical model of an integrated human thermal system is formulated. The system consists of an external thermal regulation device on the human body. The purpose of the device (a network of cooling tubes held in contact with the surface of the skin) is to maintain the human body in a state of thermoneutrality. The device is controlled by varying the inlet coolant temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The differential equations of the model are approximated by a set of algebraic equations which result from the application of the explicit forward finite difference method to the differential equations. The integrated human thermal system is simulated for a variety of combinations of the inlet coolant temperature, coolant mass flow rate, and metabolic rates. Two specific cases are considered: (1) the external thermal regulation device is placed only on the head and (2) the devices are placed on the head and the torso. The results of the simulation indicate that when the human body is exposed to hot environment, thermoneutrality can be attained by localized cooling if the operating variables of the external regulation device(s) are properly controlled.

  7. Simulation of a steady-state integrated human thermal system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, F. T.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical model of an integrated human thermal system is formulated. The system consists of an external thermal regulation device on the human body. The purpose of the device (a network of cooling tubes held in contact with the surface of the skin) is to maintain the human body in a state of thermoneutrality. The device is controlled by varying the inlet coolant temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The differential equations of the model are approximated by a set of algebraic equations which result from the application of the explicit forward finite difference method to the differential equations. The integrated human thermal system is simulated for a variety of combinations of the inlet coolant temperature, coolant mass flow rate, and metabolic rates. Two specific cases are considered: (1) the external thermal regulation device is placed only on the head and (2) the devices are placed on the head and the torso. The results of the simulation indicate that when the human body is exposed to hot environment, thermoneutrality can be attained by localized cooling if the operating variables of the external regulation device(s) are properly controlled.

  8. Simulating Humans as Integral Parts of Spacecraft Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruins, Anthony C.; Rice, Robert; Nguyen, Lac; Nguyen, Heidi; Saito, Tim; Russell, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    The Collaborative-Virtual Environment Simulation Tool (C-VEST) software was developed for use in a NASA project entitled "3-D Interactive Digital Virtual Human." The project is oriented toward the use of a comprehensive suite of advanced software tools in computational simulations for the purposes of human-centered design of spacecraft missions and of the spacecraft, space suits, and other equipment to be used on the missions. The C-VEST software affords an unprecedented suite of capabilities for three-dimensional virtual-environment simulations with plug-in interfaces for physiological data, haptic interfaces, plug-and-play software, realtime control, and/or playback control. Mathematical models of the mechanics of the human body and of the aforementioned equipment are implemented in software and integrated to simulate forces exerted on and by astronauts as they work. The computational results can then support the iterative processes of design, building, and testing in applied systems engineering and integration. The results of the simulations provide guidance for devising measures to counteract effects of microgravity on the human body and for the rapid development of virtual (that is, simulated) prototypes of advanced space suits, cockpits, and robots to enhance the productivity, comfort, and safety of astronauts. The unique ability to implement human-in-the-loop immersion also makes the C-VEST software potentially valuable for use in commercial and academic settings beyond the original space-mission setting.

  9. NASA-STD-3001, Space Flight Human-System Standard and the Human Integration Design Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Boyer, Jennifer; Holubec, Keith

    2012-01-01

    NASA-STD-3001 Space Flight Human-System Standard Volume 1, Crew Health, Volume 2, Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health, and the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH) have replaced the Man-Systems Integration Standards (MSIS), NASA-STD-3000. For decades, NASA-STD-3000 was a significant contribution to human spaceflight programs and to human-systems integration. However, with research program and project results being realized, advances in technology, and the availability of new information in a variety of topic areas, the time had arrived to update this extensive suite of standards and design information. NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 contains the Agency level standards from the human and environmental factors disciplines that ensure human spaceflight operations are performed safely, efficiently, and effectively. The HIDH is organized in the same sequence and serves as the companion document to NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2, providing a compendium of human spaceflight history and knowledge. The HIDH is intended to aid interpretation of NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 standards and to provide guidance for requirement writers and vehicle and habitat designers. Keywords Human Factors, Standards, Environmental Factors, NASA

  10. Electromechanical integration of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kehat, Izhak; Khimovich, Leonid; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Shofti, Rona; Arbel, Gil; Huber, Irit; Satin, Jonathan; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Gepstein, Lior

    2004-10-01

    Cell therapy is emerging as a promising strategy for myocardial repair. This approach is hampered, however, by the lack of sources for human cardiac tissue and by the absence of direct evidence for functional integration of donor cells into host tissues. Here we investigate whether cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells can restore myocardial electromechanical properties. Cardiomyocyte cell grafts were generated from hES cells in vitro using the embryoid body differentiating system. This tissue formed structural and electromechanical connections with cultured rat cardiomyocytes. In vivo integration was shown in a large-animal model of slow heart rate. The transplanted hES cell-derived cardiomyocytes paced the hearts of swine with complete atrioventricular block, as assessed by detailed three-dimensional electrophysiological mapping and histopathological examination. These results demonstrate the potential of hES-cell cardiomyocytes to act as a rate-responsive biological pacemaker and for future myocardial regeneration strategies.

  11. [Indoor air guide values for benzaldehyde].

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    To protect public health the German Working Group on Indoor Guidelines of the Federal Environmental Protection Agency and the States' Health Authorities is issuing indoor air guide values. For health evaluation of benzaldehyde in indoor air only two poorly documented human studies and a valid subacute inhalation animal study are available. Occupational exposure data suggest a lowest observed adverse effect level of 5 mg benzaldehyde per cubic meter for the endpoint irritation. This was used as pivotal information for the risk assessment by the Working Group. A safe LOAEL could not be derived from the subacute animal study due to several limitations. By applying a factor of 3 for extrapolation to continuous exposure, a factor of 5 for interindividual variability and a modifying factor of 2 regarding data gaps especially for children a tentative health hazard guide value (RW II) of 0.2 mg benzaldehyde/m3 indoor air is obtained. To protect from unpleasant odour a tentative health precaution guide value (RW I) of 0.02 mg benzaldehyde/m3 indoor is recommended.

  12. Rendezvous Integration Complexities of NASA Human Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack P.; Goodman, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Propellant-optimal trajectories, relative sensors and navigation, and docking/capture mechanisms are rendezvous disciplines that receive much attention in the technical literature. However, other areas must be considered. These include absolute navigation, maneuver targeting, attitude control, power generation, software development and verification, redundancy management, thermal control, avionics integration, robotics, communications, lighting, human factors, crew timeline, procedure development, orbital debris risk mitigation, structures, plume impingement, logistics, and in some cases extravehicular activity. While current and future spaceflight programs will introduce new technologies and operations concepts, the complexity of integrating multiple systems on multiple spacecraft will remain. The systems integration task may become more difficult as increasingly complex software is used to meet current and future automation, autonomy, and robotic operation requirements.

  13. Space Medicine in the Human System Integration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of integration of space medicine in the human system of lunar exploration. There is a review of historical precedence in reference to lunar surface operations. The integration process is reviewed in a chart which shows the steps from research to requirements development, requirements integration, design, verification, operations and using the lessons learned, giving more information and items for research. These steps are reviewed in view of specific space medical issues. Some of the testing of the operations are undertaken in an environment that is an analog to the exploration environment. Some of these analog environments are reviewed, and there is some discussion of the benefits of use of an analog environment in testing the processes that are derived.

  14. Integration of letters and speech sounds in the human brain.

    PubMed

    van Atteveldt, Nienke; Formisano, Elia; Goebel, Rainer; Blomert, Leo

    2004-07-22

    Most people acquire literacy skills with remarkable ease, even though the human brain is not evolutionarily adapted to this relatively new cultural phenomenon. Associations between letters and speech sounds form the basis of reading in alphabetic scripts. We investigated the functional neuroanatomy of the integration of letters and speech sounds using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Letters and speech sounds were presented unimodally and bimodally in congruent or incongruent combinations. Analysis of single-subject data and group data aligned on the basis of individual cortical anatomy revealed that letters and speech sounds are integrated in heteromodal superior temporal cortex. Interestingly, responses to speech sounds in a modality-specific region of the early auditory cortex were modified by simultaneously presented letters. These results suggest that efficient processing of culturally defined associations between letters and speech sounds relies on neural mechanisms similar to those naturally evolved for integrating audiovisual speech.

  15. Human Systems Integration Synthesis Model for Ship Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    comprehend the true status of a system. Holland provides a superb explanation of how expertise gained through training and education reduces cycle time...12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Current fiscal constraints are driving the reduction of system life cycle cost (LCC). A...v ABSTRACT Current fiscal constraints are driving the reduction of system life cycle cost (LCC). A key objective of Human Systems Integration (HSI

  16. [Project, natural lighting and comfort indoor].

    PubMed

    Buffoli, M; Capolongo, S; Cattaneo, M; Signorelli, C

    2007-01-01

    The present research aims at analyzing the relationship between the project, the natural lighting, and the residential indoor environments. The reasons that lead to this research are to be found in the complex relationship between natural lighting, sunlight, and health in indoor environments and in the oncoming research of project and technological solutions in order to guarantee an adequate level of indoor health while preserving the environment. After describing the physical and hygienic characteristics of the natural lighting, the various laws (in particular the Italian ones) were taken into account according to the definition of the minimal performance and project requirements concerning the natural lighting of the indoor residential environments. The minimal requirements for the Coefficient of Daily Lighting--CDL (illumination levels on horizontal surface inside the room/illumination levels on the same horizontal surface situated outside, closed to the windows) were satisfied on average during the project phase with a lighting ratio (area of the windows hole/floor area) more than 12.5% (1/8) for every habitable rooms. An analysis based on CDL was then performed, since it is able to estimate the level of lighting of different indoor environments for dimensional and geometric aspects, for specific characteristics of each window opening and for the context situation of the building. During the analysis, the CDL of some rooms (42) was taken and analyzed according to the specific features of the indoor environment in order to evaluate the appropriateness of the current laws on the subject, which are too often recognized as only prescriptive. In conclusion, the current laws, considering the complex reciprocity between natural lighting and indoor environments, are not very adequate in orienting the architect towards more innovative quality and performance oriented choices. According to these deficiencies, it was proposed to integrate those laws with more adequate

  17. A View Indoors, Indoor Environment Division's e-Article Series

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Indoor Environments Division has created partnership with public and private sector entities to help encourage the public to take action to minimize their risk and mitigate indoor air quality problems.

  18. Visuospatial integration and human evolution: the fossil evidence.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano; Lozano, Marina; Lorenzo, Carlos

    2016-06-20

    Visuospatial integration concerns the ability to coordinate the inner and outer environments, namely the central nervous system and the outer spatial elements, through the interface of the body. This integration is essential for every basic human activity, from locomotion and grasping to speech or tooling. Visuospatial integration is even more fundamental when dealing with theories on extended mind, embodiment, and material engagement. According to the hypotheses on extended cognition, the nervous system, the body and the external objects work as a single integrated unit, and what we call "mind" is the process resulting from such interaction. Because of the relevance of culture and material culture in humans, important changes in such processes were probably crucial for the evolution of Homo sapiens. Much information in this sense can be supplied by considering issues in neuroarchaeology and cognitive sciences. Nonetheless, fossils and their anatomy can also provide evidence according to changes involving physical and body aspects. In this article, we review three sources of morphological information concerning visuospatial management and fossils: evolutionary neuroanatomy, manipulative behaviors, and hand evolution.

  19. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Indoor Air and EnvironmentalTobacco Smoke Measured with a New Integrated Organic Vapor-ParticleSampler

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, L.A.; Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Lee, C.C.; Stevens,R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Sampling details. The novel aspect of the sampling equipment is the use of ground XAD-4 resin as a coating for annular denuders. Figure 1 shows a schematic diagram of one sampling configuration used for field testing the IOVPS in indoor air and ETS. Commercially available, single-channel glass denuders, 22 cm long, with a 1 mm annulus (University Research Glass, Carrboro, NC, USA were used with a Teflon- ) lined aluminum cyclone (cutoff 2.5 microns at 10 L mine ) preceding the first denuder. Three XAD-4-coated denuders were connected in series between the cyclone and a Teflon filter pack which contained a pre-extracted and pre-weighed Teflon-coated glass-fiber filter. (The three-denuder configuration was used for determining breakthrough of naphthalene and its methyl derivatives as a function of flow rate.) In some experiments, a coated denuder followed the filter pack. The parallel sorbent bed sampler used an aluminum open-face filter holder with a Teflon-coated glass-fiber filter, followed by a glass tube packed with 2.5 g cleaned XAD-4 resin. Flow rates, measured with a dry gas test meter, were 5, 10 and 20 L min-1 for field testing; sampling times varied from 3 to 22 hours. Indoor air with no combustion sources was sampled in an unoccupied room. Diluted sidestream smoke was sampled as a surrogate for ETS in an unventilated 20 m3 chamber at 5 L rnin-l for hour-long periods while a single-port smoking machine smoked 3 cigarettes. Ambient temperature varied between 22 and 26 C.

  20. AN INDOOR PESTICIDE AIR AND SURFACE CONCENTRATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thorough assessment of human exposure to environmental chemicals requires consideration of all processes in the sequence from source to dose. For assessment of exposure to pesticides following their use indoors, data and models are needed to estimate pesticide concentrations...

  1. AN INDOOR PESTICIDE AIR AND SURFACE CONCENTRATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thorough assessment of human exposure to environmental chemicals requires consideration of all processes in the sequence from source to dose. For assessment of exposure to pesticides following their use indoors, data and models are needed to estimate pesticide concentrations...

  2. Considerations for the integration of human and wildlife radiological assessments.

    PubMed

    Copplestone, D; Brown, J E; Beresford, N A

    2010-06-01

    A number of tools and approaches have been developed recently to allow assessments of the environmental impact of radiation on wildlife to be undertaken. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has stated an intention to provide a more inclusive protection framework for humans and the environment. Using scenarios, which are loosely based on real or predicted discharge data, we investigate how radiological assessments of humans and wildlife can be integrated with special consideration given to the recent outputs of the ICRP. We highlight how assumptions about the location of the exposed population of humans and wildlife, and the selection of appropriate benchmarks for determining potential risks can influence the outcome of the assessments. A number of issues associated with the transfer component and numeric benchmarks were identified, which need to be addressed in order to fully integrate the assessment approaches. A particular issue was the lack of comparable benchmark values for humans and wildlife. In part this may be addressed via the ICRP's recommended derived consideration reference levels for their 12 Reference Animals and Plants.

  3. Indoor air quality in a dentistry clinic.

    PubMed

    Helmis, C G; Tzoutzas, J; Flocas, H A; Halios, C H; Stathopoulou, O I; Assimakopoulos, V D; Panis, V; Apostolatou, M; Sgouros, G; Adam, E

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this work is to assess, both experimentally and theoretically the status of air quality in a dentistry clinic of the Athens University Dentistry Faculty with respect to chemical pollutants and identify the indoor sources associated with dental activities. Total VOCs, CO(2), PM(10), PM(2.5), NO(x) and SO(2) were measured over a period of approximately three months in a selected dentistry clinic. High pollution levels during the operation hours regarding CO(2), total VOCs and Particulate Matter were found, while in the non-working periods lower levels were recorded. On the contrary, NO(x) and SO(2) remained at low levels for the whole experimental period. These conditions were associated with the number of occupants, the nature of the dental clinical procedures, the materials used and the ventilation schemes, which lead to high concentrations, far above the limits that are set by international organizations and concern human exposure. The indoor environmental conditions were investigated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model PHOENICS for inert gases simulation. The results revealed diagonal temperature stratification and low air velocities leading to pollution stratification, accompanied by accumulation of inert gaseous species in certain areas of the room. Different schemes of natural ventilation were also applied in order to examine their effect on the indoor comfort conditions for the occupants, in terms of air renewal and double cross ventilation was found to be most effective. The relative contribution of the indoor sources, which are mainly associated with indoor activities, was assessed by application of the Multi Chamber Indoor Air Quality Model (MIAQ) to the experimental data. It was found that deposition onto indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism while a great amount of particulate matter emitted in the Clinic burdened severely the indoor air quality. The natural ventilation of the room seemed to reduce the levels of

  4. Reconstruction of national distribution of indoor radon concentration in Russia using results of regional indoor radon measurement programs.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, I; Malinovsky, G; Vasilyev, A; Zhukovsky, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the paper is a reconstruction of the national distribution and estimation of the arithmetic average indoor radon concentration in Russia using the data of official annual 4-DOZ reports. Annual 4-DOZ reports summarize results of radiation measurements in 83 regions of Russian Federation. Information on more than 400,000 indoor radon measurements includes the average indoor radon isotopes equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) and number of measurements by regions and by three main types of houses: wooden, one-storey non-wooden, and multi-storey non-wooden houses. To reconstruct the national distribution, all-Russian model sample was generated by integration of sub-samples created using the results of each annual regional program of indoor radon measurements in each type of buildings. According to indoor radon concentration distribution reconstruction, all-Russian average indoor radon concentration is 48 Bq/m(3). Average indoor radon concentration by region ranges from 12 to 207 Bq/m(3). The 95-th percentile of the distribution is reached at indoor radon concentration 160 Bq/m(3). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Integrating modelling and smart sensors for environmental and human health

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Stefan; Seto, Edmund; Northcross, Amanda; Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Convertino, Matteo; Jones, Rod L.; Maier, Holger R.; Schlink, Uwe; Steinle, Susanne; Vieno, Massimo; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in everyday life, generating data at an unprecedented rate and scale. However, models that assess impacts of human activities on environmental and human health, have typically been developed in contexts where data scarcity is the norm. Models are essential tools to understand processes, identify relationships, associations and causality, formalize stakeholder mental models, and to quantify the effects of prevention and interventions. They can help to explain data, as well as inform the deployment and location of sensors by identifying hotspots and areas of interest where data collection may achieve the best results. We identify a paradigm shift in how the integration of models and sensors can contribute to harnessing ‘Big Data’ and, more importantly, make the vital step from ‘Big Data’ to ‘Big Information’. In this paper, we illustrate current developments and identify key research needs using human and environmental health challenges as an example. PMID:26644778

  6. HOWDY: an integrated database system for human genome research

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Mika

    2002-01-01

    HOWDY is an integrated database system for accessing and analyzing human genomic information (http://www-alis.tokyo.jst.go.jp/HOWDY/). HOWDY stores information about relationships between genetic objects and the data extracted from a number of databases. HOWDY consists of an Internet accessible user interface that allows thorough searching of the human genomic databases using the gene symbols and their aliases. It also permits flexible editing of the sequence data. The database can be searched using simple words and the search can be restricted to a specific cytogenetic location. Linear maps displaying markers and genes on contig sequences are available, from which an object can be chosen. Any search starting point identifies all the information matching the query. HOWDY provides a convenient search environment of human genomic data for scientists unsure which database is most appropriate for their search. PMID:11752279

  7. Integrating modelling and smart sensors for environmental and human health.

    PubMed

    Reis, Stefan; Seto, Edmund; Northcross, Amanda; Quinn, Nigel W T; Convertino, Matteo; Jones, Rod L; Maier, Holger R; Schlink, Uwe; Steinle, Susanne; Vieno, Massimo; Wimberly, Michael C

    2015-12-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in everyday life, generating data at an unprecedented rate and scale. However, models that assess impacts of human activities on environmental and human health, have typically been developed in contexts where data scarcity is the norm. Models are essential tools to understand processes, identify relationships, associations and causality, formalize stakeholder mental models, and to quantify the effects of prevention and interventions. They can help to explain data, as well as inform the deployment and location of sensors by identifying hotspots and areas of interest where data collection may achieve the best results. We identify a paradigm shift in how the integration of models and sensors can contribute to harnessing 'Big Data' and, more importantly, make the vital step from 'Big Data' to 'Big Information'. In this paper, we illustrate current developments and identify key research needs using human and environmental health challenges as an example.

  8. Progress integrating medical humanities into medical education: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Stefani; Chen, Yuchia; Tsai, Duujian

    2016-09-01

    The article reviews the most recent developments in integrating humanities into medical education. Global implications and future trends are illustrated. The main concern of medical humanities education is teaching professionalism; one important aspect that has emerged is the goal of nurturing emotion through reflexivity. Relating effectively to all stakeholders and being sensitive to inequitable power dynamics are essential for professional social accountability in modern medical contexts. Mediating doctors' understanding of the clinical encounter through creative arts and narrative is part of most recent pedagogic innovations aimed at motivating learners to become empowered, engaged and caring clinicians. Scenario-based and discursive-oriented evaluations of such activities should be aligned with the medical humanities' problem-based learning curriculum. Medical humanities education fosters professional reflexivity that is important for achieving patient-centered care. Countering insufficient empathy with reflective professionalism is an urgent challenge in medical education; to answer this need, creative arts and narrative understanding have emerged as crucial tools of medical humanities education. To ensure competent professional identity formation in the era of translational medicine, medical humanities programs have adopted scenario-based assessments through inclusion of different voices and emphasizing personal reflection and social critique.

  9. Indoor Environmental Control Practices and Asthma Management.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Elizabeth C; Abramson, Stuart L; Sandel, Megan T

    2016-11-01

    Indoor environmental exposures, particularly allergens and pollutants, are major contributors to asthma morbidity in children; environmental control practices aimed at reducing these exposures are an integral component of asthma management. Some individually tailored environmental control practices that have been shown to reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations are similar in efficacy and cost to controller medications. As a part of developing tailored strategies regarding environmental control measures, an environmental history can be obtained to evaluate the key indoor environmental exposures that are known to trigger asthma symptoms and exacerbations, including both indoor pollutants and allergens. An environmental history includes questions regarding the presence of pets or pests or evidence of pests in the home, as well as knowledge regarding whether the climatic characteristics in the community favor dust mites. In addition, the history focuses on sources of indoor air pollution, including the presence of smokers who live in the home or care for children and the use of gas stoves and appliances in the home. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests can be performed or the patient can be referred for allergy skin testing to identify indoor allergens that are most likely to be clinically relevant. Environmental control strategies are tailored to each potentially relevant indoor exposure and are based on knowledge of the sources and underlying characteristics of the exposure. Strategies include source removal, source control, and mitigation strategies, such as high-efficiency particulate air purifiers and allergen-proof mattress and pillow encasements, as well as education, which can be delivered by primary care pediatricians, allergists, pediatric pulmonologists, other health care workers, or community health workers trained in asthma environmental control and asthma education.

  10. An investigation of the potential causes for the seasonal and annual variations in indoor radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Barazza, F; Gfeller, W; Palacios, M; Murith, C

    2015-11-01

    Indoor radon concentrations exhibit strong variations on short and long timescales. Besides human influences, meteorological factors significantly affect the radon concentrations indoors as well as outdoors. In this article, long-term measurements showing strong annual variations are presented, which take a very similar course in different buildings located in largely separated regions in Switzerland. Also, seasonal variations can be very significant. In general, variations in indoor radon levels can primarily be attributed to human influences. On the other hand, specific weather conditions can have a significant impact on indoor radon levels. In order to further investigate the connection between indoor radon levels and meteorological factors, a measuring campaign has been started in two buildings located in two different regions in Switzerland exhibiting different climatic characteristics. Preliminary results of these investigations are presented, which provide evidence for correlations between indoor radon levels and in particular outdoor temperatures, contributing to seasonal and annual as well as short-term variations in indoor radon concentrations.

  11. Bim-Based Indoor Path Planning Considering Obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Wei, S.; Zlatanova, S.; Zhang, R.

    2017-09-01

    At present, 87 % of people's activities are in indoor environment; indoor navigation has become a research issue. As the building structures for people's daily life are more and more complex, many obstacles influence humans' moving. Therefore it is essential to provide an accurate and efficient indoor path planning. Nowadays there are many challenges and problems in indoor navigation. Most existing path planning approaches are based on 2D plans, pay more attention to the geometric configuration of indoor space, often ignore rich semantic information of building components, and mostly consider simple indoor layout without taking into account the furniture. Addressing the above shortcomings, this paper uses BIM (IFC) as the input data and concentrates on indoor navigation considering obstacles in the multi-floor buildings. After geometric and semantic information are extracted, 2D and 3D space subdivision methods are adopted to build the indoor navigation network and to realize a path planning that avoids obstacles. The 3D space subdivision is based on triangular prism. The two approaches are verified by the experiments.

  12. Contribution of traffic emissions to indoor airborne VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    The contribution of nearby vehicle traffic to indoor airborne volatile organic compound levels and to personal exposures was examined to determine the importance of this source. Indoor and outdoor levels of selected VOCs, aldehydes, ketones, and ethanol were measured at 10 homes in Toronto, on sidewalks near the traffic source, indoors and in the backyards or balconies of apartments (outdoors). Concurrently, air exchange rates were measured at each home with a perfluorocarbon tracer method. All the residences were within 1 km of urban intersections with traffic counts of more than 20,000 vehicles per day. Average concentrations of hexane, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, benzene and propionaldehyde decreased in the order: street level > indoor > outdoor. These compounds occur in vehicle emissions, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 24 to 88 % suggesting that traffic emissions contributed to indoor pollutant level through the process of air exchange. For other compounds different trends were observed. Indoors concentrations were greater than outdoors for ethylacetate, tetrachlorethane, pinene, limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and ethanol, for example. These compounds are common in consumer products, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 2 to 44%. The differences in street and backyard (outdoor) concentrations for some compounds were large due to the presence of nearby vehicles at street level sampling sites, indicating that the impact of traffic on human exposures (pedestrians on sidewalks and occupants of vehicles) is potentially large, compared to the impact of general background urban air pollutants.

  13. Exploring the consequences of climate change for indoor air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaroff, William W.

    2013-03-01

    Climate change will affect the concentrations of air pollutants in buildings. The resulting shifts in human exposure may influence public health. Changes can be anticipated because of altered outdoor pollution and also owing to changes in buildings effected in response to changing climate. Three classes of factors govern indoor pollutant levels in occupied spaces: (a) properties of pollutants; (b) building factors, such as the ventilation rate; and (c) occupant behavior. Diversity of indoor conditions influences the public health significance of climate change. Potentially vulnerable subpopulations include not only the young and the infirm but also those who lack resources to respond effectively to changing conditions. Indoor air pollutant levels reflect the sum of contributions from indoor sources and from outdoor pollutants that enter with ventilation air. Pollutant classes with important indoor sources include the byproducts of combustion, radon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Outdoor pollutants of special concern include particulate matter and ozone. To ensure good indoor air quality it is important first to avoid high indoor emission rates for all pollutants and second to ensure adequate ventilation. A third factor is the use of air filtration or air cleaning to achieve further improvements where warranted. Reprinted with permission from Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health (2011) by the National Academy of Sciences, Courtesy of the National Academies Press, Washington, DC.

  14. Feature analysis for indoor radar target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufler, Travis D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper analyzes the spectral features from human beings and indoor clutter for building and tuning Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classifiers for the purpose of classifying stationary human targets. The spectral characteristics were obtained through simulations using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) techniques where the radar cross section (RCS) of humans and indoor clutter objects were captured over a wide range of frequencies, polarizations, aspect angles, and materials. Additionally, experimental data was obtained using a vector network analyzer. Two different feature sets for class discrimination are used from the acquired target and clutter RCS spectral data sets. The first feature vectors consist of the raw spectral characteristics, while the second set of feature vectors are statistical features extracted over a set frequency interval. Utilizing variables of frequency and polarization, a SVM classifier can be trained to classify unknown targets as a human or clutter. Classification accuracy over 80% can be effectively achieved given appropriate features.

  15. Genic insights from integrated human proteomics in GeneCards.

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Simon; Zimmerman, Shahar; Kohn, Asher; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Olender, Tsviya; Kolker, Eugene; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2016-01-01

    GeneCards is a one-stop shop for searchable human gene annotations (http://www.genecards.org/). Data are automatically mined from ∼120 sources and presented in an integrated web card for every human gene. We report the application of recent advances in proteomics to enhance gene annotation and classification in GeneCards. First, we constructed the Human Integrated Protein Expression Database (HIPED), a unified database of protein abundance in human tissues, based on the publically available mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics sources ProteomicsDB, Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database, Protein Abundance Across Organisms and The MaxQuant DataBase. The integrated database, residing within GeneCards, compares favourably with its individual sources, covering nearly 90% of human protein-coding genes. For gene annotation and comparisons, we first defined a protein expression vector for each gene, based on normalized abundances in 69 normal human tissues. This vector is portrayed in the GeneCards expression section as a bar graph, allowing visual inspection and comparison. These data are juxtaposed with transcriptome bar graphs. Using the protein expression vectors, we further defined a pairwise metric that helps assess expression-based pairwise proximity. This new metric for finding functional partners complements eight others, including sharing of pathways, gene ontology (GO) terms and domains, implemented in the GeneCards Suite. In parallel, we calculated proteome-based differential expression, highlighting a subset of tissues that overexpress a gene and subserving gene classification. This textual annotation allows users of VarElect, the suite's next-generation phenotyper, to more effectively discover causative disease variants. Finally, we define the protein-RNA expression ratio and correlation as yet another attribute of every gene in each tissue, adding further annotative information. The results constitute a significant enhancement of several Gene

  16. Genic insights from integrated human proteomics in GeneCards

    PubMed Central

    Fishilevich, Simon; Zimmerman, Shahar; Kohn, Asher; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Olender, Tsviya; Kolker, Eugene; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2016-01-01

    GeneCards is a one-stop shop for searchable human gene annotations (http://www.genecards.org/). Data are automatically mined from ∼120 sources and presented in an integrated web card for every human gene. We report the application of recent advances in proteomics to enhance gene annotation and classification in GeneCards. First, we constructed the Human Integrated Protein Expression Database (HIPED), a unified database of protein abundance in human tissues, based on the publically available mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics sources ProteomicsDB, Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database, Protein Abundance Across Organisms and The MaxQuant DataBase. The integrated database, residing within GeneCards, compares favourably with its individual sources, covering nearly 90% of human protein-coding genes. For gene annotation and comparisons, we first defined a protein expression vector for each gene, based on normalized abundances in 69 normal human tissues. This vector is portrayed in the GeneCards expression section as a bar graph, allowing visual inspection and comparison. These data are juxtaposed with transcriptome bar graphs. Using the protein expression vectors, we further defined a pairwise metric that helps assess expression-based pairwise proximity. This new metric for finding functional partners complements eight others, including sharing of pathways, gene ontology (GO) terms and domains, implemented in the GeneCards Suite. In parallel, we calculated proteome-based differential expression, highlighting a subset of tissues that overexpress a gene and subserving gene classification. This textual annotation allows users of VarElect, the suite’s next-generation phenotyper, to more effectively discover causative disease variants. Finally, we define the protein–RNA expression ratio and correlation as yet another attribute of every gene in each tissue, adding further annotative information. The results constitute a significant enhancement of several Gene

  17. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  18. An integrative transcriptomic atlas of organogenesis in human embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Dave T; Berry, Andrew A; Jennings, Rachel E; Piper Hanley, Karen; Bobola, Nicoletta; Hanley, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    Human organogenesis is when severe developmental abnormalities commonly originate. However, understanding this critical embryonic phase has relied upon inference from patient phenotypes and assumptions from in vitro stem cell models and non-human vertebrates. We report an integrated transcriptomic atlas of human organogenesis. By lineage-guided principal components analysis, we uncover novel relatedness of particular developmental genes across different organs and tissues and identified unique transcriptional codes which correctly predicted the cause of many congenital disorders. By inference, our model pinpoints co-enriched genes as new causes of developmental disorders such as cleft palate and congenital heart disease. The data revealed more than 6000 novel transcripts, over 90% of which fulfil criteria as long non-coding RNAs correlated with the protein-coding genome over megabase distances. Taken together, we have uncovered cryptic transcriptional programs used by the human embryo and established a new resource for the molecular understanding of human organogenesis and its associated disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15657.001 PMID:27557446

  19. A Model for Professional Education in the 21st Century: Integrating Humanities and Engineering through Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Barbara M.; Miller, Ronald L.

    The "HumEn" (Humanities/Engineering Integration) program developed at the Colorado School of Mines integrates humanities and engineering through reading and writing. Through integrative reading and writing engineering students are led to make appropriate connections between the humanities and their technical work, connections that will…

  20. Integrated structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh Huy; von Appen, Alexander; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Ori, Alessandro; Sparks, Lenore; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Bock, Thomas; Hagen, Wim; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2013-12-05

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a fundamental component of all eukaryotic cells that facilitates nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. It is assembled from multiple copies of about 30 nucleoporins. Due to its size and complex composition, determining the structure of the NPC is an enormous challenge, and the overall architecture of the NPC scaffold remains elusive. In this study, we have used an integrated approach based on electron tomography, single-particle electron microscopy, and crosslinking mass spectrometry to determine the structure of a major scaffold motif of the human NPC, the Nup107 subcomplex, in both isolation and integrated into the NPC. We show that 32 copies of the Nup107 subcomplex assemble into two reticulated rings, one each at the cytoplasmic and nuclear face of the NPC. This arrangement may explain how changes of the diameter are realized that would accommodate transport of huge cargoes.

  1. Oncology nurses and indoor tanning: stylish or risky behavior?

    PubMed

    Leong, Christina Marie; Palos, Guadalupe R

    2014-06-01

    Being tan has become a social norm, and some nurses engage in that widely accepted lifestyle. Mounting evidence of the increased risk to melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers associated with indoor tanning supports the need for nurses to integrate skin cancer education, counseling, and referrals into routine practice. The current article presents an overview of the risks associated with indoor tanning, discusses its acceptance as a social norm, and offers strategies to support oncology nurses in changing the widespread trend.

  2. THERP and HEART integrated methodology for human error assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglia, Francesco; Giardina, Mariarosa; Tomarchio, Elio

    2015-11-01

    THERP and HEART integrated methodology is proposed to investigate accident scenarios that involve operator errors during high-dose-rate (HDR) treatments. The new approach has been modified on the basis of fuzzy set concept with the aim of prioritizing an exhaustive list of erroneous tasks that can lead to patient radiological overexposures. The results allow for the identification of human errors that are necessary to achieve a better understanding of health hazards in the radiotherapy treatment process, so that it can be properly monitored and appropriately managed.

  3. Integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boy, Guy A.

    This paper presents an artificial intelligence approach to integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems. It discusses the motivations for Intelligent Assistant Systems in both nominal and abnormal situations. The problem of constructing procedures is shown to be a very critical issue. In particular, keeping procedural experience in both design and operation is critical. We suggest what artificial intelligence can offer in this direction. Some crucial problems induced by this approach are discussed in detail. Finally, we analyze the various roles that would be shared by both astronauts, ground operators, and the intelligent assistant system.

  4. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence.

  5. Herbs Indoors. Container Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Duane

    This package consists of two bilingual instructional booklets for use in helping Indochinese refugees learn basic gardening skills. Included in the package are Cambodian, Vietnamese, and English translations of instructions for raising herbs indoors and Cambodian and English translations of guidelines for container gardening. The herb booklet…

  6. Herbs Indoors. Container Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Duane

    This package consists of two bilingual instructional booklets for use in helping Indochinese refugees learn basic gardening skills. Included in the package are Cambodian, Vietnamese, and English translations of instructions for raising herbs indoors and Cambodian and English translations of guidelines for container gardening. The herb booklet…

  7. [Indoor air and allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kunkel, G; Rudolph, R; Muckelmann, R

    1982-01-01

    Allergies may be the source of a variety of clinical symptoms. With regard to indoor air, however, the subject will be limited to inhalative allergies. These are diseases which are caused and supported by allergens entering the human organism via the respiratory pathway. The fundamentals of the origin of inhalative allergies are briefly discussed as well as the antigen-antibody reaction and the differentiation between different allergic reactions (Types I and II). In addition, the importance of repetitive infects of the upper respiratory tract for the occurrence of allergies of the respiratory system is pointed out. The most common allergies develop at the mucosae of the nose (allergic rhinitis) and of the bronchiale (allergic asthma bronchiale). Their symptomatology is discussed. Out of the allergologically interesting components of indoor air the following are to be considered primarily: house dust, components of house dust (house dust mite, trogoderma angustum, tenebrio molitor), epithelia of animals, animal feeds, mildew and occupational substances. Unspecific irritants (chimico-physical irritations) which are not acting as allergens, have to be clearly separated from these most frequent allergens. As a possibility of treatment for the therapeutist and the patient, there is the allergen prophylaxis, i.e. an extensive sanitation of the patient's environment including elimination of the allergens and, in addition, an amelioration of the quality of the air with regard to unspecific irritants. To conclude, some socio-medical aspects of respiratory diseases are discussed.

  8. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  9. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home.

    PubMed

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to optimize the calibration of the depth cameras, to describe the multi-camera data fusion and to specify a global positioning projection to maintain the compatibility with outdoor positioning systems. The monitoring of the people trajectories at home is intended for the early detection of a shift in daily activities which highlights disabilities and loss of autonomy. This system is meant to improve homecare health management at home for a better end of life at a sustainable cost for the community.

  10. Methodological Problems on the Way to Integrative Human Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Tretter, Felix; Braun, Hans A.; Buchheim, Thomas; Draguhn, Andreas; Fuchs, Thomas; Hasler, Felix; Hastedt, Heiner; Hinterberger, Thilo; Northoff, Georg; Rentschler, Ingo; Schleim, Stephan; Sellmaier, Stephan; Tebartz Van Elst, Ludger; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience is a multidisciplinary effort to understand the structures and functions of the brain and brain-mind relations. This effort results in an increasing amount of data, generated by sophisticated technologies. However, these data enhance our descriptive knowledge, rather than improve our understanding of brain functions. This is caused by methodological gaps both within and between subdisciplines constituting neuroscience, and the atomistic approach that limits the study of macro- and mesoscopic issues. Whole-brain measurement technologies do not resolve these issues, but rather aggravate them by the complexity problem. The present article is devoted to methodological and epistemic problems that obstruct the development of human neuroscience. We neither discuss ontological questions (e.g., the nature of the mind) nor review data, except when it is necessary to demonstrate a methodological issue. As regards intradisciplinary methodological problems, we concentrate on those within neurobiology (e.g., the gap between electrical and chemical approaches to neurophysiological processes) and psychology (missing theoretical concepts). As regards interdisciplinary problems, we suggest that core disciplines of neuroscience can be integrated using systemic concepts that also entail human-environment relations. We emphasize the necessity of a meta-discussion that should entail a closer cooperation with philosophy as a discipline of systematic reflection. The atomistic reduction should be complemented by the explicit consideration of the embodiedness of the brain and the embeddedness of humans. The discussion is aimed at the development of an explicit methodology of integrative human neuroscience, which will not only link different fields and levels, but also help in understanding clinical phenomena. PMID:27965548

  11. Methodological Problems on the Way to Integrative Human Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Tretter, Felix; Braun, Hans A; Buchheim, Thomas; Draguhn, Andreas; Fuchs, Thomas; Hasler, Felix; Hastedt, Heiner; Hinterberger, Thilo; Northoff, Georg; Rentschler, Ingo; Schleim, Stephan; Sellmaier, Stephan; Tebartz Van Elst, Ludger; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience is a multidisciplinary effort to understand the structures and functions of the brain and brain-mind relations. This effort results in an increasing amount of data, generated by sophisticated technologies. However, these data enhance our descriptive knowledge, rather than improve our understanding of brain functions. This is caused by methodological gaps both within and between subdisciplines constituting neuroscience, and the atomistic approach that limits the study of macro- and mesoscopic issues. Whole-brain measurement technologies do not resolve these issues, but rather aggravate them by the complexity problem. The present article is devoted to methodological and epistemic problems that obstruct the development of human neuroscience. We neither discuss ontological questions (e.g., the nature of the mind) nor review data, except when it is necessary to demonstrate a methodological issue. As regards intradisciplinary methodological problems, we concentrate on those within neurobiology (e.g., the gap between electrical and chemical approaches to neurophysiological processes) and psychology (missing theoretical concepts). As regards interdisciplinary problems, we suggest that core disciplines of neuroscience can be integrated using systemic concepts that also entail human-environment relations. We emphasize the necessity of a meta-discussion that should entail a closer cooperation with philosophy as a discipline of systematic reflection. The atomistic reduction should be complemented by the explicit consideration of the embodiedness of the brain and the embeddedness of humans. The discussion is aimed at the development of an explicit methodology of integrative human neuroscience, which will not only link different fields and levels, but also help in understanding clinical phenomena.

  12. Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health and the Human Integration Design Handbook. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Janis

    2010-01-01

    For decades, Space Life Sciences and NASA as an Agency have considered NASA-STD-3000, Man-Systems Integration Standards, a significant contribution to human spaceflight programs and to human-systems integration in general. The document has been referenced in numerous design standards both within NASA and by organizations throughout the world. With research program and project results being realized, advances in technology and new information in a variety of topic areas now available, the time arrived to update this extensive suite of requirements and design information. During the past several years, a multi-NASA center effort has been underway to write the update to NASA-STD-3000 with standards and design guidance that would be applicable to all future human spaceflight programs. NASA-STD-3001 - Volumes 1 and 2 - and the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH) were created. Volume 1, Crew Health, establishes NASA s spaceflight crew health standards for the pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight phases of human spaceflight. Volume 2, Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health, focuses on the requirements of human-system integration and how the human crew interacts with other systems, and how the human and the system function together to accomplish the tasks for mission success. The HIDH is a compendium of human spaceflight history and knowledge, and provides useful background information and research findings. And as the HIDH is a stand-alone companion to the Standards, the maintenance of the document has been streamlined. This unique and flexible approach ensures that the content is current and addresses the fundamental advances of human performance and human capabilities and constraints research. Current work focuses on the development of new sections of Volume 2 and collecting updates to the HIDH. The new sections in development expand the scope of the standard and address mission operations and support operations. This effort is again collaboration

  13. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  14. Quantitative filter forensics for indoor particle sampling.

    PubMed

    Haaland, D; Siegel, J A

    2017-03-01

    Filter forensics is a promising indoor air investigation technique involving the analysis of dust which has collected on filters in central forced-air heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) or portable systems to determine the presence of indoor particle-bound contaminants. In this study, we summarize past filter forensics research to explore what it reveals about the sampling technique and the indoor environment. There are 60 investigations in the literature that have used this sampling technique for a variety of biotic and abiotic contaminants. Many studies identified differences between contaminant concentrations in different buildings using this technique. Based on this literature review, we identified a lack of quantification as a gap in the past literature. Accordingly, we propose an approach to quantitatively link contaminants extracted from HVAC filter dust to time-averaged integrated air concentrations. This quantitative filter forensics approach has great potential to measure indoor air concentrations of a wide variety of particle-bound contaminants. Future studies directly comparing quantitative filter forensics to alternative sampling techniques are required to fully assess this approach, but analysis of past research suggests the enormous possibility of this approach. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Tool for Human-Systems Integration Assessment: HSI Scorecard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Nihriban; Sandor, Aniko; McGuire, Kerry M.; Berdich, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development and rationale for a human-systems integration (HSI) scorecard that can be used in reviews of vehicle specification and design. This tool can be used to assess whether specific HSI related criteria have been met as part of a project milestone or critical event, such as technical reviews, crew station reviews, mockup evaluations, or even review of major plans or processes. Examples of HSI related criteria include Human Performance Capabilities, Health Management, Human System Interfaces, Anthropometry and Biomechanics, and Natural and Induced Environments. The tool is not intended to evaluate requirements compliance and verification, but to review how well the human related systems have been considered for the specific event and to identify gaps and vulnerabilities from an HSI perspective. The scorecard offers common basis, and criteria for discussions among system managers, evaluators, and design engineers. Furthermore, the scorecard items highlight the main areas of system development that need to be followed during system lifecycle. The ratings provide a repeatable quantitative measure to what has been often seen as only subjective commentary. Thus, the scorecard is anticipated to be a useful HSI tool to communicate review results to the institutional and the project office management.

  16. An Integrated Framework for Human-Robot Collaborative Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Weihua; Thobbi, Anand; Gu, Ye

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated learning framework that enables humanoid robots to perform human-robot collaborative manipulation tasks. Specifically, a table-lifting task performed jointly by a human and a humanoid robot is chosen for validation purpose. The proposed framework is split into two phases: 1) phase I-learning to grasp the table and 2) phase II-learning to perform the manipulation task. An imitation learning approach is proposed for phase I. In phase II, the behavior of the robot is controlled by a combination of two types of controllers: 1) reactive and 2) proactive. The reactive controller lets the robot take a reactive control action to make the table horizontal. The proactive controller lets the robot take proactive actions based on human motion prediction. A measure of confidence of the prediction is also generated by the motion predictor. This confidence measure determines the leader/follower behavior of the robot. Hence, the robot can autonomously switch between the behaviors during the task. Finally, the performance of the human-robot team carrying out the collaborative manipulation task is experimentally evaluated on a platform consisting of a Nao humanoid robot and a Vicon motion capture system. Results show that the proposed framework can enable the robot to carry out the collaborative manipulation task successfully.

  17. Towards an integrative picture of human sickness behavior.

    PubMed

    Shattuck, Eric C; Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Sickness behavior, a coordinated set of behavioral changes during infection and elicited by the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), is well studied in non-human animals. Over the last two decades, several papers have expanded this research to include humans. However, these studies use a variety of research designs, and typically focus on a single cytokine and only a few of the many behavioral changes constituting sickness behavior. Therefore, our understanding of human sickness behavior remains equivocal. To generate a more holistic, integrative picture of this phenomenon, a meta-analysis of the human sickness behavior literature was conducted. Full model results show that both IL-6 and IL-1β have significant relationships with sickness behavior, and the strength of these relationships is affected by a number of study parameters, such as type of immune stimulus and inclusion of controls. In addition to research design heterogeneity, other issues to address in future studies include an unequal focus on different cytokines and different sickness behaviors.

  18. Space Flight Human System Standards (SFHSS). Volume 2; Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Factors" and Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Fitts, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the standards for space flight hardware based on human capabilities and limitations. The contents include: 1) Scope; 2) Applicable documents; 3) General; 4) Human Physical Characteristics and Capabilities; 5) Human Performance and Cognition; 6) Natural and Induced Environments; 7) Habitability Functions; 8) Architecture; 9) Hardware and Equipment; 10) Crew Interfaces; 11) Spacesuits; 12) Operatons: Reserved; 13) Ground Maintenance and Assembly: Reserved; 14) Appendix A-Reference Documents; 15) Appendix N-Acronyms and 16) Appendix C-Definition. Volume 2 is supported by the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH)s.

  19. [Integrity].

    PubMed

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  20. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-O; Brown, R A; Razonable, R R

    2012-08-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is unique among human herpesviruses because of its ability to integrate into chromosomes. This entity, termed chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (CIHHV-6), is often mistaken for active infection and treated unnecessarily. The clinical significance of CIHHV-6 in transplant recipients is not defined. Herein, the clinical characteristics of 7 liver transplant patients with CIHHV-6 from our recent study, together with 14 other published cases of CIHHV-6 were reviewed. Of the 21 cases, CIHHV-6B was reported most commonly among solid organ transplant recipients, while CIHHV-6A was mostly seen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients. None of the 21 patients developed clinical symptoms related to HHV-6 after transplantation. However, antiviral therapy was administered to 5 asymptomatic patients mistaken to have HHV-6 infection because of their very high HHV-6 DNA levels, 3 who developed symptomatic cytomegalovirus disease, and 1 with graft-versus-host disease that was mistaken for HHV-6 infection. In patients who received antiviral therapy, there was no apparent decline in HHV-6 DNA load, although change in viral kinetics is difficult to discern in the setting of high baseline HHV-6 DNA load. Clinicians should be aware of this entity of CIHHV-6 so that antiviral therapy can be considered in the proper clinical context.

  1. Integrating human omics data to prioritize candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The identification of genes involved in human complex diseases remains a great challenge in computational systems biology. Although methods have been developed to use disease phenotypic similarities with a protein-protein interaction network for the prioritization of candidate genes, other valuable omics data sources have been largely overlooked in these methods. Methods With this understanding, we proposed a method called BRIDGE to prioritize candidate genes by integrating disease phenotypic similarities with such omics data as protein-protein interactions, gene sequence similarities, gene expression patterns, gene ontology annotations, and gene pathway memberships. BRIDGE utilizes a multiple regression model with lasso penalty to automatically weight different data sources and is capable of discovering genes associated with diseases whose genetic bases are completely unknown. Results We conducted large-scale cross-validation experiments and demonstrated that more than 60% known disease genes can be ranked top one by BRIDGE in simulated linkage intervals, suggesting the superior performance of this method. We further performed two comprehensive case studies by applying BRIDGE to predict novel genes and transcriptional networks involved in obesity and type II diabetes. Conclusion The proposed method provides an effective and scalable way for integrating multi omics data to infer disease genes. Further applications of BRIDGE will be benefit to providing novel disease genes and underlying mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:24344781

  2. Integrated Field-Scale, Lab-Scale, and Modeling Studies for Improving the Ability to Assess the Groundwater to Indoor Air Pathway at Chlorinated Solvent-Impacted Groundwater Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Monitoring of Indoor Air Radon Concentrations with Time .................................14 Radon Concentrations in Soil Gas... Radon soil gas concentration contours [pCi/L] ...........................................................15 Figure 13. SF6 in indoor air with a constant...calibrations ect. August 2010- present* *SF6 started in December 2010, Radon started in February 2011 All available soil gas and

  3. Human midsagittal brain shape variation: patterns, allometry and integration

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Emiliano; Martin-Loeches, Manuel; Colom, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Midsagittal cerebral morphology provides a homologous geometrical reference for brain shape and cortical vs. subcortical spatial relationships. In this study, midsagittal brain shape variation is investigated in a sample of 102 humans, in order to describe and quantify the major patterns of correlation between morphological features, the effect of size and sex on general anatomy, and the degree of integration between different cortical and subcortical areas. The only evident pattern of covariation was associated with fronto-parietal cortical bulging. The allometric component was weak for the cortical profile, but more robust for the posterior subcortical areas. Apparent sex differences were evidenced in size but not in brain shape. Cortical and subcortical elements displayed scarcely integrated changes, suggesting a modular separation between these two areas. However, a certain correlation was found between posterior subcortical and parietal cortical variations. These results should be directly integrated with information ranging from functional craniology to wiring organization, and with hypotheses linking brain shape and the mechanical properties of neurons during morphogenesis. PMID:20345859

  4. Population, human resources and development planning: towards an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Farooq, G M

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made in this discussion to outline in broad terms an analytical and operational framework for integrating population and human resources related issues. 3 sections provide a rationale for comprehensive population, human resources, and development planning; contain a brief description of the kind of policy research needed as part of the analytical base for comprehensive planning; and describe proposed institutional arrangements under which the national effort could be organized and coordinated and the related programs implemented. For comprehensive development planning, it is essential to consider population problems in their broad perspective. Population problems are related to the prevailing levels of mortality, health and nutrition, population movements, levels of unemployment, underemployment and child labor, women's roles, income inequalities, incidence of poverty, and quality of environment and the like, as well as, population growth. A model for the integration of population variables into national socioeconomic planning would involve, in increasing order of complexity, the following types of analytical work: detailed demographic estimates and projections; translation of the consequences of population dynamics into estimates of social and economic needs for the purpose of sectoral planning; and research on the more important demographic, social, and economic linkages in order to contribute to the formulation of population policies and related measures for influencing population variables directly and the overall development plan, sectoral plans, and individual programs and projects. Some of the more basic studies that would help to establish an appropriate analytical base for a comprehensive planning approach are outlined. A suitable operational framework is required for an effective and integrated approach to population, human resources, and development planning. What is necessary is the establishment of a permanent high level institution

  5. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Costa, Eunice M; Sousa, Marcos FQ; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line) as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors. PMID:19772662

  6. Indoor Subspacing to Implement Indoorgml for Indoor Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Lee, J.

    2015-10-01

    According to an increasing demand for indoor navigation, there are great attempts to develop applicable indoor network. Representation for a room as a node is not sufficient to apply complex and large buildings. As OGC established IndoorGML, subspacing to partition the space for constructing logical network is introduced. Concerning subspacing for indoor network, transition space like halls or corridors also have to be considered. This study presents the subspacing process for creating an indoor network in shopping mall. Furthermore, categorization of transition space is performed and subspacing of this space is considered. Hall and squares in mall is especially defined for subspacing. Finally, implementation of subspacing process for indoor network is presented.

  7. Human-System Integration Scorecard Update to VB.Net

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Blaze D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to create Human-System Integration (HSI) scorecard software, which could be utilized to validate that human factors have been considered early in hardware/system specifications and design. The HSI scorecard is partially based upon the revised Human Rating Requirements (HRR) intended for NASA's Constellation program. This software scorecard will allow for quick appraisal of HSI factors, by using visual aids to highlight low and rapidly changing scores. This project consisted of creating a user-friendly Visual Basic program that could be easily distributed and updated, to and by fellow colleagues. Updating the Microsoft Word version of the HSI scorecard to a computer application will allow for the addition of useful features, improved easy of use, and decreased completion time for user. One significant addition is the ability to create Microsoft Excel graphs automatically from scorecard data, to allow for clear presentation of problematic areas. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rational and benefits of creating the HSI scorecard software, the problems and goals of project, and future work that could be done.

  8. Integrated Human Test Facilities at NASA and the Role of Human Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tri, Terry O.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated human test facilities are a key component of NASA's Advanced Life Support Program (ALSP). Over the past several years, the ALSP has been developing such facilities to serve as a large-scale advanced life support and habitability test bed capable of supporting long-duration evaluations of integrated bioregenerative life support systems with human test crews. These facilities-targeted for evaluation of hypogravity compatible life support and habitability systems to be developed for use on planetary surfaces-are currently in the development stage at the Johnson Space Center. These major test facilities are comprised of a set of interconnected chambers with a sealed internal environment, which will be outfitted with systems capable of supporting test crews of four individuals for periods exceeding one year. The advanced technology systems to be tested will consist of both biological and physicochemical components and will perform all required crew life support and habitability functions. This presentation provides a description of the proposed test "missions" to be supported by these integrated human test facilities, the overall system architecture of the facilities, the current development status of the facilities, and the role that human design has played in the development of the facilities.

  9. Large Scale System Safety Integration for Human Rated Space Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Michael J.

    2005-12-01

    Since the 1960s man has searched for ways to establish a human presence in space. Unfortunately, the development and operation of human spaceflight vehicles carry significant safety risks that are not always well understood. As a result, the countries with human space programs have felt the pain of loss of lives in the attempt to develop human space travel systems. Integrated System Safety is a process developed through years of experience (since before Apollo and Soyuz) as a way to assess risks involved in space travel and prevent such losses. The intent of Integrated System Safety is to take a look at an entire program and put together all the pieces in such a way that the risks can be identified, understood and dispositioned by program management. This process has many inherent challenges and they need to be explored, understood and addressed.In order to prepare truly integrated analysis safety professionals must gain a level of technical understanding of all of the project's pieces and how they interact. Next, they must find a way to present the analysis so the customer can understand the risks and make decisions about managing them. However, every organization in a large-scale project can have different ideas about what is or is not a hazard, what is or is not an appropriate hazard control, and what is or is not adequate hazard control verification. NASA provides some direction on these topics, but interpretations of those instructions can vary widely.Even more challenging is the fact that every individual/organization involved in a project has different levels of risk tolerance. When the discrete hazard controls of the contracts and agreements cannot be met, additional risk must be accepted. However, when one has left the arena of compliance with the known rules, there can be no longer be specific ground rules on which to base a decision as to what is acceptable and what is not. The integrator must find common grounds between all parties to achieve

  10. NASA Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH): Revitalization of Space-Related Human Factors, Environmental and Habitability Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Dane; Pickett, Lynn; Tillman, Barry; Foley, Tico

    2007-01-01

    This chart illustrates the contents for NASA's Human Integration Design Handbook, which is being developed as a new reference handbook for designing systems which accomodate the capabilities and limitations of the human crew.

  11. a Review of Recent Research in Indoor Modelling & Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, M.; Isikdag, U.; Basaraner, M.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor modeling and mapping has been an active area of research in last 20 years in order to tackle the problems related to positioning and tracking of people and objects indoors, and provides many opportunities for several domains ranging from emergency response to logistics in micro urban spaces. The outputs of recent research in the field have been presented in several scientific publications and events primarily related to spatial information science and technology. This paper summarizes the outputs of last 10 years of research on indoor modeling and mapping within a proper classification which covers 7 areas, i.e. Information Acquisition by Sensors, Model Definition, Model Integration, Indoor Positioning and LBS, Routing & Navigation Methods, Augmented and Virtual Reality Applications, and Ethical Issues. Finally, the paper outlines the current and future research directions and concluding remarks.

  12. State indoor tanning laws and adolescent indoor tanning.

    PubMed

    Guy, Gery P; Berkowitz, Zahava; Jones, Sherry Everett; Olsen, Emily O'Malley; Miyamoto, Justin N; Michael, Shannon L; Saraiya, Mona

    2014-04-01

    Recently, several state indoor tanning laws, including age restrictions, were promulgated to reduce indoor tanning among minors. We examined the effects of these laws on adolescent indoor tanning. We used nationally representative data from the 2009 and 2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (n = 31 835). Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association between state indoor tanning laws and indoor tanning among US high school students. Female students in states with indoor tanning laws were less likely to engage in indoor tanning than those in states without any laws. We observed a stronger association among female students in states with systems access, parental permission, and age restriction laws than among those in states without any laws. We found no significant association among female students in states with only systems access and parental permission laws or among male students. Indoor tanning laws, particularly those including age restrictions, may be effective in reducing indoor tanning among female high school students, for whom rates are the highest. Such reductions have the potential to reduce the health and economic burden of skin cancer.

  13. State Indoor Tanning Laws and Adolescent Indoor Tanning

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Gery P.; Berkowitz, Zahava; Jones, Sherry Everett; O’Malley Olsen, Emily; Miyamoto, Justin N.; Michael, Shannon L.; Saraiya, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Recently, several state indoor tanning laws, including age restrictions, were promulgated to reduce indoor tanning among minors. We examined the effects of these laws on adolescent indoor tanning. Methods. We used nationally representative data from the 2009 and 2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (n = 31 835). Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association between state indoor tanning laws and indoor tanning among US high school students. Results. Female students in states with indoor tanning laws were less likely to engage in indoor tanning than those in states without any laws. We observed a stronger association among female students in states with systems access, parental permission, and age restriction laws than among those in states without any laws. We found no significant association among female students in states with only systems access and parental permission laws or among male students. Conclusions. Indoor tanning laws, particularly those including age restrictions, may be effective in reducing indoor tanning among female high school students, for whom rates are the highest. Such reductions have the potential to reduce the health and economic burden of skin cancer. PMID:24524515

  14. Evaluation of Human and AutomationRobotics Integration Needs for Future Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquez, Jessica J.; Adelstein, Bernard D.; Ellis, Stephen; Chang, Mai Lee; Howard, Robert

    2016-01-01

    NASA employs Design Reference Missions (DRMs) to define potential architectures for future human exploration missions to deep space, the Moon, and Mars. While DRMs to these destinations share some components, each mission has different needs. This paper focuses on the human and automation/robotic integration needs for these future missions, evaluating them with respect to NASA research gaps in the area of space human factors engineering. The outcomes of our assessment is a human and automation/robotic (HAR) task list for each of the four DRMs that we reviewed (i.e., Deep Space Sortie, Lunar Visit/Habitation, Deep Space Habitation, and Planetary), a list of common critical HAR factors that drive HAR design.

  15. Indoor air quality medicolegal issues.

    PubMed

    Ross, C S; Lockey, J E

    1994-08-01

    The regulatory and legal communities have begun only recently to address the medicolegal issues surrounding indoor air quality. No single governmental agency is responsible for indoor air quality issues. The focus of the federal government's indoor air quality programs is on the gathering and dissemination of information rather than on the regulation of indoor air pollution. State and local regulatory controls vary but may include antismoking ordinances, building codes, and contractor certification programs. Numerous lawsuits involving various parties and legal theories have been filed on the basis of illness allegedly related to indoor air quality. Further regulatory and legal review of indoor air problems will likely occur in the near future, particularly as a result of the characterization of environmental tobacco smoke as a class A carcinogen.

  16. An Integrated Hybrid Transportation Architecture for Human Mars Expeditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Raymond G.; Chai, Patrick R.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture that uses both chemical and electric propulsion systems on the same vehicle to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By applying chemical and electrical propulsion where each is most effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper presents an integrated Hybrid in-space transportation architecture for piloted missions and delivery of cargo. A concept for a Mars campaign including orbital and Mars surface missions is described in detail including a system concept of operations and conceptual design. Specific constraints, margin, and pinch points are identified for the architecture and opportunities for critical path commercial and international collaboration are discussed.

  17. Integrating an Interprofessional Education Experience Into a Human Physiology Course.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Scott; Molina, Patricia E; McDonough, Kathleen H; Mercante, Donald E; Gunaldo, Tina P

    2017-09-01

    To obtain physician assistant (PA) student perceptions about an interprofessional education (IPE) training experience embedded in a multidisciplinary science course. An IPE training experience was integrated into a graduate human physiology course offered to PA, physical therapy, and graduate studies students. The focus of the activity related to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains of (1) roles and responsibilities and (2) teams and teamwork. Effectiveness was assessed in pretraining and posttraining surveys, which included questions addressing student self-perceptions of IPEC competency domains, student assessment of the learning activity, and student reflection. We observed a statistically significant positive change in PA student perceptions of IPEC competency domains. Students also provided a positive evaluation of the IPE activity and communicated personal improvements in IPE perspectives. Incorporating planned IPE experiences into multidisciplinary health science courses represents an appropriate venue for PA students to learn and apply interprofessional competencies, which may benefit future interprofessional practice.

  18. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Unifying Human Centered Design and Systems Engineering for Human Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy A.; McGovernNarkevicius, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Despite the holistic approach of systems engineering (SE), systems still fail, and sometimes spectacularly. Requirements, solutions and the world constantly evolve and are very difficult to keep current. SE requires more flexibility and new approaches to SE have to be developed to include creativity as an integral part and where the functions of people and technology are appropriately allocated within our highly interconnected complex organizations. Instead of disregarding complexity because it is too difficult to handle, we should take advantage of it, discovering behavioral attractors and the emerging properties that it generates. Human-centered design (HCD) provides the creativity factor that SE lacks. It promotes modeling and simulation from the early stages of design and throughout the life cycle of a product. Unifying HCD and SE will shape appropriate human-systems integration (HSI) and produce successful systems.

  20. Temporal integration of light flashes by the human circadian system.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Raymond P; Zeitzer, Jamie M

    2016-03-01

    Beyond image formation, the light that is detected by retinal photoreceptors influences subcortical functions, including circadian timing, sleep, and arousal. The physiology of nonimage-forming (NIF) photoresponses in humans is not well understood; therefore, the development of therapeutic interventions based on this physiology, such as bright light therapy to treat chronobiological disorders, remains challenging. Thirty-nine participants were exposed to 60 minutes of either continuous light (n = 8) or sequences of 2-millisecond light flashes (n = 31) with different interstimulus intervals (ISIs; ranging from 2.5 to 240 seconds). Melatonin phase shift and suppression, along with changes in alertness and sleepiness, were assessed. We determined that the human circadian system integrates flash sequences in a nonlinear fashion with a linear rise to a peak response (ISI = 7.6 ± 0.53 seconds) and a power function decrease following the peak of responsivity. At peak ISI, flashes were at least 2-fold more effective in phase delaying the circadian system as compared with exposure to equiluminous continuous light 3,800 times the duration. Flashes did not change melatonin concentrations or alertness in an ISI-dependent manner. We have demonstrated that intermittent light is more effective than continuous light at eliciting circadian changes. These findings cast light on the phenomenology of photic integration and suggest a dichotomous retinohypothalamic network leading to circadian phase shifting and other NIF photoresponses. Further clinical trials are required to judge the practicality of light flash protocols. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01119365. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (1R01HL108441-01A1) and Department of Veterans Affairs Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center.

  1. Temporal integration of light flashes by the human circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Raymond P.; Zeitzer, Jamie M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beyond image formation, the light that is detected by retinal photoreceptors influences subcortical functions, including circadian timing, sleep, and arousal. The physiology of nonimage-forming (NIF) photoresponses in humans is not well understood; therefore, the development of therapeutic interventions based on this physiology, such as bright light therapy to treat chronobiological disorders, remains challenging. METHODS. Thirty-nine participants were exposed to 60 minutes of either continuous light (n = 8) or sequences of 2-millisecond light flashes (n = 31) with different interstimulus intervals (ISIs; ranging from 2.5 to 240 seconds). Melatonin phase shift and suppression, along with changes in alertness and sleepiness, were assessed. RESULTS. We determined that the human circadian system integrates flash sequences in a nonlinear fashion with a linear rise to a peak response (ISI = 7.6 ± 0.53 seconds) and a power function decrease following the peak of responsivity. At peak ISI, flashes were at least 2-fold more effective in phase delaying the circadian system as compared with exposure to equiluminous continuous light 3,800 times the duration. Flashes did not change melatonin concentrations or alertness in an ISI-dependent manner. CONCLUSION. We have demonstrated that intermittent light is more effective than continuous light at eliciting circadian changes. These findings cast light on the phenomenology of photic integration and suggest a dichotomous retinohypothalamic network leading to circadian phase shifting and other NIF photoresponses. Further clinical trials are required to judge the practicality of light flash protocols. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01119365. FUNDING. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (1R01HL108441-01A1) and Department of Veterans Affairs Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center. PMID:26854928

  2. An Integrated Suite of Tools to support Human Factors Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques V Hugo

    2001-08-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) work for the nuclear industry imposes special demands on the practitioner in terms of the scope, complexity and safety requirements for humans in nuclear installations. Unfortunately HFE lags behind other engineering disciplines in the development and use of modern, powerful tools for the full range of analysis and design processes. HFE does not appear to be an attractive market for software and hardware developers and as a result, HFE practitioners usually have to rely on inefficient general-purpose tools like standard office software, or they have to use expensive special-purpose tools that offer only part of the solution they require and which also do not easily integrate with other tools. There have been attempts to develop generic software tools to support the HFE analyst and also to achieve some order and consistency in format and presentation. However, in spite of many years of development, very few tools have emerged that have achieved these goals. This would suggest the need for special tools, but existing commercial products have been found inadequate and to date not a single tool has been developed that adequately supports the special requirements of HFE work for the nuclear industry. This paper describes an integrated suite of generic as well as purpose-built tools that facilitate information solicitation, issues tracking, work domain analysis, functional requirements analysis, function allocation, operational sequence analysis, task analysis and development of HSI design requirements. In combination, this suite of tools supports the analytical as well as the representational aspects of key HFE activities primarily for new NPPs, including capturing information from subject matter experts and various source documents directly into the appropriate tool and then linking, analyzing and extending that information further to represent detailed functional and task information, and ultimately HSI design requirements. The paper

  3. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-08-05

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  4. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73 000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards’ unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene’s functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite

  5. Filtration and indoor air quality: A practical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.T.; Huza, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    This article describes how filtration systems can be a practical and effective means to control indoor contaminants when properly designed and applied. Although indoor air quality appears to be a complex subject, in reality it reduces to two simple concerns: human health and human comfort. While the interactions exist, the environmental factors that affect human comfort are different from those factors that affect human health. Generally speaking, temperature, relative humidity, air movement and noise level contribute to human comfort, and indoor contaminants affect human health, but they can also cause comfort problems, such as odors. It is important to point out this distinction because many IAQ problems can be solved simply by a small adjustment of the temperature, humidity o ventilation rate, especially when the environment of concern is outside of the comfort zone and the air is perceived as stuffy. However, when the occupants experience headaches, fatigue, eye irritation or coughing or when they smell odors, it is likely that the problems are caused by contaminants in the indoor air. Indoor contaminants may be grouped into four categories: bioaerosols (microorganisms); respirable particulates; gaseous contaminants; and vaporous contaminants. While their concentrations may vary, all of these contaminants may exist regardless of types of building, HVAC system and occupant activity.

  6. Investigation of the treatability of the primary indoor volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloths at typical indoor concentrations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Meng; Zhang, Qiong; Hand, David W; Perram, David L; Taylor, Roy

    2009-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major concern for indoor air pollution because of the impacts on human health. In recent years, interest has increased in the development and design of activated carbon filters for removing VOCs from indoor air. Although extensive information is available on sources, concentrations, and types of indoor VOCs, there is little or no information on the performance of indoor air adsorption systems for removing low concentrations of primary VOCs. Filter designs need to consider various factors such as empty bed contact time, humidity effects, competitive adsorption, and feed concentration variations, whereas adsorption capacities of the indoor VOCs at the indoor concentration levels are important parameters for filter design. A preliminary assessment of the feasibility of using adsorption filters to remove low concentrations of primary VOCs can be performed. This work relates the information (including VOC classes in indoor air, the typical indoor concentrations, and the adsorption isotherms) with the design of a particular adsorbent/adsorbates system. As groundwork for filter design and development, this study selects the primary VOCs in indoor air of residences, schools, and offices in different geographical areas (North America, Europe, and Asia) on the basis of occurrence, concentrations, and health effects. Activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) are chosen as the adsorbents of interest. It is demonstrated that the isotherm of a VOC (e.g., toluene on the ACFC) at typical indoor concentrations-parts per billion by volume (ppbv) level-is different than the isotherm at parts per million by volume (ppmv) levels reported in the publications. The isotherms at the typical indoor concentrations for the selected primary VOCs are estimated using the Dubinin-Radushkevitch equation. The maximum specific throughput for an indoor VOC removal system to remove benzene is calculated as a worst-case scenario. It is shown that VOC adsorption

  7. Action and language integration: from humans to cognitive robots.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Anna M; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2014-07-01

    The topic is characterized by a highly interdisciplinary approach to the issue of action and language integration. Such an approach, combining computational models and cognitive robotics experiments with neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and linguistic approaches, can be a powerful means that can help researchers disentangle ambiguous issues, provide better and clearer definitions, and formulate clearer predictions on the links between action and language. In the introduction we briefly describe the papers and discuss the challenges they pose to future research. We identify four important phenomena the papers address and discuss in light of empirical and computational evidence: (a) the role played not only by sensorimotor and emotional information but also of natural language in conceptual representation; (b) the contextual dependency and high flexibility of the interaction between action, concepts, and language; (c) the involvement of the mirror neuron system in action and language processing; (d) the way in which the integration between action and language can be addressed by developmental robotics and Human-Robot Interaction.

  8. Inherited Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J; Simard, Jacques; Velásquez-García, Héctor A; Spinelli, John J; Flamand, Louis

    2017-03-01

    Background: Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (iciHHV-6) is a condition observed in approximately 1% of the population. Whether such a genetic alteration predisposes to cancer development in currently unknown. Two studies were conducted to determine whether iciHHV-6 is associated with cancer development.Methods: First, a screen of 19,597 people from the province of Quebec (Canada) was conducted. A replication test, using data from a population-based case-control study of 1,090 women with incident breast cancer and 1,053 controls from British Columbia and Ontario (Canada) was conducted. DNA samples were analyzed by qPCR and droplet digital PCR to identify iciHHV-6(+) carriers.Results: In the initial study, a potential association between iciHHV-6 positivity and breast cancer was identified [OR = 2.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.95-7.44]. In the replication dataset, no association was found between iciHHV-6 positivity in women and breast cancer (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.35-2.15).Conclusions: We found no statistically significant associations between inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6 and breast cancer in women.Impact: These results do not provide evidence to suggest that iciHHV-6 is a risk factor for breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 425-7. ©2016 AACR.

  9. DNA integrity of human leukocytes after magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Szerencsi, Ágnes; Kubinyi, Györgyi; Váliczkó, Éva; Juhász, Péter; Rudas, Gábor; Mester, Ádám; Jánossy, Gábor; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2013-10-01

    This study focuses on the effects of high-field (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans on the DNA integrity of human leukocytes in vitro in order to validate the study where genotoxic effects were obtained and published by Lee et al. The scanning protocol and exposure situation were the same as those used under routine clinical brain MRI scan. Peripheral blood samples from healthy non-smoking male donors were exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) produced by 3T magnetic resonance imaging equipment for 0, 22, 45, 67, and 89 min during the scanning procedure. Samples of positive control were exposed to ionizing radiation (4 Gy of (60)Co-γ). Single breaks of DNA in leukocytes were detected by single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Chromosome breakage, chromosome loss and micronuclei formations were detected by a micronucleus test (MN). Three independent experiments were performed. The data of comet tail DNA%, olive tail moment and micronucleus frequency showed no DNA damages due to MRI exposure. The results of the Comet assay and the micronucleus test indicate that the applied exposure of MRI does not appear to produce breaks in the DNA and has no significant effect on DNA integrity.

  10. Vertically integrated analysis of human DNA. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, M.

    1997-10-01

    This project has been oriented toward improving the vertical integration of the sequential steps associated with the large-scale analysis of human DNA. The central focus has been on an approach to the preparation of {open_quotes}sequence-ready{close_quotes} maps, which is referred to as multiple-complete-digest (MCD) mapping, primarily directed at cosmid clones. MCD mapping relies on simple experimental steps, supported by advanced image-analysis and map-assembly software, to produce extremely accurate restriction-site and clone-overlap maps. We believe that MCD mapping is one of the few high-resolution mapping systems that has the potential for high-level automation. Successful automation of this process would be a landmark event in genome analysis. Once other higher organisms, paving the way for cost-effective sequencing of these genomes. Critically, MCD mapping has the potential to provide built-in quality control for sequencing accuracy and to make possible a highly integrated end product even if there are large numbers of discontinuities in the actual sequence.

  11. Integrating human resources and program-planning strategies.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E

    1989-06-01

    The integration of human resources management (HRM) strategies with long-term program-planning strategies in hospital pharmacy departments is described. HRM is a behaviorally based, comprehensive strategy for the effective management and use of people that seeks to achieve coordination and integration with overall planning strategies and other managerial functions. It encompasses forecasting of staffing requirements; determining work-related factors that are strong "motivators" and thus contribute to employee productivity and job satisfaction; conducting a departmental personnel and skills inventory; employee career planning and development, including training and education programs; strategies for promotion and succession, including routes of advancement that provide alternatives to the managerial route; and recruitment and selection of new personnel to meet changing departmental needs. Increased competitiveness among hospitals and a shortage of pharmacists make it imperative that hospital pharmacy managers create strategies to attract, develop, and retain the right individuals to enable the department--and the hospital as a whole--to grow and change in response to the changing health-care environment in the United States. Pharmacy managers would be greatly aided in this mission by the establishment of a well-defined, national strategic plan for pharmacy programs and services that includes an analysis of what education and training are necessary for their successful accomplishment. Creation of links between overall program objectives and people-planning strategies will aid hospital pharmacy departments in maximizing the long-term effectiveness of their practice.

  12. Indoor Environment Program - 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Indoor Environment Program

    1996-11-01

    The forty-five chemists, physicists, biologists, architects, engineers, staff, and students of the Indoor Environment Program are all working to solve the problems of indoor air quality, health, comfort, and energy use associated with the indoor environment. A common thread throughout this work is the importance of ventilation--both for its role in supporting human health and comfort as well as for its liability in requiring large amounts of energy to heat and cool it. The importance of understanding these interactions can be illustrated by two examples: the health and productivity of workers (Fisk and Rosenfeld, 1996) and the performance of sensitive equipment in clean room environments (Faulkner, et d., 1996). During the past year, we estimated the magnitudes of health and productivity gains that may be obtained by providing better indoor environments. The ratio of the potential financial benefits of improving indoor environments to the costs of the improvements ranges between 20 and 50. A second example is from our Clean Room Energy Efficiency Study: Clean rooms utilize large amounts of electricity to operate fans that recirculate air at very high flow rates through particle filters. Usually, the fans operate continuously at full speed, even when the clean room is unused. To reduce the energy use in a research clean room, the rate of air recirculation was controlled in response to real-time measurements of particle concentration. With this new control system, fan energy use decreased by 65% to 85% while maintaining particle concentrations below the allowable limits except during occasional one-minute periods. The estimated payback period for this technology is one to four years.

  13. Valuing the health benefits of improving indoor air quality in residences.

    PubMed

    Chau, C K; Hui, W K; Tse, M S

    2008-05-01

    Unlike commercial premises, the indoor air quality of residences is more dynamic, uncontrolled, and prone to human behavioral changes. In consequence, measuring the health benefit gains derived from improving indoor air quality in residences is more complicated. To overcome this, a human thermal comfort model was first integrated with indoor microenvironment models, and subsequently linked with appropriate concentration-response and economic data for estimating the economic benefit gains derived from improving indoor air quality in residences for an adult and an elderly person. In this study, the development of the model is illustrated by using a typical residential apartment locating at the worst air quality neighborhood in Hong Kong and the daily weather profiles between 2002 and 2006. Three types of personal intervention measures were examined in the study: (i) using air cleaner in residence, (ii) changing time spent in residence, and (iii) relocating to a better air quality neighborhood. Our results revealed that employing air cleaners with windows closed in residence throughout the entire year was the most beneficial measure as it could provide the greatest annual health benefit gains. It would give a maximum of HK$2072 in 5-year cumulative benefit gain for an adult and HK$1700 for an elderly person. Employing air cleaners with windows closed in only cool season (October through March) could give the highest marginal return per dollar spent. The benefit gains would become smaller when windows were opened to a greater extent. By contrast, relocating to a better air quality neighborhood and changing the time spent in residence did not appeal to be beneficial intervention measures.

  14. Fundamentals of Indoor Air Quality in Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module provides the fundamentals to understanding indoor air quality. It provides a rudimentary framework for understanding how indoor and outdoor sources of pollution affect the indoor air quality of buildings.

  15. Human growth and body weight dynamics: an integrative systems model.

    PubMed

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and capturing changes in body weight, composition and height. Integrating previous empirical and modeling findings and validated against several additional empirical studies, the model replicates key trends in human growth including A) Changes in energy requirements from birth to old ages. B) Short and long-term dynamics of body weight and composition. C) Stunted growth with chronic malnutrition and potential for catch up growth. From obesity policy analysis to treating malnutrition and tracking growth trajectories, the model can address diverse policy questions. For example I find that even without further rise in obesity, the gap between healthy and actual Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) has embedded, for different population groups, a surplus of 14%-24% in energy intake which will be a source of significant inertia in obesity trends. In another analysis, energy deficit percentage needed to reduce BMI by one unit is found to be relatively constant across ages. Accompanying documented and freely available simulation model facilitates diverse applications customized to different sub-populations.

  16. Human Growth and Body Weight Dynamics: An Integrative Systems Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and capturing changes in body weight, composition and height. Integrating previous empirical and modeling findings and validated against several additional empirical studies, the model replicates key trends in human growth including A) Changes in energy requirements from birth to old ages. B) Short and long-term dynamics of body weight and composition. C) Stunted growth with chronic malnutrition and potential for catch up growth. From obesity policy analysis to treating malnutrition and tracking growth trajectories, the model can address diverse policy questions. For example I find that even without further rise in obesity, the gap between healthy and actual Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) has embedded, for different population groups, a surplus of 14%–24% in energy intake which will be a source of significant inertia in obesity trends. In another analysis, energy deficit percentage needed to reduce BMI by one unit is found to be relatively constant across ages. Accompanying documented and freely available simulation model facilitates diverse applications customized to different sub-populations. PMID:25479101

  17. Medieval Iceland, Greenland, and the New Human Condition: A case study in integrated environmental humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Steven; Ogilvie, A. E. J.; Ingimundarson, Jón Haukur; Dugmore, A. J.; Hambrecht, George; McGovern, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper contributes to recent studies exploring the longue durée of human impacts on island landscapes, the impacts of climate and other environmental changes on human communities, and the interaction of human societies and their environments at different spatial and temporal scales. In particular, the paper addresses Iceland during the medieval period (with a secondary, comparative focus on Norse Greenland) and discusses episodes where environmental and climatic changes have appeared to cross key thresholds for agricultural productivity. The paper draws upon international, interdisciplinary research in the North Atlantic region led by the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization (NABO) and the Nordic Network for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies (NIES) in the Circumpolar Networks program of the Integrated History and Future of People on Earth (IHOPE). By interlinking analyses of historically grounded literature with archaeological studies and environmental science, valuable new perspectives can emerge on how these past societies may have understood and coped with such impacts. As climate and other environmental changes do not operate in isolation, vulnerabilities created by socioeconomic factors also beg consideration. The paper illustrates the benefits of an integrated environmental-studies approach that draws on data, methodologies and analytical tools of environmental humanities, social sciences, and geosciences to better understand long-term human ecodynamics and changing human-landscape-environment interactions through time. One key goal is to apply previously unused data and concerted expertise to illuminate human responses to past changes; a secondary aim is to consider how lessons derived from these cases may be applicable to environmental threats and socioecological risks in the future, especially as understood in light of the New Human Condition, the concept transposed from Hannah Arendt's influential framing of the human condition that is

  18. [Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in indoor and outdoor dust from an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area in South China: contamination and human exposure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Chen, She-Jun; Tian, Mi; Ma, Yun-Juan; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-four indoor and fifteen outdoor dust samples were collected from an electronic waste (e-waste) area, South China in October 2006 and October 2007 and analyzed for seventeen PBDE congeners. PBDEs were detected in all dust samples. The total PBDE concentrations for indoor dusts ranged from 230-157500 ng/g, with a mean value of 9 400 ng/g, and 212-25 880 ng/g, with a mean value of 3 311 ng/g for outdoor samples, respectively. The PBDE concentrations in the present study were at the high end of the worldwide figures. BDE209 was the predominant congener. Comparison of the PBDE congener patterns in dusts and technical products suggests that the relatively high abundances of octa- to nona-PBDE congeners in the dusts might be originated from the degradation of BDE209. The average exposure estimates of PBDEs via dusts are 470, 329 and 188 ng/d for infants, toddlers and adults, respectively. The highest exposure estimates for infants and toddlers (31 500 and 19 700 ng/d) were 4 and 2.5 fold higher than those for adults. These results indicate that dust may be a very important route of exposure for PBDEs in local residents.

  19. INTEGRATED ROBOT-HUMAN CONTROL IN MINING OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    George Danko

    2005-04-01

    This report contains a detailed description of the work conducted in the first year of the project on Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations at University of Nevada, Reno. This project combines human operator control with robotic control concepts to create a hybrid control architecture, in which the strengths of each control method are combined to increase machine efficiency and reduce operator fatigue. The kinematics reconfiguration type differential control of the excavator implemented with a variety of ''software machine kinematics'' is the key feature of the project. This software re-configured excavator is more desirable to execute a given digging task. The human operator retains the master control of the main motion parameters, while the computer coordinates the repetitive movement patterns of the machine links. These repetitive movements may be selected from a pre-defined family of trajectories with different transformations. The operator can make adjustments to this pattern in real time, as needed, to accommodate rapidly-changing environmental conditions. A Bobcat{reg_sign} 435 excavator was retrofitted with electro-hydraulic control valve elements. The modular electronic control was tested and the basic valve characteristics were measured for each valve at the Robotics Laboratory at UNR. Position sensors were added to the individual joint control actuators, and the sensors were calibrated. An electronic central control system consisting of a portable computer, converters and electronic driver components was interfaced to the electro-hydraulic valves and position sensors. The machine is operational with or without the computer control system depending on whether the computer interface is on or off. In preparation for emulated mining tasks tests, typical, repetitive tool trajectories during surface mining operations were recorded at the Newmont Mining Corporation's ''Lone Tree'' mine in Nevada.

  20. Microbiota of the indoor environment: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Bateman, Ashley C; Bik, Holly M; Meadow, James F

    2015-10-13

    As modern humans, we spend the majority of our time in indoor environments. Consequently, environmental exposure to microorganisms has important implications for human health, and a better understanding of the ecological drivers and processes that impact indoor microbial assemblages will be key for expanding our knowledge of the built environment. In the present investigation, we combined recent studies examining the microbiota of the built environment in order to identify unifying community patterns and the relative importance of indoor environmental factors. Ultimately, the present meta-analysis focused on studies of bacteria and archaea due to the limited number of high-throughput fungal studies from the indoor environment. We combined 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene datasets from 16 surveys of indoor environments conducted worldwide, additionally including 7 other studies representing putative environmental sources of microbial taxa (outdoor air, soil, and the human body). Combined analysis of subsets of studies that shared specific experimental protocols or indoor habitats revealed community patterns indicative of consistent source environments and environmental filtering. Additionally, we were able to identify several consistent sources for indoor microorganisms, particularly outdoor air and skin, mirroring what has been shown in individual studies. Technical variation across studies had a strong effect on comparisons of microbial community assemblages, with differences in experimental protocols limiting our ability to extensively explore the importance of, for example, sampling locality, building function and use, or environmental substrate in structuring indoor microbial communities. We present a snapshot of an important scientific field in its early stages, where studies have tended to focus on heavy sampling in a few geographic areas. From the practical perspective, this endeavor reinforces the importance of negative "kit" controls in microbiome studies

  1. WSN based indoor air quality monitoring in classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. K.; Chew, S. P.; Jusoh, M. T.; Khairunissa, A.; Leong, K. Y.; Azid, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Indoor air quality monitoring is essential as the human health is directly affected by indoor air quality. This paper presents the investigations of the impact of undergraduate students' concentration during lecture due to the indoor air quality in classroom. Three environmental parameters such as temperature, relative humidity and concentration of carbon dioxide are measured using wireless sensor network based air quality monitoring system. This simple yet reliable system is incorporated with DHT-11 and MG-811 sensors. Two classrooms were selected to install the monitoring system. The level of indoor air quality were measured and students' concentration was assessed using intelligent test during normal lecturing section. The test showed significant correlation between the collected environmental parameters and the students' level of performances in their study.

  2. Toxicology of complex mixtures of indoor air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Lewtas, J.

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on strategies for assessing the toxicology of indoor air pollutant mixtures. These strategies are illustrated by reviewing the current problems and approaches to the toxicology of indoor air pollutants from three indoor source categories that make a major contribution to human exposure: environmental tobacco smoke, combustion emissions, and volatile organic compound (VOC) mixtures from materials and products. The strategies include assessment of: exposure and dosimetry, toxic effects of mixtures, causative agents in mixtures, and the predictability of toxicology from one mixture to another. Case studies from indoor air pollution are used to illustrate these strategies. Environmental tobacco smoke research on exposure and dosimetry illustrates new methods using biological markers. Unvented combustion sources such as kerosene heaters emit genotoxic incomplete combustion products and recent research is focused on identifying the genotoxic (causative) agents in these mixtures.

  3. Exploring Human Growth: Using a Calculator to Integrate Mathematics and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandersee, James H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents integrated activities for mathematics and biology appropriate for various levels from grades five through eight. Explores interesting aspects of human fingernails and hair growth and their mathematical relationship to time. Provides suggestions to integrate the activities with technology. (MDH)

  4. Exploring Human Growth: Using a Calculator to Integrate Mathematics and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandersee, James H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents integrated activities for mathematics and biology appropriate for various levels from grades five through eight. Explores interesting aspects of human fingernails and hair growth and their mathematical relationship to time. Provides suggestions to integrate the activities with technology. (MDH)

  5. Indoor Air vs. Indoor Construction: A New Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manicone, Santo

    2000-01-01

    Identifies the steps that can be taken to lessen the impact of indoor air pollution created from indoor renovation projects, including project management tips to help contractors avoid creating unnecessary air pollution. Final comments address air pollution control when installing new furniture, smoking restrictions, occupant relations, and the…

  6. Indoor Air vs. Indoor Construction: A New Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manicone, Santo

    2000-01-01

    Identifies the steps that can be taken to lessen the impact of indoor air pollution created from indoor renovation projects, including project management tips to help contractors avoid creating unnecessary air pollution. Final comments address air pollution control when installing new furniture, smoking restrictions, occupant relations, and the…

  7. Current implications of past DDT indoor spraying in Oman.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan; Klánová, Jana; Kohoutek, Jiří; Dvorská, Alice; Magulová, Katarína; Al-Zadjali, Said; Čupr, Pavel

    2016-04-15

    In Oman, DDT was sprayed indoors during an intensive malaria eradication program between 1976 and 1992. DDT can remain for years after spraying and is associated with potential health risk. This raises the concern for human exposure in areas where DDT was used for indoor spraying. Twelve houses in three regions with a different history of DDT indoor spraying were chosen for a sampling campaign in 2005 to determine p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDD) levels in indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil. Although DDT was only sprayed indoor, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were also found in outdoor soil. The results indicate that release and exposure continue for years after cessation of spraying. The predicted cancer risk based on concentrations determined in 2005, indicate that there was still a significant cancer risk up to 13 to 16years after indoor DDT spraying. A novel approach, based on region-specific half-lives, was used to predict concentrations in 2015 and showed that more than 21years after spraying, cancer risk for exposure to indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil are acceptable in Oman for adults and young children. The model can be used for other locations and countries to predict prospective exposure of contaminants based on indoor experimental measurements and knowledge about the spraying time-schedule to extrapolate region-specific half-lives and predict effects on the human population years after spraying.

  8. Integrating human impacts and ecological integrity into a risk-based protocol for conservation planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    Conservation planning aims to protect biodiversity by sustainng the natural physical, chemical, and biological processes within representative ecosystems. Often data to measure these components are inadequate or unavailable. The impact of human activities on ecosystem processes complicates integrity assessments and might alter ecosystem organization at multiple spatial scales. Freshwater conservation targets, such as populations and communities, are influenced by both intrinsic aquatic properties and the surrounding landscape, and locally collected data might not accurately reflect potential impacts. We suggest that changes in five major biotic drivers-energy sources, physical habitat, flow regime, water quality, and biotic interactions-might be used as surrogates to inform conservation planners of the ecological integrity of freshwater ecosystems. Threats to freshwater systems might be evaluated based on their impact to these drivers to provide an overview of potential risk to conservation targets. We developed a risk-based protocol, the Ecological Risk Index (ERI), to identify watersheds with least/most risk to conservation targets. Our protocol combines risk-based components, specifically the frequency and severity of human-induced stressors, with biotic drivers and mappable land- and water-use data to provide a summary of relative risk to watersheds. We illustrate application of our protocol with a case study of the upper Tennessee River basin, USA. Differences in risk patterns among the major drainages in the basin reflect dominant land uses, such as mining and agriculture. A principal components analysis showed that localized, moderately severe threats accounted for most of the threat composition differences among our watersheds. We also found that the relative importance of threats is sensitive to the spatial grain of the analysis. Our case study demonstrates that the ERI is useful for evaluating the frequency and severity of ecosystemwide risk, which can

  9. Towards the Application of Fuzzy Logic for Developing a Novel Indoor Air Quality Index (FIAQI).

    PubMed

    Javid, Allahbakhsh; Hamedian, Amir Abbas; Gharibi, Hamed; Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-02-01

    In the past few decades, Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) has become a primary concern to the point. It is increasingly believed to be of equal or greater importance to human health compared to ambient air. However, due to the lack of comprehensive indices for the integrated assessment of indoor air quality (IAQ), we aimed to develop a novel, Fuzzy-Based Indoor Air Quality Index (FIAQI) to bridge the existing gap in this area. We based our index on fuzzy logic, which enables us to overcome the limitations of traditional methods applied to develop environmental quality indices. Fifteen parameters, including the criteria air pollutants, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols were included in the FIAQI due mainly to their significant health effects. Weighting factors were assigned to the parameters based on the medical evidence available in the literature on their health effects. The final FIAQI consisted of 108 rules. In order to demonstrate the performance of the index, data were intentionally generated to cover a variety of quality levels. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the validity of the index. The FIAQI tends to be a comprehensive tool to classify IAQ and produce accurate results. It seems useful and reliable to be considered by authorities to assess IAQ environments.

  10. Towards the Application of Fuzzy Logic for Developing a Novel Indoor Air Quality Index (FIAQI)

    PubMed Central

    JAVID, Allahbakhsh; HAMEDIAN, Amir Abbas; GHARIBI, Hamed; SOWLAT, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past few decades, Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) has become a primary concern to the point. It is increasingly believed to be of equal or greater importance to human health compared to ambient air. However, due to the lack of comprehensive indices for the integrated assessment of indoor air quality (IAQ), we aimed to develop a novel, Fuzzy-Based Indoor Air Quality Index (FIAQI) to bridge the existing gap in this area. Methods: We based our index on fuzzy logic, which enables us to overcome the limitations of traditional methods applied to develop environmental quality indices. Fifteen parameters, including the criteria air pollutants, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols were included in the FIAQI due mainly to their significant health effects. Weighting factors were assigned to the parameters based on the medical evidence available in the literature on their health effects. The final FIAQI consisted of 108 rules. In order to demonstrate the performance of the index, data were intentionally generated to cover a variety of quality levels. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the validity of the index. Results: The FIAQI tends to be a comprehensive tool to classify IAQ and produce accurate results. Conclusion: It seems useful and reliable to be considered by authorities to assess IAQ environments. PMID:27114985

  11. Tiered Human Integrated Sequence Search Databases for Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S.; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Farrah, Terry; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The results of analysis of shotgun proteomics mass spectrometry data can be greatly affected by the selection of the reference protein sequence database against which the spectra are matched. For many species there are multiple sources from which somewhat different sequence sets can be obtained. This can lead to confusion about which database is best in which circumstances – a problem especially acute in human sample analysis. All sequence databases are genome-based, with sequences for the predicted gene and their protein translation products compiled. Our goal is to create a set of primary sequence databases that comprise the union of sequences from many of the different available sources and make the result easily available to the community. We have compiled a set of four sequence databases of varying sizes, from a small database consisting of only the ~20,000 primary isoforms plus contaminants to a very large database that includes almost all non-redundant protein sequences from several sources. This set of tiered, increasingly complete human protein sequence databases suitable for mass spectrometry proteomics sequence database searching is called the Tiered Human Integrated Search Proteome set. In order to evaluate the utility of these databases, we have analyzed two different data sets, one from the HeLa cell line and the other from normal human liver tissue, with each of the four tiers of database complexity. The result is that approximately 0.8%, 1.1%, and 1.5% additional peptides can be identified for Tiers 2, 3, and 4, respectively, as compared with the Tier 1 database, at substantially increasing computational cost. This increase in computational cost may be worth bearing if the identification of sequence variants or the discovery of sequences that are not present in the reviewed knowledge base entries is an important goal of the study. We find that it is useful to search a data set against a simpler database, and then check the uniqueness of the

  12. Tiered Human Integrated Sequence Search Databases for Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Farrah, Terry; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Omenn, Gilbert S; Moritz, Robert L

    2016-11-04

    The results of analysis of shotgun proteomics mass spectrometry data can be greatly affected by the selection of the reference protein sequence database against which the spectra are matched. For many species there are multiple sources from which somewhat different sequence sets can be obtained. This can lead to confusion about which database is best in which circumstances-a problem especially acute in human sample analysis. All sequence databases are genome-based, with sequences for the predicted gene and their protein translation products compiled. Our goal is to create a set of primary sequence databases that comprise the union of sequences from many of the different available sources and make the result easily available to the community. We have compiled a set of four sequence databases of varying sizes, from a small database consisting of only the ∼20,000 primary isoforms plus contaminants to a very large database that includes almost all nonredundant protein sequences from several sources. This set of tiered, increasingly complete human protein sequence databases suitable for mass spectrometry proteomics sequence database searching is called the Tiered Human Integrated Search Proteome set. In order to evaluate the utility of these databases, we have analyzed two different data sets, one from the HeLa cell line and the other from normal human liver tissue, with each of the four tiers of database complexity. The result is that approximately 0.8%, 1.1%, and 1.5% additional peptides can be identified for Tiers 2, 3, and 4, respectively, as compared with the Tier 1 database, at substantially increasing computational cost. This increase in computational cost may be worth bearing if the identification of sequence variants or the discovery of sequences that are not present in the reviewed knowledge base entries is an important goal of the study. We find that it is useful to search a data set against a simpler database, and then check the uniqueness of the

  13. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6: questions and answers.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Philip E; Ablashi, Dharam V; Ambros, Peter F; Agut, Henri; Caserta, Mary T; Descamps, Vincent; Flamand, Louis; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Hall, Caroline B; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kuehl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Loomis, Kristin S; Luppi, Mario; Lusso, Paolo; Medveczky, Peter G; Montoya, Jose G; Mori, Yasuko; Ogata, Masao; Pritchett, Joshua C; Rogez, Sylvie; Seto, Edward; Ward, Katherine N; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Razonable, Raymund R

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) is a condition in which the complete HHV-6 genome is integrated into the host germ line genome and is vertically transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The condition is found in less than 1% of controls in the USA and UK, but has been found at a somewhat higher prevalence in transplant recipients and other patient populations in several small studies. HHV-6 levels in whole blood that exceed 5.5 log10 copies/ml are strongly suggestive of ciHHV-6. Monitoring DNA load in plasma and serum is unreliable, both for identifying and for monitoring subjects with ciHHV-6 due to cell lysis and release of cellular DNA. High HHV-6 DNA loads associated with ciHHV-6 can lead to erroneous diagnosis of active infection. Transplant recipients with ciHHV-6 may be at increased risk for bacterial infection and graft rejection. ciHHV-6 can be induced to a state of active viral replication in vitro. It is not known whether ciHHV-6 individuals are put at clinical risk by the use of drugs that have been associated with HHV-6 reactivation in vivo or in vitro. Nonetheless, we urge careful observation when use of such drugs is indicated in individuals known to have ciHHV-6. Little is known about whether individuals with ciHHV-6 develop immune tolerance for viral proteins. Further research is needed to determine the role of ciHHV-6 in disease.

  14. Human papillomavirus genotyping and integration in ovarian cancer Saudi patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with different malignancies but its role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial. This study investigated the prevalence, genotyping and physical state of HPV in ovarian cancer Saudi patients. Methods Hundred formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ovarian carcinoma tissues and their normal adjacent tissues (NAT) were included in the study. HPV was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerated HPVL1 consensus primer pairs MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6 + to amplify a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes in a single reaction. The HPV positive samples were further genotyped using DNA sequencing. The physical state of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in the samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18. Results High percentage of HPV (42%) was observed in ovarian carcinoma compared to 8% in the NAT. The high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 45 were highly associated with the advanced stages of tumor, while low-risk types 6 and 11 were present in NAT. In malignant tissues, HPV-16 was the most predominant genotype followed by HPV-18 and -45. The percentage of viral integration into the host genome was significantly high (61.1%) compared to 38.9% episomal in HPV positive tumors tissues. In HPV18 genotype the percentage of viral integration was 54.5% compared to 45.5% episomal. Conclusion The high risk HPV genotypes in ovarian cancer may indicate its role in ovarian carcinogenesis. The HPV vaccination is highly recommended to reduce this type of cancer. PMID:24252426

  15. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6: questions and answers

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Philip E; Ablashi, Dharam V; Ambros, Peter F; Agut, Henri; Caserta, Mary T; Descamps, Vincent; Flamand, Louis; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Hall, Caroline B; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kuehl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Loomis, Kristin S; Luppi, Mario; Lusso, Paolo; Medveczky, Peter G; Montoya, Jose G; Mori, Yasuko; Ogata, Masao; Pritchett, Joshua C; Rogez, Sylvie; Seto, Edward; Ward, Katherine N; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Razonable, Raymund R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) is a condition in which the complete HHV-6 genome is integrated into the host germ line genome and is vertically transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The condition is found in less than 1% of controls in the USA and UK, but has been found at a somewhat higher prevalence in transplant recipients and other patient populations in several small studies. HHV-6 levels in whole blood that exceed 5.5 log10 copies/ml are strongly suggestive of ciHHV-6. Monitoring DNA load in plasma and serum is unreliable, both for identifying and for monitoring subjects with ciHHV-6 due to cell lysis and release of cellular DNA. High HHV-6 DNA loads associated with ciHHV-6 can lead to erroneous diagnosis of active infection. Transplant recipients with ciHHV-6 may be at increased risk for bacterial infection and graft rejection. ciHHV-6 can be induced to a state of active viral replication in vitro. It is not known whether ciHHV-6 individuals are put at clinical risk by the use of drugs that have been associated with HHV-6 reactivation in vivo or in vitro. Nonetheless, we urge careful observation when use of such drugs is indicated in individuals known to have ciHHV-6. Little is known about whether individuals with ciHHV-6 develop immune tolerance for viral proteins. Further research is needed to determine the role of ciHHV-6 in disease. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22052666

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor dust samples from Cities of Jeddah and Kuwait: Levels, sources and non-dietary human exposure.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nadeem; Ismail, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim; Khoder, Mamdouh; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour; Costa, Max; Ali, Lulwa Naseer; Wang, Wei; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah

    2016-12-15

    This study reports levels and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dust samples collected from three different microenvironments (cars, air conditioner (AC) filters and household floor dust) of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (KSA) and Kuwait. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study reporting PAHs in indoor microenvironments of KSA, which makes these findings important. Benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), phenanthrene (Phe), and pyrene (Pyr) were found to be the major chemicals in dust samples from all selected microenvironments. ΣPAHs occurred at median concentrations (ng/g) of 3450, 2200, and 2650 in Saudi AC filter, car and household floor dust, respectively. The median levels (ng/g) of ΣPAHs in Kuwaiti car (950) and household floor (1675) dust samples were lower than Saudi dust. The PAHs profile in Saudi dust was dominated by high molecular weight (HMW) (4-5 ring) PAHs while in Kuwaiti dust 3 ring PAHs have marked contribution. BaP equivalent, a marker for carcinogenic PAHs, was high in Saudi household floor and AC filter dust with median levels (ng/g) of 370 and 455, respectively. Different exposure scenarios, using 5th percentile, median, mean, and 95th percentile levels, were estimated for adults and toddlers. For Saudi and Kuwaiti toddlers worst exposure scenario of ΣPAHs was calculated at 175 and 85ng/kg body weight/day (ng/kgbw/d), respectively. For Saudi toddlers, the calculated worst exposure scenarios for carcinogenic BaP (27.7) and BbF (29.3ng/kgbw/d) was 2-4 times higher than Kuwaiti toddlers. This study is based on small number of samples which necessitate more detailed studies for better understanding of dynamics of PAHs in the indoor environments of this region. Nevertheless, our finding supports the ongoing exposure of organic pollutants to population that accumulates indoor. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. LOCALI: Calibration-Free Systematic Localization Approach for Indoor Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Usman; Hur, Soojung; Park, Yongwan

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in indoor positioning systems are based on infrastructure-free solutions, aimed at improving the location accuracy in complex indoor environments without the use of specialized resources. A popular infrastructure-free solution for indoor positioning is a calibration-based positioning, commonly known as fingerprinting. Fingerprinting solutions require extensive and error-free surveys of environments to build radio-map databases, which play a key role in position estimation. Fingerprinting also requires random updates of the database, when there are significant changes in the environment or a decrease in the accuracy. The calibration of the fingerprinting database is a time-consuming and laborious effort that prevents the extensive adoption of this technique. In this paper, we present a systematic LOCALIzation approach, “LOCALI”, for indoor positioning, which does not require a calibration database and extensive updates. The LOCALI exploits the floor plan/wall map of the environment to estimate the target position by generating radio maps by integrating path-losses over certain trajectories in complex indoor environments, where triangulation using time information or the received signal strength level is highly erroneous due to the fading effects caused by multi-path propagation or absorption by environmental elements or varying antenna alignment. Experimental results demonstrate that by using the map information and environmental parameters, a significant level of accuracy in indoor positioning can be achieved. Moreover, this process requires considerably lesser effort compared to the calibration-based techniques. PMID:28587088

  18. Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takeji

    The reduction of intake of outdoor air volume in air conditioned buildings, adopted as the strategy for saving energy, has caused sick building syndrome abroad. Such symptoms of sick building as headache, stimuli of eye and nose and lethargy, appears to result from cigarette smoke, folmaldehyde and volatile organic carbons. On the other hand, in airtight residences not only carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides from domestic burning appliances but also allergens of mite, fungi, pollen and house dust, have become a subject of discussion. Moreover, asbestos and radon of carcinogen now attract a great deal of attention. Those indoor air pollutants are discussed.

  19. Indoor and Outdoor Allergies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhavi; Hays, Amy

    2016-09-01

    In last 30 to 40 years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of allergy. This increase cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Increasing air pollution and its interaction with biological allergens along with changing lifestyles are contributing factors. Dust mites, molds, and animal allergens contribute to most of the sensitization in the indoor setting. Tree and grass pollens are the leading allergens in the outdoor setting. Worsening air pollution and increasing particulate matter worsen allergy symptoms and associated morbidity. Cross-sensitization of allergens is common. Treatment involves avoidance of allergens, modifying lifestyle, medical treatment, and immunotherapy.

  20. Detection and recognition of indoor smoking events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, Tse-Lun; Lin, Chang Hong

    2013-03-01

    Smoking in public indoor spaces has become prohibited in many countries since it not only affects the health of the people around you, but also increases the risk of fire outbreaks. This paper proposes a novel scheme to automatically detect and recognize smoking events by using exsiting surveillance cameras. The main idea of our proposed method is to detect human smoking events by recognizing their actions. In this scheme, the human pose estimation is introduced to analyze human actions from their poses. The human pose estimation method segments head and both hands from human body parts by using a skin color detection method. However, the skin color methods may fail in insufficient light conditions. Therefore, the lighting compensation is applied to help the skin color detection method become more accurate. Due to the human body parts may be covered by shadows, which may cause the human pose estimation to fail, the Kalman filter is applied to track the missed body parts. After that, we evaluate the probability features of hands approaching the head. The support vector machine (SVM) is applied to learn and recognize the smoking events by the probability features. To analysis the performance of proposed method, the datasets established in the survillance camera view under indoor enviroment are tested. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed method with accuracy rate of 83.33%.

  1. MODELING INDOOR CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of an indoor air quality model, EXPOSURE, to predict pollutant concentrations and exposures. The effects of indoor air pollutants depend on the concentrations of the pollutants and the exposure of individuals to the pollutants. The air pollutant concen...

  2. A changing climate: impacts on human exposures to O3 using an integrated modeling methodology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the impacts of changing climate on human exposure to air pollution requires future scenarios that account for changes in ambient pollutant concentrations, population sizes and distributions, and housing stocks. An integrated methodology to model changes in human exposu...

  3. A changing climate: impacts on human exposures to O3 using an integrated modeling methodology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the impacts of changing climate on human exposure to air pollution requires future scenarios that account for changes in ambient pollutant concentrations, population sizes and distributions, and housing stocks. An integrated methodology to model changes in human exposu...

  4. Rationale for a model of human systems integration: the need of a theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Fass, Didier

    2006-09-01

    Human systems integration (HSI) involves augmented human design with the objectives of augmenting human capabilities and improving human performance using behavioral technologies. The fundamental matter of human systems integration and augmented human design is the organization and the nature of interactions that couple physiological systems, humans- and engineered systems, artifacts. By this definition, augmented human consists of interactive artefacts linked to physiological systems. This paper focuses on the rationale of a HSI model based on specific experiments (comparison of dynamical sensorimotor integration and motor performances in real and virtual environments) that confirm the hypothesis of functional interaction in the framework of Chauvet's mathematical theory of integrative physiology (MTIP). Epistemological constraints for HSI and the role of MTIP are briefly discussed in this context.

  5. Indoor Mold, Toxigenic Fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: Infectious Disease Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, D. M.; Ghannoum, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Damp buildings often have a moldy smell or obvious mold growth; some molds are human pathogens. This has caused concern regarding health effects of moldy indoor environments and has resulted in many studies of moisture- and mold-damaged buildings. Recently, there have been reports of severe illness as a result of indoor mold exposure, particularly due to Stachybotrys chartarum. While many authors describe a direct relationship between fungal contamination and illness, close examination of the literature reveals a confusing picture. Here, we review the evidence regarding indoor mold exposure and mycotoxicosis, with an emphasis on S. chartarum. We also examine possible end-organ effects, including pulmonary, immunologic, neurologic, and oncologic disorders. We discuss the Cleveland infant idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage reports in detail, since they provided important impetus for concerns about Stachybotrys. Some valid concerns exist regarding the relationship between indoor mold exposure and human disease. Review of the literature reveals certain fungus-disease associations in humans, including ergotism (Claviceps species), alimentary toxic aleukia (Fusarium), and liver disease (Aspergillys). While many papers suggest a similar relationship between Stachybotrys and human disease, the studies nearly uniformly suffer from significant methodological flaws, making their findings inconclusive. As a result, we have not found well-substantiated supportive evidence of serious illness due to Stachybotrys exposure in the contemporary environment. To address issues of indoor mold-related illness, there is an urgent need for studies using objective markers of illness, relevant animal models, proper epidemiologic techniques, and examination of confounding factors. PMID:12525430

  6. Indoor mold, toxigenic fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: infectious disease perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, D M; Ghannoum, M A

    2003-01-01

    Damp buildings often have a moldy smell or obvious mold growth; some molds are human pathogens. This has caused concern regarding health effects of moldy indoor environments and has resulted in many studies of moisture- and mold-damaged buildings. Recently, there have been reports of severe illness as a result of indoor mold exposure, particularly due to Stachybotrys chartarum. While many authors describe a direct relationship between fungal contamination and illness, close examination of the literature reveals a confusing picture. Here, we review the evidence regarding indoor mold exposure and mycotoxicosis, with an emphasis on S. chartarum. We also examine possible end-organ effects, including pulmonary, immunologic, neurologic, and oncologic disorders. We discuss the Cleveland infant idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage reports in detail, since they provided important impetus for concerns about Stachybotrys. Some valid concerns exist regarding the relationship between indoor mold exposure and human disease. Review of the literature reveals certain fungus-disease associations in humans, including ergotism (Claviceps species), alimentary toxic aleukia (Fusarium), and liver disease (Aspergillys). While many papers suggest a similar relationship between Stachybotrys and human disease, the studies nearly uniformly suffer from significant methodological flaws, making their findings inconclusive. As a result, we have not found well-substantiated supportive evidence of serious illness due to Stachybotrys exposure in the contemporary environment. To address issues of indoor mold-related illness, there is an urgent need for studies using objective markers of illness, relevant animal models, proper epidemiologic techniques, and examination of confounding factors.

  7. DigitalHuman (DH): An Integrative Mathematical Model ofHuman Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, Robert L.; Summers, Richard L.; lIescu, Radu; Esters, Joyee; Coleman, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models and simulation are important tools in discovering the key causal relationships governing physiological processes and improving medical intervention when physiological complexity is a central issue. We have developed a model of integrative human physiology called DigitalHuman (DH) consisting of -5000 variables modeling human physiology describing cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, neural and metabolic physiology. Users can view time-dependent solutions and interactively introduce perturbations by altering numerical parameters to investigate new hypotheses. The variables, parameters and quantitative relationships as well as all other model details are described in XML text files. All aspects of the model, including the mathematical equations describing the physiological processes are written in XML open source, text-readable files. Model structure is based upon empirical data of physiological responses documented within the peer-reviewed literature. The model can be used to understand proposed physiological mechanisms and physiological interactions that may not be otherwise intUitively evident. Some of the current uses of this model include the analyses of renal control of blood pressure, the central role of the liver in creating and maintaining insulin resistance, and the mechanisms causing orthostatic hypotension in astronauts. Additionally the open source aspect of the modeling environment allows any investigator to add detailed descriptions of human physiology to test new concepts. The model accurately predicts both qualitative and more importantly quantitative changes in clinically and experimentally observed responses. DigitalHuman provides scientists a modeling environment to understand the complex interactions of integrative physiology. This research was supported by.NIH HL 51971, NSF EPSCoR, and NASA

  8. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT.

    PubMed

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-03-15

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT-histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3-H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid-H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3-H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A-H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone.

  9. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  10. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT

    PubMed Central

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT–histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3–H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid–H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3–H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A–H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  11. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  12. Neuroendocrine Transdifferentiation in Human Prostate Cancer Cells: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Cerasuolo, Marianna; Paris, Debora; Iannotti, Fabio A; Melck, Dominique; Verde, Roberta; Mazzarella, Enrico; Motta, Andrea; Ligresti, Alessia

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is highly sensitive to hormone therapy because androgens are essential for prostate cancer cell growth. However, with the nearly invariable progression of this disease to androgen independence, endocrine therapy ultimately fails to control prostate cancer in most patients. Androgen-independent acquisition may involve neuroendocrine transdifferentiation, but there is little knowledge about this process, which is presently controversial. In this study, we investigated this question in a novel model of human androgen-dependent LNCaP cells cultured for long periods in hormone-deprived conditions. Strikingly, characterization of the neuroendocrine phenotype by transcriptomic, metabolomic, and other statistically integrated analyses showed how hormone-deprived LNCaP cells could transdifferentiate to a nonmalignantneuroendocrine phenotype. Notably, conditioned media from neuroendocrine-like cells affected LNCaP cell proliferation. Predictive in silico models illustrated how after an initial period, when LNCaP cell survival was compromised by an arising population of neuroendocrine-like cells, a sudden trend reversal occurred in which the neuroendocrine-like cells functioned to sustain the remaining androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. Our findings provide direct biologic and molecular support for the concept that neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cell populations influences the progression to androgen independence.

  13. The modular and integrative functional architecture of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Bertolero, Maxwell A.; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Network-based analyses of brain imaging data consistently reveal distinct modules and connector nodes with diverse global connectivity across the modules. How discrete the functions of modules are, how dependent the computational load of each module is to the other modules’ processing, and what the precise role of connector nodes is for between-module communication remains underspecified. Here, we use a network model of the brain derived from resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data and investigate the modular functional architecture of the human brain by analyzing activity at different types of nodes in the network across 9,208 experiments of 77 cognitive tasks in the BrainMap database. Using an author–topic model of cognitive functions, we find a strong spatial correspondence between the cognitive functions and the network’s modules, suggesting that each module performs a discrete cognitive function. Crucially, activity at local nodes within the modules does not increase in tasks that require more cognitive functions, demonstrating the autonomy of modules’ functions. However, connector nodes do exhibit increased activity when more cognitive functions are engaged in a task. Moreover, connector nodes are located where brain activity is associated with many different cognitive functions. Connector nodes potentially play a role in between-module communication that maintains the modular function of the brain. Together, these findings provide a network account of the brain’s modular yet integrated implementation of cognitive functions. PMID:26598686

  14. Functional Integrative Levels in the Human Interactome Recapitulate Organ Organization

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Carlos; Benkahla, Alia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Brun, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Interactome networks represent sets of possible physical interactions between proteins. They lack spatio-temporal information by construction. However, the specialized functions of the differentiated cell types which are assembled into tissues or organs depend on the combinatorial arrangements of proteins and their physical interactions. Is tissue-specificity, therefore, encoded within the interactome? In order to address this question, we combined protein-protein interactions, expression data, functional annotations and interactome topology. We first identified a subnetwork formed exclusively of proteins whose interactions were observed in all tested tissues. These are mainly involved in housekeeping functions and are located at the topological center of the interactome. This ‘Largest Common Interactome Network’ represents a ‘functional interactome core’. Interestingly, two types of tissue-specific interactions are distinguished when considering function and network topology: tissue-specific interactions involved in regulatory and developmental functions are central whereas tissue-specific interactions involved in organ physiological functions are peripheral. Overall, the functional organization of the human interactome reflects several integrative levels of functions with housekeeping and regulatory tissue-specific functions at the center and physiological tissue-specific functions at the periphery. This gradient of functions recapitulates the organization of organs, from cells to organs. Given that several gradients have already been identified across interactomes, we propose that gradients may represent a general principle of protein-protein interaction network organization. PMID:21799769

  15. Viral kinetics and exhaled droplet size affect indoor transmission dynamics of influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; Chio, C P; Jou, L J; Liao, C M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of viral kinetics and exhaled droplet size on indoor transmission dynamics of influenza infection. The target cell-limited model with delayed virus production was adopted to strengthen the inner mechanisms of virus infection on human epithelial cell. The particle number and volume involved in the viral kinetics were linked with Wells-Riley mathematical equation to quantify the infection risk. We investigated population dynamics in a specific elementary school by using the seasonal susceptible - exposed - infected - recovery (SEIR) model. We found that exhaled pulmonary bioaerosol of sneeze (particle diameter <10 microm) have 10(2)-fold estimate higher than that of cough. Sneeze and cough caused risk probabilities range from 0.075 to 0.30 and 0.076, respectively; whereas basic reproduction numbers (R(0)) estimates range from 4 to 17 for sneeze and nearly 4 for cough, indicating sneeze-posed higher infection risk. The viral kinetics and exhaled droplet size for sneeze affect indoor transmission dynamics of influenza infection since date post-infection 1-7. This study provides direct mechanistic support that indoor influenza virus transmission can be characterized by viral kinetics in human upper respiratory tracts that are modulated by exhaled droplet size. Practical Implications This paper provides a predictive model that can integrate the influenza viral kinetics (target cell-limited model), indoor aerosol transmission potential (Wells-Riley mathematical equation), and population dynamic model [susceptible - exposed - infected - recovery (SEIR) model] in a proposed susceptible population. Viral kinetics expresses the competed results of human immunity ability with influenza virus generation. By linking the viral kinetics and different exposure parameters and environmental factors in a proposed school setting with five age groups, the influenza infection risk can be estimated. On the other hand, we implicated

  16. Evaluation of an Indoor Sonic Boom Subjective Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loubeau, Alexandra; Rathsam, Jonathan; Klos, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    A sonic boom simulator at NASA Langley Research Center has been constructed for research on human response to low-amplitude sonic booms heard indoors. Research in this facility will ultimately lead to development of a psychoacoustic model for single indoor booms. The first subjective test was designed to explore indoor human response to variations in sonic boom rise time and amplitude. Another goal was to identify loudness level variability across listener locations within the facility. Finally, the test also served to evaluate the facility as a laboratory research tool for studying indoor human response to sonic booms. Subjects listened to test sounds and were asked to rate their annoyance relative to a reference boom. Measurements of test signals were conducted for objective analysis and correlation with subjective responses. Results confirm the functionality of the facility and effectiveness of the test methods and indicate that loudness level does not fully describe indoor annoyance to the selected sonic boom signals.

  17. Evaluation of an Integrated Multi-Task Machine Learning System with Humans in the Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    machine learning components natural language processing, and optimization...was examined with a test explicitly developed to measure the impact of integrated machine learning when used by a human user in a real world setting...study revealed that integrated machine learning does produce a positive impact on overall performance. This paper also discusses how specific machine learning components contributed to human-system

  18. Correlations between short-term indoor and outdoor PM concentrations at residences with evaporative coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Whai; Paschold, Helmut; Morales, Hugo; Chianelli, Julian

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) was monitored at 10 residences in the El Paso, Texas region in the summer of 2001. Concurrent indoor and outdoor 10-min averaged PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations were recorded for 2 days each to establish the indoor-outdoor PM correlation for typical west Texas residences equipped with evaporative coolers. Indoor PM concentrations stabilize in approximately 10 min in a typical house equipped with evaporative coolers. If the ambient PM concentration remains steady, a 10-min average indoor air sample after the first 10-min period would contain 99% outdoor air and a 1-h average indoor air sample would actually be represented by 95% of the outdoor air. A strong diurnal pattern of PM 10 indoor and outdoor was observed in 9 out of the 10 tested houses independent of the possible human activities and other indoor sources at each residence. Consistent with prior regional studies, indoor and outdoor PM 10 concentrations at these houses frequently peaked with strong association with each other in the evening hours between 6 and 9 pm. In addition, it is observed that both indoor and outdoor PM 10 peaked after the wind speed and wind gust peaked. Indoor PM concentration peaks clearly correlated with documentation of human activities, however, these peaks tended to be of shorter duration due to the high ventilation rates of the evaporative coolers. Evaporative coolers were found to act as PM filters that effectively replace indoor air rapidly creating indoor concentrations approximately 40% of outdoor PM 10 and 35% of outdoor PM 2.5. Both cooler types, rigid media and aspen pad, appeared to produce similar reduction rates for both PM 2.5 and PM 10.

  19. Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations

    SciTech Connect

    George Danko

    2007-09-30

    This report contains a detailed description of the work conducted for the project on Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations at University of Nevada, Reno. This project combines human operator control with robotic control concepts to create a hybrid control architecture, in which the strengths of each control method are combined to increase machine efficiency and reduce operator fatigue. The kinematics reconfiguration type differential control of the excavator implemented with a variety of 'software machine kinematics' is the key feature of the project. This software re-configured excavator is more desirable to execute a given digging task. The human operator retains the master control of the main motion parameters, while the computer coordinates the repetitive movement patterns of the machine links. These repetitive movements may be selected from a pre-defined family of trajectories with different transformations. The operator can make adjustments to this pattern in real time, as needed, to accommodate rapidly-changing environmental conditions. A working prototype has been developed using a Bobcat 435 excavator. The machine is operational with or without the computer control system depending on whether the computer interface is on or off. In preparation for emulated mining tasks tests, typical, repetitive tool trajectories during surface mining operations were recorded at the Newmont Mining Corporation's 'Lone Tree' mine in Nevada. Analysis of these working trajectories has been completed. The motion patterns, when transformed into a family of curves, may serve as the basis for software-controlled machine kinematics transformation in the new human-robot control system. A Cartesian control example has been developed and tested both in simulation and on the experimental excavator. Open-loop control is robustly stable and free of short-term dynamic problems, but it allows for drifting away from the desired motion kinematics of the machine. A novel, closed

  20. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  1. INDOOR AND OUTDOOR PM10 AND ASSOCIATED METALS AND PESTICIDES IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey study in Arizona (AZ NHEXAS) sampled trace metals in multimedia in and outside of 176 representative homes in Arizona. PM10 was collected using low-flow impactors indoors and out. Primary metals evaluated from monitoring of indoor...

  2. INDOOR AND OUTDOOR PM10 AND ASSOCIATED METALS AND PESTICIDES IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey study in Arizona (AZ NHEXAS) sampled trace metals in multimedia in and outside of 176 representative homes in Arizona. PM10 was collected using low-flow impactors indoors and out. Primary metals evaluated from monitoring of indoor...

  3. Adsorption of Phthalates on Impervious Indoor Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoxing; Eichler, Clara M A; Leng, Weinan; Cox, Steven S; Marr, Linsey C; Little, John C

    2017-02-13

    Sorption of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) onto interior surfaces, often referred to as the "sink effect", and their subsequent re-emission significantly affect the fate and transport of indoor SVOCs and the resulting human exposure. Unfortunately, experimental challenges and the large number of SVOC/surface combinations have impeded progress in understanding sorption of SVOCs on indoor surfaces. An experimental approach based on a diffusion model was thus developed to determine the surface/air partition coefficient K of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) on typical impervious surfaces including aluminum, steel, glass, and acrylic. The results indicate that surface roughness plays an important role in the adsorption process. Although larger data sets are needed, the ability to predict K could be greatly improved by establishing the nature of the relationship between surface roughness and K for clean indoor surfaces. Furthermore, different surfaces exhibit nearly identical K values after being exposed to kitchen grime with values that are close to those reported for the octanol/air partition coefficient. This strongly supports the idea that interactions between gas-phase DEHP and soiled surfaces have been reduced to interactions with an organic film. Collectively, the results provide an improved understanding of equilibrium partitioning of SVOCs on impervious surfaces.

  4. Modeling the integration of bacterial rRNA fragments into the human cancer genome.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Karsten B; Gajer, Pawel; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C

    2016-03-21

    Cancer is a disease driven by the accumulation of genomic alterations, including the integration of exogenous DNA into the human somatic genome. We previously identified in silico evidence of DNA fragments from a Pseudomonas-like bacteria integrating into the 5'-UTR of four proto-oncogenes in stomach cancer sequencing data. The functional and biological consequences of these bacterial DNA integrations remain unknown. Modeling of these integrations suggests that the previously identified sequences cover most of the sequence flanking the junction between the bacterial and human DNA. Further examination of these reads reveals that these integrations are rich in guanine nucleotides and the integrated bacterial DNA may have complex transcript secondary structures. The models presented here lay the foundation for future experiments to test if bacterial DNA integrations alter the transcription of the human genes.

  5. Advancing human health risk assessment: integrating recent advisory committee recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael; Becker, Richard A; Haber, Lynne T; Pottenger, Lynn H; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A

    2013-07-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose-response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose-response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches.

  6. Sensorimotor integration for multisegmental frontal plane balance control in humans

    PubMed Central

    Goodworth, Adam D.

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the contribution of sensory information to multisegmental frontal plane balance control in humans, we developed a feedback control model to account for experimental data. Subjects stood with feet close together on a surface that rotated according to a pseudorandom waveform at three different amplitudes. Experimental frequency-response functions and impulse-response functions were measured to characterize lower body (LB) and upper body (UB) motion evoked during surface rotations while subjects stood with eyes open or closed. The model assumed that corrective torques in LB and UB segments were generated with no time delay from intrinsic musculoskeletal mechanisms and with time delay from sensory feedback mechanisms. It was found that subjects' LB control was primarily based on sensory feedback. Changes in the LB control mechanisms across stimulus amplitude were consistent with the hypothesis that sensory reweighting contributed to amplitude-dependent changes in balance responses whereby subjects decreased reliance on proprioceptive cues that oriented the LB toward the surface and increased reliance on vestibular/visual cues that oriented the LB upright toward earth vertical as stimulus amplitude increased in both eyes open and closed conditions. Sensory reweighting in the LB control system also accounted for most of the amplitude-dependent changes observed in UB responses. In contrast to the LB system, sensory reweighting was not a dominant mechanism of UB control, and UB control was more influenced by intrinsic musculoskeletal mechanisms. The proposed model refines our understanding of sensorimotor integration during balance control by including multisegmental motion and explaining how intersegmental interactions influence frontal plane balance responses. PMID:21940611

  7. Advancing human health risk assessment: Integrating recent advisory committee recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Richard A.; Haber, Lynne T.; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose–response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose–response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches. PMID:23844697

  8. Current Indoor Air Quality in Japan.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Hideto

    2016-01-01

    People spend more than two thirds of their daily time indoors. Hence, maintaining a healthy indoor environment is indispensable for the prevention of building related illness. In Japan, guidelines for indoor air quality have been established for 13 volatile/semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs/SVOCs). These guidelines are now under revision by the Committee on Sick House Syndrome: Indoor Air Pollution. In order to gain information on the current indoor air pollutants and their levels, we carried out a nation-wide survey of VOCs and aldehydes in indoor residential air during 2012-2013. In this review, I concisely summarized the current indoor air quality of Japan.

  9. Indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, D.R. )

    1992-06-01

    This article summarizes the health effects of indoor air pollutants and the modalities available to control them. The pollutants discussed include active and passive exposure to tobacco smoke; combustion products of carbon monoxide; nitrogen dioxide; products of biofuels, including wood and coal; biologic agents leading to immune responses, such as house dust mites, cockroaches, fungi, animal dander, and urine; biologic agents associated with infection such as Legionella and tuberculosis; formaldehyde; and volatile organic compounds. An approach to assessing building-related illness and tight building' syndrome is presented. Finally, the article reviews recent data on hospital-related asthma and exposures to potential respiratory hazards such as antineoplastic agents, anesthetic gases, and ethylene oxide.88 references.

  10. Indoor air pollution.

    PubMed

    Gold, D R

    1992-06-01

    This article summarizes the health effects of indoor air pollutants and the modalities available to control them. The pollutants discussed include active and passive exposure to tobacco smoke; combustion products of carbon monoxide; nitrogen dioxide; products of biofuels, including wood and coal; biologic agents leading to immune responses, such as house dust mites, cockroaches, fungi, animal dander, and urine; biologic agents associated with infection such as Legionella and tuberculosis; formaldehyde; and volatile organic compounds. An approach to assessing building-related illness and "tight building" syndrome is presented. Finally, the article reviews recent data on hospital-related asthma and exposures to potential respiratory hazards such as antineoplastic agents, anesthetic gases, and ethylene oxide.

  11. Analysis of the Integrated Defense Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Life Cycle Management Framework for Human Systems Integration Documentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Integrated Defense Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Life Cycle Management Framework for Human Systems Integration 6. AUTHOR( S ) Jeanine A...Lang and Pamela F. McLaughlin 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943...5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY

  12. Genetic and statistical study of HIV integration in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Inês J.; Gonçalves, Juliana; Moreira, Elsa; Mexia, João T.; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2013-10-01

    Integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA into human genome is essential for HIV-induced disease. The human genome is organized into chromosomes and within these we can define the chromosomal fragile sites. Our aim is to contribute to help clarifying the integration sites preferences of HIV1 and HIV2 in fragile or non-fragile regions. Here we apply statistical techniques, namely non-parametric tests and analysis of variance for analyzing two sets of data of HIV1 and HIV2 integrations in the human genome. The results show that the integrations occur significantly with more intensity in the non-fragile regions of the human genome and that the HIV1 in particular has the major contribution to this fact. This study could have implications in human disease.

  13. Occurrence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in indoor dust

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Park, Eun-Kee; Young, Thomas M.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to indoor dust enriched with endocrine-disrupting chemicals released from numerous indoor sources has been a focus of increasing concern. Longer residence times and elevated contaminant concentrations in the indoor environment may increase chances of exposure to these contaminants by 1000-fold compared to outdoor exposure. To investigate the occurrence of semi-volatile endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), phthalates, pyrethroids, DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and its metabolites, and chlordanes, indoor dust samples were collected from household vacuum cleaner bags provided by 10 apartments and 1 community hall in Davis, California, USA. Chemical analyses show that all indoor dust samples are highly contaminated by target analytes measured in the present study. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant (104–7630 μg/g) in all samples and higher than other target analytes by 2 to 6 orders of magnitude. PBDEs were also found at high concentrations (1780–25,200 ng/g). Although the use of PCBs has been banned or restricted for decades, some samples had PCBs at levels that are considered to be concerns for human health, indicating that the potential risk posed by PCBs still remains high in the indoor environment, probably due to a lack of dissipation processes and continuous release from the sources. Although the use of some PBDEs is being phased out in some parts of the U.S., this trend may apply to PBDEs as well. We can anticipate that exposure to PBDEs will continue as long as the general public keeps using existi